WorldWideScience

Sample records for quarterly environmental monitoring

  1. Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program Environmental Monitoring Program. Quarterly report, fourth quarter, October 1-December 31, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The Program agreed to comply with existing environmental monitoring regulations and to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) incorporating supplemental monitoring in the areas of water, air, solid waste, and worker health and safety during the period 1985-1992. These activities are described in a series of quarterly and annual reports. The document contains environmental compliance data collected in the fourth quarter of 1991, contents of reports on compliance data submitted to regulatory agencies, and supplemental analytical results from retorted shale pile runoff water collected following a storm event during the third quarter of 1991

  2. Unocal Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental Monitoring Plan quarterly report. Fourth quarter, 1989. Rept. for 1 Oct-31 Dec 89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commerical-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The Program agreed to comply with existing environmental monitoring regulations and to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan incorporating supplemental monitoring in the areas of water, air, solid waste, and worker health and safety during the period 1985-1992. These activities are described in a series of quarterly and annual reports. The report contains environmental compliance data reports, results of industrial hygiene compliance monitoring, and independent audits. Table 2-1 shows 14 of the 20 supplemental monitoring sites sampled during the quarter

  3. Quarterly environmental data summary for third quarter 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, Stephen H. [Weldon Spring Site, St. Charles, MO (United States)

    1999-11-05

    A copy of the quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the third quarter of 1999 is enclosed. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the WSSRAP verification group and merged into the data base during the third quarter of 1999. Selected KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during the quarter are also included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  4. Interim environmental monitoring report for the Nevada test site, first quarter 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    During the first calendar quarter of 1981, no radioactivity from the nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site was measured offsite by the US Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory. Low concentrations of 95 Zr, 95 Nb, 103 Ru, and 141 Ce attributed to the People's Republic of China nuclear test of October 15, 1980, were detected in air samples throughout the Air Surveillance Network. The maximum concentrations of these radionuclides were less than 0.1 percent of the Concentration Guides. The dosimeters of fixed station at Complex I (Coal Valley) indicated an exposure of 1.6 mR, and the dosimeters of two offsite residents, one living at Glendale, Nev., and the other near Complex I, (Coal Valley) appeared to have net exposures of 3.1 mR and 3.2 mR, respectively; however, further evaluation revealed that the net exposures were not due to an exposure from NTS operations, but may be a statistical anomaly related to an unusually low variation in the environmental background exposure rate. Further investigation is in progress

  5. Quarterly environmental data summary for fourth quarter 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1997 is prepared in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data presented constitute the QEDS. The data were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group and, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), merged into the data base during the fourth quarter of 1997. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Air data are not stored in the data base and KPA data are not merged into the regular data base. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined ``above normal`` level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal level 2 values are based, in ES and H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in response to such data. Data received and verified during the fourth quarter were within a permissible range of variability except for those which are detailed.

  6. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary (QEDS) for fourth quarter 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    This report contains the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1998 in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses) were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the fourth quarter of 1998. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during fourth quarter 1998 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  7. Environmental Biosciences Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  8. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program: Third quarter 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Table 1 lists those well series with constituents in the groundwater above Flag 2 during third quarter 1992, organized by location. Results from all laboratory analyses are used to generate this table. Specific conductance and pH data from the field also are included in this table

  9. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary - second quarter 1997 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.; Marks, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1997 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized below: All of the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during April, May, and June 1997, were performed as planned with the exception of UN-216-E-9. This site was not surveyed as stabilization activities were in progress. The sites scheduled for the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) team were switched with those identified for the third quarter as there was a conflict with vegetation management activities

  10. The Savannah River site`s groundwater monitoring program: second quarter 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1997, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. A detailed explanation of the flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1997 are included in this report.

  11. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-17

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Analytical results from third quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  12. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-17

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Analytical results from third quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  13. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: Second Quarter 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1995 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized

  14. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary. Fourth quarter, 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.; Markes, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Fourth Quarter 1995 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are described

  15. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2009-01-30

    Current research projects have focused Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP) talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene, low-dose ionizing radiation (gamma and neutron) and alpha radiation from plutonium. Trichloroethylene research has been conducted as a joint collaborative effort with the University of Georgia. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Laboratory work has been completed on several trichloroethylene risk assessment projects, and these projects have been brought to a close. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the remaining trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A comprehensive manuscript on the scientific basis of trichloroethylene risk assessment is in preparation. Work on the low-dose radiation risk assessment projects is also progressing at a slowed rate as a result of funding uncertainties. It has been necessary to restructure the proponency and performance schedule of these projects, with the project on Low-Dose Radiation: Epidemiology Risk Models transferred to DOE Office of Science proponency under a separate funding instrument. Research on this project will continue under the provisions of the DOE Office of Science funding instrument, with progress reported in accordance with the requirements of that funding instrument. Progress on that project will no longer be reported in quarterly reports for DE-FC09-02CH11109. Following a meeting at the Savannah River Site on May 8, 2008, a plan was submitted for development of an epidemiological cohort study and prospective medical surveillance system for the assessment of disease rates among workers at the Savannah River

  16. Environmental surveillance program. Quarterly progress report, July--September, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.W.; Hall, L.F.; Downs, J.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains data developed from monitoring site measurements and laboratory analyses of environmental samples that were collected during the period of July-September, 1993. Because some laboratory procedures are lengthy and could adversely affect the desired timeliness of reports, results of some analyses from this time period will be included in the next quarterly report. Quarterly reports, then, will be routine periodic documents that present continually updated information concerning the potential presence of environmental contaminants in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). During the third calendar quarter of 1993, Environmental Surveillance Program (ESP) measurements did not reveal unexpected levels of contaminants in any environmental samples measured or analyzed. Most of the results reported in this document are related to off-site air and ground water measurements. Future reports will include results of monitoring at additional locations and for additional environmental materials. Annual reports from the ESP will contain data generated during the previous four calendar quarters, and will display measurement trends for various combinations of locations, contaminants and environmental media. The annual report will also include more interpretive material and discussions than will normally be found in quarterly reports

  17. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-10-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  18. Environmental Biosciences First Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-09-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  19. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  20. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2008-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  1. Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly, September 1, 1976--December 1, 1976. [Monitoring of environment for radioactivity and chemical pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, E.P. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This report presents current data from the HASL environmental programs, The Swedish Defense Research Establishment, The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Argonne National Laboratory and The New Zealand National Radiation Laboratory. The initial section consists of interpretive reports and notes on ground level air radioactivity in Sweden from nuclear explosions, plutonium in air near the Rocky Flats Plant, nitrous oxide concentrations in the stratosphere, lake sediment sampling, plutonium and americium in marine and fresh water biological systems, radium in cat litter, and quality control analyses. Subsequent sections include tabulations of radionuclide and stable lead concentrations in surface air; strontium-90 in deposition, milk, diet, and tapwater; cesium-137 in Chicago foods in October 1976 and environmental radioactivity measurements in New Zealand in 1975. A bibliography of recent publications related to environmental studies is also presented.

  2. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement: Quarterly environmental data summary for third quarter 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-06

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the third quarter of 1998 is enclosed. The data presented in this letter and attachment constitute the QEDS. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the third quarter of 1998. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined above normal Level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal Level 2 values are based, in ES and H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits, and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in the event that above normal data occur.

  3. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Third quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-02-04

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Table 1 lists those well series with constituents in the groundwater above Flag 2 during third quarter 1992, organized by location. Results from all laboratory analyses are used to generate this table. Specific conductance and pH data from the field also are included in this table.

  4. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary - first quarter 1997 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckinney, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The First Quarter 1997 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized below: (1) All of the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during January, February, and March 1997, were performed as planned. (2) One hundred four environmental radiological surveys were performed during the first quarter 1997, twenty-nine at the active waste sites and seventy-five at the inactive waste sites. Contamination above background levels was found at eight of the active waste sites and seven of the inactive waste sites. Contamination levels as high as >1,000,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys twelve were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas and three were in contamination areas. The contamination found within ten of the URM areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. In the remaining five sites the areas were posted and will require decontamination. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR's) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action if required. (3) During the first quarter of 1997, 5.6 hectares (13.8 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Contamination Area (CA)/Soil Contamination (SC) to URM. (4) During the first quarter of 1997, the size of 216-A-25 Gable Mountain Pond was increased from 30.4 to 34.5 hectares (75.0 to 85.2 acres). This increase in size was due to the correction of the original boundary area by using the advanced technology of a global positioning system (GPS). An area, 1.6 hectares (4.0 acres), east of and adjacent to the 241-S/SX/SY tank farm complex was posted as a contamination/soil contamination area. (5) Five open Surveillance Compliance Inspection Reports (SCIRs) had not been resolved

  5. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: First quarter 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-04-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The surveys included in this program consist of inactive waste sites; outdoor radiological control areas; tank farm perimeters and associated diversion boxes, lift stations, and vent stations; perimeters of active or uncovered waste sites such as burial grounds, retention basins, ponds, process trenches, and ditches; and road and rail surfaces. This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed during the First Quarter of 1995. The status of corrective actions required from current and past reports are also discussed

  6. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report, Second Quarter 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1999-07-29

    This report contains analytical data for samples taken during Second Quarter 1999 from wells of the LFW series located at the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site. The data are submitted in reference to the Sanitary Landfill Operating Permit. The report presents monitoring results that equaled or exceeded the Safe Drinking Water Act final Primary Drinking Water Standards or screening levels, established by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the South Carolina final Primary Drinking Water Standard for lead, or the SRS flagging criteria.

  7. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report, Third Quarter 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1999-12-08

    This report contains analytical data for samples taken during Third Quarter 1999 from wells of the LFW series located at the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site. The data are submitted in reference to the Sanitary Landfill Operating Permit. The report presents monitoring results that equaled or exceeded the Safe Drinking Water Act final Primary Drinking Water Standards or screening levels, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the South Carolina final Primary Drinking Water Standard for lead, or the SRS flagging criteria.

  8. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This report contains analytical data for samples taken during third quarter 1995 from wells of the LFW series located at the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The data are submitted in reference to the Sanitary Landfill Operating Permit (DWP-087A). The report presents monitoring results that equaled or exceeded the Safe Drinking Water Act final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or screening levels, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the South Carolina final Primary Drinking Water Standard for lead, or the SRS flagging criteria.

  9. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report, Third Quarter 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains analytical data for samples taken during Third Quarter 1999 from wells of the LFW series located at the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site. The data are submitted in reference to the Sanitary Landfill Operating Permit. The report presents monitoring results that equaled or exceeded the Safe Drinking Water Act final Primary Drinking Water Standards or screening levels, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the South Carolina final Primary Drinking Water Standard for lead, or the SRS flagging criteria

  10. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This report contains analytical data for samples taken during third quarter 1995 from wells of the LFW series located at the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The data are submitted in reference to the Sanitary Landfill Operating Permit (DWP-087A). The report presents monitoring results that equaled or exceeded the Safe Drinking Water Act final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or screening levels, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the South Carolina final Primary Drinking Water Standard for lead, or the SRS flagging criteria

  11. Environmental surveillance data report for the first quarter of 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasing, T.J.; Daniels, K.L.; Goldberg, P.Y.; Horwedel, B.M.; McCollough, I.L.; Osborne-Lee, A.E.; Valentine, C.K.; Wolf, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    During the first quarter of 1988, over 1800 samples which represent more than 6000 analyses and measurements were collected by the Environmental Monitoring and Compliance (EMC) Department. More than ten real-time monitoring stations, which telemeter 10-minute averaged readings of radiation levels, total precipitation, flows, water, and air quality parameters around ORNL also reported data. In addition, three meteorological towers sent weather data at various heights to a host computer every 15-minutes. Real-time measurements of external gamma radiation are now being reported from several stations, included some recently activated or upgraded stations. Measurements this quarter indicate that external gamma radiation around ORNL is close to background, except at station 4, which is located between the Waste Treatment Plant and waste treatment ponds and therefore experiences higher levels of radiation. Cobalt-60 concentrations in Melton Branch remained low, as they had been during the fourth quarter of 1987. Lack of discharge from the HFIR ponds is the apparent cause of the reduced concentrations, as these ponds appear to be the source of most of the cobalt-60 that does occur in Melton Branch. Flow-weighted concentration of radionuclides in surface water were found to be generally much lower than the DOE derived concentration guidelines except for tritium in Melton Branch. Tritium concentrations measured at Melton Branch Site 1 exceeded the corresponding guideline by 30% during March

  12. Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Currently, 125 wells monitor groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site. Samples from the wells are analyzed for selected heavy metals, herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents during third quarter 1994. Sixty-four (51%) of the 125 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium activities. Trichloroethylene concentrations exceeded the final PDWS in 22 (18%) wells. Chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene, elevated in one or more wells during third quarter 1994, also occurred in elevated levels during second quarter 1994. These constituents generally were elevated in the same wells during both quarters. Gross alpha, which was elevated in only one well during second quarter 1994, was elevated again during third quarter. Mercury, which was elevated during first quarter 1994, was elevated again in one well. Dichloromethane was elevated in two wells for the first time in several quarters

  13. Environmental surveillance data report for the third quarter of 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, K.L.; Goldberg, P.Y.; Horwedel, B.M.; McCollough, I.L.; Osborne-Lee, A.E.; Owenby, R.K.; Watson, J.B.; Wilson, M.M.

    1987-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1987, over 1600 samples which represent more than 5000 analyses and measurements were collected by the Environmental Monitoring and Compliance (EMC) Department. Uranium concentrations measured on air filters near the Y-12 plant were higher than normal due to a release from that facility in May. More than 60% of the noncompliances with the NPDES permit for the third quarter occurred in July. These were primarily in total suspended solids at the Sewage Treatment Plant. The cause of these high concentrations has been explored with the plant operating staff but is currently unresolved. Because of past noncompliances in fecal coliform and chlorine concentrations at the Sewage Treatment Plant, an engineering review has been initiated to examine the present chlorination system. This review is intended to provide a permanent solution to these types of problems. Maximum concentrations of total radioactive strontium ( 89 Sr + 90 Sr) in bluegill were lower than those measured during the second quarter. There were not significant differences in the total radioactive strontium in blue gill at any of the Clinch River locations. 17 figs., 45 tabs

  14. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects. Quarterly report for the period of February, March and April 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. [Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Progress Center

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US DOE Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators. (VC)

  15. Quarterly Environmental Radiological Survey Summary Third Quarter 1998, 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCKINNEY, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The Third Quarter 1998 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized: (1) All of the eighty-five environmental radiological surveys scheduled during July, August and September were performed as planned. Fifty-one of the surveys were conducted at Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) sites and thirty-four at Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) sites. Contamination above background levels was found at seventeen of the PHMC waste sites and two of the ERC waste sites. Contamination levels as high and gt;1,000,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) per 100 cm(sup 2) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys nine were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas, three were in unposted areas and seven were in contamination areas. The contamination found within four of the URM and three of the CA areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. The remaining five URM and two unposted sites were posted and along with the five CA sites will require remediation. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR's) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action as required. (2) During the second quarter of 1998, 1.2 hectares (3.0 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Contamination Area (CA)/Soil Contamination (SC) to URM. (3) Four hectares (10 acres) located south and west of B-Plant were posted as a radiological buffer area as a result of a contamination spread. This off-normal occurrence is currently being investigated. (4) Four Surveillance Compliance Inspection Reports (SCIRs) remained open and had not been resolved. Tank Farms Operations has responsibility for the unresolved SCIRs

  16. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  17. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  18. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-07

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1990 (April through June) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1990 are listed in this report.

  19. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-07

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1990 (April through June) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1990 are listed in this report.

  20. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  1. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  2. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  3. Metallurgical Laboratory (HWMF) Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Units were also similar to previous quarters. During second quarter 1994, SRS received South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control approval for constructing five point-of-compliance wells and two plume definition wells near the Met Lab Hazardous Waste Management Facility. This project began in July 1994 and is complete; however, analytical data from these wells are not yet available

  4. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: First quarter 1993, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Environmental Protection Department`s Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) during the first quarter of 1993. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  5. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-17

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by the Environmental Protection Department`s Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) during the fourth quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  6. Rulison Site groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of the fourth quarter 1997 groundwater sampling event for the Rulison Site, which is located approximately 65 kilometers (km) (40 miles [mi]) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. This is the eighth and final sampling event of a quarterly groundwater monitoring program implemented by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This program monitored the effectiveness of remediation of a drilling effluent pond that had been used to store drilling mud during drilling of the emplacement hole for a 1969 gas stimulation test conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) (the predecessor agency to the DOE) and Austral Oil Company (Austral)

  7. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: Third quarter 1994--100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed on waste disposal sites located at the Hanford Site. The Third Quarter 1994 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports and are summarized below: (1) All the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during July, August, and September 1994 were completed except for the D Island vent riser area. The surveys for the 200-W railways, spurs, and sidings were completed during this period after being delayed by equipment problems during the second quarter. (2) No Compliance Assessment Reports (CARs) were issued for sites found out of compliance with standards identified in WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance. (3) Two Surveillance Compliance/Inspection Reports (SCIRs) were closed during the Third Quarter of 1994. (4) Eleven open SCIRs had not been resolved

  8. Cod monitoring; results 2015, quarter 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijden, van der K.J.; Machiels, M.A.M.; Trapman, B.K.; Kraan, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    The Cod monitoring program is part of the Dutch cod avoidance plan developed by the Dutch Government together with the Dutch fishing sector. The aim of this cod monitoring program is to provide information on the Catch per Unit Effort (CpUE) in the TR fleet (bottom trawls and seines). This is needed

  9. Cod monitoring : results 2015, quarter 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teal, L.R.; Reijden, van der K.J.; Machiels, M.A.M.; Kraan, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    The Cod monitoring program is part of the Dutch cod avoidance plan developed by the Dutch Government together with the Dutch fishing sector. The aim of this cod monitoring program is to provide information on the Catch per Unit Effort (CpUE) in the TR fleet (bottom trawls and seines). This is needed

  10. Quarterly seismic monitoring report 96B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reidel, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the location, magnitude, and other pertinent information on earthquakes recorded on and near the Hanford Site by Westinghouse Seismic Monitoring during the period encompassing January 1, 1996 to March 31, 1996

  11. Environmental Restoration Operations: Consolidated Quarterly Report January -March 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This Environmental Restoration Operations (ER) Consolidated Quarterly Report (ER Quarterly Report) provides the status of ongoing corrective action activities being implemented at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) during the January, February, and March 2017 quarterly reporting period. Table I-1 lists the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) identified for corrective action at SNL/NM. Sections I.2.1 and I.2.2 summarize the work completed during this quarter. Section I.2.1 summarizes the quarterly activities at sites undergoing corrective action field activities. Field activities are conducted at the three groundwater AOCs (Burn Site Groundwater [BSG AOC], Technical Area [TA]-V Groundwater [TAVG AOC], and Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater [TAG AOC]). Section I.2.2 summarizes quarterly activities at sites where the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous Waste Bureau (HWB) issued a certificate of completion and the sites are in the corrective action complete (CAC) regulatory process. Currently, SWMUs 8 and 58, 68, 149, 154, and 502 are in the CAC regulatory process. Corrective action activities are deferred at the Long Sled Track (SWMU 83), the Gun Facilities (SWMU 84), and the Short Sled Track (SWMU 240) because these three sites are active mission facilities. These three active mission sites are located in TA-III. This Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico Environmental Restoration Operations (ER) Consolidated Quarterly Report (ER Quarterly Report) fulfills all quarterly reporting requirements set forth in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Operating Permit and the Compliance Order on Consent.

  12. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program: Second quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.D. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-10-07

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Since 1991, the flagging criteria have been based on the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water standards and on method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1992 are listed in this report.

  13. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Second quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1992-10-07

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Since 1991, the flagging criteria have been based on the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water standards and on method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1992 are listed in this report.

  14. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report: First quarter 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report contains analytical data for samples taken during first quarter 1997 from wells of the LFW series located at the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The data are submitted in reference to the Sanitary Landfill Operating permit (DWP-087A). The report presents monitoring results that equaled or exceeded the Safe Drinking Water Act final primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or screening levels, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the South Carolina final Primary Drinking Water Standard for lead, or the SRS flagging criteria. Wells LFW6R, LFW8R, LFW10A, LFW18, LFW21, and LFW23R were not sampled due to their proximity to the Sanitary Landfill Closure Cap activities. Wells LFW61D and LFW62D are Purge Water Containment Wells and contain mercury. These wells were not sampled since the purge water cannot be treated at the M-1 Air Stripper until the NPDES permit for the stripper is modified.

  15. Environmental Restoration Operations Consolidated Quarterly Report: July-September 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This Environmental Restoration Operations (ER) Consolidated Quarterly Report (ER Quarterly Report) provides the status of ongoing corrective action activities being implemented at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) during the July, August, and September 2016 quarterly reporting period. The Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) identified for corrective action at SNL/NM are listed in Table I-1. Sections I.2.1 and I.2.2 summarize the work completed during this quarter. Section I.2.1 summarizes the quarterly activities at sites undergoing corrective action field activities. Field activities are conducted at the three groundwater AOCs (Burn Site Groundwater [BSG AOC], Technical Area [TA]-V Groundwater [TAVG AOC], and Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater [TAG AOC]). Section I.2.2 summarizes quarterly activities at sites where the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) issued a certificate of completion and the sites are in the corrective action complete (CAC) regulatory process. Currently, SWMUs 8 and 58, 68, 149, 154, and 502 are in the CAC regulatory process. Corrective action activities are deferred at the Long Sled Track (SWMU 83), the Gun Facilities (SWMU 84), and the Short Sled Track (SWMU 240) because these three sites are active mission facilities. These three active sites are located in TA-III.

  16. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program: Fourth quarter 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.D. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-06-02

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from fourth quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  17. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Fourth quarter 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1992-06-02

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from fourth quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  18. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Second quarter, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-10

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  19. Environmental Biosciences Quarterly Report, September - December, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  20. Environmental Biosciences Program Second Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-12-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  1. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-06-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  2. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-03-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  3. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    During third quarter 1994, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Eight parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exceeded final PDWS in one well. Aluminum, iron, manganese, tin, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters. During second quarter 1994, SRS received South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control approval for constructing five point-of-compliance wells and two plume definition wells near the Met Lab HWMF. This project began in July 1994 and is complete; however, analytical data from these wells is not available yet

  4. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-06-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation s need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyles (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  5. Environmental Biosciences Program Second Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-12-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  6. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, S.W.; Gallegos, G.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Tate, P.J.; Balke, B.K.; Biermann, A.H.; Hoppes, W.G.; Fields, B.C.; Gouveia, F.J.; Berger, R.L.; Miller, F.S.; Rueppel, D.W.; Sims, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    The primary tasks of the environmental monitoring section (EMS) Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are: effluent monitoring of air, sewer, and NPDES water. Surveillance monitoring of soil, vegetation and foodstuff, water, air particulate, and air tritium. Radiation monitoring, dose assessment, emergency response, quality assurance, and reporting. This report describes LLNL and the monitoring plan

  7. quarters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Are there many words combining both space and time? A quarter is one of such rare words: it means both a part of the city space and a period of the year. A regular city has parts bordered by four streets. For example, Chita is a city with an absolutely orthogonal historical center. This Utopian city was designed by Decembrists in the depth of Siberian ore-mines (120. The 130 Quarter in Irkutsk is irregular from its inception because of its triangular form. Located between two roads, the forked quarter was initially bordered by flows along the west-east axis – the main direction of the country. That is why it appreciated the gift for the 350 anniversary of its transit existence – a promenade for an unhurried flow of pedestrians. The quarter manages this flow quite well, while overcoming the difficulties of new existence and gathering myths (102. Arousing many expectations, the “Irkutsk’s Quarters” project continues the theme that was begun by the 130 Quarter and involved regeneration, revival and search for Genius Loci and the key to each single quarter (74. Beaded on the trading axis, these shabby and unfriendly quarters full of rubbish should be transformed for the good of inhabitants, guests and the small business. The triptych by Lidin, Rappaport and Nevlyutov is about happiness of urbanship and cities for people, too (58. The City Community Forum was also devoted to the urban theme (114. Going through the last quarter of the year, we hope that Irkutsk will keep to the right policy, so that in the near future the wooden downtown quarters will become its pride, and the design, construction and investment complexes will join in desire to increase the number of comfortable and lively quarters in our city. The Baikal Beam will get one more landmark: the Smart School (22 for Irkutsk’s children, including orphans, will be built in several years on the bank of Chertugeevsky Bay.

  8. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  9. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.d.

    2003-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  10. Second Quarter Report Environmental Biosciences Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2002-10-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  11. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  12. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed

  13. Optimization of environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, M.

    1986-01-01

    The routine work and tasks related to prevention in environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities range from low level methodology to the necessity of being likewise prepared to perform environmental impact measurements after nuclear incidents and accidents are presented [pt

  14. Environmental monitoring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 52 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs

  15. Environmental γ radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Xiaopeng

    1993-01-01

    The environmental γ radiation monitor is a kind of dose or dose rate measuring devices, which can be used for monitoring environmental γ radiation around a nuclear site when normal or even abnormal events occur. The monitor is controlled by a single-chip microcomputer so that it can acquire synchronously the data from four detectors and transfer the data to a central computer. The monitor has good temperature property due to the technique of temperature correction. The monitor has been used in the environment monitoring vehicle for Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

  16. Quarterly Briefing Book on Environmental and Waste Management Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of the Quarterly Briefing Book on Environmental and Waste Management Activities is to provide managers and senior staff at the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and its contractors with timely and concise information on Hanford Site environmental and waste management activities. Each edition updates the information on the topics in the previous edition, deletes those determined not to be of current interest, and adds new topics to keep up to date with changing environmental and waste management requirements and issues. Section A covers current waste management and environmental restoration issues. In Section B are writeups on national or site-wide environmental and waste management topics. Section C has writeups on program- and waste-specific environmental and waste management topics. Section D provides information on waste sites and inventories on the site. 15 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Quarterly Briefing Book on Environmental and Waste Management Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of the Quarterly Briefing Book on Environmental and Waste Management Activities is to provide managers and senior staff at the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and its contractors with timely and concise information on Hanford Site environmental and waste management activities. Each edition updates the information on the topics in the previous edition, deletes those determined not to be of current interest, and adds new topics to keep up to date with changing environmental and waste management requirements and issues. Section A covers current waste management and environmental restoration issues. In Section B are writeups on national or site-wide environmental and waste management topics. Section C has writeups on program- and waste-specific environmental and waste management topics. Section D provides information on waste sites and inventories on the site. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1994 and 1994 summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    Eighty-nine wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane, a common laboratory contaminant, and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1994. Benzene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloropropane, gross alpha, mercury, nonvolatile beta, tetrachloroethylene, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 140 ft/year during first and fourth quarters 1994

  19. The Savannah River Site`s groundwater monitoring program. Third quarter 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-06

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

  20. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-06-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the fourth quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of analytical and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  1. Rulison Site groundwater monitoring report fourth quarter, 1996. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Project Rulison, a joint US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Austral Oil Company (Austral) experiment, was conducted under the AEC`s Plowshare Program to evaluate the feasibility of using a nuclear device to stimulate natural gas production in low-permeability, gas-producing geologic formations. The experiment was conducted on September 10, 1969, and consisted of detonating a 40-kiloton nuclear device at a depth of 2,568 m below ground surface. This report summarizes the results of the fourth quarter 1996 groundwater sampling event for the Rulison Site, which is located approximately 65 kilometers (km) (40 miles [mi]) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. The sampling was performed as part of a quarterly groundwater monitoring program implemented by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to monitor the effectiveness of remediation of a drilling effluent pond located at the site. The effluent pond was used for the storage of drilling mud during drilling of the emplacement hole for a 1969 gas stimulation test.

  2. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    During first quarter 1995, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for selected heavy metals, field measurements, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Total organic halogens exceeded its Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criterion during first quarter 1995 as in fourth quarter 1994. Aluminum, iron, and manganese, which were not analyzed for during fourth quarter 1994, exceeded the Flag 2 criteria in at least two wells each during first quarter 1995. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting the determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters

  3. Environmental radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tsutomu; Shioiri, Masatoshi; Sakamaki, Tsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring systems are used to measure and monitoring gamma-rays at the observation boundaries of nuclear facilities and in the surrounding areas. In recent years, however, few new nuclear facilities have been constructed and the monitoring systems shift to renewal of existing systems. In addition, in order to increase public acceptance, the facilities are being equipped with communication lines to provide data to prefectural environmental centers. In this text, we introduce the latest technology incorporated in replacement of environmental radiation monitoring systems. We also introduce a replacement method that can shorten the duration during which environmental dose rate measurement is interrupted by enabling both the replacement system and the system being replaced to perform measurements in parallel immediately before and after the replacement. (author)

  4. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, July 1994--September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) stated in the proposal to DOE are as follows: Development of a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication that recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all; development of a pool of talented scientist and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; identification of needs and development of programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This is a progress report of the first quarter of the third year of the grant. It reports progress against these grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan (published at the end of the first year of the grant)

  5. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, July--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-31

    This report describes activities and reports on progress for the first quarter (July--September) of the fourth year of the grant to support the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) at the Medical University of South Carolina. It reports progress against the grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant. The objectives of EHAP stated in the proposal to DOE are to: (1) develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication that recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all; (2) develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; and (3) identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health-oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management.

  6. Environmental radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Isao

    2011-01-01

    The samples, pretreatment method, and measurement methods of 'Environmental radioactivity level by prefecture' of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Education (MEXT) is explained. It consists of 1), 'Environmental radioactivity level by prefecture' in normal period, 2) 'Strengthening of Monitoring of Environmental Radioactivity Level by Prefecture' of MEXT at emergency 3) strengthening of monitoring by Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, 4) radiation monitoring around the nuclear facility, 5) strengthening of monitoring by MEXT, and 6) quality of monitoring. The survey item and samples etc., of 'Environmental radioactivity level by prefecture', monitoring post, NaI (Tl) scintillation survey meter, sampling and pretreatment methods for radionuclide analysis in normal period, an example of germanium semiconductor detector, gamma ray spectrum of spaghetti from Italy by germanium semiconductor detector, flow chart of radionuclide analysis of fallout in normal period and emergency by germanium semiconductor detector, example of analytical method of radioactive strontium ( ion exchange method), outline of plutonium analytical method for emergency, sampling and pretreatment methods of radionuclides for strengthening, monitoring result around Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant from June 23 to 24, 2011, change of air dose rate of monitoring post in Mito city from March 14 to 26, 2011, concentration of I-131 and Cs-137 in fallout in Hitachinaka city from March 19 to April 30, 2011, and change of concentration of I-131, Cs-134 and Cs-137 in tap water of Iitate village from March 20 to April 30, 2011, are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  7. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-31

    The objectives of this report are to: (1) develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication that recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards, both chemical and radiation, on the health and well-being of all; (2) develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; and (3) identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This report describes the progress made this quarter in the following areas: public and professional outreach; science programs; clinical programs; and information support and access systems.

  8. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1999 and 1999 Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    2000-01-01

    A maximum of thirty eight-wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Iron (Total Recoverable), Chloroethene (Vinyl Chloride) and 1,1-Dichloroethane were the most widespread constituents exceeding the Final Primary Drinking Water Standards during 1999. Trichloroethylene, 1,1-Dichloroethylene, 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Aluminum (Total Recoverable), Benzene, cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Dichlorodifluoromethane, Dichloromethane (Methylene Chloride), Gross Alpha, Mercury (Total Recoverable), Nonvolatile Beta, Tetrachloroethylene, Total Organic Halogens, Trichlorofluoromethane, Tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill is to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 144.175 ft/year during first quarter 1999 and 145.27 ft/year during fourth quarter 1999

  9. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    1999-01-01

    During fourth quarter 1998, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells

  10. Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Darrell

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies are presented. The topics include: 1) Monitoring & Controlling the Environment; 2) Illustrative Example: Canary 3) Ground-based Commercial Technology; 4) High Capability & Low Mass/Power + Autonomy = Key to Future SpaceFlight; 5) Current Practice: in Flight; 6) Current Practice: Post Flight; 7) Miniature Mass Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration and Long Duration Human Flight; 8) Hardware and Data Acquisition System; 9) 16S rDNA Phylogenetic Tree; and 10) Preview of Porter.

  11. Environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1988-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities is part of general monitoring for environmental radioactivity all over the territory of the Federal Republic of Germany. General principles of environmental monitoring were formulated by the ICRP in 1965. In 1974 guidelines for measures of monitoring the environment of NPP incorporating LWR were drafted, which helped to standardize environmental monitoring programs. Since 1958, data on environmental radioactivity from measurements by authorized laboratories have been published in reports. (DG)

  12. 1985 environmental monitoring report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

    1986-04-01

    The environmental monitoring program is designed to determine that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. The data were evaluated using the appropriate environmental regulatory criteria. The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1985 are summarized in this report. Detailed data are not included in the main body of the report, but are tabulated and presented in Appendix D. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratoy; concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory; and the 1984 strontium-90 data which was not available for inclusion in the 1984 Environmental Monitoring Report. In 1985, the results of the surveillance program demonstraed that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

  13. Environmental monitoring programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    The tasks of the radiation protection department at a nuclear power plant are mentioned and described. Special attention is given to the environmental monitoring program. The consequences from regulations, the different items in the program and the results are described. (orig./RW)

  14. Environmental monitoring programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    During 1989 there were about 1000 premises in England and Wales authorised to discharge radioactive wastes. The majority of these premises consisted of hospitals, universities and industrial, research or manufacturing centres. Discharges from these premises when made in accordance with the strict conditions specified in their authorisations will have been of little radiological significance. In the case of nuclear sites authorisations or approvals are issued jointly by the DoE and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) known collectively as the Authorising Departments. In Wales these functions are undertaken by the Welsh Office with the support of HMIP and MAFF. The Authorising Departments specify numerical limits on the amounts of radioactivity which operators may discharge to the environment. In addition operators are required to demonstrate that the best practicable means (BPM) to minimise discharges is undertaken. Operators are also required to carry out appropriate environmental monitoring to demonstrate the effectiveness of BPM. As part of their regulatory functions the Authorising Departments undertake their own environmental monitoring programmes to act as both a check on site operator's returns and to provide independent data on the exposure of the public. HM Inspectorate of Pollution has monitored levels of radioactivity in drinking water sources for many years and published results annually. MAFF undertakes two programmes to monitor radioactivity in the aquatic environment and in terrestrial foodstuffs and publishes annual reports. Environmental monitoring programmes undertaken by both nuclear site operators and government departments are summarised. (author)

  15. 1984 environmental monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    The environmental monitoring program has been designed to ensure that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. A listing, as required by DOE Order 5484.1 of BNL facilities, of environmental agencies and permits is provided in the Environmental Program Information Section 3.0, Table B. Since the aquifer underlying Long Island has been designated a ''sole source'' aquifer, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Drinking Water Standards have been used in the assessment of ground water data. However, the limits prescribed in the regulations are not directly applicable to the monitoring well data since (1) the standards apply to a community water supply system, i.e., one serving more than 25 individuals, and (2) the standards represent an annual average concentration. Since the monitoring wells are not components of the Laboratory's water supply system, the EPA drinking water standards are employed as reference criteria to which the surveillance well data is compared. The standards also serve as guidance levels for any appropriate remedial action. 36 refs., 9 figs., 40 tabs

  16. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program quarterly report, January--March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-30

    The objectives of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) stated in the proposal to DOE are to: develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication that recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all; develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; and identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This report describes activities and reports on progress for the third quarter (January--March) of the third year of the grant. It reports progress against these grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant. Questions, comments, or requests for further information concerning the activities under this grant can be forwarded to Jack Davis in the EHAP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (803) 727-6450.

  17. Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

  18. Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilt, G.C.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures

  19. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: 100, 200, 300 and 600 Areas. Fourth quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed on waste disposal sites located at the Hanford Site. The Fourth Quarter 1994 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized

  20. Sanitary Landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarterly report and summary 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Fifty-seven wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane a common laboratory contaminant, and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1993. Benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroethene 1,2 dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloropropane, gross alpha, lindane, mercury, tetrachloroethylene, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. No groundwater contaminants were observed in wells screened in the lower section of Steed Pond Aquifer.

  1. Environmental monitoring report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs maintained by the Pinellas Plant are designed to determine the efficiencies of treatment and control mechanisms; to provide measurements of discharge concentrations for comparison with applicable standards; and to assess the concentrations of these discharges in the environment. Site perimeter and off-site air samples for tritium gas and tritium oxide, as well as off-site surface water samples obtained to distances of 9.6 kilometers (6 miles) from the plant site and analyzed for tritium content, showed levels significantly less than 1 / 10 of 1 percent of the recommended guide for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Small sealed plutonium sources are utilized at this site. No plutonium was released to the environment and monitoring data showed environmental background levels

  2. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-11-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

  3. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    During third quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Eight parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards; and aluminum, iron, lead, manganese, pH, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water-table unit were similar to previous quarters

  4. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Woo

    2012-03-15

    Environmental Radiation Monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment. radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis on the sites of KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactors and their environments. The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by an ERM and the accumulated radiation dose by a TLD were almost same level compared with the previous years. The activity of gross {alpha} and gross {beta}, Tritium, Uranium and Strontium in environmental samples showed a environmental level. The {gamma}-radionuclides such as natural radionuclides 40K or 7Be were detected in pine needle and food. The nuclear radionuclides 134Cs, 137Cs or 131I were temporarily detected in the samples of air particulate and rain in April and of fall out in 2nd quarter from the effect of Fukusima accident.

  5. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period July through September 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2007-02-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period July through September 2006. Eighteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) sites were sampled during the reporting quarter.

  6. Monitoring of environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The results are described of monitoring radioactivity of atmospheric fallout, surface waters, soils, plant feeds, cereals, and other agricultural produce. The results were obtained over a long time period. Radioactivity was also measured of milk, milk products, vegetables and fruits, meat and hen eggs, flour and bakery products with a view to radionuclide migration in the food chain. The daily intake of 90 Sr and 137 Cs from food was determined from the values obtained and the consumption of the individual types of food. Strontium-90 distribution was studied in the bones and the teeth of the population in Slovakia. With the commissioning of nuclear power plants, emissions and liquid wastes were monitored and their environmental impact assessed. (E.S.)

  7. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report, fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This progress report for fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary fro the Savannah River Plant includes discussion on the following topics: description of facilities; hydrostratigraphic units; monitoring well nomenclature; integrity of the monitoring well network; groundwater monitoring data; analytical results exceeding standards; tritium, nitrate, and pH time-trend data; water levels; groundwater flow rates and directions; upgradient versus downgradient results

  8. Environmental surveillance data report for the first quarter of 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    The Department of Environmental Management (DEM) within the Environmental and Occupational Safety Division (E and OS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for environmental surveillance to: (1) assure compliance with all Federal, State, and local standards for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution, (2) monitor the adequacy of containment and effluent controls, and (3) assess impacts on the environment of releases from ORNL facilities. During 1986, the Low-Level Counting Facility at ORNL began reporting radionuclide measurements in a manner different from that of previous years. Prior to 1986, data below the minimum detectable limit were reported as ''less than (<)'' the detection limit. This year, results that are negative (samples less than instrument background) are reported. If these data are compared to previous years, it will appear that average values for 1986 have decreased. Apparent decreases may be attributed to the reporting of negative values and the subsequent averaging of this data. Nonradionuclide results that are below the analytical detection limit are expressed as less than (<) the limit. In computing average values, sample results below the limit are assigned the limit, and the resulting average value is expressed as less than the computed value. The Four-Plant Analytical Committee is reviewing the standardization of reporting of less than detectable values. Their recommendations will be incorporated in these reports as they become policy

  9. Environmental monitoring report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The Pinellas Plant is operated for the U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) by the Neutron Devices Department of the General Electric Company. The plant's 1100 employees are engaged in the design, development, and manufacture of special electronic and mechanical nuclear weapons components. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs maintained by the Pinellas Plant are designed to determine the efficiencies of treatment and control mechanisms, to provide measurements of discharge concentrations for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess the effect of these discharges on the environment. Small quantities of tritium gas, tritium oxide, and krypton-85 gas were released from the plant during the year. Average ground level concentrations of these radioisotopes were all significantly less than 1/10 of 1 percent of the recommended guide for continuous nonoccupational exposure

  10. Quantities for environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    It is recommended that if measurements are made with the objective of monitor radiation levels in the environment to elucidate long-term changes in these levels, then air kerma should be used. If the objective is to give an indication that levels from man-made sources are acceptable within specified limits for the exposure of people, then ambient dose equivalent should be used. It should be noted that radiation risks to individuals are best expressed by the quantity effective dose equivalent. If this latter quantity is to be accurately assessed, it may be necessary to obtain details of the quality of the environmental radiation that cannot be described adequately by simple measurements of either air kerma or ambient dose equivalent. If the above objectives pertain, the measurements should record both air kerma and ambient dose equivalent. If neutrons are measured in the environment then ambient dose equivalent is the appropriate quantity for both the above objectives. (author)

  11. Miniaturized Environmental Monitoring Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. B. Freidhoff

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the Mass Spectrograph on a Chip (MSOC) program is the development of a miniature, multi-species gas sensor fabricated using silicon micromachining technology which will be orders of magnitude smaller and lower power consumption than a conventional mass spectrometer. The sensing and discrimination of this gas sensor are based on an ionic mass spectrograph, using magnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The fields cause a spatial separation of the ions according to their respective mass-to-charge ratio. The fabrication of this device involves the combination of microelectronics with micromechanically built sensors and, ultimately, vacuum pumps. The prototype of a chemical sensor would revolutionize the method of performing environmental monitoring for both commercial and government applications. The portable unit decided upon was the miniaturized gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer detector, referred to as a GC/MS in the analytical marketplace.

  12. Environmental monitoring report, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the Pinellas Plant during 1974. Sample analyses revealed the on-site sewage treatment facility operated well within State of Florida Standards. Likewise, offsite discharges met the applicable standards for arsenic, biochemical oxygen demand, chlorides, chromium, copper, cyanides, detergents, dissolved oxygen, dissolved solids, fluorides, lead, mercury, nitrogen, oils and greases, phenols, pH, phosphorus, suspended solids, turbidity and zinc. The results of iron and specific conductance analyses showed levels in excess of state standards and are discussed in the body of the report. In addition to the non-radioactive parameters listed above, a small quantity of radioactive tritium oxide was released in the plant's liquid effluent. Small quantities of tritium gas, tritium oxide, and krypton-85 gas were released from the plant during the year. Average ground level concentrations of these radioisotopes were all significantly less than 1 percent of recommended guide for continuous nonoccupational exposure. (U.S.)

  13. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    During first quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, adionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  14. M-Area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring report -- first quarter 1994. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, C.S.; Washburn, F.; Jordan, J.; Van Pelt, R.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during first quarter 1994 as required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. During first quarter 1994, 42 point-of-compliance (POC) wells at the M-Area HWMF were sampled for drinking water parameters

  15. Mound Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, L.R.; Tullis, M.S.; Paulick, R.P.; Roush, L.L.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) is to describe the environmental monitoring and surveillance programs in place at Mound. The Plan is required by DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE, 1990). The programs described in the EMP are required by the DOE 5400 Order series and by the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environment Surveillance (DOE 1991a), referred to as the Regulatory Guide throughout this Plan

  16. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

  17. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    During second quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses (exclusive of boron and lithium) and turbidity measurements. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells during second quarter 1994. Carbon tetrachloride exceeded the final PDWS in well HAC 4. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 3. Specific conductance and total organic halogens were elevated in well HAC 2. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Groundwater flow direction in the water stable beneath the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west during second quarter 1994. During previous quarters, the groundwater flow direction has been consistently to the northwest or the north-northwest. This apparent change in flow direction may be attributed to the lack of water elevations for wells HTF 16 and 17 and the anomalous water elevations for well HAC 2 during second quarter

  18. Environmental monitoring for krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.E.

    1973-01-01

    85 Kr presents unique environmental monitoring problems because it does not react with other elements and compounds at normal ambient temperatures and pressures. However, elaborate means are available to manage the 85 Kr problem, but a simpler, inexpensive approach is required if monitoring is to be accomplished at many sampling locations. This work shows that environmental monitoring for 85 Kr is possible by collecting air samples in thin plastic bags, and counting the bags for beta particle activity. The direct counting of contained samples of this type makes it possible to detect concentrations less than the public MPC for 85 Kr. The bagged-sample technique is readily adaptable to any environmental monitoring station with power to run a low-volume air pump. The idea of counting the bagged-sample directly is a new, low-cost, approach to environmental gas monitoring which may have application in environmental, clinical, and industrial situations

  19. Environmental Monitoring Plan - February 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, G. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fish, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Griffin, D. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patterson, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, T M; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R

    2016-02-08

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection oft/ic Pubile and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the hiota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements.

  20. Environmental monitoring and information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbert, R.

    1998-01-01

    Environmental monitoring and information systems installed by Dornier are summarized. A broad spectrum of environmental areas from air quality and water to radioactivity is covered. Nuclear power plant monitoring systems, either as remote or plant-internal monitoring systems, form an important element of the work undertaken. The systems delivered covered local, regional or national areas. The range of services provided, and hardware and software platforms are listed. (R.P.)

  1. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs

  2. Fiber optic field analytical instrumentation in place of quarterly compliance monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshaw, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    ChemSensor reg-sign is a new field analytical tool capable of in situ, real time measurements of organics in water. The purpose of this paper is to describe the application of this new instrument to the ongoing monitoring of petroleum contaminated ground water. The sensing element in ChemSensor incorporates a short optical fiber core with a hydrophobic/organophilic chemical coating. Light is launched into the fiber from a light emitting diode and detected at the opposite end by a photodiode. When the sensor is immersed in water containing organics, the organics partition into the organophilic coating and change the effective refractive index of he coating allowing light to escape. The resultant loss of light reaching the detector correlates to the concentration of organics present. It has been demonstrated through extensive field tests that response factors developed for ChemSensor allow it to be used as an accurate indication of BTEX contamination present. A large scale field test with an environmental consultant and a petroleum company was conducted to gain confidence in the correlation of ChemSensor to laboratory methods. As a result of this study, a case was made to the state regulators for substitution of a portion of the quarterly compliance monitoring with ChemSensor. This program has the potential to save the petroleum company thousands in laboratory analytical costs per year. This paper discusses the application of ChemSensor to sites contaminated by gasoline as well as the collection and interpretation of the data

  3. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungers, D.K.

    1993-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between May 24 and August 20, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from samples collected during the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  4. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    During second quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total organic halogens exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  5. Mixed waste management facility groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1996 and 1996 summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1996, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroethene, chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethylene, dichloromethane, gross alpha, and tetrachloroethylene also exceeded final PDWS in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone llB2 (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone llB1 (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in six Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters

  6. Mixed waste management facility groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1995 and 1995 summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1995, seven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Chloroethene, gross alpha, lead, mercury, and tetrachloroethylene also exceeded final PDWS in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone IIB 2 (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB 1 (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in three Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters

  7. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. First quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-03

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted during the first quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  8. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program - Second Quarter 1998 (April through June 1998)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchison, J B

    1999-02-10

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during second quarter 1998. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for the program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  9. The Savannah River Site`s groundwater monitoring program. First quarter 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  10. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program second quarter 1999 (April through June 1999)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by Savannah River Site during first quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results

  11. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1--March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This quarterly report contains data received between January and March 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported. Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment.

  12. 2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-30

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  13. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

    2010-01-27

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for

  14. 1986 environmental monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1987-06-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1986 are summarized in this report. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates and halogens; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the organics, radioactivity, and water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; and the concentrations of organics, radioactivity, and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory. In 1986, the results of the surveillance program demonstrated that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards

  15. Life Support Systems: Environmental Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support Systems project Environmental Monitoring (EM) systems task objectives are to develop and demonstrate onboard...

  16. Environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, M.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of one environmental monitoring program for nuclear facilities, are presented. The program in Federal Republic of Germany, its goals, its basic conditions, its regulations, and its dose limits are emphasized. (E.G.) [pt

  17. Program of environmental radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirement of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01, 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', as expressed in the section 5.14, related to the Program of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (PMRA)

  18. ERMS - Environmental Radiation Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vax, Eran; Sarusi, Benny; Sheinfeld, Mati; Levinson, Shmuel; Brandys, Irad; Sattinger, Danny; Wengrowicz, Udi; Tshuva, Avi; Tirosh, Dan

    2008-01-01

    A new Environmental Radiation Monitoring System (ERMS) has been developed in the NRCN as an extensive tool to be applied in case of nuclear malfunction or Nuclear Disposal Device (NDD) incident, as well as for routine radiation monitoring of the reactor's vicinity. The system collects real-time environmental data such as: gamma radiation, wind speed, wind direction, and temperature for monitoring purposes. The ERMS consists of a main Control Center and an array of monitoring stations. Fixed, environmental, gamma radiation monitoring stations are installed at the reactor's surroundings while portable stations can be posted rapidly along the wind direction, enhancing the spatial sampling of the radiation measurements and providing better hazard assessment at an emergency event. The presented ERMS, based on industrial standards for hardware and network protocols, is a reliable standalone system which upgrades the readiness to face a nuclear emergency event by supplying real-time, integrated meteorological and radiation data. (author)

  19. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.D.; Lee, Y.B.; Lee, W.Y.; Park, D.W.; Chung, B.G.

    1980-01-01

    For the KAERI site, various environmental samples were collected three times a month, and the natural environmental radiation levels were also measured at each sampling point. Measurements for gross alpha and beta radioactivities of the samples were routinely measured for all samples. Strontium-90 concentrations were also analysed for the fallout and air samples collected daily basis on the roof of the main building. Accumulated exposure including the possibility of determination of low level environmental radiation field by employing thermoluminescent dosimeter, CaSO 4 : Dsub(y)-0.4 teflon disc type, at 6 posts in on-site of the KAERI. As for Kori site, at 19 points of ON, OFF-site, and at the same time the environmental radiation exposure rate at each sampling point were measured. Several environmental samples such as surface soil, pine needles, water samples, milk sample and pasture samples were collected and analysed on a quarterly basis. As a result of the survey it can be said that no significant release of radiation to the environment due to the operations of nuclear facilities including research reactor at the KAERI and power reactor at the Kori has been found during the period of the survey and monitoring. (author)

  20. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  1. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    During first quarter 1993, eight constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste anagement Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults (HWMWDV). As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, or nonvolatile beta levels also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells. However, several Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells also contained elevated constituent levels. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to previous quarters.

  2. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1993, 10 constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chloroethane (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), lead, mercury, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in two Aquifer Unit 2A (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow direction and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  3. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    During third quarter 1993, eight constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), lead, mercury, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The elevated constituents were found in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1} (Barnwell/McBean) wells. No elevated constituents were exhibited in Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  4. Environmental monitoring program of CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.G.

    1985-09-01

    This environmental monitoring program of CDTN aim to do a survey that permit to verify if the radioactive wastes release by CDTN agree with basic rudiments of radioprotection, evaluate the environmental impact, verify the adjustment of using proceedings to effluents control, to evaluate the maximum radiation doses that public persons will be able to get yearly. (C.M.) [pt

  5. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1, 1993 through March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. This quarterly report contains data received between March 8 and May 24, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  6. Environmental Restoration (ER) Consolidated Quarterly Report_April to June 2017_ October 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This Environmental Restoration Operations (ER) Consolidated Quarterly Report (ER Quarterly Report) provides the status of ongoing corrective action activities being implemented at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) during the April, May, and June 2017 quarterly reporting period. Table I-1 lists the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) identified for corrective action at SNL/NM. Sections I.2.1 and I.2.2 summarize the work completed during this quarter. Section I.2.1 summarizes the quarterly activities at sites undergoing corrective action field activities. Field activities are conducted at the three groundwater AOCs (Burn Site Groundwater [BSG AOC], Technical Area [TA]-V Groundwater [TAVG AOC], and Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater [TAG AOC]). Section I.2.2 summarizes quarterly activities at sites where the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous Waste Bureau (HWB) issued a certificate of completion and the sites are in the corrective action complete (CAC) regulatory process. Currently, SWMUs 8 and 58, 68, 149, 154, and 502 are in the CAC regulatory process. Corrective action activities are deferred at the Long Sled Track (SWMU 83), the Gun Facilities (SWMU 84), and the Short Sled Track (SWMU 240) because these three sites are active mission facilities. These three active mission sites are located in TA-III.

  7. Environmental monitoring using lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Ahmed, N.

    1997-01-01

    Activities of human beings are creating slow and long term changes in the Earth's atmosphere. As the sun provides the driving force for earth's ecosystem, therefore earth's radiation budget is an important parameter. Composition of the atmosphere is of basic importance in determining this radiation budget. Out of the atmospheric species, ozone is of special importance because it filters out much of the solar UV, while certain other molecular species, such as SO/sub 2/ , NO/sub 2/, benzene, toluene and aerosols have very harmful effects on life. Depletion of ozone layer over Antarctic and addition of chemical species to atmosphere and oceans have disturbed our ecosystem seriously. Thorough monitoring of distribution and dynamics of these species is essential for devising any countermeasure for their control. Conventional method of atmospheric monitoring (balloon, rocket or satellite borne sensors) are limited either in range or type of measurement apart from being complex and somewhat expensive. LASER based 'light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technique, on the other hand, enjoys a number of advantages over others. Due to recent developments in LASER technique, on the other hand, enjoys a number of advantages over other. Due to recent developments in LASER technology, LIDARS are economical and very flexible in range and type of measurement. This paper presents an overview of the technique. It includes principle of LIDAR, highlights its applications to the monitoring of atmosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere. (author)

  8. Environmental and process monitoring technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum dealing with state-of-the-art methods and instrumentation for environmental and process monitoring. In the last few years, important advances have been made in improving existing analytical methods and developing new techniques for trace detection of chemicals. These monitoring technologies are a topic of great interest for environmental and industrial control in a wide spectrum of areas. Sensitive detection, selective characterization, and cost-effective analysis are among the most important challenges facing monitoring technologies. This conference integrating interdisciplinary research and development was aimed to present the most recent advances and applications in the important areas of environmental and process monitoring. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 34 papers for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  9. Near-facility environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Perkins, C.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the routine near-facility environmental monitoring programs which are presently being conducted at the Hanford Site. Several types of environmental media are sampled near nuclear facilities to monitor the effectiveness of waste management and restoration activities, and effluent treatment and control practices. These media include air, surface water and springs, surface contamination, soil and vegetation, investigative sampling (which can include wildlife), and external radiation. Sampling and analysis information and analytical results for 1994 for each of these media are summarized in this section. Additional data and more detailed information may be found in Westinghouse Hanford Company Operational Environmental Monitoring Annual Report, Calendar Year 1994.

  10. 1977 environmental monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, J.R.

    1978-04-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during 1977 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory

  11. 1979 environmental monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, J.R.

    1980-04-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during 1979 are summarized. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory

  12. 1981 environmental monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, J.R.; Olmer, L.L.

    1982-04-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1981 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. 28 references, 9 figures, 20 tables

  13. 1980 environmental monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, J.R.; Olmer, L.L.

    1981-04-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during 1980 are summarized. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory

  14. 1976 environmental monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, J.R.

    1977-04-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other environmental pollutants found in the vicinity of Brookhaven National Laboratory during 1976 are summarized. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in precipitation; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk, grass, and soil samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. The external radiation level for 1976 at the north boundary of the Laboratory attributable to an ecology forest irradiation source was 74.4 mrem, or 14 percent of the applicable Radiation Protection Standard

  15. Integrated environmental monitoring -- prototype demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryce, R.W.; Vail, L.W.; Hostetler, D.D.; Meyer, P.D.; Carlson, T.J.; Miller, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Groundwater monitoring is an important activity at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Monitoring programs at DOE facilities have evolved in response to operational needs at the facilities, public outcries for information, regulatory requirements, DOE orders, and improvements in monitoring technology. Decisions regarding sampling location, sampling frequency, analyses performed, and other aspects of monitoring network design can have major implications for detecting releases and for making subsequent higher level decisions about facility operation and remediation. The Integrated Environmental Monitoring (IEM) concept is a set of analytical procedures and software tools that can be used to improve monitoring network design decisions. Such decisions include the choice of monitoring locations, sampling frequencies, sensor technologies, and monitored constituents. IEM provides a set of monitoring alternatives that balance the tradeoffs between competing monitoring objectives such as the minimization of cost and the minimization of uncertainty. The alternatives provided are the best available with respect to the monitoring objectives, consistent with the physical and chemical characteristics of the site, and consist with applicable regulatory requirements. The selection of the best monitoring alternative to implement is made by the stakeholders after reviewing the alternatives and tradeoffs produced by the IEM process

  16. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with Module 3, Section C, of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989, effective November 2, 1992. The monitoring well network is composed of 87 FSB wells screened in the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning in the first quarter of 1993, the standard for comparison became the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS) specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B permit. Currently and historically, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the second half of 1993, notably aluminum, iodine-129, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B 2 and Aquifer Zone 2B 1 wells. However, several Aquifer Unit 2A wells also contain elevated levels of constituents. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the FASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988

  17. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report for Year 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  18. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report, Year 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-03-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  19. First and second quarters 1999 - TNX Area groundwater and effectiveness monitoring strategy data only report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents data of groundwater monitoring conducted during the first and second quarters of 1999 in support of the Interim Remedial Action. The data is from groundwater monitoring wells described in this report as the primary, secondary, and recovery wells of the initial operation of the Effectiveness Monitoring Strategy (EMS) as stipulated in Revision 1.3 (WSRC, 1996), the proposed wells for the full operation of the EMS as described in Revision 1.5 (WSRC, 1999), and general wells pertinent to the report. Also included are data from SRTC projects in the TNX Area that are deemed useful for groundwater characterization

  20. ICPP [Idaho Chemical Processing Plant] environmental monitoring report, CY-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, K.R.

    1989-08-01

    Summarized in this report are the data collected through Environmental Monitoring programs conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) by the Environmental Engineering (EE) Section of the Nuclear and Industrial Safety (N and IS) Department. The ICPP is responsible for complying with all applicable Federal, State, Local and DOE Rules, Regulations and Orders. Radiological effluent and emissions are regulated by the DOE. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates all nonradiological waste resulting from the ICPP operations including all airborne, liquid, and solid waste. The EE subsection completed a Quality Assurance (QA) Plan for Environmental Monitoring activities during the third quarter of 1986. QA activities have resulted in the ICPP's implementation of the Environmental Protection Agency rules and guidelines pertaining to the collection, analyses, and reporting of environmentally related samples. Where no approved methods for analyses existed for radionuclides, currently used methods were submitted for the EPA approval. 33 figs., 14 tabs

  1. Environmental Monitoring at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, J.; Harries, J.; Harrison, J.; Hoffmann, E.

    2003-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates several national facilities, including Australia's only research reactor, HIFAR, produces radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals and carries out research in nuclear science and technology. ANSTO monitors the amount of airborne emissions, the radioactive and non-radioactive contaminants released to the sewer, the quality of storm water leaving the site and the quality of ground water. The potential effective dose rates to the general public from airborne discharges and effluent release from the Lucas Heights in 2002-03 were less than 0.006 mSv/year, well below the 1mSv/year dose rate limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the Australian National Occupational Health and Safety Commission

  2. MUSC Environmental Biosciences Program First Quarter Report May - June, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr

    2002-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  3. Savannah River Plant remote environmental monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The SRP remote environmental monitoring system consists of separations facilities stack monitors, production reactor stack monitors, twelve site perimeter monitors, river and stream monitors, a geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) data link, reactor cooling lake thermal monitors, meteorological tower system, Weather Information and Display (WIND) system computer, and the VANTAGE data base management system. The remote environmental monitoring system when fully implemented will provide automatic monitoring of key stack releases and automatic inclusion of these source terms in the emergency response codes

  4. Remote radiation environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashayev, A.M.; Mehdiyev, A.Sh.; Bayramov, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The project of the automated remote monitoring for a level of an environment background radiation in settlements along boundary of the Azerbaijan Republic is developed. The main purpose of the project is: increase of a level of a radiation safety on territory of the Azerbaijan Republic; controlling of a level of an environment background radiation on boundary of the Azerbaijan Republic with the purpose of well-timed warning and acceptance of indispensable measures at probable emergencies on Atomic Power Stations in a number adjacent from Azerbaijan countries, or other ecological catastrophes; controlling of a level of an environment background radiation along eastern suburbs of Azerbaijan regions occupied of Armenia's army and detection of the facts of wrongful disposals of atomic engineering of Armenia on territory of Azerbaijan. As is known, in a number adjacent from Azerbaijan countries the nuclear industry is advanced or develops. It has resulted in origin of threat of a radiation hazard in case of ecological catastrophes: widely scale leakage of radioactive wastes, explosions, or fires on nuclear generating sets, acts of sabotage, directional against Azerbaijan. In this case, at unfavorable meteorological conditions a radioactive waste may be brought by a wind or a rain on territory of Azerbaijan. Measurement is supposed a carry with the help of 'EKOMON' fixed stations. The results of round-the-clock a gamma and a neutron background measurement from the stations will be transmitted automatically to a dispatcher station in the central computer. Established on the stations telescopic sensors also will allow to determine a direction of a radiation and coordinates of radiation source. Stations will be located along boundary, and also in Kedabek, Akstafa, Terter, Agdam and Fizuli regions, and in Autonomous Republic of Nakhichevan

  5. Environmental monitoring at Olympic Dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The environmental management and protection program at the Olympic Dam uranium/copper/gold project, Roxby Downs, South Australia, monitors eight major environmental parameters - meteorology, vegetation, mine site rehabilitation, fauna, terrain, soil salinity, hydrogeology and well fields. It came into effect with the approval of the South Australian Government in March 1987. The Great Artesian Basin, one of the world's greatest artesian basins, is the source of the water supply for the project

  6. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and open-quotes Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilitiesclose quotes (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported

  7. Enlisting qualitative methods to improve environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental monitoring tracks ecological changes in order to support environmental management decisions. Monitoring design is driven by natural scientists, usually lacking a formal social science basis. However, human perspectives drive environmental resource decisions, with ...

  8. Environmental hazards assessment program. Quarterly report, July 1996--September 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    On June 23, 1992, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FG01-92EW50625 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP). Dr. James B. Edwards, President of the Medical University of South Carolina, suggested, open-quotes Good health is not the result of good doctoring but the result of a healthy society in a healthy, economic, political and biological environment.close quotes To further good health, it is appropriate that an educational institution such as MUSC utilize grant funds to help people from all walks of life understand better what truly does affect human health, what does not, and why

  9. Environmental monitoring network for India

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.V. Sundareshwar; R. Murtugudde; G. Srinivasan; S. Singh; K.J. Ramesh; R. Ramesh; S.B. Verma; D. Agarwal; D. Baldocchi; C.K. Baru; K.K. Baruah; G.R. Chowdhury; V.K. Dadhwal; C.B.S. Dutt; J. Fuentes; Prabhat Gupta; W.W. Hardgrove; M. Howard; C.S. Jha; S. Lal; W.K. Michener; A.P. Mitra; J.T. Morris; R.R. Myneni; M. Naja; R. Nemani; R. Purvaja; S. Raha; S.K. Santhana Vanan; M. Sharma; A. Subramaniam; R. Sukumar; R.R. Twilley; P.R. Zimmerman

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the consequences of global environmental change and its mitigation will require an integrated global effort of comprehensive long-term data collection, synthesis, and action (1). The last decade has seen a dramatic global increase in the number of networked monitoring sites. For example, FLUXNET is a global collection of >300 micrometeorological...

  10. Thermoluminescence dosimetry environmental monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoluzzi, S.

    1989-01-01

    In this report, characteristics and performances of an environmental monitoring system with thermoluminescence dosimetry are presented. Most of the work deals with the main physical parameters necessary for measurements of ambiental dose. At the end of this report some of level doses in the environment around the site of the ENEA Center of Energy Research Salluggia (Italy) are illustrated

  11. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) was monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning first quarter 1993, the HASB`s Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), established in Appendix 3D-A of the cited permit, became the standard for comparison. Historically as well as currently, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constitutents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB (notably aluminum, iodine-129, strontium-90, technetium-99, and zinc) during the second half of 1993. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1}. However, constituents exceeding standards also occurred in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1} and Aquifer Unit 2A. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps include in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1993. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the HASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  12. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) was monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning first quarter 1993, the HASB's Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), established in Appendix 3D-A of the cited permit, became the standard for comparison. Historically as well as currently, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constitutents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB (notably aluminum, iodine-129, strontium-90, technetium-99, and zinc) during the second half of 1993. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B 2 and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone 2B 1 . However, constituents exceeding standards also occurred in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone 2B 1 and Aquifer Unit 2A. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps include in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1993. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the HASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988

  13. Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments

  14. Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

  15. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1 through June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and ''Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities,'' as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company manages RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. This quarterly report contains data received between May 20 and August 19, 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported

  16. Environmental monitoring in emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This manual gives technical guidance on emergency monitoring procedures to those who would have to assess the situation after an accident leading to the uncontrolled release of radioactive substances to the environment. Its aim is to draw attention to the important factors that should be considered in formulating emergency plans. The seven annexes contain inventories of fission products and possible releases; dispersion, deposition and dose-exposure relationships for airborne releases; α-, β- and γ-radiation surveys; information on sample collection and field evaluation; and brief descriptions of the environmental monitoring procedures adopted in previous emergencies (Windscale 1957, AERE Harwell 1961 and NRTS Idaho 1961).

  17. Mobile environmental radiation monitoring station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assido, H.; Shemesh, Y.; Mazor, T.; Tal, N.; Barak, D.

    1997-01-01

    A mobile environmental radiation monitoring station has been developed and established for the Israeli Ministry of Environment. The radiation monitoring station is ready for immediate placing in any required location, or can be operated from a vehicle. The station collects data Tom the detector and transfers it via cellular communication network to a Computerized Control Center for data storage, processing, and display . The mobile station is fully controlled from the. Routinely, the mobile station responses to the data request accumulated since the last communication session. In case of fault or alarm condition in the mobile station, a local claim is activated and immediately initiates communication with the via cellular communication network. (authors)

  18. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in one or more groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Fifty-seven (48%) of the 120 monitoring wells, contained elevated tritium activities, and 23 (19%) contained elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Total alpha-emitting radium, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, cadmium, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, or nonvolatile beta levels exceeded standards in one or more wells. During 1992, elevated levels of 13 constituents were found in one or more of 80 of the 120 groundwater monitoring wells (67%) at the MWMF and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene exceeded their final PDWS more frequently and more consistently than did other constituents. Tritium activity exceeded its final PDWS m 67 wells and trichloroethylene was. elevated in 28 wells. Lead, tetrachloroethylene, total alpha-emitting radium, gross alpha, cadmium, chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene 1,2-dichloroethane, mercury, or nitrate exceeded standards in one or more wells during the year. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its drinking water screening level in 3 wells during the year.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Project quarterly technical report, April--June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-18

    This quarterly report describes the technical status of activities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. Each activity is identified by an activity data sheet number, a brief title describing the activity or the technical area where the activity is located, and the name of the project leader. The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) portion of the facility operating permit requires the submission of a technical progress report on a quarterly basis. This report, submitted to fulfill the permit`s requirement, summarizes the work performed and the results of sampling and analysis in the ER Project. Suspect waste found include: Radionuclides, high explosives, metals, solvents and organics. The data provided in this report have not been validated. These data are considered ``reviewed data.``

  20. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.

    1992-06-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 61 refs

  1. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement. Quarterly report for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 4, July 1995--September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program that are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The reporting period covered herein is July through September 1995 (fourth quarter of FY 1995). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been approved as FY 1995 commitments

  2. Environmental Monitoring of Endemic Cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElNemr, W.; Jutla, A. S.; Constantin de Magny, G.; Hasan, N. A.; Islam, M.; Sack, R.; Huq, A.; Hashem, F.; Colwell, R.

    2012-12-01

    Cholera remains a major public health threat. Since Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease, is autochthonous to riverine, estuarine, and coastal waters, it is unlikely the bacteria can be eradicated from its natural habitat. Prediction of disease, in conjunction with preventive vaccination can reduce the prevalence rate of a disease. Understanding the influence of environmental parameters on growth and proliferation of bacteria is an essential first step in developing prediction methods for outbreaks. Large scale geophysical variables, such as SST and coastal chlorophyll, are often associated with conditions favoring growth of V. cholerae. However, local environmental factors, meaning biological activity in ponds from where the bulk of populations in endemic regions derive water for daily usage, are either neglected or oversimplified. Using data collected from several sites in two geographically distinct locations in South Asia, we have identified critical local environmental factors associated with cholera outbreak. Of 18 environmental variables monitored for water sources in Mathbaria (a coastal site near the Bay of Bengal) and Bakergonj (an inland site) of Bangladesh, water depth and chlorophyll were found to be important factors associated with initiation of cholera outbreaks. Cholera in coastal regions appears to be related to intrusion. However, monsoonal flooding creates conditions for cholera epidemics in inland regions. This may be one of the first attempts to relate in-situ environmental observations with cholera. We anticipate that it will be useful for further development of prediction models in the resource constrained regions.

  3. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported

  4. Environmental radon and thoron monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    A large two-filter type monitor (ERM-3) has been developed for measuring environmental levels of radon and thoron to within several picocuries per cubic meter. The inlet filters of the monitor remove daughter activity from the entering air stream but permit radon and thoron to pass. Daughter activity formed in the 0.9 m 3 decay chamber is collected by the fixed exit filter. The alpha activity of the filter is detected with a zinc sulfide scintillator and a 12 cm phototube, counted with an automatic timer and scaler, and is printed out on a teletypewriter for predetermined counting intervals. The teletypewriter also punches a tape to provide computer-compatible readout

  5. Monitoring Biodiversity using Environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis

    DNA). Especially the advance in DNA sequencing technology has revolutionized this field and opened new frontiers in ecology, evolution and environmental sciences. Also, it is becoming a powerful tool for field biologist, with new and efficient methods for monitoring biodiversity. This thesis focuses on the use...... of eDNA in monitoring of biodiversity in different settings. First, it is shown that a diversity of rare freshwater animals – representing amphibians, fish, mammals, insects and crustaceans – can be detected based on eDNA obtained directly from 15 ml water samples of lakes, ponds and streams...... setting, showing that eDNA obtained directly from ½ l seawater samples can account for marine fish biodiversity using NGS. Promisingly, eDNA covered the fish diversity better than any of 9 methods, conventionally used in marine fish surveys. Additionally, it is shown that even short 100-bp. fish e...

  6. Conductometric Microbiosensors for Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei V. Dzyadevych

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the principles of conductometric measurements in ionic media and the equivalent electrical circuits of different designs for conductometric measurements. These types of measurements were first applied for monitoring biocatalytic reactions. The use of conductometric microtransducers is then presented and detailed in the case of pollutant detection for environmental monitoring. Conductometric biosensors have advantages over other types of transducers: they can be produced through inexpensive thinfilm standard technology, no reference electrode is needed and differential mode measurements allow cancellation of a lot of interferences. The specifications obtained for the detection of different pesticides, herbicides and heavy metal ions, based on enzyme inhibition, are presented as well as those obtained for the detection of formaldehyde, 4- chlorophenol, nitrate and proteins as markers of dissolved organic carbon based on enzymatic microbiosensors.

  7. Instrumentation for environmental monitoring: biomedical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    An update is presented to Volume four of the six-volume series devoted to a survey of instruments useful for measurements in biomedicine related to environmental research and monitoring. Results of the survey are given as descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. Methods of detection and analysis of gaseous organic pollutants and metals, including Ni and As are presented. Instrument techniques and notes are included on atomic spectrometry and uv and visible absorption instrumentation

  8. Environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulos, D.; Winter, M.

    1982-01-01

    Environmental monitoring adds to the control of emissions of radioactive substances from nuclear facilities. The radioactive substances released with the exhaust air and the liquid effluent result in impact levels in the immediate vicinity, which must be ascertained by measurement. Impact control serves for the quantitative assessment of man-made radioactivity in different media of relevant pathways and for the direct assessment of the radiation exposure of the public living in the vicinity. In this way, the radiation exposure of the environment, which can be calculated if the emission data and the meteorological diffusion parameters are known, is controlled directly. (orig./RW)

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2008-04-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  12. BIOSENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING: A REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosensors show the potential to complement laboratory-based analytical methods for environmental applications. Although biosensors for potential environmental-monitoring applications have been reported for a wide range of environmental pollutants, from a regulatory perspective, ...

  13. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Volume 15, No. 4: Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1995. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  14. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Volume 15, No. 4: Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1995. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

  15. Environmental Protection Department's well inventory (through the second quarter of 1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C.D.

    1991-10-01

    This report is an inventory of the wells contained in Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) documents since the startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and includes wells monitored by special request and SRS research wells. Wells listed in this inventory are monitoring wells unless otherwise indicated. The purpose of this report is as follows: To provide a historical record of the wells that EPD/EMS has monitored; to provide a document containing a list of wells that are currently in the EPD/EMS Groundwater Monitoring Program; and to provide pertinent information about all wells listed in EPD/EMS documents

  16. FY 1990 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office. Work plan and quarterly reports, first through fourth quarter reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-11-01

    This work includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies and site mitigation plans; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to state and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design activities. In addition to these, archaeological and other activities will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, derivative classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports not included in the requirements of the individual projects.

  17. Environmental radioactivity monitoring in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltezos, A.; Potiriadis, C.; Aravantinos, A.

    1997-01-01

    Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the national organization responsible for the environmental radioactivity measurements in Greece. In order to monitor the radioactivity, 12 stations were placed all over Greece. Each station is equipped with NaI detector, measuring daily the total gamma dose rates. After the Chernobyl experience many countries have installed dense automatic networks, for measuring environmental radioactivity and serving as an early warning systems. In Greece a small telemetric network of two stations was installed in Athens area as a pilot project. Each station consists of two GM detectors (for low and high dose rate respectively). Data are collected for every ten minutes sampling time. Regration time of one hour is obtained. In case of level one and level two alarm states, the sampling time intervals are ten and one minutes respectively. The measurements are obtained by the above stations using the lines of the telephone network, and stored in the central station. Financial support to upgrade the existing telemetric system was assured by the addition of 25 new telemetric stations which will cover madly the northern part bordering to other states with nuclear power plants.In order to complete the network, we plan to add more stations to measure the gamma dose rates spread all over Greece, and also monitor river water. (authors)

  18. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  19. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Quarterly report, September--November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates); Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates

  20. Environmental monitoring system with TLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguerre, L.; Carelli, J.; Gregori, B.

    2006-01-01

    Presently work the methodology used by the Laboratory of Thermoluminescent Dosimetry (TLD) of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (RNA) to gauge it system of environmental monitoring in function of the media absorbed dose rate in free air and the environmental dose equivalent, H * (10), according to the recommendation ICRU Report 47 is described. It was studied the response of the environmental dosemeter (DA) in fields of photonic radiation of energies W60, Wl 10, W200 and 137 Cs. The irradiations were carried out following the recommendations of the standard ISO:4037. It was analyzed the response in the DA of the detectors LiF: Mg, Ti and CaF 2 : Dy for the different radiation qualities and the relative response at 137 Cs of both. The methodology used in the evaluation of the dose includes: the correction of the readings of both detectors by fading, gotten experimentally, the witness of transfers, the energy answer and the value of the zero. The dose is calculated applying the average pondered in uncertainty of the dose obtained for each type of detector. Its were analyzed and calculated the uncertainties that affect to the measurement following the recommendation of the Argentine standard IRAM 35050. The detection limit of the absorbed dose rate in free air of this system it is 3.5 n Gy/h for a period of sampling of 3 months. With this detection limit environmental dose equivalent rates of the order of 70 n Sv/h are measured with an expanded uncertainty of the order of 10% with a cover factor k = 2. (Author)

  1. Environmental Protection Department's well inventory (through the second quarter of 1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report is an inventory of the wells recorded in Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) documents since the startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and includes wells monitored by special request and SRS research wells. The purpose of this report is as follows: to provide a historical record of the wells that EPD/EMS has monitored; to provide a document containing a list of wells that are currently in the EPD/EMS Groundwater Monitoring Program; to provide pertinent information about all wells listed in EPD/EMS documents

  2. Environmental Protection Department`s well inventory (through the second quarter of 1993)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report is an inventory of the wells recorded in Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) documents since the startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and includes wells monitored by special request and SRS research wells. The purpose of this report is as follows: to provide a historical record of the wells that EPD/EMS has monitored; to provide a document containing a list of wells that are currently in the EPD/EMS Groundwater Monitoring Program; to provide pertinent information about all wells listed in EPD/EMS documents.

  3. Concept for integrated environmental monitoring. Scientific approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, W [comp.; Schoenthaler, K; Kerner, H F; Koeppel, J; Spandau, L

    1998-09-01

    Despite considerable expenditures for environmental protection and intensified efforts in the areas of environmental research and monitoring, environmental damage increasingly occurs, sometimes with global effects, largely due to the lack of early diagnosis. In the past few years various institutions have therefore demanded improvements in environmental monitoring. The Council of Experts on Environmental Issues (`Rat von Sachverstaendigen fuer Umweltfragen`, SRU), in particular, in its `Environmental Report` of 1987 and in its Special Report on `General Ecological Environmental Monitoring` (1990) presented far-reaching demands for a nationwide ecological early warning system which should integrate the various local, regional, national, and even global monitoring levels, and which should encompass an environmental monitoring of entire ecosystems at representative locations. This is aimed at creating the prerequisites for - detection of long-term gradual environmental change, - confirmation of refutation of initial assumptions regarding the causes of these environmental changes, - permitting decisions on preventive actions to stabilize or improve environmental conditions and - making it possible to assess the success of environmental protection policies. This report includes an abbreviated version and documentation of the conference on the `Concept for Integrated Environmental Monitoring` and the final report `Specification of the Concept for Integrated Environmental Monitoring from the Perspective of Nature Conservation`. (orig.)

  4. Microalgae as embedded environmental monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogburn, Zachary L.; Vogt, Frank

    2017-01-01

    In marine ecosystems, microalgae are an important component as they transform large quantities of inorganic compounds into biomass and thereby impact environmental chemistry. Of particular relevance is phytoplankton's sequestration of atmospheric CO 2 , a greenhouse gas, and nitrate, one cause of harmful algae blooms. On the other hand, microalgae sensitively respond to changes in their chemical environment, which initiates an adaptation of their chemical composition. Analytical methodologies were developed in this study that utilize microalgae's adaptation as a novel approach for in-situ environmental monitoring. Longterm applications of these novel methods are investigations of environmental impacts on phytoplankton's sequestration performance and their nutritional value to higher organisms feeding on them. In order to analyze the chemical composition of live microalgae cells (Nannochloropsis oculata), FTIR-ATR spectroscopy has been employed. From time series of IR spectra, the formation of bio-sediment can be monitored and it has been shown that the nutrient availability has a small but observable impact. Since this bio-sediment formation is governed by several biological parameters of the cells such as growth rate, size, buoyancy, number of cells, etc., this enables studies of chemical environment's impact on biomass formation and the cells' physical parameters. Moreover, the spectroscopic signature of these microalgae has been determined from cultures grown under 25 different CO 2 and NO 3 − mixtures (200 ppm-600 ppm CO 2 , 0.35 mM-0.75 mM NO 3 − ). A novel, nonlinear modeling methodology coined ‘Predictor Surfaces’ is being presented by means of which the nonlinear responses of the cells to their chemical environment could reliably be described. This approach has been utilized to measure the CO 2 concentration in the atmosphere over the phytoplankton culture as well as the nitrate concentration dissolved in their growing

  5. Microalgae as embedded environmental monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogburn, Zachary L.; Vogt, Frank, E-mail: fvogt@utk.edu

    2017-02-15

    In marine ecosystems, microalgae are an important component as they transform large quantities of inorganic compounds into biomass and thereby impact environmental chemistry. Of particular relevance is phytoplankton's sequestration of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, a greenhouse gas, and nitrate, one cause of harmful algae blooms. On the other hand, microalgae sensitively respond to changes in their chemical environment, which initiates an adaptation of their chemical composition. Analytical methodologies were developed in this study that utilize microalgae's adaptation as a novel approach for in-situ environmental monitoring. Longterm applications of these novel methods are investigations of environmental impacts on phytoplankton's sequestration performance and their nutritional value to higher organisms feeding on them. In order to analyze the chemical composition of live microalgae cells (Nannochloropsis oculata), FTIR-ATR spectroscopy has been employed. From time series of IR spectra, the formation of bio-sediment can be monitored and it has been shown that the nutrient availability has a small but observable impact. Since this bio-sediment formation is governed by several biological parameters of the cells such as growth rate, size, buoyancy, number of cells, etc., this enables studies of chemical environment's impact on biomass formation and the cells' physical parameters. Moreover, the spectroscopic signature of these microalgae has been determined from cultures grown under 25 different CO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup −} mixtures (200 ppm-600 ppm CO{sub 2}, 0.35 mM-0.75 mM NO{sub 3}{sup −}). A novel, nonlinear modeling methodology coined ‘Predictor Surfaces’ is being presented by means of which the nonlinear responses of the cells to their chemical environment could reliably be described. This approach has been utilized to measure the CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere over the phytoplankton culture as well as the nitrate

  6. Annual environmental monitoring report, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, L.D.; Cantelow, H.

    1975-04-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a large multi-disciplinary research institute, is located in the hills above the University of California and the City of Berkeley. Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Chemistry research are the main contributors to the environmental radiation. In order to pursue this research effort, large particle accelerators have been built and are operated almost continuously. Other research may also involve the use of radioisotopes. These research activities result in a small but finite population dose to the general population which works or resides in the area surrounding the Laboratory. The annual maximum permissible dose equivalent (MPD) for members of the general population is recommended to be 500 mrem, however, Laboratory policy is to keep the population exposure as low as practicable at all times. In order to assure that this is done, several environmental monitoring stations are maintained which continuously telemeter radiation information to a central location. This information is presented here along with studies of the population distribution, in order to provide a total man-rem estimate. Using the data in this report the population dose due to laboratory operation ranges from 0.4 percent to 5.7 percent of the MPD. (U.S.)

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not

  8. M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report, First quarter 1995, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This report, in three volumes, describes the ground water monitoring and c corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the fourth quarter 1994 and first quarter 1995. Concise description of the program and considerable data documenting the monitoring and remedial activities are included in the document. This is Volume 1 covering the following topics: sampling and results; hydrogeologic assessment; water quality assessment; effectiveness of the corrective-action program; corrective-action system operation and performance; monitoring and corrective-action program assessment; proposed monitoring and corrective-action program modifications. Also included are the following appendicies: A-standards; B-flagging criteria; C-figures; D-monitoring results tables; E-data quality/usability assessment

  9. Program of environmental and bio monitoring sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, H.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about the importance of the biological signs to determine the environmental features characteristics.The low level of taxonomic resolution and the environmental perturbation is determined by the bio monitoring techniques

  10. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program second quarter 1999 (April through June 1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-12-16

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by Savannah River Site during first quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  11. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program First Quarter 2000 (January through March 2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukes, M.

    2000-11-16

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during first quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  12. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program Third Quarter 2000 (July through September 2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukes, M.D.

    2001-05-02

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during third quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  13. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program Second Quarter 2000 (April through June 2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukes, M.D.

    2001-04-17

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during second quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  14. Monitoring Activities Review action report for the Environmental Monitoring Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Wright, K.C.

    1990-12-01

    To improve program planning and to provide bases for technical improvement of the monitoring program, the EG ampersand G Environmental Monitoring (EM) organization has regularly used the Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) process since 1982. Each MAR is conducted by a committee of individuals selected for their experience in the various types of monitoring performed by the EM organization. An MAR of the Environmental Monitoring Program was conducted in 1988. This action report identifies and discusses the recommendations of this MAR committee. This action report also identifies the actions already taken by the EM Unit in response to these recommendations, as well as the actions and schedules to be taken. 10 refs

  15. 1988 Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) of the environmental monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The EGandG Idaho Environmental Monitoring (EM) Unit is responsible for coordinating and conducting environmental measurements of radioactive and hazardous contaminants around facilities operated by EGandG Idaho. The EM Unit has several broad program objectives, which include complying with regulatory standards and developing a basis for estimating future impacts of operations at EGandG Idaho facilities. To improve program planning and to provide bases for technical improvement of the monitoring program, the EGandG Environmental Monitoring organization has regularly used the Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) process since 1982. Each MAR is conducted by a committee of individuals selected for their experience in the various types of monitoring performed by the EM organization. Previous MAR studies have focused on procedures for all currently monitored media except biota. Biotic monitoring was initiated following the last MAR. This report focuses on all currently monitored media, and includes the first review of biotic monitoring. The review of biotic monitoring has been conducted at a level of detail consistent with initial MAR reports for other parts of the Waste Management Program Facilities Environmental Monitoring Program. The review of the biotic monitoring activities is presented in Section 5.5 of this report. 21 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Regional Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program Data (REMAP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regional Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (REMAP) was initiated to test the applicability of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program...

  17. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement quarterly report for the Environmental Restoration Program, Volume 1, October--December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program which are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The reporting period covered is October through December 1992(first quarter of FY 1993). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been formally approved as FY 1993 commitments. This first section is followed by: significant accomplishments; technical status at Y-12 operable units, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge K-25 site, Clinch River, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and technical oversight and technical programs; and response action contractor assignments

  18. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    protect the environment, it is imperative to conduct environmental impact assessment ... Ethiopia enacted the Environmental Impact Assessment Proclamation in 2002 ... flora, fauna, soil, air, water, climate, natural or cultural heritage, other.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordstrom, Jenifer [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This plan provides a high-level summary of environmental monitoring performed by various organizations within and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Guide DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, and in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The purpose of these orders is to 1) implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations, and 2) to establish standards and requirements for the operations of DOE and DOE contractors with respect to protection of the environment and members of the public against undue risk from radiation. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL Site, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. Detailed monitoring procedures, program plans, or other governing documents used by contractors or agencies to implement requirements are referenced in this plan. This plan covers all planned monitoring and environmental surveillance. Non-routine activities such as special research studies and characterization of individual sites for environmental restoration are outside the scope of this plan.

  1. Steps in formulating an environmental monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This section describes the process of establishing a complete equipment environmental monitoring program; the step by step process is also illustrated in Table 3 of the Summary. The following decisions must be made in defining the program: an initial characterization of plant environment, how to integrate with existing programs to realize the maximum benefits, identification of the specific monitoring locations, determining the monitoring techniques, frequency of recording data, monitoring duration, quality assurance requirements, and finally, establishing the recordkeeping requirements

  2. Elimination of quarterly urinalysis of radiation workers based on detection capability of portal monitors for internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanuja, Jayalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Covidien is a radiopharmaceutical manufacturing company in Missouri, USA. The facility produces radionuclides for diagnostic and therapeutic use. The radionuclides of interest, 123 I, 67 Ga, 99 Mo, 99m Tc, 201 Tl, 111 In, and 131 I are fairly short lived with the exception of 51 Cr. The operating license document for the company mandated quarterly urinalysis (bioassay) of all radiation workers in the facility. This was labor intensive and did not enhance the quality of radiation protection program. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) required a technical basis to prove that there was no compromise in the radiological safety and accurate dose assessment in the event of internal contamination of radiation workers if quarterly urinalysis was discontinued. Measurements in a phantom, gamma spectroscopy analysis, as well as calculations showed that there was no need to perform quarterly urinalysis and that portal monitors and other radiological controls were sufficient to detect any chronic or acute intake of radioactivity by radiation workers. Technical evaluation showed Portal monitors can detect an Effective Dose Equivalent of 0.1 mSv (10 mrem) in a year. NRC allowed revision of operating license document and operating procedures to discontinue quarterly urinalysis. (author)

  3. Environmental monitoring in Finland 2006-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, J.

    2006-01-01

    This publication presents environmental monitoring carried out in Finland in 2006-2008. It is a summary of the environmental monitoring activities of the following national institutes: Geological Survey of Finland, Finnish Meteorological Institute, National Public Health Institute, Plant Production Inspection Centre, Finnish Museum of Natural History, Agrifood Research Finland, Finnish Institute of Marine Research, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Information Centre of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, Statistics Finland, Finnish Environment Institute, and Regional Environment Centres. Monitoring of natural resources, environmental pressures, state of the environment, water and health, land use and environmental policy are presented. The objective was to compile the information on national environmental monitoring and to activate information exchange and cooperation in this field. (orig.)

  4. Centralized environmental radiation monitoring system in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hideo

    1993-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has continued the radiation background survey and environmental radiation monitoring to ensure the safety of the residents around the Institute. For the monitoring of β and γ radiations and α and β radioactivities in air, the centralized automatic environmental radiation monitoring system (EMS) applying a computer with monitoring stations (MS) was established. The system has been renewed twice in 1973 and 1988. In 1962, a new concept emergency environmental γ-ray monitoring system (MP) was begun to construct and completed in 1965 independent of EMS. The first renewal of the EMS was carried out by focusing on the rapid and synthetic judgement and estimation of the environmental impacts caused by radiation and radioactive materials due to the operation of nuclear facilities by centralizing the data measured at MS, MP, a meteorological station, stack monitors and drainage monitoring stations under the control of computer. Present system renewed in 1988 was designed to prevent the interruption of monitoring due to computer troubles, communication troubles and power failures especially an instant voltage drop caused by thunder by reflecting the experiences through the operation and maintenance of the former system. Dual telemeters whose power is constantly supplied via batteries (capable of 10 min. monitoring after power failure) are equipped in the monitoring center to cope with telemeter troubles, which has operated successfully without any suspension being attributable to the power failures and telemeter troubles. (J.P.N.)

  5. Environmental gamma radiation monitoring at Visakhapatnam using thermoluminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarnkar, M.; Sahu, S.K.; Takale, R.A.; Shetty, P.G.; Pundit, G.G.; Puranik, V.D.

    2012-01-01

    The gamma rays are the most significant part of environmental dose due to its large range and deep penetrating power. The environmental gamma radiation is mainly originated from two sources natural radiation and artificially produced radiation. The natural radiation dose arises from the cosmic radiation (galactic and solar) and from the Earth (terrestrial) surface. In the last few decades there is a growing concern all over the world about radiation and their exposure to population. Thus it is necessary to conduct radiological environmental surveillance. The radiation survey data are useful to establish the natural background gamma radiation levels. Extensive gamma radiation survey was carried out around the surroundings of Vishakhapatnam using Thermoluminescence Dosimeters (TLDs). The CaSO 4 :(0.2 mole %) Dy Teflon TLD discs, specifically designed for environmental gamma radiation monitoring purpose were used. These TLD badge are having very high TL sensitivity, a negligible fading rate and a stable TL response. TLDs were deployed on quarterly basis for two years to obtain the cumulative gamma background radiation levels in the study area. The radiological survey was also carried out by using a calibrated radiation survey meter. The annual dose rates were computed from quarterly values actually found and normalised to 365 days. The environmental gamma radiation levels around Vishakhapatnam were found to be in the range of 0.79 mGy/y to 1.86 mGy/y. It is clearly seen from the results that location to location there is a large variation in external gamma radiation levels. During the cycle of the TLD survey, spot readings of the background radiation levels were taken, both while placing the TLDs and while removing them. The instantaneous dose rates measured using survey meter, are also following the large variation as found in TLDs. It varies between 110 nGy/hr to 210 nGy/hr. (author)

  6. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY85 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. All of the tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), has a full year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the RF Test Facility were in operation. The phased approach to TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the establishment of locations for off-site monitoring. An environmental committee established in December 1984 reviewed items of environmental importance. During CY85 no adverse effects to the environmental resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations

  7. Environmental monitoring by means of remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilen-Willige, B.

    1993-01-01

    Aircraft and satellite aerial photographs represent indispensible tools for environmental observation today. They contribute to a systematic inventory of important environmental parameters such as climate, vegetation or surface water. Their great importance lies in the continuous monitoring of large regions so that changes in environmental conditions are quickly detected. This book provides an overview of the capabilities of remote sensing in environmental monitoring and in the recognition of environmental problems as well as of the usefulness of remote sensing data for environmental planning. Also addressed is the role of remote sensing in the monitoring of natural hazards such as earthquakes and volcano eruptions as well as problems of remote sensing technology transfer to developing countries. (orig.) [de

  8. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY84 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a complete year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak was in operation and the RF Test Facility came on-line. The phased approach of TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the addition of neutron monitors. During CY84 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations

  9. Environmental Radiation Data: report 55, July-September 1988. Quarterly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    Environmental Radiation Data (ERD) contains data from the Environmental Radiation Ambients Monitoring System (ERAMS). Data from similar networks operated by contributing States, Canada, Mexico, and the Pan American Health Organization are reported in the ERD when available. The ERAMS is comprised of nationwide sampling stations that provide air, surface and drinking water and milk samples from which environmental radiation levels are derived. Sampling locations are selected to provide optimal population coverage while functioning to monitor fallout from nuclear devices and other forms of radioactive contamination of the environment. The radiation analyses performed on these samples include gross alpha and gross beta levels, gamma analyses for fission products, and specific analyses for uranium, plutonium, strontium, iodine, radium, krypton, and tritium

  10. Environmental monitoring of Chinook Salmon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.; Boreham, D.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of monitoring plants and animals in the environment as become increasingly important with recent developments over the past few years. New ICRP recommendations, coming into effect summer 2007, require the monitoring of non-human biota. There is increasing public concern for safety and general well-being of plants and animals near nuclear reactors and other nuclear facilities. However, most current monitoring techniques do not adequately address this concern. I will discuss several current biological techniques to address the radiation sensitivity animals in the environment, including their advantages and drawbacks. Our research has examined several aquatic animals to determine their sensitivity to radiation. (author)

  11. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 1, Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement Quarterly Report for the Environmental Restoration Program was prepared to satisfy requirements for progress reporting on Environmental Restoration Program (ER) activities as specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The reporting period covered in this document is October through December 1995. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.2.3.04 (Activity Data Sheet 8304). Publication of this document meets two FFA milestones. The FFA Quarterly Report meets an FFA milestone defined as 30 days following the end of the applicable reporting period. Appendix A of this report meets the FFA milestone for the Annual Removal Action Report for the period FYs 1991--95. This document provides information about ER Program activities conducted on the Oak Ridge Reservation under the FFA. Specifically, it includes information on milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period, as well as scheduled for completion during the next reporting period (quarter); accomplishments of the ER Program; concerns related to program work; and scheduled activities for the next quarter. It also provides a listing of the identity and assigned tasks of contractors performing ER Program work under the FFA.

  12. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Geun Sik and others

    2001-02-01

    Environmental Radiation Monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment. Radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor are the follows : The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost same level compared with the past years. Gross {alpha}, {beta} radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. {gamma}-radionuclides in water samples were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul Research Reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by {gamma}-spectrometry.

  13. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Young Ho

    2000-02-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor are the follows: The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost some level compared with the past years. Gross α, β radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. γ-radionuclides in water sample were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul Research Reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by γ-spectrometry. (author)

  14. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Young Ho

    2000-02-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor are the follows: The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost some level compared with the past years. Gross {alpha}, {beta} radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. {gamma}-radionuclides in water sample were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul Research Reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by {gamma}-spectrometry. (author)

  15. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Young Ho; Lee, M.H. [and others

    1999-02-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul research reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul research reactor are the follows : The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost same level compared with the past years. Gross {alpha}, {beta} radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. {gamma}-radionuclides in water samples were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul research reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by {gamma}-spectrometry. (author). 3 refs., 50 tabs., 12 figs.

  16. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Geun Sik and others

    2001-02-01

    Environmental Radiation Monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment. Radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor are the follows : The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost same level compared with the past years. Gross α, β radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. γ-radionuclides in water samples were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul Research Reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by γ-spectrometry

  17. Environmental radiation monitoring around the research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Lee, Hyun Duk; Kim, Sam Rang; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jeong Moo; Lee, Myeon Joo; Lee, Myeong Ho; Hong, Kwang Hee; Lim, Moon Ho; Lee, Won Yoon; Park, Do Won; Choi, Sang Do

    1993-04-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring was carried out measurement of environmental radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul research reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul research reactor are the follows : The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost same level compared with the past years. Gross α, β radioactivity in environmental sample was not found abnormal data. γ-radionuclides in water samples were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul research reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by γ-spectrometry. (Author)

  18. Environmental radioactivity monitoring in Republic of Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksic, J.; Radenkovic, M.; Tanaskovic, I.; Vujovic, M.; Vuletic

    2011-01-01

    According to environmental radioactivity monitoring programme continuous measurements of radioactivity in different samples are performed. Measurements are performed in aerosol samples, fallout, soil, surface waters, drinking water, food of animal and plant origin, milk and feeding stuffs. [sr

  19. Instrumentation for environmental monitoring in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, N.M.; Graven, R.M.; Budnitz, R.J.; Mack, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    A brief review of the status of instrumentation for monitoring environmental pollutants is given. Pollutants are divided into six broad categories: trace elements, pesticides and herbicides, ionizing radiation and radionuclides, asbestos and other microparticulates, and gaseous pollutants. (U.S.)

  20. Manual on environmental monitoring in normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Many establishments handling radioactive materials produce, and to some extent also discharge, radioactive waste as part of their normal operation. The radiation doses to which members of the public may be exposed during such operation must remain below the stipulated level. The purpose of this manual is to provide technical guidance for setting up programmes of routine environmental monitoring in the vicinity of nuclear establishment. The annex gives five examples of routine environmental monitoring programmes currently in use: these have been indexed separately.

  1. Development of a real-time monitor for airborne alpha emissions. First quarter report, TTP AL 142003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritzo, R.E.; Fowler, M.M.

    1994-02-01

    This is the first quarterly report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 for TTP AL 142003, Development of a Real-Time Monitor for Airborne Alpha Emissions. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is developing a new technology for on-line, real-time monitoring of incinerator stacks for low levels of airborne alpha activity. While initially developed for incinerators, this new technology may well find other applications in continuous air monitoring, process monitoring, and monitoring during remediation activities. Referred to as the Large-Volume Flow Thru Detector System (LVFTDS), this technology responds directly to the need for fast responding, high sensitivity effluent monitoring systems. With DOE EM-50 funding, LANL has fabricated a bench-top proof of concept detector system and is conducting tests to evaluate its performance. A second- generation prototype is being designed, based on requirements driven by potential field test sites. An industrial partner is being solicited to license the technology. Field trials of a full-scale detector system are planned for FY 95. Accomplishments during the first quarter of FY 94 are chronicled in this report, including budgetary data. A schedule for the remainder of the fiscal year is also provided.

  2. Environmental monitoring master sampling schedule: January--December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of the Hanford Site is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for calendar year 1989 for the Surface and Ground-Water Environmental Monitoring Projects. This schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operations, program requirements, and the nature of the observed results. Operational limitations such as weather, mechanical failures, sample availability, etc., may also require schedule modifications. Changes will be documented in the respective project files, but this plan will not be reissued. This schedule includes routine ground-water sampling performed by PNL for Westinghouse Hanford Company, but does not include samples that may be collected in 1989 to support special studies or special contractor projects, or for quality control. The sampling schedule for Site-wide chemical monitoring is not included here, because it varies each quarter as needed, based on past results and operating needs. This schedule does not include Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water sampling performed by PNL for Hanford Site contractors, nor does it include sampling that may be done by other DOE Hanford contractors

  3. Environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO2. First quarterly report, September 1--September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tester, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is divided into five sections (corresponding to five tasks) which all must be considered in order to determine the ultimate environmental impact of ocean disposal of CO 2 . The sections are: ambient physical and chemical properties of the ocean; CO 2 loadings (i.e. quantities and purities of CO 2 ) produced using different capture technologies; methods of CO 2 transport and injection, and their associated physical/chemical perturbations; environmental impacts for the scenarios outlined in section the previous section; and other considerations including legal issues, public perception, and monitoring requirements

  4. Pinellas Plant environmental monitoring report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs maintained by the Pinellas Plant are designed to determine the efficiencies of treatment and control mechanisms for environmental releases; to provide measurements of discharge concentrations for comparison with applicable standards; and to assess the concentrations of these discharges in the on-site and off-site environment

  5. Improving ecological response monitoring of environmental flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison J; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D; Nielsen, Daryl L; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  6. Improving Ecological Response Monitoring of Environmental Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison J.; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D.; Nielsen, Daryl L.; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  7. Centralized environmental radiation monitoring system in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, H.; Kobalyashi, H.

    1993-01-01

    JAERI has continued the environmental radiation background survey and monitoring to ensure the safety of the peoples around the institute since one year before the first criticality of JRR-1 (Japan Research Reactor No.1) in August 1957. Air absorbed doses from β and γ radiation, α and β radioactivity in air and the radioactivities in environmental samples were the monitoring items. For the monitoring of β and γ radiation and α and β radioactivity in air, monitoring station and the centralized automatic environmental radiation monitoring system applying a computer were established as a new challenging monitoring system for nuclear facility, which was the first one not only in Japan but also in the would in 1960 and since then the system has been renewed two times (in 1973 and 1988) by introducing the latest technology in the fields of radiation detection and computer control at each stage. Present system renewed in 1988 was designed to prevent the interruption of monitoring due to computer troubles, communication troubles and power failures especially an instant voltage drop arisen from thunder by reflecting the experiences through the operation and maintenance of the former system. Dual telemeters whose power is constantly supplied via batteries (capable of 10 min monitoring after power failure) are equipped in the monitoring center to cope with telemeter troubles, which has operated successfully without any suspension being attributable to the power failures and telemeter troubles

  8. Application of radiophotoluminescence dosemeters for environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, A.; Tamura, T.; Mochizuki, T.; Numakunai, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Ohi, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Feasibility study has been made on the radiofluorescence glass (RPL) dosemeters for environmental radiation monitoring. Main items in the laboratory tests are batch uniformities of pre-dose and sensitivity, build-up characteristics of RPL intensity, energy and angular responses, stabilities for RPL reading, anneal cycling and climatic conditional changes. We have determined self-irradiation dose and cosmic ray contribution. Radiation monitoring field test for the RPL dosemeters has been conducted in comparison with the present TLD systems. A procedure manual for the environmental monitoring by the use of RPL dosemeters is in preparation

  9. Radiological assessments, environmental monitoring, and study design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.R.; Elle, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Studies of the behavior of transuranic elements in the environment form the basic data for applied programs in radiological assessment, environmental monitoring, derivation of radiation-protection standards, and environmental impact statements. This chapter introduces some of the major information requirements of these applications of transuranic research data. Characteristics of the source terms from nuclear activities usually are needed for an analysis of environmental pathways or deployment of monitoring systems. Major inhalation and ingestion pathways are considered in assessments of hazards from transuranics and are discussed from the viewpoint of research needed

  10. Environmental monitoring at Hanford for 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    Environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site is conducted by the Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division, as part of its contract to operate the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy. The data collected provide a historical record of the levels of radionuclides and radiation attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford operations. Data are also collected to monitor the status of chemical materials on the Site and in the Columbia River. This report represents a single, comprehensive source of environmental monitoring data collected during 1986 by PNL's Environmental monitoring Group in the offsite and onsite environments. Appendix A contains data and data summaries for results obtained during 1986 that include statistical estimates of variation. Information in Appendix A is intended for readers with a scientific interest or for those who wish to evaluate results in a manner not included here. 71 refs., 66 figs., 17 tabs

  11. Microbial biosensors for environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David VOGRINC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are analytical devices capable of sensing substances in the environment due to the specific biological reaction of the microorganism or its parts. Construction of a microbial biosensor requires knowledge of microbial response to the specific analyte. Linking this response with the quantitative data, using a transducer, is the crucial step in the construction of a biosensor. Regarding the transducer type, biosensors are divided into electrochemical, optical biosensors and microbial fuel cells. The use of the proper configuration depends on the selection of the biosensing element. With the use of transgenic E. coli strains, bioluminescence or fluorescence based biosensors were developed. Microbial fuel cells enable the use of the heterogeneous microbial populations, isolated from wastewater. Different microorganisms are used for different pollutants – pesticides, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, organic waste, etc. Biosensing enables measurement of their concentration and their toxic or genotoxic effects on the microbes. Increasing environmental awareness has contributed to the increase of interest for biomonitoring. Although technologies, such as bioinformatics and genetic engineering, allow us to design complex and efficient microbial biosensors for environmental pollutants, the transfer of the laboratory work to the field still remains a problem to solve.

  12. Environmental monitoring of molecular tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimasa, M.; Ichimasa, Y.; Akita, Y. (Ibaraki Univ., Mito (Japan). Faculty of Science); Suzuki, M.; Obayashi, H.; Sakuma, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The oxidation of atmospheric molecular tritium (HT) in vegetation was determined by in vitro experiments for various kinds of woody and herbaceous plant leaves, mosses and lichens taken from a forest and a garden in Ibaraki prefecture and a forest in Gifu prefecture, and comparison of the HT oxidation activity in vegetation was made with those in its neighboring surface soil (0-5cm in depth). The oxidation of HT in woody plant leaves was extremely low, only about 1/10000-1/1000 that in the surface soil as well as herbaceous plant leaves with some exception, whereas HT oxidation in mosses and lichens was 50-500 times that in pine needles. These results suggest the usefulness of mosses and lichens as monitor vegetation for accidental release of HT into the environment. (author).

  13. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2005-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Emmy L.; Loosz, Tom; Ferris, John M.; Harrison, Jennifer J.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the results of ANSTO's environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) sites, from July 2005 to June 2006. Estimated effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially affected by routine airborne emissions from the LHSTC were less than 0.005 mSv/year. The maximum potential dose was 23% of the ANSTO ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv/year, much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv/year that is recommended by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). The effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially exposed to routine liquid effluent releases from the LHSTC have been realistically estimated as a quarter (or less) of the estimated doses to the critical group for airborne releases. The median tritium concentrations detected in groundwater and surface waters at the LHSTC were typically less than 2% of those set out in the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. The airborne emissions from the NMC were below the ARPANSA-approved notification levels. Results of environmental monitoring at both ANSTO sites confirm that the facilities continue to be operated well within regulatory limits. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose of -1.5 mSv/year experienced by members of the Australian public

  14. Full spectrum analysis in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Sascha; Hartmann, Soeren; Pimpl, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In the environmental monitoring spectroscopic gamma detectors are frequently used. The motivation to use spectroscopic gamma detectors is the higher sensitivity and specific spectral information. For the analysis often the photo peaks of the gamma spectrum are used to identify the nuclide. These methods are very reliable, robust and well developed but using only the photo peak means also to use only a fraction of the available information. Doing a full spectrum analysis based on principle components obtained from NASVD for description of the radiation background and adjustment calculations are a possible analysis method which may provide advantages compared to a peak based analysis when used for a continuous environmental monitoring. An analysis example is shown and discussed with a measured time series of gamma spectra obtained from a spectroscopic gamma detector SARA IGS710 with a NaI(Tl) scintillator as it is used in the environmental monitoring.

  15. Full spectrum analysis in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinahrdt, S.; Hartmann, S.; Pimpl, R.

    2014-01-01

    In the environmental monitoring spectroscopic gamma detectors are frequently used. The motivation to use spectroscopic gamma detectors is the higher sensitivity and specific spectral information. For the analysis often the photo peaks of the gamma spectrum are used to identify the nuclide. These methods are very reliable, robust and well developed but using only the photo peak means also to use only a fraction of the available information. Doing a full spectrum analysis based on principal components obtained from NASVD for description of the radiation background and adjustment calculations are a possible analysis method, which may provide advantages compared to a peak based analysis when used for a continuous environmental monitoring. An analysis example is shown and discussed with a measured time series of gamma spectra obtained from a spectroscopic gamma detector SARA IGS710 with a NaI(Tl) scintillator as it is used in the environmental monitoring. (authors)

  16. Integrated environmental monitoring and information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The concept of the environmental monitoring within the territory of the Slovak Republic and the concept of the integrated environmental information system of the Slovak Republic were accepted and confirmed by the Government Order No. 449/1992. The state monitoring system covering the whole territory of Slovakia is the most important and consists of 13 Partial Monitoring Systems (PMSs). List of PMSs is included. The listed PMSs are managed according to the concept of the Sectoral Information System (SIS) of the Ministry of the Environment of the Slovak Republic (MESR) which was established by the National Council Act No. 261/1995 Coll. on the SIS. The SIS consists of 18 subsystems which are listed. The overviews of budget of PMSs as well as of environmental publications and periodicals of the MESR are included

  17. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1983-04-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY82 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Since this is PPPL's first official annual report and programs are in initial phases, a part of the report deals with program expansion for the coming years. A phased approach has been planned to assure the proper level of monitoring to coincide with the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) program

  18. Environmental monitoring with a portable TLD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, P P; Feher, I; Deme, S; Szabo, B; Vagvoelgyi, J; German, E [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest. Central Research Inst. for Physics

    1984-01-01

    Two types of TLD systems are used for environmental dose monitoring. One is based on an NHZ-203 laboratory TLD reader and CaSO/sub 4/:Dy powder. The other is based on CaSO/sub 4/:Tm bulbs and a small, portable TLD reader built into a cross-country car and operated by means of the car battery. The laboratory TLD system has been used for many years for environmental monitoring and it has been tested and proved satisfactory at international intercomparisons for environmental dosemeters. The new portable TLD system has the advantage of being able to establish the dose in a few minutes at the environmental station. The transport dose is omitted as the TLDs are evaluated at the field site. The evaluation of a bulb needs only a few minutes and the measured dose value can be reported back by radio - an important aspect during an emergency situation.

  19. Annual report on global environmental monitoring - 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In recent decades, scientific evidence from long-term monitoring has revealed the creeping destruction of ecosystems upon which human existence depends. Recognition of this destruction is changing the international policies used to manage our planet. Vast quantities of information regarding the status of the global environment is necessary in order to achieve a solid consensus among nations for environmental policies. To detect global change early, systematic monitoring with coverage of the entire surface of the earth should be implemented under close coordination among countries and researchers from different disciplines. The resulting precise and accurate measurements should be integrated in a timely fashion into an internationally coordinated database which will be available to the decision makers. In view of this concept, the Center for Global Environmental Research was established in 1990 and started work on monitoring, data management, modeling and their integration. CGER's field of monitoring covers the stratosphere, troposphere, fresh water, marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Groups of researchers are organized to design and conduct the monitoring. After intensive examination by these researchers, the resulting data are compiled into this report to be used in academic society as well as to serve decision makers. In 1993 two series of monitoring data reached this stage of publishing. This report contains the results of the Ozone Lidar Monitoring Program and the Japan-Korea Marine Biogeochemical Monitoring Program. The Center for Global Environmental Research very much appreciates both the research staff of these programs for their long-term and patient measurements and the advisory members for their valuable recommendations to the staffs. Those researchers who wish to examine and utilize the raw or primary data are strongly encouraged to contact the Monitoring Section of the center

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse Electric Company Waste Isolation Division

    1999-01-01

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program Requirements (DOE, 1990a), requires each DOE facility to prepare an EMP. This document is prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (DOE, 1990b); Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 834, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (Draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1 (DOE, 1995), which is the driver for the Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP project is operated by Westinghouse Electric Company, Waste Isolation Division (WID), for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of the WIPP's effluent and environmental monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses the WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE, 1991). This document references DOE orders and other federal and state regulations affecting environmental monitoring programs at the site. WIPP procedures, which implement

  1. Environmental monitoring handbook for coal conversion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salk, M.S.; DeCicco, S.G. (eds.)

    1978-05-01

    The primary objectives of the Department of Energy's (DOE) coal conversion program are to demonstrate the environmental acceptability, technical feasibility, and economic viability of various technologies for gaseous, liquid, and solid fuels from coal. The Environmental Monitoring Handbook for Coal Conversion Facilities will help accomplish the objective of environmental acceptability by guiding the planning and execution of socioeconomic and environmental monitoring programs for demonstration facilities. These programs will provide information adequate to (1) predict, insofar as is possible, the potential impacts of construction and operation of a coal conversion plant, (2) verify the occurrence of these or any other impacts during construction and operation, (3) determine the adequacy of mitigating measures to protect the environment, (4) develop effluent source terms for process discharges, and (5) determine the effectiveness of pollution control equipment. Although useful in a variety of areas, the handbook is intended primarily for contractors who, as industrial partners with DOE, are building coal conversion plants. For the contractor it is a practical guide on (1) the methodology for developing site- and process-specific environmental monitoring programs, (2) state-of-the-art sampling and analytical techniques, and (3) impact analyses.To correspond to the phases of project activity, the subject matter is divided into four stages of monitoring: (1) a reconnaissance or synoptic survey, (2) preconstruction or baseline, (3) construction, and (4) operation, including process monitoring (prepared by Radian Corp., McLean, Va.). For each stage of monitoring, guidelines are given on socioeconomics, aquatic and terrestrial ecology, air quality and meteorology, surface and groundwater quality, geohydrology and soil survey, and surface water hydrology.

  2. Pinellas Plant environmental monitoring report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs maintained by the Pinellas Plant are designed to determine the efficiencies of treatment and control mechanisms for environmental releases; to provide measurements of discharge concentrations for comparison with applicable standards; and to assess the concentrations of these discharges in the on-site and off-site environment. This report was prepared in accordance with the reporting requirements of USDOE Draft Order 5484.1A, ''Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements.'' All radiological and chemical effluents were found in compliance

  3. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.D.; Lee, W.Y.; Park, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements and monitoring of the environmental radiation levels, as well as radioactivity of the various environmental samples were carried out three times a month in the on-site and the off-site around the KAERI site. Measurements were made for both gross alpha and beta radioactivity of all environmental samples. Gross beta measurements were made for radioactivity of the fallout, airborne particulates and precipitations which were collected on a daily basis on the roof of the main building. Measurements of the accumulated doses were also carried out at 10 posts on a bimonthly basis by employing thermoluminescent dosimeters

  4. Cooperative Remote Monitoring, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: Fourth quarter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo, G M [ed.

    1995-01-01

    The DOE`s Cooperative Remote Monitoring programs integrate elements from research and development and implementation to achieve DOE`s objectives in arms control and nonproliferation. The contents of this issue are: cooperative remote monitoring--trends in arms control and nonproliferation; Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS); Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring Systems (ATMS); Tracking and Nuclear Materials by Wide-Area Nuclear Detection (WAND); Cooperative Monitoring Center; the International Remote Monitoring Project; international US and IAEA remote monitoring field trials; Project Dustcloud: monitoring the test stands in Iraq; bilateral remote monitoring: Kurchatov-Argonne-West Demonstration; INSENS Sensor System Project.

  5. Finnish remote environmental monitoring field demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toivonen, H.; Leppaenen, A.; Ylaetalo, S.; Lehtinen, J.; Hokkinen, J.; Tarvainen, M.; Crawford, T.; Glidewell, D.; Smartt, H.; Torres, J.

    1997-10-01

    Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Helsinki, Finland and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), working under the Finnish Support Program to IAEA Safeguards and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) funded International Remote Monitoring Program (Task FIN E 935), have undertaken a joint effort to demonstrate the use of remote monitoring for environmental air sampling and safeguards applications. The results of the task will be used by the IAEA to identify the feasibility, cost-effectiveness, reliability, advantages, and problems associated with remote environmental monitoring. An essential prerequisite for a reliable remote air sampling system is the protection of samples against tampering. Means must be developed to guarantee that the sampling itself has been performed as designed and the original samples are not substituted with samples produced with other equipment at another site. One such method is to label the samples with an unequivocal tag. In addition, the inspection personnel must have the capability to remotely monitor and access the automated environmental air sampling system through the use of various sensors and video imagery equipment. A unique aspect to this project is the network integration of remote monitoring equipment with a STUK radiation monitoring system. This integration will allow inspectors to remotely view air sampler radiation data and sensor/image data through separate software applications on the same review station. A sensor network and video system will be integrated with the SNL developed Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) to provide a comprehensive remote monitoring approach for safeguards purposes. This field trial system is being implemented through a multiphase approach for use by STUK, SNL, and for possible future use by the IAEA

  6. FIBER OPTIC SENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to decades of neglect as well as ever-increasing industrial activity, environmental monitoring has become an important issue. Given the expense and time constraints associated with classical laboratory analysis, there exists a growing interest in cost-effective and real-time ...

  7. DIADEM: a system for collaborative environmental monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winterboer, A.; Martens, M.A.; Pavlin, G.; Groen, F.C.A.; Evers, V.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental monitoring and emergency response projects in urban-industrial areas increasingly rely on efficient collaboration between experts in control rooms and at incident locations, and citizens who live or work in the area. In the video accompanying this abstract we present a system that uses

  8. Environmental monitoring at Hanford for 1984. Supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, K.R.; Carlile, J.M.V.; Dirkes, R.L.; Jaquish, R.E.; Trevathan, M.S.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    A range fire started on private land on August 10, 1984, and burned northward onto the Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Environmental monitoring results from air samples collected during and after the fire indicated that no radioactive materials different from normal levels were present in the air

  9. Environmental Radiation Monitoring Around the Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Geun Sik; Lee, Chang Woo

    2008-05-15

    Environmental Radiation Monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment. radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis on the sites of KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactors and their environments. The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by an ERM and the accumulated radiation dose by a TLD were almost same level compared with the previous years. The activity of gross {alpha} and gross {beta}, Tritium, Uraniu and Strontium in environmental samples showed a environmental level. The radioactivities of most {gamma}-radionuclides in air particulate, surface water and ground water were less than MDA except {sup 40}K or {sup 7}Be which are natural radionuclides. However, not only {sup 40}K or {sup 7}Be but also {sup 137}Cs were detected at the background level in surface soil, discharge sediment and fallout or pine needle.

  10. The Vaalputs radiological environmental monitoring programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van As, D.; Posnik, S.J.; Bain, C.A.R.

    1986-01-01

    An environmental monitoring programme was initiated two years before radioactive waste was due to be disposed of at the Vaalputs site. During this time a database was established against which future changes in the radiation levels of the environment could be measured. The monitoring network included the measurement of radiation doses, radioactivity levels in soil, vegetation, groundwater, and agricultural produce. A natural radiation dose to the average individual of 2,2 mSv per annum was established. Meteorological parameters were collected and used to assess the potential release and transport of radioactivity through the environment. A survey of the habits of the surrounding population was conducted to identify the principal food chains. In addition to complying with the licensing requirements for the waste disposal site, the environmental monitoring programme is contributing valuable scientific information on evapotranspiration and percolation in semi-arid environments

  11. Environmental radiation monitoring in Sao Paulo state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agudo, E.G.; Albuquerque, A.M. de; Vasconcellos, N.V. de

    1991-01-01

    The results of environmental radiation monitoring that CETESB (Technological Company of Environmental Sanitation of Sao Paulo) does in influence areas of radioactive materials store of Nuclemon Minero-Quimica S.A. in the municipality of Itu, Sao Paulo State, are presented. The data comprises the period of 1983-1990 with information about concentration levels of radium-225 in underground and superficial waters of the region. On March, 1989, was detected contamination in a well near of the stores. The levels observed, its implications in terms of health risks and possible causes of event are discussed too. The goals that CETESB intends to reach in terms of monitoring of environmental radiation in Sao Paulo State are also presented. (C.M.)

  12. Environmental radiation exposure: Regulation, monitoring, and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yu, C.; Hong, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    Radioactive releases to the environment from nuclear facilities constitute a public health concern. Protecting the public from such releases can be achieved through the establishment and enforcement of regulatory standards. In the United States, numerous standards have been promulgated to regulate release control at nuclear facilities. Most recent standards are more restrictive than those in the past and require that radioactivity levels be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Environmental monitoring programs and radiological dose assessment are means of ensuring compliance with regulations. Environmental monitoring programs provide empirical information on releases, such as the concentrations of released radioactivity in environmental media, while radiological dose assessment provides the analytical means of quantifying dose exposures for demonstrating compliance

  13. Metagenomic applications in environmental monitoring and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techtmann, Stephen M; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-10-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has dramatically dropped and the scale of sequencing projects has increased accordingly. This has provided the opportunity for the routine use of sequencing techniques in the monitoring of environmental microbes. While metagenomic applications have been routinely applied to better understand the ecology and diversity of microbes, their use in environmental monitoring and bioremediation is increasingly common. In this review we seek to provide an overview of some of the metagenomic techniques used in environmental systems biology, addressing their application and limitation. We will also provide several recent examples of the application of metagenomics to bioremediation. We discuss examples where microbial communities have been used to predict the presence and extent of contamination, examples of how metagenomics can be used to characterize the process of natural attenuation by unculturable microbes, as well as examples detailing the use of metagenomics to understand the impact of biostimulation on microbial communities.

  14. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markes, B.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-10

    This document provides the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) and the Project Hanford Management Contractor.(PHMC) a schedule in accordance with the WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance` and BHI- EE-02, Environmental Requirements, of monitoring and sampling routines for the Near-Field Monitoring (NFM) program during calendar year (CY) 1997. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Near-Field Monitoring. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Near- Field Monitoring and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1998. The outside perimeter road surveys of 200 East and West Area and the rail survey from the 300 Area to Columbia Center will be performed in the year 2000 per agreement with Department of Energy. Richland Field Office. This schedule does not discuss staffing needs, nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines. Personnel performing routines to meet this schedule shall communicate any need for assistance in completing these routines to Radiological Control management and Near-Field Monitoring. After each routine survey is completed, a copy of the survey record, maps, and data sheets will be forwarded to Near-Field Monitoring. These routine surveys will not be considered complete until this documentation is received. At the end of each month, the ERC and PHMC radiological control organizations shall forward a copy of the Routine

  15. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.

    1994-12-01

    This document provides Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) a schedule of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) program during calendar year (CY) 1995. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Near-Field Monitoring. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Near-Field Monitoring and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995

  16. Terra Nova Environmental effects monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, U.; Murdoch, M.

    2000-01-01

    Elements of the environmental effects monitoring program in the Terra Nova oil field, about 350 km east-southeast of St. John's, Newfoundland, are described. This oilfield is being developed using a floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) facility. A total of 24 wells are expected to be drilled through seven subsea templates located in four glory holes to protect them from icebergs. Subsea installations will be linked to the FPSO by trenched flowlines connected to flexible risers. The FPSO will offload to shuttle tankers. First oil is expected in 2001. The environmental effects monitoring program will be conducted annually for the first two years beginning in 2000. Subsequent scheduling will be determined after a review of monitoring data collected during the first three years. Input to the design of the monitoring program was provided by all stakeholders, i. e. owners, local public, government agencies and regional and international experts. A model was developed linking project discharges and possible effects to the environment, including marine resources in the area, and the information derived from these activities was used to generate a set of predictions and hypotheses to be tested in the monitoring program. The monitoring program will use two spatial models: a regression or gradient design and a control-impact design. The gradient design will monitor water column and sediment chemistry, sediment toxicity and benthic invertebrate communities. The control-impact design will be used to monitor larger and more mobile fish or shellfish. The evaluated results will serve as the basis for determining impact predictions and to provide information to allow for decisions pertaining to the protection of the marine environment

  17. Sampling method of environmental radioactivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This manual provides sampling methods of environmental samples of airborne dust, precipitated dust, precipitated water (rain or snow), fresh water, soil, river sediment or lake sediment, discharged water from a nuclear facility, grains, tea, milk, pasture grass, limnetic organisms, daily diet, index organisms, sea water, marine sediment, marine organisms, and that for tritium and radioiodine determination for radiation monitoring from radioactive fallout or radioactivity release by nuclear facilities. This manual aims at the presentation of standard sampling procedures for environmental radioactivity monitoring regardless of monitoring objectives, and shows preservation method of environmental samples acquired at the samplingpoint for radiation counting for those except human body. Sampling techniques adopted in this manual is decided by the criteria that they are suitable for routine monitoring and any special skillfulness is not necessary. Based on the above-mentioned principle, this manual presents outline and aims of sampling, sampling position or object, sampling quantity, apparatus, equipment or vessel for sampling, sampling location, sampling procedures, pretreatment and preparation procedures of a sample for radiation counting, necessary recording items for sampling and sample transportation procedures. Special attention is described in the chapter of tritium and radioiodine because these radionuclides might be lost by the above-mentioned sample preservation method for radiation counting of less volatile radionuclides than tritium or radioiodine. (Takagi, S.)

  18. Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R. [and others

    1996-10-01

    As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-01-01

    As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities

  20. Monitoring environmental exposures with semen assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Semen studies in humans and animals have yielded extensive and compelling evidence that sperm can be used to assess reproductive potential and diagnose pathology. More recent studies on mutagens and carcinogens both at this and other laboratories suggest that a combination of mouse and human assays can be an efficient, effective approach to monitoring for reproductive hazards in the environment. We are investigating the potential of using variability in sperm morphology and DNA content to quantify and monitor the effects of environmental agents on the human testes. Here we review the status of human and mouse assays for environmental surveillance, discuss the genetic and fertility implications of chemically induced semen changes, and describe the high-speed flow methods being developed to automate sperm assays

  1. Environmental radiation monitoring technology: Capabilities and needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation monitoring in the Savannah River Site (SRS) environment is conducted by a combination of automated, remote sampling and/or analysis systems, and manual sampling operations. This program provides early detection of radionuclide releases, minimizes the consequences, and assesses the impact on the public. Instrumentation installed at the release points monitor the atmospheric and aqueous releases from SRS operations. Ground water and air monitoring stations are strategically located throughout the site for radionuclide migration studies. The environmental radiological monitoring program at SRS includes: fixed monitoring stations for atmospheric radionuclide concentrations, aqueous monitors for surface water measurements, mobile laboratory operations for real-time, in-field measurements, aerial scanning for wide area contamination surveillance, and hand-held instruments for radionuclide-specific measurements. Rigorous environmentnal sampling surveillance coupled with laboratory analyses provide confirmatory results for all in-field measurements. Gaps in the technologies and development projects at SRS to fill these deficiencies are discussed in the context of customer needs and regulatory requirements

  2. Environmental perverse incentives in coastal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Mark T

    2013-08-15

    It can be argued that the intensity of monitoring of coastal marine environments lags behind the equivalent terrestrial environments. This results in a paucity of long-term time series of key environmental parameters such as turbidity. This lack of management information of the sources and sinks, and causes and impacts of stressors to the coastal marine environment, along with a lack of co-ordination of information collection is compromising the ability of environmental impact assessments of major coastal developments to discriminate between local and remote anthropogenic impacts, and natural or background processes. In particular, the quasi outsourcing of the collection of coastal information can lead to a perverse incentive whereby in many cases nobody is actively or consistently monitoring the coastal marine environment effectively. This is particularly the case with regards to the collection of long-term and whole-of-system scale data. This lack of effective monitoring can act to incentivise poor environmental performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental radiation monitoring of Vizag City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekanth, B.; Narsaiah, M.V.R.; Saindane, Shashank; Pujari, Raju; Krishna, N.S.; Sambamurthy, T.; Chaudhury, Probal; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    Radiological impact assessment is to be carried out following any radiological emergency to implement the required counter measures. A ground based environmental radiation monitoring of Vizag city has been carried out by installing various radiation monitoring instruments in a vehicle to generate the base line radiation data. It also helps to check the illicit trafficking of radioactive sources and also identifying the orphan sources. The average background radiation level observed in Vizag city was 80 nGy/h. Database of baseline radiation level with GPS location at all important locations of the whole city has been developed. No illicit trafficking of radioactive materials and orphan sources were detected during the survey. All the detectors used in the survey shown good correlation in their response. The study showed that mobile monitoring methodology will be useful in the quick assessment of radiological impact and strengthens the decision makers in reducing consequences by initiating immediate counter measures

  4. Citizen Sensing for Improved Urban Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijun Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science is increasingly being used in diverse research domains. With the emergence and rapid development of sensor technologies, citizens potentially have more powerful tools to collect data and generate information to understand their living environment. Although sensor technologies are developing fast, citizen sensing has not been widely implemented yet and published studies are only a few. In this paper, we analyse the practical experiences from an implementation of citizen sensing for urban environment monitoring. A bottom-up model in which citizens develop and use sensors for environmental monitoring is described and assessed. The paper focuses on a case study of Amsterdam Smart Citizens Lab using NO2 sensors for air quality monitoring. We found that the bottom-up citizen sensing is still challenging but can be successful with open cooperation and effective use of online and offline facilities. Based on the assessment, suggestions are proposed for further implementations and research.

  5. Environmental effects monitoring for exploration drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Cook, J.A.; Mathieu, A.

    2003-01-01

    Strategies for monitoring the environmental effects of single exploratory offshore wells on the east coast of Canada were evaluated. The report was compiled from consultations with scientists, regulators and stakeholders as well as a review of regulatory regimes and toxicity results. The aim of the report was to develop a decision tree for determining when to conduct environmental effects monitoring (EEM). Respondents evinced lower levels of concern for single exploratory wells than for production developments. A number of scientists argued for full statistical treatment of all data, and many people argued that more assurance was needed that the marine environment was not being unduly harmed. Respondents also considered that biological effects should be a primary focus, rather than the occurrence of trace chemical signals, and that seabirds and mammals should be monitored. Concern was expressed over the value of data collected from monitoring the effects of exploratory drilling activities. It was suggested that local and site-specific issues should be considered in the design of EEM programs. Respondents expressed strong concern about potential cumulative effects with other industrial activities, and suggested that test cases should be established and monitored to develop a scientific rationale for the inclusion or exclusion of specific variables in future EEM programs. A decision tree was developed based on 3 scenarios: (1) compliance monitoring only in well known areas with no sensitive issues; opportunistic EEM surveys of sediments, benthos, seabirds and marine mammals in shallow or deep areas with no known sensitive issues; and (3) custom EEM surveys for sensitive areas. Currently, there are EEM requirements for drilling exploratory wells offshore Canada's east coast. 58 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  6. Evaluation of environmental monitoring thermoluminescent dosimeter locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnison, R.

    1992-12-01

    Geostatistics, particularly kriging, has been used to assess the adequacy of the existing NTS thermoluminescent dosimeter network for determination of environmental exposure levels. (Kriging is a linear estimation method that results in contour plots of both the pattern of the estimated gamma radiation over the area of measurements and also of the standard deviations of the estimated exposure levels.) Even though the network was not designed as an environmental monitoring network, ft adequately serves this function in the region of Pahute and Rainier Mesas.. The Yucca Flat network is adequate only if a reasonable definition of environmental exposure levels is required; R is not adequate for environmental monitoring in Yucca Flat if a coefficient of variation of 10 percent or less is chosen as the criterion for network design. A revision of the Yucca Flat network design should be based on a square grid pattern with nodes 5000 feet (about one mile) apart, if a 10 percent coefficient of variation criterion is adopted. There were insufficient data for southern and western sections of the NTS to perform the geostatistical analysis. A very significant finding was that a single network design cannot be used for the entire NTS, because different areas have different variograms. Before any design can be finalized, the NTS management must specify the exposure unit area and coefficient of variation that are to be used as design criteria

  7. Tracking environmental monitoring data using EDRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelder, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    For 10 years, operating contractors at the US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) manually compiled and tracked environmental monitoring data collected at the GJPO and for the Monticello Remedial Action Project in Monticello, Utah. The Environmental Data Retrieval and Information System (EDRIS), which uses an ORACLE database, helps maintain compliance and facilitates the tracking and comparison of these data with the applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) such as CERCLA, RCRA and the state regulations. The design of EDRIS allows unrestricted input and verification of all aspects of a complete environmental monitoring database package. This database catalogs the following components: groundwater chemistry, surface water chemistry, air particulate chemistry, soil chemistry, sewer effluent chemistry, storm run-off chemistry, the quantity of suspended air particulates less than 10 μ in size, meteorological data, radon data, environmental radiation data, water levels, information on well installations and completions, status of all applicable permits and ARARs. Macros enable the transfer of information to EDRIS in an electronic format to maintain the integrity of the data. In addition to data entry and verification, EDRIS capabilities allow unrestricted retrieval of data through menus designed to permit various types of comparisons, including an examination of historical and current data against the most restrictive current standard. One example of the flexibility of EDRIS is the ability to compare the data with selected standards. This comparison is accomplished by performing applicable calculations to the data as they are retrieved from the database

  8. Monitoring Environmental Quality by Sniffing Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibo Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the environmental pollution and degradation in China has become a serious problem with the rapid development of Chinese heavy industry and increased energy generation. With sustainable development being the key to solving these problems, it is necessary to develop proper techniques for monitoring environmental quality. Compared to traditional environment monitoring methods utilizing expensive and complex instruments, we recognized that social media analysis is an efficient and feasible alternative to achieve this goal with the phenomenon that a growing number of people post their comments and feelings about their living environment on social media, such as blogs and personal websites. In this paper, we self-defined a term called the Environmental Quality Index (EQI to measure and represent people’s overall attitude and sentiment towards an area’s environmental quality at a specific time; it includes not only metrics for water and food quality but also people’s feelings about air pollution. In the experiment, a high sentiment analysis and classification precision of 85.67% was obtained utilizing the support vector machine algorithm, and we calculated and analyzed the EQI for 27 provinces in China using the text data related to the environment from the Chinese Sina micro-blog and Baidu Tieba collected from January 2015 to June 2016. By comparing our results to with the data from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS, we showed that the environment evaluation model we constructed and the method we proposed are feasible and effective.

  9. Environmental Monitoring of Microbe Metabolic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Brad (Inventor); Fleming, Erich (Inventor); Piccini, Matthew (Inventor); Beasley, Christopher (Inventor); Bebout, Leslie (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Mobile system and method for monitoring environmental parameters involved in growth or metabolic transformation of algae in a liquid. Each of one or more mobile apparati, suspended or partly or wholly submerged in the liquid, includes at least first and second environmental sensors that sense and transmit distinct first and second environmental, growth or transformation parameter values, such as liquid temperature, temperature of gas adjacent to and above the exposed surface, liquid pH, liquid salinity, liquid turbidity, O.sub.2 dissolved in the liquid, CO.sub.2 contained in the liquid, oxidization and reduction potential of the liquid, nutrient concentrations in the liquid, nitrate concentration in the liquid, ammonium concentration in the liquid, bicarbonate concentration in the liquid, phosphate concentration in the liquid, light intensity at the liquid surface, electrical conductivity of the liquid, and a parameter.alpha.(alga) associated with growth stage of the alga, using PAM fluorometry or other suitable parameter measurements.

  10. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2004-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Emmy L.; Loosz, Tom; Ferris, John M.; Harrison, Jennifer J.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the results of ANSTO's environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) sites, from July 2004 to June 2005. Effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially affected by routine airborne emissions from the LHSTC were less than 0.005 mSv/year. This estimated maximum potential dose is less than 24% of the ANSTO ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv/year, and much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv/year that is recommended by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). The effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially exposed to routine liquid effluent releases from the LHSTC have been realistically estimated as a quarter (or less) of the estimated doses to the critical group for airborne releases. The levels of tritium detected in groundwater and stormwater at the LHSTC were less than those set out in the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. The airborne and liquid effluent emissions from the NMC were below both the ARPANSA-approved notification levels and Sydney Water limits for acceptance of trade wastewater to sewer. Results of environmental monitoring at both ANSTO sites confirm that the facilities continue to be operated well within regulatory limits. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose of ∼1.5 mSv/year experienced by members of the Australian public

  11. Environmental Monitoring Report - United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Facilities, Calendar Year 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    Each year since 1972, a report has been prepared on the environmental monitoring activities for the DOE facilities in oak Ridge, Tennessee, for the previous calendar year. previously, the individual facilities published quarterly and annual progress reports that contained some environmental monitoring data. The environmental monitoring program for 1984 includes sampling and analysis of air, water from surface streams, groundwater, creek sediment, biota, and soil for both radioactive and nonradioactive (including hazardous) materials. Special environmental studies that have been conducted in the Oak Ridge area are included in this report, primarily as abstracts or brief summaries. The annual report for 1984 on environmental monitoring and surveillance of the Oak Ridge community by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is included as an appendix. A brief description of the topography and climate of the Oak Ridge area and a short description of the three DOE facilities are provided below to enhance the reader's understanding of the direction and contents of the environmental monitoring program for Oak Ridge.

  12. RadNet (Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — RadNet, formerly Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS), is a national network of monitoring stations that regularly collect air, precipitation,...

  13. The Architectural and Environmental Refurbishment of Industrialised Residential Construction. The example of the Selva Cafaro Quarter in Naples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Perriccioli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay presents the experimental research conducted over the past years by the CHED (Concept House and Environmental Design Research Unit at the “Eduardo Vittoria” School of Architecture and Design in Ascoli Piceno, focused on the theme of Social Housing. The CHED is a temporary research team that proposes a union between diverse know-how, cultures, skills and specialisations, working towards a method of theoretical and conceptual investigation and design and building experiments in the field of innovative construction for sustainable dwelling. In particular, the experience outlined in this text relates to a design experiment completed between 2010 and 2011 and outside the borders of the Marche region, in agreement with the City of Naples' Assessorato all’Edilizia e al Centro Storico (Department of Building and the Historical Centre and focused on the architectural and environmental refurbishment of the residential quarter of Selva Cafaro in San Pietro a Patierno (Naples.

  14. Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Monsi; Howard, David

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) is a project focused on evolving existing and maturing emerging 'closed loop' atmosphere revitalization (AR) life support systems that produce clean, breathable air for crewmembers, and developing a suite of low mass, low power environmental monitors to detect and measure air- and waterborne constituents and contaminants. The objective is to improve reliability and efficiency, reduce mass and volume, and increase recovery of oxygen from carbon dioxide created by human metabolism from 43% to greater than 90%. The technology developments under ARREM are vital to extending human space missions from low-Earth orbit like the International Space Station to destinations deeper into space such as Mars where dependency on Earth for resupply of maintenance items and critical life support elements such as water and oxygen is not possible. The primary goal of the ARREM project is to demonstrate that systems meet the more stringent performance parameters for deep space exploration and are compatible with other systems within closed loop life support through a series of integrated tests performed in an environmental test chamber capable of simulating human metabolic activities and measuring systems outputs.

  15. Environmental monitoring of secondhand smoke exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelberg, Benjamin J; Hepp, Lisa M; Avila-Tang, Erika; Gundel, Lara; Hammond, S Katharine; Hovell, Melbourne F; Hyland, Andrew; Klepeis, Neil E; Madsen, Camille C; Navas-Acien, Ana; Repace, James; Samet, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    The complex composition of secondhand smoke (SHS) provides a range of constituents that can be measured in environmental samples (air, dust and on surfaces) and therefore used to assess non-smokers' exposure to tobacco smoke. Monitoring SHS exposure (SHSe) in indoor environments provides useful information on the extent and consequences of SHSe, implementing and evaluating tobacco control programmes and behavioural interventions, and estimating overall burden of disease caused by SHSe. The most widely used markers have been vapour-phase nicotine and respirable particulate matter (PM). Numerous other environmental analytes of SHS have been measured in the air including carbon monoxide, 3-ethenylpyridine, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tobacco-specific nitrosamines, nitrogen oxides, aldehydes and volatile organic compounds, as well as nicotine in dust and on surfaces. The measurement of nicotine in the air has the advantage of reflecting the presence of tobacco smoke. While PM measurements are not as specific, they can be taken continuously, allowing for assessment of exposure and its variation over time. In general, when nicotine and PM are measured in the same setting using a common sampling period, an increase in nicotine concentration of 1 μg/m3 corresponds to an average increase of 10 μg/m3 of PM. This topic assessment presents a comprehensive summary of SHSe monitoring approaches using environmental markers and discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these methods and approaches. PMID:22949497

  16. Development of the Guardian environmental monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, J.L.; Thompson, I.M.G.

    1982-01-01

    The report describes the Guardian Environmental Monitoring System, developed jointly by the CEGB's Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories (BNL) and GEC Energy Systems Limited (ESL). The basic battery operated instrument was developed by BNL for the measurement of any nuclear facility contribution to the overall environmental dose. It uses an energy compensated Geiger counter to provide a continuous record for over a month of dose rates from 1 μR h -1 (10nGy h -1 ). Results are presented of initial development trials and of an intercomparison with the USA Environmental Measurement Laboratory. The Guardian system, however, was developed, not only to meet the CEGB requirements for a recording monitor, but also to meet the requirements of US Regulatory Commission Guide RG 1.97, introduced as a result of the accident at Three Mile Island. This system, by using two energy compensated Geiger counters has a range from 1μRh -1 up to 10Rh -1 (approximately equal to 100mGyh -1 ), and the associated electronics provides automatic range changing, including fast response to ramp exposure rate changes, alarm and test facilities and telemetry by line or radio to a central station. (author)

  17. Environmental radioactivity monitoring around Jeongeup ARTI in 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Jong; Kwon, Ho Je; Kang, Tai Jin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    In Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI), the environmental radioactivity monitoring programme has been enforced since 2007. This study has been done to guarantee the local residence radiation safety by detecting in early stage a possible radiological effect due to the operation of the ARTI facilities. For the radioactivity measurement, fourteen selected samples were gathered not only monthly, quarterly, half-yearly but also in the harvesting season. Measurement and analysis were done on the samples collected in and around the ARTI. The gamma exposure rates measured in and around ARTI was in the range of 0.05{approx}0.3 {mu}Sv/h. The range of gross-beta-radioactivity analyzed for the water samples except waste water was from <3.451 to 288 mBq/L. The range of 3H concentration detected in the rain sample collected in the ARTI site was 0.951{approx}2.34 Bq/L. 90Sr was not detected from all the samples of soil and honey, pine needles. The above results confirmed that there has been no influence due to operation of the ARTI facilities.. The analysis result reveals that there is no radiological influence due to operation of the ARTI facilities. Also, it is judged that the samples analyzed for the first time in 2009 have to be continuously evaluated afterward

  18. Environmental monitoring report: Sandia Laboratories, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, T.N.

    1977-04-01

    Water and vegetation are monitored to determine Sandia Laboratories impact on the surrounding environment. Nonradioactive pollutants released are reported. Radioactive effluents are also reported and their person-rem contribution to the Albuquerque population is calculated. The environmental monitoring for calendar year 1976 shows that concentrations of radioactive materials in the Albuquerque area are typical of natural background for the area. An exception is a single onsite location where slightly abnormal uranium concentrations are expected. An estimated 0.044 person-rem Albuquerque area (80 km radius) population dose commitment results from calculated Sandia Laboratories releases. Over the same area 57,000 person-rem is accumulated from natural background. There were no measurable offsite radioactive effluent releases in CY 1976

  19. Continuous environmental radiation monitoring network at Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somayaji, K.M.; Mathiyarasu, R.; Prakash, G.S.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Rajagopal, V.

    1997-01-01

    The report highlights our experience in the design and installation of monitoring stations as part of continuous environmental radiation monitoring network around the periphery of the nuclear complex at Kalpakkam. Five monitoring stations, one each in south-west sector (Main Gate I) and south-south west (Main Gate II) and the others in North sector (HASL and ESG) and in north-west section (WIP) have been set up. Two independent detector systems, based on high pressure ionisation chamber (HPIC) and energy compensated GM have been installed at each of these locations and the data has been logged continuously using a data logger. The data so gathered at each monitoring station is retrieved every week by means of a hand held terminal (HHT) with a built-in non-volatile memory and transferred to an IBM PC-AT for data analysis and archival. The report discusses in depth the design and developmental efforts undertaken to set up the network, starting from the basic detectors. The work involved the design of suitable electrometer circuits for measuring the low levels of current from HPICs, and the subsequent study of the performance of the highly sensitive preamplifier under diurnal variations of ambient conditions. The report includes, in detail the design aspects and fabrication details of low current measuring electrometer circuits

  20. Environmental monitoring at Hanford for 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquish, R.E.; Mitchell, P.J.

    1988-05-01

    Envoronmental monitoring activities performed on the Hanford Site for 1987 are discussed in this report. Samples of environmental media were collected to determine radionuclide and chemical concentrations at locations in the geographical area. Results are discussed in detail in subsequent sections of this report. Surveillance of radioactivity in the Hanford vicinity during 1987 indicated concentrations well below applicable DOE and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. Radioactive materials released from Hanford operations were generally indistinguishable above background in the offsite environment. Continued influence from the 1986 reactor accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in the USSR was not apparent this year. Chemical concentrations in air were below applicable standards established by the EPA and the State of Washington. Chemicals detected in the ground water beneath the Site can be attributed to both Site operations and natural background levels. Several chemicals regulated by the EPA and the State of Washington exceeded EPA drinking water standards (DWS). 106 refs., 71 figs., 110 tabs

  1. Environmental monitoring around the Swedish Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondesson, A.; Luening, M.; Wallberg, L.; Wijk, H.

    1999-01-01

    The environmental monitoring programme for the nuclear facilities has shown that the radioactive discharges increase the concentrations of some radionuclides in the local marine environment around the Swedish nuclear facilities. Samples from the terrestrial environment rarely show increased radionuclide concentrations. From a radiological point of view the most important nuclide in the environmental samples usually is CS-137. However, the largest part of the present concentrations of Cs-137 in the Swedish environment originate from the Chernobyl accident. The concentrations of radionuclides that can be found in biota around the nuclear facilities are much lower than the concentration levels that are known to give acute damage to organisms. The total radiation doses from the discharges of radionuclides are small. (au)

  2. Sandia National Laboratories 1979 environmental monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, T.N.

    1980-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque is located south of the city on two broad mesas. The local climate is arid continental. Radionuclides are released from five technical areas from the Laboratories' resarch activities. Sandia's environmental monitoring program searches for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitters, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. No activity was found in public areas in excess of local background in 1979. The Albuquerque population receives only 0.076 person-rem (estimated) from airborne radioactive releases. While national security research is the laboratories' major responsibility, energy research is a major area of activity. Both these research areas cause radioactive releases

  3. Role of analytical chemistry in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayasth, S.; Swain, K.

    2004-01-01

    Basic aspects of pollution and the role of analytical chemistry in environmental monitoring are highlighted and exemplified, with emphasis on trace elements. Sources and pathways of natural and especially man-made polluting substances as well as physico-chemical characteristics are given. Attention is paid to adequate sampling in various compartments of the environment comprising both lithosphere and biosphere. Trace analysis is dealt with using a variety of analytical techniques, including criteria for choice of suited techniques, as well as aspects of analytical quality assurance and control. Finally, some data on trace elements levels in soil and water samples from India are presented. (author)

  4. Determination of radiation direction in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Vicente de Paulo de; Moura, Eduardo S.; Rocha, Felicia D.G.; Manzoli, Jose Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of environmental exposure has been performed in Brazil using the thermoluminescence technique at Thermoluminescence Dosimetry Laboratory (LDT), at Nuclear and Energetic Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP). To carry out these measurements, several thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) were used to measure the expose. In this procedure, very few information of direction where the radiation came from is available. A vague supposition about the direction from where the radiation came from could be inferred only by evaluation of multiple dosimeters displaced at entire region of monitoring, but this demand to much effort or sometimes become impractical for certain situations. In this work, a single device is used to provide information about the direction from where the radiation came through. This device is called directional dosimeter (DD). Using more than one DD it is possible to reduce the uncertainty of the measurements and determine the radiation source position. The DD basically consists of a regular solid with high effective atomic number, where one TLD is positioned at each face. The DD allows evaluating the environmental exposure and the direction of the radiation by a simple vector sum. At each face of the DD, it is associated an orthogonal vector, and modulus of this vector represents the correspond exposure measured by the TLD. The direction of the radiation source is the sum of these faces vectors. The prototype used in this work was a lead cube with six TLDs of CaSO 4 :Dy/Teflon. The TLDs have high sensibility and are already used in area, environmental and personal monitoring. The measurements had shown the correct environmental exposure and a good indication of the radiation direction. (author)

  5. M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1999, Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the first and second quarters 1999

  6. Statistical Methods for Environmental Pollution Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Richard O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The application of statistics to environmental pollution monitoring studies requires a knowledge of statistical analysis methods particularly well suited to pollution data. This book fills that need by providing sampling plans, statistical tests, parameter estimation procedure techniques, and references to pertinent publications. Most of the statistical techniques are relatively simple, and examples, exercises, and case studies are provided to illustrate procedures. The book is logically divided into three parts. Chapters 1, 2, and 3 are introductory chapters. Chapters 4 through 10 discuss field sampling designs and Chapters 11 through 18 deal with a broad range of statistical analysis procedures. Some statistical techniques given here are not commonly seen in statistics book. For example, see methods for handling correlated data (Sections 4.5 and 11.12), for detecting hot spots (Chapter 10), and for estimating a confidence interval for the mean of a lognormal distribution (Section 13.2). Also, Appendix B lists a computer code that estimates and tests for trends over time at one or more monitoring stations using nonparametric methods (Chapters 16 and 17). Unfortunately, some important topics could not be included because of their complexity and the need to limit the length of the book. For example, only brief mention could be made of time series analysis using Box-Jenkins methods and of kriging techniques for estimating spatial and spatial-time patterns of pollution, although multiple references on these topics are provided. Also, no discussion of methods for assessing risks from environmental pollution could be included.

  7. "Smart pebble" design for environmental monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Pavlovskis, Edgars

    2014-05-01

    Sediment transport, due to primarily the action of water, wind and ice, is one of the most significant geomorphic processes responsible for shaping Earth's surface. It involves entrainment of sediment grains in rivers and estuaries due to the violently fluctuating hydrodynamic forces near the bed. Here an instrumented particle, namely a "smart pebble", is developed to investigate the exact flow conditions under which individual grains may be entrained from the surface of a gravel bed. This could lead in developing a better understanding of the processes involved, while focusing on the response of the particle during a variety of flow entrainment events. The "smart pebble" is a particle instrumented with MEMS sensors appropriate for capturing the hydrodynamic forces a coarse particle might experience during its entrainment from the river bed. A 3-axial gyroscope and accelerometer registers data to a memory card via a microcontroller, embedded in a 3D-printed waterproof hollow spherical particle. The instrumented board is appropriately fit and centred into the shell of the pebble, so as to achieve a nearly uniform distribution of the mass which could otherwise bias its motion. The "smart pebble" is powered by an independent power to ensure autonomy and sufficiently long periods of operation appropriate for deployment in the field. Post-processing and analysis of the acquired data is currently performed offline, using scientific programming software. The performance of the instrumented particle is validated, conducting a series of calibration experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions. "Smart pebble" allows for a wider range of environmental sensors (e.g. for environmental/pollutant monitoring) to be incorporated so as to extend the range of its application, enabling accurate environmental monitoring which is required to ensure infrastructure resilience and preservation of ecological health.

  8. Environmental monitoring at Hanford for 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, K.R.; Carlile, J.M.V.; Dirkes, R.L.; Jaquish, R.E.; Trevathan, M.S.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1985-05-01

    Environmental surveillance activities performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Hanford Site for 1984 are discussed in this report. Samples of environmental media were collected in support of the Hanford Environmental Monitoring Program to determine radionuclide concentrations in the Hanford environs. Radiological impacts in terms of radiation dose equivalents as a result of Hanford operations are also discussed. Gross beta radioactivity concentrations in airborne particulates at all sampling locations were lower in 1984 than during 1983 as a result of declining levels of worldwide fallout. Slightly higher levels of 85 Kr and 129 I were noted at several onsite and offsite locations. The sampling location in close proximity to the PUREX plant also detected increased 3 H. Very low levels of radionuclides were detected in samples of Columbia River water during 1984. An extensive groundwater monitoring program was performed for the Hanford Site during 1984. The 3 H and nitrate plumes continued to move slowly toward the Columbia River. All 3 H results were within applicable concentration guides. Samples of deer, rabbits, game birds, waterfowl and fish were collected onsite or in the Columbia River at locations where the potential for radionuclide uptake was most likely, or at the nearest locations where wildlife samples were available. Radioisotope levels were measured. Dose rates from external penetrating radiation measured in the vicinity of residential areas were similar to those observed in the previous years, and no contribution from Hanford activities could be identified. An assessment of the 1984 potential radiological impacts attributable to the Hanford operations indicated that measured and calculated radiation doses to the public continued to be low, and well below applicable regulatory limits. 21 refs., 48 figs., 83 tabs

  9. GERMON. Global Environmental Radiation Monitoring Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Between 15-18 December 1987, a meeting of experts of WHO/UNEP met at Le Vesinet, France, to develop the basic principles of a global environmental radiation monitoring network (GERMON) which would have the function of reporting on a regular basis environmental radiation levels, and be positioned to provide rapid and reliable radiation measurements in the event of a major radiation release. To date, some 58 countries have indicated their willingness to become part of GERMON. About 40 of these have technical staff and equipment to meet the minimum requirements for joining the network, and about 30 have designated appropriate organizations within their country to serve as national Liaison Institutions for GERMON. Sixteen countries are now providing data on a regular basis to the CCC at SCPRI in Le Vesinet, France. Thirty-two countries responded to the request of WHO for readiness to take part in a IAEA radiation emergency exercise. The present meeting has been held in Montgomery, Alabama, USA at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory between 27 April 1992 and 30 April 1992, with the purpose of reviewing GERMON. One important topic considered was the implementation of GERMON in the Americas. Particular attention was given to the need for better coordination with IAEA in responding to the Convention on Early Notification, to the role of the CCC, to forms of data transmission, etc

  10. 24 CFR 50.22 - Environmental management and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental management and... and Urban Development PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Environmental Review Procedures § 50.22 Environmental management and monitoring. An Environmental Management and...

  11. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-10-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  12. Environmental radiation monitoring results for the period 1989-1999 in NAPS region using TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, A.S.; Chougaonkar, M.P.; Mayya, Y.S.; Sadasivan, S.; Sharma, L.N.

    2001-06-01

    In this report, we present the results of environmental gamma radiation levels monitored around NAPS region using TLDs. The report gives quarterly environmental radiation monitoring data obtained during the period 1989-'99; i.e. during the operating phase of the reactor. Twenty eight TLD locations were selected within a radius of twenty six km. of which six were within the exclusion zone (radius 1.6 km). The mean gamma radiation level within the exclusion zone has been evaluated as 111 ± 6.6 mR/year and that for locations beyond the exclusion zone as 140 ± 14 mR/year. As these values are well within the corresponding pre-operational general background value of 142 ± 30 mR/year (Basu et. al 1989), it is concluded that the reactor operations have not contributed to any increase in the gamma radiation levels in the environs of the NAPS region. (author)

  13. Analysis of general specifications for nuclear facilities environmental monitoring vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    At present, with the nuclear energy more increasingly extensive application, the continuous stable radiation monitoring has become the focus of the public attention. The main purpose of the environmental monitoring vehicle for the continuous monitoring of the environmental radiation dose rate and the radionuclides concentration in the medium around nuclear facilities is that the environmental radiation level and the radioactive nuclides activity in the environment medium are measured. The radioactive pollution levels, the scope contaminated and the trends of the pollution accumulation are found out. The change trends for the pollution are observed and the monitoring results are explained. The domestic demand of the environmental monitoring for the nuclear facilities is shown in this report. The changes and demands of the routine environmental monitoring and the nuclear emergency monitoring are researched. The revision opinions for EJ/T 981-1995 General specifications for nuclear facilities environmental monitoring vehicles are put forward. The purpose is to regulate domestic environmental monitoring vehicle technical criterion. The criterion makes it better able to adapt and serve the environmental monitoring for nuclear facilities. The technical guarantee is provided for the environmental monitoring of the nuclear facilities. (authors)

  14. Annual environmental monitoring report: calender year 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, B.M.; Carfagno, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    The local environment surrounding Mound Facility was monitored for tritium and plutonium-238. The results are reported for calendar year 1977. The environmental parameters analyzed included air, water, foodstuffs, soil and silt. The average concentrations of plutonium-238 and tritium were within the applicable stringent standards for radioactive species adopted by the U.S. DOE. Mound Facility drinking water has been brought into compliance with the new EPA standard for tritium in community drinking water systems, and Mound has undertaken a program to achieve compliance for nine private wells adjacent to the Facility site. The program has partially achieved its objective by bringing Mound wells and some of the nine affected private wells in the vicinity of Mound Facility into compliance with the U.S. EPA standard and significantly reducing tritium concentration in the remaining wells. Data concerning nonradioactive species in air and water are also presented and compared to federal, state, and local standards, where applicable

  15. Radiation survey meters used for environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerke, H.; Sigurdsson, T.; Meier Pedersen, K.; Grindborg, J.-E.; Persson, L.; Siiskonen, T.; Hakanen, A.; Kosunen, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Nordic dosimetry group set up the GammaRate project to investigate how its expertise could be used to assure appropriate usage of survey meters in environmental monitoring. Considerable expertise in calibrating radiation instruments exists in the Nordic radiation protection authorities. The Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian authorities operate Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) that provide users with calibration traceable to internationally recognised primary standards. These authorities together with the Icelandic authorities have formally cooperated since 2002 in the field of radiation dosimetry. Dosimetry is the base for assesment of risk from ionising radiation and calibration of instruments is an imported part in dosimetry. The Nordic dosimetry group has been focused on cancer therapy. This work extends the cooperation to the dosimetry of radiation protection and environmental monitoring. This report contains the formal, theoretical and practical background for survey meter measurements. Nordic standards dosimetry laboratories have the capability to provide traceable calibration of instruments in various types of radiation. To verify and explore this further in radiation protection applications a set of survey instruments were sent between the five Nordic countries and each of the authority asked to provide a calibration coefficient for all instruments. The measurement results were within the stated uncertainties, except for some results from NRPA for the ionchamber based instrument. The comparison was shown to be a valuable tool to harmonize the calibration of radiation protection instruments in the Nordic countries. Dosimetry plays an important role in the emergency situations, and it is clear that better traceability and harmonised common guidelines will improve the emergency preparedness and health. (Author)

  16. Radiation survey meters used for environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerke, H. (ed.) (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, NRPA (Norway)); Sigurdsson, T. (Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority, Geislavarnir Rikisins, GR (IS)); Meier Pedersen, K. (National Board of Health, Statens Institut for Straalebeskyttelse (SIS) (Denmark)); Grindborg, J.-E.; Persson, L. (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Straalsaekerhetsmyndigheten (SSM) (Sweden)); Siiskonen, T.; Hakanen, A.; Kosunen, A. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Saeteilyturvakeskus (STUK) (Finland))

    2012-01-15

    The Nordic dosimetry group set up the GammaRate project to investigate how its expertise could be used to assure appropriate usage of survey meters in environmental monitoring. Considerable expertise in calibrating radiation instruments exists in the Nordic radiation protection authorities. The Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian authorities operate Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) that provide users with calibration traceable to internationally recognised primary standards. These authorities together with the Icelandic authorities have formally cooperated since 2002 in the field of radiation dosimetry. Dosimetry is the base for assesment of risk from ionising radiation and calibration of instruments is an imported part in dosimetry. The Nordic dosimetry group has been focused on cancer therapy. This work extends the cooperation to the dosimetry of radiation protection and environmental monitoring. This report contains the formal, theoretical and practical background for survey meter measurements. Nordic standards dosimetry laboratories have the capability to provide traceable calibration of instruments in various types of radiation. To verify and explore this further in radiation protection applications a set of survey instruments were sent between the five Nordic countries and each of the authority asked to provide a calibration coefficient for all instruments. The measurement results were within the stated uncertainties, except for some results from NRPA for the ionchamber based instrument. The comparison was shown to be a valuable tool to harmonize the calibration of radiation protection instruments in the Nordic countries. Dosimetry plays an important role in the emergency situations, and it is clear that better traceability and harmonised common guidelines will improve the emergency preparedness and health. (Author)

  17. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S. M.; Christensen, S. W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; McCracken, M.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth G. R.; Stewart, A. J.

    2001-01-19

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant). As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Complex on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the

  18. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains brief outlines of the multiple projects under the responsibility of the Western Environmental Technology Office in Butte Montana. These projects include biomass remediation, remediation of contaminated soils, mine waste technology, and several other types of remediation

  19. Environmental wodking level monitor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D; McDowell, W.P.; Groer, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    The Environmental Working Level Monitor (EWLM) is an instrument used to automatically monitor airborne Rn-daughter concentrations and the Working Level (WL). It is an ac powered, microprocessor--based instrument with an external inverter provided for dc operation if desired. The microprocessor's control processor unit (CPU) controls the actuation of the detector assembly and processes its output signals to yield the measurements in the proper units. The detectors are fully automated and require no manual operations once the instrument is programmed. They detect and separate the alpha emitters of RaA and RaC' as well as detecting the beta emitters of RaB and RaC. The resultant pulses from these detected radioisotopes are transmitted to the CPU. The programmed microprocessor performs the mathematical manipulations necessary to output accurate Rn-daughter concentrations and the WL. A special subroutine within the system program enables the EWLM to run a calibration procedure on command which yields calibration data. This data can then be processed in a separate program on most computers capable of BASIC programming. This calibration program results in the derivation of coefficients and beta efficiencies which provides the calibrated coefficients and beta efficiencies required by the main system program to assure proper calibration of the individual EWLM's

  20. Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly, December 1, 1975--March 1, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, E.P. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents current data from the HASL environmental programs and Dr. James Lovelock of Bowerchalke, Wilts, England. The initial section consists of interpretive reports and notes on Freon-11 and carbon tetrachloride in ground level air in the British Isles and these same gases as well as sulfur hexafluoride in the stratosphere. Subsequent sections include tabulations of radionuclide levels in stratospheric air, surface air, deposition, milk, diet, and tap water. A bibliography of recent publications related to environmental studies is also presented

  1. JAXA's activities for environmental health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    In the first ten years after establishment of the Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) in 2003, our focuses were mainly on technical development (hardware and software) and accumulation of application research. In the next decade, we focus more on solution on social issues using innovative space science technology. Currently, JAXA is operating and developing several earth observation satellites and sensors: Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) "IBUKI", Global Change Observation Mission - Water "SHIZUKU" (GCOM-W), Global Precipitation Measurement/Dual- frequency Precipitation Radar (GPM/DPR), Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 "DAICHI-2" (ALOS-2), Global Change Observation Mission - Climate (GCOM-C), Earth Cloud, Aerosol and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE), and GOSAT-2. They will provide essential environmental parameters, such as aerosols, clouds, land vegetation, ocean color, GHGs, and so on. In addition to the above missions, we are studying new instruments (altimeter, LIDAR, detectors, optical components) to obtain new parameters. Our activities will advance to provide essential inputs for diagnosis, prediction, and management of climate change, environmental assessment, and disaster monitoring.

  2. Unocal Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program Environmental Monitoring Program. Annual report, October 1, 1990-December 31, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The Program agreed to comply with existing environmental monitoring regulations and to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) incorporating supplemental monitoring in the areas of water, air, solid waste, and worker health and safety during the period 1985-1992. These activities are described in a series of quarterly and annual reports. The report contains summaries of compliance and supplemental environmental and industrial hygiene and health surveillance monitoring conducted during the period; compliance permits, permit changes, and Notices of Violations discussions; statistical significance of Employee General Health information, medical histories, physical exams, pulmonary functions, clinical tests and demographics; independent audit reports; and a description of retorted shale disposal activities

  3. Suggestions for the Improvement of Environmental Radiation Monitoring in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadrack, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring in Kenya was started in 1990 following the 1979 Three Mile Island and the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plants accidents. The main purpose was to measure the radioactivity of foodstuffs imported from oversees and to carry out environmental radiation monitoring of soil, rock, water and air sample to check for contamination. Through environmental radiation monitoring, the Food and Environmental Monitoring Section (FEM) of the Kenya Radiation Protection Board (RPB) works to protect the public and environment from hazards associated with ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper was to highlight suggestions for the improvement of environmental radiation monitoring in Kenya with respect to protecting the public and the environment against undue radiation risk by ensuring that potential exposures are kept As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). The suggestions for improvement will serve as a guideline for the strengthening of environmental radiation monitoring program in Kenya

  4. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed

  5. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs

  6. UNOCAL Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental Monitoring Plan - supplemental environmental. Volume 1. Trip 2 report. Rept. for 1988-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The Program agreed to comply with existing environmental monitoring regulations and to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) incorporating supplemental monitoring in the areas of water, air, solid waste, and worker health and safety during the period 1985-1992. These activities are described in a series of quarterly and annual reports. The report contains results of three years of supplemental environmental sampling (Trial Trip, 1988; Trip 1, 1989; and Trip 2, 1990); Trip 2 sampling and analytical methods; quality assurance and quality control procedures; sampling and analytical methods; and corrected data from 1988 and 1989 gas and particulate concentrations

  7. Environmental radiation monitoring from the decommission of TRIGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Geun Sik; Lee, Chang Woo

    2000-03-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring was carried out with measurement of environmental radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around TRIGA Research Reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around TRIGA Research Reactor are the follows: The average level of environmental radiation measured by potable ERM and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost same level compared with thepast years. Gross {beta} radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. {gamma}-radionuclides in water samples were not detected. but only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. (author)

  8. A New Environmental Monitoring System For Silkworm Incubators

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandra Duque-Torres; Juan Ruiz-Rosero; Gesille Zambrano-Gonzalez; Martha Almanza-Pinzon; Oscar Mauricio Caicedo Rendon; Gustavo Ramirez-Gonzalez

    2018-01-01

    A newly Monitoring Environmental Conditions System is proposed based on Raspberry-Pi. This proposal monitors the temperature, humidity, and luminosity in a silkworm incubator. The monitoring data are collected and save in the cloud for the subsequent analysis. The monitoring environmental system is based on Raspberry Pi due to capabilities, features, and low cost. The preliminary tests were realized in a real scenery and the results demonstrating its reliability.

  9. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Database contains estuarine and coastal data that EMAP and Regional-EMAP have collected...

  10. Next Generation UAV Based Spectral Systems for Environmental Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — At present, UAVs used in environmental monitoring mostly collect low spectral resolution imagery, capable of retrieving canopy greenness or properties related water...

  11. Atmosphere Resource Recovery & Environmental Monitoring for Long Duration Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Atmosphere Resource Recovery & Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) for Long Duration Exploration Project project is maturing Atmosphere Revitalization...

  12. Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly, December 1, 1976--March 1, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, E.P. Jr.

    1977-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for four sections of this report that gives data on fallout radioactivity in environmental samples from throughout the world, Pb content in surface air samples, Pu deposits at the Rocky Flats plant, and chemical effects of SF/sub 6/ and Freon-II in the stratosphere. (CH)

  13. Environmental monitoring around the Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental Survey Laboratories (ESLs) are established at all major nuclear installations before the commissioning of an installation. As per the lndian regulations, the environmental monitoring around NPPs are carried out by an independent body. Accordingly, Environmental Survey Laboratories (ESLs) under Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is entrusted with the responsibility. This paper presents the various aspects of environmental monitoring programmes being pursued around Indian NPPs

  14. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2007-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2006 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  15. Small mammals as monitors of environmental contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talmage, S.S.; Walton, B.T.

    1991-01-01

    The merit of using small mammals as monitors of environmental contaminants was assessed using data from the published literature. Information was located on 35 species of small mammals from 7 families used to monitor heavy metals, radionuclides, and organic chemicals at mine sites, industrial areas, hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites, and agricultural and forested land. To document foodchain transfer of chemicals, concentrations in soil, vegetation, and invertebrates, where available, were included. The most commonly trapped North American species were Peromyscus leucopus, Blarina brevicauda, and Microtus pennsylvanicus. In these species, exposure to chemicals was determined from tissue residue analyses, biochemical assays, and cytogenetic assays. Where enough information was available, suitable target tissues, or biological assays for specific chemicals were noted. In general, there was a relationship between concentrations of contaminants in the soil or food, and concentrations in target tissues of several species. This relationship was most obvious for the nonessential heavy metals, cadmium, lead, and mercury and for fluoride. Kidney was the single best tissue for residue analyses of inorganic contaminants. However, bone should be the tissue of choice for both lead and fluorine. Exposure to lead was also successfully documented using biochemical and histopathological endpoints. Bone was the tissue of choice for exposure to 90Sr, whereas muscle was an appropriate tissue for 137Cs. For organic contaminants, exposure endpoints depended on the chemical(s) of concern. Liver and whole-body residue analyses, as well as enzyme changes, organ histology, genotoxicity, and, in one case, population dynamics, were successfully used to document exposure to these contaminants

  16. H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, Third and fourth quarters 1995: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    Groundwater at the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) is monitored in compliance with applicable regulations. Monitoring results are compared to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental control (SCDHEC) Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS). Historically as well as currently, nitrate-nitrite as nitrogen, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the second half of 1995. Elevated constituents were found primarily in the water table (Aquifer Zone IIB 2 ), however, constitutents exceeding standards also occurred in several different aquifer zones monitoring wells. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the H-Area HWMF have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988

  17. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, Third and fourth quarters 1995: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    Groundwater at the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) is monitored in compliance with applicable regulations. Monitoring results are compared to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS). Historically and currently, gross alpha, nitrates, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceed the GWPS in the groundwater during the second half of 1995, notably cadmium, lead, radium-226, radium-228, strontium-90, and total alpha-emitting radium. The elevated constituents were found primarily in the water table (aquifer zone IIB 2 ), however, several other aquifer unit monitoring wells contained elevated levels of constituents. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the F-Area HWMF have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988

  18. Environmental monitoring report, 1978: Pinellas Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    Effluent and environmental monitoring programs maintained by the Pinellas Plant are designed to determine efficiencies of treatment and control mechanisms; to provide measurements of discharge concentrations for comparison with applicable standards; and to assess the concentrations of these discharges in the environment. Small quantities of tritium gas, tritium oxide and krypton-85 gas were released from the plant during the year. Average maximum ground level concentrations of these radioisotopes were all significantly less than 1/10 of 1 percent of the recommended guide for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Off-site releases of liquid effluents were analyzed for compliance with NPDES permit issues for this site by the U.S. Environmental protection Agency. Analyses were performed fo biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, fecal coliform bacteria, pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, chlorides, chromium, copper, cyanides, detergents, fluorides, iron, lead, mercury, oil plus greases, phenols, turbidity and zinc. All results with the exception of suspended solids were well within permit limits. Site perimeter and off-site air samples for tritium gas and tritium oxide, as well as off-site surface water samples obtained to distances of 9.6 kilometers from the plant site and analyzed for tritium content, showed levels significantly less than 1/10 of 1 percent of the recommended guide for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Calculations were made to determine the radiation doses resulting from releases of tritium oxide and krypton-85 to: an individual at the site boundary; individuals in the closest residential area; and the population within 80 kilometers of the plant site. Calculated doses are exceedingly small when compared to the recommended standards. The total dose commitment to the population residing within 80 kilometers was determined to be 0.40 man-rem as compared to annual dose from natural radiation of 210,747 man-rem

  19. Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Sharon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) environmental surveillance is to characterize radiological and nonradiological conditions of the off-site environs and estimate public doses related to these conditions, confirm estimations of public dose based on effluent monitoring data, and, where appropriate, provide supplemental data to support compliance monitoring for applicable environmental regulations. This environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is intended to document the rationale, frequency, parameters, and analytical methods for the ORR environmental surveillance program and provides information on ORR site characteristics, environmental pathways, dose assessment methods, and quality management. ORR-wide environmental monitoring activities include a variety of media including air, surface water, vegetation, biota, and wildlife. In addition to these activities, site-specific effluent, groundwater, and best management monitoring programs are conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). This is revision 5.

  20. Bangladesh Agro-Climatic Environmental Monitoring Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermillion, C.; Maurer, H.; Williams, M.; Kamowski, J.; Moore, T.; Maksimovich, W.; Obler, H.; Gilbert, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Agro-Climatic Environmental Monitoring Project (ACEMP) is based on a Participating Agency Service Agreement (PASA) between the Agency for International Development (AID) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In FY80, the Asia Bureau and Office of Federal Disaster Assistance (OFDA), worked closely to develop a funding mechanism which would meet Bangladesh's needs both for flood and cyclone warning capability and for application of remote sensing data to development problems. In FY90, OFDA provided for a High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) receiving capability to improve their forecasting accuracy for cyclones, flooding and storm surges. That equipment is primarily intended as a disaster prediction and preparedness measure. The ACEM Project was designed to focus on the development applications of remote sensing technology. Through this Project, AID provided to the Bangladesh Government (BDG) the equipment, technical assistance, and training necessary to collect and employ remote sensing data made available by satellites as well as hydrological data obtained from data collection platforms placed in major rivers. The data collected will enable the BDG to improve the management of its natural resources.

  1. Image-based spectroscopy for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmakov, Eduard; Molina, Carolyn; Wynne, Rosalind

    2014-03-01

    An image-processing algorithm for use with a nano-featured spectrometer chemical agent detection configuration is presented. The spectrometer chip acquired from Nano-Optic DevicesTM can reduce the size of the spectrometer down to a coin. The nanospectrometer chip was aligned with a 635nm laser source, objective lenses, and a CCD camera. The images from a nanospectrometer chip were collected and compared to reference spectra. Random background noise contributions were isolated and removed from the diffraction pattern image analysis via a threshold filter. Results are provided for the image-based detection of the diffraction pattern produced by the nanospectrometer. The featured PCF spectrometer has the potential to measure optical absorption spectra in order to detect trace amounts of contaminants. MATLAB tools allow for implementation of intelligent, automatic detection of the relevant sub-patterns in the diffraction patterns and subsequent extraction of the parameters using region-detection algorithms such as the generalized Hough transform, which detects specific shapes within the image. This transform is a method for detecting curves by exploiting the duality between points on a curve and parameters of that curve. By employing this imageprocessing technique, future sensor systems will benefit from new applications such as unsupervised environmental monitoring of air or water quality.

  2. Database for environmental monitoring at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raceanu, M.; Varlam, C.; Enache, A.; Faurescu, I.

    2006-01-01

    To ensure that an assessment could be made of the impact of nuclear facilities on the local environment, a program of environmental monitoring must be established well in advance of nuclear facilities operation. Enormous amount of data must be stored and correlated starting with: location, meteorology, type sample characterization from water to different kind of food, radioactivity measurement and isotopic measurement (e.g. for C-14 determination, C-13 isotopic correction it is a must). Data modelling is a well known mechanism describing data structures at a high level of abstraction. Such models are often used to automatically create database structures, and to generate code structures used to access databases. This has the disadvantage of losing data constraints that might be specified in data models for data checking. Embodiment of the system of the present application includes a computer-readable memory for storing a definitional data table for defining variable symbols representing respective measurable physical phenomena. The definitional data table uniquely defines the variable symbols by relating them to respective data domains for the respective phenomena represented by the symbols. Well established rules of how the data should be stored and accessed, are given in the Relational Database Theory. The theory comprise of guidelines such as the avoidance of duplicating data using technique call normalization and how to identify the unique identifier for a database record. (author)

  3. Environmental monitoring well housing and protection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenner, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for housing and protecting an environmental monitoring well having a well pipe disposed in a well bore with an upper and extending toward the surface of the ground. It comprises: placing an enclosure ins aid well bore around the upper end of the well pipe, the enclosure being of unitary construction and having an upper opening, a lower opening and an inwardly-protruding ledge between the upper opening and the lower opening, placing sealing means in the well bore between the outter surface of the well pipe and the inner surface of the enclosure, the sealing means being a composition distinct from the well pipe; placing on the ledge a flexible gasket having a shape substantially identical to the shape of the surface of the ledge; placing on the gasket within the enclosure a cover having an upper surface and a peripheral shape substantially identical to the shape of the interior of the enclosure, and attaching the cover to the enclosure so that the upper opening of the enclosure and the upper surface of the cover are substantially flush with the surface of the ground

  4. Annual environmental monitoring report: calendar year 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, B.M.; Robinson, B.; Carfagno, D.G.

    1977-01-01

    The local environment surrounding Mound Laboratory was monitored for tritium and plutonium-238 released by Mound Laboratory. The results are reported for calendar year 1976. The environmental parameters analyzed included air, water, foodstuffs, and silt. The average concentrations of plutonium-238 and tritium were within the stringent standards for radioactive species adopted by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. Data concerning nonradioactive species in air and water are also presented and compared to federal, state, and local standards, where applicable. Although there are no specific standards (RCG) for plutonium-238 and tritium in foodstuffs, the concentrations found, if compared to the water standard, are also a small fraction of the RCG. In addition, there is no evidence of other than minimal reentrainment of radioactive species from silt. Mound Laboratory has undertaken a comprehensive program to bring water supplies into compliance with new U.S. EPA drinking water standards which will be effective June 24, 1977. Mound Laboratory has been granted a National Pollutant Discharge Ellimination System permit. Analyses during 1976 indicate compliance with permit conditions. All results indicated that Mound effluent streams have no significant effect on the Great Miami River and certainly do not cause Ohio Stream Standards to be exceeded. These data demonstrate compliance with various current regulatory agency standards and that the operation of Mound Laboratory has a negligible effect on the environment

  5. Database for environmental monitoring in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raceanu, Mircea; Varlam, Carmen; Iliescu, Mariana; Enache, Adrian; Faurescu, Ionut

    2006-01-01

    To ensure that an assessment could be made of the impact of nuclear facilities on the local environment, a program of environmental monitoring must be established well before of nuclear facility commissioning. Enormous amount of data must be stored and correlated starting with: location, meteorology, type sample characterization from water to different kind of foods, radioactivity measurement and isotopic measurement (e.g. for C-14 determination, C-13 isotopic correction it is a must). Data modelling is a well known mechanism describing data structures at a high level of abstraction. Such models are often used to automatically create database structures, and to generate the code structures used to access the databases. This has the disadvantage of losing data constraints that might be specified in data models for data checking. Embodiment of the system of the present application includes a computer-readable memory for storing a definitional data table for defining variable symbols representing the corresponding measurable physical quantities. Developing a database system implies setting up well-established rules of how the data should be stored and accessed what is commonly called the Relational Database Theory. This consists of guidelines regarding issues as how to avoid duplicating data using the technique called normalization and how to identify the unique identifier for a database record. (authors)

  6. Environmental restoration at the Pantex Plant. Quarterly progress report, April 12, 1995--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbeneau, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the Work Plans for activities associated with Environmental Restoration of the perched aquifer and contaminated soils at the Pantex Plant. The Higher Education Consortium/Pantex Research Laboratory is participating in the Consortium Grant to evaluate subsurface remediation alternatives for the perched aquifer at the Pantex Plant. Research activities will develop site characterization data and evaluate remediation alternatives for the perched aquifer and the overlying vadose zone. The work plans cover research activities for the remainder of FY95, and proposed activities for FY96 and thereafter. A separate document will present more detailed plans for FY96 activities and budget requirements

  7. Citizen-based environmental radiation monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alemayehu, B.; Mckinzie, M.; Cochran, T.; Sythe, D.; Randrup, R.; Lafargue, E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses a Citizen Radiation Monitoring project designed and implemented by the Natural Resources Defense Council . The goal of the project was to implement a radiation monitoring system that provides radiation data accessible to the public. The monitoring system consisted of usage of a radiation detector integrated with near real-time data collection and visualization. The monitoring systems were installed at five different locations and background radiation measurements were taken. The developed monitoring system demonstrated that citizen-based monitoring system could provide accessible radiation data to the general public and relevant to the area where they live. (author)

  8. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1982-06-01

    Results for 1981 of the LBL Environmental Monitoring Program are given. Data include monitoring results for accelerator-produced radiation, airborne and waterborne radionuclides, and nonradioactive pollutants. Population doses resulting from LBL operations are given in terms of accelerator-produced and airborne radioactivities. Trends in the environmental impacts of LBL operations are discussed in terms of accelerator-produced, airborne, and waterborne radionuclides

  9. Environmental Monitoring at the Savannah River Plant, Annual Report - 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, C.

    2001-07-26

    An environmental monitoring program has been in existence at SRP since 1951. The original preoperational surveys have evolved into an extensive environmental monitoring program in which sample types from approximately 500 locations are analyzed for radiological and/or nonradiological parameters. The results of these analyses for 1981 are presented in this report.

  10. Integrated environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaquish, R.E.

    1990-08-01

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington, has a mission of defense production, waste management, environmental restoration, advanced reactor design, and research development. Environmental programs at Hanford are conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The WHC environmental programs include the compliance and surveillance activities associated with site operations and waste management. The PNL environmental programs address the site-wide and the of-site areas. They include the environmental surveillance and the associated support activities, such as dose calculations, and also the monitoring of environmental conditions to comply with federal and state environmental regulations on wildlife and cultural resources. These are called ''independent environmental programs'' in that they are conducted completely separate from site operations. The Environmental Surveillance and Oversight Program consists of the following projects: surface environmental surveillance; ground-water surveillance; wildlife resources monitoring; cultural resources; dose overview; radiation standards and calibrations; meteorological and climatological services; emergency preparedness

  11. Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCKINNEY, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near-facility environmental monitoring directed by Waste Management Technical Services and supersedes HNF-EP-0538-4. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by Waste Management Technical Services in implementing near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.1 (DOE 1990) as a part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE-RL 1997) and is used to define: Environmental measurement and sampling locations used to monitor environmental contaminants near active and inactive facilities and waste storage and disposal sites; Procedures and equipment needed to perform the measurement and sampling; Frequency and analyses required for each measurement and sampling location; Minimum detection level and accuracy; Quality assurance components; and Investigation levels. Near-facility environmental monitoring for the Hanford Site is conducted in accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1990), 5400.5 (DOE 1993), 5484.1 (DOE 1990), and 435.1 (DOE 1999), and DOE/EH-O173T (DOE 1991). It is Waste Management Technical Services' objective to manage and conduct near-facility environmental monitoring activities at the Hanford Site in a cost-effective and environmentally responsible manner that is in compliance with the letter and spirit of these regulations and other environmental regulations, statutes, and standards

  12. 1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends.

  13. 1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends

  14. Methods and advantages of intercomparisons of TLDs for environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Klemic, G.

    1997-01-01

    One of the most difficult tasks facing the international community is the monitoring of environmental radiation for potential increases due to facility accidents or weapons activity. Monitoring networks have been established to provide a record of natural background radiation as well as measure any radiation releases from a facility. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are an important element of such networks and are the most widely used passive detector for environmental monitoring. In order to reach a high international standard in the application of TLDs in routine environmental monitoring, there is a need for a intercomparisons. (authors)

  15. The Westinghouse Hanford Company Operational Environmental Monitoring Program CY-93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.W.

    1993-10-01

    The Operational Environmental Monitoring Program (OEMP) provides facility-specific environmental monitoring to protect the environment adjacent to facilities under the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and assure compliance with WHC requirements and local, state, and federal environmental regulations. The objectives of the OEMP are to evaluate: compliance with federal (DOE, EPA), state, and internal WHC environmental radiation protection requirements and guides; performance of radioactive waste confinement systems; and trends of radioactive materials in the environment at and adjacent to nuclear facilities and waste disposal sites. This paper identifies the monitoring responsibilities and current program status for each area of responsibility

  16. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Shik; Noh, Hyung Ah [Daejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2002. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  17. Environmental radiation monitoring system in Tokai and Oarai areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigeki

    1983-01-01

    In the Tokai and the Oarai areas there are total of seventeen enterprises, different in size and kind, connected with nuclear energy. Environmental monitoring is carried out in the cooperation of the Government, local governments and enterprises according to the plans by a prefectural monitoring committee. The purpose is in the following three aspects: (1) Estimation of the dose of general people, based on environmental radioactivity and released radioactivity data (2) Grasping the radioactive accumulation on long-terms (3) Detection of abnormal releases from the enterprises at an early stage. By environmental monitoring made thus far, no rise in environmental radioactivities due to the enterprises is indicated. (author)

  18. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Shik; Noh, Hyung Ah [Daejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2002. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  19. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Shik.; Noh, Hyung Ah [Taejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Taejon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Taejon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2000. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Taejon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  20. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Sik; Noh, Hyung Ah [Daejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2001. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  1. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, J. S.; Kim, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Taejon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Taejon Radiation Monitoring Station in 1998. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Taejon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period

  2. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Jae Sik; Noh, Hyung Ah

    2001-12-01

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2001. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period

  3. Environmental management and monitoring for education building development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, R. M.

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of research were (1) a conceptual, functional model designed and implementation for environmental management and monitoring for education building development, (2) standard operational procedure made for management and monitoring for education building development, (3) assessed physic-chemical, biological, social-economic environmental components so that fulfilling sustainable development, (4) environmental management and monitoring program made for decreasing negative and increasing positive impact in education building development activities. Descriptive method is used for the research. Cibiru UPI Campus, Bandung, West Java, Indonesia was study location. The research was conducted on July 2016 to January 2017. Spatial and activities analysis were used to assess physic-chemical, biological, social-economic environmental components. Environmental management and monitoring for education building development could be decreasing water, air, soil pollution and environmental degradation in education building development activities.

  4. Pinellas Plant environmental monitoring report, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs maintained by the Pinellas Plant are designed to determine the efficiencies of treatment and control mechanisms, to provide measurements of discharge concentrations for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess the concentrations of these discharges in the environment. Small quantities of tritium gas, tritium oxide, carbon-14 labeled solvent and krypton-85 gas were released from the plant during the year. Average maximum ground level concentrations of these radioisotopes were all significantly less than 1/10 of 1% of the standard for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Off-site releases of liquid effluents were analyzed for compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for this site. Analyses were performed for biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, fecal coliform bacteria, pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, chlorides, chromium, copper, cyanides, detergents, fluorides, iron, lead, mercury, oil plus greases, phenols, turbidity and zinc. Excursions above permit limits were experienced in the results for suspended solids, fecal coliforms, iron and mercury. In addition to the non-radioactive parameters listed, a small quantity of radioactive tritium oxide was released in the effluent. Analyses showed the average concentration was 0.43% of the nonoccupational standard. Site perimeter and off-site air samples for tritium gas and tritium oxide, as well as off-site surface water samples obtained to distance of 9.6 kilometers from the plant site and analyzed for tritium content, showed levels significantly less than 1/10 of 1% of the standard for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Calculation were made to determine the radiation doses resulting from releases of tritium oxide, krypton-85 and carbon-14 to: an individual at the site boundary; individuals in the closest residential area; and the population within 80 kilometers (50 miles) of the plant site

  5. Pinellas Plant environmental monitoring report, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs are presented. Small quantities of tritium gas, tritium oxide, carbon-14 labeled solvent and krypton-85 gas were released from the plant during the year. Average maximum ground level concentrations of these radioisotopes were all less than 3/10 of 1 percent of the standard for continuous nonoccupational exposure. The plant's combined sanitary and industrial liquid effluents were analyzed for arsenic, barium, biochemical oxygen demand, boron, cadmium, total chromium, trivalent chromium, hexavalent chromium, copper, cyanide, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, phenolics, selenium, silver, sulfides, suspended solids and zinc. Small quantities of radioactive tritium were released to the POTW and from the East Pond. Analyses showed the levels were less than 1/10 of one percent of the applicable standards. Site perimeter and off-site air samples for tritium gas and tritium oxide, as well as off-site surface water samples obtained to distance of 9.6 kilometers (6 miles) from the plant site and analyzed for tritium content, showed levels significantly less than 1/10 of 1 percent of the standard for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Calculations were made to determine the radiation doses resulting from releases of tritium oxide, krypton-85 and carbon-14. The calculated doses are exceedingly small when compared to the applicable standards. The total dose commitment to the population residing within 80 kilometers (50 miles) was determined to be 0.40 man-rem as compared to the annual dose from natural radiation of 243,117 man-rem. 10 references, 3 figures, 12 tables

  6. Near-facility environmental monitoring quality assurance project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near facility environmental monitoring performed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations and supersedes WHC-EP-0538-2. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by waste management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations in implementing facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site

  7. Environmental radiation monitoring system with GPS (global positioning system)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoto, Itsuro

    2000-01-01

    This system combines a radiation monitoring car with GPS and a data processor (personal computer). It distributes the position information acquired through GPS to the data such as measured environmental radiation dose rate and energy spectrum. It also displays and edits the data for each measuring position on a map. Transmitting the data to the power station through mobile phone enables plan managers to easily monitor the environmental radiation dose rate nearby and proper emergency monitoring. (author)

  8. Environmental Sampling, Monitoring and Site Assessment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical data on environmental quality with regard to the presence of radiological contamination of all kinds regulated...

  9. The community environmental monitoring program: a model for stakeholder involvement in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwell, William T.; Shafer, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1981, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has involved stakeholders directly in its daily operation and data collection, as well as in dissemination of information on radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the primary location where the United States (US) conducted nuclear testing until 1992. The CEMP is funded by the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, and is administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. The CEMP provides training workshops for stakeholders involved in the program, and educational outreach to address public concerns about health risk and environmental impacts from past and ongoing NTS activities. The network includes 29 monitoring stations located across an approximately 160,000 km 2 area of Nevada, Utah and California in the southwestern US. The principal radiological instruments are pressurized ion chambers for measuring gamma radiation, and particulate air samplers, primarily for alpha/beta detection. Stations also employ a full suite of meteorological instruments, allowing for improved interpretation of the effects of meteorological events on background radiation levels. Station sensors are wired to state-of-the-art data-loggers that are capable of several weeks of on-site data storage, and that work in tandem with a communications system that integrates DSL and wireless internet, land line and cellular phone, and satellite technologies for data transfer. Data are managed through a platform maintained by the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) that DRI operates for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The WRCC platform allows for near real-time upload and display of current monitoring information in tabular and graphical formats on a public web site. Archival data for each station are also available on-line, providing the ability to perform trending analyses or calculate site

  10. Environmental radiation monitoring from the decommission of TRIGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi Geun Sik; Lee, Chang Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-02-01

    Environmental Radiation Monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment radiation and environment radioactivity analysis around TRIGA Research Reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around TRIGA Research Reactor are the follows: The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by potable ERM and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost same level compared with the past years. Gross {beta} radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. v-radionuclides in water samples were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. 37 refs., 12 figs., 31 tabs. (Author)

  11. Recovery and evaluation of historical environmental monitoring data at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirkes, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from the nuclear operations at the Hanford site since 1944. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task within HEDR is charged with assembling, evaluating, and summarizing key historical measurements of radionuclide concentrations in the environment on and around the Hanford site. The recovery and evaluation of historical environmental monitoring data are integral parts of the environmental dose reconstruction process. The data generated through historical environmental monitoring programs may be critical in the development of dose modeling codes and in performing a meaningful environmental pathway analysis. In addition, environmental monitoring data are essential in the verification of model calculations and in the validation of the model itself. The paper a task logic flowchart illustrating how the process evolves within the Environmental Monitoring Data Task and the interaction with other project tasks. The reconstruction of such data presents numerous challenges, many of which are not generally encountered in typical scientific studies. This paper discusses the process of reconstructing historical environmental monitoring data at Hanford. Several of the difficulties encountered during this process are presented. Items that may be beneficial and should be considered in performing such a task are identified

  12. Automated biomonitoring: living sensors as environmental monitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gruber, D; Diamond, J

    1988-01-01

    Water quality continues to present problems of global concern and has resulted in greatly increased use of automated biological systems in monitoring drinking water, industrial effluents and wastewater...

  13. Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy, Alaska final Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-14

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) provides the mechanism to evaluate the integrated coal combustion/emission control system being demonstrated by the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) as part-of the third solicitation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT-III). The EMP monitoring is intended to satisfy two objectives: (1) to develop the information base necessary for identification, assessment, and mitigation of potential environmental problems arising from replication of the technology and (2) to identify and quantify project-specific and site-specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents (Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision). The EMP contains a description of the background and history of development of the project technologies and defines the processes that will take place in the combustion and spray dryer absorber systems, including the formation of flash-calcined material (FCM) and its use in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal from the flue gases. It also contains a description of the existing environmental resources of the project area. The EMP includes two types of environmental monitoring that are to be used to demonstrate the technologies of the HCCP: compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring. Compliance monitoring activities include air emissions, wastewater effluents, and visibility. Monitoring of these resources provide the data necessary to demonstrate that the power plant can operate under the required state and federal statutes, regulations, and permit requirements.

  14. Regional Geographic Information Systems of Health and Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurolap Semen A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a new scientific and methodological approach to designing geographic information systems of health and environmental monitoring for urban areas. Geographic information systems (GIS are analytical tools of the regional health and environmental monitoring; they are used for an integrated assessment of the environmental status of a large industrial centre or a part of it. The authors analyse the environmental situation in Voronezh, a major industrial city, located in the Central Black Earth Region with a population of more than 1 million people. The proposed research methodology is based on modern approaches to the assessment of health risks caused by adverse environmental conditions. The research work was implemented using a GIS and multicriteria probabilistic and statistical evaluation to identify cause-and-effect links, a combination of action and reaction, in the dichotomy ‘environmental factors — public health’. The analysis of the obtained statistical data confirmed an increase in childhood diseases in some areas of the city. Environmentally induced diseases include congenital malformations, tumors, endocrine and urogenital pathologies. The main factors having an adverse impact on health are emissions of carcinogens into the atmosphere and the negative impact of transport on the environment. The authors identify and characterize environmentally vulnerable parts of the city and developed principles of creating an automated system of health monitoring and control of environmental risks. The article offers a number of measures aimed at the reduction of environmental risks, better protection of public health and a more efficient environmental monitoring.

  15. Environmental monitoring activities in JAERI at JCO accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2001-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) was involved in a various environmental monitoring activities, such as environmental radiation monitoring by monitoring post and monitoring car, air dust, soil, green vegetables and water sampling and measurements, neutron and gamma radiation dose rate survey around the JCO site for emergency response actions to the JCO accident on September 30, 1999. These activities were performed from Sep. 30 to Oct. 2, and were the initial and first stage activities in the emergency environmental monitoring activities. JAERI has been assigned to the public organization to support the government by Disaster Prevention Fundamental Law. These activities were performed to ensure the public safety to avoid the effluent of the accident. Through the environmental monitoring activities, I recognized that the importance of the accident information to make the best use for the initial environmental monitoring, and the monitoring information exchange is important to perform the effective monitoring activities for taking the early countermeasures such as evacuation to the public. (author)

  16. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-01-01

    Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST

  17. Modular Subsea Monitoring Network (MSM) - Realizing Integrated Environmental Monitoring Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosch, Thomas; Fietzek, Peer

    2016-04-01

    In a variety of scientific and industrial application areas, ranging i.e. from the supervision of hydrate fields over the detection and localization of fugitive emissions from subsea oil and gas production to fish farming, fixed point observatories are useful and applied means. They monitor the water column and/or are placed at the sea floor over long periods of time. They are essential oceanographic platforms for providing valuable long-term time series data and multi-parameter measurements. Various mooring and observatory endeavors world-wide contribute valuable data needed for understanding our planet's ocean systems and biogeochemical processes. Continuously powered cabled observatories enable real-time data transmission from spots of interest close to the shore or to ocean infrastructures. Independent of the design of the observatories they all rely on sensors which demands for regular maintenance. This work is in most cases associated with cost-intensive maintenance on a regular time basis for the entire sensor carrying fixed platform. It is mandatory to encounter this asset for long-term monitoring by enhancing hardware efficiency. On the basis of two examples of use from the area of hydrate monitoring (off Norway and Japan) we will present the concept of the Modular Subsea Monitoring Network (MSM). The modular, scalable and networking capabilities of the MSM allow for an easy adaptation to different monitoring tasks. Providing intelligent power management, combining chemical and acoustical sensors, adaptation of the payload according to the monitoring tasks, autonomous powering, modular design for easy transportation, storage and mobilization, Vessel of Opportunity-borne launching and recovery capability with a video-guided launcher system and a rope recovery system are key facts addressed during the development of the MSM. Step by step the MSM concept applied to the observatory hardware will also be extended towards the gathered data to maximize the

  18. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: ARSENIC MONITORING TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This technology ...

  19. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement: Quarterly report for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 2, January--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report provides information about ER Program activities conducted on the Oak Ridge Reservation under the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). Specifically, it includes information on milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period as well as scheduled for completion during the next reporting period (quarter), accomplishments of the ER Program, concerns related to program work, and scheduled activities for the next quarter. It also provides a listing of the identity and assigned tasks of contractors performing ER Program work under the FFA.

  20. Operational environmental monitoring plan for the waste isolation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, D.D.; Baker, P.L.; Cockman, J.S.; Fischer, N.T.; Flynn, D.T.; Harvill, J.P.; Knudtsen, K.L.; Louderbough, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    This plan defines the scope and extent of the WIPP effluent and environmental monitoring programs during the facility's operational life. It also discusses the quality assurance/quality control programs which ensure that samples collected and the resulting analytical data are representative of actual conditions at the WIPP site. This plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP, including: a summary of environmental program information, including an update of the status of environmental permits and compliance activities; a description of the WIPP project and its mission; a description of the local environment, including demographics; a summary of applicable standards and regulatory requirements and brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences; a summary of the preoperational environmental monitoring and assessment activities and responses to the requirements (Appendix A) and guidelines presented in the ''Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance for US DOE Operations.'' 166 refs., 28 figs., 27 tabs

  1. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Kang, Tae Woo; Park, Won Pyo [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 2002. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters.

  2. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Z. K.; Oh, S. H. [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 1997. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters.

  3. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Kang, Tae Woo; Park, Won Pyo [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 2001. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters.

  4. Environmental monitoring plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is an omnibus document providing a single point of reference for the effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORR areas outside specific facility boundaries. Authorization and requirement for the EMP are contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 Chapter 4, which states that environmental monitoring consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. This EMP is intended to document the rationale and design criteria for the effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs, extent and frequency of sampling and analysis, analytical laboratory procedures, quality assurance, implementation, and reporting. The EMP describes one of several programs that collect and analyze data to assess the impacts of ORR on the environment and human health. Others include the Environmental Restoration Program and the Clinch River Remedial Investigation Program. While the ultimate goal for DOE may be to integrate information from all these programs into a formalized assessment of risk to ecosystems and human health, that level of integration is beyond the scope of the EMP. The EMP outlines the goals of environmental monitoring for the ORR and its facilities and includes activities that are not presently conducted. In general, the programs described in this EMP represent an increase in surveillance activities over past practices

  5. Environmental monitoring report, Sandia Laboratories 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, W.L.; Simmons, T.N.

    1976-04-01

    Water and vegetation are monitored to determine Sandia Laboratories impact on the surrounding environment. Nonradioactive pollutants released are reported. Radioactive effluents are also reported and their person-rem contribution to the population is calculated

  6. Environmental Monitors on Lobster Traps Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The eMOLT project is a non-profit collaboration of industry, science, and academics devoted to monitoring of the physical environment of the Gulf of Maine and the...

  7. 2002 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-01-01

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance

  8. 1997 LMITCO Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, B.; Street, L.; Wilhelmsen, R.

    1998-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1997 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs and compares 1997 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standard, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends indicating a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. With the exception of one nitrogen sample in the disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond, compliance with permits and applicable regulations was achieved. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that public health and the environment were protected.

  9. Environmental monitoring considerations for low-level waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlet, J.

    1982-01-01

    All waste disposal sites are required to monitor the environment. The proposed NRC licensing rule, 10 CFR Part 61, requires that such monitoring be conducted before, during, and after a site is operated. An adequate monitoring program consists of measuring concentrations of radionuclides, chemically-toxic substances, and leachate indicators in environmental media and of evaluating specific physical properties of the site. In addition, the composition of the buried waste must be known. Methods for obtaining this information are discussed and monitoring programs are presented for the preoperational, operational, and postclosure phases of a disposal site. Environmental monitoring is considered in a broad context, since it includes monitoring burial trenches onsite, as well as surveillance in the offsite environment. Postclosure monitoring programs will be strongly influenced by the operational monitoring results. In some respects, this phase will be easier since the migration pathways should be well known and the number of radionuclides of concern reduced by radioactive decay. The results of the environmental monitoring program will be vital to successful site operation. These results should be used to determine if operational changes are needed and to predict future environmental impacts

  10. 3D inkjet printed disposable environmental monitoring wireless sensor node

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Shamim, Atif

    2017-01-01

    We propose a disposable, miniaturized, moveable, fully integrated 3D inkjet-printed wireless sensor node for large area environmental monitoring applications. As a proof of concept, we show the wireless sensing of temperature, humidity and H2S

  11. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1979-04-01

    Environmental monitoring data are reported for accelerator produced radiation; radionuclide measurements and release data from atmospheric and water sampling; population dose equivalent resulting from LBL operations; and non-radioactive pollutants

  12. The Telemetric Early Warning Environmental Radiation Monitoring System of Cyprus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christofides, S [Medical Physics Department, Nicosia General Hospital, Nicosia (Cyprus)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents the hardware design, the development of the software and the use of the Telemetric Early Warning Environmental Radiation Monitoring System (TEWERMS) of Cyprus. (author). 3 refs, 6 figs.

  13. Oregon Crest-to-Coast Environmental Monitoring Transect Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The US Environmental Protection Agency - Western Ecology Division (EPA) has been monitoring above- and belowground climate data from 23 locations along an Oregon...

  14. Environmental monitoring program to NUCLEMON deposits in Botuxim - Itu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An Environmental monitoring program to be executed in routine as caution against a possible contamination in adjacents regions of Radioactive Materials deposits sites of Santo Amaro (USAM)/NUCLEMON is presented. (author) [pt

  15. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING DATABASES FOR STATISTIC ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Databases designed for statistical analyses have characteristics that distinguish them from databases intended for general use. EMAP uses a probabilistic sampling design to collect data to produce statistical assessments of environmental conditions. In addition to supporting the ...

  16. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.M.; Olivieri, I.; Waller, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how...... for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We...

  17. Environmental monitoring and mitigation plan for site characterization: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the EMMP is: to identify, in consultation with the affected states and Indian tribes, potentially significant adverse environmental impacts that could result from site characterization activities, to describe data collection methods that will be used to monitor any such identified impacts, and procedures for mitigating them. Chapter 2 of the EMMP provides an overview of the background and scope of the document. Chapter 3 of the EMMP provides a description of site characterization phase activities planned to assess the geologic condition of the site and construct the exploratory shafts and surface support facilities. The rationale for developing environmental monitoring studies is presented in Chapeter 4. Chapter 5 contains descriptions of the environmental monitoring and mitigation procedures whenever they are applicable. Additionally, in Chapter 6, the EMMP includes a procedure for modifying the monitoring and mitigation program and an approach for reporting monitoring results to interested parties. 21 figs., 10 tabs

  18. Environmental monitoring in the vicinity of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacomino, V.M.F.; Maduar, M.F.

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide guidance for setting up programmes of environmental monitoring in the vicinity of establishments in a normal condition of operation. It intends to contribute for trainning of technicians working in the nuclear field. In order to illustrate the application of the basic principles described in this manual, the routine environmental monitoring programme carried out in the IPEN-CNEN/SP is presented. (author)

  19. Wireless data management system for environmental monitoring in livestock buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gray

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The impact of air quality on the health, welfare and productivity of livestock needs to be considered, especially when livestock are kept in enclosed buildings. The monitoring of such environmental factors allows for the development of appropriate strategies to reduce detrimental effects of sub-optimal air quality on the respiratory health of both livestock and farmers. In 2009, an environmental monitoring system was designed, developed and tested that allowed for the monitoring of a number of airborne pollutants. One limitation of the system was the manual collection of logged data from each unit. This paper identifies limitations of the current environmental monitoring system and suggests a range of networking technologies that can be used to increase usability. Consideration is taken for the networking of environmental monitoring units, as well as the collection of recorded data. Furthermore, the design and development of a software system that is used to collate and store recorded environmental data from multiple farms is explored. In order to design such a system, simplified software engineering processes and methodologies have been utilised. The main steps taken in order to complete the project were requirements elicitation with clients, requirements analysis, system design, implementation and finally testing. The outcome of the project provided a potential prototype for improving the environmental monitoring system and analysis informing the benefit of the implementation.

  20. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, W.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Buddemeir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Information on monitoring activities is reported in two sections for EDB/ERA/INIS. The first section covers all information reported except Appendix D, which gives details of sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring used at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A separate abstract was prepared for Appendix D

  1. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring; Umweltradioaktivitaet. Messung und Ueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-11-15

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  2. The role of digital data entry in participatory environmental monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brammer, Jeremy R.; Brunet, Nicolas D.; Burton, A.C.; Cuerrier, Alain; Danielsen, Finn; Dewan, Kanwaljeet; Herrmann, Thora Martina; Jackson, Micha V.; Kennett, Rod; Larocque, Guillaume; Mulrennan, Monica; Pratihast, Arun Kumar; Saint-Arnaud, Marie; Scott, Colin; Humphries, Murray M.

    2016-01-01

    Many argue that monitoring conducted exclusively by scientists is insufficient to address ongoing environmental challenges. One solution entails the use of mobile digital devices in participatory monitoring (PM) programs. But how digital data entry affects programs with varying levels of

  3. Environmental monitoring, restoration and assessment: What have we learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, R.H. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    The Twenty-Eighth Hanford Symposium on Health and the Environment was held in Richland, Washington, October 16--19, 1989. The symposium was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The symposium was organized to review and evaluate some of the monitoring and assessment programs that have been conducted or are currently in place. Potential health and environmental effects of energy-related and other industrial activities have been monitored and assessed at various government and private facilities for over three decades. Most monitoring is required under government regulations; some monitoring is implemented because facility operators consider it prudent practice. As a result of these activities, there is now a substantial radiological, physical, and chemical data base for various environmental components, both in the United States and abroad. Symposium participants, both platform and poster presenters, were asked to consider, among other topics, the following: Has the expenditure of millions of dollars for radiological monitoring and assessment activities been worth the effort How do we decide when enough monitoring is enough Can we adequately assess the impacts of nonradiological components -- both inorganic and organic -- of wastes Are current regulatory requirements too restrictive or too lenient Can monitoring and assessment be made more cost effective Papers were solicited in the areas of environmental monitoring; environmental regulations; remediation, restoration, and decommissioning; modeling and dose assessment; uncertainty, design, and data analysis; and data management and quality assurance. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

  4. Environmental monitoring, restoration and assessment: What have we learned?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Twenty-Eighth Hanford Symposium on Health and the Environment was held in Richland, Washington, October 16--19, 1989. The symposium was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The symposium was organized to review and evaluate some of the monitoring and assessment programs that have been conducted or are currently in place. Potential health and environmental effects of energy-related and other industrial activities have been monitored and assessed at various government and private facilities for over three decades. Most monitoring is required under government regulations; some monitoring is implemented because facility operators consider it prudent practice. As a result of these activities, there is now a substantial radiological, physical, and chemical data base for various environmental components, both in the United States and abroad. Symposium participants, both platform and poster presenters, were asked to consider, among other topics, the following: Has the expenditure of millions of dollars for radiological monitoring and assessment activities been worth the effort? How do we decide when enough monitoring is enough? Can we adequately assess the impacts of nonradiological components -- both inorganic and organic -- of wastes? Are current regulatory requirements too restrictive or too lenient? Can monitoring and assessment be made more cost effective? Papers were solicited in the areas of environmental monitoring; environmental regulations; remediation, restoration, and decommissioning; modeling and dose assessment; uncertainty, design, and data analysis; and data management and quality assurance. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases

  5. Safety and Environmental Protection Division 1975 environmental monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.P.; Ash, J.A.

    1976-04-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other environmental pollutants found in the vicinity of Brookhaven National Laboratory during 1975 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in precipitation; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk, grass and soil samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory

  6. Deep sea mining: Environmental monitoring and management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    monitoring can be done by combining long-term measurements using continuous recorders at predetermined locations over a period of time as well as intermittent observations over a particular area from time to time. A careful approach for waste disposal also...

  7. Monitoring endangered freshwater biodiversity using environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Kielgast, Jos; Iversen, Lars Lønsmann

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are among the most endangered habitats on Earth, with thousands of animal species known to be threatened or already extinct. Reliable monitoring of threatened organisms is crucial for data-driven conservation actions but remains a challenge owing to nonstandardized methods t...

  8. Environmental monitoring program for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roenick, R.G.; Kreter, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    The programs aims to determine the area of largest environmental impact, taking into consideration the various installations in the Resende Industrial Complex. In the present work a mathematical model is applied based on regional data, and after the study of the use of land and waster resources in the area. The work, begin two years before the operation of the installation, has been subsequently modified by the environmental analyses obtained. The background levels of integrated dose are determined, and all the pollutents existing in the air, land and water have been classified, with the object of characterizing the region 20 Kilometers around the nuclear installation. (Author) [pt

  9. Site characterisation and monitoring for environmental remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsley, Ian; Davies, Michael; Murley, Robert; Pearman, Ian; Harman, Nicholas; Proctor, Lorna; Armitage, Jack; Beddow, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Radioactive contamination of nuclear and mineral processing sites can be very varied. Early work in the extraction of uranium and thorium led to the disposal of large amounts of waste containing a variety of daughter radioisotopes. Later, the development of nuclear weapon programs led to large scale processing of uranium and thorium ores, physical separation of isotopes, and the initiation of nuclear fission with the resulting production of fission product radionuclides and activated metals. Weapons testing and reprocessing of reactor fuel again led to the release of fission and activation products, together with radioelements from the chemistry of fuel extraction. Finally the recovery of oil and gas reserves have once again led to renewed interest in NORM (naturally occurring radioactive materials) in the form of Pb-210/Po-210 scales in gas pipelines and Ra-226/Ra-228 in oil pipelines. Methods of monitoring for the contamination generated from all of these processes are considered together with recommended monitoring options for contamination products using gamma, beta and alpha measuring techniques. Specific examples of several site characterisation and monitoring projects are given - covering site investigation through to in-situ and on-site monitoring during the actual remediation. Many of the projects described are of a large scale, typically involving many thousands of tons of waste material. The rapid identification and sentencing into the relevant waste categories is essential in support of on-site civil engineering processes. Consideration of tailoring the monitoring process to achieve such high throughput rates is given. (authors)

  10. Environmental monitoring at the Savannah River Plant. Annual report, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeigler, C.C.; Culp, P.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-11-01

    The results of the 1980 Savannah River Plant environmental monitoring program are presented. Appendices contain data analysis and quality control information, minimum detectable levels, tabes of environmental sample analyses, and maps of sampling locations. Radioactive releases are divided into four categories for comparison with previous releases. The categories are: tritium, noble gases, beta and gamma emitters, and total alpha emitters. 34 figures, 58 tables

  11. Environmental DNA for wildlife biology and biodiversity monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohmann, Kristine; Evans, Alice; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Extraction and identification of DNA from an environmental sample has proven noteworthy recently in detecting and monitoring not only common species, but also those that are endangered, invasive, or elusive. Particular attributes of so-called environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis render it a potent t...

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued requirements for complying with DOLE and other Federal agency environmental regulations. DOE Order 5400.1 requires environmental monitoring plans for each DOE operation that uses, generates, releases, or manages pollutants of radioactive and hazardous materials

  13. Environmental Monitoring Curriculum System and Application-Oriented Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Wang, Xin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Through building the environmental monitoring curriculum system for application-oriented talents, the comprehensive design and practice were constructed from the syllabus, textbooks, web-based courses, top-quality courses, test paper bank, open laboratory and scientific research etc. The aims are to promote environmental science professional,…

  14. Industrial Environmental Monitoring — A Land Restoration Costs Tracking Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskakov, M.; Nurgaziyev, M.; Eleyushov, B.; Kayukov, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure in use in Kazakhstan for controlling the rehabilitation of sites damaged by subsurface operations. It sets out the legal requirements and a methodology for production environmental control in which a procedure is established for monitoring and impact assessment and for optimizing remediation approaches, taking into account the environmental impact and the associated costs of different options. (author)

  15. Applied research of environmental monitoring using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Young Sam; Moon, Jong Hwa; Chung, Young Ju

    1997-08-01

    This technical report is written as a guide book for applied research of environmental monitoring using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The contents are as followings; sampling and sample preparation as a airborne particulate matter, analytical methodologies, data evaluation and interpretation, basic statistical methods of data analysis applied in environmental pollution studies. (author). 23 refs., 7 tabs., 9 figs.

  16. Environmental monitoring at the Savannah River Plant. Annual report, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, C.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1975-08-01

    Results obtained from the environmental radioactivity monitoring program at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) during 1974 are summarized. A brief discussion of plant releases to the environment and radioactivity detected in the environment is presented in the following text, figures, and tables. The appendices contain tables of results from environmental samples analyses, sensitivities of laboratory analyses, and maps of sampling locations. (auth)

  17. Radiological Protection and Environmental Monitoring in Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez Pacheco, J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the main activities of the Department of Radiological Protection, Nuclear Energy Commission of Bolivia. The following topics are covered: organization, environmental control of air, water, milk and plants, personal dosimetry, instrumentation and calibration, protection in uranium mines. Standard setting and international cooperation aspects are also presented

  18. Environmental monitoring of the Cea Valduc centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guetat, Ph.; Jaskula, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the main features of the environmental control in the vicinity of the CEA Valduc centre, explains the site specific characteristics, the surveillance policy, and some historical elements about tritium atmospheric release. Some levels of activities are given, corresponding to an exposure level below 0.02% of natural irradiation. (author)

  19. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report. Calendar Year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations

  20. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-12-31

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

  1. Smart Sensing Technology for Agriculture and Environmental Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The book focuses on the different aspects of sensing technology, i.e. high reliability, adaptability, recalibration, information processing, data fusion, validation and integration of novel and high performance sensors specifically aims to monitor agricultural and environmental parameters.   This book is dedicated to Sensing systems for Agricultural and Environmental Monitoring  offers to variety of users, namely, Master and PhD degree students, researchers, practitioners, especially Agriculture and Environmental engineers. The book will provide an opportunity of a dedicated and a deep approach in order to improve their knowledge in this specific field.

  2. Multiparametric methane sensor for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borecki, M.; Duk, M.; Kociubiński, A.; Korwin-Pawlowski, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Today, methane sensors find applications mostly in safety alarm installations, gas parameters detection and air pollution classification. Such sensors and sensors elements exists for industry and home use. Under development area of methane sensors application is dedicated to ground gases monitoring. Proper monitoring of soil gases requires reliable and maintenance-free semi-constant and longtime examination at relatively low cost of equipment. The sensors for soil monitoring have to work on soil probe. Therefore, sensor is exposed to environment conditions, as a wide range of temperatures and a full scale of humidity changes, as well as rain, snow and wind, that are not specified for classical methane sensors. Development of such sensor is presented in this paper. The presented sensor construction consists of five commercial non dispersive infra-red (NDIR) methane sensing units, a set of temperature and humidity sensing units, a gas chamber equipped with a micro-fan, automated gas valves and also a microcontroller that controls the measuring procedure. The electronics part of sensor was installed into customized 3D printed housing equipped with self-developed gas valves. The main development of proposed sensor is on the side of experimental evaluation of construction reliability and results of data processing included safety procedures and function for hardware error correction. Redundant methane sensor units are used providing measurement error correction as well as improved measurement accuracy. The humidity and temperature sensors are used for internal compensation of methane measurements as well as for cutting-off the sensor from the environment when the conditions exceed allowable parameters. Results obtained during environment sensing prove that the gas concentration readings are not sensitive to gas chamber vertical or horizontal position. It is important as vertical sensor installation on soil probe is simpler that horizontal one. Data acquired during six

  3. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Nevada Test Site and support facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan applies to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) operations on the Continental US (including Amchitka Island, Alaska) that are under the purview of the DOE Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV). The primary purpose of these operations is the conduct of the nuclear weapons testing program for the DOE and the Department of Defense. Since 1951, these tests have been conducted principally at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, this Environmental Monitoring Plan brings together in one document a description of the environmental activities conducted at the NTS by user organizations, operations support contractors, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The EPA conducts both the offsite environmental monitoring program around the NTS and post-operational monitoring efforts at non-NTS test locations used between 1961 and 1973 in other parts of the continental US. All of these monitoring activities are conducted under the auspices of the DOE/NV, which has the stated policy of conducting its operations in compliance with both the letter and the spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards

  4. Environmental radiation monitoring system in nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Sadazumi; Tadachi, Katsuo; Endo, Mamoru; Yuya, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    At the time of the construction of nuclear power stations, prior to their start of operation, the state of environmental radiation must be grasped. After the start of the power stations, based on those data, the system of environmental radiation monitoring is established. Along with the construction of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, The Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. jointly with Fujitsu Ltd. has developed a high-reliability, environmental radiation monitoring system, and adopted ''optical data highways'' using optical fiber cables for communication. It consists of a central monitoring station and 11 telemeter observation points, for collecting both radiation and meteorological data. The data sent to the central station through the highways are then outputted on a monitoring panel. They are analyzed with a central processor, and the results are printed out. (Mori, K.)

  5. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  6. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations

  7. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Kang, Tae Woo [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 2000. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters. There was no significant difference in environmental radioactivities between 1999 and 2000.

  8. BNL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN TRIENNIAL UPDATE, JANUARY 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multi-program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is located on a 5,265-acre site in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. BNL has a comprehensive Environmental Management System (EMS) in place, which meets the requirements of the International Organization for Standardization 14001 EMS Standard, as described in the BNL EMS Manual. BNL's extensive environmental monitoring program is one component of the EMS, and the BNL Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes this program in detail. The data derived from systematically monitoring the various environmental media on site enable BNL to make informed decisions concerning the protection of human health and the environment and to be responsive to community concerns.

  9. NST Quarterly - issue January 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    NST Quarterly reports current development in Nuclear Science and Technology in Malaysia. The subjects discussed are i. food and drinking water which are the major pathways of radionuclides to man and ii. nuclear techniques help to monitor sedimentation in reservoir

  10. Development of monitoring technology for environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Cho, Young Hyun; Lee, M. H.; Choi, K. S.; Hong, K. H.; Sin, H. S.; Kim, M. K.; Pak, J. H.

    2000-05-01

    The accurate and reliable determination techniques of the radioactive isotopes in environmental samples are very important to protect public health from the potential hazards of radiation. Isolation and purification of radiostrontium from environmental aqueous sample was performed by using strontium selectively binding resin (Sr-spec) and strontium selectively permeable liquid membrane. Radioactivity of radiostrontium was measured by liquid scintillation counter coupled with dual counting window and spectrum unfolding method. With combustion apparatus a new determination of Tc-99 in the environmental samples was developed for overcoming demerits of conventional TBP extraction method. An optimized method for determining beta-emitting 2 41Pu in the presence of alpha-emitting nuclides was developed using a liquid scintillation counting system. A method for measuring Rn-222 and Ra-226 in aqueous sample using liquid scintillation counting technique has studied. On-line measurement system coupled with ion chromatography and portable liquid scintillation detector was developed. U and Th measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The mehtod of flow-injection preconcentration for the analysis of U and Th in seawater was developed. A new electrodeposition method for alpha spectrometry was developed

  11. Development of monitoring technology for environmental radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Cho, Young Hyun; Lee, M. H.; Choi, K. S.; Hong, K. H.; Sin, H. S.; Kim, M. K.; Pak, J. H

    2000-05-01

    The accurate and reliable determination techniques of the radioactive isotopes in environmental samples are very important to protect public health from the potential hazards of radiation. Isolation and purification of radiostrontium from environmental aqueous sample was performed by using strontium selectively binding resin (Sr-spec) and strontium selectively permeable liquid membrane. Radioactivity of radiostrontium was measured by liquid scintillation counter coupled with dual counting window and spectrum unfolding method. With combustion apparatus a new determination of Tc-99 in the environmental samples was developed for overcoming demerits of conventional TBP extraction method. An optimized method for determining beta-emitting {sup 2}41Pu in the presence of alpha-emitting nuclides was developed using a liquid scintillation counting system. A method for measuring Rn-222 and Ra-226 in aqueous sample using liquid scintillation counting technique has studied. On-line measurement system coupled with ion chromatography and portable liquid scintillation detector was developed. U and Th measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The mehtod of flow-injection preconcentration for the analysis of U and Th in seawater was developed. A new electrodeposition method for alpha spectrometry was developed.

  12. Programmes and Systems for Source and Environmental Radiation Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The discharge of radionuclides to the atmosphere and aquatic environments is a legitimate practice in the nuclear and other industries, hospitals and research. Where appropriate, monitoring of the discharges and of relevant environmental media is an essential regulatory requirement in order to ensure appropriate radiation protection of the public. Such monitoring provides information on the actual amounts of radioactive material discharged and the radionuclide concentrations in the environment, and is needed to demonstrate compliance with authorized limits, to assess the radiation exposure of members of the public and to provide data to aid in the optimization of radiation protection. Uncontrolled releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere and aquatic environments may occur as a result of a nuclear or radiological accident. Again, monitoring at the source of the release and of the environment is necessary. In this case, monitoring is used both to assess the radiation exposure of members of the public and to determine the actions necessary for public protection, including longer term countermeasures. Source and environmental monitoring associated with the release of radionuclides to the environment is the subject of a number of IAEA Safety Standards, particularly IAEA Safety Standard RS-G-1.8 (Environmental and Source Monitoring for Purposes of Radiation Protection). This publication is intended to complement this Safety Guide and, by so doing, replaces Safety Series No. 41 (Objectives and Design of Environmental Monitoring Programmes for Radioactive Contaminants) and Safety Series No. 46 (Monitoring of Airborne and Liquid Radioactive Releases from Nuclear Facilities to the Environment). Like Safety Standard RS-G-1.8, this Safety Report deals with monitoring at the source and in the environment associated with authorized releases of radionuclides to the environment. It also deals with the general issues of emergency monitoring during and in the aftermath of an

  13. Exploring the heavy air pollution in Beijing in the fourth quarter of 2015: assessment of environmental benefits for red alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Teng; Nie, Lei; Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Zhanshan; Xue, Yifeng; Gao, Jiajia; Wu, Xiaoqing; Fan, Shoubin; Cheng, Linglong

    2018-06-01

    In recent years, Beijing has experienced severe air pollution which has caused widespread public concern. Compared to the same period in 2014, the first three quarters of 2015 exhibited significantly improved air quality. However, the air quality sharply declined in the fourth quarter of 2015, especially in November and December. During that time, Beijing issued the first red alert for severe air pollution in history. In total, 2 red alerts, 3 orange alerts, 3 yellow alerts, and 3 blue alerts were issued based on the adoption of relatively temporary emergency control measures to mitigate air pollution. This study explored the reasons for these variations in air quality and assessed the effectiveness of emergency alerts in addressing severe air pollution. A synthetic analysis of emission variations and meteorological conditions was performed to better understand these extreme air pollution episodes in the fourth quarter of 2015. The results showed that compared to those in the same period in 2014, the daily average emissions of air pollutants decreased in the fourth quarter of 2015. However, the emission levels of primary pollutants were still relatively high, which was the main intrinsic cause of haze episodes, and unfavorable meteorological conditions represented important external factors. Emergency control measures for heavy air pollution were implemented during this red alert period, decreasing the emissions of primary air pollutants by approximately 36% and the PM2.5 concentration by 11%‒21%.

  14. Design and analysis of environmental monitoring programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lophaven, Søren Nymand

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes statistical methods for modelling space-time phenomena. The methods were applied to data from the Danish marine monitoring program in the Kattegat, measured in the five-year period 1993-1997. The proposed model approaches are characterised as relatively simple methods, which...... into account. Thus, it serves as a compromise between existing methods. The space-time model approaches and geostatistical design methods used in this thesis are generally applicable, i.e. with minor modifications they could equally well be applied within areas such as soil and air pollution. In Danish: Denne...

  15. Active sites environmental monitoring Program - Program Plan: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, C.M.; Hicks, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of active low-level-waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Several changes have recently occurred in regard to the sites that are currently used for waste storage and disposal. These changes require a second set of revisions to the ASEMP program plan. This document incorporates those revisions. This program plan presents the organization and procedures for monitoring the active sites. The program plan also provides internal reporting levels to guide the evaluation of monitoring results

  16. Development of technology on environmental monitoring, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigemitsu; Shimizu, Takehiko; Akutsu, Ken; Shinohara, Kunihiko

    1992-01-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99), which has a long half-life and relatively high fission yield, is one of the important radionuclide for environmental assessment. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the distribution and behavior of these long-lived radionuclides in the environment. The conventional method for the determination of Tc-99 is beta-ray counting using a low-background gas flow proportional counter. However, the method has disadvantages in that it demands a high degree of radiochemical purification of Tc-99 to eliminate beta-ray emitting nuclides coexisting in the samples and the electrodeposition of Tc-99 for it activity counting, and in that it requires a rather long counting time. A new analytical technique using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied to the determination of some long-lived radionuclides in environmental samples. The sensitivities were 10 to 10000 times better than other counting method. And counting times were 300 to 10000 times shorter than that method. ICP-MS is expected to be widely used for the determination of other low level and long-lived radionuclides, with high precision and lower detection limit. (author)

  17. Environmental monitoring in four European museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuffo, Dario; Van Grieken, Rene; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Sturaro, Giovanni; Valentino, Antonio; Bernardi, Adriana; Blades, Nigel; Shooter, David; Gysels, Kristin; Deutsch, Felix; Wieser, Monika; Kim, Oliver; Ulrych, Ursula

    In a European multidisciplinary research project concerning environmental diagnostics, museums have been selected, having different climate and pollution conditions, i.e.: Correr Museum, Venice (Italy); Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna (Austria); Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp (Belgium); Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, Norwich (UK). Some field tests investigated the microclimate, the gaseous and particulate air pollution and the biological contamination to suggest mitigative techniques that may reduce the potential for damage in the long run. Potential risk factors are generated by imbalance in temperature and humidity, generated by heating, air conditioning or ventilating system (HVAC), or the building structures, exchange of outside air, or large visitor numbers. HVAC may also enhance indoor gaseous pollution. Plants and carpets represent potential niches for bacterial colonisation. Pollutants and particles have been recognised having partly external and partly internal origin. Tourism has a direct negative impact, i.e. transport of external particles, release of heat, vapour and CO 2, as well as generation of turbulence, which increases the deposition rate of particulate matter. However, the main problem is that the microclimate has been planned for the well being of visitors during only the visiting time, disregarding the needs of conservation that requires a constant climate by day and by night. In some of these cases, better environmental niches have been obtained with the help of showcases. In other cases, showcases worsened the situation, especially when incandescent lamps were put inside.

  18. Environmental monitoring at the Savannah River Plant. Annual report, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeigler, C.C.; Lawrimore, I.B.; O'Rear, W.E.

    1985-06-01

    Ensuring the radiation safety of the public in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant was a foremost consideration in the design of the plant and has continued to be a primary objective during 31 years of SRP operations. An extensive surveillance program has been continuously maintained since 1951 (before SRP startup) to determine the concentrations of radionuclides in the environment of the plant. The results of this comprehensive monitoring program are reported annually in two publications. The first, ''Savannah River Plant Environmental Report for 1984'' [DPSPU85-30-1], contains radiation dose data, routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities, summaries of environmental protection programs that are in progress, summaries of sitewide environmental research and management programs, and a summary of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities. This report is the second and contains primarily radiation dose data and radiological and nonradiological monitoring data both onsite and offsite. It is placed in Department of Energy (DOE) reading rooms and is available to the public upon request. A listing of corresponding reports that have been issued since before plant startup is presented in Appendix A. The scope of the environmental monitoring program at SRP has increased significantly during the years since plant startup. The change is reflected in annual reports. Prior to the mid-1970's the reports contained primarily radiological monitoring data. Beginning in the mid-1970's the reports started including more and more nonradiological monitoring data as those programs increased. The nonradiological monitoring program now approaches the size and extensiveness of the radiological monitoring program

  19. Environmental monitoring systems: a new type of mobile laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, L.; Langmueller, G.; Tuerschmann, G.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear facilities are obligated to monitor the environmental radiation in their vicinity, which is often fulfilled by monitoring cars, combined with fixed monitoring stations. The MOLAR Mobile Laboratory for Environmental Radiation Monitoring as described here is being used under normal and accident conditions as a spot check monitoring system or to perform continuous measurements along a driving track. The mobile laboratories are continuously connected with the control centre's CRCS Central Radiological Computer System, where the RIS Radiological Information System provides corresponding evaluation functions. The mobile labs contain measuring and controlling units like γ-dose rate monitors, γ-spectrometer with a HpGe High Purity Germanium detector, a lead shielded measuring cell and MCA Multi-Channel Analyser, portable β-contamination monitor, α/β/γ multipurpose quick measuring unit, aerosol and iodine sampling units. The collected samples are safely stored for the transport to the environmental laboratory for being analysed later. The geographical location of the moving car is continuously determined by the satellite based GPS Global Positioning System and transferred in the on-board rack mounted computer system for being stored and locally displayed. Real-time data transmission via radio and mobile phone is continuously performed to supply the RIS Radiological Information System in the control centre via radio and mobile phone. The latter also serves for voice communication. Currently three MOLAR systems can be operated parallel and independent from the control centre. The system is ready to be extended to more mobile labs. This combination of mobile monitoring, sample analysis and radiological assessment of environmental data in combination with process occurrences has turned out to be a powerful instrument for emergency preparedness and environmental supervising. (orig.) [de

  20. Environmental monitoring of the Angra reactor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, J.R.D.; Winter, M.

    1986-04-01

    The single and sumarized results obtained under the monitoring program are presented and compared with those obtained during the preoperational period. Direct radiation was measured with a solid-state dosimeter network. The concentration levels of natural and artificial radionuclides were determined in primary media like air, surface and sea water, in accumulators like soil, sand and sediments, in indicators like grass and seaweed, and in the main local foodstuff, which includes marine produce (fish, shellfish and shrimps), milk bananas, manioc and oranges. The measurements included gross alpha and beta activity measurements and gamma spectrometry. Specific techniques were used for the measurement of the activity concentration of tritium in sea water and surface water and of I-131 in air and milk. The only detectable artificial radionuclide was CS-137 whose occasional presence in milk, pasture, fish and manioc can be attributed to world-wide fallout. (orig./PW) [de

  1. NST Quarterly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    NST Quarterly reports current development in nuclear science and technology in Malaysia. It keeps readers informed on the progress of research, services, application of nuclear science and technology, and other technical news. It highlights MINT activities and also announces coming events

  2. NST Quarterly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    NST Quarterly reports current development in nuclear science and technology in Malaysia. It keeps readers informed on the progress of research, services, application of nuclear science and technology, and other technical news. It highlights MINT activities and also announces coming events.

  3. Environmental radioactivity monitoring around the Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, K.; Hareyama, H.; Takeishi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited has carried out environmental monitoring in order to check that the dose of radiation to which the public is exposed around the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is much lower than the annual dose limit. The monitoring is mainly carried out according to 'the program decided by the Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC) of Japan' and 'the program decided by the Aomori Prefectural Government.' In this report, we present information on the monitoring according to the NSC program, that is the point of view of selection of the monitoring items for dose assessment, the point of view of the dose assessment from the monitoring results, etc. Also, we report on estimation of the effects from the facilities on the monitoring results obtained and dose assessment of the public during Active testing of RRP. (author)

  4. Comfort monitoring? Environmental assessment follow-up under community-industry negotiated environmental agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, Bram; Birk, Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    Negotiated environmental agreements are becoming common practice in the mining industry. In principle, negotiated environmental agreements are said to respond to many of the shortcomings of environmental impact assessment by providing for improved follow-up of project impacts through, among other things, data provision, engaging stakeholders in the monitoring and management of project impacts, and building capacity at the local level to deal with project-induced environmental change. In practice, however, little is known about the efficacy of follow-up under negotiated environmental agreements between proponents and communities and the demonstrated value added to project impact management. This paper examines follow-up practice under negotiated environmental agreements with a view to understanding whether and how community-based monitoring under privatized agreements actually contributes to improved follow-up and impact management. Based on lessons emerging from recent experiences with environmental agreements in Canada's uranium industry, we show that follow-up under negotiated agreements may be described as 'comfort monitoring'. While such monitoring does improve community-industry relations and enhance corporate image, it does little to support effects-based management. If follow-up under negotiated agreements is to be credible over the long term, there is a need to ensure that monitoring results are useful for, and integrated with, regulatory-based monitoring and project impact management practices.

  5. INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING--Radiation--Vol3Pt1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authors, Various

    1972-01-02

    A comprehensive survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring is being carried out by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory originally under a grant from the National Science Foundation and now by the Office of Health and Environmental Research of the Department of Energy. Instruments being investigated are those useful for measurements in Air Quality, Water Quality, Radiation, and Biomedicine related to environmental research and monitoring. Consideration is given to instruments and techniques presently in use and to those developed for other purposes but having possible applications to this work. The results of the survey are given as (a) descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, (b) critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and (c) recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. Information is also given regarding the pollutants to be monitored: their characteristics and forms, their sources and pathways, their effects on the ecosystem, and the means of controlling them through process and regulatory controls.

  6. Environmental monitoring at the Savannah River Plant. Annual report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, C.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1978-03-01

    The environmental monitoring program at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) provides reliable measurement of radioactive materials released at the source (approximately 40 locations) and present in the environment (approximately 500 locations). In recent years, water-quality testing and analysis have become an essential part of the environmental monitoring program. Aqueous discharges to plant streams are monitored for nonradioactive materials by chemical analyses of water sampled in flowing streams (approximately 25 locations). A brief discussion of plant releases to the environment and radioactive and nonradioactive materials detected in the environment are presented. The appendices contain data analysis and quality control information, sensitivities of laboratory analyses, tables of environmental sample analyses, and maps of sampling locations

  7. The use of plants for environmental monitoring and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Freemark, K

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents a critical review on phytotoxicity tests for environmental monitoring and assessment. Vascular macrophytes used in the laboratory testing are emphasized; algae are mentioned only for comparison. Several issues are discussed, including the rationale for and misconceptions about phytotoxicity tests, relation to regulation, status of phytotoxicity test protocols, advantages and disadvantages of phytotoxicity tests, and possible research directions. Aquatic and terrestrial macrophytes, along with algae, are essential components of ecosystems. Macrophytes are becoming more important for the monitoring and assessment of herbicides, effluents, and industrial chemicals. In the United States, Canada, and international organizations, phytotoxicity tests can be required for environmental monitoring and assessment in statutes such as Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act; Toxic Substances Control Act; Water Quality Act; Canadian Pest Control Products Act; and Canadian Environmental Protection Act. Possible research directions for phytotoxicity tests are discussed relative to the role in regulations of industrial chemicals, effluents, hazardous waste sites, and pesticides.

  8. Graphic overview system for DOE's effluent and environmental monitoring programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burson, Z.G.; Elle, D.R.

    1980-03-01

    The Graphic Overview System is a compilation of photos, maps, overlays, and summary information of environmental programs and related data for each DOE site. The information consists of liquid and airborne effluent release points, on-site storage locations, monitoring locations, aerial survey results, population distributions, wind roses, and other related information. The relationships of different environmental programs are visualized through the use of colored overlays. Trends in monitoring data, effluent releases, and on-site storage data are also provided as a corollary to the graphic display of monitoring and release points. The results provide a working tool with which DOE management (headquarters and field offices) can place in proper perspective key aspects of all environmental programs and related data, and the resulting public impact of each DOE site

  9. Environmental monitoring at the Savannah River Plant. Annual report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, C.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1975-01-01

    The environmental monitoring program at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) provides reliable measurement of radioactive materials both released at the source (approximately 40 locations) and concentrated in the environment (approximately 500 locations). In recent years, water quality testing and analysis have become an essential part of the environmental monitoring program. Aqueous discharges to plant streams are monitored for nonradioactive materials by chemical analyses of water sampled in flowing streams (approximately 25 locations). A brief discussion of plant releases to the environment and radioactive and nonradioactive materials detected in the environment are presented in the following text, figures, and tables. The appendices contain an interpretation of data treatment, tables of results of environmental sample analyses, sensitivities of laboratory analyses, and maps of sampling locations

  10. Integrating environmental monitoring with cumulative effects management and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronmiller, Joshua G; Noble, Bram F

    2018-05-01

    Cumulative effects (CE) monitoring is foundational to emerging regional and watershed CE management frameworks, yet monitoring is often poorly integrated with CE management and decision-making processes. The challenges are largely institutional and organizational, more so than scientific or technical. Calls for improved integration of monitoring with CE management and decision making are not new, but there has been limited research on how best to integrate environmental monitoring programs to ensure credible CE science and to deliver results that respond to the more immediate questions and needs of regulatory decision makers. This paper examines options for the integration of environmental monitoring with CE frameworks. Based on semistructured interviews with practitioners, regulators, and other experts in the Lower Athabasca, Alberta, Canada, 3 approaches to monitoring system design are presented. First, a distributed monitoring system, reflecting the current approach in the Lower Athabasca, where monitoring is delegated to different external programs and organizations; second, a 1-window system in which monitoring is undertaken by a single, in-house agency for the purpose of informing management and regulatory decision making; third, an independent system driven primarily by CE science and understanding causal relationships, with knowledge adopted for decision support where relevant to specific management questions. The strengths and limitations of each approach are presented. A hybrid approach may be optimal-an independent, nongovernment, 1-window model for CE science, monitoring, and information delivery-capitalizing on the strengths of distributed, 1-window, and independent monitoring systems while mitigating their weaknesses. If governments are committed to solving CE problems, they must invest in the long-term science needed to do so; at the same time, if science-based monitoring programs are to be sustainable over the long term, they must be responsive to

  11. Countrywide Environmental Radiation Monitoring in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golder, F.; Osvay, M.

    1998-01-01

    Hungary has a countrywide early warning radiation monitoring network which consist of about 70 stations in an on-line connection with the Emergency Information Center of the National System for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness. The system consists of a variety of stations and organizations including Hungarian Meteorological Service, Ministry of Environment and Regional Policy operate their own networks which are not connected with the central system, but could in certain cases exchange the data. The overall impression of the early warning for the radiation emergency is very good, as the system is in the 24 hours on-line mode and raise alarm immediately if the measured values exceed the preset limit. It this respect, the organization appears very good and capable (together with laboratory services) to assure reasonable protection of the population. The possibility to measure the radioactivity in the environment, food and water exist through a series of laboratories, which operate throughout the country. Those appear to be reasonably well equipped and both the knowledge and the experience of their staff appear very high. The same applies for the tools and methods used to forecast the impact and the consequences. (author)

  12. Environmental monitoring for tritium separation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlam, Carmen; Stefanescu, Ioan; Steflea, Dumitru; Lazar, Roxana Elena

    2001-01-01

    The Cryogenic Pilot is an experimental project within the nuclear energy national research program, which has the aim of developing technologies for tritium and deuterium separation by cryogenic distillation. The experimental installation is located 15 km near the highest city of the area and 1 km near Olt River. An important chemical activity is developed in the area and almost all the neighbors of the Experimental Cryogenic Pilot are chemical plants. It is necessary to emphasize this aspect because the sewage system is connected with the other tree chemical plants from the neighborhood. In this work, a low background liquid scintillation is used to determine tritium activity concentration according to ISO 9698/1998. We measured drinking water, precipitation, river water, underground and waste water. The tritium level was between 10 TU and 27 TU what indicates that there is no sources of tritium contamination in the neighborhood of Cryogenic Pilot. In order to determine baseline levels we decided to monitor monthly each location. In this paper it is presented the standard method used for tritium determination in water samples, the precautions needed in order to achieve reliable results, and the evolution of tritium level in different location near the Tritium and Deuterium Cryogenic Separation Experimental Pilot. (authors)

  13. Environmental monitoring plan, July 1--December 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) under the terms of the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA) are providing annual reports: reporting of State's monitoring and analysis, and findings of DOE's quality and effectiveness of DOE's monitoring and surveillance. This report blends some of both of the required annual reports as described in the TOA section A.7.2.2. The Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) integrates the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation. This report presents the results of environmental monitoring in Tennessee in the following areas: surface waters; ground water; air; and fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas

  14. 1998 Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. V. Street

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1998 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1998 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The INEEL complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the exception of nitrogen samples in a disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  15. Environmental monitoring with TLD in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, P.; Mora, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using thermoluminescent dosimeters (Harshaw TLD-200) the first set of costarican data on absorbed doses in air from natural radiation is obtained. During the period from September 1996 to october 2000 eight different sites throughout the country were chosen to instal the TLD stations. Each station had eight cards (five were changed every three months and three changed annually). The dosimeters were read in the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory using a 4000 Harshaw reader and with the help a mathematical algorithm and the equipment calibration factors the dose rate in air (nGy h -1 ) was calculated. The national average is 108.9 ± 32.4 nGy h -1 , the lowest values (in nGy h -1 ) were obtain at sea level at Quebrada Honda with 53 ± 11 and the highest values (in nGy h -1 ) at Cartago with 160 ± 19. A slight increase with altitude is observed even though the Cartago station was always the highest. The values found agree with reported worldwide values for environmental doses in air. (Author) [es

  16. Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly, March 1--June 1, 1976. [Fallout, natural radioactivity, and lead in environmental samples from USA, India, and Taiwan during 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, E.P. Jr.

    1976-07-01

    This report presents current data from the HASL environmental programs, the Air Monitoring Section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Center in India, the Health Physics Section of the Institute of Nuclear Science in Taiwan and the Radiological and Environmental Research Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial section consists of interpretive reports and notes on the history of long-range fallout, cesium-137 in Bombay milk, natural and fallout radioactivity in Indian diet, reporting results of radioactivity measurements at near zero levels of sample activity and background, plutonium in soil northeast of the Nevada Test Site, radon levels at the Lloyd, NY regional station, strontium-90 in New York and San Francisco diets through 1975, plutonium-239, 240 in 1974 diet, up-dating stratospheric radionuclide inventories to July 1975 and a revised table of radionuclides. Subsequent sections include tabulations of radionuclide levels in stratospheric air; lead and radionuclides in surface air; strontium-90 in deposition, milk, diet, tap water, and human bone; cesium-137 in Chicago foods in April 1976; and environmental radioactivity surveys for nuclear power plants in North Taiwan. A bibliography of recent publications related to environmental studies is also presented.

  17. An agent-based intelligent environmental monitoring system

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasiadis, Ioannis N; Mitkas, Pericles A

    2004-01-01

    Fairly rapid environmental changes call for continuous surveillance and on-line decision making. There are two main areas where IT technologies can be valuable. In this paper we present a multi-agent system for monitoring and assessing air-quality attributes, which uses data coming from a meteorological station. A community of software agents is assigned to monitor and validate measurements coming from several sensors, to assess air-quality, and, finally, to fire alarms to appropriate recipie...

  18. Environmental Monitoring Of Microbiological Laboratory: Expose Plate Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahaya Talib; Othman Mahmud; Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Asmah Mohibat; Muhamad Syazwan Zulkifli

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of microorganism is important and conducted regularly on environment of microbiological laboratory at Medical Technology Division. Its objective is to ensure the quality of working environment is maintained according to microbial contamination, consequently to assure the quality of microbiological tests. This paper presents report of environmental monitoring since year 2007. The test involved was bacterial colony counts after the growth media was exposed to air at identified location. (author)

  19. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000

  20. Environmental monitoring of low-level radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jester, W.A.; Yu, C.

    1985-01-01

    The authors discuss some of the current rationale behind the environmental monitoring of low-level radioactive materials are as follows: Committee 4 of the International commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) defined three broad objectives for environmental monitoring: 1) assessment of the actual or potential exposure of humans to radioactive materials or radiation present in their environment or the estimation of the probable upper limits of such exposure; 2) scientific investigation, sometimes related to the assessment of exposures, sometimes to other objectives; 3) improved public relations. Various regulations have been written requiring environmental monitoring to ensure that the public is not being exposed to excessive amounts of radiation from natural sources or from human activities. An example of the monitoring of natural sources of radiation is a requirement of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations whereby U.S. water supply companies must have drinking water monitored at least once every four years for radionuclides, primarily the naturally occurring radium-226

  1. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000.

  2. Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2001 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U. S. Department of Energy

  3. 1997 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1997 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE)

  4. Naval Reactors Facility Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2003 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy

  5. Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1999 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

  6. 1993 environmental monitoring report for the naval reactors facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1993 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE)

  7. 1991 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1991 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were within the guidelines established by state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or heath and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the EnVironmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE)

  8. Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2000 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

  9. Environmental monitoring and cooperative resource management at the WIPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This poster session by the Environmental Monitoring Section of the US DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is to demonstrate that the DOE is committed to sound environmental management. This WIPP poster session demonstrates radiological as well as nonradiological environmental monitoring activities conducted routinely at the WIPP. And how data collected prior to the WIPP being operational is used to establish a preoperational baseline for environmental studies in which the samples collected during the operational phase will be compared. Cooperative Resource Management is a relatively new concept for governments agencies. It allows two or more agencies the ability to jointly share in funding a program or project and yet both agencies can benefit from the outcome. These programs are usually a biological type study. The WIPP cooperative agreement between the US BLM, DOE and its contractors is to continue the ongoing documentation of the diversity of the Chihuahuan desert

  10. Neutron dosimetry. Environmental monitoring in a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavera D, L.; Camacho L, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The measurements carried out on reactor dosimetry are applied mainly to the study on the effects of the radiation in 108 materials of the reactor; little is on the environmental dosimetry outside of the primary container of BWR reactors. In this work the application of a neutron spectrometer formed by plastic detectors of nuclear traces manufactured in the ININ, for the environmental monitoring in penetrations around the primary container of the unit I of the Laguna Verde central is presented. The neutron monitoring carries out with purposes of radiological protection, during the operational tests of the reactor. (Author)

  11. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs

  12. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  13. Environmental monitoring report, 1980: Pinellas Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    Results of the monitoring program at the Pinellas Plant are described. Small quantities of tritium gas, tritium oxide, carbon-14 labeled solvent and krypton-85 gas were released from the plant during the year. Average maximum ground level concentrations of these radioisotopes were all significantly less than 0.1% of the recommended guide for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Off-site releases of liquid effluents were analyzed for compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Analyses were performed for biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, fecal coliform bacteria, pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, chlorides, chromium, copper, cyanides, detergents, fluorides, iron, lead, mercury, oil plus greases, phenols, turbidity, and zinc. In addition to the non-radioactive parameters listed above, a small quantity of radioactive tritium oxide was released in the effluent. Analyses showed the average concentration was 0.20% of the nonoccupational exposure guide. Site perimeter and off-site air samples for tritium gas and tritium oxide, as well as off-site surface water samples obtained to distance of 9.6 kilometers (6 miles) from the plant site and analyzed for tritium content, showed levels significantly less than 0.1% of the recommended guide for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Small sealed plutonium sources containing approximately 80% plutonium-238 oxide and 20% plutonium-239 oxide and other isotopes, are utilized at this site. No plutonium was released to the environment.Calculations were made to determine the radiation doses resulting from releases of tritium oxide, 85 Kr, and 14 C to: an individual at the site boundary; individuals in the closest residential area; and the population within 80 kilometers (50 miles) of the plant site. The total dose commitment to the population residing within 80 kilometers was determined to be 0.55 man-rem as compared to the annual dose from natural radiation of 223,165 man-rem

  14. 15. Experts' meeting on monitoring environmental radioactivity. Data - models - information. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The proceedings of the 15. Experts' meeting on monitoring environmental radioactivity include contributions o the following topics: environmental monitoring in Germany; developments in emergency protection and environmental monitoring; implementation of model and information systems; measuring programs during events and exercises; public information during local and global events; fast and (new) analytical methods; measures of the quality management systems; European and international environmental monitoring harmonization.

  15. The national environmental radiation monitoring network in egypt. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    Post accident environmental pollution with radionuclides occurs at accident site, and also cross borders to affect distant localities. The situation in egypt present special importance regarding its position near asian near asian and european nuclear sites, israel in east, and libya in the west. Also, the present and future nuclear installations in egypt. Environmental base line monitoring data is essential knowledge in nuclear practices. For these reasons, the egyptian government took steps to set up a national response plan for dealing with inside and outside accidents. The key elements of the plan is the establishment of a national environmental monitoring network (NERMN) and a nuclear emergency response system (NERS). The NERMN will detect radioactivity resulting from any accident affecting the egyptian territory even if it is not formally reported under international agreements, or if there are delays in notification. Therefore, the system provides the means of assembling and analyzing the radiological monitoring data related to the accident, and allowing information for the authorities. This is met with through a fully automatic system for gamma radiation monitoring and a semiautomatic system for air activity monitoring (aerosol), and network of liquid monitors. 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. The national environmental radiation monitoring network in egypt. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsy, M S [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Post accident environmental pollution with radionuclides occurs at accident site, and also cross borders to affect distant localities. The situation in egypt present special importance regarding its position near asian near asian and european nuclear sites, israel in east, and libya in the west. Also, the present and future nuclear installations in egypt. Environmental base line monitoring data is essential knowledge in nuclear practices. For these reasons, the egyptian government took steps to set up a national response plan for dealing with inside and outside accidents. The key elements of the plan is the establishment of a national environmental monitoring network (NERMN) and a nuclear emergency response system (NERS). The NERMN will detect radioactivity resulting from any accident affecting the egyptian territory even if it is not formally reported under international agreements, or if there are delays in notification. Therefore, the system provides the means of assembling and analyzing the radiological monitoring data related to the accident, and allowing information for the authorities. This is met with through a fully automatic system for gamma radiation monitoring and a semiautomatic system for air activity monitoring (aerosol), and network of liquid monitors. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: FY 1990 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    Chapter 3 of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE 1988) sets forth requirements for environmental monitoring of active low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites. Active sites are defined as those LLW facilities that were in use on or after the date of the order (September 1988). The transuranic (TRU) waste storage areas in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 North are covered by Chap. 2 of the order. In both chapters, monitoring is required to provide for early warning of leaks before those leaks pose a threat to human health or the environment. Chapter 3 also requires that monitoring be conducted to evaluate the short- and long-term performance of LLW disposal facilities. In accordance with this order, the Solid Waste Operations Department at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established an Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) that is implemented by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at ORNL. This report summarizes data from ASEMP monitoring activities for the final 6 months of FY 1990. A brief summary of the monitoring methodology for each site is presented also

  18. Annual environmental monitoring report, January--December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Environmental monitoring results continue to demonstrate that, except for penetrating radiation, environmental radiological impact due to SLAC operation is not distinguishable from natural environmantal sources. During 1977, the maximum neutron dose near the site boundary was 8.2 mrem. This represents about 8.2% of the annual dose from natural sources at this elevation, and 1.6% of the technical standard of 500 mrem per person annually

  19. Systematic environmental monitoring model for decision in Public Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Cunha Cardoso Filho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Addresses the existing interdisciplinary between Information Science and public policies, and proposes to environmental monitoring tool as a relevant tool for improving the process of evaluating the effectiveness of these social policies and social programs, there included the legislative branch, through the collection, processing and provision of information allowing to identify the environmental changes and propose, consistently, the improvement of public policies that meet the demands of citizens.

  20. 1995 annual water monitoring report, LEHR environmental restoration, University of California at Davis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D.L.; Smith, R.M.; Sauer, D.R. [and others

    1996-03-01

    This 1995 Annual Water Monitoring Report presents analytical data collected between January and December 1995 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) located at the University of California (UC), Davis. This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in compliance with the Water Monitoring Plan for the LEHR site, which contains the sample collection, analysis, and quality assurance/quality control procedures and reporting requirements. Water monitoring during 1995 was conducted in conjunction with the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study currently being implemented at the LEHR site as part of a US Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored environmental restoration program. Based on a review of historical groundwater monitoring data compiled since the fall of 1990, the list of analytes included in the program was reduced and the schedule for analyzing the remaining analytes was revised. The revision was implemented for the first time in the summer monitoring period. Analytes eliminated from the program were those that were (1) important for establishing baseline groundwater chemistry (alkalinity, anions, Eh, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand); (2) important for establishing sources of contamination; (3) not detected in water samples or not from the LEHR site; and (4) duplicates of another measurement. Reductions in the analytical schedule were based on the monitoring history for each well; the resultant constituents of concern list was developed for individual wells. Depending on its importance in a well, each analyte was analyzed quarterly, semi-annually, or annually. Pollutants of major concern include organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides.

  1. 1995 annual water monitoring report, LEHR environmental restoration, University of California at Davis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, D.L.; Smith, R.M.; Sauer, D.R.

    1996-03-01

    This 1995 Annual Water Monitoring Report presents analytical data collected between January and December 1995 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) located at the University of California (UC), Davis. This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in compliance with the Water Monitoring Plan for the LEHR site, which contains the sample collection, analysis, and quality assurance/quality control procedures and reporting requirements. Water monitoring during 1995 was conducted in conjunction with the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study currently being implemented at the LEHR site as part of a US Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored environmental restoration program. Based on a review of historical groundwater monitoring data compiled since the fall of 1990, the list of analytes included in the program was reduced and the schedule for analyzing the remaining analytes was revised. The revision was implemented for the first time in the summer monitoring period. Analytes eliminated from the program were those that were (1) important for establishing baseline groundwater chemistry (alkalinity, anions, Eh, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand); (2) important for establishing sources of contamination; (3) not detected in water samples or not from the LEHR site; and (4) duplicates of another measurement. Reductions in the analytical schedule were based on the monitoring history for each well; the resultant constituents of concern list was developed for individual wells. Depending on its importance in a well, each analyte was analyzed quarterly, semi-annually, or annually. Pollutants of major concern include organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides

  2. Environmental Radiological Impact of Nuclear Power. Monitoring and Control Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of the environment and public exposure to ionizing radiation may result from releases from programmed or accidental operations in regulated activities, or they may be due to preexisting situations such as contamination caused by past accidents, radioactive rain caused by nuclear tests, or increased natural radioactivity resulting from human activities. In many cases, both the emission sources and the environment should be monitored to determine the risk to the population and verify to what extent the limits and conditions established by competent authorities are being observed. Monitoring can be divided into three categories: monitoring of the emission source, of the receiving medium and of members of the public; individual monitoring of the population is extremely rare and would only be considered when estimated doses substantially exceed the annual public dose limit. In practices likely to produce significant radioactive releases, as is the case of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the limits and conditions for monitoring and controlling them and the requirements for environmental radiological monitoring are established in the licensing process. Programs implemented during normal operation of the facilities form the basis for monitoring in the event of accidents. in addition to environmental radiological monitoring associated with facilities, different countries have monitoring programs outside the facilities zones of influence, in order to ascertain the nationwide radiological fund and determine possible increases in this fund. In Spain, the facilities that generate radioactive waste have effluent storage, treatment and removal systems and radiological monitoring programs based on site and discharge characteristics. The environmental radiological monitoring system is composed of the network implemented by the owners in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities zones of influence, and by nationwide monitoring networks managed by the Consejo de

  3. Environmental monitoring report for Plantex Plant covering 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, R.E.; Cornelius, V.A.

    1980-05-01

    The environmental monitoring program at Pantex Plant for 1979 is summarized. Monitoring data for both radioactive and non-radioactive species in the local environment are presented. Although plant activities involve the handling of significant quantities of uranium, plutonium, and tritium, only small releases of uranium (depleted in the isotope 235 U) and tritium occurred which could have affected the local environment. Monitoring data indicate that concentrations of these nuclides in the environment are below established criteria for air and water and therefore do not present a health hazard either to employees or to the public

  4. Environmental monitoring report for Pantex Plant covering 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, R.E.; Laseter, W.A.

    1981-03-01

    This report summarizes the environmental monitoring program at Pantex Plant for 1980. Monitoring data for both radioactive and non-radioactive species in the local environment is presented. Although plant activities involve the handling of significant quantities of uranium, plutonium, and tritium, only small releases of uranium (depleted in the isotope 235 U) and tritium occurred which could have affected the local environment. Monitoring data indicate that concentrations of these nuclides in the environment are below established criteria for air and water and therefore do not present a health hazard either to employees or to the public

  5. Environmental monitoring report for Pantex Plant covering 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laseter, W.A.

    1983-03-01

    This report summarizes the environmental monitoring program at Pantex Plant for 1982. Monitoring data for both radioactive and non-radioactive species in the local environment is presented. Plant activities involve the handling of significant quantities of uranium, plutonium, and tritium. However, only small releases of uranium (depleted in the isotope 235 U) and tritium occurred which could have affected the local environment. Monitoring data indicate that concentrations of these nuclides in the environment are below established criteria for air and water and therefore should not present a health hazard either to employees or to the public

  6. Liquid microjet - a new tool for environmental water quality monitoring?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstein, W.; Buntine, M.

    2001-01-01

    Our ability to provide real-time, cost-effective and efficient technologies for water quality monitoring remains a critical global environmental research issue. Each year, ground and surface waterways around the world, the global marine environment and the especially-fragile interzonal estuarine ecosystems are being placed under severe stress due to ever-increasing levels of pollutants entering the earth's aquasphere. An almost revolutionary breakthrough in water quality monitoring would be achieved with the development of a real-time, broad-spectrum chemical analysis technology. In this article, a real-time mass spectrometric based water quality monitoring centre around in vacuo liquid microjet injection methodologies is presented

  7. Monitoring activities review of the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, P.D.

    1992-03-01

    The 1992 Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) is directed at the Radiological Environment Surveillance Program (RESP) activities at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of Idaho Engineering Laboratory (INEL). MAR panelists studied RESP documents and discussed their concerns with Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU) staff and other panel members. These concerns were subsequently consolidated into a collection of recommendations with supporting discussions. Recommendations focus on specific monitoring activities, as well as the overall program. The MAR report also contains pertinent comments that should not require further action

  8. Environmental monitoring report, May 10, 1993--June 1, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) DOE Oversight Division (DOE-O) monitoring effort will serve as oversight with ongoing compliance and ambient sampling by Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor staff programs. These sources provide a comprehensive database which must be reviewed and analyzed in order to streamline DOE-O sampling efforts. DOE-O monitoring is necessary to provide quality control, to ensure compliance, to ensure completeness, and to assure protection of public health and the environment. The Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA), includes a section on Environmental Monitoring as Attachment A. To accomplish these objectives, DOE-O will implement the following monitoring programs: surface waters; ground water; air; fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas

  9. 1999 Environmental Restoration Contractor Revegetation Monitoring Report; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. A. Gano

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the results of revegetation monitoring conducted in early May through early July 1999. Fourth-year monitoring was conducted at the Horn Rapids Landfill, Horseshoe Landfill, and Nike Landfill. Third-year monitoring was conducted on the Bridge Overlook, PSN 72/82, PSN 12/14, and the North Slope Cheatgrass Area. Second-year monitoring was conducted at the 600-104 waste site (2,4-D cleanup site); the 300-FF-1 sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata) transplant areas, 2 16-A-25 emergency extension site; and the 200-ZP-1 pipeline. First-year monitoring was conducted at the 300 Area North Process Trench, Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) Mitigation sites, and the 116-C-l Restoration site

  10. Continuous monitoring system for environmental {gamma} radiation near nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Jin; Qingyu, Yue; Wenhai, Wang [Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy

    1996-06-01

    The continuous monitoring system which is used for the environmental routine and accident emergency {gamma} radiation monitoring near nuclear facility is described. The continuous monitoring system consists of a high pressurized ionization chamber, integrated weak current amplifier, V/F converter and intelligent data recorder. The data gained by recorder can be transmitted to a PC through a standard RS-232-C interface for the data handling and graph plotting. This continuous monitoring system has the functions of alarm over threshold and recorded output signal of detector and temperature. The measuring range is from 10 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1} to 10 mGy{center_dot}h{sup -1} because a high insulation switch atomically changed measuring ranges is used. The monitoring system has been operating continuously for a long time with high stability and reliability. (5 figs., 2 tabs.).

  11. Continuous monitoring system for environmental γ radiation near nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Hua; Yue Qingyu; Wang Wenhai

    1996-06-01

    The continuous monitoring system which is used for the environmental routine and accident emergency γ radiation monitoring near nuclear facility is described. The continuous monitoring system consists of a high pressurized ionization chamber, integrated weak current amplifier, V/F converter and intelligent data recorder. The data gained by recorder can be transmitted to a PC through a standard RS-232-C interface for the data handling and graph plotting. This continuous monitoring system has the functions of alarm over threshold and recorded output signal of detector and temperature. The measuring range is from 10 nGy·h -1 to 10 mGy·h -1 because a high insulation switch atomically changed measuring ranges is used. The monitoring system has been operating continuously for a long time with high stability and reliability. (5 figs., 2 tabs.)

  12. 1987 environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devlin, T.K.

    1988-04-01

    Sandia National Labortories conduct various research activities related to Department of Energy interests which have the potential for release of hazardous materials or radionuclides to the environment. A strict environmental control program places maximum emphasis on limiting releases. The environmental monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and augmented by Sandia is designed to measure the performance of the environmental controls. The program includes analysis of air, water, soil, vegetation, sewer effluent, ground water, and foodstuffs for various toxic, hazardous, or radioactive materials. Based on these studies, the releases of materials of concern at Sandia during 1987 were well below applicable Department of Energy standards. 8 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs

  13. Governance through information: environmental monitoring from a citizen-consumer perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, van den S.W.K.

    2006-01-01

    The function of environmental monitoring and information in governing the environment has changed considerably in recent times. Traditionally, environmental monitoring was geared towards governments and producers; it provided them with the information required to formulate environmental policies and

  14. An Overview of Sensor networks for Environmental Noise Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Wessels, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has shown a growing number and wide variety of systems for monitoring environmental noise. This ongoing development is made possible by the availability of cheaper and smaller hardware and innovations in communication networks. The developments are fed by a growing interest in

  15. Environmental monitoring and deep ocean disposal of packaged radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.T.; Preston, A.

    1980-01-01

    The aims and objectives of environmental monitoring as laid down, for example by the ICRP and the IAEA include the assessment of actual or potential radiation exposure of man and the requirements of scientific investigations. The fulfillment of these aims is discussed in the context of the disposal of packaged radioactive waste in the deep Atlantic Ocean within the terms of the London Dumping Convention and within a regional agreement, the consultation/surveillance mechanism of the Nuclear Energy Agency. The paper discusses UK attitudes to such environmental monitoring, concentrates on the first of these ICRP objectives and shows how this is unlikely to be achieved by direct measurement in view of the small quantities of radioactive material involved relative to the scale of the receiving environment, and the timescale on which return to man can be conceived. Whilst meaningful environmental measurement is very unlikely to facilitate direct estimation of public radiation exposure by monitoring, it is still held that the basic objective of environmental monitoring can be met. A means by which this may be achieved is by oceanographic models. These procedures are discussed, illustrating the application of this philosophy in practice. (H.K.)

  16. Instructions for operating LBL Passive Environmental Radon Monitor (PERM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegel, M.L.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Ingersoll, J.G.

    1979-08-01

    The Passive Environmental Radon Monitor (PERM) is used to assess the impact of energy conservation in buildings, with reduced ventilation. Reduced ventilation can lead to increased concentration of air contaminants. The instrument operates on the principle of electrostatic collection of 218 Po ions. Cumulative alpha activity collects on the electrode and is detected with a lithium fluoride thermoluminescent detector

  17. Designing interruptive behaviors of a public environmental monitoring robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, V.; de Vries, R.; Alvito, P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports ongoing research to inform the design of a social robot to monitor levels of pollutant gasses in the air. Next to licensed environmental agents and immobile chemical sensors, mobile technologies such as robotic agents are needed to collect complaints and smell descriptions from

  18. Environmental performance, profitability, asset utilization, debt monitoring and firm value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukit, R. Br; Haryanto, B.; Ginting, P.

    2018-02-01

    The growing issue on firm value shows that firm value is not only determined by the firm ability to increase financial profit, but also by the company's concern in maintaining the environmental condition. The industrial development produces waste that pollutes the environment that has potential to serious impact on the next life. In addition to provide financial benefits, companies are increasingly facing pressure to be socially responsible for the survival of the company. However, past findings demonstrate that the effect of environmental performance, profitability, and asset utilization to the firm’s value are still unclear. This study aims to test whether environmental performance, firm profitability and asset utilization can effectively enhance firm value in two different conditions: intensive debt monitoring and less intensive debt monitoring. Sample of companies is taken from the list of Indonesia Stock Exchange during the period of 2013 to 2015. Using multiple regression analysis, discloses that: in intensive monitoring, managers tend to have high firm value when company has high environmental performance and or high profitability and high asset utilization. Monitoring system needs to be intensified especially for companies with the above characteristics.

  19. Environmental monitoring program for Itataia industrial complex before operational phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condessa, M.L.M.B.

    1982-01-01

    This environmental monitoring program aims to characterize the environment in adjacent area of Itataia Industrial Complex. The places and frequencies of samples and measurements, as well as analysis and parameters to be measured in each type of samples are presented. (C.M.) [pt

  20. Evergreen oak leaves as natural monitor in environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capannesi, G.; Rosada, A.; Caroli, S.

    1988-01-01

    Evergreen oak was chosen as a possible biological monitor of environmental pollution. It was shown that there was a direct relationship between the concentration of elements in leaves and the presence of pollution sources, i.e. the density of vehicular traffic. (author) 12 figs.; 3 tabs