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Sample records for quantum zeno effect

  1. Non-Markovianity during quantum Zeno effect

    CERN Document Server

    Thilagam, A

    2013-01-01

    We examine the Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in the context of non-Markovian dynamics in entangled spin-boson systems in contact with noninteracting reservoirs. We identify enhanced non-Markovian signatures in specific two-qubit partitions of a Bell-like initial state, with results showing that the intra-qubit Zeno effect or anti-Zeno effect occurs in conjunction with inter-qubit non-Markovian dynamics for a range of system parameters. The time domain of effective Zeno or anti-Zeno dynamics is about the same order of magnitude as the non-Markovian time scale of the reservoir correlation dynamics, and changes in decay rate due to the Zeno mechanism appears coordinated with information flow between specific two-qubit partitions. We extend our analysis to examine the Zeno mechanism-non-Markovianity link using the tripartite states arising from a donor-acceptor-sink model of photosynthetic biosystems.

  2. Quantum Zeno effects with "pulsed" and "continuous" measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Facchi, P.; Pascazio, S.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of a quantum system undergoing measurements is investigated. Depending on the features of the interaction Hamiltonian, the decay can be slowed (quantum Zeno effect) or accelerated (inverse quantum Zeno effect), by changing the time interval between successive (pulsed) measurements or, alternatively, by varying the "strength" of the (continuous) measurement.

  3. Quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in the Friedrichs model

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, I; Pronko, G P; Yarevsky, E

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the short-time behavior of the survival probability in the frame of the Friedrichs model for different formfactors. We have shown that this probability is not necessary analytic at the time origin. Furthermore, the probability may not be quadratic for the short times while the quantum Zeno effect still exists in such a case. We have found that the time when the quantum Zeno effect could be observed is much smaller than usually estimated. We have also studied the anti-Zeno era and have estimated its duration.

  4. Quantum Zeno effect by general measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Koshino, K

    2004-01-01

    It was predicted that frequently repeated measurements on an unstable state may alter the decay rate of the state. This is called the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) or the anti-Zeno effect (AZE), depending on whether the decay is suppressed or enhanced. In conventional theories of the QZE and AZE, effects of measurements are simply described by the projection postulate, assuming that each measurement is an instantaneous and ideal one. However, real measurements are not instantaneous and ideal. For the QZE and AZE by such general measurements, interesting and surprising features have recently been revealed, which we review in this article. The results are based on the quantum measurement theory, which is also reviewed briefly. As a typical model, we consider a continuous measurement of the decay of an excited atom by a photodetector that detects a photon emitted from the atom upon decay. This measurement is an indirect negative-result one, for which the curiosity of the QZE and AZE is emphasized. It is shown that t...

  5. The Quantum Zeno Effect -- Watched Pots in the Quantum World

    CERN Document Server

    Venugopalan, Anu

    2012-01-01

    In the 5th century B.C.,the philosopher and logician Zeno of Elea posed several paradoxes which remained unresolved for over two thousand five hundred years. The $20^{th}$ century saw some resolutions to Zeno's mind boggling problems. This long journey saw many significant milestones in the form of discoveries like the tools of converging series and theories on infinite sets in mathematics. In recent times, the Zeno effect made an intriguing appearance in a rather unlikely place - a situation involving the time evolution of a quantum system, which is subject to "observations" over a period of time. Leonid Khalfin working in the former USSR in the 1960s and ECG Sudarshan and B. Misra at the University of Texas, Austin, first drew attention to this problem. In 1977, ECG Sudarshan and B. Misra published a paper on the quantum Zeno effect, called "The Zeno's paradox in quantum theory". Their fascinating result revealed the bizarre workings of the quantum world. Misra and Sudarshan's 1977 paper activated over two ...

  6. Analyzing the Quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects using optimal projective measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, Muhammad Junaid; Chaudhry, Adam Zaman

    2017-09-18

    Measurements in quantum mechanics can not only effectively freeze the quantum system (the quantum Zeno effect) but also accelerate the time evolution of the system (the quantum anti-Zeno effect). In studies of these effects, a quantum state is prepared repeatedly by projecting the quantum state onto the initial state. In this paper, we repeatedly prepare the initial quantum state in a different manner. Instead of only performing projective measurements, we allow unitary operations to be performed, on a very short time-scale, after each measurement. We can then repeatedly prepare the initial state by performing some projective measurement and then, after each measurement, we perform a suitable unitary operation to end up with the same initial state as before. Our objective is to find the projective measurements that minimize the effective decay rate of the quantum state. We find such optimal measurements and the corresponding decay rates for a variety of system-environment models such as the pure dephasing model and the spin-boson model. We find that there can be considerable differences between this optimized effective decay rate and the usual decay rate obtained by repeatedly projecting onto the initial state. In particular, the Zeno and anti-Zeno regimes can be considerably modified.

  7. Quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in an unstable system with two bound states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modi, Kavan [Department of Physics, Center for Complex Quantum Systems, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1081 (United States)], E-mail: modik@physics.utexas.edu; Shaji, Anil [Department of Physics, Center for Complex Quantum Systems, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1081 (United States)

    2007-08-20

    We analyze the experimental observations reported by Fischer et al. [M.C. Fischer, B. Gutierrez-Medina, M.G. Raizen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 040402] by considering a system of coupled unstable bound quantum states |A> and |B>. The state |B> is coupled to a set of continuum states |C{theta}({omega})>. We investigate the time evolution of |A> when it decays into |C{theta}({omega})> via |B>, and find that frequent measurements on |A> leads to both the quantum Zeno effect and the anti-Zeno effects depending on the frequency of measurements. We show that it is the presence of |B> which allows for the anti-Zeno effect.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of quantum Zeno effect in the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Danko

    2014-01-01

    Environmental decoherence appears to be the biggest obstacle for successful construction of quantum mind theories. Nevertheless, the quantum physicist Henry Stapp promoted the view that the mind could utilize quantum Zeno effect to influence brain dynamics and that the efficacy of such mental efforts would not be undermined by environmental decoherence of the brain. To address the physical plausibility of Stapp's claim, we modeled the brain using quantum tunneling of an electron in a multiple-well structure such as the voltage sensor in neuronal ion channels and performed Monte Carlo simulations of quantum Zeno effect exerted by the mind upon the brain in the presence or absence of environmental decoherence. The simulations unambiguously showed that the quantum Zeno effect breaks down for timescales greater than the brain decoherence time. To generalize the Monte Carlo simulation results for any n-level quantum system, we further analyzed the change of brain entropy due to the mind probing actions and proved ...

  9. Quantum Zeno effect in atomic spin-exchange collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kominis, I.K. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion 71103 (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology, Heraklion 71110 (Greece)], E-mail: ikominis@iesl.forth.gr

    2008-07-07

    The suppression of spin-exchange relaxation in dense alkali-metal vapors discovered in 1973 and governing modern atomic magnetometers is here reformulated in terms of quantum measurement theory and the quantum Zeno effect. This provides a new perspective of understanding decoherence in spin-polarized atomic vapors.

  10. Quantum description of classical apparatus; Zeno effect and decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Gurvitz, S A

    2003-01-01

    We study the measurement process by treating classical detectors entirely quantum mechanically. Transition to the classical description and the mechanism of decoherence is investigated. We concentrate on influence of continuous measurement on decay of unstable systems (quantum Zeno effect). We discuss the experimental consequences of our results and a role of the projection postulate in a measurement process.

  11. Quantum Zeno effect in atomic spin-exchange collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-01-01

    The suppression of spin-exchange relaxation in dense alkali-metal vapors discovered in 1973 and governing modern atomic magnetometers is here reformulated in terms of quantum measurement theory and the quantum Zeno effect. This provides a new perspective of understanding decoherence in spin-polarized atomic vapors.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of quantum Zeno effect in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Danko

    2015-12-01

    Environmental decoherence appears to be the biggest obstacle for successful construction of quantum mind theories. Nevertheless, the quantum physicist Henry Stapp promoted the view that the mind could utilize quantum Zeno effect to influence brain dynamics and that the efficacy of such mental efforts would not be undermined by environmental decoherence of the brain. To address the physical plausibility of Stapp's claim, we modeled the brain using quantum tunneling of an electron in a multiple-well structure such as the voltage sensor in neuronal ion channels and performed Monte Carlo simulations of quantum Zeno effect exerted by the mind upon the brain in the presence or absence of environmental decoherence. The simulations unambiguously showed that the quantum Zeno effect breaks down for timescales greater than the brain decoherence time. To generalize the Monte Carlo simulation results for any n-level quantum system, we further analyzed the change of brain entropy due to the mind probing actions and proved a theorem according to which local projections cannot decrease the von Neumann entropy of the unconditional brain density matrix. The latter theorem establishes that Stapp's model is physically implausible but leaves a door open for future development of quantum mind theories provided the brain has a decoherence-free subspace.

  13. Simple computer model for the quantum Zeno effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, D

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a simple model for repeated measurement of a quantum system: the evolution of a free particle, simulated by discretising the particle's position. This model is easily simulated by computer and provides a useful arena to investigate the effects of measurement upon dynamics, in particular the slowing of evolution due to measurement (the `quantum Zeno effect'). The results of this simulation are discussed for two rather different sorts of measurement process, both of which are (simplified forms of) measurements used in previous simulations of position measurement. A number of interesting results due to measurement are found, and the investigation casts some light on previous disagreements about the presence or absence of the Zeno effect.

  14. Quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno paradoxes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S M Roy

    2001-02-01

    Continuous observation of a time independent projection operator is known to prevent change of state (the quantum Zeno paradox). We discuss the recent result that generic continuous measurement of time dependent projection operators will in fact ensure change of state: an anti-Zeno paradox.

  15. Observation of the Quantum Zeno Effect on a Single Solid State Spin

    CERN Document Server

    Wolters, Janik; Schoenfeld, Rolf Simon; Benson, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The quantum Zeno effect, i.e. the inhibition of coherent quantum dynamics by projective measurements is one of the most intriguing predictions of quantum mechanics. Here we experimentally demonstrate the quantum Zeno effect by inhibiting the microwave driven coherent spin dynamics between two ground state spin levels of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond nano-crystals. Our experiments are supported by a detailed analysis of the population dynamics via a semi-classical model.

  16. Quantum Zeno Effect in the Strong Measurement Regime of Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    we report the direct observation of theQZE in a superconducting qubit undergoing continuous strongmeasurement with simultaneous qubit driving...New J. Phys. 18 (2016) 053031 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/18/5/053031 PAPER Quantum Zeno effect in the strongmeasurement regime of circuit quantum...of quantum jumps between states for a qubit beingmeasured continuously at rate Gm is the same as that for a qubit undergoing discretemeasurements at

  17. Evolution of an Atom Impeded by Measurement The Quantum Zeno Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wunderlich, C; Toschek, P E; Wunderlich, Chr.; Balzer, Chr.

    2001-01-01

    A quantum system being observed evolves more slowly. This `'quantum Zeno effect'' is reviewed with respect to a previous attempt of demonstration, and to subsequent criticism of the significance of the findings. A recent experiment on an {\\it individual} cold trapped ion has been capable of revealing the micro-state of this quantum system, such that the effect of measurement is indeed discriminated from dephasing of the quantum state by either the meter or the environment.

  18. Analysis of the quantum Zeno effect for quantum control and computation

    CERN Document Server

    Dominy, Jason M; Rezakhani, A T; Lidar, D A

    2012-01-01

    Within quantum information, many methods have been proposed to avoid or correct the deleterious effects of the environment on a system of interest. In this work, expanding on our earlier paper [G. A. Paz-Silva et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 080501 (2012), arXiv:1104.5507], we evaluate the applicability of the quantum Zeno effect as one such method. Using the algebraic structure of stabilizer quantum error correction codes as a unifying framework, two open-loop protocols are described which involve frequent non-projective (i.e., weak) measurement of either the full stabilizer group or a minimal generating set thereof. The effectiveness of the protocols is measured by the distance between the final state under the protocol and the final state of an idealized evolution in which system and environment do not interact. Rigorous bounds on this metric are derived which demonstrate that, under certain assumptions, a Zeno effect may be realized with arbitrarily weak measurements, and that this effect can protect an arb...

  19. Quantum Zeno Effect Underpinning the Radical-Ion-Pair Mechanism of Avian Magnetoreception

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, I K

    2008-01-01

    The intricate biochemical processes underlying avian magnetoreception, the sensory ability of migratory birds to navigate using earths magnetic field, have been narrowed down to spin-dependent recombination of radical-ion pairs to be found in avian species retinal proteins. The avian magnetic field detection is governed by the interplay between magnetic interactions of the radicals unpaired electrons and the radicals recombination dynamics. Critical to this mechanism is the long lifetime of the radical-pair spin coherence, so that the weak geomagnetic field will have a chance to signal its presence. It is here shown that a fundamental quantum phenomenon, the quantum Zeno effect, is at the basis of the radical-ion-pair magnetoreception mechanism. The quantum Zeno effect naturally leads to long spin coherence lifetimes, without any constraints on the systems physical parameters, ensuring the robustness of this sensory mechanism. Basic experimental observations regarding avian magnetic sensitivity are seamlessly...

  20. Absorption-free optical pumping spin control with the quantum Zeno effect

    CERN Document Server

    Nakanishi, T; Kitano, M

    2002-01-01

    We show that atomic spin motion can be controlled by circularly polarized light without light absorption in the strong pumping limit. In this limit, the pumping light, which drives the empty spin state, destroys the Zeeman coherence effectively and freezes the coherent transition via the quantum Zeno effect. It is verified experimentally that the amount of light absorption decreases asymptotically to zero as the incident light intensity is increased.

  1. The transition from quantum Zeno to anti-Zeno effects for a qubit in a cavity by varying the cavity frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiufeng, E-mail: xfcao@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Ai, Qing; Sun, Chang-Pu [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2012-01-09

    We propose a strategy to demonstrate the transition from the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) to the anti-Zeno effect (AZE) using a superconducting qubit coupled to a transmission line cavity, by varying the central frequency of the cavity mode. Our results are obtained without the rotating wave approximation (RWA), and the initial state (a dressed state) is easy to prepare. Moreover, we find that in the presence of both qubit's intrinsic bath and the cavity bath, the emergence of the QZE and the AZE behaviors relies not only on the match between the qubit energy-level-spacing and the central frequency of the cavity mode, but also on the coupling strength between the qubit and the cavity mode. -- Highlights: ► We propose how to demonstrate the transition from Zeno effect to anti-Zeno effect. ► Our results are beyond the RWA, and the initial state is easy to prepare. ► The case of both qubit's intrinsic bath and cavity bath coexist is also studied.

  2. Decoherence and Zeno time in quantum computations

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, I; Pronko, G; Yarevsky, E

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the short-time behaviour of the survival probability in the frame of the Friedrichs model for different form factors. We have shown that the probability may not be quadratic for the short times while the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) still exists in this case. We have found that the time when the QZE could be observed is much smaller than usually assumed. We have studied the anti-Zeno era and have estimated its duration. Related decoherence processes are also discussed.

  3. Geometry of Time, Axiom of Choice and Neuro-Biological Quantum Zeno Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Modgil, Moninder Singh

    2007-01-01

    Role of axiom of choice in quantum measurement is highlighted by suggesting that the conscious observer chooses the outcome from a mixed state. Further, in a periodically repeating universe, these outcomes must be pre-recorded within the non-physical conscious observers, which precludes free will. Free will however exists in a universe with open time, It is suggested that psychology's binding problem is connected with Cantor's original definition of set. Influence of consciousness on material outcome through quantum processes is discussed and interesting constraints derived. For example, it is predicted that quantum mechanical brain states should get frozen if monitored at sufficiently small space-time intervals - a neuro-biological version of the so called quantum zeno effect, which has been verified in domain of micro-physics. Existence of a very small micro-mini-black-hole in brain is predicted as a space-time structural interface between consciousness and brain, whose vaporization explains mass-loss repor...

  4. Zeno and Anti Zeno effect for a two level system in a squeezed bath

    CERN Document Server

    Mundarain, D F

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the appearance of Zeno (QZE) or anti-Zeno (QAE) effect in an exponentially decaying system. We consider the quantum dynamics of a continuously monitored two level system interacting with a squeezed bath. We find that the behavior of the system depends critically on the way in which the squeezed bath is prepared. For specific choices of the squeezing phase the system shows Zeno or anti-Zeno effect in conditions for which it would decay exponentially if no measurements were done. This result allows for a clear interpretation in terms of the equivalent spin system interacting with a fictitious magnetic field.

  5. Quantum Zeno effect in a nitrogen-vacancy center embedded in a spin bath

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Zhi-Sheng; Zhang, Mei; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We study the longitudinal relaxation of a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center surrounded by a $^{13}$C nuclear spin bath in diamond. By means of cluster-correlation expansion (CCE), we numerically demonstrate the decay process of electronic state induced by cross relaxation at low temperature. It is shown that the CCE method is not only capable of describing pure-dephasing effect at large-detuning regime, but it can also simulate the quantum dynamics of populations in the nearly resonant regime. We present a proposal to slow down the decay of NV center via implementing quantum Zeno effect (QZE). The numerical result shows that QZE can effectively inhibit the decay of NV center.

  6. On-chip interaction-free measurements via the quantum Zeno effect

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiao-song; Schuck, Carsten; Fong, King Y; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2014-01-01

    Although interference is a classical-wave phenomenon, the superposition principle, which underlies interference of individual particles, is at the heart of quantum physics. An interaction-free measurements (IFM) harnesses the wave-particle duality of single photons to sense the presence of an object via the modification of the interference pattern, which can be accomplished even if the photon and the object haven't interacted with each other. By using the quantum Zeno effect, the efficiency of an IFM can be made arbitrarily close to unity. Here we report an on-chip realization of the IFM based on silicon photonics. We exploit the inherent advantages of the lithographically written waveguides: excellent interferometric phase stability and mode matching, and obtain multipath interference with visibility above 98%. We achieved a normalized IFM efficiency up to 68.2%, which exceeds the 50% limit of the original IFM proposal.

  7. Quantum Zeno effect and the impact of flavor in leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchet, S; Raffelt, G G

    2006-01-01

    In thermal leptogenesis, the cosmic matter-antimatter asymmetry is produced by CP violation in the decays N --> l + \\Phi of heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos N into ordinary leptons l and Higgs particles \\Phi. If some charged-lepton Yukawa couplings are in equilibrium during the leptogenesis epoch, the l interactions with the background medium are flavor sensitive and the coherence of their flavor content defined by N --> l+\\Phi is destroyed, modifying the efficiency of the inverse decays. We point out, however, that it is not enough that the flavor-sensitive processes are fast on the cosmic expansion time scale, they must be fast relative to the N l +\\Phi reactions lest the flavor amplitudes of l remain frozen by the repeated N l+\\Phi ``measurements''. Our more restrictive requirement is significant in the most interesting ``strong wash-out case'' where N l +\\Phi is fast relative to the cosmic expansion rate. We derive conditions for the unflavored treatment to be adequate and for flavor effects to be...

  8. Quantum Anti-Zeno Treatment of Zeno-type Sleep Disorders

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Rajat Kumar

    2011-01-01

    It is proposed that for those sleep disorders of psychological origin which can be considered to be a Quantum Zeno Effect-type phenomenon of persistence in the waking state due to the inhibition of the transition to the Deep Sleep state, the treatment may very well lie in the application of the principle of accelerating the decay by the introduction of a third state which facilitates the transition as realized in the Quantum Anti-Zeno effect. Steps of practical therapeutic implementation of the program are delineated.

  9. Quantum Zeno Effect and Light-Dark Periods for a Single Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Beige, A; Beige, Almut; Hegerfeldt, Gerhard C.

    1996-01-01

    The quantum Zeno effect (QZE) predicts a slow-down of the time development of a system under rapidly repeated ideal measurements, and experimentally this was tested for an ensemble of atoms using short laser pulses for non-selective state measurements. Here we consider such pulses for selective measurements on a single system. Each probe pulse will cause a burst of fluorescence or no fluorescence. If the probe pulses were strictly ideal measurements, the QZE would predict periods of fluorescence bursts alternating with periods of no fluorescence (light and dark periods) which would become longer and longer with increasing frequency of the measurements. The non-ideal character of the measurements is taken into account by incorporating the laser pulses in the interaction, and this is used to determine the corrections to the ideal case. In the limit, when the time between the laser pulses goes to zero, no freezing occurs but instead we show convergence to the familiar macroscopic light and dark periods of the co...

  10. Total Quantum Zeno effect and Intelligent States for a two level system in a squeezed bath

    CERN Document Server

    Mundarain, D; Stephany, J

    2006-01-01

    In this work we show that by frequent measurements of adequately chosen observables, a complete suppression of the decay in an exponentially decaying two level system interacting with a squeezed bath is obtained. The observables for which the effect is observed depend on the the squeezing parameters of the bath. The initial states which display Total Zeno Effect are intelligent states of two conjugate observables associated to the electromagnetic fluctuations of the bath.

  11. Simulating Zeno physics by a quantum quench with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing-Jun; An, Jun-Hong; Kwek, L. C.; Luo, Hong-Gang; Oh, C. H.

    2014-06-01

    Studying out-of-equilibrium physics in quantum systems under quantum quench is of vast experimental and theoretical interest. Using periodic quantum quenches, we present an experimentally accessible scheme to simulate the quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in an open quantum system of a single superconducting qubit interacting with an array of transmission line resonators. The scheme is based on the following two observations: First, compared with conventional systems, the short-time nonexponential decay in our superconducting circuit system is readily observed; and second, a quench-off process mimics an ideal projective measurement when its time duration is sufficiently long. Our results show the active role of quantum quench in quantum simulation and control.

  12. Quantum quasi-Zeno dynamics: Transitions mediated by frequent projective measurements near the Zeno regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, T. J.; Vedral, V.

    2016-07-01

    Frequent observation of a quantum system leads to quantum Zeno physics, where the system evolution is constrained to states commensurate with the measurement outcome. We show that, more generally, the system can evolve between such states through higher-order virtual processes that pass through states outside the measurement subspace. We derive effective Hamiltonians to describe this evolution, and the dependence on the time between measurements. We demonstrate application of this phenomena to prototypical quantum many-body system examples, spin chains and atoms in optical lattices, where it facilitates correlated dynamical effects.

  13. A model of the quantum-classical and mind-brain connections, and of the role of the quantum Zeno effect in the physical implementation of conscious intent

    CERN Document Server

    Stapp, Henry P

    2008-01-01

    A simple exactly solvable model is given of the dynamical coupling between a person's classically described perceptions and that person's quantum mechanically described brain. The model is based jointly upon von Neumann's theory of measurement and the empirical findings of close connections between conscious intentions and synchronous oscillations in well separated parts of the brain. A quantum-Zeno-effect-based mechanism is described that allows conscious intentions to influence brain activity in a functionally appropriate way. The robustness of this mechanism in the face of environmental decoherence effects is emphasized.

  14. Zeno and anti-Zeno effects for photon polarization dephasing

    CERN Document Server

    Kofman, A G; Opatrny, T

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a simple, experimentally feasible scheme, which elucidates the principles of controlling ("engineering") the reservoir spectrum and the spectral broadening incurred by repeated measurements. This control can yield either the inhibition (Zeno effect) or the acceleration (anti-Zeno effect) of the quasi-exponential decay of the observed state by means of frequent measurements. In the discussed scheme, a photon is bouncing back and forth between two perfect mirrors, each time passing a polarization rotator. The horizontal and vertical polarizations can be viewed as analogs of an excited and a ground state of a two level system (TLS). A polarization beam splitter and an absorber for the vertically polarized photon are inserted between the mirrors, and effect measurements of the polarization. The polarization angle acquired in the electrooptic polarization rotator can fluctuate randomly, e.g., via noisy modulation. In the absence of an absorber the polarization randomization corresponds to TLS decay into...

  15. Quantum Error Correction in the Zeno Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Erez, N; Reznik, B; Vaidman, L; Erez, Noam; Aharonov, Yakir; Reznik, Benni; Vaidman, Lev

    2003-01-01

    In order to reduce errors, error correction codes (ECCs) need to be implemented fast. They can correct the errors corresponding to the first few orders in the Taylor expansion of the Hamiltonian of the interaction with the environment. If implemented fast enough, the zeroth order error predominates and the dominant effect is of error prevention by measurement (Zeno Effect) rather than correction. In this ``Zeno Regime'', codes with less redundancy are sufficient for protection. We describe such a simple scheme, which uses two ``noiseless'' qubits to protect a large number, $n$, of information qubits from noise from the environment. The ``noisless qubits'' can be realized by treating them as logical qubits to be encoded by one of the previously introduced encoding schemes.

  16. Fast synthesis of the Fredkin gate via quantum Zeno dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiao-Qiang; Zheng, Tai-Yu; Zhang, Shou

    2012-12-01

    We propose a scheme for fast synthesizing the Fredkin gate with rf SQUID qubits. This scheme utilizes the quantum Zeno dynamics induced by continuous couplings and the non-identical couplings between SQUIDs and superconducting cavity. The effects of decoherence on the performance for the gate are analyzed in virtue of master equation and non-unitary evolution with full Hamiltonian. The strictly numerical simulation shows that the fidelity of this Fredkin gate is relatively high corresponding to current typical experimental parameters. Furthermore, an equivalent physical model is also constructed in an array of coupled cavities.

  17. Non-Hermitian dynamics in the quantum Zeno limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, W.; Caballero-Benitez, S. F.; Mekhov, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    We show that weak measurement leads to unconventional quantum Zeno dynamics with Raman-like transitions via virtual states outside the Zeno subspace. We extend this concept into the realm of non-Hermitian dynamics by showing that the stochastic competition between measurement and a system's own dynamics can be described by a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. We obtain a solution for ultracold bosons in a lattice and show that a dark state of tunneling is achieved as a steady state in which the observable's fluctuations are zero and tunneling is suppressed by destructive matter-wave interference.

  18. Non-Hermitian Dynamics in the Quantum Zeno Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, Wojciech; Mekhov, Igor B

    2015-01-01

    Measurement is one of the most counter-intuitive aspects of quantum physics. Frequent measurements of a quantum system lead to quantum Zeno dynamics where time evolution becomes confined to a subspace defined by the projections. However, weak measurement performed at a finite rate is also capable of locking the system into such a Zeno subspace in an unconventional way: by Raman-like transitions via virtual intermediate states outside this subspace, which are not forbidden. Here, we extend this concept into the realm of non-Hermitian dynamics by showing that the stochastic competition between measurement and a system's own dynamics can be described by a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. We obtain an analytic solution for ultracold bosons in a lattice and show that a dark state of the tunnelling operator is a steady state in which the observable's fluctuations are zero and tunnelling is suppressed by destructive matter-wave interference. This opens a new venue of investigation beyond the canonical quantum Zeno dynamic...

  19. Fusing atomic W states via quantum Zeno dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Y Q; Shao, X Q; Yi, X X

    2017-05-03

    We propose a scheme for preparation of large-scale entangled W states based on the fusion mechanism via quantum Zeno dynamics. By sending two atoms belonging to an n-atom W state and an m-atom W state, respectively, into a vacuum cavity (or two separate cavities), we may obtain a (n + m - 2)-atom W state via detecting the two-atom state after interaction. The present scheme is robust against both spontaneous emission of atoms and decay of cavity, and the feasibility analysis indicates that it can also be realized in experiment.

  20. Stochastic quantum Zeno-based detection of noise correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias M.; Gherardini, Stefano; Caruso, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    A system under constant observation is practically freezed to the measurement subspace. If the system driving is a random classical field, the survival probability of the system in the subspace becomes a random variable described by the Stochastic Quantum Zeno Dynamics (SQZD) formalism. Here, we study the time and ensemble average of this random survival probability and demonstrate how time correlations in the noisy environment determine whether the two averages do coincide or not. These environment time correlations can potentially generate non-Markovian dynamics of the quantum system depending on the structure and energy scale of the system Hamiltonian. We thus propose a way to detect time correlations of the environment by coupling a quantum probe system to it and observing the survival probability of the quantum probe in a measurement subspace. This will further contribute to the development of new schemes for quantum sensing technologies, where nanodevices may be exploited to image external structures or biological molecules via the surface field they generate.

  1. Quantum Zeno suppression of dipole-dipole forces

    CERN Document Server

    Wüster, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We consider inter-atomic forces due to resonant dipole-dipole interactions within a dimer of highly excited Rydberg atoms, embedded in an ultra-cold gas. These forces rely on a coherent superposition of two-atom electronic states, which is destroyed by continuous monitoring of the dimer state through a detection scheme utilizing controllable interactions with the background gas atoms. We show that this intrinsic decoherence of the molecular energy surface can gradually deteriorate a repulsive dimer state, causing a mixing of attractive and repulsive character. For sufficiently strong decoherence, a Zeno-like effect causes a complete arrest of interatomic forces. We finally show how short decohering pulses can controllably redistribute population between the different molecular energy surfaces.

  2. Zeno effect and switching of solitons in nonlinear couplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullaev, F Kh; Konotop, V V; Ögren, Magnus;

    2011-01-01

    The Zeno effect is investigated for soliton type pulses in a nonlinear directional coupler with dissipation. The effect consists in increase of the coupler transparency with increase of the dissipative losses in one of the arms. It is shown that localized dissipation can lead to switching...

  3. Repeater-Assisted Zeno Effect in Classical Stochastic Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Shi-Jian; WANG Li-Gang; WANG Zhi-Guo; LIN Hai-Qing

    2012-01-01

    We address the possibility of the classical Zeno effect in classical stochastic processes as sampled by transferring a digitized image through a classical channel with surrounding noise. It is shown that the the classical state of the image decays inevitably with the distance of the channel due to the interference of the surroundings. However, if there are enough repeaters, which can both check and recover the state's information, the classical state's decay rate will be significantly suppressed, then a classical Zeno effect might occur.%We address the possibility of the classical Zeno effect in classical stochastic processes as sampled by transferring a digitized image through a classical channel with surrounding noise.It is shown that the the classical state of the image decays inevitably with the distance of the channel due to the interference of the surroundings.However,if there are enough repeaters,which can both check and recover the state's information,the classical state's decay rate will be significantly suppressed,then a classical Zeno effect might occur.

  4. Distributed orbital state quantum cloning with atomic ensembles via quantum Zeno dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Li-Tuo; Yang, Zhen-Biao

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for distributed orbital state quantum cloning with atomic ensembles based on the quantum Zeno dynamics. These atomic ensembles which consist of identical three-level atoms are trapped in distant cavities connected by a single-mode integrated optical star coupler. These qubits can be manipulated through appropriate modulation of the coupling constants between atomic ensemble and classical field, and the cavity decay can be largely suppressed as the number of atoms in the ensemble qubits increases. The present scheme provides a new way to construct the quantum communication network.

  5. Quantum Hamlet Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Panković, Vladan

    2009-01-01

    In this work, by use of a formalism similar to formalism of the quantum Zeno effect (decrease of the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurements) and quantum anti-Zeno effect (increase of the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurements), we introduce so-called quantum Hamlet effect. It represents a complete destruction of the quantum predictions on the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurement. Precisely, by means of some especial, correctly defined, frequent measurements, decay probability of an unstable quantum system can behave as a divergent series without any definite value. In this way there is quantum mechanically completely unsolvable ``Hamlet dilemma'', to decay or not to decay.

  6. Non-Geometric Conditional Phase Gate by Quantum Zeno Dynamics in Laser-Excited Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Wan-Jun; SHEN Li-Tuo; WU Huai-Zhi; LIN Xiu

    2013-01-01

    Based on the quantum Zeno dynamics,we propose a two-qubit non-geometric conditional phase gate between two nitrogen-vacancy centers coupled to a whispering-gallery mode cavity.The varying phases design of periodic laser can be used for realizing non-geometric conditional phase gate,and the cavity mode is virtually excited during the gate operation.Thus,the fidelity of the gate operation is insensitive to cavity decay and the fluctuation of the preset laser intensity.The numerical simulation with a realistic set of experimental parameters shows that the gate fidelity 0.987 can be within reached in the near future.

  7. Super Mario's prison break —A proposal of object-intelligent-feedback-based classical Zeno and anti-Zeno effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shi-Jian

    2009-10-01

    Super Mario is imprisoned by a demon in a finite potential well on his way to save Princess Peach. He can escape from the well with the help of a flight of magic stairs floating in the space. However, the hateful demon may occasionally check his status. At that time, he has to make a judgement of either jumping to the inside ground immediately in order to avoid the discovery of his escape intention, or speeding up his escape process. Therefore, if the demon checks him too frequently such that there is no probability for him to reach the top of the barrier, he will be always inside the well, then a classical Zeno effect occurs. On the other hand, if the time interval between two subsequent checks is large enough such that he has a higher probability of being beyond the demon's controllable range already, then the demon's check actually speeds up his escape and a classical anti-Zeno effect takes place.

  8. Generating and stabilizing the GHZ state in circuit QED: Joint measurement, Zeno effect and feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Wei; Ding, Xinmei; Xu, Luting; Li, Xin-Qi

    2011-01-01

    In solid-state circuit QED system, we extend the previous study of generating and stabilizing two-qubit Bell state [Phys. Rev. A 82, 032335 (2010)], to three-qubit GHZ state. In dispersive regime, we employ the homodyne joint readout for multiple qubits to infer the state for further processing, and in particular use it to stabilize the state directly by means of an alternate-flip-interrupted Zeno (AFIZ) scheme. Moreover, the state-of-the-art feedback action based on the filtered current enables not only a deterministic generation of the pre-GHZ state in the initial stage, but also a fast recovery from the environment-caused degradation in the later stabilization process. We show that the proposed scheme can maintain the state with high fidelity if the efficient quantum measurement and rapid single-qubit rotations are available.

  9. [On Atomic Nuclear Fusion Processes at Low-Temperatures. An Enhancement of the Probability of Transition through a Potential Barrier Due to the So-Called Barrier Anti-Zeno Effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiot, V A

    2016-01-01

    It is known that in quantum mechanics the act of observing the experiment can affect the experimental findings in some cases. In particular, it happens under the so-called Zeno effect. In this work it is shown that in contrast to the "standard" Zeno-effect where the act of observing a process reduces the probability of its reality, an inverse situation when a particle transmits through a potential barrier (a so-called barrier anti-Zeno effect) can be observed, the observation of the particle essentially increases the probability of its transmission through the barrier. The possibility of using the barrier anti-Zeno effect is discussed to explain paradoxical results of experiments on "cold nuclear fusion" observed in various systems including biological ones. (According to the observers who performed the observations, the energy generation, which could not be explained by any chemical processes, as well as the change in the isotope and even element composition of the studied object may occur in these systems.

  10. 4$\\pi$ detector for study of Zeno effect using 220Rn -> 216Po alpha->alpha correlated chains

    CERN Document Server

    Nadderd, L; Subotic, K; Polyakov, A N; Lobanov, Y V; Rykhlyuk, A V

    2015-01-01

    First test of the 4pi detector for study of exponential law of radioactive decay and possibility of observation of Zeno effect [1-3], measuring the mean life of 216Po is presented. This detector consists of two surface-barrier n-Si(Au) detectors placed in the close contact ( 4T1/2. Both, the data acquisition system and the vacuum chamber design are presented in brief.

  11. Quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects measured by transition probabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenxian, E-mail: wxzhang@whu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Kofman, A.G. [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States); Zhuang, Jun [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); You, J.Q. [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 10084 (China); Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nori, Franco [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2013-10-30

    Using numerical calculations, we compare the transition probabilities of many spins in random magnetic fields, subject to either frequent projective measurements, frequent phase modulations, or a mix of modulations and measurements. For various distribution functions, we find the transition probability under frequent modulations is suppressed most if the pulse delay is short and the evolution time is larger than a critical value. Furthermore, decay freezing occurs only under frequent modulations as the pulse delay approaches zero. In the large pulse-delay region, however, the transition probabilities under frequent modulations are highest among the three control methods.

  12. Zeno Paradox for Bohmian Trajectories: The Unfolding of the Metatron

    OpenAIRE

    De Gosson, Maurice,; Hiley, Basil

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the track of an {\\alpha}-particle passing through a cloud chamber using the Bohm theory and show that the resulting classical track has its origins in the quantum Zeno effect. By assuming the ionised gas molecules reveal the positions of the {\\alpha}-particle on its trajectory and using these positions in a short time propagator technique developed by de Gosson, we show it is the failure of the quantum potential to develop quickly enough that leads to the appearance of the classica...

  13. Zeno Paradox for Bohmian Trajectories: The Unfolding of the Metatron

    CERN Document Server

    de Gosson, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    We study an analogue of the quantum Zeno paradox for the Bohm trajectory of a sharply located particle (or a system of particles). We show that a continuously observed Bohm trajectory is the classical trajectory predicted by Hamiltonian mechanics.

  14. Adiabatic passage for one-step generation of n-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of superconducting qubits via quantum Zeno dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Lei; Song, Chong; Xu, Jing; Yu, Lin; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2016-09-01

    An efficient scheme is proposed for generating n-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of n superconducting qubits separated by (n-1) coplanar waveguide resonators capacitively via adiabatic passage with the help of quantum Zeno dynamics in one step. In the scheme, it is not necessary to precisely control the time of the whole operation and the Rabi frequencies of classical fields because of the introduction of adiabatic passage. The numerical simulations for three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state show that the scheme is insensitive to the dissipation of the resonators and the energy relaxation of the superconducting qubits. The three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state can be deterministically generated with comparatively high fidelity in the current experimental conditions, though the scheme is somewhat sensitive to the dephasing of superconducting qubits.

  15. Effect of Quantum Point Contact Measurement on Electron Spin State in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Fei-Yun; TU Tao; HAO Xiao-Jie; GUO Guang-Can; GUO Guo-Ping

    2009-01-01

    We study the time evolution of two electron spin states in a double quantum-dot system, which includes a nearby quantum point contact (QPC) as a measurement device. We find that the QPC measurement induced decoherence is in the microsecond timescale. We also find that the enhanced QPC measurement will trap the system in its initial spin states, which is consistent with the quantum Zeno effect.

  16. Nonlinear Zeno dynamics due to atomic interactions in Bose–Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, V.G.; Shchesnovich, V.S., E-mail: valery@ufabc.edu.br

    2014-12-01

    We show that nonlinear interactions induce both the Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in the generalized Bose–Josephson model (with the on-site interactions and the second-order tunneling) describing Bose–Einstein condensate in double-well trap subject to particle removal from one of the wells. We find that the on-site interactions induce only the Zeno effect, which appears at long evolution times, whereas the second-order tunneling leads to a strong decay of the atomic population at short evolution times, reminiscent of the anti-Zeno effect, and destroys the nonlinear Zeno effect due to the on-site interactions at long times.

  17. Zeno's dialectische redenering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemans, J.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Over de historische achtergronden van de dialectische benadering van argumentatie is veel minder bekend dan over die van de logische en de retorische benadering. In dit artikel worden de argumentatietheoretische opvattingen behandeld van Zeno van Elea, de filosoof die in antieke bronnen als de ‘uitv

  18. Zeno's Paradox of Immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, S Jay; Carnes, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    Scientists who speculate on the future of human longevity have a broad range of views ranging from the promise of immortality, to radical life extension, to declines in life expectancy. Among those who contend that radical life extension is already here, or on the horizon, or immortality is forthcoming, elements of their reasoning appear surprisingly close, if not identical, to a famous mathematical paradox posed by the ancient Greek mathematician known as Zeno. Here we examine the underlying assumptions behind the views that much longer life expectancies are forthcoming or have already arrived, and place their line of reasoning within the context of a new Zeno paradox described here as The Paradox of Immortality. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Zeno-Gravity Correspondence: Zeno's Dichotomy Paradox and Gravitational red-shift near Event Horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Sridip

    2016-01-01

    We relate Zeno's Dichotomy paradox with gravitational red-shift near event horizon in a spherically symmetric space-time. A dictionary of this connection, henceforth called as Zeno-Gravity correspondence, has been built up. The infinite sequence of Zeno's paradox gets mapped to the effect of infinite gravitational red-shift near event horizon and the infinite amount of co-ordinate time the light/particle takes to reach the horizon, starting from a finite distance away from the horizon. Utilizing the dictionary, we elucidate the concept of gravitational red-shift and co-ordinate chart, not covering the whole manifold in a more transparent student-friendly manner without using sophisticated machinery of differential geometry.

  20. Bibliographic guide to the foundations of quantum mechanics and quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, A

    2000-01-01

    This is a collection of references (papers, books, preprints, book reviews, Ph. D. thesis, patents, etc.), sorted alphabetically and (some of them) classified by subject, on foundations of quantum mechanics and quantum information. Specifically, it covers hidden variables (``no-go'' theorems, experiments), interpretations of quantum mechanics, entanglement, quantum effects (quantum Zeno effect, quantum erasure, ``interaction-free'' measurements, quantum ``non-demolition'' measurements), quantum information (cryptography, cloning, dense coding, teleportation), and quantum computation.

  1. An Invisible Quantum Tripwire

    CERN Document Server

    Anisimov, Petr M; McCracken, S Blane; Dowling, Jonathan P

    2010-01-01

    We present here a quantum tripwire, which is a quantum optical interrogation technique capable of detecting an intrusion with very low probability of the tripwire being revealed to the intruder. Our scheme combines interaction-free measurement with the quantum Zeno effect in order to interrogate the presence of the intruder without interaction. The tripwire exploits a curious nonlinear behavior of the quantum Zeno effect we discovered, which occurs in a lossy system. We also employ a statistical hypothesis testing protocol, allowing us to calculate a confidence level of interaction-free measurement after a given number of trials. As a result, our quantum intruder alert system is robust against photon loss and dephasing under realistic atmospheric conditions and its design minimizes the probabilities of false positives and false negatives as well as the probability of becoming visible to the intruder.

  2. Quantum Zeno Effect Underpinning the Radical-Ion-Pair Mechanism of Avian Magnetoreception

    OpenAIRE

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-01-01

    The intricate biochemical processes underlying avian magnetoreception, the sensory ability of migratory birds to navigate using earths magnetic field, have been narrowed down to spin-dependent recombination of radical-ion pairs to be found in avian species retinal proteins. The avian magnetic field detection is governed by the interplay between magnetic interactions of the radicals unpaired electrons and the radicals recombination dynamics. Critical to this mechanism is the long lifetime of t...

  3. Dynamical systems revisited : Hybrid systems with Zeno executions

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, JUN; Johansson, Karl Henrik; Lygeros, John; Sastry, Shankar

    2000-01-01

    Results from classical dynamical systems are generalized to hybrid dynamical systems. The concept of omega limit set is introduced for hybrid systems and is used to prove new results on invariant sets and stability, where Zeno and non-Zeno hybrid systems can be treated within the same framework. As an example, LaSalle's Invariance Principle is extended to hybrid systems. Zeno hybrid systems are discussed in detail. The omega limit set of a Zeno execution is characterized for classes of hybrid...

  4. Nonideal Quantum Measurement Effects on the Switching Currents Distribution of Josephson Junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Pierro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The quantum character of Josephson junctions is ordinarily revealed through the analysis of the switching currents, i.e. the current at which a finite voltage appears: A sharp rise of the voltage signals the passage (tunnel) from a trapped state (the zero voltage solution) to a running state (the finite voltage solution). In this context, we investigate the probability distribution of the Josephson junctions switching current taking into account the effect of the bias sweeping rate and introducing a simple nonideal quantum measurements scheme. The measurements are modelled as repeated voltage samplings at discrete time intervals, that is with repeated projections of the time dependent quantum solutions on the static or the running states, to retrieve the probability distribution of the switching currents. The distribution appears to be immune of the quantum Zeno effect, and it is close to, but distinguishable from, the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. For energy barriers comparable to the quantum fund...

  5. Zeno: Critical Fluid Light Scattering Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Robert W.; Shaumeyer, J. N.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Boukari, Hacene; Gent, David A.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    1996-01-01

    The Zeno (Critical Fluid Light Scattering) experiment is the culmination of a long history of critical fluid light scattering in liquid-vapor systems. The major limitation to making accurate measurements closer to the critical point was the density stratification which occurs in these extremely compressible fluids. Zeno was to determine the critical density fluctuation decay rates at a pair of supplementary angles in the temperature range 100 mK to 100 (mu)K from T(sub c) in a sample of xenon accurately loaded to the critical density. This paper gives some highlights from operating the instrument on two flights March, 1994 on STS-62 and February, 1996 on STS-75. More detail of the experiment Science Requirements, the personnel, apparatus, and results are displayed on the Web homepage at http://www.zeno.umd.edu.

  6. ZENO: A Critical Fluid Light Scattering Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The ZENO experiment flew on the STS-62, it is designed to verify intriguing, but previously untested, theories in fluid physics. These theories attempt to describe dramatic changes in the properties of fluids near the critical temperature at which the vapor and liquid forms co-exist.

  7. On the Zeno behavior of linear complementarity systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camlibel, MK; Schumacher, JM

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the so-called Zeno phenomenon is addressed for linear complementarity systems which are interconnections of linear systems and complementarity conditions. We present some sufficient conditions for absence of Zeno behavior. It is also shown that the zero state, which is the most obviou

  8. The true quantum face of the "exponential" decay law

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanowski, K

    2016-01-01

    Results of theoretical studies of the quantum unstable systems caused that there are rather widespread belief that a universal feature od the quantum decay process is the presence of three time regimes of the decay process: the early time (initial) leading to the Quantum Zeno (or Anti Zeno) Effects, "exponential" (or "canonical") described by the decay law of the exponential form, and late time characterized by the decay law having inverse--power law form. Based on the fundamental principles of the quantum theory we give the proof that there is no time interval in which the survival probability (decay law) could be a decreasing function of time of the purely exponential form but even at the "exponential" regime the decay curve is oscillatory modulated with a smaller or a large amplitude of oscillations depending on parameters of the model considered.

  9. True quantum face of the "exponential" decay law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanowski, Krzysztof

    2017-05-01

    Results of theoretical studies of the quantum unstable systems caused that there are rather widespread belief that a universal feature of the quantum decay process is the presence of three time regimes of the decay process: the early time (initial) leading to the Quantum Zeno (or Anti Zeno) Effects, "exponential" (or "canonical") described by the decay law of the exponential form, and late time characterized by the decay law having inverse-power law form. Based on the fundamental principles of the quantum theory we give the proof that there is no time interval in which the survival probability (decay law) could be a decreasing function of time of the purely exponential form but even at the "exponential" regime the decay curve is oscillatory modulated with a smaller or a large amplitude of oscillations depending on parameters of the model considered.

  10. Quantum computation in decoherence-free subspace via cavity-decay-assisted adiabatic passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FENG Xunli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work,a scheme for quantum computation based on cavity QED in a decoherence-free subspaces via using the technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP is proposed.To implement universal quantum logic gates that form basic blocks of quantum computation,we suppose two atoms are trapped in a single-mode cavity with large decay rates and are driven by the laser fields.The relatively large cavity decay can be used for the continuous detection of the cavity mode as so-called ″cavity-decay-induced quantum Zeno effect″.The results show that,decoherence induced by the atomic spontaneous emission and cavity decay can be efficiently suppress with the STIRAP technique and the quantum Zeno effect.

  11. Protocol for Direct Counterfactual Quantum Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Hatim; Li, Zheng-Hong; Al-Amri, M.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2013-04-01

    It has long been assumed in physics that for information to travel between two parties in empty space, “Alice” and “Bob,” physical particles have to travel between them. Here, using the “chained” quantum Zeno effect, we show how, in the ideal asymptotic limit, information can be transferred between Alice and Bob without any physical particles traveling between them.

  12. Quantum Cosmology: Effective Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Quantum cosmology has traditionally been studied at the level of symmetry-reduced minisuperspace models, analyzing the behavior of wave functions. However, in the absence of a complete full setting of quantum gravity and detailed knowledge of specific properties of quantum states, it remained difficult to make testable predictions. For quantum cosmology to be part of empirical science, it must allow for a systematic framework in which corrections to well-tested classical equations can be derived, with any ambiguities and ignorance sufficiently parameterized. As in particle and condensed-matter physics, a successful viewpoint is one of effective theories, adapted to specific issues one encounters in quantum cosmology. This review presents such an effective framework of quantum cosmology, taking into account, among other things, space-time structures, covariance, the problem of time and the anomaly issue.

  13. Quantum teleportation without classical channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Amri, M.; Li, Zheng-Hong; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, we show how quantum teleportation can be achieved without the assistance of classical channels. Our protocol does not need any pre-established entangled photon pairs beforehand. Just by utilizing quantum Zeno effect and couterfactual communication idea, we can achieve two goals; entangling a photon and an atom and also disentangling them by non-local interaction. Information is completely transferred from atom to photon with controllable disentanglement processes. More importantly, there is no need to confirm teleportation results via classical channels.

  14. Quantum Effects in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  15. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  16. Effectively Emergent Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2008-01-01

    We consider non minimal coupling between matters and gravity in modified theories of gravity. In contrary to the current common sense, we report that quantum mechanics can effectively emerge when the space-time geometry is sufficiently flat. In other words, quantum mechanics might play no role when and where the space-time geometry is highly curved. We study the first two simple models of Effectively Emergent Quantum Mechanics(EEQM): R-dependent EEQM and G-dependent EEQM where R is the Ricci scalar and G is the Gauss-Bonnet Lagrangian density. We discuss that these EEQM theories might be fine tuned to remain consistent with all the implemented experiments and performed observations. In particular, we observe that G-dependent EEQM softens the problem of quantum gravity.

  17. Effectively calculable quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Bolotin, Arkady

    2015-01-01

    According to mathematical constructivism, a mathematical object can exist only if there is a way to compute (or "construct") it; so, what is non-computable is non-constructive. In the example of the quantum model, whose Fock states are associated with Fibonacci numbers, this paper shows that the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics is non-constructive since it permits an undecidable (or effectively impossible) subset of Hilbert space. On the other hand, as it is argued in the paper, if...

  18. The quantum sweeper effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grössing, G.; Fussy, S.; Mesa Pascasio, J.; Schwabl, H.

    2015-07-01

    We show that during stochastic beam attenuation in double slit experiments, there appear unexpected new effects for transmission factors below a ≤ 10-4, which can eventually be observed with the aid of weak measurement techniques. These are denoted as quantum sweeper effects, which are characterized by the bunching together of low counting rate particles within very narrow spatial domains. We employ a “superclassical” modeling procedure which we have previously shown to produce predictions identical with those of standard quantum theory. Thus it is demonstrated that in reaching down to ever weaker channel intensities, the nonlinear nature of the probability density currents becomes ever more important. We finally show that the resulting unexpected effects nevertheless implicitly also exist in standard quantum mechanics.

  19. Quantum Magellan Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan

    2009-01-01

    In this work we consider remarkable experiment of the quantum dynamical interaction between a photon and fixed beam splitter with additional two optical fibers. Given fibers, having "circular", almost completely closed loop forms, admit that both superposition terms, corresponding to reflecting and passing photon, interact unlimitedly periodically with splitter. For increasing number of given interactions final state of the photon tends to superposition of reflecting and passing photon with equivalent superposition coefficients quite independently of their initial values. So, many time repeated unitary quantum dynamical evolution implies an unexpected degeneration. Feynman ingeniously observed that a time of the degeneration of the ideas will come, known to any great geographer-explorer (e.g. Magellan that first circumnavigate Earth), when he thinks about the army of the tourists that will come after him. For this reason mentioned dynamical degeneration will be called quantum Magellan effect. Also, we conside...

  20. The effect of quantum noise on the restricted quantum game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Shuai; Fang Mao-Fa

    2006-01-01

    It has recently been established that quantum strategies have great advantage over classical ones in quantum games. However, quantum states are easily affected by the quantum noise resulting in decoherence. In this paper, we investigate the effect of quantum noise on the restricted quantum game in which one player is restricted in classical strategic space, another in quantum strategic space and only the quantum player is affected by the quantum noise. Our results show that in the maximally entangled state, no Nash equilibria exist in the range of 0< p≤0.422 (p is the quantum noise parameter), while two special Nash equilibria appear in the range of 0.422 < p< 1. The advantage that the quantum player diminished only in the limit of maximum quantum noise. Increasing the amount of quantum noise leads to the increase of the classical player's payoff and the reduction of the quantum player's payoff, but is helpful in forming two Nash equilibria.

  1. Quantum renewal equation for the first detection time of a quantum walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, H.; Kessler, D. A.; Barkai, E.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the statistics of the first detected passage time of a quantum walk. The postulates of quantum theory, in particular the collapse of the wave function upon measurement, reveal an intimate connection between the wave function of a process free of measurements, i.e. the solution of the Schrödinger equation, and the statistics of first detection events on a site. For stroboscopic measurements a quantum renewal equation yields basic properties of quantum walks. For example, for a tight binding model on a ring we discover critical sampling times, diverging quantities such as the mean time for first detection, and an optimal detection rate. For a quantum walk on an infinite line the probability of first detection decays like {{≤ft(\\text{time}\\right)}-3} with a superimposed oscillation, critical behavior for a specific choice of sampling time, and vanishing amplitude when the sampling time approaches zero due to the quantum Zeno effect.

  2. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sisir

    2014-07-01

    The debates about the trivial and non-trivial effects in biological systems have drawn much attention during the last decade or so. What might these non-trivial sorts of quantum effects be? There is no consensus so far among the physicists and biologists regarding the meaning of "non-trivial quantum effects". However, there is no doubt about the implications of the challenging research into quantum effects relevant to biology such as coherent excitations of biomolecules and photosynthesis, quantum tunneling of protons, van der Waals forces, ultrafast dynamics through conical intersections, and phonon-assisted electron tunneling as the basis for our sense of smell, environment assisted transport of ions and entanglement in ion channels, role of quantum vacuum in consciousness. Several authors have discussed the non-trivial quantum effects and classified them into four broad categories: (a) Quantum life principle; (b) Quantum computing in the brain; (c) Quantum computing in genetics; and (d) Quantum consciousness. First, I will review the above developments. I will then discuss in detail the ion transport in the ion channel and the relevance of quantum theory in brain function. The ion transport in the ion channel plays a key role in information processing by the brain.

  3. Collective dynamics of multimode bosonic systems induced by weak quantum measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Kozlowski, Wojciech; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F.; Mekhov, Igor B.

    2016-07-01

    In contrast to the fully projective limit of strong quantum measurement, where the evolution is locked to a small subspace (quantum Zeno dynamics), or even frozen completely (quantum Zeno effect), the weak non-projective measurement can effectively compete with standard unitary dynamics leading to nontrivial effects. Here we consider global weak measurement addressing collective variables, thus preserving quantum superpositions due to the lack of which path information. While for certainty we focus on ultracold atoms, the idea can be generalized to other multimode quantum systems, including various quantum emitters, optomechanical arrays, and purely photonic systems with multiple-path interferometers (photonic circuits). We show that light scattering from ultracold bosons in optical lattices can be used for defining macroscopically occupied spatial modes that exhibit long-range coherent dynamics. Even if the measurement strength remains constant, the quantum measurement backaction acts on the atomic ensemble quasi-periodically and induces collective oscillatory dynamics of all the atoms. We introduce an effective model for the evolution of the spatial modes and present an analytic solution showing that the quantum jumps drive the system away from its stable point. We confirm our finding describing the atomic observables in terms of stochastic differential equations.

  4. Quantum nature of edge magnetism in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golor, Michael; Wessel, Stefan; Schmidt, Manuel J

    2014-01-31

    It is argued that the subtle crossover from decoherence-dominated classical magnetism to fluctuation-dominated quantum magnetism is experimentally accessible in graphene nanoribbons. We show that the width of a nanoribbon determines whether the edge magnetism is on the classical side, on the quantum side, or in between. In the classical regime, decoherence is dominant and leads to static spin polarizations at the ribbon edges, which are well described by mean-field theories. The quantum Zeno effect is identified as the basic mechanism which is responsible for the spin polarization and thereby enables the application of graphene in spintronics. On the quantum side, however, the spin polarization is destroyed by dynamical processes. The great tunability of graphene magnetism thus offers a viable route for the study of the quantum-classical crossover.

  5. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Since the last decade the study of quantum mechanical phenomena in biological systems has become a vibrant field of research. Initially sparked by evidence of quantum effects in energy transport that is instrumental for photosynthesis, quantum biology asks the question of how methods and models from quantum theory can help us to understand fundamental mechanisms in living organisms. This approach entails a paradigm change challenging the related disciplines: The successful framework of quantum theory is taken out of its low-temperature, microscopic regimes and applied to hot and dense macroscopic environments, thereby extending the toolbox of biology and biochemistry at the same time. The Quantum Effects in Biological Systems conference is a platform for researchers from biology, chemistry and physics to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of quantum biology. After meetings in Lisbon (2009), Harvard (2010), Ulm (2011), Berkeley (2012), Vienna (2013), Singapore (2014) and Florence (2015),...

  6. Effective equations for the quantum pendulum from momentous quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Hector H.; Chacon-Acosta, Guillermo [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingenieria, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Chihuahua 31125 (Mexico); Departamento de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Artificios 40, Mexico D. F. 01120 (Mexico)

    2012-08-24

    In this work we study the quantum pendulum within the framework of momentous quantum mechanics. This description replaces the Schroedinger equation for the quantum evolution of the system with an infinite set of classical equations for expectation values of configuration variables, and quantum dispersions. We solve numerically the effective equations up to the second order, and describe its evolution.

  7. The effect of quantum noise on multiplayer quantum game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Shuai; Fang Mao-Fa; Zheng Xiao-Juan

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been realized that quantum strategies have a great advantage over classical ones in quantum games.However, quantum states are easily affected by the quantum noise, resulting in decoherence. In this paper, we investigate the effect of quantum noise on a multiplayer quantum game with a certain strategic space, with all players affected by the same quantum noise at the same time. Our results show that in a maximally entangled state, a special Nash equilibrium appears in the range of 0 (≤) p (≤) 0.622 (p is the quantum noise parameter), and then disappears in the range of 0.622 < p (≤) 1. Increasing the amount of quantum noise leads to the reduction of the quantum player's payoff.

  8. Observable Effects of Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Lay Nam; Sun, Chen; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the generic phenomenology of quantum gravity and, in particular, argue that the observable effects of quantum gravity, associated with new, extended, non-local, non-particle-like quanta, and accompanied by a dynamical energy-momentum space, are not necessarily Planckian and that they could be observed at much lower and experimentally accessible energy scales.

  9. Thermal baths as quantum resources: more friends than foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurizki, Gershon; Shahmoon, Ephraim; Zwick, Analia

    2015-12-01

    In this article we argue that thermal reservoirs (baths) are potentially useful resources in processes involving atoms interacting with quantized electromagnetic fields and their applications to quantum technologies. One may try to suppress the bath effects by means of dynamical control, but such control does not always yield the desired results. We wish instead to take advantage of bath effects, that do not obliterate ‘quantumness’ in the system-bath compound. To this end, three possible approaches have been pursued by us. (i) Control of a quantum system faster than the correlation time of the bath to which it couples: such control allows us to reveal quasi-reversible/coherent dynamical phenomena of quantum open systems, manifest by the quantum Zeno or anti-Zeno effects (QZE or AZE, respectively). Dynamical control methods based on the QZE are aimed not only at protecting the quantumness of the system, but also diagnosing the bath spectra or transferring quantum information via noisy media. By contrast, AZE-based control is useful for fast cooling of thermalized quantum systems. (ii) Engineering the coupling of quantum systems to selected bath modes: this approach, based on field-atom coupling control in cavities, waveguides and photonic band structures, allows one to drastically enhance the strength and range of atom-atom coupling through the mediation of the selected bath modes. More dramatically, it allows us to achieve bath-induced entanglement that may appear paradoxical if one takes the conventional view that coupling to baths destroys quantumness. (iii) Engineering baths with appropriate non-flat spectra: this approach is a prerequisite for the construction of the simplest and most efficient quantum heat machines (engines and refrigerators). We may thus conclude that often thermal baths are ‘more friends than foes’ in quantum technologies.

  10. Quantum gravitational effects on boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I Y

    2016-01-01

    Quantum gravitational effects may hold the key to some of the outstanding problems in theoretical physics. In this work we analyze the perturbative quantum effects on the boundary of a gravitational system and Dirichlet boundary condtion imposed at the classical level. Our analysis reveals that for a black hole solution there exists a clash between the quantum effects and Dirichlet boundary condition: the solution of the one-particle-irreducible (1PI) action no longer obeys the Dirichlet boundary condition. The analysis also suggests that the violation of the Dirichlet boundary condition should be tied with a certain mechanism of information storage on the boundary.

  11. Quantum Effects in Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharian, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the vacuum expectation value of the current density for a charged scalar field on a slice of anti-de Sitter (AdS) space with toroidally compact dimensions. Along the compact dimensions periodicity conditions are imposed on the field operator with general phases and the presence of a constant gauge field is assumed. The latter gives rise to Aharonov-Bohm-like effects on the vacuum currents. The current density along compact dimensions is a periodic function of the gauge field flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. It vanishes on the AdS boundary and, near the horizon, to the leading order, it is conformally related to the corresponding quantity in Minkowski bulk for a massless field. For large values of the length of the compact dimension compared with the AdS curvature radius, the vacuum current decays as power-law for both massless and massive fields. This behavior is essentially different from the corresponding one in Minkowski background, where the currents for a massive field are suppressed exponentially.

  12. Probabilistic direct counterfactual quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng

    2017-02-01

    It is striking that the quantum Zeno effect can be used to launch a direct counterfactual communication between two spatially separated parties, Alice and Bob. So far, existing protocols of this type only provide a deterministic counterfactual communication service. However, this counterfactuality should be payed at a price. Firstly, the transmission time is much longer than a classical transmission costs. Secondly, the chained-cycle structure makes them more sensitive to channel noises. Here, we extend the idea of counterfactual communication, and present a probabilistic-counterfactual quantum communication protocol, which is proved to have advantages over the deterministic ones. Moreover, the presented protocol could evolve to a deterministic one solely by adjusting the parameters of the beam splitters. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61300203).

  13. Contemporary Criticism and the Return of Zeno.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wendell V.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that contemporary critical literary theories such as hermaneutics, reader-response, speech-act, structuralism, and deconstructionism share with pre-Platonic Eleatic thought a distrust of cause-and-effect reasoning and an emphasis on paradox. (MM)

  14. Collective dynamics of multimode bosonic systems induced by weak quantum measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F; Mekhov, Igor B

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to strong projective measurement, which freezes the system evolution by quantum Zeno effect, weak measurement can effectively compete with standard unitary dynamics leading to nontrivial effects. Here we consider global weak measurement addressing several bosonic modes at the same time, thus preserving quantum superpositions due to the lack of which path information. While for certainty we focus on ultracold atoms, the idea can be generalized to other multimode quantum systems, including various quantum emitters, optomechanical arrays, and purely photonic systems with multiple-path interferometers. We show that light scattering from ultracold bosons in optical lattices can be used for defining macroscopically occupied spatial modes that exhibit long-range coherent dynamics. Even for constant external measurement, the quantum measurement backaction acts on the atomic ensemble quasi-periodically and induces collective oscillatory dynamics of all the atoms. We introduce an effective model for the evo...

  15. Quantum metrology from a quantum information science perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Toth, Geza

    2015-01-01

    We summarise important recent advances in quantum metrology, in connection to experiments in cold gases, trapped cold atoms and photons. First we review simple metrological setups, such as quantum metrology with spin squeezed states, with Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states, Dicke states and singlet states. We calculate the highest precision achievable in these schemes. Then, we present the fundamental notions of quantum metrology, such as shot-noise scaling, Heisenberg scaling, the quantum Fisher information and the Cramer-Rao bound. Using these, we demonstrate that entanglement is needed to surpass the shot-noise scaling in very general metrological tasks with a linear interferometer. We discuss some applications of the quantum Fisher information, such as how it can be used to obtain a criterion for a quantum state to be a macroscopic superposition. We show how it is related to the the speed of a quantum evolution, and how it appears in the theory of the quantum Zeno effect. Finally, we explain how uncorrela...

  16. Quantum effects near future singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D; Dito, Giuseppe; Fabris, Julio C; Houndjo, Mahouton J S

    2012-01-01

    General relativity allows a variety of future singularities to occur in the evolution of the universe. At these future singularities, the universe will end in a singular state after a finite proper time and geometrical invariants of the space time will diverge. One question that naturally arises with respect to these cosmological scenarios is the following: can quantum effects lead to the avoidance of these future singularities? We analyze this problem considering massless and conformally coupled scalar fields in an isotropic and homogeneous background leading to future singularities. It is shown that near strong, big rip-type singularities, with violation of the energy conditions, the quantum effects are very important, while near some milder classes of singularity like the sudden singularity, which preserve the energy conditions, quantum effects are irrelevant.

  17. Quantum phase transitions in constrained Bose systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnes, Lars

    2011-01-01

    This doctoral thesis studies low dimensional quantum systems that can be realized in recent cold atom experiments. From the viewpoint of quantum statistical mechanics, the main emphasis is on the detailed study of the different quantum and thermal phases and their transitions using numerical methods, such as quantum Monte Carlo and the Tensor Network Renormalization Group. The first part of this work deals with a lattice Boson model subject to strong three-body losses. In a quantum-Zeno li...

  18. Effective Constraints for Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin; Skirzewski, Aureliano; Tsobanjan, Artur

    2008-01-01

    An effective formalism for quantum constrained systems is presented which allows manageable derivations of solutions and observables, including a treatment of physical reality conditions without requiring full knowledge of the physical inner product. Instead of a state equation from a constraint operator, an infinite system of constraint functions on the quantum phase space of expectation values and moments of states is used. The examples of linear constraints as well as the free non-relativistic particle in parameterized form illustrate how standard problems of constrained systems can be dealt with in this framework.

  19. Quantum effects in warp drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finazzi Stefano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Warp drives are interesting configurations that, at least theoretically, provide a way to travel at superluminal speed. Unfortunately, several issues seem to forbid their realization. First, a huge amount of exotic matter is required to build them. Second, the presence of quantum fields propagating in superluminal warp-drive geometries makes them semiclassically unstable. Indeed, a Hawking-like high-temperature flux of particles is generated inside the warp-drive bubble, which causes an exponential growth of the energy density measured at the front wall of the bubble by freely falling observers. Moreover, superluminal warp drives remain unstable even if the Lorentz symmetry is broken by the introduction of regulating higher order terms in the Lagrangian of the quantum field. If the dispersion relation of the quantum field is subluminal, a black-hole laser phenomenon yields an exponential amplification of the emitted flux. If it is superluminal, infrared effects cause a linear growth of this flux.

  20. Quantum channels and memory effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Filippo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    Any physical process can be represented as a quantum channel mapping an initial state to a final state. Hence it can be characterized from the point of view of communication theory, i.e., in terms of its ability to transfer information. Quantum information provides a theoretical framework and the proper mathematical tools to accomplish this. In this context the notion of codes and communication capacities have been introduced by generalizing them from the classical Shannon theory of information transmission and error correction. The underlying assumption of this approach is to consider the channel not as acting on a single system, but on sequences of systems, which, when properly initialized allow one to overcome the noisy effects induced by the physical process under consideration. While most of the work produced so far has been focused on the case in which a given channel transformation acts identically and independently on the various elements of the sequence (memoryless configuration in jargon), correlated error models appear to be a more realistic way to approach the problem. A slightly different, yet conceptually related, notion of correlated errors applies to a single quantum system which evolves continuously in time under the influence of an external disturbance which acts on it in a non-Markovian fashion. This leads to the study of memory effects in quantum channels: a fertile ground where interesting novel phenomena emerge at the intersection of quantum information theory and other branches of physics. A survey is taken of the field of quantum channels theory while also embracing these specific and complex settings.

  1. THz quantum-confined Stark effect in semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.;

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an instantaneous all-optical manipulation of optical absorption at the ground state of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) via a quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) induced by the electric field of incident THz pulses with peak electric fields reaching 200 kV/cm in the free space...

  2. Classical and quantum many-body effects on the critical properties and thermodynamic regularities of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgranges, C.; Anderson, P. W.; Delhommelle, J.

    2017-02-01

    Using molecular simulation, we determine the critical properties of Si as well as the loci for several remarkable thermodynamic contours spanning the supercritical region of the phase diagram. We consider a classical three-body potential as well as a quantum (tight-binding) many-body model, and determine the loci for the ideality contours, including the Zeno line and the H line of ideal enthalpy. The two strategies (classical or quantum) lead to strongly asymmetric binodals and to critical properties in good agreement with each other. The Zeno and H lines are found to remain linear over a wide temperature interval, despite the changes in electronic structure undergone by the fluid along these contours. We also show that the classical and quantum model yield markedly different results for the parameters defining the H line, the exponents for the power-laws underlying the line of minima for the isothermal enthalpy and for the density required to achieve ideal behavior, most notably for the enthalpy.

  3. Quantum trajectories under frequent measurements in a non-Markovian environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Luting; Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-09-01

    In this work we generalize the quantum trajectory (QT) theory from Markovian to non-Markovian environments. We model the non-Markovian environment by using a Lorentzian spectral density function with bandwidth (Λ ), and find a perfect "scaling" property with the measurement frequency (τ-1) in terms of the scaling variable x =Λ τ . Our result bridges the gap between the existing QT theory and the Zeno effect, by rendering them as two extremes corresponding to x →∞ and x →0 , respectively. This x -dependent criterion improves the idea of using τ alone and quantitatively identifies the validity condition of the conventional QT theory.

  4. Lectures on the Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to describe the basic theoretical structures underlying the rich and beautiful physics of the quantum Hall effect. The focus is on the interplay between microscopic wavefunctions, long-distance effective Chern-Simons theories, and the modes which live on the boundary. The notes are aimed at graduate students in any discipline where $\\hbar=1$. A working knowledge of quantum field theory is assumed. Contents: 1. The Basics (Landau levels and Berry phase). 2. The Integer Quantum Hall Effect. 3. The Fractional Quantum Hall Effect. 4. Non-Abelian Quantum Hall States. 5. Chern-Simons Theories. 6. Edge Modes.

  5. Dynamical memory effects in correlated quantum channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Carole; Karpat, Göktuǧ; Macchiavello, Chiara; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-09-01

    Memory effects play a fundamental role in the study of the dynamics of open quantum systems. There exist two conceptually distinct notions of memory discussed for quantum channels in the literature. In quantum information theory quantum channels with memory are characterized by the existence of correlations between successive applications of the channel on a sequence of quantum systems. In open quantum systems theory memory effects arise dynamically during the time evolution of quantum systems and define non-Markovian dynamics. Here we relate and combine these two different concepts of memory. In particular, we study the interplay between correlations between multiple uses of quantum channels and non-Markovianity as nondivisibility of the t -parametrized family of channels defining the dynamical map.

  6. Quantum coherence in the dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samos-Sáenz de Buruaga, D. N.; Sabín, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We propose to use quantum coherence as the ultimate proof of the quantum nature of the radiation that appears by means of the dynamical Casimir effect in experiments with superconducting microwave waveguides. We show that, unlike previously considered measurements such as entanglement and discord, quantum coherence does not require a threshold value of the external pump amplitude and is highly robust to thermal noise.

  7. Nonlocal Quantum Effects in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dumin, Yurii V

    2014-01-01

    Since it is commonly believed that the observed large-scale structure of the Universe is an imprint of quantum fluctuations existing at the very early stage of its evolution, it is reasonable to pose the question: Do the effects of quantum nonlocality, which are well established now by the laboratory studies, manifest themselves also in the early Universe? We try to answer this question by utilizing the results of a few experiments, namely, with the superconducting multi-Josephson-junction loops and the ultracold gases in periodic potentials. Employing a close analogy between the above-mentioned setups and the simplest one-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model, we show that the specific nonlocal correlations revealed in the laboratory studies might be of considerable importance also in treating the strongly-nonequilibrium phase transitions of Higgs fields in the early Universe. Particularly, they should substantially reduce the number of topological defects (e.g., domain walls) expected du...

  8. Non-Zenoness of piecewise affine dynamical systems and affine complementarity systems with inputs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Le Quang THUAN

    2014-01-01

    In the context of continuous piecewise affine dynamical systems and affine complementarity systems with inputs, we study the existence of Zeno behavior, i.e., infinite number of mode transitions in a finite-length time interval, in this paper. The main result reveals that continuous piecewise affine dynamical systems with piecewise real-analytic inputs do not exhibit Zeno behavior. Applied the achieved result to affine complementarity systems with inputs, we also obtained a similar conclusion. A direct benefit of the main result is that one can apply smooth ordinary differential equations theory in a local manner for the analysis of continuous piecewise affine dynamical systems with inputs.

  9. Effects of quantum gravity on black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Deyou; Yang, Haitang; Yang, Shuzheng

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss effects of quantum gravity on black hole physics. After a brief review of the origin of the minimal observable length from various quantum gravity theories, we present the tunneling method. To incorporate quantum gravity effects, we modify the Klein-Gordon equation and Dirac equation by the modified fundamental commutation relations. Then we use the modified equations to discuss the tunneling radiation of scalar particles and fermions. The corrected Hawking temperatures are related to the quantum numbers of the emitted particles. Quantum gravity corrections slow down the increase of the temperatures. The remnants are observed as $M_{\\hbox{Res}}\\gtrsim \\frac{M_p}{\\sqrt{\\beta_0}}$. The mass is quantized by the modified Wheeler-DeWitt equation and is proportional to $n$ in quantum gravity regime. The thermodynamical property of the black hole is studied by the influence of quantum gravity effects.

  10. Effects of Spin Quantum Force in Magnetized Quantum Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨秀峰; 姜虹; 祁学宏; 段文山

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the governing equations for a quantum magnetoplasma including the electron spin -1/2 effects and quantum Bohm potential, we derive Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation of the system of quantum magneto- hydrodynamics (QMHD). The amplitude and width of magnetosonic soliton with different parameters in the system are studied. It is found that the normalized Zeeman energy E plays a crucial role, for E ≥ 1 the amplitude τmξ and the width we of solitary wave all decrease as E increases. That is, the introduction of spin quantum force modifies the shape of solitary magnetosonic waves and makes them more narrower and shallower.

  11. Nonlocal Quantum Effects in Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii V. Dumin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since it is commonly believed that the observed large-scale structure of the universe is an imprint of quantum fluctuations existing at the very early stage of its evolution, it is reasonable to pose the question: do the effects of quantum nonlocality, which are well established now by the laboratory studies, manifest themselves also in the early universe? We try to answer this question by utilizing the results of a few experiments, namely, with the superconducting multi-Josephson-junction loops and the ultracold gases in periodic potentials. Employing a close analogy between the above-mentioned setups and the simplest one-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model, we show that the specific nonlocal correlations revealed in the laboratory studies might be of considerable importance also in treating the strongly nonequilibrium phase transitions of Higgs fields in the early universe. Particularly, they should substantially reduce the number of topological defects (e.g., domain walls expected due to independent establishment of the new phases in the remote spatial regions. This gives us a hint on resolving a long-standing problem of the excessive concentration of topological defects, inconsistent with observational constraints. The same effect may be also relevant to the recent problem of the anomalous behavior of cosmic microwave background fluctuations at large angular scales.

  12. Quantum effects in beam-plasma instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, A

    2015-01-01

    Among the numerous works on quantum effects that have been published in recent years, streaming instabilities in plasma have also been revisited. Both the fluid quantum and the kinetic Wigner-Maxwell models have been used to explore quantum effects on the Weibel, Filamentation and Two-Stream instabilities. While quantum effects usually tend to reduce the instabilities, they can also spur new unstable branches. A number of theoretical results will be reviewed together with the implications to one physical setting, namely the electron driven fast ignition scenario.

  13. Quantum Measurement-induced Dynamics of Many-Body Ultracold Bosonic and Fermionic Systems in Optical Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F; Elliott, Thomas J; Mekhov, Igor B

    2015-01-01

    Trapping ultracold atoms in optical lattices enabled numerous breakthroughs uniting several disciplines. Although the light is a key ingredient in such systems, its quantum properties are typically neglected, reducing the role of light to a classical tool for atom manipulation. Here we show how elevating light to the quantum level leads to novel phenomena, inaccessible in setups based on classical optics. Interfacing a many-body atomic system with quantum light opens it to the environment in an essentially nonlocal way, where spatial coupling can be carefully designed. The competition between typical processes in strongly correlated systems (local tunnelling and interaction) with global measurement backaction leads to novel multimode dynamics and the appearance of long-range correlated tunnelling capable of entangling distant lattices sites, even when tunnelling between neighbouring sites is suppressed by the quantum Zeno effect. We demonstrate both the break-up and protection of strongly interacting fermion ...

  14. Boundary Effects in Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Asorey, M

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the role of boundaries in the infrared behavior of quantum field theories. By means of a novel method we calculate the vacuum energy for a massless scalar field confined between two homogeneous parallel plates with the most general type of boundary properties. This allows the discrimination between boundary conditions which generate attractive or repulsive Casimir forces between the plates. In the interface between both regimes we find a very interesting family of boundary conditions which do not induce any type of Casimir force. We analyze the effect of the renormalization group flow on these boundary conditions. Even if the Casimirless conformal invariant conditions are physically unstable under renormalization group flow they emerge as a new set of conformally invariant boundary conditions which are anomaly free.

  15. Discrete quantum geometries and their effective dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Thürigen, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In several approaches towards a quantum theory of gravity, such as group field theory and loop quantum gravity, quantum states and histories of the geometric degrees of freedom turn out to be based on discrete spacetime. The most pressing issue is then how the smooth geometries of general relativity, expressed in terms of suitable geometric observables, arise from such discrete quantum geometries in some semiclassical and continuum limit. In this thesis I tackle the question of suitable observables focusing on the effective dimension of discrete quantum geometries. For this purpose I give a purely combinatorial description of the discrete structures which these geometries have support on. As a side topic, this allows to present an extension of group field theory to cover the combinatorially larger kinematical state space of loop quantum gravity. Moreover, I introduce a discrete calculus for fields on such fundamentally discrete geometries with a particular focus on the Laplacian. This permits to define the ef...

  16. Spacetime Coarse Grainings in the Decoherent Histories Approach to Quantum Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wallden, P

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of assigning consistent probabilities to sets of histories characterized by whether they enter a particular subspace of the Hilbert space of a closed system during a given time interval. In particular we investigate the case that this subspace is a region of the configuration space. This corresponds to a particular class of coarse grainings of spacetime regions. We consider with the arrival time problem and the problem of time in reparametrization invariant theories as for example in canonical quantum gravity. Decoherence conditions and probabilities for those application are derived. The resulting decoherence condition does not depend on the explicit form of the restricted propagator that was problematic for generalizations such as application in quantum cosmology. Closely related is the problem of tunnelling time as well as the quantum Zeno effect. Some interpretational comments conclude, and we discuss the applicability of this formalism to deal with the arrival time problem.

  17. Discrete quantum geometries and their effective dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuerigen, Johannes

    2015-07-02

    In several approaches towards a quantum theory of gravity, such as group field theory and loop quantum gravity, quantum states and histories of the geometric degrees of freedom turn out to be based on discrete spacetime. The most pressing issue is then how the smooth geometries of general relativity, expressed in terms of suitable geometric observables, arise from such discrete quantum geometries in some semiclassical and continuum limit. In this thesis I tackle the question of suitable observables focusing on the effective dimension of discrete quantum geometries. For this purpose I give a purely combinatorial description of the discrete structures which these geometries have support on. As a side topic, this allows to present an extension of group field theory to cover the combinatorially larger kinematical state space of loop quantum gravity. Moreover, I introduce a discrete calculus for fields on such fundamentally discrete geometries with a particular focus on the Laplacian. This permits to define the effective-dimension observables for quantum geometries. Analysing various classes of quantum geometries, I find as a general result that the spectral dimension is more sensitive to the underlying combinatorial structure than to the details of the additional geometric data thereon. Semiclassical states in loop quantum gravity approximate the classical geometries they are peaking on rather well and there are no indications for stronger quantum effects. On the other hand, in the context of a more general model of states which are superposition over a large number of complexes, based on analytic solutions, there is a flow of the spectral dimension from the topological dimension d on low energy scales to a real number between 0 and d on high energy scales. In the particular case of 1 these results allow to understand the quantum geometry as effectively fractal.

  18. Chaos in effective classical and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti, L; Modugno, M; Casetti, Lapo; Gatto, Raoul; Modugno, Michele

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of classical and quantum N-component phi^4 oscillators in presence of an external field. In the large N limit the effective dynamics is described by two-degree-of-freedom classical Hamiltonian systems. In the classical model we observe chaotic orbits for any value of the external field, while in the quantum case chaos is strongly suppressed. A simple explanation of this behaviour is found in the change in the structure of the orbits induced by quantum corrections. Consistently with Heisenberg's principle, quantum fluctuations are forced away from zero, removing in the effective quantum dynamics a hyperbolic fixed point that is a major source of chaos in the classical model.

  19. Jump time and passage time the duration of a quantum transition

    CERN Document Server

    Schulman, L S

    2001-01-01

    Under unitary evolution, systems move gradually from state to state. An unstable atom has amplitude in its original state after many lifetimes ($\\tau_L$). But in the laboratory, transitions seem to go instantaneously, as suggested by the term "quantum jump." The problem studied here is whether the "jump" can be assigned a duration, in theory and in experiment. Two characteristic times are defined, jump time ($\\tau_J$) and passage time ($\\tau_P$). Both use Zeno time, $\\tau_Z$, defined in terms of $H$ and its initial state as $\\tau_Z \\equiv \\hbar/\\sqrt{}$, with $E_\\psi \\equiv $. $\\tau_J$ is defined in terms of the time needed to slow (\\`a la the quantum Zeno effect) the decay: $\\tau_J \\equiv \\tau_Z^2/\\tau_L$. It appears in several contexts. It is related to tunneling time in barrier penetration. Its inverse is the bandwidth of the Hamiltonian, in a time-energy uncertainty principle. $\\tau_J$ is also an indicator of the duration of the quadratic decay regime in both experiment and in numerical calculations (cf. ...

  20. The quantum Hall effects: Philosophical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, P.

    2015-05-01

    The Quantum Hall Effects offer a rich variety of theoretical and experimental advances. They provide interesting insights on such topics as gauge invariance, strong interactions in Condensed Matter physics, emergence of new paradigms. This paper focuses on some related philosophical questions. Various brands of positivism or agnosticism are confronted with the physics of the Quantum Hall Effects. Hacking's views on Scientific Realism, Chalmers' on Non-Figurative Realism are discussed. It is argued that the difficulties with those versions of realism may be resolved within a dialectical materialist approach. The latter is argued to provide a rational approach to the phenomena, theory and ontology of the Quantum Hall Effects.

  1. Thermodynamics of the quantum butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Campisi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    In this letter we consider the quantum analogue of the butterfly effect which is well known in the field of classical non-linear dynamics. Recently, it has been proposed to measure the effect using an out-of-time-order correlator (OTOC) between two local operators. Effectively measuring the degree of non-commutativity in time, this correlator describes the phenomenon of information scrambling in quantum information. Here we show that the butterfly effect can be recast as a two-measurement scheme inspired from the field of non-equilibrium quan- tum thermodynamics. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an OTOC can emerge as the characteristic function of the work distribution. Our realisation not only offers a physically intuitive thermodynamical interpretation of the quantum butterfly effect, it also inspires novel experimental schemes to study the problem of quantum information scrambling.

  2. Quantum Hall effect in momentum space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically discuss a momentum-space analog of the quantum Hall effect, which could be observed in topologically nontrivial lattice models subject to an external harmonic trapping potential. In our proposal, the Niu-Thouless-Wu formulation of the quantum Hall effect on a torus is realized in the toroidally shaped Brillouin zone. In this analogy, the position of the trap center in real space controls the magnetic fluxes that are inserted through the holes of the torus in momentum space. We illustrate the momentum-space quantum Hall effect with the noninteracting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model, for which we numerically demonstrate how this effect manifests itself in experimental observables. Extension to the interacting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model is also briefly considered. We finally discuss possible experimental platforms where our proposal for the momentum-space quantum Hall effect could be realized.

  3. Gravitational and rotational effects in quantum interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anandan, J.

    1977-03-15

    The phase shift due to gravitation and rotation in the quantum interference of two coherent beams is obtained relativistically and compared with the recent experiment of Colella, Overhauser, and Werner. A general expression relating the quantum phase shift to the transverse acceleration of a classical particle in the plane of interference for an arbitrary interaction with any external field is given. This can serve as a correspondence principle between quantum physics and classical physics. The phase shift due to the coupling of spin to curvature of space-time is deduced and written explicitly for the special case of a Schwarzschild field. The last result implies that a massless spinning particle can have at most two helicity states and its world line in a gravitational field is a null geodesic. Finally, new experiments are proposed to test the effect of rotation on quantum interference and to obtain direct evidence of the equivalence principle in quantum mechanics.

  4. Coherent quantum effects through dispersive bosonic media

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Sai-Yun; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Serafini, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    The coherent evolution of two atomic qubits mediated by a set of bosonic field modes is investigated. By assuming a specific encoding of the quantum states in the internal levels of the two atoms we show that entangling quantum gates can be realised, with high fidelity, even when a large number of mediating modes is involved. The effect of losses and imperfections on the gates' operation is also considered in detail.

  5. Algorithmic quantum simulation of memory effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Di Candia, R.; Casanova, J.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method for the algorithmic quantum simulation of memory effects described by integrodifferential evolution equations. It consists in the systematic use of perturbation theory techniques and a Markovian quantum simulator. Our method aims to efficiently simulate both completely positive and nonpositive dynamics without the requirement of engineering non-Markovian environments. Finally, we find that small error bounds can be reached with polynomially scaling resources, evaluated as the time required for the simulation.

  6. Effective pure states for bulk quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knill, E.; Chuang, I.; Laflamme, R.

    1997-11-01

    In bulk quantum computation one can manipulate a large number of indistinguishable quantum computers by parallel unitary operations and measure expectation values of certain observables with limited sensitivity. The initial state of each computer in the ensemble is known but not pure. Methods for obtaining effective pure input states by a series of manipulations have been described by Gershenfeld and Chuang (logical labeling) and Corey et al. (spatial averaging) for the case of quantum computation with nuclear magnetic resonance. We give a different technique called temporal averaging. This method is based on classical randomization, requires no ancilla qubits and can be implemented in nuclear magnetic resonance without using gradient fields. We introduce several temporal averaging algorithms suitable for both high temperature and low temperature bulk quantum computing and analyze the signal to noise behavior of each.

  7. Effective operator formalism for open quantum systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2012-01-01

    We present an effective operator formalism for open quantum systems. Employing perturbation theory and adiabatic elimination of excited states for a weakly driven system, we derive an effective master equation which reduces the evolution to the ground-state dynamics. The effective evolution...

  8. Quantum Gravity signatures in the Unruh effect

    CERN Document Server

    Alkofer, Natalia; Saueressig, Frank; Versteegen, Fleur

    2016-01-01

    We study quantum gravity signatures emerging from phenomenologically motivated multiscale models, spectral actions, and Causal Set Theory within the detector approach to the Unruh effect. We show that while the Unruh temperature is unaffected, Lorentz-invariant corrections to the two-point function leave a characteristic fingerprint in the induced emission rate of the accelerated detector. Generically, quantum gravity models exhibiting dynamical dimensional reduction exhibit a suppression of the Unruh rate at high energy while the rate is enhanced in Kaluza-Klein theories with compact extra dimensions. We quantify this behavior by introducing the "Unruh dimension" as the effective spacetime dimension seen by the Unruh effect and show that it is related, though not identical, to the spectral dimension used to characterize spacetime in quantum gravity. We comment on the physical origins of these effects and their relevance for black hole evaporation.

  9. Quantum gravity signatures in the Unruh effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkofer, Natalia; D'Odorico, Giulio; Saueressig, Frank; Versteegen, Fleur

    2016-11-01

    We study quantum gravity signatures emerging from phenomenologically motivated multiscale models, spectral actions, and causal set theory within the detector approach to the Unruh effect. We show that while the Unruh temperature is unaffected, Lorentz-invariant corrections to the two-point function leave a characteristic fingerprint in the induced emission rate of the accelerated detector. Generically, quantum gravity models exhibiting dynamical dimensional reduction exhibit a suppression of the Unruh rate at high energy while the rate is enhanced in Kaluza-Klein theories with compact extra dimensions. We quantify this behavior by introducing the "Unruh dimension" as the effective spacetime dimension seen by the Unruh effect and show that it is related, though not identical, to the spectral dimension used to characterize spacetime in quantum gravity. We comment on the physical origins of these effects and their relevance for black hole evaporation.

  10. Toward simulating complex systems with quantum effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenion-Hanrath, Rachel Lynn

    Quantum effects like tunneling, coherence, and zero point energy often play a significant role in phenomena on the scales of atoms and molecules. However, the exact quantum treatment of a system scales exponentially with dimensionality, making it impractical for characterizing reaction rates and mechanisms in complex systems. An ongoing effort in the field of theoretical chemistry and physics is extending scalable, classical trajectory-based simulation methods capable of capturing quantum effects to describe dynamic processes in many-body systems; in the work presented here we explore two such techniques. First, we detail an explicit electron, path integral (PI)-based simulation protocol for predicting the rate of electron transfer in condensed-phase transition metal complex systems. Using a PI representation of the transferring electron and a classical representation of the transition metal complex and solvent atoms, we compute the outer sphere free energy barrier and dynamical recrossing factor of the electron transfer rate while accounting for quantum tunneling and zero point energy effects. We are able to achieve this employing only a single set of force field parameters to describe the system rather than parameterizing along the reaction coordinate. Following our success in describing a simple model system, we discuss our next steps in extending our protocol to technologically relevant materials systems. The latter half focuses on the Mixed Quantum-Classical Initial Value Representation (MQC-IVR) of real-time correlation functions, a semiclassical method which has demonstrated its ability to "tune'' between quantum- and classical-limit correlation functions while maintaining dynamic consistency. Specifically, this is achieved through a parameter that determines the quantumness of individual degrees of freedom. Here, we derive a semiclassical correction term for the MQC-IVR to systematically characterize the error introduced by different choices of simulation

  11. The quantum Hall's effect:A quantum electrodynamic phenomenon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.I. Arbab

    2012-01-01

    We have applied Maxwell's equations to study the physics of quantum Hall's effect.The electromagnetic properties of this system are obtained.The Hall's voltage,VH =2πh2ns/e rn,where ns is the electron number density,for a 2-dimensional system,and h =2πh is the Planck's constant,is found to coincide with the voltage drop across the quantum capacitor.Consideration of the cyclotronic motion of electrons is found to give rise to Hall's resistance.Ohmic resistances in the horizontal and vertical directions have been found to exist before equilibrium state is reached.At a fundamental level,the Hall's effect is found to be equivalent to a resonant LCR circuit with LH =2π m/e2ns and CH =me2/2πh2ns satisfying the resonance condition with resonant frequency equal to the inverse of the scattering (relaxation) time,Ts.The Hall's resistance is found to be RH =√LH/CH.The Hall's resistance may be connected with the impedance that the electron wave experiences when it propagates in the 2-dimeasional gas.

  12. Quantum metrology and estimation of Unruh effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieci; Tian, Zehua; Jing, Jiliang; Fan, Heng

    2014-11-26

    We study the quantum metrology for a pair of entangled Unruh-Dewitt detectors when one of them is accelerated and coupled to a massless scalar field. Comparing with previous schemes, our model requires only local interaction and avoids the use of cavities in the probe state preparation process. We show that the probe state preparation and the interaction between the accelerated detector and the external field have significant effects on the value of quantum Fisher information, correspondingly pose variable ultimate limit of precision in the estimation of Unruh effect. We find that the precision of the estimation can be improved by a larger effective coupling strength and a longer interaction time. Alternatively, the energy gap of the detector has a range that can provide us a better precision. Thus we may adjust those parameters and attain a higher precision in the estimation. We also find that an extremely high acceleration is not required in the quantum metrology process.

  13. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in real materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-11-01

    Under a strong magnetic field, the quantum Hall (QH) effect can be observed in two-dimensional electronic gas systems. If the quantized Hall conductivity is acquired in a system without the need of an external magnetic field, then it will give rise to a new quantum state, the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state. The QAH state is a novel quantum state that is insulating in the bulk but exhibits unique conducting edge states topologically protected from backscattering and holds great potential for applications in low-power-consumption electronics. The realization of the QAH effect in real materials is of great significance. In this paper, we systematically review the theoretical proposals that have been brought forward to realize the QAH effect in various real material systems or structures, including magnetically doped topological insulators, graphene-based systems, silicene-based systems, two-dimensional organometallic frameworks, quantum wells, and functionalized Sb(111) monolayers, etc. Our paper can help our readers to quickly grasp the recent developments in this field. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574051), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 14ZR1403400), and Fudan High-end Computing Center, China.

  14. Quantum gravity, effective fields and string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N E J

    2004-01-01

    We look at the various aspects of treating general relativity as a quantum theory. It is briefly studied how to consistently quantize general relativity as an effective field theory. A key achievement here is the long-range low-energy leading quantum corrections to both the Schwarzschild and Kerr metrics. The leading quantum corrections to the pure gravitational potential between two sources are also calculated, both in the mixed theory of scalar QED and quantum gravity and in the pure gravitational theory. The (Kawai-Lewellen-Tye) string theory gauge/gravity relations is next dealt with. We investigate if the KLT-operator mapping extends to the case of higher derivative effective operators. The KLT-relations are generalized, taking the effective field theory viewpoint, and remarkable tree-level amplitude relations between the field theory operators are derived. Quantum gravity is finally looked at from the the perspective of taking the limit of infinitely many spatial dimensions. It is verified that only a c...

  15. Quantum Mechanics for Everybody: An autonomous MOOC on EdX for nonscientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freericks, James; Cutler, Dylan; Vieira-Barbosa, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    We have launched a MOOC for nonscientists that teaches quantum mechanics using the Feynman methodology as outlined in his QED book and in a similar book by Daniel Styer. Using a combination of videos, voice-over powerpoint animations, computer simulations and interactive tutorials, we teach the fundamentals of quantum mechanics employing a minimum of math (high school algebra, square roots, and a little trigonometry) but going into detail on a number of complex quantum ideas. We begin with the Stern-Gerlach experiment, including delayed choice and Bell's inequality variants. Then we focus on light developing the quantum theory for partial reflection and diffraction. At this point we demonstrate the complexity of quantum physics by showing how watched and unwatched two-slit experiments behave differently and how quantum particles interfere. The four week course ends with advanced topics in light where we cover the idea of an interaction free measurement, the quantum Zeno effect and indistinguishable particles via the Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment. We hope this MOOC will reach thousands of students interesting in learning quantum mechanics without any dumbing down or the need to learn complex math. It can also be used with undergraduates to help with conceptual understanding. Funded by the National Science Foundation under grants numbered PHY-1620555 and PHY-1314295 and by Georgetown University.

  16. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Ibere; Mohapatra, Sonali [University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using Effective Field Theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration. (orig.)

  17. Effective constraints of loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, M; Kagan, M; Skirzewski, A; Bojowald, Martin; Hernandez, Hector; Kagan, Mikhail; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2006-01-01

    Within a perturbative cosmological regime of loop quantum gravity corrections to effective constraints are computed. This takes into account all inhomogeneous degrees of freedom relevant for scalar metric modes around flat space and results in explicit expressions for modified coefficients and of higher order terms. It also illustrates the role of different scales determining the relative magnitude of corrections. Our results demonstrate that loop quantum gravity has the correct classical limit, at least in its sector of cosmological perturbations around flat space, in the sense of perturbative effective theory.

  18. Quantum and isotope effects in lithium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, Graeme J.; Dunuwille, Mihindra; Martinez-Canales, Miguel; Loa, Ingo; Zhang, Rong; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Cai, Weizhao; Deemyad, Shanti

    2017-06-01

    The crystal structure of elements at zero pressure and temperature is the most fundamental information in condensed matter physics. For decades it has been believed that lithium, the simplest metallic element, has a complicated ground-state crystal structure. Using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells and multiscale simulations with density functional theory and molecular dynamics, we show that the previously accepted martensitic ground state is metastable. The actual ground state is face-centered cubic (fcc). We find that isotopes of lithium, under similar thermal paths, exhibit a considerable difference in martensitic transition temperature. Lithium exhibits nuclear quantum mechanical effects, serving as a metallic intermediate between helium, with its quantum effect-dominated structures, and the higher-mass elements. By disentangling the quantum kinetic complexities, we prove that fcc lithium is the ground state, and we synthesize it by decompression.

  19. Mesoscopic effects in the quantum Hall regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Bhatt; Xin Wan

    2002-02-01

    We report results of a study of (integer) quantum Hall transitions in a single or multiple Landau levels for non-interacting electrons in disordered two-dimensional systems, obtained by projecting a tight-binding Hamiltonian to the corresponding magnetic subbands. In finite-size systems, we find that mesoscopic effects often dominate, leading to apparent non-universal scaling behavior in higher Landau levels. This is because localization length, which grows exponentially with Landau level index, exceeds the system sizes amenable to the numerical study at present. When band mixing between multiple Landau levels is present, mesoscopic effects cause a crossover from a sequence of quantum Hall transitions for weak disorder to classical behavior for strong disorder. This behavior may be of relevance to experimentally observed transitions between quantum Hall states and the insulating phase at low magnetic fields.

  20. Loop quantum gravity as an effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2012-01-01

    As a canonical and generally covariant gauge theory, loop quantum gravity requires special techniques to derive effective actions or equations. If the proper constructions are taken into account, the theory, in spite of considerable ambiguities at the dynamical level, allows for a meaningful phenomenology to be developed, by which it becomes falsifiable. The tradiational problems plaguing canonical quantum-gravity theories, such as the anomaly issue or the problem of time, can be overcome or are irrelevant at the effective level, resulting in consistent means of physical evaluations. This contribution presents aspects of canonical equations and related notions of (deformed) space-time structures and discusses implications in loop quantum gravity, such as signature change at high density from holonomy corrections, and falsifiability thanks to inverse-triad corrections.

  1. Estimate of beryllium critical point on the basis of correspondence between the critical and the Zeno-line parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbaum, E M

    2012-12-20

    The critical-point coordinates of Beryllium have been calculated by means of recently found similarity relations between the Zeno-line and the critical-point parameters. We have used the NVT MC simulations and pseudopotential theory to calculate the Zeno-line parameters together with the data of isobaric measurements to construct the liquid branch of Beryllium binodal. The critical-point coordinates, determined this way, are lower than earlier estimates. We have shown that these previous estimates are in evident contradiction with available measurements data. Present investigation can resolve this contradiction if the measurements data are supposed to be reliable.

  2. Kant and zeno of elea: historical precedents of the "sceptical method"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Micheli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For Kant's interpretation of Zeno in KrV A502-507/B530-535, scholars have usually referred to Plato's Phaedrus (261d; in reality the sources Kant uses are, on one hand, Brucker (who depends in turn on the pseudo-Aristotelian De Melisso, Xenophane, et Gorgia, 977 b 2-21, and, on the other, Plato's Parmenides (135e6-136b1 and Proclus' commentary on it, as quoted by Gassendi in a popular textbook he wrote on the history of logic.

  3. Quantum Hall Effect in Higher Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Karabali, Dimitra; Karabali, Dimitra

    2002-01-01

    Following recent work on the quantum Hall effect on $S^4$, we solve the Landau problem on the complex projective spaces ${\\bf C}P^k$ and discuss quantum Hall states for such spaces. Unlike the case of $S^4$, a finite spatial density can be obtained with a finite number of internal states for each particle. We treat the case of ${\\bf C}P^2$ in some detail considering both Abelian and nonabelian background fields. The wavefunctions are obtained and incompressibility of the Hall states is shown. The case of ${\\bf C}P^3$ is related to the case of $S^4$.

  4. Holographic Butterfly Effect at Quantum Critical Points

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yi; Wu, Jian-Pin

    2016-01-01

    When the Lyapunov exponent $\\lambda_L$ in a quantum chaotic system saturates the bound $\\lambda_L\\leqslant 2\\pi k_BT$, it is proposed that this system has a holographic dual described by a gravity theory. In particular, the butterfly effect as a prominent phenomenon of chaos can ubiquitously exist in a black hole system characterized by a shockwave solution near the horizon. In this letter we propose that the butterfly velocity $v_B$ can be used to diagnose quantum phase transition (QPT) in holographic theories. We provide evidences for this proposal with two holographic models exhibiting metal-insulator transitions (MIT), in which the second derivative of $v_B$ with respect to system parameters characterizes quantum critical points (QCP) with local extremes. We also point out that this proposal can be tested by experiments in the light of recent progress on the measurement of out-of-time-order correlation function (OTOC).

  5. Finding quantum effects in strong classical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel; Labun, Lance; Labun, Ou Z.

    2017-06-01

    The long-standing challenge to describing charged particle dynamics in strong classical electromagnetic fields is how to incorporate classical radiation, classical radiation reaction and quantized photon emission into a consistent unified framework. The current, semiclassical methods to describe the dynamics of quantum particles in strong classical fields also provide the theoretical framework for fundamental questions in gravity and hadron-hadron collisions, including Hawking radiation, cosmological particle production and thermalization of particles created in heavy-ion collisions. However, as we show, these methods break down for highly relativistic particles propagating in strong fields. They must therefore be improved and adapted for the description of laser-plasma experiments that typically involve the acceleration of electrons. Theory developed from quantum electrodynamics, together with dedicated experimental efforts, offer the best controllable context to establish a robust, experimentally validated foundation for the fundamental theory of quantum effects in strong classical potentials.

  6. Nonlinear peltier effect in quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachek, E. N.; Scherbakov, A. G.; Landman, Uzi

    1998-11-01

    A theoretical analysis of the Peltier effect in two-dimensional quantum point contacts, in field-free conditions and under the influence of applied magnetic fields, is presented. It is shown that in the nonlinear regime (finite applied voltage) new peaks in the Peltier coefficient appear leading to violation of Onsager's relation. Oscillations of the Peltier coefficient in a magnetic field are demonstrated.

  7. Quantum confined Stark effect in Gaussian quantum wells: A tight-binding study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Morales, A.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I. [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina Con Paseo La Bufa S/N, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    The main characteristics of the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) are studied theoretically in quantum wells of Gaussian profile. The semi-empirical tight-binding model and the Green function formalism are applied in the numerical calculations. A comparison of the QCSE in quantum wells with different kinds of confining potential is presented.

  8. Quantum Mechanical Effects in Gravitational Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate quantum mechanical effects to various aspects of gravitational collapse. These quantum mechanical effects are implemented in the context of the Functional Schr\\"odinger formalism. The Functional Schr\\"odinger formalism allows us to investigate the time-dependent evolutions of the quantum mechanical effects, which is beyond the scope of the usual methods used to investigate the quantum mechanical corrections of gravitational collapse. Utilizing the time-dependent nature of the Functional Schr\\"odinger formalism, we study the quantization of a spherically symmetric domain wall from the view point of an asymptotic and infalling observer, in the absence of radiation. To build a more realistic picture, we then study the time-dependent nature of the induced radiation during the collapse using a semi-classical approach. Using the domain wall and the induced radiation, we then study the time-dependent evolution of the entropy of the domain wall. Finally we make some remarks about the pos...

  9. Stochasticity effects in quantum radiation reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Neitz, N

    2013-01-01

    When an ultrarelativistic electron beam collides with a sufficiently intense laser pulse, radiation-reaction effects can strongly alter the beam dynamics. In the realm of classical electrodynamics, radiation reaction has a beneficial effect on the electron beam as it tends to reduce its energy spread. Here, we show that when quantum effects become important, radiation reaction induces the opposite effect, i.e., the electron beam spreads out after interacting with the laser pulse. We identify the physical origin of this opposite tendency in the intrinsic stochasticity of photon emission, which becomes substantial in the full quantum regime. Our numerical simulations indicated that the predicted effects of the stochasticity can be measured already with presently available lasers and electron accelerators.

  10. Stochasticity effects in quantum radiation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitz, N; Di Piazza, A

    2013-08-02

    When an ultrarelativistic electron beam collides with a sufficiently intense laser pulse, radiation-reaction effects can strongly alter the beam dynamics. In the realm of classical electrodynamics, radiation reaction has a beneficial effect on the electron beam as it tends to reduce its energy spread. Here we show that when quantum effects become important, radiation reaction induces the opposite effect; i.e., the energy distribution of the electron beam spreads out after interacting with the laser pulse. We identify the physical origin of this opposite tendency in the intrinsic stochasticity of photon emission, which becomes substantial in the quantum regime. Our numerical simulations indicate that the predicted effects of the stochasticity can be measured already with presently available lasers and electron accelerators.

  11. Effective operator formalism for open quantum systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2012-01-01

    We present an effective operator formalism for open quantum systems. Employing perturbation theory and adiabatic elimination of excited states for a weakly driven system, we derive an effective master equation which reduces the evolution to the ground-state dynamics. The effective evolution...... involves a single effective Hamiltonian and one effective Lindblad operator for each naturally occurring decay process. Simple expressions are derived for the effective operators which can be directly applied to reach effective equations of motion for the ground states. We compare our method...

  12. Non-monotonicity in the quantum-classical transition: Chaos induced by quantum effects

    CERN Document Server

    Kapulkin, A; Kapulkin, Arie; Pattanayak, Arjendu K.

    2007-01-01

    The transition from classical to quantum behavior for chaotic systems is understood to be accompanied by the suppression of chaotic effects as the relative size of $\\hbar$ is increased. We show evidence to the contrary in the behavior of the quantum trajectory dynamics of a dissipative quantum chaotic system, the double-well Duffing oscillator. The classical limit in the case considered has regular behavior, but as the effective $\\hbar$ is increased we see chaotic behavior. This chaos then disappears deeper into the quantum regime, which means that the quantum-classical transition in this case is non-monotonic in $\\hbar$.

  13. Quantum Information Processing using Nonlinear Optical Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Mejling

    of the converted idler depends on the other pump. This allows for temporal-mode-multiplexing. When the effects of nonlinear phase modulation (NPM) are included, the phases of the natural input and output modes are changed, reducing the separability. These effects are to some degree mediated by pre......This PhD thesis treats applications of nonlinear optical effects for quantum information processing. The two main applications are four-wave mixing in the form of Bragg scattering (BS) for quantum-state-preserving frequency conversion, and sum-frequency generation (SFG) in second-order nonlinear...... to obtain a 100 % conversion efficiency is to use multiple stages of frequency conversion, but this setup suffers from the combined effects of NPM. This problem is circumvented by using asymmetrically pumped BS, where one pump is continuous wave. For this setup, NPM is found to only lead to linear phase...

  14. Synchronization effect for uncertain quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Gebremariam, Tesfay; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for investigating the synchronization effect for uncertain networks with quantum chaotic behaviors in this paper. Through designing a special function to construct Lyapunov function of network and the adaptive laws of uncertain parameters, the synchronization between the uncertain network and the synchronization target can be realized, and the uncertain parameters in state equations of the network nodes are perfectly identified. All the theoretical results are verified by numerical simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization technique.

  15. Quantum and field effects of oxide heterostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Felix

    , these interfaces are the ones between CaZrO3/SrTiO3 and amorphous-LaAlO3/(La, Sr)MnO3/SrTiO3. The sample preparation section is ended by outlininga patterning strategy for the high-electron mobility interface at amorphous-LaAlO3/(La, Sr)MnO3/SrTiO3. Subsequently, the effects of electrostatic gating is studied...... with a gradual tuning of the interface conductivity. Finally, the so-called quantum Hall effect is demonstrated at the interface between amorphous-LaAlO3/(La, Sr)MnO3/SrTiO3. The manifestation of the quantum Hall effect reveals that the interface conductivity is comprised of several subbands conducting...

  16. Spatially dependent Kondo effect in Quantum Corrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Enrico; Morr, Dirk K.

    2007-03-01

    We study the Kondo screening of a single magnetic impurity placed inside a quantum corral consisting of non-magnetic impurities on the surface of a metallic host system. We show that the spatial structure of the corral's eigenmodes leads to a spatially dependent Kondo effect whose signatures are experimentally measurable spatial variations of the Kondo temperature, TK, and of the critical Kondo coupling, Jcr. Moreover we find that the screening of the magnetic impurity is accompanied by the formation of multiple Kondo resonances with characteristic spatial patterns that provide further experimental signatures of the spatially dependent Kondo effect. Our results demonstrate that quantum corrals provide new possibilities to manipulate and explore the Kondo effect.

  17. The Quantum World of Ultra-Cold Atoms and Light - Book 1: Foundations of Quantum Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Crispin; Zoller, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Quantized Radiation Field * 12.2. Decay of an Excited Atom * 12.3. The Two-Level Atom in a Strong Classical Driving Field * 12.4. Interaction of a Two-Level Atom with a Single Mode * IV - QUANTUM STOCHASTIC PROCESSES * 13. Quantum Markov Processes * 13.1. Two-Level Atom in a Finite-Temperature Electromagnetic Field * 13.2. Derivation of theMaster Equation * 13.3. More General Heat Baths * 13.4. Quantum Correlation Functions and Spectra * 14. Applications of the Master Equation * 14.1. A Two-Level Atom Interacting with a Thermal Heat Bath * 14.2. The Two-Level Atom Driven by a Coherent Light Field * 14.3. Master Equations for Harmonic Oscillator Systems * 14.4. A Simple Model of Laser Cooling * V - PHASE SPACE METHODS * 15. Phase Space Representations for Bosons * 15.1. The Quantum Characteristic Function * 15.2. Phase Space Representations of the Density Operator * 16. Wigner Function Methods * 16.1. Operator Correspondences and Equations of Motion * 16.2. Damped and Driven Systems * 16.3. The Wigner Distribution Function f (x, p) * 16.4. Quantum Fluctuations in Equations of Motion * 17. P-Function Methods * 17.1. Introduction * 17.2. Artificial Neural Networks * 17.3. Clinical Example * VI - QUANTUM MEASUREMENT THEORY * 18. Foundations and Formalism of Quantum Measurement * 18.1. Formulations of Quantum Mechanics * 18.2. Modelling a Measurement-Tracks in a Cloud Chamber * 18.3. Formal Quantum Measurement Theory * 18.4. Multitime Measurements * 19. Continuous Measurements * 19.1. Photon Counting * 19.2. Wavefunction Interpretation of Continuous Measurement * 19.3. Application to Matter Wave Interference * 19.4. Damping of Quantum Coherence * 19.5. The Emergence of the oscopic World * 20. The Quantum Zeno Effect * 20.1. Theoretical Basis for the Quantum Zeno Effect * 20.2. A Quantum Model of Trapped Atoms * 20.3. Quantum Zeno Effect for a Bose-Einstein Condensate * References * Author Index * Subject Index

  18. Effective Hamiltonian approach to periodically perturbed quantum optical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainz, I. [Centro Universitario de los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon, 47460 Lagos de Moreno, Jal. (Mexico)]. E-mail: isa@culagos.udg.mx; Klimov, A.B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, 44410 Guadalajara, Jal. (Mexico)]. E-mail: klimov@cencar.udg.mx; Saavedra, C. [Center for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)]. E-mail: csaaved@udec.cl

    2006-02-20

    We apply the method of Lie-type transformations to Floquet Hamiltonians for periodically perturbed quantum systems. Some typical examples of driven quantum systems are considered in the framework of this approach and corresponding effective time dependent Hamiltonians are found.

  19. Effects of Quantum Noise on Quantum Clock Synchronization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢端; 彭进业

    2012-01-01

    In laboratory environment, the channel apparatus will generate particular dominant quantum noise. The noise then will give rise to some errors during synchronization. In this work, the accuracies of one qubit transport protocol and entangled states transport protocol in the presence of noise have been studied. With the help of three important and familiar noise models, the quantum noise will degrade the accuracy has been proved. Due to the influence of quantum noise, the accuracy of entangled qubits decrease faster than that of one qubit. The entangled states will improve the accuracy in noise-free channel, and will degrade the accuracy in noise channel.

  20. Quantum Effects in Higher-Order Correlators of a Quantum-Dot Spin Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, A.; Li, F.; Müller, K.; Simmet, T.; Ardelt, P.-L.; Finley, J. J.; Sinitsyn, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    We measure time correlators of a spin qubit in an optically active quantum dot beyond the second order. Such higher-order correlators are shown to be directly sensitive to pure quantum effects that cannot be explained within the classical framework. They allow direct determination of ensemble and quantum dephasing times, T2* and T2, using only repeated projective measurements and without the need for coherent spin control. Our method enables studies of purely quantum behavior in solid state systems, including tests of the Leggett-Garg type of inequalities that rule out local hidden variable interpretation of the quantum-dot spin dynamics.

  1. Many electron effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Pandey; Manoj K Harbola; V Ranjan; Vijay A Singh

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit shell structures, very similar to atoms. Termed as ‘artificial atoms’ by some, they are much larger (1 100 nm) than real atoms. One can study a variety of manyelectron effects in them, which are otherwise difficult to observe in a real atom. We have treated these effects within the local density approximation (LDA) and the Harbola–Sahni (HS) scheme. HS is free of the selfinteraction error of the LDA. Our calculations have been performed in a three-dimensional quantum dot. We have carried out a study of the size and shape dependence of the level spacing. Scaling laws for the Hubbard ‘’ are established.

  2. Effective Dynamics of Disordered Quantum Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Chahan M.; Gneiting, Clemens; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We derive general evolution equations describing the ensemble-average quantum dynamics generated by disordered Hamiltonians. The disorder average affects the coherence of the evolution and can be accounted for by suitably tailored effective coupling agents and associated rates that encode the specific statistical properties of the Hamiltonian's eigenvectors and eigenvalues, respectively. Spectral disorder and isotropically disordered eigenvector distributions are considered as paradigmatic test cases.

  3. The pinning effect in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monisha, P. J., E-mail: pjmonisha@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, D V R College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad-502285 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The pinning effect is studied in a Gaussian quantum dot using the improved Wigner-Brillouin perturbation theory (IWBPT) in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. The electron ground state plus one phonon state is degenerate with the electron in the first excited state. The electron-phonon interaction lifts the degeneracy and the first excited states get pinned to the ground state plus one phonon state as we increase the confinement frequency.

  4. Gravitational Effects of a Crystalline Quantum Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, David

    2017-01-01

    In this work, concepts in quantum mechanics and general relativity are used to derive the quantums of space and time. After showing that space and time, at the Planck scale, must be discrete and not continuous, various anomalous gravitational effects are described. It is discussed how discrete space necessarily imposes order upon Wheeler's quantum foam, changing the foam into a crystal. The forces in this crystal are gravitational forces due to the ordered array of electrically neutral Planck masses, and with a lattice constant on the order of the Planck length. Thus the crystal is a gravity crystal rather than the more common crystals (e.g., silicon) that rely on electromagnetic forces. It is shown that similar solid-state physics techniques can be applied to this universe-wide gravity crystal to calculate particles' dispersion curves. It is shown that the crystal produces typical crystalline effects, namely bandgaps, Brillouin zones, and effective inertial masses that may differ from the gravitational masses with possible values even being near zero or negative. It is shown that the gravity crystal can affect the motion of black holes in dramatic ways, imbuing them with a negative inertial mass such that they are pushed by the pull of gravity.

  5. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction.

  6. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction. PMID:28632165

  7. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2017-06-20

    In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction.

  8. Quantum optical effective-medium theory and transformation quantum optics for metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn; Amooghorban, Ehsan; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    While typically designed to manipulate classical light, metamaterials have many potential applications for quantum optics as well. We argue why a quantum optical effective-medium theory is needed. We present such a theory for layered metamaterials that is valid for light propagation in all spatial...... directions, thereby generalizing earlier work for one-dimensional propagation. In contrast to classical effective-medium theory there is an additional effective parameter that describes quantum noise. Our results for metamaterials are based on a rather general Lagrangian theory for the quantum...

  9. Effective evolution equations from quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikter, Niels; Schlein, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    These notes investigate the time evolution of quantum systems, and in particular the rigorous derivation of effective equations approximating the many-body Schrödinger dynamics in certain physically interesting regimes. The focus is primarily on the derivation of time-dependent effective theories (non-equilibrium question) approximating many-body quantum dynamics. The book is divided into seven sections, the first of which briefly reviews the main properties of many-body quantum systems and their time evolution. Section 2 introduces the mean-field regime for bosonic systems and explains how the many-body dynamics can be approximated in this limit using the Hartree equation. Section 3 presents a method, based on the use of coherent states, for rigorously proving the convergence towards the Hartree dynamics, while the fluctuations around the Hartree equation are considered in Section 4. Section 5 focuses on a discussion of a more subtle regime, in which the many-body evolution can be approximated by means of t...

  10. Integer quantum Hall effect in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellal, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.jellal@gmail.com [Saudi Center for Theoretical Physics, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Sciences, Chouaïb Doukkali University, 24000 El Jadida (Morocco)

    2016-04-08

    We study the quantum Hall effect in a monolayer graphene by using an approach based on thermodynamical properties. This can be done by considering a system of Dirac particles in an electromagnetic field and taking into account of the edges effect as a pseudo-potential varying continuously along the x direction. At low temperature and in the weak electric field limit, we explicitly determine the thermodynamical potential. With this, we derive the particle numbers in terms of the quantized flux and therefore the Hall conductivity immediately follows.

  11. Excitons in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-09-01

    Quasiparticles of charge 1/m in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect form excitons, which are collective excitations physically similar to the transverse magnetoplasma oscillations of a Wigner crystal. A variational exciton wavefunction which shows explicitly that the magnetic length is effectively longer for quasiparticles than for electrons is proposed. This wavefunction is used to estimate the dispersion relation of these excitons and the matrix elements to generate them optically out of the ground state. These quantities are then used to describe a type of nonlinear conductivity which may occur in these systems when they are relatively clean.

  12. Possible Effects of Quantum Mechanics Violation Induced by Certain Quantum Gravity on Neutrino Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C H; Li Xue Qian; Liu, Y; Ma, F C; Tao, Z; CHANG, Chao-Hsi; DAI, Wu-Sheng; LI, Xue-Qian; LIU, Yong; MA, Feng-Cai; TAO, Zhi-jian

    1999-01-01

    In this work we tried extensively to apply the EHNS postulation about the quantum mechanics violation effects induced by the quantum gravity of black holes to neutrino oscillations. The possibilities for observing such effects in the neutrino experiments (in progress and/or accessible in the near future) were discussed. Of them, an interesting one was outlined specially.

  13. Possible Quantum Absorber Effects in Cortical Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Uwe

    The Wheeler-Feynman transactional "absorber" approach was proposed originally to account for anomalous resonance coupling between spatio-temporally distant measurement partners in entangled quantum states of so-called Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradoxes, e.g. of spatio-temporal non-locality, quantum teleportation, etc. Applied to quantum brain dynamics, however, this view provides an anticipative resonance coupling model for aspects of cortical synchronization and recurrent visual action control. It is proposed to consider the registered activation patterns of neuronal loops in so-called synfire chains not as a result of retarded brain communication processes, but rather as surface effects of a system of standing waves generated in the depth of visual processing. According to this view, they arise from a counterbalance between the actual input's delayed bottom-up data streams and top-down recurrent information-processing of advanced anticipative signals in a Wheeler-Feynman-type absorber mode. In the framework of a "time-loop" model, findings about mirror neurons in the brain cortex are suggested to be at least partially associated with temporal rather than spatial mirror functions of visual processing, similar to phase conjugate adaptive resonance-coupling in nonlinear optics.

  14. A Case Against the Linguistic Approach to Metaphysics Zeno Vendler ’s Project and Beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Xiao-ling

    2014-01-01

    There are two approaches to metaphysics that concern language, the logical and the linguistic. Zeno Vendler, who took the linguistic one, distinguished with transformational techniques between two semantic categories, namely fact and event, and regarded them as corresponding respectively to a metaphysical category of beings. In doing this he presupposed that indepen-dent semantic categories could be sorted out, and corresponding categories of beings that are independent of language can be de-rived. But our analysis of Vendler’s case shows that it is not semantic categories but grammar that functions in differentiating event and fact. At least some semantic categories could not be separated from grammar, and this casts doubt on the linguistic ap-proach to metaphysics. If semantic categories are not independent of grammar, we could not derive metaphysics from linguistic study.

  15. Jeans instability with exchange effects in quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, M., E-mail: jamil.gcu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rasheed, A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Rozina, Ch. [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Jung, Y.-D. [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-08-15

    Jeans instability is examined in magnetized quantum dusty plasmas using the quantum hydrodynamic model. The quantum effects are considered via exchange-correlation potential, recoil effect, and Fermi degenerate pressure, in addition to thermal effects of plasma species. It is found that the electron exchange and correlation potential have significant effects over the threshold value of wave vector and Jeans instability. The presence of electron exchange and correlation effect shortens the time of dust sound that comparatively stabilizes the self gravitational collapse. The results at quantum scale are helpful in understanding the collapse of the self-gravitating dusty plasma systems.

  16. In-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Hsu, Hsiu-Chuan; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2013-08-23

    The quantum Hall effect can only be induced by an out-of-plane magnetic field for two-dimensional electron gases, and similarly, the quantum anomalous Hall effect has also usually been considered for systems with only out-of-plane magnetization. In the present work, we predict that the quantum anomalous Hall effect can be induced by in-plane magnetization that is not accompanied by any out-of-plane magnetic field. Two realistic two-dimensional systems, Bi2Te3 thin film with magnetic doping and HgMnTe quantum wells with shear strains, are presented and the general condition for the in-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect is discussed based on the symmetry analysis. Nonetheless, an experimental setup is proposed to confirm this effect, the observation of which will pave the way to search for the quantum anomalous Hall effect in a wider range of materials.

  17. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  18. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-17

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  19. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  20. A study of plasmonic enhanced transmission effects in nano-optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gbur, Greg

    2012-01-24

    This project was a numerical study of the behavior of surface plasmons in nano-systems, focusing on the interaction between plasmons, light, and nano-scale structures such as nano-scale metallic wires and quantum wires/dots. The primary results of the project included: a) the demonstration of the use of surface plasmons to modify the spatial coherence of a light wave, b) the demonstration of a feasible plasmonic superresolved readout system, and c) the demonstration of a Plasmonic Zeno effect, in which the attenuation of a light wave in metal is suppressed by breaking up the metal into a collection of structured layers. The integration of quantum wire/dot effects with the plasmonic simulations proved to be harder than expected, in large part due to the lack of accurate and simple quantum dot models.

  1. Dynamics of Quantum Entanglement in Reservoir with Memory Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝翔; 沙金巧; 孙坚; 朱士群

    2012-01-01

    The non-Markovian dynamics of quantum entanglement is studied by the Shabani-Lidar master equation when one of entangled quantum systems is coupled to a local reservoir with memory effects. The completely positive reduced dynamical map can be constructed in the Kraus representation. Quantum entanglement decays more slowly in the non-Markovian environment. The decoherence time for quantum entanglement can be markedly increased with the change of the memory kernel. It is found out that the entanglement sudden death between quantum systems and entanglement sudden birth between the system and reservoir occur at different instants.

  2. Quantum mechanical effects analysis of nanostructured solar cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badea Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum mechanical effects resulted from the inclusion of nanostructures, represented by quantum wells and quantum dots, in the i-layer of an intermediate band solar cell will be analyzed. We will discuss the role of these specific nanostructures in the increasing of the solar cells efficiency. InAs quantum wells being placed in the i-layer of a gallium arsenide (GaAs p-i-n cell, we will analyze the quantum confined regions and determine the properties of the eigenstates located therein. Also, we simulate the electroluminescence that occurs due to the nanostructured regions.

  3. Quantum spring from the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2010-07-01

    The Casimir effect arises not only in the presence of material boundaries but also in space with nontrivial topology. In this Letter, we choose a topology of the flat (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime, which causes the helix boundary condition for a Hermitian massless scalar field. Especially, Casimir effect for a massless scalar field on the helix boundary condition is investigated in two and three dimensions by using the zeta function techniques. The Casimir force parallel to the axis of the helix behaves very much like the force on a spring that obeys the Hooke's law when the ratio r of the pitch to the circumference of the helix is small, but in this case, the force comes from a quantum effect, so we would like to call it quantum spring. When r is large, this force behaves like the Newton's law of universal gravitation in the leading order. On the other hand, the force perpendicular to the axis decreases monotonously with the increasing of the ratio r. Both forces are attractive and their behaviors are the same in two and three dimensions.

  4. On the Effect of Quantum Noise in a Quantum-Relativistic Prisoner's Dilemma Cellular Automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Sanz, Ramón; Situ, Haozhen

    2016-12-01

    The disrupting effect of quantum noise on the dynamics of a spatial quantum relativistic formulation of the iterated prisoner's dilemma game with variable entangling is studied in this work. The game is played in the cellular automata manner, i.e., with local and synchronous interaction. The game is assessed in fair and unfair contests.

  5. Nonideal effects in quantum field-effect directional coupler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Yue-E; Yan Xiao-Hong; Chen Yuan-Ping

    2006-01-01

    The nonideal effects in a quantum field-effect directional coupler where two quantum wires are coupled through a finite potential barrier are studied by adopting the lattice Green function method. The results show that the electron energy distribution, asymmetric geometry and finite temperature all have obvious influence on the electron transfer of the coupler. Only for the electrons with energies in a certain region, can the complete periodic transfer between two quantum wires take place. The conductance of these electrons as a function of the barrier length and potential height exhibits a fine periodic or quasi-periodic pattern. For the electrons with energies beyond the region, however, the complete periodic transfer does not hold any more since many irregular oscillations are superimposed on the conductance profile. In addition, the finite temperature and asymmetric geometry both can reduce the electron transfer efficiency.

  6. Characteristic time-scales for macroscopic quantum tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranfagni, A. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Panciatichi 64, 50127 Florence (Italy); Scuola di Specializzazione in Ottica dell' Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Cacciari, I. [Scuola di Specializzazione in Ottica dell' Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Sandri, P. [Scuola di Specializzazione in Ottica dell' Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Ranfagni, C. [Facolta di Scienze Matematiche, Fisiche e Naturali, Corso di Laurea in Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Ruggeri, R. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: r.ruggeri@ifac.cnr.it; Agresti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy)

    2005-08-22

    Tunneling time ({tau}{sub t}), in its real and imaginary parts, can be deduced from measurements of decay time ({tau}{sub d}) in Josephson junctions. It turns out that the real part of {tau}{sub t} is much shorter than the imaginary one, which can be identified with the semiclassical time. A third quantity is the Zeno-time ({tau}{sub Z}) which, in turn, can be estimated from the previous ones, since it is approximately given by their geometrical mean. The possibility of observing the Zeno-effect is then discussed.

  7. Approximate calculation of electronic energy levels of axially symmetric quantum dot and quantum ring by using energy dependent effective mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu-Min; Yu Zhong-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electronic structures about the semiconductor quantum dot and the semiconductor quantum ring are presented in this paper. To reduce the calculation costs, for the quantum dot and the quantum ring, their simplified axially symmetric shapes are utilized in our analysis. The energy dependent effective mass is taken into account in solving the Schrodinger equations in the single band effective mass approximation. The calculated results show that the energy dependent effective mass should be considered only for relatively small volume quantum dots or small quantum rings. For large size quantum materials, both the energy dependent effective mass and the parabolic effective mass can give the same results. The energy states and the effective masses of the quantum dot and the quantum ring as a function of geometric parameters are also discussed in detail.

  8. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetically doped InAs/GaSb quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Ze; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Samarth, Nitin; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2014-10-03

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect has recently been observed experimentally in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)(2)Te(3) at a low temperature (∼ 30 mK). In this work, we propose realizing the quantum anomalous Hall effect in more conventional diluted magnetic semiconductors with magnetically doped InAs/GaSb type-II quantum wells. Based on a four-band model, we find an enhancement of the Curie temperature of ferromagnetism due to band edge singularities in the inverted regime of InAs/GaSb quantum wells. Below the Curie temperature, the quantum anomalous Hall effect is confirmed by the direct calculation of Hall conductance. The parameter regime for the quantum anomalous Hall phase is identified based on the eight-band Kane model. The high sample quality and strong exchange coupling make magnetically doped InAs/GaSb quantum wells good candidates for realizing the quantum anomalous Hall insulator at a high temperature.

  9. Extracting Work from Quantum Measurement in Maxwell's Demon Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elouard, Cyril; Herrera-Martí, David; Huard, Benjamin; Auffèves, Alexia

    2017-06-01

    The essence of both classical and quantum engines is to extract useful energy (work) from stochastic energy sources, e.g., thermal baths. In Maxwell's demon engines, work extraction is assisted by a feedback control based on measurements performed by a demon, whose memory is erased at some nonzero energy cost. Here we propose a new type of quantum Maxwell's demon engine where work is directly extracted from the measurement channel, such that no heat bath is required. We show that in the Zeno regime of frequent measurements, memory erasure costs eventually vanish. Our findings provide a new paradigm to analyze quantum heat engines and work extraction in the quantum world.

  10. Extracting Work from Quantum Measurement in Maxwell's Demon Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elouard, Cyril; Herrera-Martí, David; Huard, Benjamin; Auffèves, Alexia

    2017-06-30

    The essence of both classical and quantum engines is to extract useful energy (work) from stochastic energy sources, e.g., thermal baths. In Maxwell's demon engines, work extraction is assisted by a feedback control based on measurements performed by a demon, whose memory is erased at some nonzero energy cost. Here we propose a new type of quantum Maxwell's demon engine where work is directly extracted from the measurement channel, such that no heat bath is required. We show that in the Zeno regime of frequent measurements, memory erasure costs eventually vanish. Our findings provide a new paradigm to analyze quantum heat engines and work extraction in the quantum world.

  11. Universal quantum constraints on the butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Berenstein, David

    2015-01-01

    Lyapunov exponents play an important role in the evolution of quantum chaotic systems in the semiclassical limit. We conjecture the existence of an upper bound on the Lyapunov exponents that contribute to the quantum motion. This is a universal feature in any quantum system or quantum field theory, including those with a gravity dual, at zero or finite temperature. It has its origin in the finite size of the Hilbert space that is available to an initial quasi-classical configuration. An important consequence of this result is a universal quantum bound on the maximum growth rate of the entanglement entropy.

  12. Quantum optical effective-medium theory for layered metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Amooghorban, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    The quantum optics of metamaterials starts with the question whether the same effective-medium theories apply as in classical optics. In general the answer is negative. For active plasmonics but also for some passive metamaterials, we show that an additional effective-medium parameter is indispensable besides the effective index, namely the effective noise-photon distribution. Only with the extra parameter can one predict how well the quantumness of states of light is preserved in the metamaterial. The fact that the effective index alone is not always sufficient and that one additional effective parameter suffices in the quantum optics of metamaterials is both of fundamental and practical interest. Here from a Lagrangian description of the quantum electrodynamics of media with both linear gain and loss, we compute the effective noise-photon distribution for quantum light propagation in arbitrary directions in layered metamaterials, thereby detailing and generalizing our recent work [ E. Amooghorban et al., Ph...

  13. Multidimensional Quantum Tunneling in the Schwinger Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Dumlu, Cesim K

    2015-01-01

    We study the Schwinger effect, in which the external field having a spatio-temporal profile creates electron-positron pairs via multidimensional quantum tunneling. Our treatment is based on Gutzwiller's trace formula for the QED effective action, whose imaginary part is represented by a sum over complex wordlines. The worldlines are multi-periodic, and the periods of motion collectively depend on the strength of spatial and temporal inhomogeneity. We argue that Hamilton's characteristic function that leads to the correct tunneling amplitude must explicitly depend on both periods, and is represented by an average over the internal cycles of motion. We use this averaging method to calculate the pair production rate in an exponentially damped sinusoidal field, where we find that the initial conditions for each family of periodic trajectories lie on a curve in the momentum plane. The ratio of the periods, which may also be referred as the topological index, stays uniform on each curve. Calculation of tunneling am...

  14. Higher (odd dimensional quantum Hall effect and extended dimensional hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Hasebe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate dimensional ladder of higher dimensional quantum Hall effects by exploiting quantum Hall effects on arbitrary odd dimensional spheres. Non-relativistic and relativistic Landau models are analyzed on S2k−1 in the SO(2k−1 monopole background. The total sub-band degeneracy of the odd dimensional lowest Landau level is shown to be equal to the winding number from the base-manifold S2k−1 to the one-dimension higher SO(2k gauge group. Based on the chiral Hopf maps, we clarify the underlying quantum Nambu geometry for odd dimensional quantum Hall effect and the resulting quantum geometry is naturally embedded also in one-dimension higher quantum geometry. An origin of such dimensional ladder connecting even and odd dimensional quantum Hall effects is illuminated from a viewpoint of the spectral flow of Atiyah–Patodi–Singer index theorem in differential topology. We also present a BF topological field theory as an effective field theory in which membranes with different dimensions undergo non-trivial linking in odd dimensional space. Finally, an extended version of the dimensional hierarchy for higher dimensional quantum Hall liquids is proposed, and its relationship to quantum anomaly and D-brane physics is discussed.

  15. Higher (odd) dimensional quantum Hall effect and extended dimensional hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Kazuki

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate dimensional ladder of higher dimensional quantum Hall effects by exploiting quantum Hall effects on arbitrary odd dimensional spheres. Non-relativistic and relativistic Landau models are analyzed on S 2 k - 1 in the SO (2 k - 1) monopole background. The total sub-band degeneracy of the odd dimensional lowest Landau level is shown to be equal to the winding number from the base-manifold S 2 k - 1 to the one-dimension higher SO (2 k) gauge group. Based on the chiral Hopf maps, we clarify the underlying quantum Nambu geometry for odd dimensional quantum Hall effect and the resulting quantum geometry is naturally embedded also in one-dimension higher quantum geometry. An origin of such dimensional ladder connecting even and odd dimensional quantum Hall effects is illuminated from a viewpoint of the spectral flow of Atiyah-Patodi-Singer index theorem in differential topology. We also present a BF topological field theory as an effective field theory in which membranes with different dimensions undergo non-trivial linking in odd dimensional space. Finally, an extended version of the dimensional hierarchy for higher dimensional quantum Hall liquids is proposed, and its relationship to quantum anomaly and D-brane physics is discussed.

  16. Effective equations for isotropic quantum cosmology including matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2007-01-01

    Effective equations often provide powerful tools to develop a systematic understanding of detailed properties of a quantum system. This is especially helpful in quantum cosmology where several conceptual and technical difficulties associated with the full quantum equations can be avoided in this way. Here, effective equations for Wheeler-DeWitt and loop quantizations of spatially flat, isotropic cosmological models sourced by a massive or interacting scalar are derived and studied. The resulting systems are remarkably different from that given for a free, massless scalar. This has implications for the coherence of evolving states and the realization of a bounce in loop quantum cosmology.

  17. Conditioned quantum motion of an atom in a continuously monitored one-dimensional lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattmann, Ralf; Mølmer, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    We consider a quantum particle on a one-dimensional lattice subject to weak local measurements and study its stochastic dynamics conditioned on the measurement outcomes. Depending on the measurement strength our analysis of the quantum trajectories reveals dynamical regimes ranging from quasicoherent wave-packet oscillations to a Zeno-type dynamics. We analyze how these dynamical regimes are directly reflected in the spectral properties of the noisy measurement records.

  18. Destruction of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect by Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1985-07-01

    It is suggested that Hall steps in the fractional quantum Hall effect are physically similar to those in the ordinary quantum Hall effect. This proposition leads to a simple scaling diagram containing a new type of fixed point, which is identified with the destruction of the fractional states by disorder. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Bulk Versus Edge in the Quantum Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Y. -C.; Lee, D.-H.

    1996-01-01

    The manifestation of the bulk quantum Hall effect on edge is the chiral anomaly. The chiral anomaly {\\it is} the underlying principle of the ``edge approach'' of quantum Hall effect. In that approach, $\\sxy$ should not be taken as the conductance derived from the space-local current-current correlation function of the pure one-dimensional edge problem.

  20. Low-Energy Effective Theories of Quantum Link and Quantum Spin Models

    CERN Document Server

    Schlittgen, B

    2001-01-01

    Quantum spin and quantum link models provide an unconventional regularization of field theory in which classical fields arise via dimensional reduction of discrete variables. This D-theory regularization leads to the same continuum theories as the conventional approach. We show this by deriving the low-energy effective Lagrangians of D-theory models using coherent state path integral techniques. We illustrate our method for the $(2+1)$-d Heisenberg quantum spin model which is the D-theory regularization of the 2-d O(3) model. Similarly, we prove that in the continuum limit a $(2+1)$-d quantum spin model with $SU(N)_L\\times SU(N)_R\\times U(1)_{L=R}$ symmetry is equivalent to the 2-d principal chiral model. Finally, we show that $(4+1)$-d SU(N) quantum link models reduce to ordinary 4-d Yang-Mills theory.

  1. On Quantum Effects in a Theory of Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    We construct a descriptive toy model that considers quantum effects on biological evolution starting from Chaitin's classical framework. There are smart evolution scenarios in which a quantum world is as favorable as classical worlds for evolution to take place. However, in more natural scenarios, the rate of evolution depends on the degree of entanglement present in quantum organisms with respect to classical organisms. If the entanglement is maximal, classical evolution turns out to be more favorable. PMID:22413059

  2. On quantum effects in a theory of biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Delgado, M A

    2012-01-01

    We construct a descriptive toy model that considers quantum effects on biological evolution starting from Chaitin's classical framework. There are smart evolution scenarios in which a quantum world is as favorable as classical worlds for evolution to take place. However, in more natural scenarios, the rate of evolution depends on the degree of entanglement present in quantum organisms with respect to classical organisms. If the entanglement is maximal, classical evolution turns out to be more favorable.

  3. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of "clocks"

    CERN Document Server

    Zych, Magdalena; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of "clocks", which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. "Clock" interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  4. Casimir effect from macroscopic quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philbin, T G, E-mail: tgp3@st-andrews.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    The canonical quantization of macroscopic electromagnetism was recently presented in (Philbin 2010 New J. Phys. 12 123008). This theory is used here to derive the Casimir effect, by considering the special case of thermal and zero-point fields. The stress-energy-momentum tensor of the canonical theory follows from Noether's theorem, and its electromagnetic part in thermal equilibrium gives the Casimir energy density and stress tensor. The results hold for arbitrary inhomogeneous magnetodielectrics and are obtained from a rigorous quantization of electromagnetism in dispersive, dissipative media. Continuing doubts about the status of the standard Lifshitz theory as a proper quantum treatment of Casimir forces do not apply to the derivation given here. Moreover, the correct expressions for the Casimir energy density and stress tensor inside media follow automatically from the simple restriction to thermal equilibrium, without the need for complicated thermodynamical or mechanical arguments.

  5. Peltier effect in strongly driven quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewski, M.; Crivelli, D.; Prelovšek, P.

    2014-08-01

    We study a microscopic model of a thermocouple device with two connected correlated quantum wires driven by a constant electric field. In such a closed system we follow the time and position dependence of the entropy density using the concept of the reduced density matrix. At weak driving, the initial changes of the entropy at the junctions can be described by the linear Peltier response. At longer times the quasiequilibrium situation is reached with well defined local temperatures which increase due to an overall Joule heating. On the other hand, a strong electric field induces a nontrivial nonlinear thermoelectric response, e.g., the Bloch oscillations of the energy current. Moreover, we show for the doped Mott insulators that strong driving can reverse the Peltier effect.

  6. Formulation of the Relativistic Quantum Hall Effect and "Parity Anomaly"

    CERN Document Server

    Yonaga, Kouki; Shibata, Naokazu

    2016-01-01

    We present a relativistic formulation of the quantum Hall effect on a Riemann sphere. An explicit form of the pseudopotential is derived for the relativistic quantum Hall effect with/without mass term.We clarify particular features of the relativistic quantum Hall states with use of the exact diagonalization study of the pseudopotential Hamiltonian. Physical effects of the mass term to relativistic quantum Hall states are investigated in detail.The mass term acts as an interporating parameter between the relativistic and non-relativistic quantum Hall effects. It is pointed out that the mass term inequivalently affects to many-body physics of the positive and negative Landau levels and brings instability of the Laughlin state of the positive first relativistic Landau level as a consequence of the "parity anomaly".

  7. Quantum effects of massive modes in a cosmological quantum space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Tavakoli, Yaser

    2015-01-01

    The quantum theory of a massive, minimally coupled scalar field on an isotropic cosmological quantum space-time is revisited. The interplay between the quantum background and the massive modes of the field, when disregarding their back-reaction effects, gives rise to a theory of quantum field on an effective, dressed space-time whose isotropy may be broken in the direction of the field propagation. On the resulting dressed geometry, evolution of the massive modes, by analyzing the solutions to the corresponding Klein-Gordon equation, is investigated. In particular, by computing the leading order contributions in adiabatic series, an approximate solution for the mode function is obtained. By using the adiabatic regularization, to the fourth order in expansion series, the renormalization of the stress-energy and Hamiltonian of the quantized field is studied. The problem of particle production is studied here in the light of the classical theory of wave propagation on the effective anisotropic background. To the...

  8. Kondo effect in quantum dots and molecular devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lang; LI Hongxiang; HU Wenping; ZHU Daoben

    2005-01-01

    Kondo effect is a very important many-body phenomenon in condensed matter physics,which explains why the resistance increases as the temperature is lowered (usually <10 K) in dilute magnetic alloy, and why the conductance increases as temperature is decreased in quantum dots. This paper simply introduces equilibrium and non- equilibrium Kondo effects in quantum dots together with the Kondo effect in quantum dots with even number of electrons (when the singlet and triplet states are degenerate). Furthermore, Kondo effect in single atom/molecular transistors is introduced, which indicates a new way to study Kondo effect.

  9. Few-body, hyperspherical treatment of the quantum Hall effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooten R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum Hall effect arises from the quantum behavior of two-dimensional, strongly-interacting electrons exposed to a strong, perpendicular magnetic field [1, 2]. Conventionally treated from a many-body perspective, we instead treat the system from the few-body perspective using collective coordinates and the hyperspherical adiabatic technique developed originally for atomic systems [3]. The grand angular momentum K from K-harmonic few-body theory, is shown to be an approximate good collective quantum number in this system, and is shown to correlate with known fractional quantum Hall (FQH states at experimentally observed filling factors.

  10. Quantum radiation reaction effects in multiphoton Compton scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Piazza, A; Hatsagortsyan, K Z; Keitel, C H

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  11. Quantum teleportation of nonclassical wave packets: An effective multimode theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benichi, Hugo; Takeda, Shuntaro; Lee, Noriyuki; Furusawa, Akira [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    We develop a simple and efficient theoretical model to understand the quantum properties of broadband continuous variable quantum teleportation. We show that, if stated properly, the problem of multimode teleportation can be simplified to teleportation of a single effective mode that describes the input state temporal characteristic. Using that model, we show how the finite bandwidth of squeezing and external noise in the classical channel affect the output teleported quantum field. We choose an approach that is especially relevant for the case of non-Gaussian nonclassical quantum states and we finally back-test our model with recent experimental results.

  12. Kondo effects in triangular triple quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Akira; Numata, Takahide; Nisikawa, Yunori; Hewson, A. C.

    2009-03-01

    We study the conductance through a triangular triple quantum dot, which is connected to two noninteracting leads, using the numerical renormalization group (NRG). It is found that the system shows a variety of Kondo effects depending on the filling of the triangle. The SU(4) Kondo effect occurs at half-filling, and a sharp conductance dip due to a phase lapse appears in the gate-voltage dependence. Furthermore, when four electrons occupy the three sites on average, a local S=1 moment, which is caused by the Nagaoka mechanism, is induced along the triangle. The temperature dependence of the entropy and spin susceptibility of the triangle shows that this moment is screened by the conduction electrons via two separate stages at different temperatures. The two-terminal and four-terminal conductances show a clear difference at the gate voltages, where the SU(4) or the S=1 Kondo effects occur[1]. We will also discuss effects of deformations of the triangular configuration, caused by the inhomogeneity in the inter-dot couplings and in the gate voltages. [4pt] [1] T.Numata, Y.Nisikawa, A.Oguri, and A.C.Hewson: arXiv:0808.3496.

  13. Quantum-Memory Effects in the Emission of Quantum-Dot Microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, C.; Huttner, U.; Mootz, M.; Kira, M.; Koch, S. W.; Tempel, J.-S.; Aßmann, M.; Bayer, M.; Mintairov, A. M.; Merz, J. L.

    2014-08-01

    The experimentally measured input-output characteristics of optically pumped semiconductor microcavities exhibits unexpected oscillations modifying the fundamentally linear slope in the excitation power regime below lasing. A systematic microscopic analysis reproduces these oscillations, identifying them as a genuine quantum-memory effect, i.e., a photon-density correlation accumulated during the excitation. With the use of projected quantum measurements, it is shown that the input-output oscillations can be controlled and enhanced by an order of magnitude when the quantum fluctuations of the pump are adjusted.

  14. Measuring the effective phonon density of states of a quantum dot in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Høeg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Kreiner-Møller, Asger

    2013-01-01

    We employ detuning-dependent decay-rate measurements of a quantum dot in a photonic-crystal cavity to study the influence of phonon dephasing in a solid-state quantum-electrodynamics experiment. The experimental data agree with a microscopic non-Markovian model accounting for dephasing from...... longitudinal acoustic phonons, and the analysis explains the difference between nonresonant cavity feeding in different nanocavities. From the comparison between experiment and theory we extract the effective phonon density of states experienced by the quantum dot in the nanocavity. This quantity determines...

  15. Polaron Energy and Effective Mass in Parabolic Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Ping; LIANG Xi-Xia

    2005-01-01

    @@ The energy and effective mass of a polaron in a parabolic quantum well are studied theoretically by using LLP-like transformations and a variational approach. Numerical results are presented for the polaron energy and effective mass in the GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As parabolic quantum well. The results show that the energy and the effective mass of the polaron both have their maxima in the finite parabolic quantum well but decrease monotonously in the infinite parabolic quantum well with the increasing well width. It is verified that the bulk longitudinal optical phonon mode approximation is an adequate formulation for the electron-phonon coupling in parabolic quantum well structures.

  16. Quantum noise memory effect of multiple scattered light

    CERN Document Server

    Lodahl, P

    2005-01-01

    We investigate frequency correlations in multiple scattered light that are present in the quantum fluctuations. The memory effect for quantum and classical noise is compared, and found to have markedly different frequency scaling, which was confirmed in a recent experiment. Furthermore, novel mesoscopic correlations are predicted that depend on the photon statistics of the incoming light.

  17. Phase effects in HgTe quantum structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, M.; Buhmann, H.; Becker, C.R.; Molenkamp, L.W. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

    2007-07-01

    HgTe quantum well structures with high electron mobilities have been used to fabricate quantum interference devices. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations have been studied in the low and high magnetic field regime. In the latter case a decrease of the effective ring radius is observed. Additionally, as a consequence of the strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling within this material, it was possible to observe conductance oscillations which are due to the so-called Aharonov-Casher effect. These quantum interference effects are effectively controlled by the applied magnetic and electric field. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. THz Electro-absorption Effect in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.;

    2011-01-01

    Instantaneous electro-absorption effect in quantum dots, induced by electric field of THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth is demonstrated in THz pump - optical probe experiment. This effect may be promising for Tbit/s wireless transmission systems.......Instantaneous electro-absorption effect in quantum dots, induced by electric field of THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth is demonstrated in THz pump - optical probe experiment. This effect may be promising for Tbit/s wireless transmission systems....

  19. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Lellouch, L; Portelli, A; Szabo, K K; Toth, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  20. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Hoelbling, C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Katz, S.D. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); MTA-ELTE Lendület Lattice Gauge Theory Research Group, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Lellouch, L., E-mail: lellouch@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [CNRS, Aix-Marseille U., U. de Toulon, CPT, UMR 7332, F-13288, Marseille (France); Portelli, A. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Szabo, K.K. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Toth, B.C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-04-10

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  1. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fodor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  2. Quantum corrections in massive bigravity and new effective composite metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-05-01

    We compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the interactions between the two metrics of the ghost-free massive bigravity. When considering gravitons running in the loops, we show how the structure of the interactions gets destabilized at the quantum level, exactly in the same way as in its massive gravity limit. A priori one might have expected a better quantum behavior, however, the broken diffeomorphism invariance out of the two initial diffeomorphisms in bigravity has similar consequences at the quantum level as the broken diffeomorphism in massive gravity. From lessons of the generated quantum corrections through matter loops we propose yet other types of effective composite metrics to which the matter fields can couple. Among these new effective metrics there might be one or more that could provide interesting phenomenology and important cosmological implications.

  3. Quantum corrections in massive bigravity and new effective composite metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2014-01-01

    We compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the interactions between the two metrics of the ghost-free massive bigravity. When considering gravitons running in the loops, we show how the structure of the interactions gets destabilized at the quantum level, exactly in the same way as in its massive gravity limit. A priori one might have expected a better quantum behavior, however the broken diffeomorphism invariance out of the two initial diffeomorphisms in bigravity has similar consequences at the quantum level as the broken diffeomorphism in massive gravity. From lessons of the generated quantum corrections through matter loops we propose yet other types of effective composite metrics to which the matter fields can couple. Among these new effective metrics there might be one or more that could provide interesting phenomenology and important cosmological implications.

  4. Quantum effects at low-energy atom–molecule interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Deb; A Rakshit; J Hazra; D Chakraborty

    2013-01-01

    The effects of quantum interference in inter-conversion between cold atoms and diatomic molecules are analysed in this study. Within the framework of Fano’s theory, continuum bound anisotropic dressed state formalism of atom–molecule quantum dynamics is presented. This formalism is applicable in photo- and magneto-associative strong-coupling regimes. The significance of Fano effect in ultracold atom–molecule transitions is discussed. Quantum effects at low-energy atom–molecule interface are important for exploring coherent phenomena in hitherto unexplored parameter regimes.

  5. Quantum radiation by electrons in lasers and the Unruh effect

    CERN Document Server

    Schützhold, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the Larmor radiation known from classical electrodynamics, electrons in a laser field may emit pairs of entangled photons -- which is a pure quantum effect. We investigate this quantum effect and discuss why it is suppressed in comparison with the classical Larmor radiation (which is just Thomson backscattering of the laser photons). Further, we provide an intuitive explanation of this process (in a simplified setting) in terms of the Unruh effect.

  6. Two Quantum Effects In The Theory Of Gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, S P

    2005-01-01

    We will discuss two methods by which the formalism of quantum field theory can be included in calculating the physical effects of gravitation. In the first of these, the consequences of treating general relativity as an effective quantum field theory will be examined. The primary result will be the calculation of the first-order quantum gravity corrections to the β functions of arbitrary Yang-Mills theories. These corrections will effect the high-energy phenomenology of such theories, including the details of coupling constant unification. Following this, we will address the question of how to form effective quantum field theories in classical gravitational backgrounds. We follow the prescription that effective theories should provide a description of experimentally accessible degrees of freedom with all other degrees of freedom integrated out of the theory. We will show that this prescription appears to fail for a scalar field in a black hole background because of an anomaly generated in general cov...

  7. Pseudo Memory Effects, Majorization and Entropy in Quantum Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Bracken, A J; Tsohantjis, I; Bracken, Anthony J.; Ellinas, Demosthenes; Tsohantjis, Ioannis

    2004-01-01

    A quantum random walk on the integers exhibits pseudo memory effects, in that its probability distribution after N steps is determined by reshuffling the first N distributions that arise in a classical random walk with the same initial distribution. In a classical walk, entropy increase can be regarded as a consequence of the majorization ordering of successive distributions. The Lorenz curves of successive distributions for a symmetric quantum walk reveal no majorization ordering in general. Nevertheless, entropy can increase, and computer experiments show that it does so on average. Varying the stages at which the quantum coin system is traced out leads to new quantum walks, including a symmetric walk for which majorization ordering is valid but the spreading rate exceeds that of the usual symmetric quantum walk.

  8. Light propagation on quantum curved spacetime and back reaction effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozameh, Carlos; Parisi, Florencia [FaMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2007-09-07

    We study the electromagnetic field equations on an arbitrary quantum curved background in the semiclassical approximation of loop quantum gravity. The effective interaction Hamiltonian for the Maxwell and gravitational fields is obtained and the corresponding field equations, which can be expressed as a modified wave equation for the Maxwell potential, are derived. We use these results to analyze electromagnetic wave propagation on a quantum Robertson-Walker spacetime and show that Lorentz invariance is not preserved. The formalism developed can be applied to the case where back reaction effects on the metric due to the electromagnetic field are taken into account, leading to non-covariant field equations.

  9. Quantum effects for particles channeling in a bent crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feranchuk, Ilya; San, Nguyen Quang

    2016-09-01

    Quantum mechanical theory for channeling of the relativistic charged particles in the bent crystals is considered in the paper. Quantum effects of under-barrier tunneling are essential when the radius of the curvature is closed to its critical value. In this case the wave functions of the quasi-stationary states corresponding to the particles captured in a channel are presented in the analytical form. The efficiency of channeling of the particles and their angular distribution at the exit crystal surface are calculated. Characteristic experimental parameters for observation the quantum effects are estimated.

  10. Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect Induced by Quantum Phase Transition in HgCdTe Quantum Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wen; Chang, Kai; /Beijing, Inst. Semiconductors; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    Spin Hall effect can be induced both by the extrinsic impurity scattering and by the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in the electronic structure. The HgTe/CdTe quantum well has a quantum phase transition where the electronic structure changes from normal to inverted. We show that the intrinsic spin Hall effect of the conduction band vanishes on the normal side, while it is finite on the inverted side. This difference gives a direct mechanism to experimentally distinguish the intrinsic spin Hall effect from the extrinsic one.

  11. Spontaneous Coherence Effects in Quantum Dots and Quantum Wells Placed in Microcavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaputkina N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bose-Einstein condensation temperature Tc for a system of coupled quantum dots in a microcavity was estimated in function of the confining potential steepness, the external magnetic field strength, and the barrier layer width for indirect excitons. The effect of the magnetic field on Tc was found to be nonmonotonic over a certain range of the control parameters. The reason is the presence of two competing mechanisms accompanying the increase of the magnetic field: (a increase of the magnetoexciton effective mass and (b increase of the effective confining potential steepness for quantum dots.

  12. Fractional quantum Hall effect in the absence of Landau levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, D N; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Sun, Kai; Sheng, L

    2011-07-12

    It is well known that the topological phenomena with fractional excitations, the fractional quantum Hall effect, will emerge when electrons move in Landau levels. Here we show the theoretical discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect in the absence of Landau levels in an interacting fermion model. The non-interacting part of our Hamiltonian is the recently proposed topologically non-trivial flat-band model on a checkerboard lattice. In the presence of nearest-neighbouring repulsion, we find that at 1/3 filling, the Fermi-liquid state is unstable towards the fractional quantum Hall effect. At 1/5 filling, however, a next-nearest-neighbouring repulsion is needed for the occurrence of the 1/5 fractional quantum Hall effect when nearest-neighbouring repulsion is not too strong. We demonstrate the characteristic features of these novel states and determine the corresponding phase diagram.

  13. Effects of decoherence and imperfections for quantum algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Pomeransky, A A; Shepelyansky, D L

    2004-01-01

    We study effects of static inter-qubit interactions and random errors in quantum gates on the stability of various quantum algorithms including the Grover quantum search algorithm and the quantum chaos maps. For the Grover algorithm our numerical and analytical results show existence of regular and chaotic phases depending on the static imperfection strength $\\epsilon$. The critical border $\\epsilon_c$ between two phases drops polynomially with the number of qubits $n_q$ as $\\epsilon_c \\sim n_q^{-3/2}$. In the regular phase $(\\epsilon 2^{-n_q/2}$. In the chaotic phase $(\\epsilon > \\epsilon_c)$ the algorithm is completely destroyed. The results for the Grover algorithm are compared with the imperfection effects for quantum algorithms of quantum chaos maps where the universal law for the fidelity decay is given by the Random Matrix Theory (RMT). We also discuss a new gyroscopic quantum error correction method which allows to reduce the effect of static imperfections. In spite of this decay GYQEC allows to obta...

  14. Spacetime effects on satellite-based quantum communications

    CERN Document Server

    Bruschi, David Edward; Fuentes, Ivette; Jennewein, Thomas; Razavi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of space-time curvature on space-based quantum communication protocols. We analyze tasks that require either the exchange of single photons in a certain entanglement distribution protocol or beams of light in a continuous-variable quantum key distribution scheme. We find that gravity affects the propagation of photons, therefore acting as a noisy channel for the transmission of information. The effects can be measured with current technology.

  15. Jet Extinction from Non-Perturbative Quantum Gravity Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Kilic, Can; Lath, Amitabh; Rose, Keith; Thomas, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The infrared-ultraviolet properties of quantum gravity suggest on very general grounds that hard short distance scattering processes are highly suppressed for center of mass scattering energies beyond the fundamental Planck scale. If this scale is not too far above the electroweak scale, these non-perturbative quantum gravity effects could be manifest as an extinction of high transverse momentum jets at the LHC. To model these effects we implement an Extinction Monte Carlo modification of the...

  16. Interface phonon effect on optical spectra of quantum nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, Alexander Yu., E-mail: maslov.ton@mail.ioffe.r [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Polytechnicheskaya st., 26, 194021 Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Proshina, Olga V.; Rusina, Anastasia N. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Polytechnicheskaya st., 26, 194021 Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-15

    This paper deals with theory of large radius polaron effect in quantum wells, wires and dots. The interaction of charge particles and excitons with both bulk and interface optical phonons is taken into consideration. The analytical expression for polaron binding energy is obtained for different types of nanostructures. It is shown that the contribution of interface phonons to the polaron binding energy may exceed the bulk phonon part. The manifestation of polaron effects in optical spectra of quantum nanostructures is discussed.

  17. Chern-Simons Dynamics and the Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Balachandran, A P

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical developments during the past several years have shown that large scale properties of the Quantum Hall system can be successfully described by effective field theories which use the Chern-Simons interaction. In this article, we first recall certain salient features of the Quantum Hall Effect and their microscopic explanation. We then review one particular approach to their description based on the Chern-Simons Lagrangian and its variants.

  18. Quantum optical effective-medium theory and transformation quantum optics for metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubs, Martijn; Amooghorban, Ehsan; Zhang, Jingjing; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-09-01

    While typically designed to manipulate classical light, metamaterials have many potential applications for quantum optics as well. We argue why a quantum optical effective-medium theory is needed. We present such a theory for layered metamaterials that is valid for light propagation in all spatial directions, thereby generalizing earlier work for one-dimensional propagation. In contrast to classical effective-medium theory there is an additional effective parameter that describes quantum noise. Our results for metamaterials are based on a rather general Lagrangian theory for the quantum electrodynamics of media with both loss and gain. In the second part of this paper, we present a new application of transformation optics whereby local spontaneous-emission rates of quantum emitters can be designed. This follows from an analysis how electromagnetic Green functions trans- form under coordinate transformations. Spontaneous-emission rates can be either enhanced or suppressed using invisibility cloaks or gradient index lenses. Furthermore, the anisotropic material profile of the cloak enables the directional control of spontaneous emission.

  19. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  20. Quantum confinement effects in low-dimensional systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Topwal

    2015-06-01

    The confinement effects of electrons in ultrathin films and nanowires grown on metallic and semiconducting substrates investigated using band mapping of their electronic structures using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is discussed here. It has been shown that finite electron reflectivity at the interface is sufficient to sustain the formation of quantum well states and weak quantum well resonance states even in closely matched metals. The expected parabolic dispersion of sp-derived quantum well states for free-standing layers undergoes deviations from parabolic behaviour and modifications due to the underlying substrate bands, suggesting the effects of strong hybridization between the quantum well states and the substrate bands. Electron confinement effects in low dimensions as observed from the dispersionless features in the band structures are also discussed.

  1. Graphene and the universality of the quantum Hall effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzalenchuk, A.; Janssen, T. J.B.M.; Kazakova, O.

    2013-01-01

    The quantum Hall effect allows the standard for resistance to be defined in terms of the elementary charge and Planck's constant alone. The effect comprises the quantization of the Hall resistance in two-dimensional electron systems in rational fractions of RK=h/e2=25812.8074434(84) Ω (Mohr P. J....... et al., Rev. Mod. Phys., 84 (2012) 1527), the resistance quantum. Despite 30 years of research into the quantum Hall effect, the level of precision necessary for metrology, a few parts per billion, has been achieved only in silicon and III-V heterostructure devices. In this lecture we show...... that graphene - a single layer of carbon atoms - beats these well-established semiconductor materials as the system of choice for the realisation of the quantum resistance standard. Here we shall briefly describe graphene technology, discuss the structure and electronic properties of graphene, including...

  2. Effects of symmetry breaking in finite quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birman, J.L. [Department of Physics, City College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Nazmitdinov, R.G. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca 07122 (Spain); Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Yukalov, V.I., E-mail: yukalov@theor.jinr.ru [Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The review considers the peculiarities of symmetry breaking and symmetry transformations and the related physical effects in finite quantum systems. Some types of symmetry in finite systems can be broken only asymptotically. However, with a sufficiently large number of particles, crossover transitions become sharp, so that symmetry breaking happens similarly to that in macroscopic systems. This concerns, in particular, global gauge symmetry breaking, related to Bose–Einstein condensation and superconductivity, or isotropy breaking, related to the generation of quantum vortices, and the stratification in multicomponent mixtures. A special type of symmetry transformation, characteristic only for finite systems, is the change of shape symmetry. These phenomena are illustrated by the examples of several typical mesoscopic systems, such as trapped atoms, quantum dots, atomic nuclei, and metallic grains. The specific features of the review are: (i) the emphasis on the peculiarities of the symmetry breaking in finite mesoscopic systems; (ii) the analysis of common properties of physically different finite quantum systems; (iii) the manifestations of symmetry breaking in the spectra of collective excitations in finite quantum systems. The analysis of these features allows for the better understanding of the intimate relation between the type of symmetry and other physical properties of quantum systems. This also makes it possible to predict new effects by employing the analogies between finite quantum systems of different physical nature.

  3. Detecting quantum gravitational effects of loop quantum cosmology in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Tao; Cleaver, Gerald; Kirsten, Klaus; Sheng, Qin; Wu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We derive the primordial power spectra and spectral indexes of the density fluctuations and gravitational waves in the framework of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) with holonomy and inverse-volume corrections, by using the uniform asymptotic approximation method to its third-order, at which the upper error bounds are $\\lesssim 0.15\\%$, accurate enough for the current and forthcoming cosmological observations. Then, using the Planck, BAO and SN data we obtain new constraints on quantum gravitational effects from LQC corrections, and find that such effects could be well within the detection of the current and forthcoming experiments.

  4. Casimir Effects in Renormalizable Quantum Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, N; Weigel, H; Graham, Noah; Jaffe, Robert L.; Weigel, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    We review the framework we and our collaborators have developed for the study of one-loop quantum corrections to extended field configurations in renormalizable quantum field theories. We work in the continuum, transforming the standard Casimir sum over modes into a sum over bound states and an integral over scattering states weighted by the density of states. We express the density of states in terms of phase shifts, allowing us to extract divergences by identifying Born approximations to the phase shifts with low order Feynman diagrams. Once isolated in Feynman diagrams, the divergences are canceled against standard counterterms. Thus regulated, the Casimir sum is highly convergent and amenable to numerical computation. Our methods have numerous applications to the theory of solitons, membranes, and quantum field theories in strong external fields or subject to boundary conditions.

  5. Casimir Effects in Renormalizable Quantum Field Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Noah; Jaffe, Robert L.; Weigel, Herbert

    We present a framework for the study of one-loop quantum corrections to extended field configurations in renormalizable quantum field theories. We work in the continuum, transforming the standard Casimir sum over modes into a sum over bound states and an integral over scattering states weighted by the density of states. We express the density of states in terms of phase shifts, allowing us to extract divergences by identifying Born approximations to the phase shifts with low order Feynman diagrams. Once isolated in Feynman diagrams, the divergences are canceled against standard counterterms. Thus regulated, the Casimir sum is highly convergent and amenable to numerical computation. Our methods have numerous applications to the theory of solitons, membranes, and quantum field theories in strong external fields or subject to boundary conditions.

  6. Magnetocaloric effect in quantum spin-s chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Honecker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We compute the entropy of antiferromagnetic quantum spin-s chains in an external magnetic field using exact diagonalization and Quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The magnetocaloric effect, i. e., temperature variations during adiabatic field changes, can be derived from the isentropes. First, we focus on the example of the spin-s=1 chain and show that one can cool by closing the Haldane gap with a magnetic field. We then move to quantum spin-s chains and demonstrate linear scaling with s close to the saturation field. In passing, we propose a new method to compute many low-lying excited states using the Lanczos recursion.

  7. Effective horizons for quantum communication in a Schwarzschild spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Hosler, Dominic; Kok, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Communication between a free-falling observer and an observer hovering above the Schwarzschild horizon of a black hole suffers from Unruh-Hawking noise, which degrades communication channel capacities. Ignoring time dilation, which affects all channels equally, we show that for bosonic communication using single and dual rail encoding the classical channel capacity reaches a finite value and the quantum channel capacity falls off exponentially. The latter defines an effective horizon, beyond which quantum communication becomes exponentially resource inefficient. The characteristic length scale associated with this quantum horizon depends on the mass of the black hole and the frequency of the communication channel.

  8. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of “clocks”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zych, M.; Pikovski, I.; Costa, F.; Brukner, Č.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of “clocks”, which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. “Clock” interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  9. Topological Effects on Quantum Phase Slips in Superfluid Spin Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigate effects of quantum fluctuations on superfluid spin transport through easy-plane quantum antiferromagnetic spin chains in the large-spin limit. Quantum fluctuations result in the decaying spin supercurrent by unwinding the magnetic order parameter within the easy plane, which is referred to as phase slips. We show that the topological term in the nonlinear sigma model for the spin chains qualitatively differentiates the decaying rate of the spin supercurrent between the integer versus half-odd-integer spin chains. An experimental setup for a magnetoelectric circuit is proposed, in which the dependence of the decaying rate on constituent spins can be verified by measuring the nonlocal magnetoresistance.

  10. Quantum Effects of Mesoscopic Inductance and Capacity Coupling Circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Xin; AN Zhan-Yuan; SONG Yong-Hua

    2006-01-01

    Using the quantum theory for a mesoscopic circuit based on the discretenes of electric charges, the finitedifference Schrodinger equation of the non-dissipative mesoscopic inductance and capacity coupling circuit is achieved.The Coulomb blockade effect, which is caused by the discreteness of electric charges, is studied. Appropriately choose the components in the circuits, the finite-difference Schrodinger equation can be divided into two Mathieu equations in p representation. With the WKBJ method, the currents quantum fluctuations in the ground states of the two circuits are calculated. The results show that the currents quantum zero-point fluctuations of the two circuits are exist and correlated.

  11. Exchange effects in magnetized quantum plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Trukhanova, Mariya Iv

    2015-01-01

    We apply the many-particle quantum hydrodynamics including the Coulomb exchange interaction to magnetized quantum plasmas. We consider a number of wave phenomenon under influence of the Coulomb exchange interaction. Since the Coulomb exchange interaction affects longitudinal and transverse-longitudinal waves we focus our attention to the Langmuir waves, Trivelpiece-Gould waves, ion-acoustic waves in non-isothermal magnetized plasmas, the dispersion of the longitudinal low-frequency ion-acoustic waves and low-frequencies electromagnetic waves at $T_{e}\\gg T_{i}$ . We obtained the numerical simulation of the dispersion properties of different types of waves.

  12. Quantum-Confinement Effects on Binding Energies and Optical Properties of Excitons in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘晖

    2004-01-01

    Quantum-confinement effects on the binding energy and the linear optical susceptibility of excitons in quantum dots are studied. It is found that the binding energy and the linear optical susceptibility are sensitive to the barrier height and the dot size. For an infinite barrier, the binding energy of excitons decreases monotonically with the increasing dot radius, and the absorption intensity has almost the same amplitude with the increasing photon energy. For a finite barrier, the binding energy has a maximum value with the increasing dot radius, and the absorption intensity damps rapidly with the increasing photon energy. The effective mass ratio is also found to have an influence on the binding energy. The results could be confirmed by future experiments on excitons in quantum dots.

  13. Thermal effects on photon-induced quantum transport in a single quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, M O; de Oliveira, E J R; Villas-Bôas, J M; Souza, F M

    2013-04-03

    We theoretically investigate laser induced quantum transport in a single quantum dot attached to electrical contacts. Our approach, based on a nonequilibrium Green function technique, allows us to include thermal effects on the photon-induced quantum transport and excitonic dynamics, enabling the study of non-Markovian effects. By solving a set of coupled integrodifferential equations, involving correlation and propagator functions, we obtain the photocurrent and the dot occupation as a function of time. Two distinct sources of decoherence, namely, incoherent tunneling and thermal fluctuations, are observed in the Rabi oscillations. As temperature increases, a thermally activated Pauli blockade results in a suppression of these oscillations. Additionally, the interplay between photon and thermally induced electron populations results in a switch of the current sign as time evolves and its stationary value can be maximized by tuning the laser intensity.

  14. Effective quantum gravity observables and locally covariant QFT

    CERN Document Server

    Rejzner, Kasia

    2016-01-01

    Perturbative algebraic quantum field theory (pAQFT) is a mathematically rigorous framework that allows to construct models of quantum field theories on a general class of Lorentzian manifolds. Recently this idea has been applied also to perturbative quantum gravity, treated as an effective theory. The difficulty was to find the right notion of observables that would in an appropriate sense be diffeomorphism invariant. In this article I will outline a general framework that allows to quantize theories with local symmetries (this includes infinitesimal diffeomorphism transformations) with the use of the BV (Batalin-Vilkovisky) formalism. This approach has been successfully applied to effective quantum gravity in a recent paper by R. Brunetti, K. Fredenhagen and myself. In the same paper we also proved perturbative background independence of the quantized theory, which is going to be discussed in the present work as well.

  15. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T; Sun, Yujie; Božović, Ivan

    2016-04-19

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4(LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point atx∼ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear belowTCG∼ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps,Δx∼ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state.

  16. Quantum Gravity Effects in Scalar, Vector and Tensor Field Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anindita

    Quantum theory of gravity deals with the physics of the gravitational field at Planck length scale (10-35 m). Even though it is experimentally hard to reach the Planck length scale, on can look for evidence of quantum gravity that is detectable in astrophysics. In this thesis, we try to find effects of loop quantum gravity corrections on observable phenomena. We show that the quantum fluctuation strain for LIGO data would be 10 -125 on the Earth. Th correction is, however, substantial near the black hole horizon. We discuss the effect of this for scalar field propagation followed by vector and tensor fields. For the scalar field, the correction introduces a new asymmetry; for the vector field, we found a new perturbation solution and for the tensor field, we found the corrected Einstein equations which are yet to solve. These will affect phenomena like Hawking radiation, black hole entropy and gravitational waves.

  17. Piezo-Phototronic Effect in a Quantum Well Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Du, Chunhua; Zhou, Yongli; Jiang, Chunyan; Pu, Xiong; Liu, Wei; Hu, Weiguo; Chen, Hong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-05-24

    With enhancements in the performance of optoelectronic devices, the field of piezo-phototronics has attracted much attention, and several theoretical works have been reported based on semiclassical models. At present, the feature size of optoelectronic devices are rapidly shrinking toward several tens of nanometers, which results in the quantum confinement effect. Starting from the basic piezoelectricity equation, Schrödinger equation, Poisson equation, and Fermi's golden rule, a self-consistent theoretical model is proposed to study the piezo-phototronic effect in the framework of perturbation theory in quantum mechanics. The validity and universality of this model are well-proven with photoluminescence measurements in a single GaN/InGaN quantum well and multiple GaN/InGaN quantum wells. This study provides important insight into the working principle of nanoscale piezo-phototronic devices as well as guidance for the future device design.

  18. Spacetime effects on satellite-based quantum communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Ralph, Timothy C.; Fuentes, Ivette; Jennewein, Thomas; Razavi, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the consequences of space-time being curved on space-based quantum communication protocols. We analyze tasks that require either the exchange of single photons in a certain entanglement distribution protocol or beams of light in a continuous-variable quantum key distribution scheme. We find that gravity affects the propagation of photons, therefore adding additional noise to the channel for the transmission of information. The effects could be measured with current technology.

  19. Quantum size effects in InP inner film fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ting-yun; WANG Ke-xin; LU Jun

    2005-01-01

    Based on the semiconductor amplifiing properties and the structure of optical fiber wave guide an InP inner fiber is developed.The InP inner film fiber can be employed as a small size,broadband,and ultra-short fiber amplifier.The quantum size effects of the fiber are emphatically investigated in the work.Using the experimental data,we compare the effective mass approximation (EMA) with effective parameterization within the tight binding (EPTB) models for the accurate description of the quantum size effects in InP.The results show that the EPTB model provides an excellent description of band gap variation over a wide range of sizes.The Bohr diameter and the effective Rydberg energy of InP are calculated.Finally,the amplifiing properties of the InP inner film fiber are discussed due to the quantum size effects.

  20. Quantum-Confined Stark Effects in a Single GaN Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-Hui; WANG Xue-Feng; LI Shu-Shen

    2008-01-01

    Using analytical expressions for the polarization field in GaN quantum dot, and an approximation by separating the potential into a radial and an axial, we investigate theoretically the quantum-confined Stark effects. The electron and hole energy levels and optical transition energies are calculated in the presence of an electric field in different directions. The results show that the electron and hole energy levels and the optical transition energies can cause redshifts for the lateral electric field and blueshifts for the vertical field. The rotational direction of electric field can also change the energy shift.

  1. Quantum-Confined Stark Effect in Ensemble of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Bing; ZHANG Hui-Chao; ZHANG Jia-Yu; Huaipeng Su; Y.Andrew Wang

    2010-01-01

    @@ The presence of a strong,changing,randomly-oriented,local electric field,which is induced by the photo-ionization that occurs universally in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots(QDs),makes it difficult to observe the quantumconfined Stark effect in ensemble of colloidal QDs.We propose a way to inhibit such a random electric field,and a clear quantum-confined Stark shift is observed directly in close-packed colloidal QDs.Besides the applications in optical switches and modulators,our experimental results indicate how the oscillator strengths of the optical transitions are changed under external electric fields.

  2. The quantum Goldilocks effect: on the convergence of timescales in quantum transport

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, Seth; Shabani, Alireza; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-01-01

    Excitonic transport in photosynthesis exhibits a wide range of time scales. Absorption and initial relaxation takes place over tens of femtoseconds. Excitonic lifetimes are on the order of a nanosecond. Hopping rates, energy differences between chromophores, reorganization energies, and decoherence rates correspond to time scales on the order of picoseconds. The functional nature of the divergence of time scales is easily understood: strong coupling to the electromagnetic field over a broad band of frequencies yields rapid absorption, while long excitonic lifetimes increase the amount of energy that makes its way to the reaction center to be converted to chemical energy. The convergence of the remaining time scales to the centerpoint of the overall temporal range is harder to understand. In this paper we argue that the convergence of timescales in photosynthesis can be understood as an example of the `quantum Goldilocks effect': natural selection tends to drive quantum systems to the degree of quantum coheren...

  3. Singularity free gravitational collapse in an effective dynamical quantum spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, R., E-mail: ramon.torres-herrera@upc.edu; Fayos, F., E-mail: f.fayos@upc.edu

    2014-06-02

    We model the gravitational collapse of heavy massive shells including its main quantum corrections. Among these corrections, quantum improvements coming from Quantum Einstein Gravity are taken into account, which provides us with an effective quantum spacetime. Likewise, we consider dynamical Hawking radiation by modeling its back-reaction once the horizons have been generated. Our results point towards a picture of gravitational collapse in which the collapsing shell reaches a minimum non-zero radius (whose value depends on the shell initial conditions) with its mass only slightly reduced. Then, there is always a rebound after which most (or all) of the mass evaporates in the form of Hawking radiation. Since the mass never concentrates in a single point, no singularity appears.

  4. Unconventional quantum Hall effect in Floquet topological insulators

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2016-07-27

    We study an unconventional quantum Hall effect for the surface states of ultrathin Floquet topological insulators in a perpendicular magnetic field. The resulting band structure is modified by photon dressing and the topological property is governed by the low-energy dynamics of a single surface. An exchange of symmetric and antisymmetric surface states occurs by reversing the lights polarization. We find a novel quantum Hall state in which the zeroth Landau level undergoes a phase transition from a trivial insulator state, with Hall conductivity αyx = 0 at zero Fermi energy, to a Hall insulator state with αyx = e2/2h. These findings open new possibilities for experimentally realizing nontrivial quantum states and unusual quantum Hall plateaus at (±1/2,±3/2,±5/2, ...)e2/h. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK.

  5. Unconventional quantum Hall effect in Floquet topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, M; Vasilopoulos, P; Schwingenschlögl, U

    2016-09-28

    We study an unconventional quantum Hall effect for the surface states of ultrathin Floquet topological insulators in a perpendicular magnetic field. The resulting band structure is modified by photon dressing and the topological property is governed by the low-energy dynamics of a single surface. An exchange of symmetric and antisymmetric surface states occurs by reversing the light's polarization. We find a novel quantum Hall state in which the zeroth Landau level undergoes a phase transition from a trivial insulator state, with Hall conductivity [Formula: see text] at zero Fermi energy, to a Hall insulator state with [Formula: see text]. These findings open new possibilities for experimentally realizing nontrivial quantum states and unusual quantum Hall plateaus at [Formula: see text].

  6. Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics: The effect of polydispersity

    KAUST Repository

    Zhitomirsky, David

    2012-02-08

    The size-effect tunability of colloidal quantum dots enables facile engineering of the bandgap at the time of nanoparticle synthesis. The dependence of effective bandgap on nanoparticle size also presents a challenge if the size dispersion, hence bandgap variability, is not well-controlled within a given quantum dot solid. The impact of this polydispersity is well-studied in luminescent devices as well as in unipolar electronic transport; however, the requirements on monodispersity have yet to be quantified in photovoltaics. Here we carry out a series of combined experimental and model-based studies aimed at clarifying, and quantifying, the importance of quantum dot monodispersity in photovoltaics. We successfully predict, using a simple model, the dependence of both open-circuit voltage and photoluminescence behavior on the density of small-bandgap (large-diameter) quantum dot inclusions. The model requires inclusion of trap states to explain the experimental data quantitatively. We then explore using this same experimentally tested model the implications of a broadened quantum dot population on device performance. We report that present-day colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic devices with typical inhomogeneous linewidths of 100-150 meV are dominated by surface traps, and it is for this reason that they see marginal benefit from reduction in polydispersity. Upon eliminating surface traps, achieving inhomogeneous broadening of 50 meV or less will lead to device performance that sees very little deleterious impact from polydispersity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Peltier effect in strongly driven quantum wires

    OpenAIRE

    Mierzejewski, M.; Crivelli, D.; Prelovsek, P.

    2013-01-01

    We study a microscopic model of a thermocouple device with two connected correlated quantum wires driven by a constant electric field. In such isolated system we follow the time-- and position--dependence of the entropy density using the concept of the reduced density matrix. At weak driving, the initial changes of the entropy at the junctions can be described by the linear Peltier response. At longer times the quasiequilibrium situation is reached with well defined local temperatures which i...

  8. 8 π -periodic dissipationless ac Josephson effect on a quantum spin Hall edge via a quantum magnetic impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Hoi-Yin; Sau, Jay D.

    2017-01-01

    Time-reversal invariance places strong constraints on the properties of the quantum spin Hall edge. One such restriction is the inevitability of dissipation in a Josephson junction between two superconductors formed on such an edge without the presence of interaction. Interactions and spin-conservation breaking are key ingredients for the realization of the dissipationless ac Josephson effect on such quantum spin Hall edges. We present a simple quantum impurity model that allows us to create a dissipationless fractional Josephson effect on a quantum spin Hall edge. We then use this model to substantiate a general argument that shows that any such nondissipative Josephson effect must necessarily be 8 π periodic.

  9. Thermal effects on quantum communication through spin chains

    CERN Document Server

    Bayat, A; Bayat, Abolfazl; Karimipour, Vahid

    2004-01-01

    We study the effect of thermal fluctuations in a recently proposed protocol for transmission of unknown quantum states through quantum spin chains. We develop a low temperature expansion for general spin chains. We then apply this formalism to study exactly thermal effects on short spin chains of four spins. We show that optimal times for extraction of output states are almost independent of the temperature which lowers only the fidelity of the channel. Moreover we show that thermal effects are smaller in the anti-ferromagnetic chains than the ferromagnetic ones.

  10. One-loop effective action in quantum gravitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rachwal, Leslaw; Codello, Alessandro; Percacci, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present the formalism of computing one-loop effective action for Quantum Gravitation using non-local heat kernel methods. We found agreement with previous old results. In main part of my presentation I considered the system of E-H gravitation and scalar fields. We were able to derive non......-local quantum effective action up to the second order in heat kernel generalized curvatures. By going to flat spacetime expressions for gravitational form factors are possible to construct and compare with the results from effective field theory for gravity....

  11. Unusual quantum confined Stark effect and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in semiconductor quantum rings with anisotropic effective masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, G. O.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, Andrey; Farias, G. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the energy spectrum of quantum rings made out of a bidimensional semiconductor material with anisotropic band structures are investigated within the effective-mass model. The interplay between the effective-mass anisotropy and the radial confinement leads to wave functions that are strongly localized at two diametrically opposite regions where the kinetic energy is lowest due to the highest effective mass. We show that this quantum phenomenon has clear consequences on the behavior of the energy states in the presence of applied in-plane electric fields and out-of-plane magnetic fields. In the former, the quantum confined Stark effect is observed with either linear or quadratic shifts, depending on the direction of the applied field. As for the latter, the usual Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are not observed for a circularly symmetric confining potential, however they can be reinstated if an elliptic ring with an appropriate aspect ratio is chosen.

  12. Quantum effects in graphene monolayers: Path-integral simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramírez, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    Path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations have been carried out to study the influence of quantum dynamics of carbon atoms on the properties of a single graphene layer. Finite-temperature properties were analyzed in the range from 12 to 2000 K, by using the LCBOPII effective potential. To assess the magnitude of quantum effects in structural and thermodynamic properties of graphene, classical molecular dynamics simulations have been also performed. Particular emphasis has been laid on the atomic vibrations along the out-of-plane direction. Even though quantum effects are present in these vibrational modes, we show that at any finite temperature classical-like motion dominates over quantum delocalization, provided that the system size is large enough. Vibrational modes display an appreciable anharmonicity, as derived from a comparison between kinetic and potential energies of the carbon atoms. Nuclear quantum effects are found to be appreciable in the interatomic distance and layer area at finite temperatures. The thermal expansion coefficient resulting from PIMD simulations vanishes in the zero-temperature limit, in agreement with the third law of thermodynamics.

  13. Interaction-Free Effects Between Distant Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonov, Yakir; Elitzur, Avshalom C; Smolin, Lee

    2016-01-01

    A gedankenexperiment is presented where an excited and a ground-state atom are positioned such that, within the former's half-life time, they exchange a photon with 50% probability. A measurement of their energy state will therefore indicate in 50% of the cases that no photon was exchanged. Yet other measurements would reveal that, by the mere possibility of exchange, the two atoms become entangled. Consequently, the "no exchange" result, apparently precluding entanglement, is non-locally established between the atoms by this very entanglement. When densely repeated several times, this result gives rise to the Quantum Zeno effect as well, again exerted between distant atoms without photon exchange. We discuss these experiments as variants of IFM, now generalized for both spatial and temporal uncertainties. We next employ weak measurements for a sharper and simpler elucidation of the paradox. Interpretational issues are discussed in the conclusion, and a resolution is offered within the Two-State Vector Formal...

  14. Focus on quantum effects and noise in biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, G. R.; Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B.

    2011-11-01

    The role of quantum mechanics in biological organisms has been a fundamental question of twentieth-century biology. It is only now, however, with modern experimental techniques, that it is possible to observe quantum mechanical effects in bio-molecular complexes directly. Indeed, recent experiments have provided evidence that quantum effects such as wave-like motion of excitonic energy flow, delocalization and entanglement can be seen even in complex and noisy biological environments (Engel et al 2007 Nature 446 782; Collini et al 2010 Nature 463 644; Panitchayangkoon et al 2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 12766). Motivated by these observations, theoretical work has highlighted the importance of an interplay between environmental noise and quantum coherence in such systems (Mohseni et al 2008 J. Chem. Phys. 129 174106; Plenio and Huelga 2008 New J. Phys. 10 113019; Olaya-Castro et al 2008 Phys. Rev. B 78 085115; Rebentrost et al 2009 New J. Phys. 11 033003; Caruso et al 2009 J. Chem. Phys. 131 105106; Ishizaki and Fleming 2009 J. Chem. Phys. 130 234111). All of this has led to a surge of interest in the exploration of quantum effects in biological systems in order to understand the possible relevance of non-trivial quantum features and to establish a potential link between quantum coherence and biological function. These studies include not only exciton transfer across light harvesting complexes, but also the avian compass (Ritz et al 2000 Biophys. J. 78 707), and the olfactory system (Turin 1996 Chem. Sens. 21 773; Chin et al 2010 New J. Phys. 12 065002). These examples show that the full understanding of the dynamics at bio-molecular length (10 Å) and timescales (sub picosecond) in noisy biological systems can uncover novel phenomena and concepts and hence present a fertile ground for truly multidisciplinary research.

  15. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y3Fe5O12) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  16. Quantum chromodynamics effects in electroweak and Higgs physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Frank Petriello

    2012-10-01

    Several examples of the often intricate effects of higher-order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) corrections on predictions for hadron-collider observables, are discussed, using the production of electroweak gauge boson and the Standard Model Higgs boson as examples. Particular attention is given to the interplay of QCD effects and experimental cuts, and to the use of scale variations as estimates of theoretical uncertainties.

  17. Quantum vacuum effects from boundaries of designer potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konopka, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Vacuum energy in quantum field theory, being the sum of zero-point energies of all field modes, is formally infinite but yet, after regularization or renormalization, can give rise to finite observable effects. One way of understanding how these effects arise is to compute the vacuum energy in an id

  18. Dynamical quantum Hall effect in the parameter space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsev, V; Polkovnikov, A

    2012-04-24

    Geometric phases in quantum mechanics play an extraordinary role in broadening our understanding of fundamental significance of geometry in nature. One of the best known examples is the Berry phase [M.V. Berry (1984), Proc. Royal. Soc. London A, 392:45], which naturally emerges in quantum adiabatic evolution. So far the applicability and measurements of the Berry phase were mostly limited to systems of weakly interacting quasi-particles, where interference experiments are feasible. Here we show how one can go beyond this limitation and observe the Berry curvature, and hence the Berry phase, in generic systems as a nonadiabatic response of physical observables to the rate of change of an external parameter. These results can be interpreted as a dynamical quantum Hall effect in a parameter space. The conventional quantum Hall effect is a particular example of the general relation if one views the electric field as a rate of change of the vector potential. We illustrate our findings by analyzing the response of interacting spin chains to a rotating magnetic field. We observe the quantization of this response, which we term the rotational quantum Hall effect.

  19. Quantum dust magnetosonic waves with spin and exchange correlation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroof, R.; Qamar, A. [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); Mushtaq, A. [Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan 23200 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2016-01-15

    Dust magnetosonic waves are studied in degenerate dusty plasmas with spin and exchange correlation effects. Using the fluid equations of magnetoplasma with quantum corrections due to the Bohm potential, temperature degeneracy, spin magnetization energy, and exchange correlation, a generalized dispersion relation is derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. The exchange-correlation potentials are used, based on the adiabatic local-density approximation, and can be described as a function of the electron density. For three different values of angle, the dispersion relation is reduced to three different modes under the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic assumptions. It is found that the effects of quantum corrections in the presence of dust concentration significantly modify the dispersive properties of these modes. The results are useful for understanding numerous collective phenomena in quantum plasmas, such as those in compact astrophysical objects (e.g., the cores of white dwarf stars and giant planets) and in plasma-assisted nanotechnology (e.g., quantum diodes, quantum free-electron lasers, etc.)

  20. THz Electro-absorption Effect in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil;

    2011-01-01

    In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electroabsorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by electric field of a THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth. Temporal features as fast as 460 fs were encoded onto an optical probe signal.......In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electroabsorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by electric field of a THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth. Temporal features as fast as 460 fs were encoded onto an optical probe signal....

  1. THz Electro-absorption Effect in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil

    2011-01-01

    In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electroabsorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by electric field of a THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth. Temporal features as fast as 460 fs were encoded onto an optical probe signal.......In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electroabsorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by electric field of a THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth. Temporal features as fast as 460 fs were encoded onto an optical probe signal....

  2. Proton Conductivity in Phosphoric Acid: The Role of Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heres, M.; Wang, Y.; Griffin, P. J.; Gainaru, C.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Phosphoric acid has one of the highest intrinsic proton conductivities of any known liquids, and the mechanism of this exceptional conductivity remains a puzzle. Our detailed experimental studies discovered a strong isotope effect in the conductivity of phosphoric acids caused by (i) a strong isotope shift of the glass transition temperature and (ii) a significant reduction of the energy barrier by zero-point quantum fluctuations. These results suggest that the high conductivity in phosphoric acids is caused by a very efficient proton transfer mechanism, which is strongly assisted by quantum effects.

  3. Oscillatory quantum interference effects in narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillianfeld, R. B.; Kallaher, R. L.; Heremans, J. J.; Chen, Hong; Goel, N.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.; Van Roy, W.; Borghs, G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate quantum interference phenomena in narrow bandgap semiconductors under strong spin-orbit interaction, by measuring the magnetoresistance across mesoscopic closed-path structures fabricated in two-dimensional electron systems. We discuss our results in terms of four quantum interference effects brought about by geometric phases acquired by the electron wave functions: the Aharonov-Bohm phase, the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect, the Berry's phase due to the evolution of the spin degree of freedom, and the Aharonov-Casher phase.

  4. Effective and fundamental quantum fields at criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Michael

    2010-10-28

    We employ Wetterich's approach to functional renormalization as a suitable method to investigate universal phenomena in non-perturbative quantum field theories both qualitatively and quantitatively. Therefore we derive and investigate flow equations for a class of chiral Yukawa models with and without gauge bosons and reveal fixed-point mechanisms. In four dimensions chiral Yukawa systems serve as toy models for the standard model Higgs sector and show signatures of asymptotically safe fixed points by a balancing of bosonic and fermionic contributions. In the approximations investigated this renders the theory fundamental and solves the triviality problem. Further, we obtain predictions for the Higgs mass and even for the top mass of our toy model. In three dimensions we compute the critical exponents which define new universality classes and provide benchmark values for systems of strongly correlated chiral fermions. In a Yukawa system of non-relativistic two-component fermions a fixed point dominates the renormalization flow giving rise to universality in the BCS-BEC crossover. We push the functional renormalization method to a quantitative level and we compute the critical temperature and the single-particle gap with a considerable precision for the whole crossover. Finally, we provide further evidence for the asymptotic safety scenario in quantum gravity by confirming the existence of an ultraviolet fixed point under inclusion of a curvature-ghost coupling. (orig.)

  5. Quantum gravity effects in Myers-Perry space-times

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    We study quantum gravity effects for Myers-Perry black holes assuming that the leading contributions arise from the renormalization group evolution of Newton's coupling. Provided that gravity weakens following the asymptotic safety conjecture, we find that quantum effects lift a degeneracy of higher-dimensional black holes, and dominate over kinematical ones induced by rotation, particularly for small black hole mass, large angular momentum, and higher space-time dimensionality. Quantum-corrected space-times display inner and outer horizons, and show the existence of a black hole of smallest mass in any dimension. Ultra-spinning solutions no longer persist. Thermodynamic properties including temperature, specific heat, the Komar integrals, and aspects of black hole mechanics are studied as well. Observing a softening of the ring singularity, we also discuss the validity of classical energy conditions.

  6. Pseudorelativistic effects on solitons in quantum semiconductor plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunliang; Wang, Xiaodan; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2015-04-01

    A theory for nonlinear excitations in quantum plasmas is presented for narrow-gap semiconductors by considering the combined effects of quantum and pseudorelativity. The system is governed by a coupled Klein-Gordon equation for the collective wave functions of the conduction electrons and Poisson's equation for the electrostatic potential. This gives a closed system, including the effects of charge separation, quantum tunneling, and pseudorelativity. By choosing the typical parameters of semiconductor InSb, the quasistationary soliton solution, which is a multipeaked dark soliton, is obtained numerically and shows depleted electron densities correlated with a localized potential. The dynamical simulation result shows that the dark soliton is stable and has a multipeaked profile, which is consistent with the quasistationary solution. The present model and results may be useful in understanding the nonlinear properties of semiconductor plasma on an ultrafast time scale.

  7. Pseudorelativistic effects on solitons in quantum semiconductor plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunliang; Wang, Xiaodan; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2015-04-01

    A theory for nonlinear excitations in quantum plasmas is presented for narrow-gap semiconductors by considering the combined effects of quantum and pseudorelativity. The system is governed by a coupled Klein-Gordon equation for the collective wave functions of the conduction electrons and Poisson's equation for the electrostatic potential. This gives a closed system, including the effects of charge separation, quantum tunneling, and pseudorelativity. By choosing the typical parameters of semiconductor InSb, the quasistationary soliton solution, which is a multipeaked dark soliton, is obtained numerically and shows depleted electron densities correlated with a localized potential. The dynamical simulation result shows that the dark soliton is stable and has a multipeaked profile, which is consistent with the quasistationary solution. The present model and results may be useful in understanding the nonlinear properties of semiconductor plasma on an ultrafast time scale.

  8. Random operators disorder effects on quantum spectra and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Aizenman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the mathematical theory of disorder effects on quantum spectra and dynamics. Topics covered range from the basic theory of spectra and dynamics of self-adjoint operators through Anderson localization-presented here via the fractional moment method, up to recent results on resonant delocalization. The subject's multifaceted presentation is organized into seventeen chapters, each focused on either a specific mathematical topic or on a demonstration of the theory's relevance to physics, e.g., its implications for the quantum Hall effect. The mathematical chapters include general relations of quantum spectra and dynamics, ergodicity and its implications, methods for establishing spectral and dynamical localization regimes, applications and properties of the Green function, its relation to the eigenfunction correlator, fractional moments of Herglotz-Pick functions, the phase diagram for tree graph operators, resonant delocalization, the spectral statistics conjecture, and rela...

  9. Quantum gravity effects in Myers-Perry space-times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litim, Daniel F.; Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex,Falmer Campus, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-03

    We study quantum gravity effects for Myers-Perry black holes assuming that the leading contributions arise from the renormalization group evolution of Newton’s coupling. Provided that gravity weakens following the asymptotic safety conjecture, we find that quantum effects lift a degeneracy of higher-dimensional black holes, and dominate over kinematical ones induced by rotation, particularly for small black hole mass, large angular momentum, and higher space-time dimensionality. Quantum-corrected space-times display inner and outer horizons, and show the existence of a black hole of smallest mass in any dimension. Ultra-spinning solutions no longer persist. Thermodynamic properties including temperature, specific heat, the Komar integrals, and aspects of black hole mechanics are studied as well. Observing a softening of the ring singularity, we also discuss the validity of classical energy conditions.

  10. Effects of reservoir squeezing on quantum systems and work extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X. L.; Wang, Tao; Yi, X. X.

    2012-11-01

    We establish a quantum Otto engine cycle in which the working substance contacts with squeezed reservoirs during the two quantum isochoric processes. We consider two working substances: (1) a qubit and (2) two coupled qubits. Due to the effects of squeezing, the working substance can be heated to a higher effective temperature, which leads to many interesting features different from the ordinary ones, such as (1) for the qubit as working substance, if we choose the squeezed parameters properly, the positive work can be exported even when THquantum fuel is more efficient than the classical one.

  11. High-temperature quantum kinetic effect in silicon nanosandwiches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagraev, N. T.; Grigoryev, V. Yu.; Klyachkin, L. E.; Malyarenko, A. M.; Mashkov, V. A.; Romanov, V. V.; Rul, N. I.

    2017-01-01

    The negative-U impurity stripes confining the edge channels of semiconductor quantum wells are shown to allow the effective cooling inside in the process of the spin-dependent transport, with the reduction of the electron-electron interaction. The aforesaid promotes also the creation of composite bosons and fermions by the capture of single magnetic flux quanta on the edge channels under the conditions of low sheet density of carriers, thus opening new opportunities for the registration of the quantum kinetic phenomena in weak magnetic fields at high-temperatures up to the room temperature. As a certain version noted above we present the first findings of the high temperature de Haas-van Alphen, 300 K, quantum Hall, 77 K, effects as well as quantum conductance staircase in the silicon sandwich structure that represents the ultra-narrow, 2 nm, p-type quantum well (Si-QW) confined by the delta barriers heavily doped with boron on the n-type Si (100) surface.

  12. Effects of quantum coherence in metalloprotein electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Ross; Goold, John; Heaney, Libby; Farrow, Tristan; Vedral, Vlatko

    2012-09-01

    Many intramolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in biology are mediated by metal centers in proteins. This process is commonly described by a model of diffusive hopping according to the semiclassical theories of Marcus and Hopfield. However, recent studies have raised the possibility that nontrivial quantum mechanical effects play a functioning role in certain biomolecular processes. Here, we investigate the potential effects of quantum coherence in biological ET by extending the semiclassical model to allow for the possibility of quantum coherent phenomena using a quantum master equation based on the Holstein Hamiltonian. We test the model on the structurally defined chain of seven iron-sulfur clusters in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide plus hydrogen:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I), a crucial respiratory enzyme and one of the longest chains of metal centers in biology. Using experimental parameters where possible, we find that, in limited circumstances, a small quantum mechanical contribution can provide a marked increase in the ET rate above the semiclassical diffusive-hopping rate. Under typical biological conditions, our model reduces to well-known diffusive behavior.

  13. The spin Hall effect in a quantum gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, M C; Williams, R A; Jiménez-García, K; LeBlanc, L J; Perry, A R; Spielman, I B

    2013-06-13

    Electronic properties such as current flow are generally independent of the electron's spin angular momentum, an internal degree of freedom possessed by quantum particles. The spin Hall effect, first proposed 40 years ago, is an unusual class of phenomena in which flowing particles experience orthogonally directed, spin-dependent forces--analogous to the conventional Lorentz force that gives the Hall effect, but opposite in sign for two spin states. Spin Hall effects have been observed for electrons flowing in spin-orbit-coupled materials such as GaAs and InGaAs (refs 2, 3) and for laser light traversing dielectric junctions. Here we observe the spin Hall effect in a quantum-degenerate Bose gas, and use the resulting spin-dependent Lorentz forces to realize a cold-atom spin transistor. By engineering a spatially inhomogeneous spin-orbit coupling field for our quantum gas, we explicitly introduce and measure the requisite spin-dependent Lorentz forces, finding them to be in excellent agreement with our calculations. This 'atomtronic' transistor behaves as a type of velocity-insensitive adiabatic spin selector, with potential application in devices such as magnetic or inertial sensors. In addition, such techniques for creating and measuring the spin Hall effect are clear prerequisites for engineering topological insulators and detecting their associated quantized spin Hall effects in quantum gases. As implemented, our system realizes a laser-actuated analogue to the archetypal semiconductor spintronic device, the Datta-Das spin transistor.

  14. The Quantum Spin Hall Effect: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konig, Markus; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W.; /Wurzburg U.; Hughes, Taylor L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Recently, a new class of topological insulators has been proposed. These topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the helical edge states give rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in the absence of any external magnetic field. Here we review a recent theory which predicts that the QSH state can be realized in HgTe/CdTe semiconductor quantum wells. By varying the thickness of the quantum well, the band structure changes from a normal to an 'inverted' type at a critical thickness d{sub c}. We present an analytical solution of the helical edge states and explicitly demonstrate their topological stability. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QSH state in HgTe/(Hg,Cd)Te quantum wells. We review both the fabrication of the sample and the experimental setup. For thin quantum wells with well width d{sub QW} < 6.3 nm, the insulating regime shows the conventional behavior of vanishingly small conductance at low temperature. However, for thicker quantum wells (d{sub QW} > 6.3 nm), the nominally insulating regime shows a plateau of residual conductance close to 2e{sup 2}/h. The residual conductance is independent of the sample width, indicating that it is caused by edge states. Furthermore, the residual conductance is destroyed by a small external magnetic field. The quantum phase transition at the critical thickness, d{sub c} = 6.3 nm, is also independently determined from the occurrence of a magnetic field induced insulator to metal transition.

  15. Anisotropic intrinsic spin Hall effect in quantum wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, A W; Akis, R; Ferry, D K

    2011-11-23

    We use numerical simulations to investigate the spin Hall effect in quantum wires in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. We find that the intrinsic spin Hall effect is highly anisotropic with respect to the orientation of the wire, and that the nature of this anisotropy depends strongly on the electron density and the relative strengths of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings. In particular, at low densities, when only one subband of the quantum wire is occupied, the spin Hall effect is strongest for electron momentum along the [N110] axis, which is the opposite of what is expected for the purely 2D case. In addition, when more than one subband is occupied, the strength and anisotropy of the spin Hall effect can vary greatly over relatively small changes in electron density, which makes it difficult to predict which wire orientation will maximize the strength of the spin Hall effect. These results help to illuminate the role of quantum confinement in spin-orbit-coupled systems, and can serve as a guide for future experimental work on the use of quantum wires for spin-Hall-based spintronic applications.

  16. Photonic analogue of quantum spin Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    He, Cheng; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yulin; Feng, Liang; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Symmetry-protected photonic topological insulator exhibiting robust pseudo-spin-dependent transportation, analogous to quantum spin Hall (QSH) phases and topological insulators, are of great importance in fundamental physics. Such transportation robustness is protected by time-reversal symmetry. Since electrons (fermion) and photons (boson) obey different statistics rules and associate with different time-reversal operators (i.e., Tf and Tb, respectively), whether photonic counterpart of Kramers degeneracy is topologically protected by bosonic Tb remains unidentified. Here, we construct the degenerate gapless edge states of two photonic pseudo-spins (left/right circular polarizations) in the band gap of a two-dimensional photonic crystal with strong magneto-electric coupling. We further demonstrated that the topological edge states are in fact protected by Tf rather than commonly believed Tb and their pseudo-spin dependent transportation is robust against Tf invariant impurities, discovering for the first tim...

  17. Quantum Effect in Mesoscopic Open Electron Resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zhan-Yuan; ZHANG Xiao-Hong; HAN Ying-Hui

    2008-01-01

    The open electron resonator is a mesoscopic device that has attracted considerable attention due to its remarkable behavior: conductance oscillations. In this paper, using an improved quantum theory to mesoscopic circuits developed recently by Li and Chen, the mesoscopic electron resonator is quantized based on the fundamental fact that the electric charge takes discrete value. With presentation transformation and unitary transformation, the Schrodinger equation becomes an standard Mathieu equation. Then, the detailed energy spectrum and wave functions in the system are obtained, which will be helpful to the observation of other characters of electron resonator. The average of currents and square of the current are calculated, the results show the existence of the current fluctuation, which causes the noise in the circuits, the influence of inductance to the noise is discussed. With the results achieved, the stability characters of mesoscopic electron resonator are studied firstly, these works would be benefit to the design and control of integrate circuit.

  18. Observational Selection Effects in Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Page, Don N

    2007-01-01

    Scientific theories need to be testable by observations, say using Bayes' theorem. A complete theory needs at least the three parts of dynamical laws for specified physical variables, the correct solution of the dynamical laws (boundary conditions), and the connection with observations or experience or conscious perceptions (laws of psycho-physical parallelism). Principles are proposed for Bayesian meta-theories. One framework that obeys these principles is Sensible Quantum Mechanics (SQM), which is discussed. In principle, it allows one to test between single-history and many-worlds theories, and to discuss threats to certain theories from fake universes and Boltzmann brains. The threat of fake universes may be dismissed if one doubts the substrate-independence of consciousness, which seems very implausible in the SQM framework. Boltzmann brains seem more problematic, though there are many conceivable solutions. SQM also suggests the possibility that past steps along our evolutionary ancestry may be so rare ...

  19. Emergence of integer quantum Hall effect from chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Chushun; Wang, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytic microscopic theory showing that in a large class of spin-$\\frac{1}{2}$ quasiperiodic quantum kicked rotors, a dynamical analog of the integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) emerges from an intrinsic chaotic structure. Specifically, the inverse of the Planck's quantum ($h_e$) and the rotor's energy growth rate mimic the `filling fraction' and the `longitudinal conductivity' in conventional IQHE, respectively, and a hidden quantum number is found to mimic the `quantized Hall conductivity'. We show that for an infinite discrete set of critical values of $h_e$, the long-time energy growth rate is universal and of order of unity (`metallic' phase), but otherwise vanishes (`insulating' phase). Moreover, the rotor insulating phases are topological, each of which is characterized by a hidden quantum number. This number exhibits universal behavior for small $h_e$, i.e., it jumps by unity whenever $h_e$ decreases, passing through each critical value. This intriguing phenomenon is not triggered by the...

  20. Metastable States of Josepshon Vortices: Thermal Processes and Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallraff, A.; Kemp, A.; Koval, Yu.; Ustinov, A. V.; Fistul, M. V.

    2001-03-01

    We experimentally study the dynamics of a single Josephson vortex in a tilted periodic potential. In the presence of a bias current applied uniformly to a long Josephson junction, metastable vortex-states are induced by the interaction of the vortex with an artificially formed inhomogeneity in the junction, or by shaping the junction subject to a small external magnetic field [1]. At high temperatures, we observe the thermal escape of the vortex out of the metastable state. As temperature and damping is reduced, the macroscopic quantum properties of Josephson vortices, such as energy level quantization and quantum tunneling, are expected to manifest themselves [2,3]. We report on our current experimental work to observe these effects. Our interest in this macroscopic quantum system is related to the possibility of using quantum states of Josephson vortices for performing quantum computation. We have suggested that a vortex trapped in a double-well potential in a narrow long junction can be used as a scalable and well-controllable qubit [1]. [1] A. Wallraff et al. , J. Low Temp. Phys. J. Low Temp. Phys. 188, 543 (2000). [2] T. Kato and M. Imada, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 65, 2963 (1996). [3] A. Shnirman, E. Ben-Jacob, and B. Malomed, Phys. Rev. B 56, 14677 (1997).

  1. Quantum Effect in the Mesoscopic RLC Circuits with a Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Xin; YAN Zhan-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The research work on the quantum effects in mesoscopic circuits has undergone a rapid development recently, however the whole quantum theory of the mesoscopic circuits should consider the discreteness of the electric charge. In this paper, based on the fundamental fact that the electric charge takes discrete values, the finite-difference Schrodinger equation of.the mesoscopic RLC circuit with a source is achieved. With a unitary transformation, the Schrodinger equation becomes the standard Mathieu equation, then the energy spectrum and the wave functions of the system are obtained. Using the WKBJ method, the average of currents and square of the current are calculated. The results show the existence of the current fluctuation, which causes noise in the circuits. This paper is an application of the whole quantum mesoscopic circuits theory to the fundamental circuits, and the results will shed light on the design of the miniation circuits, especially on the purpose of reducing quantum noise coherent controlling of the mesoscopic quantum states.

  2. Effect of structural disorder on quantum oscillations in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, B. C., E-mail: b.c-camargo@yahoo.com.br; Kopelevich, Y. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Usher, A.; Hubbard, S. B. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-18

    We have studied the effect of structural disorder on the de Haas van Alphen and Shubnikov de Haas quantum oscillations measured in natural, Kish, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples at temperatures down to 30 mK and at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The measurements were performed on different samples characterized by means of x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy techniques. Our results reveal a correlation between the amplitude of quantum oscillations and the sample surface roughness.

  3. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  4. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  5. Effective photon mass and exact translating quantum relativistic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Fernando; Manrique, Marcos Antonio Albarracin

    2016-04-01

    Using a variation of the celebrated Volkov solution, the Klein-Gordon equation for a charged particle is reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations, exactly solvable in specific cases. The new quantum relativistic structures can reveal a localization in the radial direction perpendicular to the wave packet propagation, thanks to a non-vanishing scalar potential. The external electromagnetic field, the particle current density, and the charge density are determined. The stability analysis of the solutions is performed by means of numerical simulations. The results are useful for the description of a charged quantum test particle in the relativistic regime, provided spin effects are not decisive.

  6. The Quantum Hall Effect in Supersymmetric Chern-Simons Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, David

    2015-01-01

    In d=2+1 dimensions, there exist gauge theories which are supersymmetric but non-relativistic. We solve the simplest U(1) gauge theory in this class and show that the low-energy physics is that of the fractional quantum Hall effect, with ground states given by the Laughlin wavefunctions. We do this by quantising the vortices and relating them to the quantum Hall matrix model. We further construct coherent state representations of the excitations of vortices. These are quasi-holes. By an explicit computation of the Berry phase, without resorting to a plasma analogy, we show that these excitations have fractional charge and spin.

  7. Kondo effect for electron transport through an artificial quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Ke-Wei; Xiong Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    We have calculated the transport properties of electron through an artificial quantum dot by using the numerical renormalization group technique in this paper.We obtain the conductance for the system of a quantum dot which is embedded in a one-dimensional chain in zero and finite temperature cases.The external magnetic field gives rise to a negative magnetoconductance in the zero temperature case.It increases as the external magnetic field increases.We obtain the relation between the coupling coefficient and conductance.If the interaction is big enough to prevent conduction electrons from tunnelling through the dot,the dispersion effect is dominant in this case.In the Kondo temperature regime,we obtain the conductivity of a quantum dot system with Kondo correlation.

  8. A tunable colloidal quantum dot photo field-effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Subir

    2011-01-01

    We fabricate and investigate field-effect transistors in which a light-absorbing photogate modulates the flow of current along the channel. The photogate consists of colloidal quantum dots that efficiently transfer photoelectrons to the channel across a charge-separating (type-II) heterointerface, producing a primary and sustained secondary flow that is terminated via electron back-recombination across the interface. We explore colloidal quantum dot sizes corresponding to bandgaps ranging from 730 to 1475 nm and also investigate various stoichiometries of aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) channel materials. We investigate the role of trap state energies in both the colloidal quantum dot energy film and the AZO channel. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic insulator heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Jing; Felser, Claudia; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-03-11

    On the basis of ab initio calculations, we predict that a monolayer of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 and GdI2 heterostructure is a quantum anomalous Hall insulator with a nontrivial band gap up to 38 meV. The principle behind our prediction is that the band inversion between two topologically trivial ferromagnetic insulators can result in a nonzero Chern number, which offers a better way to realize the quantum anomalous Hall state without random magnetic doping. In addition, a simple effective model is presented to describe the basic mechanism of spin polarized band inversion in this system. Moreover, we predict that 3D quantum anomalous Hall insulator could be realized in (Bi2/3Cr1/3)2Te3 /GdI2 superlattice.

  10. The Temperature Effects on the Ion Trap Quantum Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongmin; JiatiLIN

    2001-01-01

    We consider one source of decoherence for a quantum computer composed of many trapped ions due to the thermal effects of the system in the presence of laser-ion interaction.The upper limit of the temperature at which the logical gate operations could be carried out reliably is given,and our result is agreement with the experiment.

  11. THz Electro-absorption Effect in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.;

    2011-01-01

    In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electro-absorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by the electric field of a single-cycle THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth and with free-space peak electric field reaching 220 kV/cm. The transient modulation of QD...

  12. Towards a quantum Hall effect for atoms using electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ericsson, M; Ericsson, Marie; Sjoqvist, Erik

    2002-01-01

    An atomic analogue of Landau quantization based on the Aharonov-Casher (AC) interaction is developed. The effect provides a first step towards an atomic quantum Hall system using electric fields, which may be realized in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

  13. Effects of spin-orbit coupling on quantum transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardarson, Jens Hjorleifur

    2008-01-01

    The effect of spin-orbit coupling on various quantum transport phenomena is considered. The main topics discussed are: * How spin-orbit coupling can induce shot noise through trajectory splitting. * How spin-orbit coupling can degrade electron-hole entanglement (created by a tunnel barrier) by mo

  14. Effective action for a quantum scalar field in warped spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff da Silva, J.M.; Mendonca, E.L.; Scatena, E. [Universidade Estadual Paulista ' ' Julio de Mesquita Filho' ' -UNESP, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    We investigate the one-loop corrections, at zero as well as finite temperature, of a scalar field taking place in a braneworld motivated warped background. After to reach a well-defined problem, we calculate the effective action with the corresponding quantum corrections to each case. (orig.)

  15. Growth mechanism and quantum confinement effect of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯孙齐; 俞大鹏; 张洪洲; 白志刚; 丁彧; 杭青岭; 邹英华; 王晶晶

    1999-01-01

    The methods for synthesizing one-dimensional Si nanowires with controlled diameter are introduced. The mechanism for the growth of Si nanowires and the growth model for different morphologies of Si nanowires are described, and the quantum confinement effect of the Si nanowires is presented.

  16. Effect of magnetic field on an electronic structure and intraband quantum transitions in multishell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holovatsky, V. A.; Voitsekhivska, O. M.; Yakhnevych, M. Ya.

    2017-09-01

    The electron energy spectrum and wave functions in multishell spherical quantum dot, consisting of core and two spherical shells - potential wells separated by thin potential barriers, are obtained in the framework of the effective mass approximation and single band model. The investigations are performed within the matrix method for the nanostructure driven by magnetic field using the complete set of wave functions obtained without the magnetic field. The electron dipole momentum and oscillator strengths of intraband quantum transitions as functions of the magnetic field induction are numerically calculated. In order to increase the sensibility to magnetic field, the geometric parameters of the shells are chosen in such a way that the electron in the ground state is to be located in outer spherical well, but when the magnetic field induction becomes bigger, it moves into the core. It is shown that size of the middle potential well causes the smooth change of the electron location due to the effect of magnetic field, what is displayed on optical properties of nanostructure. The calculations are performed for multishell quantum dot CdSe/ZnS/CdSe/ZnS/CdSe.

  17. Composite particle and field theory in atomic quantum Hall effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Bo; Chen Zeng-Bing

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the composite particle description of the atomic quantum Hall (QH) effect. We further give the Chern-Simon-Gross-Pitaevskii (CSGP) effective theory for the atomic Hall liquid, which is the counterpart of Chern-Simon theory in electron Hall effect. What we obtained is equivalent to the Laughlin wavefunction approach.Our results show that in terms of composite particles, the atomic Hall effect is really the same as the electronic QH effect. The CSGP effective theory would shed new light on the atomic QH effect.

  18. Photodynamic antibacterial effect of graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Biljana Z; Milenkovic, Marina M; Dakic, Ivana R; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana M; Milosavljevic, Momir S; Budimir, Milica D; Paunovic, Verica G; Dramicanin, Miroslav D; Markovic, Zoran M; Trajkovic, Vladimir S

    2014-05-01

    Synthesis of new antibacterial agents is becoming increasingly important in light of the emerging antibiotic resistance. In the present study we report that electrochemically produced graphene quantum dots (GQD), a new class of carbon nanoparticles, generate reactive oxygen species when photoexcited (470 nm, 1 W), and kill two strains of pathogenic bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Bacterial killing was demonstrated by the reduction in number of bacterial colonies in a standard plate count method, the increase in propidium iodide uptake confirming the cell membrane damage, as well as by morphological defects visualized by atomic force microscopy. The induction of oxidative stress in bacteria exposed to photoexcited GQD was confirmed by staining with a redox-sensitive fluorochrome dihydrorhodamine 123. Neither GQD nor light exposure alone were able to cause oxidative stress and reduce the viability of bacteria. Importantly, mouse spleen cells were markedly less sensitive in the same experimental conditions, thus indicating a fairly selective antibacterial photodynamic action of GQD.

  19. Effect of quantum therapy on pork quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin BODNAR; Jozef NAGY; Peter POPELKA; Beáta KOR(E)NEKOV(A); Ján MACANGA; Alena NAGYOVA

    2011-01-01

    In this study the impact of quantum therapy on meat quality of slaughtered pigs was investigated.For this purpose the pigs were treated with different doses of magnet-infrared-laser (MIL) radiation.Animals were divided into four groups according to radiation doses (4096,512,and 64 Hz,and control without application),which were applied in the lumbar area of musculus /ongissimus dorsi (loin) at various time intervals prior to the slaughter (14 d,24 h,and 1 h).Animals were slaughtered and the meat quality was evaluated by determining of pH value (1,3,and 24 h post slaughter),drip loss,colour,and lactic acid and phosphoric acid amounts.MIL therapy can be used in various fields of veterinary medicine as are surgery and orthopaedics,internal medicine,dentistry,pulmonology,gastroenterology,gynaecology,urology,nephrology,and dermatology.The results achieved showed that MIL radiation used in a short period before slaughter (1 h) can cause a change in the meat quality,as reflected by the non-standard development of pH values,increases in drip loss,and changes of meat colour.

  20. Transport of quantum excitations coupled to spatially extended nonlinear many-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iubini, Stefano; Boada, Octavi; Omar, Yasser; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The role of noise in the transport properties of quantum excitations is a topic of great importance in many fields, from organic semiconductors for technological applications to light-harvesting complexes in photosynthesis. In this paper we study a semi-classical model where a tight-binding Hamiltonian is fully coupled to an underlying spatially extended nonlinear chain of atoms. We show that the transport properties of a quantum excitation are subtly modulated by (i) the specific type (local versus non-local) of exciton-phonon coupling and by (ii) nonlinear effects of the underlying lattice. We report a non-monotonic dependence of the exciton diffusion coefficient on temperature, in agreement with earlier predictions, as a direct consequence of the lattice-induced fluctuations in the hopping rates due to long-wavelength vibrational modes. A standard measure of transport efficiency confirms that both nonlinearity in the underlying lattice and off-diagonal exciton-phonon coupling promote transport efficiency at high temperatures, preventing the Zeno-like quench observed in other models lacking an explicit noise-providing dynamical system.

  1. Perspectives in Quantum Hall Effects Novel Quantum Liquids in Low-Dimensional Semiconductor Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sarma, Sankar Das

    1996-01-01

    The discovery of the quantized and fractional Quantum Hall Effect phenomena is among the most important physics findings in the latter half of this century. The precise quantization of the electrical resistance involved in the quantized Hall effect phenomena has led to the new definition of the resistance standard and has metrologically affected all of science and technology. This resource consists of contributions from the top researchers in the field who present recent experimental and theoretical developments. Each chapter is self-contained and includes its own set of references guiding rea

  2. Quantum spin Hall effect in α -Sn /CdTe(001 ) quantum-well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küfner, Sebastian; Matthes, Lars; Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    The electronic and topological properties of heterovalent and heterocrystalline α -Sn/CdTe(001) quantum wells (QWs) are studied in dependence on the thickness of α -Sn by means of ab initio calculations. We calculate the topological Z2 invariants of the respective bulk crystals, which identify α -Sn as strong three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs), whereas CdTe is a trivial insulator. We predict the existence of two-dimensional (2D) topological interface states between both materials and show that a topological phase transition from a trivial insulating phase into the quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase in the QW structures occurs at much higher thicknesses than in the HgTe case. The QSH effect is characterized by the localization, dispersion, and spin polarization of the topological interface states. We address the distinction of the 3D and 2D TI characters of the studied QW structures, which is inevitable for an understanding of the underlying quantum state of matter. The 3D TI nature is characterized by two-dimensional topological interface states, while the 2D phase exhibits one-dimensional edge states. The two different state characteristics are often intermixed in the discussion of the topology of 2D QW structures, especially, the comparison of ab initio calculations and experimental transport studies.

  3. Effects of anisotropy and Coulomb interactions on quantum transport in a quadruple quantum-dot structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, M. Yu.; Val'kov, V. V.; Aksenov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical investigation of the spectral and transport properties of a quadruple quantum-dot (QQD) structure which is one of the popular low-dimensional systems in the context of fundamental quantum physics study, future electronic applications, and quantum calculations. The density of states, occupation numbers, and conductance of the structure were analyzed using the nonequilibrium Green's functions in the tight-binding approach and the equation-of-motion method. In particular the anisotropy of hopping integrals and on-site electron energies as well as the effects of the finite intra- and interdot Coulomb interactions were investigated. It was found out that the anisotropy of the kinetic processes in the system leads to the Fano-Feshbach asymmetrical peak. We demonstrated that the conductance of the QQD device has a wide insulating band with steep edges separating triple-peak structures if the intradot Coulomb interactions are taken into account. The interdot Coulomb correlations between the central QDs result in the broadening of this band and the occurrence of an additional band with low conductance due to the Fano antiresonances. It was shown that in this case the conductance of the anisotropic QQD device can be dramatically changed by tuning the anisotropy of on-site electron energies.

  4. Polaronic Effects of an Exciton in a Cylindrical Quantum Wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui-Qiang; XIE Hong-Jing; GUO Kang-Xian; YU You-Bin; DENG Yong-Qing

    2005-01-01

    The effects of exciton-optical phonon interaction on the binding energy and the total and reduced effective masses of an exciton in a cylindrical quantum wire have been investigated. We adopt a perturbative-PLL [T.D. Lee,F. Low, and D. Pines, Phys. Rev. B90 (1953) 297] technique to construct an effective Hamiltonian and then use a variational solution to deal with the exciton-phonon system. The interactions of exciton with the longitudinal-optical phonon and the surface-optical phonon have been taken into consideration. The numerical calculations for GaAs show that the influences of phonon modes on the exciton in a quasi-one-dimensional quantum wire are considerable and should not be neglected. Moreover the numerical results for heavy- and light-hole exciton are obtained, which show that the polaronic effects on two types of excitons are very different but both depend heavily on the sizes of the wire.

  5. Super quantum measures on effect algebras with the Riesz decomposition properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yongjian, E-mail: yjxie@snnu.edu.cn; Ren, Fang [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Yang, Aili [College of Science, Xi’an University of Science and Technology, Xi’an 710054 (China)

    2015-10-15

    We give one basis of the space of super quantum measures on finite effect algebras with the Riesz decomposition properties (RDP for short). Then we prove that the super quantum measures and quantum interference functions on finite effect algebras with the RDP are determined each other. At last, we investigate the relationships between the super quantum measures and the diagonally positive signed measures on finite effect algebras with the RDP in detail.

  6. Quantum mechanical effects of topological origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    Following a brief review of the original Casimir and Aharonov-Bohm effects, some other effects of similar natures are mentioned. A Casimir interaction between AB fluxes is presented. Possible realizations of the Casimir effects for massive charged fields in solid state structures and a new AB effect for photons are suggested.

  7. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, A. J.; Lim, J. S.; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S.; Katine, J. A.; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior.

  8. Spin analogs of superconductivity and integer quantum Hall effect in an array of spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by the successful idea of using weakly coupled quantum electronic wires to realize the quantum Hall effects and the quantum spin Hall effects, we theoretically study two systems composed of weakly coupled quantum spin chains within the mean-field approximations, which can exhibit spin analogs of superconductivity and the integer quantum Hall effect. First, a certain bilayer of two arrays of interacting spin chains is mapped, via the Jordan-Wigner transformation, to an attractive Hubbard model that exhibits fermionic superconductivity, which corresponds to spin superconductivity in the original spin Hamiltonian. Secondly, an array of spin-orbit-coupled spin chains in the presence of a suitable external magnetic field is transformed to an array of quantum wires that exhibits the integer quantum Hall effect, which translates into its spin analog in the spin Hamiltonian. The resultant spin superconductivity and spin integer quantum Hall effect can be characterized by their ability to transport spin without any resistance.

  9. EDITORIAL: CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2010-09-01

    Although time-dependent quantum systems have been studied since the very beginning of quantum mechanics, they continue to attract the attention of many researchers, and almost every decade new important discoveries or new fields of application are made. Among the impressive results or by-products of these studies, one should note the discovery of the path integral method in the 1940s, coherent and squeezed states in the 1960-70s, quantum tunneling in Josephson contacts and SQUIDs in the 1960s, the theory of time-dependent quantum invariants in the 1960-70s, different forms of quantum master equations in the 1960-70s, the Zeno effect in the 1970s, the concept of geometric phase in the 1980s, decoherence of macroscopic superpositions in the 1980s, quantum non-demolition measurements in the 1980s, dynamics of particles in quantum traps and cavity QED in the 1980-90s, and time-dependent processes in mesoscopic quantum devices in the 1990s. All these topics continue to be the subject of many publications. Now we are witnessing a new wave of interest in quantum non-stationary systems in different areas, from cosmology (the very first moments of the Universe) and quantum field theory (particle pair creation in ultra-strong fields) to elementary particle physics (neutrino oscillations). A rapid increase in the number of theoretical and experimental works on time-dependent phenomena is also observed in quantum optics, quantum information theory and condensed matter physics. Time-dependent tunneling and time-dependent transport in nano-structures are examples of such phenomena. Another emerging direction of study, stimulated by impressive progress in experimental techniques, is related to attempts to observe the quantum behavior of macroscopic objects, such as mirrors interacting with quantum fields in nano-resonators. Quantum effects manifest themselves in the dynamics of nano-electromechanical systems; they are dominant in the quite new and very promising field of circuit

  10. The Unruh effect interpreted as a quantum noise channel

    CERN Document Server

    Omkar, S; Srikanth, R; Alok, Ashutosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We derive the operator-sum representation for the noise channel that acts on a mode of a free Dirac field, as seen by a relativistically accelerated observer. A modal qubit thus appears as if subjected to quantum noise that degrades quantum information, as observed in the accelerated reference frame. We compare and contrast this noise channel, which arises from the Unruh effect, from a conventional noise due to environmental decoherence. We show that the Unruh channel produces an amplitude damping like effect, associated with zero temperature, even though the Unruh effect is associated with a non-zero temperature. Asymptotically, the Bloch sphere subjected to the channel does not converge to a point, as would be expected by fluctuation-dissipation arguments, but contracts by a finite factor. We note that turning off the drive that generates the acceleration corresponds to a non-completely-positive (NCP) map.

  11. High-order Primordial Perturbations with Quantum Gravitational Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Tao; Kirsten, Klaus; Cleaver, Gerald; Sheng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a systematic investigation of high-order primordial perturbations with nonlinear dispersion relations due to quantum gravitational effects in the framework of {\\em uniform asymptotic approximations}. Because of these effects, the equation of motion of the mode function in general has multiple-turning points. After obtaining analytically approximated solutions in different regions, associated with different types of turning points, to any order, we match them to the third one. To this order the errors are less than $0.15\\%$. General expressions of the power spectra of the primordial tensor and scalar perturbations are derived explicitly. We also investigate effects of back-reactions of the quantum gravitational corrections, and make sure that inflation lasts long enough in order to solve underlying problems, such as flatness, horizon and monopole. Various features of the spectra that are observationally relevant are investigated. In particular, under a moderate assumption about the en...

  12. Memory effects in attenuation and amplification quantum processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Mancini, Stefano

    2010-09-01

    With increasing communication rates via quantum channels, memory effects become unavoidable whenever the use rate of the channel is comparable to the typical relaxation time of the channel environment. We introduce a model of a bosonic memory channel, describing correlated noise effects in quantum-optical processes via attenuating or amplifying media. To study such a channel model, we make use of a proper set of collective field variables, which allows us to unravel the memory effects, mapping the n-fold concatenation of the memory channel to a unitarily equivalent, direct product of n single-mode bosonic channels. We hence estimate the channel capacities by relying on known results for the memoryless setting. Our findings show that the model is characterized by two different regimes, in which the cross correlations induced by the noise among different channel uses are either exponentially enhanced or exponentially reduced.

  13. Memory effects in attenuation and amplification quantum processes

    CERN Document Server

    Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    With increasing communication rates via quantum channels, memory effects become unavoidable whenever the use rate of the channel is comparable with the typical relaxation time of the channel environment. We then introduce a model of bosonic memory channel, describing correlated noise effects in quantum optical processes via attenuating or amplifying media. To study such a channel model we make use of a proper set of collective field variables, which allows us to unravel the memory effects, mapping the n-fold concatenation of the memory channel to a, unitarily equivalent, direct product of n single-mode bosonic channels. We hence estimate the channel capacities by relying on known results for the memoryless setting. Our findings show that the model is characterized by two different regimes, in which the cross-correlations induced by the noise among different channel uses are either exponentially enhanced or exponentially reduced.

  14. Quantum Gravity Effects On Charged Micro Black Holes Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasvandi, N; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdullah, W A T Wan

    2016-01-01

    The charged black hole thermodynamics is corrected in terms of the quantum gravity effects. Most of the quantum gravity theories support the idea that near the Planck scale, the standard Heisenberg uncertainty principle should be reformulated by the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) which provides a perturbation framework to perform required modifications of the black hole quantities. In this paper, we consider the effects of the minimal length and maximal momentum as GUP type I and the minimal length, minimal momentum, and maximal momentum as GUP type II on thermodynamics of the charged TeV-scale black holes. We also generalized our study to the universe with the extra dimensions based on the ADD model. In this framework, the effect of the electrical charge on thermodynamics of the black hole and existence of the charged black hole remnants as a potential candidate for the dark matter particles are discussed.

  15. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  16. Field-effect transistor self-electrooptic effect device integrated photodiode, quantum well modulator and transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.A.B.; Feuer, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Shunk, S.C.; Henry, J.E.; Burrows, D.J.; Chemla, D.S.

    1989-03-01

    The authors propose and demonstrate the integration of a photodiode, a quantum-confined Stark effect quantum well optical modulator and a metal-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MESFET), to make a field-effect transistor self-electrooptic effect device. This integration allows optical inputs and outputs on the surface of a GaAs-integrated circuit chip, compatible with standard MESFET processing. As an illustration of feasibility, the authors demonstrate optical signal amplification with a single MESFET.

  17. Quantum electrodynamic effects in finite space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobiasch, P.; Walther, H.

    The modifications of various quantum properties due to a discrete structure of the modes of the vacuum electromagnetic field are discussed. In contrast to the usual case of a continuous spectrum of the free space fluctuations, we consider physical systems in a resonator or in a wave guide. It is shown that the relaxation time of the system can be increased ot decreased, by increasing or decreasing the density of modes with respect to the case of unperturbed vacuum. On the other hand, we predict level shifts due to the reduced mass of the electron and deviations from the Lambshift for hydrogen in a wave guide, which can be detected with the presently feasible high resolution spectroscopy. We propose an experimental set-up. Nous discutons les modifications de diverses propriétés quantiques sous l'influence d'une structure de modes discrets du champ électromagnétique dans le vide. En comparaison du cas habituel d'un spectre continu des fluctuations du vide dans l'espace libre, nous considérons ici des systèmes physiques dans un résonateur ou un guide d'ondes. Il est démontré que le temps de relaxation du système peut être prolongé ou raccourci, ceci en augmentant ou diminuant la densité des modes par rapport à sa valeur dans le vide non-perturbé. D'autre part, nous prédisons des déplacements de niveau dus à la masse réduite de l'électron et des déviations du Lamb shift pour des atomes d'hydrogène dans un guide d'ondes, qui peuvent être détectées grâce à la haute résolution accessible actuellement en spectroscopie. Nous présentons un dispositif expérimental.

  18. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: effective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Montoya, Edison

    2017-03-01

    We study solutions to the effective equations for the Bianchi IX class of spacetimes within loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We consider Bianchi IX models whose matter content is a massless scalar field, by numerically solving the loop quantum cosmology effective equations, with and without inverse triad corrections. The solutions are classified using certain geometrically motivated classical observables. We show that both effective theories—with lapse N  =  V and N  =  1—resolve the big bang singularity and reproduce the classical dynamics far from the bounce. Moreover, due to the positive spatial curvature, there is an infinite number of bounces and recollapses. We study the limit of large field momentum and show that both effective theories reproduce the same dynamics, thus recovering general relativity. We implement a procedure to identify amongst the Bianchi IX solutions, those that behave like k  =  0,1 FLRW as well as Bianchi I, II, and VII0 models. The effective solutions exhibit Bianchi I phases with Bianchi II transitions and also Bianchi VII0 phases, which had not been studied before. We comment on the possible implications of these results for a quantum modification to the classical BKL behaviour.

  19. Electromagnetically induced classical and quantum Lau effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Deqin

    2016-07-01

    We present two schemes of Lau effect for an object, an electromagnetically induced grating generated based on the electromagnetically induced effect. The Lau interference pattern is detected either directly in the way of the traditional Lau effect measurement with a classical thermal light being the imaging light, or indirectly and nonlocally in the way of two-photon coincidence measurement with a pair of entangled photons being the imaging light.

  20. Secular effects on inflation from one-loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrer, J. A.; Espriu, D.

    2008-06-01

    In this Letter we revisit and extend a previous analysis where the possible relevance of quantum gravity effects in a cosmological setup was studied. The object of interest are non-local (logarithmic) terms generated in the effective action of gravity due to the exchange in loops of massless modes (such as photons or the gravitons themselves). We correct one mistake existing in the previous work and discuss the issue in a more general setting in different cosmological scenarios. We obtain the one-loop quantum-corrected evolution equations for the cosmological scale factor up to a given order in a derivative expansion in two particular cases: a matter dominated universe with vanishing cosmological constant, and in a de Sitter universe. We show that the quantum corrections, albeit tiny, may have a secular effect that eventually modifies the expansion rate. For a de Sitter universe they tend to slow down the rate of the expansion, while the effect may be the opposite in a matter dominated universe.

  1. Electron interaction and spin effects in quantum wires, quantum dots and quantum point contacts: a first-principles mean-field approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zozoulenko, I V; Ihnatsenka, S [Solid State Electronics, Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Linkoeping University, 60174 Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2008-04-23

    We have developed a mean-field first-principles approach for studying electronic and transport properties of low dimensional lateral structures in the integer quantum Hall regime. The electron interactions and spin effects are included within the spin density functional theory in the local density approximation where the conductance, the density, the effective potentials and the band structure are calculated on the basis of the Green's function technique. In this paper we present a systematic review of the major results obtained on the energetics, spin polarization, effective g factor, magnetosubband and edge state structure of split-gate and cleaved-edge overgrown quantum wires as well as on the conductance of quantum point contacts (QPCs) and open quantum dots. In particular, we discuss how the spin-resolved subband structure, the current densities, the confining potentials, as well as the spin polarization of the electron and current densities in quantum wires and antidots evolve when an applied magnetic field varies. We also discuss the role of the electron interaction and spin effects in the conductance of open systems focusing our attention on the 0.7 conductance anomaly in the QPCs. Special emphasis is given to the effect of the electron interaction on the conductance oscillations and their statistics in open quantum dots as well as to interpretation of the related experiments on the ultralow temperature saturation of the coherence time in open dots.

  2. Noise spectrum of quantum transport through double quantum dots: Renormalization and non-Markovian effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengqin Shi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the time-nonlocal particle number-resolved master equation, we investigate the sequential electron transport through the interacting double quantum dots. Our calculations show that there exists the effect of energy renormalization in the dispersion of the bath interaction spectrum and it is sensitive to the the bandwidth of the bath. This effect would strongly affect the stationary current and its zero-frequency shot noise for weak inter-dot coherent coupling strength, but for strong inter-dot coupling regime, it is negligible due to the strong intrinsic Rabi coherent dynamics. Moreover, the possible observable effects of the energy renormalization in the noise spectrum are also investigated through the Rabi coherence signal. Finally, the non-Markovian effect is manifested in the finite-frequency noise spectrum with the appearance of quasisteps, and the magnitude of these quasisteps are modified by the dispersion function.

  3. Noise spectrum of quantum transport through double quantum dots: Renormalization and non-Markovian effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pengqin; Hu, Menghan; Ying, Yaofeng; Jin, Jinshuang

    2016-09-01

    Based on the time-nonlocal particle number-resolved master equation, we investigate the sequential electron transport through the interacting double quantum dots. Our calculations show that there exists the effect of energy renormalization in the dispersion of the bath interaction spectrum and it is sensitive to the the bandwidth of the bath. This effect would strongly affect the stationary current and its zero-frequency shot noise for weak inter-dot coherent coupling strength, but for strong inter-dot coupling regime, it is negligible due to the strong intrinsic Rabi coherent dynamics. Moreover, the possible observable effects of the energy renormalization in the noise spectrum are also investigated through the Rabi coherence signal. Finally, the non-Markovian effect is manifested in the finite-frequency noise spectrum with the appearance of quasisteps, and the magnitude of these quasisteps are modified by the dispersion function.

  4. Covariant effective action for a Galilean invariant quantum Hall system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geracie, Michael; Prabhu, Kartik; Roberts, Matthew M.

    2016-09-01

    We construct effective field theories for gapped quantum Hall systems coupled to background geometries with local Galilean invariance i.e. Bargmann spacetimes. Along with an electromagnetic field, these backgrounds include the effects of curved Galilean spacetimes, including torsion and a gravitational field, allowing us to study charge, energy, stress and mass currents within a unified framework. A shift symmetry specific to single constituent theories constraints the effective action to couple to an effective background gauge field and spin connection that is solved for by a self-consistent equation, providing a manifestly covariant extension of Hoyos and Son's improvement terms to arbitrary order in m.

  5. Effective approach to non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, David M

    2015-01-01

    Boundary conditions on non-relativistic wavefunctions are generally not completely constrained by the basic precepts of quantum mechanics, so understanding the set of possible self-adjoint extensions of the Hamiltonian is required. For real physical systems, non-trivial self-adjoint extensions have been used to model contact potentials when those interactions are expected a priori. However, they must be incorporated into the effective description of any quantum mechanical system in order to capture possible short-distance physics that does not decouple in the low energy limit. Here, an approach is described wherein an artificial boundary is inserted at an intermediate scale on which boundary conditions may encode short-distance effects that are hidden behind the boundary. Using this approach, an analysis is performed of the free particle, harmonic oscillator, and Coulomb potential in three dimensions. Requiring measurable quantities, such as spectra and cross sections, to be independent of this artificial bou...

  6. Quantum Reality, Complex Numbers and the Meteorological Butterfly Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, T N

    2004-01-01

    A not-too-technical version of the paper: "A Granular Permutation-based Representation of Complex Numbers and Quaternions: Elements of a Realistic Quantum Theory" - Proc. Roy. Soc.A (2004) 460, 1039-1055. The phrase "meteorological butterfly effect" is introduced to illustrate, not the familiar loss of predictability in low-dimensional chaos, but the much less familiar and much more radical paradigm of the finite-time predictability horizon, associated with upscale transfer of uncertainty in certain multi-scale systems (such as the 3D atmosphere). The meteorological butterfly effect is then used to provide a novel reinterpretation of complex algebra in terms of a family of self-similar permutation operators. Finally, a realistic deterministic reformulation of the foundations of quantum theory is given using this reinterpretation of complex numbers. Despite determinism, this reformulation has the emergent property of counterfactual indefiniteness.

  7. Deformed Calogero-Sutherland model and fractional quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atai, Farrokh; Langmann, Edwin

    2017-01-01

    The deformed Calogero-Sutherland (CS) model is a quantum integrable system with arbitrary numbers of two types of particles and reducing to the standard CS model in special cases. We show that a known collective field description of the CS model, which is based on conformal field theory (CFT), is actually a collective field description of the deformed CS model. This provides a natural application of the deformed CS model in Wen's effective field theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), with the two kinds of particles corresponding to electrons and quasi-hole excitations. In particular, we use known mathematical results about super-Jack polynomials to obtain simple explicit formulas for the orthonormal CFT basis proposed by van Elburg and Schoutens in the context of the FQHE.

  8. Quantum spin/valley Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions in silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2013-04-26

    We present a theoretical realization of quantum spin and quantum valley Hall effects in silicene. We show that combination of an electric field and intrinsic spin-orbit interaction leads to quantum phase transitions at the charge neutrality point. This phase transition from a two dimensional topological insulator to a trivial insulating state is accompanied by a quenching of the quantum spin Hall effect and the onset of a quantum valley Hall effect, providing a tool to experimentally tune the topological state of silicene. In contrast to graphene and other conventional topological insulators, the proposed effects in silicene are accessible to experiments.

  9. Quantum Goos-Hanchen effect in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Beenakker, C. W. J.; Sepkhanov, R. A.; Akhmerov, A. R.; Tworzydlo, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Goos-Hanchen (GH) effect is an interference effect on total internal reflection at an interface, resulting in a shift sigma of the reflected beam along the interface. We show that the GH effect at a p-n interface in graphene depends on the pseudospin (sublattice) degree of freedom of the massless Dirac fermions, and find a sign change of sigma at angle of incidence alpha*=arcsin[sin alpha_c]^1/2 determined by the critical angle alpha_c for total reflection. In an n-doped channel with p-do...

  10. Quantized Thermal Transport in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, C. L.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze thermal transport in the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), employing a Luttinger liquid model of edge states. Impurity mediated inter-channel scattering events are incorporated in a hydrodynamic description of heat and charge transport. The thermal Hall conductance, $K_H$, is shown to provide a new and universal characterization of the FQHE state, and reveals non-trivial information about the edge structure. The Lorenz ratio between thermal and electrical Hall conductances {\\i...

  11. Quantum effective potential, electron transport and conformons in biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandoloff, Rossen [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Balakrishnan, Radha [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2005-07-08

    In the Kirchhoff model of a biopolymer, conformation dynamics can be described in terms of solitary waves, for certain special cross-section asymmetries. Applying this to the problem of electron transport, we show that the quantum effective potential arising due to the bends and twists of the polymer enables us to formalize and quantify the concept of a conformon that has been hypothesized in biology. Its connection to the soliton solution of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation emerges in a natural fashion.

  12. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  13. Noninertial effects on the quantum dynamics of scalar bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Luis B. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Departamento de Fisica, Sao Luis, MA (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    The noninertial effect of rotating frames on the quantum dynamics of scalar bosons embedded in the background of a cosmic string is considered. In this work, scalar bosons are described by the Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau (DKP) formalism. Considering the DKP oscillator in this background the combined effects of a rotating frames and cosmic string on the equation of motion, energy spectrum, and DKP spinor are analyzed and discussed in detail. Additionally, the effect of rotating frames on the scalar bosons' localization is studied. (orig.)

  14. Thermopower enhancement in quantum wells with the Rashba effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lihua [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Jiong; Wang, Shanyu; Wei, Ping; Yang, Jihui, E-mail: jihuiy@uw.edu, E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Zhang, Wenqing, E-mail: jihuiy@uw.edu, E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Chen, Lidong [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-11-17

    We theoretically demonstrate that the thermopower in two-dimensional quantum wells (QWs) can be significantly enhanced by its Rashba spin-splitting effect, governed by the one-dimensional density of states in the low Fermi energy region. The thermopower enhancement is due to the lower Fermi level for a given carrier concentration in Rashba QWs, as compared with that in normal two-dimensional systems without the spin-splitting effect. The degenerate approximation directly shows that larger strength of Rashba effect leads to higher thermopower and consequently better thermoelectric performance in QWs.

  15. Quark confinement and the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-Jun; GENG Wen-Tong

    2008-01-01

    Working in the physics of Wilson factor and Aharonov-Bohm effect,we find in the fluxtubequark system the topology of a baryon consisting of three heavy flavor quarks resembles that of the fractional quantum Hall effect(FQHE)in condensed matter.This similarity yields the result that the constituent quarks of baryon have the"filling factor"1/3.thus the previous conjecture that quark confinement is a correlation effect is confirmed.Moreover,by deriving a Hamiltonian of the system analogous to that of FQHE,we predict an energy gap for the ground state of a heavy three-quark system.

  16. Sudden Transition between Quantum Correlation and Classical Correlation: the Effect of Interaction between Subsystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun-Yan; WANG Lin-Cheng; YI Xue-Xi

    2011-01-01

    We study the quantum discord dynamics of a bipartite composite system in the presence of a dissipative environment and investigate the effect of the interaction between the two subsystems. The results show that the interaction can influence the sudden transition between the quantum correlation and the classical correlation and for the maximally mixed marginals initial states, the sudden transition regime will always exist. The entanglements are also discussed in comparison to the quantum discord in describing the quantum correlations.%@@ We study the quantum discord dynamics of a bipartite composite system in the presence of a dissipative envi- ronment and investigate the effect of the interaction between the two subsystems.The results show that the interaction can influence the sudden transition between the quantum correlation and the classical correlation and for the maximally mixed marginals initial states, the sudden transition regime will always exist.The entangle- ments are also discussed in comparison to the quantum discord in describing the quantum correlations.

  17. Adding quantum effects to the semi-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Simulating the molecular dynamics (MD) using classical or semi-classical trajectories provides important details for the understanding of many chemical reactions, protein folding, drug design, and solvation effects. MD simulations using trajectories have achieved great successes in the computer simulations of various systems, but it is difficult to incorporate quantum effects in a robust way. Therefore, improving quantum wavepacket dynamics and incorporating nonadiabatic transitions and quantum effects into classical and semi-classical molecular dynamics is critical as well as challenging. In this paper, we present a MD scheme in which a new set of equations of motion (EOM) are proposed to effectively propagate nuclear trajectories while conserving quantum mechanical energy which is critical for describing quantum effects like tunneling. The new quantum EOM is tested on a one-state one-dimensional and a two-state two-dimensional model nonadiabatic systems. The global quantum force experienced by each trajecto...

  18. Effective spacetime understanding emergence in effective field theory and quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Crowther, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the notion that quantum gravity may represent the "breakdown" of spacetime at extremely high energy scales. If spacetime does not exist at the fundamental level, then it has to be considered "emergent", in other words an effective structure, valid at low energy scales. The author develops a conception of emergence appropriate to effective theories in physics, and shows how it applies (or could apply) in various approaches to quantum gravity, including condensed matter approaches, discrete approaches, and loop quantum gravity.

  19. Unruh effect and macroscopic quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Steane, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influence of Unruh radiation on matter-wave interferometry experiments using neutral objects modeled as dielectric spheres. The Unruh effect leads to a loss of coherence through momentum diffusion. This is a fundamental source of decoherence that affects all objects having electromagnetic interactions. However, the effect is not large enough to prevent the observation of interference for objects of any size, even when the path separation is larger than the size of the object. When the acceleration in the interferometer arms is large, inertial tidal forces will disrupt the material integrity of the interfering objects before the Unruh decoherence of the centre of mass motion is sufficient to prevent observable interference.

  20. Kondo Effect at a Quantum Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazashvili, Revaz; Coleman, Piers

    1998-03-01

    The Kondo effect in a metal on the verge of a zero-temperature magnetic instability provides a fascinating example of interference between local and long-range correlations. (A. I. Larkin and V. I. Mel'nikov, Sov. Phys. JETP 34, 656 (1972)) (P. Coleman and A. M. Tsvelik, cond-mat/9707003) (A. Sengupta, cond-mat/9707316) We discuss possible consequences of this interference, including the breakdown of the Fermi liquid state.

  1. The God effect quantum entanglement, science’s strangest phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Clegg, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be true What is entanglement? It's a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected---instantly---in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it "spooky" and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the "God Effect," was one of Einstein's few---and perhaps one of his greatest---mistakes. What does it mean? The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more. In The God Effect, veteran science writer Brian Clegg has written an ex...

  2. The local nature of incompressibility of quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendirlik, E. M.; Sirt, S.; Kalkan, S. B.; Ofek, N.; Umansky, V.; Siddiki, A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the experimental realization of the integer quantum Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron system, the interrelation between the conductance quantization and the topological properties of the system has been investigated. Assuming that the two-dimensional electron system is described by a Bloch Hamiltonian, system is insulating in the bulk of sample throughout the quantum Hall plateau due to a magnetic field induced energy gap. Meanwhile, the system is conducting at the edges resembling a 2+1 dimensional topological insulator without time-reversal symmetry. Here, by our magneto-transport measurements performed on GaAs/AlGaAs high purity Hall bars with two inner contacts we show that incompressible strips formed at the edges result in Hall quantization, even if the bulk is compressible. Consequently, the relationship between the quantum Hall effect and topological bulk insulator breaks for specific field intervals within the plateaus. The measurement of conducting bulk, strongly challenges all existing single-particle theories. PMID:28071652

  3. Scattering approach to quantum transport and many body effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichard, Jean-Louis; Freyn, Axel

    2010-12-01

    We review a series of works discussing how the scattering approach to quantum transport developed by Landauer and Buttiker for one body elastic scatterers can be extended to the case where electron-electron interactions act inside the scattering region and give rise to many body scattering. Firstly, we give an exact numerical result showing that at zero temperature a many body scatterer behaves as an effective one body scatterer, with an interaction dependent transmission. Secondly, we underline that this effective scatterer depends on the presence of external scatterers put in its vicinity. The implications of this non local scattering are illustrated studying the conductance of a quantum point contact where electrons interact with a scanning gate microscope. Thirdly, using the numerical renormalization group developed by Wilson for the Kondo problem, we study a double dot spinless model with an inter-dot interaction U and inter-dot hopping td, coupled to leads by hopping terms tc. We show that the quantum conductance as a function of td is given by a universal function, independently of the values of U and tc, if one measures td in units of a characteristic scale τ(U,tc). Mapping the double dot system without spin onto a single dot Anderson model with spin and magnetic field, we show that τ(U,tc) = 2TK, where TK is the Kondo temperature of the Anderson model.

  4. An effective Hamiltonian approach to quantum random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debajyoti; Paul, Niladri; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Ghosh, Tarun Kanti

    2017-03-01

    In this article we present an effective Hamiltonian approach for discrete time quantum random walk. A form of the Hamiltonian for one-dimensional quantum walk has been prescribed, utilizing the fact that Hamiltonians are generators of time translations. Then an attempt has been made to generalize the techniques to higher dimensions. We find that the Hamiltonian can be written as the sum of a Weyl Hamiltonian and a Dirac comb potential. The time evolution operator obtained from this prescribed Hamiltonian is in complete agreement with that of the standard approach. But in higher dimension we find that the time evolution operator is additive, instead of being multiplicative (see Chandrashekar, Sci. Rep. 3, 2829 (18)). We showed that in the case of two-step walk, the time evolution operator effectively can have multiplicative form. In the case of a square lattice, quantum walk has been studied computationally for different coins and the results for both the additive and the multiplicative approaches have been compared. Using the graphene Hamiltonian, the walk has been studied on a graphene lattice and we conclude the preference of additive approach over the multiplicative one.

  5. Nambu-Goldstone Effective Theory of Information at Quantum Criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar; Wintergerst, Nico

    2015-01-01

    We establish a fundamental connection between quantum criticality of a many-body system, such as Bose-Einstein condensates, and its capacity of information-storage and processing. For deriving the effective theory of modes in the vicinity of the quantum critical point we develop a new method by mapping a Bose-Einstein condensate of $N$-particles onto a sigma model with a continuous global (pseudo)symmetry that mixes bosons of different momenta. The Bogolyubov modes of the condensate are mapped onto the Goldstone modes of the sigma model, which become gapless at the critical point. These gapless Goldstone modes are the quantum carriers of information and entropy. Analyzing their effective theory, we observe the information-processing properties strikingly similar to the ones predicted by the black hole portrait. The energy cost per qubit of information-storage vanishes in the large-$N$ limit and the total information-storage capacity increases with $N$ either exponentially or as a power law. The longevity of i...

  6. The local nature of incompressibility of quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendirlik, E. M.; Sirt, S.; Kalkan, S. B.; Ofek, N.; Umansky, V.; Siddiki, A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the experimental realization of the integer quantum Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron system, the interrelation between the conductance quantization and the topological properties of the system has been investigated. Assuming that the two-dimensional electron system is described by a Bloch Hamiltonian, system is insulating in the bulk of sample throughout the quantum Hall plateau due to a magnetic field induced energy gap. Meanwhile, the system is conducting at the edges resembling a 2+1 dimensional topological insulator without time-reversal symmetry. Here, by our magneto-transport measurements performed on GaAs/AlGaAs high purity Hall bars with two inner contacts we show that incompressible strips formed at the edges result in Hall quantization, even if the bulk is compressible. Consequently, the relationship between the quantum Hall effect and topological bulk insulator breaks for specific field intervals within the plateaus. The measurement of conducting bulk, strongly challenges all existing single-particle theories.

  7. About empty waves, their effect, and the quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wechsler, Sofia

    2010-01-01

    When a quantum object -- a particle as we call it in a non-rigorous way -- is described by a multi-branched wave- function, with the corresponding wave-packets occupying separated regions of the time-space, a frequently asked question is whether the quantum object is actually contained in only one of these wave-packets. If the answer is positive, then the other wave-packets are called in literature empty waves. The wave-packet containing the object is called a full wave, and is the only one that would produce a recording in a detector. A question immediately arising is whether the empty waves may also have an observable effect. Different works were dedicated to the elucidation of this question. None of them proved that the hypothesis of full/empty waves is correct - it may be that the Nature is indeed non-deterministic and the quantum object is not confined to one region of the space-time. All the works that proved that the empty waves have an effect, in fact, proved that if there exist full and empty waves, ...

  8. Cancer proliferation and therapy: the Warburg effect and quantum metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuszynski Jack A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cancer cells, in contrast to normal differentiated cells, rely on aerobic glycolysis instead of oxidative phosphorylation to generate metabolic energy, a phenomenon called the Warburg effect. Model Quantum metabolism is an analytic theory of metabolic regulation which exploits the methodology of quantum mechanics to derive allometric rules relating cellular metabolic rate and cell size. This theory explains differences in the metabolic rates of cells utilizing OxPhos and cells utilizing glycolysis. This article appeals to an analytic relation between metabolic rate and evolutionary entropy - a demographic measure of Darwinian fitness - to: (a provide an evolutionary rationale for the Warburg effect, and (b propose methods based on entropic principles of natural selection for regulating the incidence of OxPhos and glycolysis in cancer cells. Conclusion The regulatory interventions proposed on the basis of quantum metabolism have applications in therapeutic strategies to combat cancer. These procedures, based on metabolic regulation, are non-invasive, and complement the standard therapeutic methods involving radiation and chemotherapy

  9. Quantum backreaction (Casimir) effect. II. Scalar and electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Herdegen, A

    2005-01-01

    Casimir effect in most general terms may be understood as a backreaction of a quantum system causing an adiabatic change of the external conditions under which it is placed. This paper is the second installment of a work scrutinizing this effect with the use of algebraic methods in quantum theory. The general scheme worked out in the first part is applied here to the discussion of particular models. We consider models of the quantum scalar field subject to external interaction with ``softened'' Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on two parallel planes. We show that the case of electromagnetic field with softened perfect conductor conditions on the planes may be reduced to the other two. The ``softening'' is implemented on the level of the dynamics, and is not imposed ad hoc, as is usual in most treatments, on the level of observables. We calculate formulas for the backreaction energy in these models. We find that the common belief that for electromagnetic field the backreaction force tends to the strict...

  10. An effective Hamiltonian approach to quantum random walk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DEBAJYOTI SARKAR; NILADRI PAUL; KAUSHIK BHATTACHARYA; TARUN KANTI GHOSH

    2017-03-01

    In this article we present an effective Hamiltonian approach for discrete time quantum random walk. A form of the Hamiltonian for one-dimensional quantum walk has been prescribed, utilizing the fact that Hamiltoniansare generators of time translations. Then an attempt has been made to generalize the techniques to higher dimensions. We find that the Hamiltonian can be written as the sum of a Weyl Hamiltonian and a Dirac comb potential. The time evolution operator obtained from this prescribed Hamiltonian is in complete agreement with that of the standard approach. But in higher dimension we find that the time evolution operator is additive, instead of being multiplicative (see Chandrashekar, $\\it{Sci. Rep}$. 3, 2829 (2013)). We showed that in the case of two-step walk, the time evolution operator effectively can have multiplicative form. In the case of a square lattice, quantum walk has been studied computationally for different coins and the results for both the additive and the multiplicative approaches have been compared. Using the graphene Hamiltonian, the walk has been studied on a graphene lattice and we conclude the preference of additive approach over the multiplicative one.

  11. Impact of nonlinear effective interactions on GFT quantum gravity condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Pithis, Andreas G A; Tomov, Petar

    2016-01-01

    We present the numerical analysis of effectively interacting Group Field Theory (GFT) models in the context of the GFT quantum gravity condensate analogue of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for real Bose-Einstein condensates including combinatorially local interaction terms. Thus we go beyond the usually considered construction for free models. More precisely, considering such interactions in a weak regime, we find solutions for which the expectation value of the number operator N is finite, as in the free case. When tuning the interaction to the strongly nonlinear regime, however, we obtain solutions for which N grows and eventually blows up, which is reminiscent of what one observes for real Bose-Einstein condensates, where a strong interaction regime can only be realized at high density. This behaviour suggests the breakdown of the Bogoliubov ansatz for quantum gravity condensates and the need for non-Fock representations to describe the system when the condensate constituents are strongly correlated. Furthe...

  12. Matrix method analysis of quantum Hall effect device connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolano, M.; Callegaro, L.

    2012-02-01

    The modelling of electrical connections of single, or several, multiterminal quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices is relevant for electrical metrology: it is known, in fact, that certain particular connections allow (i) the realization of multiples or fractions of the quantized resistance, or (ii) the rejection of stray impedances, so that the configuration maintains the status of quantum standard. Ricketts-Kemeny and Delahaye equivalent circuits are known to be accurate models of the QHE: however, the numerical or analytical solution of electrical networks including these equivalent circuits can be difficult. In this paper, we introduce a method of analysis based on the representation of a QHE device by means of the indefinite admittance matrix: external connections are then represented with another matrix, easily written by inspection. Some examples, including the solution of double- and triple-series connections, are shown.

  13. Matrix method analysis of quantum Hall effect device connections

    CERN Document Server

    Ortolano, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The modelling of electrical connections of single, or several, multiterminal quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices is relevant for electrical metrology: it is known, in fact, that certain particular connections allow i) the realization of multiples or fractions of the quantised resistance, or ii) the rejection of stray impedances, so that the configuration maintains the status of quantum standard. Ricketts-Kemeny and Delahaye equivalent circuits are known to be accurate models of the QHE: however, the numerical or analytical solution of electrical networks including these equivalent circuits can be difficult. In this paper, we introduce a method of analysis based on the representation of a QHE device by means of the \\emph{indefinite admittance matrix}: external connections are then represented with another matrix, easily written by inspection. Some examples, including the solution of double- and triple-series connections, are shown.

  14. Towards Experimental Tests of Quantum Effects in Cytoskeletal Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Mershin, A; Miller, J H; Nawarathna, D; Skoulakis, E M C; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E; Kolomenskij, A A; Schüssler, H A; Luduena, R F; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Mershin, Andreas; Sanabria, Hugo; Miller, John H.; Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthna; Skoulakis, Efthimios M.C.; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Kolomenskii, Alexadre A.; Schuessler, Hans A.; Luduena, Richard F.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2005-01-01

    It has become increasingly evident that fabrication of novel biomaterials through molecular self-assembly is going to play a significant role in material science and possibly the information technology of the future. Tubulin, microtubules (MTs) and the cytoskeleton are dynamic, self-assembling systems and we asked whether their structure and function contain the clues on how to fabricate biomolecular information processing devices. Here we review our neurobiological studies of transgenic Drosophila that strongly suggest the microtubular cytoskeleton is near the 'front lines' of intracellular information manipulation and storage. We also establish that spectroscopic techniques such as refractometry, surface plasmon resonance sensing and dielectric spectroscopy, coupled with molecular dynamic simulations and (quantum) electrodynamic analytical theory are useful tools in the study of the electrodynamic and possible quantum effects in cytoskeletal proteins. Implicit in our driving question is the possibility that...

  15. Quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene with permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, F. D.; Cazimajou, T.; Sekine, Y.; Hibino, H.; Irie, H.; Glattli, D. C.; Kumada, N.; Roulleau, P.

    2016-12-01

    We have observed the well-kown quantum Hall effect (QHE) in epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide (SiC) by using, for the first time, only commercial NdFeB permanent magnets at low temperature. The relatively large and homogeneous magnetic field generated by the magnets, together with the high quality of the epitaxial graphene films, enables the formation of well-developed quantum Hall states at Landau level filling factors v = ±2, commonly observed with superconducting electro-magnets. Furthermore, the chirality of the QHE edge channels can be changed by a top gate. These results demonstrate that basic QHE physics are experimentally accessible in graphene for a fraction of the price of conventional setups using superconducting magnets, which greatly increases the potential of the QHE in graphene for research and applications.

  16. Understanding boundary effects in quantum state tomography - One qubit case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Takanori; Turner, Peter S.; Murao, Mio

    2014-12-01

    For classical and quantum estimation with finite data sets, the estimation error can deviate significantly from its asymptotic (large data set) behavior. In quantum state tomography, a major reason for this is the existence of a boundary in the parameter space imposed by constraints, such as the positive semidefiniteness of density matrices. Intuitively, we should be able to reduce the estimation error by using our knowledge of these constraints. This intuition is correct for maximumlikelihood estimators, but the size of the reduction has not been evaluated quantitatively. In this proceeding, we evaluate the improvement in one qubit state tomography by using mathematical tools in classical statistical estimation theory. In particular, we show that the effect of the reduction decreases exponentially with respect to the number of data sets when the true state is mixed, and it remains at arbitrarily large data set when the true state is pure.

  17. Probing quantum gravity effects in black holes at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alberghi, G L; Galli, D; Gregori, D; Tronconi, A; Vagnoni, V

    2006-01-01

    We study modifications of the Hawking emission in the evaporation of miniature black holes possibly produced in accelerators when their mass approaches the fundamental scale of gravity, set to 1 TeV according to some extra dimension models. Back-reaction and quantum gravity corrections are modelled by employing modified relations between the black hole mass and temperature. We release the assumption that black holes explode at 1 TeV or leave a remnant, and let them evaporate to much smaller masses. We have implemented such modified decay processes into an existing micro-black hole event generator, performing a study of the decay products in order to search for phenomenological evidence of quantum gravity effects.

  18. Effects of quantum fluctuations of metric on the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rongjia

    2016-09-01

    We consider a model of modified gravity from the nonperturbative quantization of a metric. We obtain the modified gravitational field equations and the modified conservational equations. We apply it to the FLRW spacetime and find that due to the quantum fluctuations a bounce universe can be obtained and a decelerated expansion can also possibly be obtained in a dark energy dominated epoch. We also discuss the effects of quantum fluctuations on inflation parameters (such as slow-roll parameters, spectral index, and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation) and find values of parameters in the comparing the predictions of inflation can also work to drive the current epoch of acceleration. We obtain the constraints on the parameter of the theory from the observation of the big bang nucleosynthesis.

  19. Massive Dirac fermions and the zero field quantum Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    Raya, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    Through an explicit calculation for a Lagrangian in quantum electrodynamics in (2+1)-space--time dimensions (QED$_3$), making use of the relativistic Kubo formula, we demonstrate that the filling factor accompanying the quantized electrical conductivity for massive Dirac fermions of a single species in two spatial dimensions is a half (in natural units) when time reversal and parity symmetries of the Lagrangian are explicitly broken by the fermion mass term. We then discuss the most general form of the QED$_3$ Lagrangian, both for irreducible and reducible representations of the Dirac matrices in the plane, with emphasis on the appearance of a Chern-Simons term. We also identify the value of the filling factor with a zero field quantum Hall effect (QHE).

  20. Massive Dirac fermions and the zero field quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Alfredo; Reyes, Edward D.

    2008-09-01

    Through an explicit calculation for a Lagrangian in quantum electrodynamics in (2+1)-spacetime dimensions (QED3), making use of the relativistic Kubo formula, we demonstrate that the filling factor accompanying the quantized electrical conductivity for massive Dirac fermions of a single species in two spatial dimensions is a half (in natural units) when time reversal and parity symmetries of the Lagrangian are explicitly broken by the fermion mass term. We then discuss the most general form of the QED3 Lagrangian, for both irreducible and reducible representations of the Dirac matrices in the plane, with emphasis on the appearance of a Chern-Simons term. We also identify the value of the filling factor with a zero field quantum Hall effect (QHE).

  1. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aavishkar A.; Chowdhury, Debanjan; Sachdev, Subir; Swingle, Brian

    2017-07-01

    We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov) exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z >1 .

  2. Holographic butterfly effect and diffusion in quantum critical region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yi; Xian, Zhuo-Yu

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the butterfly effect and charge diffusion near the quantum phase transition in holographic approach. We argue that their criticality is controlled by the holographic scaling geometry with deformations induced by a relevant operator at finite temperature. Specifically, in the quantum critical region controlled by a single fixed point, the butterfly velocity decreases when deviating from the critical point. While, in the non-critical region, the behavior of the butterfly velocity depends on the specific phase at low temperature. Moreover, in the holographic Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, the universal behavior of the butterfly velocity is absent. Finally, the tendency of our holographic results matches with the numerical results of Bose-Hubbard model. A comparison between our result and that in the O( N ) nonlinear sigma model is also given.

  3. Noninertial effects on nonrelativistic topological quantum scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, H. F.; Bakke, K.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate noninertial effects on the scattering problem of a nonrelativistic particle in the cosmic string spacetime. By considering the nonrelativistic limit of the Dirac equation we are able to show, in the regime of small rotational frequencies, that the phase shift has two contribution: one related to the noninertial reference frame, and the other, due to the cosmic string conical topology. We also show that both the incident wave and the scattering amplitude are altered as a consequence of the noninertial reference frame and depend on the rotational frequency.

  4. Self-screening of the quantum confined Stark effect by the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Wei Sun, Xiao, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Volkan Demir, Hilmi, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-06-16

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the polar orientations significantly suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) caused by the strong polarization induced electric field in the quantum wells, which is a fundamental problem intrinsic to the III-nitrides. Here, we show that the QCSE is self-screened by the polarization induced bulk charges enabled by designing quantum barriers. The InN composition of the InGaN quantum barrier graded along the growth orientation opportunely generates the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barrier, which well compensate the polarization induced interface charges, thus avoiding the electric field in the quantum wells. Consequently, the optical output power and the external quantum efficiency are substantially improved for the LEDs. The ability to self-screen the QCSE using polarization induced bulk charges opens up new possibilities for device engineering of III-nitrides not only in LEDs but also in other optoelectronic devices.

  5. Encoding quantum information in a stabilized manifold of a superconducting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzard, S.; Leghtas, Z.; Mundhada, S. O.; Axline, C.; Reagor, M.; Chou, K.; Blumoff, J.; Sliwa, K. M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.

    In a superconducting Josephson circuit architecture, we activate a multi-photon process between two modes by applying microwave drives at specific frequencies. This creates a pairwise exchange of photons between a high-Q cavity and the environment. The resulting open dynamical system develops a two-dimensional quasi-energy ground state manifold. Can we encode, protect and manipulate quantum information in this manifold? We experimentally investigate the convergence and escape rates in and out of this confined subspace. Finally, using quantum Zeno dynamics, we aim to perform gates which maintain the state in the protected manifold at all times. Work supported by: ARO, ONR, AFOSR and YINQE.

  6. Effective production of orbital quantum entanglement in chaotic quantum dots with nonideal contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E. H.; Almeida, F. A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We study orbital entanglement production in a chaotic quantum dot with two-channel leads by varying the opacity of the contacts in the unitary and orthogonal Wigner-Dyson ensembles. We computed the occurrence probability of entangled states (squared norm) and its concurrence (entanglement level). We also define an entanglement production factor to properly evaluate the entanglement behavior in the system considering effective aspects. The results are numerically obtained through (i) integrations over random matrix ensembles (exact results) for the scenario of one contact ideally fixed and (ii) random matrix simulations for arbitrary contact opacities (sampling). Those outcomes are in mutual agreement and indicate that the optimum effective production of orbital entanglement is achieved when both contacts are ideal and the time-reversal symmetry is broken.

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Quantum Confinement Effect on the Blue Shift in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changiz. Vatankhah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nano particles of zinc sulfide (ZnS of face centered cubic (fcc structures were synthesized using sulphur source of soium sulphide and mercaptoethanol respectively via Chemical Bath Deposition method. The synthesized quantum dots were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and UV-visible spectrophotometry. The average crystallite size calculated from TEM and XRD pattern has been found to in the range 4.6 – 1.9 nm, the pariticles size decreases with the increase of the capping agent concentrations from 0. 001 to 0.7 Mol. The absorption coefficient in the range 325 - 250 nm decreases with increasing capping agent and the particles. ZnS nanoparticles were also derived from time independent Schrodinger equations for ZnS system and calculated the coefficient absorption using the density functional theory (DFT . It is shown that decreasing of ZnS nanosize lead to changes the optical properties and coefficient absorption in the visible region does not occur and the particles act like a transparent material. In this work, the blue shift was observed in absorption-wavelength both theoretical and experimental method due to the quantum confinement effects.

  8. The theta parameter in loop quantum gravity: effects on quantum geometry and black hole entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Rezende, Danilo Jimenez

    2007-01-01

    The precise analog of the theta-quantization ambiguity of Yang-Mills theory exists for the real SU(2) connection formulation of general relativity. As in the former case theta labels representations of large gauge transformations, which are super-selection sectors in loop quantum gravity. We show that unless theta=0, the (kinematical) geometric operators such as area and volume are not well defined on spin network states. More precisely the intersection of their domain with the dense set Cyl in the kinematical Hilbert space H of loop quantum gravity is empty. The absence of a well defined notion of area operator acting on spin network states seems at first in conflict with the expected finite black hole entropy. However, we show that the black hole (isolated) horizon area--which in contrast to kinematical area is a (Dirac) physical observable--is indeed well defined, and quantized so that the black hole entropy is proportional to the area. The effect of theta is negligible in the semiclassical limit where pro...

  9. Nonlocal memory effects in the dynamics of open quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Elsi-Mari; Piilo, Jyrki; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2011-01-01

    We study a model of two entangled photons interacting locally with two dephasing environments. It is shown that initial correlations between the local environments can generate a nonlocal quantum process from a local interaction Hamiltonian. While the global dynamics of the two-photon polarization state exhibits strong memory effects, the induced local dynamics of either of the two photons is found to be Markovian. A direct connection between the degree of memory effects and the amount of correlations in the initial environmental state is derived. The results demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, enlarging an open system can change the dynamics from Markovian to non-Markovian.

  10. Strong quantum confinement effects in thin zinc selenide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoutas, S.; Poulopoulos, P.; Karoutsos, V.; Angelakeris, M.; Flevaris, N. K.

    2006-01-01

    Thin Zinc Selenide films in the thickness range 3-50 nm have been prepared on high quality glass substrates by e-beam evaporation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Optical absorption spectroscopy experiments reveal a systematically increasing blue shift of the effective bandgap energy as the film thickness decreases, reaching a maximum value of 0.32 eV for the thinner film. The experimental results, which indicate the presence of strong quantum confinement effects, are fairly well described by theoretical calculations based on the potential morphing method, using as a confining potential the finite square well potential with height of the barriers equal to 5 eV.

  11. Antiresonance Effect in Electronic Tunnelling through a One-Dimensional Quantum Dot Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Pu-Nan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Electronic tunnelling through a one-dimensional quantum dot chain is theoretically studied, when two leads couple to the individual component quantum dots of the chain arbitrarily. If there are some dangling quantum dots in the chain outside the leads, the electron tunnelling through the quantum dot chain is wholly forbidden while the energy of the incident electron is just equal to the molecular energy levels of the dangling quantum dots,which is known as the antiresonance effect. In addition, the influence of electron interaction on the antiresonance effect is discussed within the Hartree-Fock approximation.

  12. Squeezed State Effects on Continuous Variable Quantum Erasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Peter; Kasisomayajula, Vijay; Russo, Onofrio

    2008-03-01

    Experimental verification of complementarity using quantum erasing for the continuous variable (CV) infinite dimensional Hilbert space has been considered. [1] The complemetary pair is that of the canonically conjugate amplitude and phase quadratures of light. The amplitude quadrature is labeled to a squeezed meter signal by quantum nondemolition (QND) [2] entanglement coupling. [3] Knowledge of which eigenstate (WE) can be obtained by measuring this amplitude in the meter state, and can thereafter be `lost' by measuring the quadrature phase of the meter, thus restoring the quadrature phase of the signal beam in a process known as quantum erasure. [4] The coupling, i.e. the labeling of the signal state to the meter state, is implemented with a beam splitter coupled to the squeezed light meter beam. [4] We investigate the effects of using the unitary squeeze operator S(z)=exp.5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 (z*a^2 - za^+2) where z = re^i(squeezing angle) on selected coherent states under certain conditions. [5,6] [1] U. L. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 100403 (2004). [2] V. B. Braginsky et al., Science 209, 547 (1980). [3] R. Bruckmeimer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 43 (1997). [4] P. Grangier et al., Nature 396, 537 (1998). [5] C. M. Caves, Phys. Rev. D 23, 1693 (1981). [6] D. Stoler, Phys. Rev. D. 1, 3217 (1970), D. Stoler, Phys. Rev. D. 4, 1925 (1971). .

  13. Effective potential for moment-method simulation of quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriman, A. M.; Zhou, J.-R.; Kluksdahl, N. C.; Choi, H. H.; Ferry, D. K.

    1989-12-01

    In the simulation of submicron devices, complete quantum descriptions can be extremely computationally intensive, and reduced descriptions are desirable. One such description utilizes a few low-order moments of the momentum distribution that are defined by the Wigner function. Two major difficulties occur in applying this moment method: (i) An independent calculation is required to find quantum mechanically accurate initial conditions. (ii) For a system in a mixed state, the hierarchy of time evolution equations for the moments does not close. We describe an approach to solve these problems. The initial distribution is determined in equilibrium by means of a new effective potential, chosen for its ability to treat the sharp potential features which occur in heterostructures. It accurately describes barrier penetration and repulsion, as well as quantum broadening of the momentum distribution. The moment equation hierarchy is closed at the level of the second-moment time evolution equation, using a closure that is exact for a shifted Fermi distribution. Band-bending is included by simultaneous self-consistent determination of all the moments.

  14. Edge states and integer quantum Hall effect in topological insulator thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song-Bo; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2015-08-25

    The integer quantum Hall effect is a topological state of quantum matter in two dimensions, and has recently been observed in three-dimensional topological insulator thin films. Here we study the Landau levels and edge states of surface Dirac fermions in topological insulators under strong magnetic field. We examine the formation of the quantum plateaux of the Hall conductance and find two different patterns, in one pattern the filling number covers all integers while only odd integers in the other. We focus on the quantum plateau closest to zero energy and demonstrate the breakdown of the quantum spin Hall effect resulting from structure inversion asymmetry. The phase diagrams of the quantum Hall states are presented as functions of magnetic field, gate voltage and chemical potential. This work establishes an intuitive picture of the edge states to understand the integer quantum Hall effect for Dirac electrons in topological insulator thin films.

  15. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: Effective dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Corichi, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We study numerically the solutions to the effective equations of Bianchi IX spacetimes within Loop Quantum Cosmology. We consider Bianchi IX models with and without inverse triad corrections whose matter content is a scalar field without mass. The solutions are classified using the classical observables. We show that both effective theories --with lapse N=V and N=1-- solve the big bang singularity and reproduce the classical dynamics far from the bounce. Moreover, due to the spatial compactness, there is an infinity number of bounces and recollapses. We study the limit of large volume and show that both effective theories reproduce the same dynamics, thus recovering general relativity. We implement a procedure to identify amongst the Bianchi IX solutions, those that behave like k=0,1 FLRW as well as Bianchi I, II, and VII_0 models. The effective solutions exhibit Bianchi I phases with Bianchi II transitions and also Bianchi VII_0 phases, which had not been studied before, at the quantum nor effective level. W...

  16. Quantum Confinement Effects in Strained SiGe/Si Multiple Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Strained SiGe/Si multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were grown by cold-wall ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD). Photoluminescence measurement was performed to study the exciton energies of strained Si0.84 Ge0.16/Si MQWs with SiGe well widths ranging from 4.2nm to 25.4nm. The confinement energy of 43meV is found in the Si0.84Ge0.16/Si MQWs with well width of 4.2nm. The confinement energy was calculated by solving the problem of a particle confined in a single finite rectangular poteintial well using one band effect mass model. Experimental and theoretical confinement energies are in good agreement

  17. Relativistic effects on the modulational instability of electron plasma waves in quantum plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudev Ghosh; Swarniv Chandra; Sailendra Nath Paul

    2012-05-01

    Relativistic effects on the linear and nonlinear properties of electron plasma waves are investigated using the one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model for a twocomponent electron–ion dense quantum plasma. Using standard perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) containing both relativistic and quantum effects has been derived. This equation has been used to discuss the modulational instability of the wave. Through numerical calculations it is shown that relativistic effects significantly change the linear dispersion character of the wave. Unlike quantum effects, relativistic effects are shown to reduce the instability growth rate of electron plasma waves.

  18. Exponential speed-up with a single bit of quantum information: Testing the quantum butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Poulin, D; Laflamme, R; Ollivier, H; Poulin, David; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Laflamme, Raymond; Ollivier, Harold

    2003-01-01

    We present an efficient quantum algorithm to measure the average fidelity decay of a quantum map under perturbation using a single bit of quantum information. Our algorithm scales only as the complexity of the map under investigation, so for those maps admitting an efficient gate decomposition, it provides an exponential speed up over known classical procedures. Fidelity decay is important in the study of complex dynamical systems, where it is conjectured to be a signature of quantum chaos. Our result also illustrates the role of chaos in the process of decoherence.

  19. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Ross H., E-mail: r.mckenzie@uq.edu.au; Bekker, Christiaan [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 (Australia); Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2014-05-07

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X–H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O–H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 − 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X–H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  20. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-05-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X-H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 - 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X-H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  1. Quantum effects on compressional Alfven waves in compensated semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, M. R. [Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, East West University, Aftabnagar, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh)

    2015-03-15

    Amplitude modulation of a compressional Alfven wave in compensated electron-hole semiconductor plasmas is considered in the quantum magnetohydrodynamic regime in this paper. The important ingredients of this study are the inclusion of the particle degeneracy pressure, exchange-correlation potential, and the quantum diffraction effects via the Bohm potential in the momentum balance equations of the charge carriers. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the evolution of the slowly varying amplitude of the compressional Alfven wave by employing the standard reductive perturbation technique. Typical values of the parameters for GaAs, GaSb, and GaN semiconductors are considered in analyzing the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the compressional Alfven wave. Detailed analysis of the modulation instability in the long-wavelength regime is presented. For typical parameter ranges of the semiconductor plasmas and at the long-wavelength regime, it is found that the wave is modulationally unstable above a certain critical wavenumber. Effects of the exchange-correlation potential and the Bohm potential in the wave dynamics are also studied. It is found that the effect of the Bohm potential may be neglected in comparison with the effect of the exchange-correlation potential in the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the compressional Alfven wave.

  2. Horava-Lifshitz Gravity and Effective Theory of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Chaolun

    2014-01-01

    We show that Horava-Lifshitz gravity theory can be employed as a covariant framework to build an effective field theory for the fractional quantum Hall effect that respects all the spacetime symmetries such as non-relativistic diffeomorphism invariance and anisotropic Weyl invariance as well as the gauge symmetry. The key to this formalism is a set of correspondence relations that maps all the field degrees of freedom in the Horava-Lifshitz gravity theory to external background (source) fields among others in the effective action of the quantum Hall effect, according to their symmetry transformation properties. We originally derive the map as a holographic dictionary, but its form is independent of the existence of holographic duality. This paves the way for the application of Horava-Lifshitz holography on fractional quantum Hall effect. Using the simplest holographic Chern-Simons model, we compute the low energy effective action at leading orders and show that it captures universal electromagnetic and geomet...

  3. Accelerated nuclear quantum effects sampling with open path integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzola, Guglielmo

    2016-01-01

    We numericaly demonstrate that, in double well models, the autocorrelation time of open path integral Monte Carlo simulations can be much smaller compared to standard ones using ring polymers. We also provide an intuitive explanation based on the role of instantons as transition states of the path integral pseudodynamics. Therefore we propose that, in all cases when the ground state approximation to the finite temperature partition function holds, open path integral simulations can be used to accelerate the sampling in realistic simulations aimed to explore nuclear quantum effects.

  4. Correlation effects in strain-induced quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, R.; DeVittorio, M.; Cingolani, R.; Molinari, E. [Ist. Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia (INFM) and Dipt. di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Univ. Lecce (Italy); Hohenester, U. [INFM and Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. Modena e Reggio E. (Italy); Lipsanen, H.; Tulkki, J. [Optoelectronics Lab. and Lab. of Computational Engineering, Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland); Ahopelto, J. [VTT Electronics (Finland); Uchida, K.; Miura, N. [Inst. for Solid State Physics, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Arakawa, Y. [Inst. of Industrial Science, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-03-08

    We report on Coulomb correlation effects in the luminescence of strain-induced quantum dots. In single dots, under low power excitation, we observe the rising of sharp lines associated to the formation of excitonic molecules. In the grand-ensemble, in magnetic fields up to 45 T, we observe Darwin-Fock states of the dots to merge into a unique Landau level, with a considerable reduction in the total diamagnetic shift due to the enhanced electron-hole correlation caused by the increased degeneracy of the state. (orig.)

  5. Vortex equations governing the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Luciano, E-mail: lmedina@nyu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    An existence theory is established for a coupled non-linear elliptic system, known as “vortex equations,” describing the fractional quantum Hall effect in 2-dimensional double-layered electron systems. Via variational methods, we prove the existence and uniqueness of multiple vortices over a doubly periodic domain and the full plane. In the doubly periodic situation, explicit sufficient and necessary conditions are obtained that relate the size of the domain and the vortex numbers. For the full plane case, existence is established for all finite-energy solutions and exponential decay estimates are proved. Quantization phenomena of the magnetic flux are found in both cases.

  6. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A., E-mail: elembaj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Tan, S. G. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Siu, Z. B. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σ{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σ{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σ{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  7. $W_{\\infty}$ algebra in the integer quantum Hall effects

    OpenAIRE

    Azuma, Hiroo

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the $W_{\\infty}$ algebra in the integer quantum Hall effects. Defining the simplest vacuum, the Dirac sea, we evaluate the central extension for this algebra. A new algebra which contains the central extension is called the $W_{1+\\infty}$ algebra. We show that this $W_{1+\\infty}$ algebra is an origin of the Kac-Moody algebra which determines the behavior of edge states of the system. We discuss the relation between the $W_{1+\\infty}$ algebra and the incompressibility of the int...

  8. Effective Simulation of Quantum Entanglement Based on Classical Fields Modulated with Pseudorandom Phase Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Jian; Xu, Yingying; Dong, Hongtao

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that n classical fields modulated with n different pseudorandom phase sequences can constitute a 2^n-dimensional Hilbert space that contains tensor product structure. By using classical fields modulated with pseudorandom phase sequences, we discuss effective simulation of Bell states and GHZ state, and apply both correlation analysis and von Neumann entropy to characterize the simulation. We obtain similar results with the cases in quantum mechanics and find that the conclusions can be easily generalized to n quantum particles. The research on simulation of quantum entanglement may be important, for it not only provides useful insights into fundamental features of quantum entanglement, but also yields new insights into quantum computation.

  9. Intermixing effects on emission properties of InGaN/GaN coupled Quantum wells

    KAUST Repository

    Susilo, Tri B.

    2015-02-01

    Intermixing processes in quantum wells have been extensively studied in order to modify characteristic of semiconductor devices such as LEDs. Controlling the band gap of material by introducing intermixing process can be used to enable broadband and controllable emission of LEDs. Quantum well intermixing (QWI) in InGaN/GaN double quantum well (DQW) is discussed in this paper. By varying the interdiffusion and separation lengths, the effects of intermixing process on the quantum eigen energies of the wells are studied. The investigation is carried out using a homegrown Quantum-FDTD simulator. © 2015 IEEE.

  10. Effective boson-spin model for nuclei ensemble based universal quantum memory

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Z; Shi, T; Sun, C P

    2004-01-01

    We study the collective excitation of a macroscopic ensemble of polarized nuclei fixed in a quantum dot. Under the approximately homogeneous condition that we explicitly present in this paper, this many-particle system behaves as a single mode boson interacting with the spin of a single conduction band electron confined in this quantum dot. Within this effective spin-boson system, the quantum information carried by the electronic spin can be coherently transferred into the collective bosonic mode of excitation in the ensemble of nuclei. In this sense, the collective bosonic excitation can serve as a stable quantum memory to store the quantum information of spin state of electron.

  11. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  12. Cascade quantum teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nan-run; GONG Li-hua; LIU Ye

    2006-01-01

    In this letter a cascade quantum teleportation scheme is proposed. The proposed scheme needs less local quantum operations than those of quantum multi-teleportation. A quantum teleportation scheme based on entanglement swapping is presented and compared with the cascade quantum teleportation scheme. Those two schemes can effectively teleport quantum information and extend the distance of quantum communication.

  13. Time-reversal-breaking induced quantum spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Shao, D. X.; Deng, Ming-Xun; Deng, W. Y.; Sheng, L.

    2017-01-01

    We show that quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect does not occur in a square lattice model due to cancellation of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling coming from different hopping paths. However, we show that QSH effect can be induced by the presence of staggered magnetic fluxes alternating directions square by square. When the resulting Peierls phase takes a special value , the system has a composite symmetry ΘΡ− with Θ the time-reversal operator and Ρ− transforming the Peierls phase from γ to γ − , which protects the gapless edge states. Once the phase deviates from , the edge states open a gap, as the composite symmetry is broken. We further investigate the effect of a Zeeman field on the QSH state, and find that the edge states remain gapless for . This indicates that the QSH effect is immune to the magnetic perturbation. PMID:28220858

  14. Nuclear Quantum Effects on Aqueous Electron Attachment and Redox Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkin, Vladimir V; VandeVondele, Joost

    2017-03-17

    Nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) on the reduction and oxidation properties of small aqueous species (CO2, HO2, and O2) are quantified and rationalized by first-principles molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integration. Vertical electron attachment, or electron affinity, and detachment energies (VEA and VDE) are strongly affected by NQEs, decreasing in absolute value by 0.3 eV going from a classical to a quantum description of the nuclei. The effect is attributed to NQEs that lessen the solvent response upon oxidation/reduction. The reduction of solvent reorganization energy is expected to be general for small solutes in water. In the thermodynamic integral that yields the free energy of oxidation/reduction, these large changes enter with opposite sign, and only a small net effect (0.1 eV) remains. This is not obvious for CO2, where the integrand is strongly influenced by NQEs due to the onset of interaction of the reduced orbital with the conduction band of the liquid during thermodynamic integration. We conclude that NQEs might not have to be included in the computation of redox potentials, unless high accuracy is needed, but are important for VEA and VDE calculations.

  15. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  16. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  17. Scar and Antiscar Quantum Effects in Open Chaotic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1999-01-01

    We predict and numerically observe strong periodic orbit effects in the properties of open quantum systems with a chaotic classical limit. Antiscars lead to a large number of exponentially narrow resonances when the opening is located on a short unstable orbit of the closed system; the probability to remain in the system at long times is thus exponentially enhanced over the random matrix theory prediction. The distribution of resonance widths and the probability to remain are quantitatively given in terms of only the stability matrix of the orbit on which the opening is placed. The long-time remaining probability density is non-trivially distributed over the available phase space; it can be enhanced or suppressed near orbits other than the one on which the lead is located, depending on the periods and classical actions of these other orbits. These effects of the short periodic orbits on quantum decay rates have no classical counterpart, and first appear on times scales much larger than the Heisenberg time of ...

  18. Mixing effects in the crystallization of supercooled quantum binary liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühnel, M.; Kalinin, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fernández, J. M.; Tejeda, G.; Moreno, E.; Montero, S. [Laboratory of Molecular Fluid Dynamics, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Tramonto, F.; Galli, D. E. [Laboratorio di Calcolo Parallelo e di Simulazioni di Materia Condensata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nava, M. [Laboratorio di Calcolo Parallelo e di Simulazioni di Materia Condensata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Computational Science, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI Campus, Via Giuseppe Buffi 13, CH-6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut für Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI - Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-08-14

    By means of Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets, we have investigated the crystallization process of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures composed of parahydrogen (pH{sub 2}) or orthodeuterium (oD{sub 2}) diluted with small amounts of neon. We show that the introduction of the Ne impurities affects the crystallization kinetics in terms of a significant reduction of the measured pH{sub 2} and oD{sub 2} crystal growth rates, similarly to what found in our previous work on supercooled pH{sub 2}-oD{sub 2} liquid mixtures [Kühnel et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 180201(R) (2014)]. Our experimental results, in combination with path-integral simulations of the supercooled liquid mixtures, suggest in particular a correlation between the measured growth rates and the ratio of the effective particle sizes originating from quantum delocalization effects. We further show that the crystalline structure of the mixtures is also affected to a large extent by the presence of the Ne impurities, which likely initiate the freezing process through the formation of Ne-rich crystallites.

  19. Gravitational wave echoes from macroscopic quantum gravity effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló, Carlos; Carballo-Rubio, Raúl; Garay, Luis J.

    2017-05-01

    New theoretical approaches developed in the last years predict that macroscopic quantum gravity effects in black holes should lead to modifications of the gravitational wave signals expected in the framework of classical general relativity, with these modifications being characterized in certain scenarios by the existence of dampened rep-etitions of the primary signal. Here we use the fact that non-perturbative corrections to the near-horizon external geometry of black holes are necessary for these modifications to exist, in order to classify different proposals and paradigms with respect to this criterion and study in a neat and systematic way their phenomenology. Proposals that lead naturally to the existence of echoes in the late-time ringdown of gravitational wave signals from black hole mergers must share the replacement of black holes by horizonless configurations with a physical surface showing reflective properties in the relevant range of frequencies. On the other hand, proposals or paradigms that restrict quantum gravity effects on the external geometry to be perturbative, such as black hole complementarity or the closely related firewall proposal, do not display echoes. For the sake of completeness we exploit the interplay between the timescales associated with the formation of firewalls and the mechanism behind the existence of echoes in order to conclude that even unconventional distortions of the firewall concept (such as naked firewalls) do not lead to this phenomenon.

  20. Quantum pump effect in a four-terminal mesoscopic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaikai, Wang

    2015-02-01

    Quantum pump effect in a four-terminal mesoscopic structure constructed from a homogeneous two-dimensional electron gas is investigated. Oscillating electric potentials are applied to the two opposite terminals of the four-terminal mesoscopic structure. In both the remaining two opposite terminals and in the central region there are constant potentials that do not change with time. The oscillating potentials change slowly in comparison with all of the internal time scales of the structure and the amplitude of the oscillating potentials is small in comparison with the Fermi energy. The current of each lead and the transmission coefficients from one lead to another are calculated by using the non-equilibrium Green's function approach under the adiabatic approximation. In the remaining two opposite terminals of the four-terminal structure, the quantum pump effect can produce an electric current whose magnitude and direction depends on the Fermi energy. The pumped currents are ascribed to the asymmetry of transmission coefficients with respect to the Fermi energy.

  1. Quantum spin Hall effect in twisted bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchiaro, F.; Guinea, F.; San-Jose, P.

    2017-06-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment (Sanchez-Yamagishi et al 2016 Nat. Nanotechnol. 214) reporting evidence of helical spin-polarized edge states in layer-biased twisted bilayer graphene under a magnetic flux, we study the possibility of stabilising a quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase in such a system, without Zeeman or spin-orbit couplings, and with a QSH gap induced instead by electronic interactions. We analyse how magnetic flux, electric field, interlayer rotation angle, and interactions (treated at a mean field level) combine to produce a pseudo-QSH with broken time-reversal symmetry, and spin-polarized helical edge states. The effect is a consequence of a robust interaction-induced ferrimagnetic ordering of the quantum Hall ground state under an interlayer bias, provided the two rotated layers are effectively decoupled at low energies. We discuss in detail the electronic structure and the constraints on system parameters, such as the angle, interactions and magnetic flux, required to reach the pseudo-QSH phase. We find, in particular, that purely local electronic interactions are not sufficient to account for the experimental observations, which demand at least nearest-neighbour interactions to be included.

  2. Anomalous Effects from Dipole-Environment Quantum Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Porcelli, Elio B

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analyze anomalous effects observed in the operation of two different technological devices: a magnetic core and a parallel plate (symmetrical or asymmetrical) capacitor. From experimental measurements on both devices, we detected small raised anomalous forces that cannot be explained by known interactions in the traditional theories. As the variations of device inertia have not been completely understood by means of current theories, we here propose a theoretical framework in which the anomalous effects can consistently be explained by a preexisting state of quantum entanglement between the external environment and either magnetic dipoles of magnetic cores or electric dipoles of capacitors, so that the effects would be manifested by the application of a strong magnetic field on the former or an intense electric field on the latter. The values of the macroscopic observables calculated in such a theoretical framework revealed good agreement with the experimental measurements performed in both c...

  3. Gravitational quantum effects in the light of BICEP2 results

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Recently BICEP2 found that the vanishing of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ is excluded at $7\\sigma$ level, and its most likely value is $r=0.2^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$ at $1 \\sigma$ level. This immediately causes a tension with the Planck constraint $r < 0.11$. In addition, it also implies that the inflaton experienced a Planck excursion during inflation $\\Delta\\phi /M_{Pl} \\geq {\\cal{O}}(1)$, whereby the effective theory of inflation becomes questionable. In this brief report, we show that the inflationary paradigm is still robust, even after the quantum effects are taken into account. Moreover, these effects even help to relax the tension on the different values of $r$ given by BICEP2 and Planck.

  4. Pseudo Magnetic Faraday and Quantum Hall Effect In Oscillating Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Anita; Mullen, Kieran

    When a graphene layer is stressed, the strain changes the phase between sites in a tight binding model of the system. This phase can be viewed as a pseudo-magnetic vector potential. The corresponding pseudo-magnetic field has been experimentally verified in static cases. We examine the case of oscillating graphene ribbons and explore two new effects. The first is to investigate an oscillating pseudo-magnetic field that produces a quantum Hall effect: we calculate the I-V characteristic of an oscillating graphene nanoribbon as a function of frequency, and amplitude in both the oscillations and the applied driving voltage. Second, the time dependent pseudo-magnetic field should produce a pseudo-Faraday effect driving electrons in different valleys in opposite directions. In both cases, we make explicit calculations for experiment. This project was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation under Grant DMR-1310407.

  5. Thermopiezoelectric and Nonlinear Electromechanical Effects in Quantum Dots and Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sunil; Bahrami-Samani, M.; Melnik, R. V. N.; Toropova, M.; Zu, Jean

    2010-01-01

    We report thermopiezoelectric (TPE) and nonlinear electromechanical (NEM) effects in quantum dots (QD) and nanowires (NW) analyzed with a model based on coupled thermal, electric and mechanical balance equations. Several representative examples of low dimensional semiconductor structures (LDSNs) are studied. We focus mainly on GaN/AlN QDs and CdTe/ZnTe NWs which we analyze for different geometries. GaN/AlN nano systems are observed to be more sensitive to thermopiezoelectric effects than those of CdTe/ZnTe. Furthermore, noticeable qualitative and quantitative variations in electromechanical fields are observed as a consequence of taking into account NEM effects, in particular in GaN/AlN QDs.

  6. Temperature dependence of isotopic quantum effects in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, R T; Benmore, C J; Neuefeind, J; Kohara, S; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2005-02-04

    The technique of high energy x-ray diffraction has been used to measure the temperature variation of hydrogen versus deuterium isotopic quantum effects on the structure of water. The magnitude of the effect is found to be inversely proportional to the temperature, varying by a factor of 2.5 over the range 6 to 45 degrees C. In addition, the H216O versus H218O effect has been measured at 26 degrees C and the structural difference shown to be restricted to the nearest neighbor molecular interactions. The results are compared to recent simulations and previously measured isochoric temperature differentials; additionally, implications for H/D substitution experiments are considered.

  7. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Shyamal, E-mail: sbsp@uohyd.ac.in [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, C.R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad-500046 (India)

    2015-05-15

    We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over {sup 4}He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

  8. Observations of the Ramsauer-Townsend effect in quaternionic quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobhani, Hadi [Damghan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Young Researchers and Elite Club, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hassanabadi, Hassan [Shahrood University of Technology, Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chung, Won Sang [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Physics and Research Institute of Natural Science, College of Natural Science, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this article, one of the well-known effects in quantum mechanics is addressed and also the extended form of quantum mechanics which is based on quaternions is presented. In the presence of this version of quantum mechanics the Ramsauer-Townsend effect has been investigated and the existence of this phenomenon is studied according to quaternionic calculations; results are presented by graphs. (orig.)

  9. Probing the (empirical quantum structure embedded in the periodic table with an effective Bohr model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Nardin Favaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic shell structure can be observed by inspecting the experimental periodic properties of the Periodic Table. The (quantum shell structure emerges from these properties and in this way quantum mechanics can be explicitly shown considering the (semi-quantitative periodic properties. These periodic properties can be obtained with a simple effective Bohr model. An effective Bohr model with an effective quantum defect (u was considered as a probe in order to show the quantum structure embedded in the Periodic Table. u(Z shows a quasi-smoothed dependence of Z, i.e., u(Z ≈ Z2/5 - 1.

  10. Loop Quantum effects on Om-diagnostic and its Cosmological Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Rudra, Prabir

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the Loop quantum effects on the \\textit{Om} diagnostic and subsequently on the universe. We reconstruct the \\textit{Om} diagnostic in the background of Loop quantum gravity and then study the behaviour of various Chaplygin gas dark energy models using the modified diagnostic in a comparative scenario. The trajectories discriminate the various dark energy models from each other both in the Einstein gravity as well as Loop quantum gravity. The Loop quantum effects are also clearly noticeable from the trajectories in past, present and future universe. We see that the Loop quantum deviations are highly pronounced in the early universe, but alleviates as we tend towards the present universe and continue to decay in future. Thus it puts a big question on the effectiveness and consequently the suitability of loop quantum cosmology to explain the future universe.

  11. The quantum anomalous Hall effect in kagome lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhiyong, E-mail: zyzhang@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2011-09-14

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in kagome lattices is investigated in the presence of both Rashba spin-orbit coupling and an exchange field. In addition to the gap at the Dirac points as found in graphene, a new topological energy gap is opened at the {Gamma} point. With the Fermi energy lying in the first gap, the Chern number c = 2 as in graphene, whereas with it lying in the second one, c = 1. The distribution of Berry curvature is obtained to reveal the nontrivial topological properties in momentum space. For stripes with 'armchair' and 'zigzag' edges, the topological characteristics of gapless edge states on the genus g = 2 Riemann surface are studied. The obtained nonzero winding numbers also demonstrate the QAH effect. (paper)

  12. Quantum Electrodynamics Effects in Rovibrational Spectra of Molecular Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasa, Jacek; Piszczatowski, Konrad; Łach, Grzegorz; Przybytek, Michał; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2011-10-11

    The dissociation energies from all rovibrational levels of H2 and D2 in the ground electronic state are calculated with high accuracy by including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects in the nonadiabatic treatment of the nuclear motion. For D2, the obtained energies have theoretical uncertainties of 0.001 cm(-1). For H2, similar uncertainties are for the lowest levels, while for the higher ones the uncertainty increases to 0.005 cm(-1). Very good agreement with recent high-resolution measurements of the rotational v = 0 levels of H2, including states with large angular momentum J, is achieved. This agreement would not have been possible without accurate evaluation of the relativistic and QED contributions and may be viewed as the first observation of the QED effects, mainly the electron self-energy, in a molecular spectrum. For several electric quadrupole transitions, we still observe certain disagreement with experimental results, which remains to be explained.

  13. Magnetic Field Effects on Quantum-Dot Spin Valves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jin-Hua; SUN Qing-Feng; XIE Xin-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    We study the magnetic field effects on the spin-polarized transport of the quantum dot (QD) spin valve in the sequential tunneling regime. A set of generalized master equation is derived. Based on that, we discuss the collinear and noneollinear magnetic field effects, respectively. In the collinear magnetic field case, we find that the Zeeman splitting can induce a negative differential conductance (NDC), which is quite different from the one found in previous studies. It has a critical polarization in the parallel arrangement and will disappear in the antiparallel configuration. In the noncollinear magnetic field case, the current shows two plateaus and their angular dependence is analyzed. Although sometimes the two current plateaus have similar angular dependence, their mechanisms are different. Our formalism is also suitable for calculating the transport in magnetic molecules, in which the spin splitting is induced not by a magnetic field but by the intrinsic magnetization.

  14. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aavishkar A. Patel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z>1.

  15. Quantum effects in the diffusion of hydrogen on Ru(0001)

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Eliza M; Ellis, John; Michaelides, Angelos; Allison, William

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of hydrogen diffusion on metal surfaces is important, not just for its role in heterogeneous catalysis and hydrogen fuel cell technology, but also because it provides model systems where tunneling can be studied under well-defined conditions. Here we report helium spin-echo measurements of the atomic-scale motion of hydrogen on the Ru(0001) surface between 75 and 250 K. Quantum effects are evident at temperatures as high as 200 K, while below 120 K we observe a tunneling-dominated temperature independent jump rate of 1.9$\\times$10$^9$ s$^{-1}$, many orders of magnitude faster than previously seen. Quantum transition state theory calculations based on ab initio path-integral simulations reproduce the temperature dependence of the rate at higher temperatures and predict a crossover to tunneling-dominated diffusion at low temperatures, although the tunneling rate is under-estimated, highlighting the need for future experimental and theoretical studies of hydrogen diffusion on well-defined surfac...

  16. Radiation Effects in Nanostructures: Comparison of Proton Irradiation Induced Changes on Quantum Dots and Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, R.; Swift, G.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W.; Tang, Y.; Wang, K.; Dowd, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Successful implementation of technology using self-forming semiconductor Quantum Dots (QDs) has already demonstrated that temperature independent Dirac-delta density of states can be exploited in low current threshold QD lasers and QD infrared photodetectors.

  17. Quantum Transfer Energy and Nonlocal Correlation in a Dimer with Time-Dependent Coupling Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M.; Berrada, K.; Haddon, Robert C.; Al-Hadeethi, Yas F.; Al-Heniti, Saleh H.; Raffah, Bahaaudin M.

    2017-02-01

    The presence of coherence phenomenon due to the interference of probability amplitude terms, is one of the most important features of quantum mechanics theory. Recent experiments show the presence of quantum processes whose coherence provided over suddenly large interval-time. In particular, photosynthetic mechanisms in light-harvesting complexes provide oscillatory behaviors in quantum mechanics due to quantum coherence. In this work, we investigate the coherent quantum transfer energy for a single-excitation and nonlocal correlation in a dimer system modelled by a two-level atom system with and without time-dependent coupling effect. We analyze and explore the required conditions that are feasible with real experimental realization for optimal transfer of quantum energy and generation of nonlocal quantum correlation. We show that the enhancement of the probability for a single-excitation transfer energy is greatly benefits from the combination of the energy detuning and time-dependent coupling effect. We investigate the presence of quantum correlations in the dimer using the entanglement of formation. We also find that the entanglement between the donor and acceptor is very sensitive to the physical parameters and it can be generated during the coherent energy transfer. On the other hand, we study the dynamical behavior of the quantum variance when performing a measurement on an observable of the density matrix operator. Finally, an interesting relationship between the transfer probability, entanglement and quantum variance is explored during the time evolution in terms of the physical parameters.

  18. Quantum Size Effects on Two Electrons and Two Holes in Double-Layer Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang; ZHU Wu

    2002-01-01

    We propose a procedure to solve exactly the Schrodinger equation for a system of two electrons and two holes in a double-layer quantum dot by using the method of few-body physics. The features of the low-lying spectra have been deduced based on symmetry. The binding energies of the ground state are obtained as a function of the electron-to-hole mass ratio σ for a few values of the quantum dot size.

  19. Quantum Dynamics and Spectroscopy of Ab Initio Liquid Water: The Interplay of Nuclear and Electronic Quantum Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2017-03-22

    Understanding the reactivity and spectroscopy of aqueous solutions at the atomistic level is crucial for the elucidation and design of chemical processes. However, the simulation of these systems requires addressing the formidable challenges of treating the quantum nature of both the electrons and nuclei. Exploiting our recently developed methods that provide acceleration by up to 2 orders of magnitude, we combine path integral simulations with on-the-fly evaluation of the electronic structure at the hybrid density functional theory level to capture the interplay between nuclear quantum effects and the electronic surface. Here we show that this combination provides accurate structure and dynamics, including the full infrared and Raman spectra of liquid water. This allows us to demonstrate and explain the failings of lower-level density functionals for dynamics and vibrational spectroscopy when the nuclei are treated quantum mechanically. These insights thus provide a foundation for the reliable investigation of spectroscopy and reactivity in aqueous environments.

  20. Non-abelian fractional quantum hall effect for fault-resistant topological quantum computation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei; Thalakulam, Madhu; Shi, Xiaoyan; Crawford, Matthew; Nielsen, Erik; Cederberg, Jeffrey George

    2013-10-01

    Topological quantum computation (TQC) has emerged as one of the most promising approaches to quantum computation. Under this approach, the topological properties of a non-Abelian quantum system, which are insensitive to local perturbations, are utilized to process and transport quantum information. The encoded information can be protected and rendered immune from nearly all environmental decoherence processes without additional error-correction. It is believed that the low energy excitations of the so-called =5/2 fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state may obey non-Abelian statistics. Our goal is to explore this novel FQH state and to understand and create a scientific foundation of this quantum matter state for the emerging TQC technology. We present in this report the results from a coherent study that focused on obtaining a knowledge base of the physics that underpins TQC. We first present the results of bulk transport properties, including the nature of disorder on the 5/2 state and spin transitions in the second Landau level. We then describe the development and application of edge tunneling techniques to quantify and understand the quasiparticle physics of the 5/2 state.

  1. Quantum Effects on the Coulomb Logarithm for Energetic IonsDuring the Initial Thermalization Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓柏权; 严建成; 邓梅根; 彭利林

    2002-01-01

    We have discussed the quantum mechanical effects for the energetic charged particles produced in D - He3 fusionreactions. Our results show that it is better to use the proper Coulomb logarithm at the high-energy end indescribing the thermalization process, because the quantum mechanical effects on the Coulomb logarithm are notnegligible, based on an assumption of binary collision.

  2. Thickness Dependence of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulator Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Jing; Ou, Yunbo; Hao, Zhenqi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zuocheng; Zhang, Liguo; Lin, Chaojing; Liao, Jian; Li, Yongqing; Wang, Li-Li; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Yayu; He, Ke; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the quantum anomalous Hall effect with the thickness of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2 Te3 magnetic topological insulator films is studied, revealing how the effect is caused by the interplay of the surface states, band-bending, and ferromagnetic exchange energy. Homogeneity in ferromagnetism is found to be the key to high-temperature quantum anomalous Hall material.

  3. Bound values for Hall conductivity of heterogeneous medium under quantum Hall effect conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V E Arkhincheev

    2008-02-01

    Bound values for Hall conductivity under quantum Hall effect (QHE) conditions in inhomogeneous medium has been studied. It is shown that bound values for Hall conductivity differ from bound values for metallic conductivity. This is due to the unusual character of current percolation under quantum Hall effect conditions.

  4. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in stanene on a nonmagnetic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huisheng; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Yao, Yugui; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-12-01

    Since the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect was realized in magnetic topological insulators, research on the effect has become a hot topic. The very harsh realizing requirements of the effect in experiments, however, hinder its practical applications. Based on ab initio methods, we find that nonmagnetic Pb I2 films are ideal substrates for the two-dimensional honeycomb stanene. The QAH effect with a pretty large band gap (up to 90 meV) can be achieved in the functionalized stanene /Pb I2 heterostructure. Despite van der Waals interactions in the heterostructure, band inversions are found to be happening between Sn (s and px ,y ) and Pb (px ,y) orbitals, playing a key role in determining the nontrivial topology and the large band gap of the system. Having no magnetic atoms is imperative to triggering the QAH effect. A very stable rudimentary device having QAH effects is proposed based on the Sn /Pb I2 heterostructure. Our results demonstrate that QAH effects can be easily realized in the Sn /Pb I2 heterostructures in experiments.

  5. Memory effect in the upper bound of the heat flux induced by quantum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, T.

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamic behaviors in a quantum Brownian motion coupled to a classical heat bath is studied. We then define a heat operator by generalizing the stochastic energetics and show the energy balance (first law) and the upper bound of the expectation value of the heat operator (second law). We further find that this upper bound depends on the memory effect induced by quantum fluctuations and hence the maximum extractable work can be qualitatively modified in quantum thermodynamics.

  6. Covariant methods for calculating the low-energy effective action in quantum field theory and quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Avramidi, I G

    1994-01-01

    We continue the development of the effective covariant methods for calculating the heat kernel and the one-loop effective action in quantum field theory and quantum gravity. The status of the low-energy approximation in quantum gauge theories and quantum gravity is discussed in detail on the basis of analyzing the local Schwinger - De Witt expansion. It is argued that the low-energy limit, when defined in a covariant way, should be related to background fields with covariantly constant curvature, gauge field strength and potential. Some new approaches for calculating the low-energy heat kernel assuming a covariantly constant background are proposed. The one-loop low-energy effective action in Yang-Mills theory in flat space with arbitrary compact simple gauge group and arbitrary matter on a covariantly constant background is calculated. The stability problem of the chromomagnetic (Savvidy-type) vacuum is analyzed. It is shown, that this type of vacuum structure can be stable only in the case when more than on...

  7. The quantum anomalous Hall effect in kagomé lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong

    2011-09-14

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in kagomé lattices is investigated in the presence of both Rashba spin-orbit coupling and an exchange field. In addition to the gap at the Dirac points as found in graphene, a new topological energy gap is opened at the Γ point. With the Fermi energy lying in the first gap, the Chern number = 2 as in graphene, whereas with it lying in the second one, = 1. The distribution of Berry curvature is obtained to reveal the nontrivial topological properties in momentum space. For stripes with 'armchair' and 'zigzag' edges, the topological characteristics of gapless edge states on the genus g = 2 Riemann surface are studied. The obtained nonzero winding numbers also demonstrate the QAH effe

  8. Topological insulator in junction with ferromagnets: Quantum Hall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovskiy, A. L.; Kagalovsky, V.

    2015-06-01

    The ferromagnet-topological insulator-ferromagnet (FM-TI-FM) junction exhibits thermal and electrical quantum Hall effects. The generated Hall voltage and transverse temperature gradient can be controlled by the directions of magnetizations in the FM leads, which inspires the use of FM-TI-FM junctions as electrical and as heat switches in spintronic devices. Thermal and electrical Hall coefficients are calculated as functions of the magnetization directions in ferromagnets and the spin-relaxation time in TI. Both the Hall voltage and the transverse temperature gradient decrease but are not completely suppressed even at very short spin-relaxation times. The Hall coefficients turn out to be independent of the spin-relaxation time for symmetric configuration of FM leads.

  9. Quantum Hall effect in kagome lattices under staggered magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhiyong, E-mail: zyzhang@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2011-10-26

    The interplay of staggered magnetic field (SMF) and uniform magnetic field (UMF) on the quantum Hall effect (QHE) in kagome lattices is investigated in the weak UMF limit. The topological band gaps coming from SMF are robust against UMF although the extended bands split into a series of Landau levels. With SMF applied, in the unconventional QHE region, one plateau of Hall conductance becomes wider and the others are compressed. Meanwhile, one of the two series of integer Hall plateaus splits and the resulting two series of Hall plateaus still exhibit the integer behavior. The Hall conductance varies with SMF step by step with the step height being e{sup 2}/h or 2e{sup 2}/h according to the QHE being conventional or unconventional. In the transitional regions, redistribution of Chern numbers happens even in the weak UMF limit. (paper)

  10. Admittance measurements in the quantum Hall effect regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, C., E-mail: carlos.hernandezr@unimilitar.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Carrera 11 # 101-80, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia); Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, A.A. 4976, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia); Consejo, C.; Chaubet, C. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb L2C, Université Montpellier II, Pl. E. Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2014-11-15

    In this work we present an admittance study of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the quantum Hall effect (QHE) regime. We have studied several Hall bars in different contacts configurations in the frequency range 100 Hz–1 MHz. Our interpretation is based on the Landauer–Büttiker theory and takes into account both the capacitance and the topology of the coaxial cables which are connected to the sample holder. We show that we always observe losses through the capacitive impedance of the coaxial cables, except in the two contacts configuration in which the cable capacitance does not influence the admittance measurement of the sample. In this case, we measure the electrochemical capacitance of the 2DEG and show its dependence with the filling factor ν.

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezerlis, A; Tews, I; Epelbaum, E; Gandolfi, S; Hebeler, K; Nogga, A; Schwenk, A

    2013-07-19

    We present the first quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations with chiral effective field theory (EFT) interactions. To achieve this, we remove all sources of nonlocality, which hamper the inclusion in QMC calculations, in nuclear forces to next-to-next-to-leading order. We perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for the neutron matter energy up to saturation density based on local leading-order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order nucleon-nucleon interactions. Our results exhibit a systematic order-by-order convergence in chiral EFT and provide nonperturbative benchmarks with theoretical uncertainties. For the softer interactions, perturbative calculations are in excellent agreement with the AFDMC results. This work paves the way for QMC calculations with systematic chiral EFT interactions for nuclei and nuclear matter, for testing the perturbativeness of different orders, and allows for matching to lattice QCD results by varying the pion mass.

  12. Aharonov-Casher effect in quantum ring ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joibari, Fateme K.; Blanter, Ya. M.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2013-09-01

    We study the transport of electrons through a single-mode quantum ring with electric-field induced Rashba spin-orbit interaction that is subject to an in-plane magnetic field and weakly coupled to electron reservoirs. Modeling a ring array by ensemble averaging over a Gaussian distribution of energy-level positions, we predict slow conductance oscillations as a function of the Rashba interaction and electron density due to spin-orbit interaction induced beating of the spacings between the levels crossed by the Fermi energy. Our results agree with experiments by Nitta c.s. [J. Nitta, J. Takagi, F. Nagasawa, and M. Kohda, J. Phys.: Conference Series1742-659610.1088/1742-6596/302/1/012002 302, 012002 (2011) and Nagasawa (unpublished)], thereby providing an interpretation that differs from the ordinary Aharonov-Casher effect in a single ring.

  13. Effective Field Theory for Quantum Liquid in Dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gabadadze, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    An effective field theory approach is used to describe quantum matter at greater-than-atomic but less-than-nuclear densities which are encountered in white dwarf stars. We focus on the density and temperature regime for which charged spin-0 nuclei form an interacting charged Bose-Einstein condensate, while the neutralizing electrons form a degenerate fermi gas. After a brief introductory review, we summarize distinctive properties of the charged condensate, such as a mass gap in the bosonic sector as well as gapless fermionic excitations. Charged impurities placed in the condensate are screened with great efficiency, greater than in an equivalent uncondensed plasma. We discuss a generalization of the Friedel potential which takes into account bosonic collective excitations in addition to the fermionic excitations. We argue that the charged condensate could exist in helium-core white dwarf stars and discuss the evolution of these dwarfs. Condensation would lead to a significantly faster rate of cooling than th...

  14. Quantum spin Hall effect and topological insulators for light

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y

    2015-01-01

    We show that free-space light has intrinsic quantum spin-Hall effect (QSHE) properties. These are characterized by a non-zero topological spin Chern number, and manifest themselves as evanescent modes of Maxwell equations. The recently discovered transverse spin of evanescent modes demonstrates spin-momentum locking stemming from the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in Maxwell equations. As a result, any interface between free space and a medium supporting surface modes exhibits QSHE of light with opposite transverse spins propagating in opposite directions. In particular, we find that usual isotropic metals with surface plasmon-polariton modes represent natural 3D topological insulators for light. Several recent experiments have demonstrated transverse spin-momentum locking and spin-controlled unidirectional propagation of light at various interfaces with evanescent waves. Our results show that all these experiments can be interpreted as observations of the QSHE of light.

  15. Quantum-confined Stark effect in band-inverted junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Fernández, A.; Domínguez-Adame, F.

    2017-09-01

    Topological phases of matter are often characterized by interface states, which were already known to occur at the boundary of a band-inverted junction in semiconductor heterostructures. In IV-VI compounds such interface states are properly described by a two-band model, predicting the appearance of a Dirac cone in single junctions. We study the quantum-confined Stark effect of interface states due to an electric field perpendicular to a band-inverted junction. We find a closed expression to obtain the interface dispersion relation at any field strength and show that the Dirac cone widens under an applied bias. Thus, the Fermi velocity can be substantially lowered even at moderate fields, paving the way for tunable band-engineered devices based on band-inverted junctions.

  16. Quantum Gravity effect on the Quark-Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Elmashad, I; Abou-Salem, L I; Nabi, Jameel-Un; Tawfik, A

    2012-01-01

    The Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP), which has been predicted by various theories of quantum gravity near the Planck scale is implemented on deriving the thermodynamics of ideal Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) consisting of two massless quark flavors at the hadron-QGP phase equilibrium and at a vanishing chemical potential. The effective degrees of freedom and MIT bag pressure are utilized to distinguish between the hadronic and partonic phases. We find that GUP makes a non-negligible contribution to all thermodynamic quantities, especially at high temperatures. The asymptotic behavior of corresponding QGP thermodynamic quantities characterized by the Stephan-Boltzmann limit would be approached, when the GUP approach is taken into consideration.

  17. Optical waveguide arrays: quantum effects and PT symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Joglekar, Yogesh N; Scott, Derek D; Vemuri, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Over the last two decades, advances in fabrication have led to significant progress in creating patterned heterostructures that support either carriers, such as electrons or holes, with specific band structure or electromagnetic waves with a given mode structure and dispersion. In this article, we review the properties of light in coupled optical waveguides that support specific energy spectra, with or without the effects of disorder, that are well-described by a Hermitian tight-binding model. We show that with a judicious choice of the initial wave packet, this system displays the characteristics of a quantum particle, including transverse photonic transport and localization, and that of a classical particle. We extend the analysis to non-Hermitian, parity and time-reversal ($\\mathcal{PT}$) symmetric Hamiltonians which physically represent waveguide arrays with spatially separated, balanced absorption or amplification. We show that coupled waveguides are an ideal candidate to simulate $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetri...

  18. Crossed Andreev effects in two-dimensional quantum Hall systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhe; Xing, Yanxia; Guo, Ai-Min; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2016-08-01

    We study the crossed Andreev effects in two-dimensional conductor/superconductor hybrid systems under a perpendicular magnetic field. Both a graphene/superconductor hybrid system and an electron gas/superconductor one are considered. It is shown that an exclusive crossed Andreev reflection, with other Andreev reflections being completely suppressed, is obtained in a high magnetic field because of the chiral edge states in the quantum Hall regime. Importantly, the exclusive crossed Andreev reflection not only holds for a wide range of system parameters, e.g., the size of system, the width of central superconductor, and the quality of coupling between the graphene and the superconductor, but also is very robust against disorder. When the applied bias is within the superconductor gap, a robust Cooper-pair splitting process with high-efficiency can be realized in this system.

  19. Effect of Poisson noise on adiabatic quantum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, A.; Muga, J. G.; Ruschhaupt, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the master equation describing a general time-dependent quantum system with classical Poisson white noise and outline its various properties. We discuss the limiting cases of Poisson white noise and provide approximations for the different noise strength regimes. We show that using the eigenstates of the noise superoperator as a basis can be a useful way of expressing the master equation. Using this, we simulate various settings to illustrate different effects of Poisson noise. In particular, we show a dip in the fidelity as a function of noise strength where high fidelity can occur in the strong-noise regime for some cases. We also investigate recent claims [J. Jing et al., Phys. Rev. A 89, 032110 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.032110] that this type of noise may improve rather than destroy adiabaticity.

  20. Generalized Pseudopotentials for the Anisotropic Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Hu, Zi-Xiang; Lee, Ching Hua; Papić, Z.

    2017-04-01

    We generalize the notion of Haldane pseudopotentials to anisotropic fractional quantum Hall (FQH) systems that are physically realized, e.g., in tilted magnetic field experiments or anisotropic band structures. This formalism allows us to expand any translation-invariant interaction over a complete basis, and directly reveals the intrinsic metric of incompressible FQH fluids. We show that purely anisotropic pseudopotentials give rise to new types of bound states for small particle clusters in the infinite plane, and can be used as a diagnostic of FQH nematic order. We also demonstrate that generalized pseudopotentials quantify the anisotropic contribution to the effective interaction potential, which can be particularly large in models of fractional Chern insulators.

  1. The transport mechanism of the integer quantum Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    LiMing, W

    2016-01-01

    The integer quantum Hall effect is analysed using a transport mechanism with a semi-classic wave packages of electrons in this paper. A strong magnetic field perpendicular to a slab separates the electron current into two branches with opposite wave vectors $({\\it k})$ and locating at the two edges of the slab, respectively, along the current. In this case back scattering of electrons ($k\\rightarrow -k$) is prohibited by the separation of electron currents. Thus the slab exhibits zero longitudinal resistance and plateaus of Hall resistance. When the Fermi level is scanning over a Landau level when the magnetic field increases, however, the electron waves locate around the central axis of the slab and overlap each other thus back scattering of electrons takes place frequently. Then longitudinal resistance appears and the Hall resistance goes up from one plateau to a new plateau.

  2. Isotope quantum effects in water around the freezing point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, R T; Mei, Q; Benmore, C J; Neuefeind, J C; Turner, J F C; Dolgos, M; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2006-04-07

    We have measured the difference in electronic structure factors between liquid H(2)O and D(2)O at temperatures of 268 and 273 K with high energy x-ray diffraction. These are compared to our previously published data measured from 279 to 318 K. We find that the total structural isotope effect increases by a factor of 3.5 over the entire range, as the temperature is decreased. Structural isochoric temperature differential and isothermal density differential functions have been used to compare these data to a thermodynamic model based upon a simple offset in the state function. The model works well in describing the magnitude of the structural differences above approximately 310 K, but fails at lower temperatures. The experimental results are discussed in light of several quantum molecular dynamics simulations and are in good qualitative agreement with recent temperature dependent, rotationally quantized rigid molecule simulations.

  3. Suggestions for revised definitions of noise quantities, including quantum effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1999-03-01

    Recent advances in millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength receivers and the development of low-noise optical amplifiers focus attention on inconsistencies and ambiguities in the standard definitions of noise quantities and the procedures for measuring them. The difficulty is caused by the zero-point (quantum) noise hf/2 W/Hz, which is present even at absolute zero temperature, and also by the nonlinear dependence at low temperature of the thermal noise power of a resistor on its physical temperature, as given by the Planck law. Until recently, these effects were insignificant in all but the most exotic experiments, and the familiar Rayleigh-Jeans noise formula P=kT W/Hz could safely be used in most situations, Now, particularly in low-noise millimeter-wave and photonic devices, the quantum noise is prominent and the nonlinearity of the Planck law can no longer be neglected. The IEEE Standard Dictionary of Electrical and Electronics Terms gives several definitions of the noise temperature of a resistor or a port, which include: 1) the physical temperature of the resistor and 2) its available noise power density divided by Boltzmann's constant-definitions which are incompatible because of the nature of the Planck radiation law. In addition, there is no indication of whether the zero-point noise should be included as part of the noise temperature. Revised definitions of the common noise quantities are suggested, which resolve the shortcomings of the present definitions. The revised definitions have only a small effect on most RF and microwave measurements, but they provide a common consistent noise terminology from dc to light frequencies.

  4. Dynamical Lamb effect versus dissipation in superconducting quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, A. A.; Shapiro, D. S.; Pogosov, W. V.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting circuits provide a new platform for study of nonstationary cavity QED phenomena. An example of such a phenomenon is the dynamical Lamb effect, which is the parametric excitation of an atom due to nonadiabatic modulation of its Lamb shift. This effect was initially introduced for a natural atom in a varying cavity, while we suggest its realization in a superconducting qubit-cavity system with dynamically tunable coupling. In the present paper, we study the interplay between the dynamical Lamb effect and the energy dissipation, which is unavoidable in realistic systems. We find that despite naive expectations, this interplay can lead to unexpected dynamical regimes. One of the most striking results is that photon generation from vacuum can be strongly enhanced due to qubit relaxation, which opens another channel for such a process. We also show that dissipation in the cavity can increase the qubit excited-state population. Our results can be used for experimental observation and investigation of the dynamical Lamb effect and accompanying quantum effects.

  5. [Effect of quantum dots CdSe/ZnS's concentration on its fluorescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Min; Huang, Yu-hua; Luo, Ji-xiang

    2015-02-01

    The authors measured the absorption and the fluorescence spectra of the quantum dots CdSe/ZnS with 4 nm in size at different concentration with the use of the UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence spectrometer. The effect of quantum dots CdSe/ZnS's concentration on its fluorescence was especially studied and its physical mechanism was analyzed. It was observed that the optimal concentration of the quantum dots CdSe/ZnS for fluorescence is 2 micromole x L(-1). When the quantum dot's concentration is over 2 micromol x L(-1), the fluorescence is decreased with the increase in the concentration. While the quantum dot's concentration is less than 2 micromol x L(-1), the fluorescence is decreased with the decrease in the concentration. There are two main reasons: (1) fluorescence quenching and 2) the competition between absorption and fluorescence. When the quantum dot's concentration is over 2 micromol x L(-1), the distance between quantum dots is so close that the fluorescence quenching is induced. The closer the distance between quantum dots is, the more serious the fluorescence quenching is induced. Also, in this case, the absorption is so large that some of the quantum dots can not be excited because the incident light can not pass through the whole sample. As a result, the fluorescence is decreased with the increase in the quantum dot's concentration. As the quantum dot's concentration is below 2 micromol x L(-1), the distance between quantum dots is far enough that no more fluorescence quenching is induced. In this case, the fluorescence is determined by the particle number per unit volume. More particle number per unit volume produces more fluorescence. Therefore, the fluorescence is decreased with the decrease in the quantum dot's concentration.

  6. High-temperature intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in rare Earth monohalide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Menghao

    2017-06-01

    Although the quantum anomalous Hall effect was verified in 2013, presently its experimental realization is limited to doped magnetic topological insulators under extremely low temperature, while its theoretical existence is limited within doped or functionalized materials, or heterostructures. Based on first-principles calculations, LaCl and LaBr monolayer and bulk forms, which were fabricated in 1980s (Mattausch et al 1980 Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. 466 7-22 Araujo and Corbett 1981 Inorg. Chem. 20 3082-6), are both revealed to exhibit intrinsic 2D/3D quantum anomalous Hall effect with energy gaps up to 36 meV. These simple binary compounds are also revealed to be ferromagnets with high Curie temperature, which guarantees that the quantum anomalous Hall effect survives at ambient condictions. Besides holding promise for low-dissipation electronics and quantum computing, this proposal realizes 3D quantum anomalous Hall effect.

  7. Clutter attenuation using the Doppler effect in standoff electromagnetic quantum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Jitrik, Oliverio; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Venegas, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    In the context of traditional radar systems, the Doppler effect is crucial to detect and track moving targets in the presence of clutter. In the quantum radar context, however, most theoretical performance analyses to date have assumed static targets. In this paper we consider the Doppler effect at the single photon level. In particular, we describe how the Doppler effect produced by clutter and moving targets modifies the quantum distinguishability and the quantum radar error detection probability equations. Furthermore, we show that Doppler-based delayline cancelers can reduce the effects of clutter in the context of quantum radar, but only in the low-brightness regime. Thus, quantum radar may prove to be an important technology if the electronic battlefield requires stealthy tracking and detection of moving targets in the presence of clutter.

  8. Environment-induced effects on quantum chaos decoherence, delocalization and irreversibility

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, B L; Hu, B L; Shiokawa, K

    1997-01-01

    Decoherence in quantum systems which are classically chaotic is studied. It is well-known that a classically chaotic system when quantized loses many prominent chaotic traits. We show that interaction of the quantum system with an environment can under general circumstances quickly diminish quantum coherence and reenact some characteristic classical chaotic behavior. We use the Feynman-Vernon influence functional formalism to study the effect of an ohmic environment at high temperature on two classically-chaotic systems: The linear Arnold cat map (QCM) and the nonlinear quantum kicked rotor (QKR). Features of quantum chaos such as recurrence in QCM and diffusion suppression leading to localization in QKR are destroyed in a short time due to environment-induced decoherence. Decoherence also undermines localization and induces an apparent transition from reversible to irreversible dynamics in quantum chaotic systems.

  9. Piezoelectric effect in InAs/InP quantum rod nanowires grown on silicon substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anufriev, Roman; Chauvin, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.chauvin@insa-lyon.fr; Bru-Chevallier, Catherine [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL)-UMR5270-CNRS, INSA-Lyon, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Khmissi, Hammadi [Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoélectronique et Nanostructures (LMON), Faculté des Sciences, Avenue de l' environnement, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Naji, Khalid; Gendry, Michel [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL)-UMR5270-CNRS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Patriarche, Gilles [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures (LPN), UPR20-CNRS, route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France)

    2014-05-05

    We report on the evidence of a strain-induced piezoelectric field in wurtzite InAs/InP quantum rod nanowires. This electric field, caused by the lattice mismatch between InAs and InP, results in the quantum confined Stark effect and, as a consequence, affects the optical properties of the nanowire heterostructure. It is shown that the piezoelectric field can be screened by photogenerated carriers or removed by increasing temperature. Moreover, a dependence of the piezoelectric field on the quantum rod diameter is observed in agreement with simulations of wurtzite InAs/InP quantum rod nanowire heterostructures.

  10. Piezoelectric effect in InAs/InP quantum rod nanowires grown on silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anufriev, Roman; Chauvin, Nicolas; Khmissi, Hammadi; Naji, Khalid; Patriarche, Gilles; Gendry, Michel; Bru-Chevallier, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    We report on the evidence of a strain-induced piezoelectric field in wurtzite InAs/InP quantum rod nanowires. This electric field, caused by the lattice mismatch between InAs and InP, results in the quantum confined Stark effect and, as a consequence, affects the optical properties of the nanowire heterostructure. It is shown that the piezoelectric field can be screened by photogenerated carriers or removed by increasing temperature. Moreover, a dependence of the piezoelectric field on the quantum rod diameter is observed in agreement with simulations of wurtzite InAs/InP quantum rod nanowire heterostructures.

  11. Memory Effect in Upper Bound of Heat Flux Induced by Quantum Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, T

    2016-01-01

    We develop a model of quantum open systems as a quantum Brownian motion coupled to a classical heat bath by introducing a mathematical definition of operator differentials. We then define a heat operator by extending the stochastic energetics and show that this operator satisfies properties corresponding to the first and second laws in thermodynamics. We further find that the upper bound of the heat flux depends on the memory effect induced by quantum fluctuations and hence the maximum extractable work can be qualitatively modified in quantum thermodynamics.

  12. The Effect of Fatty Amine Chain Length on Synthesis Process of Inp/Zns Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining narrow size distribution through conventional methods used for quantum dots of group II-VI semiconductors is impractical in the case of III-V semiconductors speciallyInP/ZnS quantum dots because of molecular precursors depletion and growth stage continuation through Ostwald ripening process. Using fatty amines as activator along with precursors can lead to more monodispersed quantum dots. In this work, the effect of fatty amine chain length on InP/ZnS quantum dots synthesis was inve...

  13. Effective field theory of gravity: Leading quantum gravitational corrections to Newton's and Coulomb's laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Sven

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we consider general relativity and its combination with scalar quantum electrodynamics (QED) as an effective quantum field theory at energies well below the Planck scale. This enables us to compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the Newton and Coulomb potentials induced by the combination of graviton and photon fluctuations. We derive the relevant Feynman rules and compute the nonanalytical contributions to the one-loop scattering matrix for charged scalars in the nonrelativistic limit. In particular, we derive the post-Newtonian corrections of order Gm/c2r from general relativity and the genuine quantum corrections of order Gℏ/c3r2.

  14. InGaN/GaN laser diode characterization and quantum well number effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. M. Thahab; H. Abu Hassan; Z. Hassan

    2009-01-01

    The effect of quantum well number on the quantum efficiency and temperature characteristics of In-GaN/GaN laser diodes (LDs) is determined and investigated. The 3-nm-thick In0.13Ga0.87TN wells and two 6-nm-thick GaN barriers are selected as an active region for Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity waveguide edge emitting LD. The internal quantum efficiency and internal optical loss coefficient are extracted through the simulation software for single, double, and triple InGaN/GaN quantum wells. The effects of device temperature on the laser threshold current, external differential quantum efficiency (DQE), and output wavelength are also investigated. The external quantum efficiency and characteristic temperature are improved significantly when the quantum well number is two. It is indicated that the laser structures with many quantum wells will suffer from the inhomogeneity of the carrier density within the quantum well itself which affects the LD performance.

  15. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MC 0407, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0407 (United States)

    2017-02-12

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained. - Highlights: • High frequency electrostatic wave propagation is investigated in a dense semi-bounded quantum plasma. • The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. • The quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. • The frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave. • The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  16. Quantum memristors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  17. Quantum dissipative effects in graphene-like mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Fosco, C D; Mazzitelli, F D; Remaggi, M L

    2013-01-01

    We study quantum dissipative effects due to the accelerated motion of a single, imperfect, zero-width mirror. It is assumed that the microscopic degrees of freedom on the mirror are confined to it, like in plasma or graphene sheets. Therefore, the mirror is described by a vacuum polarization tensor $\\Pi_{\\alpha\\beta}$ concentrated on a time-dependent surface. Under certain assumptions about the microscopic model for the mirror, we obtain a rather general expression for the Euclidean effective action, a functional of the time-dependent mirror's position, in terms of two invariants that characterize the tensor $\\Pi_{\\alpha\\beta}$. The final result can be written in terms of the TE and TM reflection coefficients of the mirror, with qualitatively different contributions coming from them. We apply that general expression to derive the imaginary part of the `in-out' effective action, which measures dissipative effects induced by the mirror's motion, in different models, in particular for an accelerated graphene she...

  18. The surface termination effect on the quantum confinement and electron affinities of 3C-SiC quantum dots: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenkui; Dai, Ying; Yu, Lin; Guo, Meng; Huang, Baibiao; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2012-03-07

    In light of the established differences between the quantum confinement effect and the electron affinities between hydrogen-passivated C and Si quantum dots, we carried out theoretical investigations on SiC quantum dots, with surfaces uniformly terminated by C-H or Si-H bonds, to explore the role of surface terminations on these two aspects. Surprisingly, it was found that the quantum confinement effect is present (or absent) in the highest occupied (or lowest unoccupied) molecular orbital of the SiC quantum dots regardless of their surface terminations. Thus, the quantum confinement effect related to the energy gap observed experimentally (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 94, 026102) is contributed to by the size-dependence of the highest occupied states; the absence of quantum confinement in the lowest unoccupied states is in contrary to the usual belief based on hydrogen-passivated C quantum dots. However, the cause of the absence of the quantum confinement in C nanodots is not transferable to SiC. We propose a model that provides a clear explanation for all findings on the basis of the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interactions between the valence atomic p-orbital in the frontier occupied/unoccupied states. We also found that the electron affinities of the SiC quantum dots, which closely depend on the surface environments, are negative for the C-H termination and positive for the Si-H termination. The prediction of negative electron affinities in SiC quantum dots by simple C-H termination indicates a promising application for these materials in electron-emitter devices. Our model predicts that GeC quantum dots with hydrogen passivation exhibit similar features to SiC quantum dots and our study confirms the crucial role that the surface environment plays in these nanoscale systems.

  19. Magnetic Topological Insulators and Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xufeng

    The engineering of topological surface states is a key to realize applicable devices based on topological insulators (TIs). Among various proposals, introducing magnetic impurities into TIs has been proven to be an effective way to open a surface gap and integrate additional ferromagnetism with the original topological order. In this Dissertation, we study both the intrinsic electrical and magnetic properties of the magnetic TI thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. By doping transition element Cr into the host tetradymite-type V-VI semiconductors, we achieve robust ferromagnetic order with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. With additional top-gating capability, we realize the electric-field-controlled ferromagnetism in the magnetic TI systems, and demonstrate such magneto-electric effects can be effectively manipulated, depending on the interplays between the band topology, magnetic exchange coupling, and structural engineering. Most significantly, we report the observation of quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the Cr-doped (BiSb)2Te3 samples where dissipationless chiral edge conduction is realized in the macroscopic millimeter-size devices without the presence of any external magnetic field, and the stability of the quantized Hall conductance of e2/h is well-maintained as the film thickness varies across the 2D hybridization limit. With additional quantum confinement, we discover the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE states, and reveal the universal QAHE phase diagram in the thin magnetic TI samples. In addition to the uniform magnetic TIs, we further investigate the TI/Cr-doped TI bilayer structures prepared by the modulation-doped growth method. By controlling the magnetic interaction profile, we observe the Dirac hole-mediated ferromagnetism and develop an effective way to manipulate its strength. Besides, the giant spin-orbit torque in such magnetic TI-based heterostructures enables us to demonstrate the current

  20. Quantum gravity effects near the null black hole singularity

    CERN Document Server

    Bonanno, A; Bonanno, Alfio; Reuter, Martin

    1999-01-01

    The structure of the Cauchy Horizon singularity of a black hole formed in a generic collapse is studied by means of a renormalization group equation for quantum gravity. It is shown that during the early evolution of the Cauchy Horizon the strength of the classical divergence of the mass function is weakened when quantum fluctuations of the metric are taken into account.

  1. Quantum Chaotic Environments, The Butterfly Effect, And Decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Karkuszewski, Z P; Zurek, W H; Karkuszewski, Zbyszek P.; Jarzynski, Christopher; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of quantum systems that are chaotic in a classical limit, to small perturbations of their equations of motion. This sensitivity, originally studied in the context of defining quantum chaos, is relevant to decoherence in situations when the environment has a chaotic classical counterpart.

  2. Temperature scaling in the quantum-Hall-effect regime in a HgTe quantum well with an inverted energy spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arapov, Yu. G.; Gudina, S. V.; Neverov, V. N.; Podgornykh, S. M.; Popov, M. R., E-mail: rafaelp@yandex.ru; Harus, G. I.; Shelushinina, N. G.; Yakunin, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The longitudinal and Hall magnetoresistances of HgTe/HgCdTe heterostructures with an inverted energy spectrum (the HgTe quantum well width is d = 20.3 nm) are measured in the quantum-Hall-effect regime at T = 2–50 K in magnetic fields up to B = 9 T. Analysis of the temperature dependences of conductivity in the transition region between the first and second plateaus of the quantum Hall effect shows the feasibility of the scaling regime for a plateau–plateau quantum phase transition in 2D-structures on the basis of mercury telluride.

  3. Acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam in the presence of quantum effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aki, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model and obtaining the dispersion relation of the Cherenkov and cyclotron waves, the acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam is investigated. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of positrons are compared together. It is shown that growth rate and, therefore, the acceleration of positrons can be increased in the presence of quantum effects.

  4. The quantum vacuum in electromagnetic fields: From the Heisenberg-Euler effective action to vacuum birefringence

    CERN Document Server

    Karbstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The focus of these lectures is on the quantum vacuum subjected to classical electromagnetic fields. To this end we explicitly derive the renowned Heisenberg-Euler effective action in constant electromagnetic fields in a rather pedagogical and easy to conceive way. As an application, we use it to study vacuum birefringence constituting one of the most promising optical signatures of quantum vacuum nonlinearity.

  5. Crystal orientation effects on the piezoelectric field of strained zinc-blende quantum-well structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Willatzen, Morten; Lassen, Benny

    2008-01-01

    A three-layered zinc-blende quantum-well structure is analyzed subject to both static and dynamic conditions for different crystal growth directions taking into account piezoelectric effects and lattice mismatch. It is found that the strain component Szz in the quantum-well region strongly depend...

  6. Purcell effect of GaAs quantum dots by photonic crystal microcavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuaki Sakoda; Takashi Kuroda; Naoki Ikeda; Takaaki Mano; Yoshimasa Sugimoto; Tetsuyuki Ochiai; Keiji Kuroda; Shunsuke Ohkouchi; Nobuyuki Koguchi; Kiyoshi Asakawa

    2009-01-01

    We fabricate photonic crystal slab microcavities embedded with GaAs quantum dots by electron beam lithography and droplet epitaxy.The Purcell effect of exciton emission of the quantum dots is confirmed by the micro photoluminescence measurement.The resonance wavelengths,widths,and polarization are consistent with numerical simulation results.

  7. QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY SYSTEM WITH A SINGLE PHOTON SOURCE BASED ON THE SPONTANEOUS PARAMETRIC SCATTERING EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Egorov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A scheme of a single photon source for quantum informatics applications based on the spontaneous parametric scattering effect is proposed and a quantum cryptography setup using it is presented. The system is compared to the alternative ones that operate with attenuated classic light.

  8. Motion and gravity effects in the precision of quantum clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Lindkvist, Joel; Johansson, Göran; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-01-01

    We show that motion and gravity affect the precision of quantum clocks. We consider a localised quantum field as a fundamental model of a quantum clock moving in spacetime and show that its state is modified due to changes in acceleration. By computing the quantum Fisher information we determine how relativistic motion modifies the ultimate bound in the precision of the measurement of time. While in the absence of motion the squeezed vacuum is the ideal state for time estimation, we find that it is highly sensitive to the motion-induced degradation of the quantum Fisher information. We show that coherent states are generally more resilient to this degradation and that in the case of very low initial number of photons, the optimal precision can be even increased by motion. These results can be tested with current technology by using superconducting resonators with tunable boundary conditions.

  9. The robustness of the quantum spin Hall effect to the thickness fluctuation in HgTe quantum wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Huai-Ming; Zhang Xiang-Lin; Feng Shi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The quantum spin Hall effect (QSHE) was first realized in HgTe quantum wells (QWs),which remain the only known two-dimensional topological insulator so far.In this paper,we have systematically studied the effect of the thickness fluctuation of HgTe QWs on the QSHE.We start with the case of constant mass with random distributions,and reveal that the disordered system can be well described by a virtual uniform QW with an effective mass when the number of components is small.When the number is infinite and corresponds to the real fluctuation,we find that the QSHE is not only robust,but also can be generated by relatively strong fluctuation.Our results imply that the thickness fluctuation does not cause backscattering,and the QSHE is robust to it.

  10. Stark effect in a wedge-shaped quantum box

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Esqueda, J A; Castillo-Mussot, M; Vazquez, G J; Reyes-Esqueda, Jorge-Alejandro; Mendoza, Carlos I.; Castillo-Mussot, Marcelo del; Vazquez, Gerardo J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of an external applied electric field on the electronic ground state energy of a quantum box with a geometry defined by a wedge is studied by carrying out a variational calculation. This geometry could be used as an approximation for a tip of a cantilever of an atomic force microscope. We study theoretically the Stark effect as function of the parameters of the wedge: its diameter, angular aperture and thickness; as well as function of the intensity of the external electric field applied along the axis of the wedge in both directions; pushing the carrier towards the wider or the narrower parts. A confining electronic effect, which is sharper as the wedge dimensions are smaller, is clearly observed for the first case. Besides, the sign of the Stark shift changes when the angular aperture is changed from small angles to angles theta>pi. For the opposite field, the electronic confinement for large diameters is very small and it is also observed that the Stark shift is almost independent with respect t...

  11. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    CERN Document Server

    McKenzie, Ross H; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G

    2014-01-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, D-H....A, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (D) and acceptor (A) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H....O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4-3.0 A, i.e., from strong to weak bonds. The position of the proton and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are discussed. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effects, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of the b...

  12. Non-local quantum effects in cosmology 1: Quantum memory, non-local FLRW equations and singularity avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    Donoghue, John F

    2014-01-01

    We discuss cosmological effects of the quantum loops of massless particles, which lead to temporal non-localities in the equations of motion governing the scale factor a(t). For the effects discussed here, loops cause the evolution of a(t) to depend on the memory of the curvature in the past with a weight that scales initially as 1/(t-t'). As one of our primary examples we discuss the situation with a large number of light particles, such that these effects occur in a region where gravity may still be treated classically. However, we also describe the effect of quantum graviton loops and the full set of Standard Model particles. We show that these effects decrease with time in an expanding phase, leading to classical behavior at late time. In a contracting phase, within our approximations the quantum results can lead to a bounce-like behavior at scales below the Planck mass, avoiding the singularities required classically by the Hawking-Penrose theorems. For conformally invariant fields, such as the Standard ...

  13. Effects of Landau level mixing on the fractional quantum Hall effect in monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael R; Nayak, Chetan

    2014-08-22

    We report results of exact diagonalization studies of the spin- and valley-polarized fractional quantum Hall effect in the N = 0 and N = 1 Landau levels in graphene. We use an effective model that incorporates Landau level mixing to lowest order in the parameter κ = ((e(2)/εℓ)/(ħv(F)/ℓ)) = (e(2)/εv(F)ħ), which is magnetic field independent and can only be varied through the choice of substrate. We find Landau level mixing effects are negligible in the N = 0 Landau level for κ ≲ 2. In fact, the lowest Landau level projected Coulomb Hamiltonian is a better approximation to the real Hamiltonian for graphene than it is for semiconductor based quantum wells. Consequently, the principal fractional quantum Hall states are expected in the N = 0 Landau level over this range of κ. In the N = 1 Landau level, fractional quantum Hall states are expected for a smaller range of κ and Landau level mixing strongly breaks particle-hole symmetry, producing qualitatively different results compared to the N = 0 Landau level. At half filling of the N = 1 Landau level, we predict the anti-Pfaffian state will occur for κ ∼ 0.25-0.75.

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Oligonol, Acupuncture, and Quantum Light Therapy in Chronic Nonbacterial Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztekin, İlhan; Akdere, Hakan; Can, Nuray; Aktoz, Tevfik; Turan, Fatma Nesrin

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to compare anti-inflammatory effects of oligonol, acupuncture, and quantum light therapy in rat models of estrogen-induced prostatitis. Adult male Wistar albino rats were grouped as follows: Group I, control (n = 10); Group II, chronic prostatitis (n = 10); Group III, oligonol (n = 10); Group IV, acupuncture (n = 10); Group V, quantum (n = 10); Group VI, oligonol plus quantum (n = 10); Group VII, acupuncture plus oligonol (n = 10); Group VIII, quantum plus acupuncture (n = 10); and Group IX, acupuncture plus quantum plus oligonol (n = 10). Chronic prostatitis (CP) was induced by the administration of 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Oligonol was given for 6 weeks at a dose of 60 mg/day. Acupuncture needles were inserted at CV 3/4 and bilaterally B 32/35 points with 1-hour manual stimulation. Quantum therapy was administered in 5-minute sessions three times weekly for 6 weeks. Lateral lobes of prostates were dissected for histopathologic evaluation. Although all of the treatment modalities tested in this study showed anti-inflammatory effects in the treatment of CP in male rats, a synergistic effect was observed for oligonol plus quantum light combination. Monotherapy with oligonol showed a superior anti-inflammatory efficacy as compared to quantum light and acupuncture monotherapies. PMID:26064171

  15. All-optically induced ultrafast currents in GaAs quantum wells: Excitonic effects and dependence on quantum well width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyadarshi, Shekhar; Maria Racu, Ana; Pierz, Klaus; Siegner, Uwe; Bieler, Mark [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Dawson, Philip [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the influence of excitonic effects on ultrafast current transients that are induced in unbiased GaAs quantum wells by all-optical excitation. The ultrafast current transients result from second-order nonlinear optical effects and were detected by measuring the simultaneously emitted THz radiation. Experiments were performed on (110)-oriented GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well samples with different well widths and with 150 fs excitation laser pulses at room temperature. By studying the dependence of the current amplitude and phase on excitation photon energy in the different samples, we find that Coulomb effects and the quantum well width substantially affect the properties of these ultrafast currents. This becomes most prominently visible when exciting light-hole exciton transitions. The phase data shows that for excitation of light-hole-type transitions a current reversal occurs as compared to excitation of heavy-hole-type transitions. The amplitude dependence of the current transients on excitation photon energy is influenced by the reversed current contribution from heavy- and light-hole-type transitions, the complex bandstructure, and non-instantaneous effects contributing to the current dynamics.

  16. Spin-current Seebeck effect in quantum dot systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Cheng; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, X C

    2014-01-29

    We first bring up the concept of the spin-current Seebeck effect based on a recent experiment (Vera-Marun et al 2012 Nature Phys. 8 313), and investigate the spin-current Seebeck effect in quantum dot (QD) systems. Our results show that the spin-current Seebeck coefficient S is sensitive to different polarization states of the QD, and therefore can be used to detect the polarization state of the QD and monitor the transitions between different polarization states of the QD. The intradot Coulomb interaction can greatly enhance S due to the stronger polarization of the QD. By using the parameters for a typical QD whose intradot Coulomb interaction U is one order of magnitude larger than the linewidth Γ, we demonstrate that the maximum value of S can be enhanced by a factor of 80. On the other hand, for a QD whose Coulomb interaction is negligible, we show that one can still obtain a large S by applying an external magnetic field.

  17. Robust quantum anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic transition metal halides

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chengxi; Wu, Haiping; Deng, Kaiming; Jena, Puru; Kan, Erjun

    2016-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is a novel topological spintronic phenomenon arising from inherent magnetization and spin-orbit coupling. Various theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted in search of robust intrinsic QAH insulators. However, up to now, it has only been observed in Cr or V doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 film in experiments with very low working temperature. Based on the successful synthesis of transition metal halides, we use first-principles calculations to predict that RuI3 monolayer is an intrinsic ferromagnetic QAH insulator with a topologically nontrivial global band gap of 11 meV. This topologically nontrivial band gap at the Fermi level is due to its crystal symmetry, thus the QAH effect is robust. Its Curie temperature, estimated to be ~360 K using Monte-Carlo simulation, is above room temperature and higher than most of two-dimensional ferromagnetic thin films. We also discuss the manipulation of its exchange energy and nontrivial band gap by applying in-plane strain. Our wor...

  18. Driven superconducting proximity effect in interacting quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghaddam, Ali G.; Koenig, Juergen [Theoretische Physik, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); CeNIDE, Duisburg (Germany); Governale, Michele [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand)

    2012-07-01

    We show that strong superconducting correlations can be induced in an interacting quantum dot (QD) using fast oscillations in the effective coupling between the dot and superconducting leads which drive the dot out of equilibrium. This is in contrast with the well-known equilibrium state suppression of proximity effect in interacting QDs. In fact although interaction prohibits the superposition of empty (0) and doubly-occupied (d) states, fast coherent dynamics accompanied by the fast variations in the tunnel coupling can produce a nonequilibrium finite probability for such a superposition. Subsequently the superconducting correlations are established inside the QD when the energy difference between 0 and d states coincide with the frequency of driving oscillations. Simultaneously the nonequilibrium occupation probabilities of 0 and d states cause a pumping current flowing to the normal lead connected to the dot. Finally we demonstrate coherent oscillations in both dot charge and current by applying a pulsed oscillatory field to the coupling of dot and superconductor which show the possibility of coherent manipulation in the subspace of 0 and d states by changing the pulse duration.

  19. Effective Floquet-Gibbs states for dissipative quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Tatsuhiko; Thingna, Juzar; Mori, Takashi; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Miyashita, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    A periodically driven quantum system, when coupled to a heat bath, relaxes to a non-equilibrium asymptotic state. In the general situation, the retrieval of this asymptotic state presents a rather non-trivial task. It was recently shown that in the limit of an infinitesimal coupling, using the so-called rotating wave approximation (RWA), and under strict conditions imposed on the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, the asymptotic state can attain the Gibbs form. A Floquet-Gibbs state is characterized by a density matrix which is diagonal in the Floquet basis of the system Hamiltonian with the diagonal elements obeying a Gibbs distribution, being parametrized by the corresponding Floquet quasi-energies. Addressing the non-adiabatic driving regime, upon using the Magnus expansion, we employ the concept of a corresponding effective Floquet Hamiltonian. In doing so we go beyond the conventionally used RWA and demonstrate that the idea of Floquet-Gibbs states can be extended to the realistic case of a weak, although finite system-bath coupling, herein termed effective Floquet-Gibbs states.

  20. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic transition metal halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengxi; Zhou, Jian; Wu, Haiping; Deng, Kaiming; Jena, Puru; Kan, Erjun

    2017-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is a novel topological spintronic phenomenon arising from inherent magnetization and spin-orbit coupling. Various theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted in search of intrinsic QAH insulators. However, up to now, it has only been observed in Cr or V doped (Bi,Sb ) 2T e3 film in experiments with very low working temperature. Based on the successful synthesis of transition metal halides, we use first-principles calculations to predict that the Ru I3 monolayer is an intrinsic ferromagnetic QAH insulator with a topologically nontrivial global band gap of 11 meV. This topologically nontrivial band gap at the Fermi level is due to its crystal symmetry, thus the QAH effect is robust. Its Curie temperature, estimated to be ˜360 K using Monte Carlo simulation, is above room temperature and higher than most two-dimensional ferromagnetic thin films. The inclusion of Hubbard U in the Ru-d electrons does not affect this result. We also discuss the manipulation of its exchange energy and nontrivial band gap by applying in-plane strain. Our work adds an experimentally feasible member to the QAH insulator family, which is expected to have broad applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.