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Sample records for quantum interference device

  1. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F., E-mail: francois.lefloch@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA - INAC - SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D. [Université Paris-sud, CNRS - IEF, F-91405 Orsay - France (France); Hasselbach, K. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS - Inst. Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Kirtley, J. R. [Center for probing at nanoscale, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305-4045 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  2. rf superconducting quantum interference device metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2007-04-01

    A rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array in an alternating magnetic field is investigated with respect to its effective magnetic permeability, within the effective medium approximation. This system acts as an inherently nonlinear magnetic metamaterial, leading to negative magnetic response, and thus negative permeability above the resonance frequency of the individual SQUIDs. Moreover, the permeability exhibits oscillatory behavior at low field intensities, allowing its tuning by a slight change of the intensity of the applied field.

  3. Quantum search via superconducting quantum interference devices in a cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yan; Dong Ping; Xue Zheng-Yuan; Cao Zhuo-Liang

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for implementing the Grover search algorithm with two superconducing quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a cavity. Our scheme only requires single resonant interaction of the SQUID-cavity system and the required interaction time is very short. The simplicity of the process and the reduction of the interaction time are important for restraining decoherence.

  4. High sensitivity double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelerhof, Derk Jan; Adelerhof, Derk Jan; Kawai, Jun; Uehara, Gen; Kado, Hisashi

    1994-01-01

    Double relaxation oscillationsuperconducting quantum interference devices(SQUIDs) (DROSs) have been fabricated with estimated relaxation frequencies up to 14 GHz. Both the intrinsic flux noise and the performance in a flux locked loop with direct voltage readout have been studied. In flux locked

  5. Improved superconducting quantum interference devices by resistance asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, G.; Pagano, S.; Sarnelli, E.; Calidonna, C. R.; Furnari, M. Mango

    2001-10-01

    Direct current superconducting quantum interference devices made by Josephson junctions with asymmetric shunt resistances have been numerically investigated in the low temperature regime. When combined with a damping resistance, the asymmetry leads to a flux to voltage transfer coefficient several times larger than the one typical of symmetric devices, together with a lower magnetic flux noise. These results show that this type of asymmetric device may replace the standard ones in a large number of magnetometric applications, improving the sensitivity performance. The large transfer coefficient may also simplify the readout electronics allowing a direct coupling of asymmetric devices to an external preamplifier, without the need of an impedance matching flux transformer.

  6. Micron size superconducting quantum interference devices of lead (Pb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sagar; Biswas, Sourav; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2017-02-01

    Micron size superconducting quantum interference devices (μ-SQUID) of lead (Pb), for probing nano-magnetism, were fabricated and characterized. In order to get continuous Pb films with small grain size, Pb was thermally evaporated on a liquid nitrogen cooled Si substrate. Pb was sandwiched between two thin Cr layers for improved adhesion and protection. The SQUID pattern was made by e-beam lithography with Pb lift-off after deposition. The current-voltage characteristics of these devices show a critical current, which exhibits the expected SQUID oscillations with magnetic field, and two re-trapping currents. As a result these devices have hysteresis at low temperatures, which disappears just below the critical temperature.

  7. Nano-superconducting quantum interference devices with suspended junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazra, D.; Hasselbach, K. [Institut Néel, CNRS and Université Joseph Fourier, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble (France); Kirtley, J. R. [Center for Probing the Nanoscale, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305-4045 (United States)

    2014-04-14

    Nano-Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (nano-SQUIDs) are usually fabricated from a single layer of either Nb or Al. We describe here a simple method for fabricating suspended nano-bridges in Nb/Al thin-film bilayers. We use these suspended bridges, which act as Josephson weak links, to fabricate nano-SQUIDs which show critical current oscillations at temperatures up to 1.5 K and magnetic flux densities up to over 20 mT. These nano-SQUIDs exhibit flux modulation depths intermediate between all-Al and all-Nb devices, with some of the desirable characteristics of both. The suspended geometry is attractive for magnetic single nanoparticle measurements.

  8. Parameter scaling in the decoherent quantum-classical transition for chaotic rf superconducting quantum interference devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ting; Yu, Yang

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigated the quantum-classical transition in rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) systems coupled to a dissipative environment. It is found that chaos emerges and the degree of chaos, the maximal Lyapunov exponent lambda(m), exhibits nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the coupling strength D. By measuring the proximity of quantum and classical evolution with the uncertainty of dynamics, we show that the uncertainty is a monotonic function of lambda(m)/D. In addition, the scaling holds in SQUID systems to a relatively smaller variant Planck's over [symbol: see text], suggesting the universality for this scaling.

  9. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K.

  10. Bosonic Operator Realization of Hamiltonian for a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi

    2004-01-01

    Based on the appropriate bosonic phase operator diagonalized in the entangled state representation we construct the Hamiltonian operator model for a superconducting quantum interference device. The current operator and voltage operator equations are derived.

  11. Quantum-ring spin interference device tuned by quantum point contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diago-Cisneros, Leo [Facultad de Física, Universidad de La Habana, C.P.10400, La Habana (Cuba); Mireles, Francisco [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, C.P. 22800 Ensenada, Baja California, México (Mexico)

    2013-11-21

    We introduce a spin-interference device that comprises a quantum ring (QR) with three embedded quantum point contacts (QPCs) and study theoretically its spin transport properties in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Two of the QPCs conform the lead-to-ring junctions while a third one is placed symmetrically in the upper arm of the QR. Using an appropriate scattering model for the QPCs and the S-matrix scattering approach, we analyze the role of the QPCs on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) conductance oscillations of the QR-device. Exact formulas are obtained for the spin-resolved conductances of the QR-device as a function of the confinement of the QPCs and the AB/AC phases. Conditions for the appearance of resonances and anti-resonances in the spin-conductance are derived and discussed. We predict very distinctive variations of the QR-conductance oscillations not seen in previous QR proposals. In particular, we find that the interference pattern in the QR can be manipulated to a large extend by varying electrically the lead-to-ring topological parameters. The latter can be used to modulate the AB and AC phases by applying gate voltage only. We have shown also that the conductance oscillations exhibits a crossover to well-defined resonances as the lateral QPC confinement strength is increased, mapping the eigenenergies of the QR. In addition, unique features of the conductance arise by varying the aperture of the upper-arm QPC and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our results may be of relevance for promising spin-orbitronics devices based on quantum interference mechanisms.

  12. Implementation of Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices via Raman Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical scheme is proposed to implement the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm with SQUIDs (superconducting quantum-interference devices) in cavity via Raman transition. The scheme only requires a quantized cavity field and classical microwave pulses. In this scheme, no transfer of quantum information between the SQUIDs and the cavity is required, the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed.

  13. Generation of an Entangled State of Two Three-Level Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices in Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating a maximally entangled state of two three-level superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) by using a quantized cavity field and classical microwave pluses in cavity. In this scheme, no quantum information will be transferred from the SQUIDs to the cavity since the cavity field is only virtually excited. Thus, the cavity decay is suppressed during the entanglement generation.

  14. Note: A hand-held high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device operating without shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, D F

    2011-02-01

    By improving the compensation circuit, a hand-held high-Tc rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) system was developed. It could operate well when moving in unshielded environment. To check the operation, it was used to do eddy-current testing by hand moving the SQUID, and the artificial defect under 6 mm aluminum plate could be successfully detected in shielded environment.

  15. Generation of Entangled States of Multiple Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices in Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating the maximally entangled states of many superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) by using a quantized cavity field and classicalmicrowave pulses in cavity. In the scheme,the maximally entangled states can be generated without requiring the measurement and individual addressing of the SQUIDs.

  16. Broadband calibrated scattering parameters characterization of a superconducting quantum interference device amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranzani, Leonardo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Spietz, Lafe; Aumentado, Jose [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2013-07-08

    In this work, we characterize the 2-port scattering parameters of a superconducting quantum interference device amplifier at {approx}20 mK over several gigahertz of bandwidth. The measurement reference plane is positioned on a 6.25 {Omega} microstrip line situated directly at the input and output of the device by means of a thru-reflect-line cryogenic calibration procedure. From the scattering parameters, we derive the device available power gain, isolation, and input impedance over the 2-8 GHz range. This measurement methodology provides a path towards designing wide-band matching circuits for low impedance superconducting amplifiers operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures.

  17. Retrieval of original signals for superconducting quantum interference device operating in flux locked mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘当婷; 田野; 赵士平; 任育峰; 陈赓华

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a simple relation between the input and output signals of a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer operating in flux locked mode in a cosine curve approximation. According to this relation, an original fast input signal can be easily retrieved from its distorted output response. This technique can be used in some areas such as sensitive and fast detection of magnetic or metallic grains in medicine and food security checking.

  18. Note: Increasing dynamic range of digital-to-analog converter using a superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Masakazu, E-mail: m.nakanishi@aist.go.jp [Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Central-3, 1-1, Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Responses of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) are periodically dependent on magnetic flux coupling to its superconducting ring and the period is a flux quantum (Φ{sub o} = h/2e, where h and e, respectively, express Planck's constant and elementary charge). Using this periodicity, we had proposed a digital to analog converter using a SQUID (SQUID DAC) of first generation with linear current output, interval of which corresponded to Φ{sub o}. Modification for increasing dynamic range by interpolating within each interval is reported. Linearity of the interpolation was also based on the quantum periodicity. A SQUID DAC with dynamic range of about 1.4 × 10{sup 7} was created as a demonstration.

  19. IETS and quantum interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Destructive quantum interference in single molecule electronics is an intriguing phenomenon; however, distinguishing quantum interference effects from generically low transmission is not trivial. In this paper, we discuss how quantum interference effects in the transmission lead to either low...... suppressed when quantum interference effects dominate. That is, we expand the understanding of propensity rules in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy to molecules with destructive quantum interference....

  20. Modulation Voltage of High T c DC Superconducting Quantum Interference Device with Damping Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enpuku, Keiji; Doi, Hideki; Tokita, Go; Maruo, Taku

    1994-05-01

    The effect of damping resistance on the voltage versus flux (V -Φ) relation of the high T c dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is studied experimentally. Dc SQUID using YBaCuO step-edge junction and damping resistance in parallel with SQUID inductance is fabricated. Measured values of modulation voltage in the V -Φ relation are compared with those of the conventional SQUID without damping resistance. It is shown that modulation voltage is much improved by using damping resistance. The obtained experimental results agree reasonably with theoretical predictions reported previously.

  1. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N

    2000-01-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz(1/2) in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz(1/2) at 10 Hz) was present. Compute...

  2. Fast preparation of W states with superconducting quantum interference devices by using dressed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ye-Hong; Shi, Zhi-Cheng; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a protocol to prepare W states with superconducting quantum interference devices by using dressed states. Through choosing a set of dressed states suitably, the protocol can be used to accelerate the adiabatic passages while additional couplings are unnecessary. Moreover, we can optimize the evolution of the system with the restraint to the populations of the intermediate states by choosing suitable control parameters. Numerical simulations show that the protocol is robust against the parameter variations and decoherence mechanisms. Furthermore, the protocol is faster and more robust against the dephasing compared with that by the adiabatic passages. As for the Rabi frequencies of pulses designed by the method, they can be expressed by the linear superpositions of Gaussian functions, which does not increase difficulty in the experiments. In addition, the protocol could be controlled and manipulated easily in experiments with a circuit quantum electrodynamics system.

  3. Accurate periodicity measurement of superconducting quantum interference device magnetic flux response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Masakazu

    2010-09-01

    It is theoretically explained that a response of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is periodically dependent on total magnetic flux coupling to the SQUID ring (Φ) and its period is a flux quantum (Φ(o)=h/2e, where h and e, respectively, express Planck's constant and elementary charge). For example, the voltage of an electromagnetically oscillated rf-SQUID or a current biased dc-SQUID is thought to be periodically dependent on Φ with a period of Φ(o). In this paper, we propose an accurate method to check the periodicity of a SQUID response by using a set of sensing coils covered with a superconducting sheath. As a demonstration, we measured periodicity of a commercially available thin-film type rf-SQUID response in magnetic flux ranging up to approximately 4300Φ(o). Its flux dependence was periodic below about 3400Φ(o).

  4. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu; Falferi, P. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  5. Principle and experimental investigation of current-driven negative-inductance superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Jianshe; Zhang, Yingshan; Cai, Han; Li, Gang; Liu, Qichun; Han, Siyuan; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-01

    A negative-inductance superconducting quantum interference device (nSQUID) is an adiabatic superconducting logic device with high energy efficiency, and therefore a promising building block for large-scale low-power superconducting computing. However, the principle of the nSQUID is not that straightforward and an nSQUID driven by voltage is vulnerable to common mode noise. We investigate a single nSQUID driven by current instead of voltage, and clarify the principle of the adiabatic transition of the current-driven nSQUID between different states. The basic logic operations of the current-driven nSQUID with proper parameters are simulated by WRspice. The corresponding circuit is fabricated with a 100 A cm‑2 Nb-based lift-off process, and the experimental results at low temperature confirm the basic logic operations as a gated buffer.

  6. Non-linear behaviour of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device coupled to a radio frequency oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Murrell, J K J

    2001-01-01

    previously unexplored regions of parameter space. We show that these calculations predict a range of previously unreported dynamical I-V characterises for SQUID rings in the strongly hysteretic regime. Finally, we present the successful realisation of a novel experimental technique that permits the weak link of a SQUID to be probed independently of the associated ring structure by mechanically opening and closing the ring. We demonstrate that this process can be completed during the same experimental run without the need for warming and re-cooling of the sample. This thesis is concerned with the investigation of the non-linear behaviour of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) coupled to a RF tank circuit. We consider two regimes, one where the underlying SQUID behaviour is non-hysteretic with respect to an externally applied magnetic flux, and the other where hysteretic (dissipative) behaviour is observed. We show that, by following non-linearities induced in the tank circuit response, the un...

  7. External driving synchronization in a superconducting quantum interference device based oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Zhao, Peng; Yu, Haifeng; Yu, Yang

    2016-11-01

    We propose an external driving, self-sustained oscillator based on superconducting resonators. The dynamics of the self-sustained oscillator can be described by a Duffing-van der Pol like equation. Under external driving, the self-sustained oscillator presents synchronization phenomena. We analytically and numerically investigate the synchronization regions, and the results show that the synchronization bandwidth can be quickly adjusted in situ by the external weak magnetic field in sub-nano seconds. Moreover, the system can re-stabilize in about 10 ns with a certain sudden change of driving frequency or the critical current of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). These advantages allow the potential applications of self-sustained oscillators in timing reference, microwave communication and electromagnetic sensing.

  8. Realization and Modeling of Metamaterials Made of rf Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trepanier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have prepared meta-atoms based on radio-frequency superconducting quantum-interference devices (rf SQUIDs and examined their tunability with dc magnetic field, rf current, and temperature. rf SQUIDs are superconducting split-ring resonators in which the usual capacitance is supplemented with a Josephson junction, which introduces strong nonlinearity in the rf properties. We find excellent agreement between the data and a model that regards the Josephson junction as the resistively and capacitively shunted junction. A magnetic field tunability of 80  THz/G at 12 GHz is observed, a total tunability of 56% is achieved, and a unique electromagnetically induced transparency feature at intermediate excitation powers is demonstrated for the first time. An rf SQUID metamaterial is shown to have qualitatively the same behavior as a single rf SQUID with regard to dc flux and temperature tuning.

  9. Experimental validation of superconducting quantum interference device sensors for electromagnetic scattering in geologic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.; Ruminer, P. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project has supported the collaborative development with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) of two critical components for a hand-held low-field magnetic sensor based on superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensor technology. The two components are a digital signal processing (DSP) algorithm for background noise rejection and a small hand-held dewar cooled by a cryocooler. A hand-held sensor has been designed and fabricated for detection of extremely weak magnetic fields in unshielded environments. The sensor is capable of measuring weak magnetic fields in unshielded environments and has multiple applications. We have chosen to pursue battlefield medicine as the highest probability near-term application because of stated needs of several agencies.

  10. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob, E-mail: ihahn@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  11. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  12. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Mok, E-mail: jmkim@kriss.re.kr; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong [Brain Cognition Measurement Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  13. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2013-12-01

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  14. Tunable strong nonlinearity of a micromechanical beam embedded in a dc-superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ella, Lior, E-mail: lior.ella@weizmann.ac.il; Yuvaraj, D.; Suchoi, Oren; Shtempluk, Oleg; Buks, Eyal [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-01-07

    We present a study of the controllable nonlinear dynamics of a micromechanical beam coupled to a dc-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device). The coupling between these systems places the modes of the beam in a highly nonlinear potential, whose shape can be altered by varying the bias current and applied flux of the SQUID. We detect the position of the beam by placing it in an optical cavity, which sets free the SQUID to be used solely for actuation. This enables us to probe the previously unexplored full parameter space of this device. We measure the frequency response of the beam and find that it displays a Duffing oscillator behavior which is periodic in the applied magnetic flux. To account for this, we develop a model based on the standard theory for SQUID dynamics. In addition, with the aim of understanding if the device can reach nonlinearity at the single phonon level, we use this model to show that the responsivity of the current circulating in the SQUID to the position of the beam can become divergent, with its magnitude limited only by noise. This suggests a direction for the generation of macroscopically distinguishable superposition states of the beam.

  15. Parasitic effects in superconducting quantum interference device-based radiation comb generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosisio, R., E-mail: riccardo.bosisio@nano.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); NEST, Instituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Giazotto, F., E-mail: giazotto@sns.it [NEST, Instituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Solinas, P., E-mail: paolo.solinas@spin.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

    2015-12-07

    We study several parasitic effects on the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) driven by an external magnetic field. This system can be used as a radiation generator similarly to what is done in optics and metrology, and allows one to generate up to several hundreds of harmonics of the driving frequency. First we take into account how the assumption of a finite loop geometrical inductance and junction capacitance in each SQUID may alter the operation of the devices. Then, we estimate the effect of imperfections in the fabrication of an array of SQUIDs, which is an unavoidable source of errors in practical situations. We show that the role of the junction capacitance is, in general, negligible, whereas the geometrical inductance has a beneficial effect on the performance of the device. The errors on the areas and junction resistance asymmetries may deteriorate the performance, but their effect can be limited to a large extent by a suitable choice of fabrication parameters.

  16. Step edge Josephson junctions and high temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Millar, A J

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) gradiometers based on the high temperature superconductor YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta (YBCO). A step-edge Josephson junction fabrication process was developed to produce sufficiently steep (>60 deg) step-edges such that junctions exhibited RSJ-like current-voltage characteristics. The mean I sub C R sub N product of a sample of twenty step-edge junctions was 130 mu V. Step-edge dc SQUIDs with inductances between 67pH and 114pH were fabricated. Generally the SQUIDs had an intrinsic white flux noise in the 10-30 mu PHI sub 0 /sq root Hz range, with the best device, a 70pH SQUID, exhibiting a white flux noise of 5 mu PHI sub 0 /sq root Hz. Different first-order SQUID gradiometer designs were fabricated from single layers of YBCO. Two single-layer gradiometer (SLG) designs were fabricated on 10x10mm sup 2 substrates. The best balance and lowest gradient sensitivity measured for these devices were 1/3...

  17. Self-heterodyne detection of the in situ phase of an atomic superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, R.; Kumar, A.; Eckel, S.; Jendrzejewski, F.; Campbell, G. K.; Edwards, Mark; Tiesinga, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present theoretical and experimental analysis of an interferometric measurement of the in situ phase drop across and current flow through a rotating barrier in a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). This experiment is the atomic analog of the rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The phase drop is extracted from a spiral-shaped density profile created by the spatial interference of the expanding toroidal BEC and a reference BEC after release from all trapping potentials. We characterize the interferometer when it contains a single particle, which is initially in a coherent superposition of a torus and reference state, as well as when it contains a many-body state in the mean-field approximation. The single-particle picture is sufficient to explain the origin of the spirals, to relate the phase-drop across the barrier to the geometry of a spiral, and to bound the expansion times for which the in situ phase can be accurately determined. Mean-field estimates and numerical simulations show that the interatomic interactions shorten the expansion time scales compared to the single-particle case. Finally, we compare the mean-field simulations with our experimental data and confirm that the interferometer indeed accurately measures the in situ phase drop.

  18. Tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Taku J.; Okuyama, Daisuke; Kimura, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    A tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (T-ADR) has been developed for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer [Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS) from Quantum Design]. The whole T-ADR system is fit in a cylindrical space of diameter 8.5 mm and length 250 mm, and can be inserted into the narrow sample tube of MPMS. A sorption pump is self-contained in T-ADR, and hence no complex gas handling system is necessary. With the single crystalline Gd3Ga5O12 garnet (˜2 g) used as a magnetic refrigerant, the routinely achievable lowest temperature is ˜0.56 K. The lower detection limit for a magnetization anomaly is ˜1 × 10-7 emu, estimated from fluctuation of the measured magnetization. The background level is ˜5 × 10-5 emu below 2 K at H = 100 Oe, which is largely attributable to a contaminating paramagnetic signal from the magnetic refrigerant.

  19. Tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Taku J; Okuyama, Daisuke; Kimura, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    A tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (T-ADR) has been developed for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer [Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS) from Quantum Design]. The whole T-ADR system is fit in a cylindrical space of diameter 8.5 mm and length 250 mm, and can be inserted into the narrow sample tube of MPMS. A sorption pump is self-contained in T-ADR, and hence no complex gas handling system is necessary. With the single crystalline Gd3Ga5O12 garnet (∼2 g) used as a magnetic refrigerant, the routinely achievable lowest temperature is ∼0.56 K. The lower detection limit for a magnetization anomaly is ∼1 × 10(-7) emu, estimated from fluctuation of the measured magnetization. The background level is ∼5 × 10(-5) emu below 2 K at H = 100 Oe, which is largely attributable to a contaminating paramagnetic signal from the magnetic refrigerant.

  20. Development of a Cryostat to Characterize Nano-scale Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Mathew; Matheny, Matthew; Knudsen, Jasmine

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and constructed a low-noise vacuum cryostat to be used for the characterization of nano-scale superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Such devices are very sensitive to magnetic fields and can measure changes in flux on the order of a single electron magnetic moment. As a part of the design process, we calculated the separation required between the cryogenic preamplifier and superconducting magnet, including a high-permeability magnetic shield, using a finite-element model of the apparatus. The cryostat comprises a vacuum cross at room temperature for filtered DC and shielded RF electrical connections, a thin-wall stainless steel support tube, a taper-sealed cryogenic vacuum can, and internal mechanical support and wiring for the nanoSQUID. The Dewar is modified with a room-temperature flange with a sliding seal for the cryostat. The flange supports the superconducting 3 Tesla magnet and thermometry wiring. Upon completion of the cryostat fabrication and Dewar modifications, operation of the nanoSQUIDs as transported from our collaborator's laboratory in Israel will be confirmed, as the lead forming the SQUID is sensitive to oxidation and the SQUIDs must be shipped in a vacuum container. After operation of the nanoSQUIDs is confirmed, the primary work of characterizing their high-speed properties will begin. This will include looking at the measurement of relaxation oscillations at high bandwidth in comparison to the theoretical predictions of the current model.

  1. High temperature superconducting thin films and quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for gradiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Graf zu Eulenburg, A

    1999-01-01

    the best balance and gradient sensitivity at 1kHz were 3x10 sup - sup 3 and 222fT/(cm sq root Hz))) respectively. The measured spatial response to a current carrying wire was in good agreement with a theoretical model. A significant performance improvement was obtained with the development of a single layer gradiometer with 13mm baseline, fabricated on 30x10mm sup 2 bicrystals. For such a device, the gradient sensitivity at 1kHz was 50fT/(cm sq root Hz)) and the gradiometer was used successfully for unshielded magnetocardiography. A parasitic effective area compensation scheme was employed with two neighbouring SQUIDs coupled in an opposite sense to the same gradiometer loop. This improved the balance from the intrinsic value of 10 sup - sup 3 to 3x10 sup - sup 5. This thesis describes several aspects of the development of gradiometers using high temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID). The pulsed laser deposition of thin films of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta (YBCO) on Sr...

  2. Operation of a superconducting nanowire quantum interference device with mesoscopic leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekker, David; Bezryadin, Alexey; Hopkins, David S.; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2005-09-01

    A theory describing the operation of a superconducting nanowire quantum interference device (NQUID) is presented. The device consists of a pair of thin-film superconducting leads connected by a pair of topologically parallel ultranarrow superconducting wires. It exhibits intrinsic electrical resistance, due to thermally activated dissipative fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter. Attention is given to the dependence of this resistance on the strength of an externally applied magnetic field aligned perpendicular to the leads, for lead dimensions such that there is essentially complete and uniform penetration of the leads by the magnetic field. This regime, in which at least one of the lead dimensions—length or width—lies between the superconducting coherence and penetration lengths, is referred to as the mesoscopic regime. The magnetic field causes a pronounced oscillation of the device resistance, with a period not dominated by the Aharonov-Bohm effect through the area enclosed by the wires and the film edges but, rather, in terms of the geometry of the leads, in contrast to the well-known Little-Parks resistance of thin-walled superconducting cylinders. A detailed theory, encompassing this phenomenology quantitatively, is developed through extensions, to the setting of parallel superconducting wires, of the Ivanchenko-Zil’berman-Ambegaokar-Halperin theory of intrinsic resistive fluctuations in a current-biased Josephson junction and the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin theory of intrinsic resistive fluctuations in a superconducting wire. In particular, it is demonstrated that via the resistance of the NQUID, the wires act as a probe of spatial variations in the superconducting order parameter along the perimeter of each lead: in essence, a superconducting phase gradiometer.

  3. An Efficient Scheme for Implementing an N-Qubit Toffoli Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG An-Shou; LIU Ji-Bing; XIANG Dong; LIU Cui-Lan; YUAN Hong

    2007-01-01

    An alternative approach is proposed to realize an n-qubit Toffoli gate with superconducting quantum-interference devices (SQUIDs) in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). In the proposal, we represent two logical gates of a qubit with the two lowest levels of a SQUID while a higher-energy intermediate level of each SQUID is utilized for the gate manipulation. During the operating process, because the cavity field is always in vacuum state, the requirement on the cavity is greatly loosened and there is no transfer of quantum information between the cavity and SQUIDs.

  4. High temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device system for detection of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzell, Alf

    2012-07-01

    This doctoral thesis was aimed at establishing a set-up with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) radio-frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technology for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles and in particular for testing applications of magnetic nanoparticle immunoassays. It was part of the EU-project ''Biodiagnostics'' running from 2005 to 2008. The method of magnetic binding assays was developed as an alternative to other methods of concentration determination like enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or fluorescent immunoassay. The ELISA has sensitivities down to analyte-concentrations of pg/ml. Multiple incubation and washing steps have to be performed for these techniques, the analyte has to diffuse to the site of binding. The magnetic assay uses magnetic nanoparticles as markers for the substance to be detected. It is being explored by current research and shows similar sensitivity compared to ELISA but in contrast - does not need any washing and can be read out directly after binding - can be applied in solution with opaque media, e.g. blood or muddy water - additionally allows magnetic separation or concentration - in combination with small magnetoresistive or Hall sensors, allows detection of only a few particles or even single beads. For medical or environmental samples, maybe opaque and containing a multitude of substances, it would be advantageous to devise an instrument, which allows to be read out quickly and with high sensitivity. Due to the mentioned items the magnetic assay might be a possibility here.

  5. An ultra-sensitive and wideband magnetometer based on a superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Jan-Hendrik; Hömmen, Peter; Drung, Dietmar; Körber, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic field noise in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) used for biomagnetic research such as magnetoencephalography or ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance is usually limited by instrumental dewar noise. We constructed a wideband, ultra-low noise system with a 45 mm diameter superconducting pick-up coil inductively coupled to a current sensor SQUID. Thermal noise in the liquid helium dewar is minimized by using aluminized polyester fabric as superinsulation and aluminum oxide strips as heat shields. With a magnetometer pick-up coil in the center of the Berlin magnetically shielded room 2 (BMSR2), a noise level of around 150 aT Hz-1/2 is achieved in the white noise regime between about 20 kHz and the system bandwidth of about 2.5 MHz. At lower frequencies, the resolution is limited by magnetic field noise arising from the walls of the shielded room. Modeling the BMSR2 as a closed cube with continuous μ-metal walls, we can quantitatively reproduce its measured field noise.

  6. Detection of bacteria in suspension using a superconducting Quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, H.L.; Myers, W.R.; Vreeland, V.J.; Alper, J.D.; Bertozzi, C.R.; Clarke, J.

    2003-06-09

    We demonstrate a technique for detecting magnetically-labeled Listeria monocytogenes and for measuring the binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and bacteria. This assay, which is both sensitive and straightforward to perform, can quantify specific bacteria in a sample without the need to immobilize the bacteria or wash away unbound magnetic particles. In the measurement, we add 50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies, to a liquid sample containing L. monocytogenes. We apply a pulsed magnetic field to align the magnetic dipole moments and use a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), an extremely sensitive detector of magnetic flux, to measure the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound particles randomize direction by Brownian rotation too quickly to be detected. In contrast, particles bound to L. monocytogenes are effectively immobilized and relax in about 1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment. This Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. The measurements indicate a detection limit of (5.6 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 6} L. monocytogenes for a 20 {micro}L sample volume. If the sample volume were reduced to 1 nL, we estimate that the detection limit could be improved to 230 {+-} 40 L. monocytogenes cells. Time-resolved measurements yield the binding rate between the particles and bacteria.

  7. Detection of bacteria in suspension using a superconducting Quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, H.L.; Myers, W.R.; Vreeland, V.J.; Alper, J.D.; Bertozzi, C.R.; Clarke, J.

    2003-06-09

    We demonstrate a technique for detecting magnetically-labeled Listeria monocytogenes and for measuring the binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and bacteria. This assay, which is both sensitive and straightforward to perform, can quantify specific bacteria in a sample without the need to immobilize the bacteria or wash away unbound magnetic particles. In the measurement, we add 50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies, to a liquid sample containing L. monocytogenes. We apply a pulsed magnetic field to align the magnetic dipole moments and use a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), an extremely sensitive detector of magnetic flux, to measure the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound particles randomize direction by Brownian rotation too quickly to be detected. In contrast, particles bound to L. monocytogenes are effectively immobilized and relax in about 1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment. This Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. The measurements indicate a detection limit of (5.6 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 6} L. monocytogenes for a 20 {micro}L sample volume. If the sample volume were reduced to 1 nL, we estimate that the detection limit could be improved to 230 {+-} 40 L. monocytogenes cells. Time-resolved measurements yield the binding rate between the particles and bacteria.

  8. Aluminum and boron nuclear quadrupole resonance with a direct current superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C.; Chang, J.; Pines, A.

    1990-12-01

    We report the application of our dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) spectrometer [C. Connor, J. Chang, and A. Pines, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61, 1059(1990)] to nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies of aluminum-27, and boron-11 in crystalline and glassy solids. Our results give e2qQ/h=2.38 MHz and η=0.0 for α-Al2O3 at 4.2 K. For the natural mineral petalite (LiAlSi4O10), we obtain e2qQ/h=4.56 MHz and η=0.47. The quadrupole resonance frequency is 1467 kHz in boron nitride, and in the vicinity of 1300 kHz for various borates in the B2O3ṡxH2O system. The distribution of boron environments in a B2O3 glass gives rise to a linewidth of about 80 kHz in the SQUID detected resonance.

  9. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y.; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N.

    2000-11-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz1/2 in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz) was present. Computer simulation showed that the loss in this trilayer system was dominated by the high loss tangent of the dielectric film used for the separation of the upper and lower superconducting films. The rf coupling coefficient krf between the resonator and the flip-chip-coupled SQUID was also estimated. The values krf2≈14×10-3 obtained for the layout with two input coils, and krf2≈45×10-3 for the layout with the labyrinth resonator were considerably higher than the typical value of krf2≈7×10-3 for the single-layer coplanar resonator. These high coupling coefficients have compensated the somewhat degraded unloaded quality factor of the resonator, thus securing the optimum operation of the rf SQUID.

  10. Low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference device operating in Tesla magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Tobias; Nagel, Joachim; Wölbing, Roman; Kemmler, Matthias; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter

    2013-01-22

    Superconductivity in the cuprate YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) persists up to huge magnetic fields (B) up to several tens of Teslas, and sensitive direct current (dc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be realized in epitaxially grown YBCO films by using grain boundary Josephson junctions (GBJs). Here we present the realization of high-quality YBCO nanoSQUIDs, patterned by focused ion beam milling. We demonstrate low-noise performance of such a SQUID up to B = 1 T applied parallel to the plane of the SQUID loop at the temperature T = 4.2 K. The GBJs are shunted by a thin Au layer to provide nonhysteretic current voltage characteristics, and the SQUID incorporates a 90 nm wide constriction which is used for on-chip modulation of the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop. The white flux noise of the device increases only slightly from 1.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz)(1/2) at B = 0 to 2.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. Assuming that a point-like magnetic particle with magnetization in the plane of the SQUID loop is placed directly on top of the constriction and taking into account the geometry of the SQUID, we calculate a spin sensitivity S(μ)(1/2) = 62 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at B = 0 and 110 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. The demonstration of low noise of such a SQUID in Tesla fields is a decisive step toward utilizing the full potential of ultrasensitive nanoSQUIDs for direct measurements of magnetic hysteresis curves of magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets.

  11. Note: simultaneous measurements of magnetization and electrical transport signal by a reconstructed superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H L; Yu, X Z; Wang, S L; Chen, L; Zhao, J H

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a sample rod which makes the conventional superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer capable of performing magnetization and electrical transport measurements simultaneously. The sample holder attached to the end of a 140 cm long sample rod is a nonmagnetic drinking straw or a 1.5 mm wide silicon strip with small magnetic background signal. Ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As films are used to test the new sample rod, and the results are in good agreement with previous report.

  12. Nano Superconducting Quantum Interference device: A powerful tool for nanoscale investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, Carmine, E-mail: carmine.granata@cnr.it; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-02-19

    The magnetic sensing at nanoscale level is a promising and interesting research topic of nanoscience. Indeed, magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological, chemical and physical systems. The study of small spin cluster, like magnetic molecules and nanoparticles, single electron, cold atom clouds, is one of the most stimulating challenges of applied and basic research of the next years. In particular, the magnetic nanoparticle investigation plays a fundamental role for the modern material science and its relative technological applications like ferrofluids, magnetic refrigeration and biomedical applications, including drug delivery, hyper-thermia cancer treatment and magnetic resonance imaging contrast-agent. Actually, one of the most ambitious goals of the high sensitivity magnetometry is the detection of elementary magnetic moment or spin. In this framework, several efforts have been devoted to the development of a high sensitivity magnetic nanosensor pushing sensing capability to the individual spin level. Among the different magnetic sensors, Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) exhibit an ultra high sensitivity and are widely employed in numerous applications. Basically, a SQUID consists of a superconducting ring (sensitive area) interrupted by two Josephson junctions. In the recent years, it has been proved that the magnetic response of nano-objects can be effectively measured by using a SQUID with a very small sensitive area (nanoSQUID). In fact, the sensor noise, expressed in terms of the elementary magnetic moment (spin or Bohr magneton), is linearly dependent on the SQUID loop side length. For this reason, SQUIDs have been progressively miniaturized in order to improve the sensitivity up to few spin per unit of bandwidth. With respect to other techniques, nanoSQUIDs offer the advantage of direct measurement of magnetization changes in small spin systems. In this review, we focus on nanoSQUIDs and its applications. In

  13. Nano Superconducting Quantum Interference device: A powerful tool for nanoscale investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic sensing at nanoscale level is a promising and interesting research topic of nanoscience. Indeed, magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological, chemical and physical systems. The study of small spin cluster, like magnetic molecules and nanoparticles, single electron, cold atom clouds, is one of the most stimulating challenges of applied and basic research of the next years. In particular, the magnetic nanoparticle investigation plays a fundamental role for the modern material science and its relative technological applications like ferrofluids, magnetic refrigeration and biomedical applications, including drug delivery, hyper-thermia cancer treatment and magnetic resonance imaging contrast-agent. Actually, one of the most ambitious goals of the high sensitivity magnetometry is the detection of elementary magnetic moment or spin. In this framework, several efforts have been devoted to the development of a high sensitivity magnetic nanosensor pushing sensing capability to the individual spin level. Among the different magnetic sensors, Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) exhibit an ultra high sensitivity and are widely employed in numerous applications. Basically, a SQUID consists of a superconducting ring (sensitive area) interrupted by two Josephson junctions. In the recent years, it has been proved that the magnetic response of nano-objects can be effectively measured by using a SQUID with a very small sensitive area (nanoSQUID). In fact, the sensor noise, expressed in terms of the elementary magnetic moment (spin or Bohr magneton), is linearly dependent on the SQUID loop side length. For this reason, SQUIDs have been progressively miniaturized in order to improve the sensitivity up to few spin per unit of bandwidth. With respect to other techniques, nanoSQUIDs offer the advantage of direct measurement of magnetization changes in small spin systems. In this review, we focus on nanoSQUIDs and its applications. In

  14. Low-noise dc superconducting quantum interference devices for gravity wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Insik

    I have designed, built and tested a low noise dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) system which is intended primarily for use in a 50 mK omnidirectional gravity wave antenna. The SQUID system has three SQUIDs on a single chip: one SQUID is the sensor, another SQUID is the main readout, and the last is a spare readout. For good impedance matching between the sensor SQUID and the input circuit, I use a thin-film transformer. This thin-film transformer gives an input inductance of about 1 muH, which is good for many applications. A SQUID system in a gravity wave antenna must operate continuously for at least 6 months with high reliability. To meet these requirements, I fabricated dc SQUID chips from Nb-Al/AlOsbx-Nb trilayers. I tested the SQUID chips in a liquid helium bath and a dilution refrigerator in the temperature range of 4.2 K to 90 mK. I have designed and tested an eddy-current damping filter as a distributed microwave filter to damp out microwave resonances in strip-line input coils coupled to SQUIDs. The filter chip consists of a Au/Cu-dot array. The filter chip was coupled to the SQUID using a flip-chip arrangement on the SQUID chip. I found that the filter reduced noise bumps and removed distortion from the current-voltage curves. To flux-lock the SQUID system, I developed 2-stage SQUID feedback loops. I investigated two cascade SQUID systems in which I feed the feedback signal into the sensor SQUID and couple the ac modulation signal to the readout SQUID. I found that the noise spectrum with 2-SQUID feedback operation recovers the noise spectrum of the sensor SQUID with about 9% higher noise.

  15. Interference of Quantum Market Strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Piotrowski, E W; Syska, J

    2003-01-01

    Recent development in quantum computation and quantum information theory allows to extend the scope of game theory for the quantum world. The paper is devoted to the analysis of interference of quantum strategies in quantum market games.

  16. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  17. One-Step Realization of SWAP Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices and Atoms in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2008-01-01

    We put forward a simple scheme for one-step realization of a two-qubit SWAP gate with SQUIDs (super-conducting quantum-interference devices) in cavity QED via Raman transition. In this scheme, the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed. The SWAP gate is realized by using only two lower flux states of the SQUID system and the excited state would not be excited. Therefore, the effect of decoherence caused from the levels of the SQUID system is possibly minimized. The scheme can also be used to implement the SWAP gate with atoms.

  18. A new type of HTc superconducting film comb-shape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Hai-yan; WANG Fu-ren; MENG Shu-chao; MAO Bo; LI Zhuang-zhi; NIE Rui-juan; LIU Xin-yuan; DAI Yuan-dong

    2006-01-01

    A new type of HTc superconducting film combshape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (RF SQUID) has been designed.This new type of superconducting film comb-shape resonator is formed by a foursquare microstrip line without a flux concentrator.The range of the center frequency of this type of resonator varies from 800 MHz to 1300 MHz by changing the length of the teeth.In this paper,we report on simulating the relationship of the value of the center frequency and the length of the teeth,and testing the noise of HTc RF SQUID coupling this comb-shape resonator.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles for high-sensitivity detection on nucleic acids via superconducting-quantum-interference-device-based immunomagnetic reduction assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S. Y.; Chieh, J. J.; Wang, W. C.; Yu, C. Y.; Hing, N. S.; Horng, H. E.; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, H. C.; Chang, C. F.; Lin, H. Y.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we investigate the feasibility of detecting quantitatively DNA molecules utilizing the technology named after the immunomagnetic reduction (IMR) assay. Magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a phosphate buffer saline solution were bio-functionalized with probing single-strand DNA. A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) ac magnetosusceptometer was employed to detect IMR signals related to the concentration of the target DNA. The results reveal that use of IMR assay had merits such as a high convenience level, e.g. wash-free processes and high sensitivity, down to pM, for DNA detection.

  20. High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device recordings of spontaneous brain activity: Towards high-Tc magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öisjöen, F.; Schneiderman, J. F.; Figueras, G. A.; Chukharkin, M. L.; Kalabukhov, A.; Hedström, A.; Elam, M.; Winkler, D.

    2012-03-01

    We have performed single- and two-channel high transition temperature (high-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of spontaneous brain activity in two healthy human subjects. We demonstrate modulation of two well-known brain rhythms: the occipital alpha rhythm and the mu rhythm found in the motor cortex. We further show that despite higher noise-levels compared to their low-Tc counterparts, high-Tc SQUIDs can be used to detect and record physiologically relevant brain rhythms with comparable signal-to-noise ratios. These results indicate the utility of high-Tc technology in MEG recordings of a broader range of brain activity.

  1. Unshielded use of thin-film Nb dc superconducting quantum interference devices and integrated asymmetric gradiometers for nondestructive evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M.E.; Nakane, H.; Cochran, A.; Weston, R.G.; Klein, U.; Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    Novel nondestructive evaluation measurements made using niobium dc superconducting quantum interference devices with integrated asymmetric first-order gradiometers are described. Comparative theoretical and experimental studies of their spatial response have been described, and it is shown that the gradiometric response makes operation possible in an unshielded and electromagnetically noisy environment. As a demonstration of their capabilities, subsurface defects in a multilayer aluminum structure have been located and mapped using induced eddy currents at 70 Hz, with no magnetic shielding around the specimen or cryostat. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John

    1991-06-01

    A sensitive spectrometer, based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device, for the direct detection of low-frequency pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), is described. The frequency response extends from about 10 to 200 kHz, and the recovery time after the magnetic pulse is removed is typically 50 μs. As examples, NMR spectra are shown from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mT, and NQR spectra are shown from 2D in a tunneling methyl group and 14N in NH4ClO4.

  3. Inductance mode characteristics of a ceramic YBa2Cu3O7-x radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device at 77 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Il'ichev, E. V.; Andreev, A. V.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results on some radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf-SQUID) signal properties are presented. The quantum interferometer was made of ceramic YBa2Cu3O7−x and was due to a low critical current operated in the inductance or nonhysteretic mode. With bias current...

  4. Unconventional Geometric Phase-Shift Gates Based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Coupled to a Single-Mode Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ke-Hui; ZHOU Zheng-Wei; GUO Guang-Can

    2006-01-01

    We present a scheme to realize geometric phase-shift gate for two superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits coupled to a single-mode microwave field. The geometric phase-shift gate operation is performed transitions during the gate operation. Thus, the docoherence due to energy spontaneous emission based on the levels of SQUIDs are suppressed. The gate is insensitive to the cavity decay throughout the operation since the cavity mode is displaced along a circle in the phase space, acquiring a phase conditional upon the two lower flux states of the SQUID qubits, and the cavity mode is still in the original vacuum state. Based on the SQUID qubits interacting with the cavity mode, our proposed approach may open promising prospects for quantum logic in SQUID-system.

  5. Quantum interference in polyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald; Movassagh, Ramis; Datta, Supriyo

    2014-12-01

    The explicit form of the zeroth Green's function in the Hückel model, approximated by the negative of the inverse of the Hückel matrix, has direct quantum interference consequences for molecular conductance. We derive a set of rules for transmission between two electrodes attached to a polyene, when the molecule is extended by an even number of carbons at either end (transmission unchanged) or by an odd number of carbons at both ends (transmission turned on or annihilated). These prescriptions for the occurrence of quantum interference lead to an unexpected consequence for switches which realize such extension through electrocyclic reactions: for some specific attachment modes the chemically closed ring will be the ON position of the switch. Normally the signs of the entries of the Green's function matrix are assumed to have no physical significance; however, we show that the signs may have observable consequences. In particular, in the case of multiple probe attachments - if coherence in probe connections can be arranged - in some cases new destructive interference results, while in others one may have constructive interference. One such case may already exist in the literature.

  6. Quantum interference in polyenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald, E-mail: rh34@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Baker Laboratory, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Movassagh, Ramis [Department of Mathematics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA and Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building E18, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Datta, Supriyo [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, Electrical Engineering Building, 465 Northwestern Ave., West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2035 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    The explicit form of the zeroth Green's function in the Hückel model, approximated by the negative of the inverse of the Hückel matrix, has direct quantum interference consequences for molecular conductance. We derive a set of rules for transmission between two electrodes attached to a polyene, when the molecule is extended by an even number of carbons at either end (transmission unchanged) or by an odd number of carbons at both ends (transmission turned on or annihilated). These prescriptions for the occurrence of quantum interference lead to an unexpected consequence for switches which realize such extension through electrocyclic reactions: for some specific attachment modes the chemically closed ring will be the ON position of the switch. Normally the signs of the entries of the Green's function matrix are assumed to have no physical significance; however, we show that the signs may have observable consequences. In particular, in the case of multiple probe attachments – if coherence in probe connections can be arranged – in some cases new destructive interference results, while in others one may have constructive interference. One such case may already exist in the literature.

  7. Graphene quantum interference photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mahbub; Voss, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a graphene quantum interference (QI) photodetector was simulated in two regimes of operation. The structure consists of a graphene nanoribbon, Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), which exhibits a strongly resonant transmission of electrons of specific energies. In the first regime of operation (that of a linear photodetector), low intensity light couples two resonant energy levels, resulting in scattering and differential transmission of current with an external quantum efficiency of up to 5.2%. In the second regime of operation, full current switching is caused by the phase decoherence of the current due to a strong photon flux in one or both of the interferometer arms in the same MZI structure. Graphene QI photodetectors have several distinct advantages: they are of very small size, they do not require p- and n-doped regions, and they exhibit a high external quantum efficiency.

  8. Graphene quantum interference photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbub Alam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a graphene quantum interference (QI photodetector was simulated in two regimes of operation. The structure consists of a graphene nanoribbon, Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI, which exhibits a strongly resonant transmission of electrons of specific energies. In the first regime of operation (that of a linear photodetector, low intensity light couples two resonant energy levels, resulting in scattering and differential transmission of current with an external quantum efficiency of up to 5.2%. In the second regime of operation, full current switching is caused by the phase decoherence of the current due to a strong photon flux in one or both of the interferometer arms in the same MZI structure. Graphene QI photodetectors have several distinct advantages: they are of very small size, they do not require p- and n-doped regions, and they exhibit a high external quantum efficiency.

  9. High critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer with feedforward active noise control system for magnetocardiographic measurement in unshielded circumstances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizukami, A.; Nishiura, H.; Sakuta, K.; Kobayashi, T

    2003-10-15

    Magnetocardiographic (MCG) measurement in unshielded environment for practical use requires to suppress the environmental magnetic noise. We have designed the high critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device (High-T{sub c} SQUID) magnetometer with feedforward active noise control (ANC) system to suppress the environmental magnetic noise. The compensatory system consisted of two SQUID magnetometers, a digital signal processor (DSP) and the coil wound around the input magnetometer. The DSP calculated the output data to minimize the environmental noise from the input and reference date and then the coil generated the magnetic field to cancel the environmental noise. This method achieved the effective noise attenuation below 100 Hz about 40 dB. MCG measurement in unshielded environment was also performed.

  10. Magnetic gradiometer based on a high-transition temperaturesuperconducting quantum interference device for improved sensitivity of abiosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, SeungKyun; Myers, W.R.; Grossman, H.L.; Cho, H-M.; Chemla,Y.R.; Clarke, John

    2002-07-08

    We describe a gradiometer based on a high-transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) for improving the sensitivity of a SQUID-based biosensor. The first-derivative gradiometer, fabricated from a single layer of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, has a baseline of 480 {micro}m and a balance against uniform fields of 1 part in 150. Used in our SQUID ''microscope,'' it reduces parasitic magnetic fields generated by the measurement process to the level of the SQUID noise. The gradiometer-based microscope is two orders of magnitude more sensitive to super paramagnetic nanoparticles bound to biological targets than our earlier magnetometer-based microscope.

  11. A High-Performance Nb Nano-Superconducting Quantum Interference Device with a Three-Dimensional Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Wang, Hao; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Long; Wang, Zhen

    2016-12-14

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) miniaturized into the nanoscale is promising in the inductive detection of a single electron spin. A nano-SQUID with a strong spin coupling coefficient, a low flux noise, and a wide working magnetic field range is highly desired in a single spin resonance measurement. Nano-SQUIDs with Dayem bridge junctions excel in a high working field range and in the direct coupling from spins to the bridge. However, the common planar structure of nano-SQUIDs is known for problems such as a shallow flux modulation depth and a troublesome hysteresis in current-voltage curves. Here, we developed a fabrication process for creating three-dimensional (3-D) niobium (Nb) nano-SQUIDs with nanobridge junctions that can be tuned independently. Characterization of the device shows up to 45.9% modulation depth with a reversible current-voltage curve. Owning to the large modulation depth, the measured flux noise is as low as 0.34 μΦ0/Hz(1/2). The working field range of the SQUID is greater than 0.5 T parallel to the SQUID plane. We believe that 3-D Nb nano-SQUIDs provide a promising step toward effective single-spin inductive detection.

  12. Interference Phenomena in Quantum Information

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanak, Martin

    2010-01-01

    One of the key features of quantum mechanics is the interference of probability amplitudes. The reason for the appearance of interference is mathematically very simple. It is the linear structure of the Hilbert space which is used for the description of quantum systems. In terms of physics we usually talk about the superposition principle valid for individual and composed quantum objects. So, while the source of interference is understandable it leads in fact to many counter-intuitive physical phenomena which puzzle physicists for almost hundred years. The present thesis studies interference in two seemingly disjoint fields of physics. However, both have strong links to quantum information processing and hence are related. In the first part we study the intriguing properties of quantum walks. In the second part we analyze a sophisticated application of wave packet dynamics in atoms and molecules for factorization of integers. The main body of the thesis is based on the original contributions listed separately...

  13. Quantum Interference in Graphene Nanoconstrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Pascal; Sadeghi, Hatef; Sangtarash, Sara; Lau, Chit Siong; Liu, Junjie; Ardavan, Arzhang; Warner, Jamie H; Lambert, Colin J; Briggs, G Andrew D; Mol, Jan A

    2016-07-13

    We report quantum interference effects in the electrical conductance of chemical vapor deposited graphene nanoconstrictions fabricated using feedback controlled electroburning. The observed multimode Fabry-Pérot interferences can be attributed to reflections at potential steps inside the channel. Sharp antiresonance features with a Fano line shape are observed. Theoretical modeling reveals that these Fano resonances are due to localized states inside the constriction, which couple to the delocalized states that also give rise to the Fabry-Pérot interference patterns. This study provides new insight into the interplay between two fundamental forms of quantum interference in graphene nanoconstrictions.

  14. Miniature ceramic-anvil high-pressure cell for magnetic measurements in a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateiwa, Naoyuki; Haga, Yoshinori; Fisk, Zachary; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2011-05-01

    A miniature opposed-anvil high-pressure cell has been developed for magnetic measurement in a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. Non-magnetic anvils made of composite ceramic material were used to generate high-pressure with a Cu-Be gasket. We have examined anvils with different culet sizes (1.8, 1.6, 1.4, 1.2, 1.0, 0.8, and 0.6 mm). The pressure generated at low temperature was determined by the pressure dependence of the superconducting transition of lead (Pb). The maximum pressure P(max) depends on the culet size of the anvil: the values of P(max) are 2.4 and 7.6 GPa for 1.8 and 0.6 mm culet anvils, respectively. We revealed that the composite ceramic anvil has potential to generate high-pressure above 5 GPa. The background magnetization of the Cu-Be gasket is generally two orders of magnitude smaller than the Ni-Cr-Al gasket for the indenter cell. The present cell can be used not only with ferromagnetic and superconducting materials with large magnetization but also with antiferromagnetic compounds with smaller magnetization. The production cost of the present pressure cell is about one tenth of that of a diamond anvil cell. The anvil alignment mechanism is not necessary in the present pressure cell because of the strong fracture toughness (6.5 MPa m(1∕2)) of the composite ceramic anvil. The simplified pressure cell is easy-to-use for researchers who are not familiar with high-pressure technology. Representative results on the magnetization of superconducting MgB(2) and antiferromagnet CePd(5)Al(2) are reported.

  15. "Quantum Interference with Slits" Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Rothman, Tony

    2010-01-01

    Marcella [arXiv:quant-ph/0703126] has presented a straightforward technique employing the Dirac formalism to calculate single- and double-slit interference patterns. He claims that no reference is made to classical optics or scattering theory and that his method therefore provides a purely quantum mechanical description of these experiments. He also presents his calculation as if no approximations are employed. We show that he implicitly makes the same approximations found in classical treatments of interference and that no new physics has been introduced. At the same time, some of the quantum mechanical arguments Marcella gives are, at best, misleading.

  16. Fraunhofer regime of operation for superconducting quantum interference filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadrin, A.V.; Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.;

    2008-01-01

    Series arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with incommensurate loop areas, so-called superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIFs), are investigated in the kilohertz and the gigahertz frequency range. In SQIFs made of high-T-c bicrystal junctions the flux-to-vol...

  17. Animal magnetocardiography using superconducting quantum interference device gradiometers assisted with magnetic nanoparticle injection: A sensitive method for early detecting electromagnetic changes induced by hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. C.; Hong, B. F.; Wu, B. H.; Yang, S. Y.; Horng, H. E.; Yang, H. C.; Tseng, W. Y. Isaac; Tseng, W. K.; Liu, Y. B.; Lin, L. C.; Lu, L. S.; Lee, Y. H.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the authors used a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetocardiography (MCG) system consisted of 64-channel low-transition-temperature SQUID gradiometers to detect the MCG signals of hepercholesterolemic rabbits. In addition, the MCG signals were recorded before and after the injection of magnetic nanoparticles into the rabbits' ear veins to investigate the effects of magnetic nanoparticles on the MCG signals. These MCG data were compared to those of normal rabbits to reveal the feasibility for early detection of the electromagnetic changes induced by hypercholesterolemia using MCG with the assistance of magnetic nanoparticle injection.

  18. Preparation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entangled states with multiple superconducting quantum-interference device qubits or atoms in cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chui-Ping; Han, Siyuan

    2004-12-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states of multiple superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) qubits by the use of a microwave cavity. The scheme operates essentially by creating a single photon through an auxiliary SQUID built in the cavity and performing a joint multiqubit phase shift with assistance of the cavity photon. It is shown that entanglement can be generated using this method, deterministic and independent of the number of SQUID qubits. In addition, we show that the present method can be applied to preparing many atoms in a GHZ entangled state, with tolerance to energy relaxation during the operation.

  19. Realization of the Greenberg-Horne (ghz) State and Swap Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices in a Cavity via Adiabatic Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, An-Shou; Cheng, Yong-Jin; Liu, Ji-Bing; Li, Tie-Ping

    We propose an alternative scheme to prepare the Greenberg-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state and realize a SWAP gate by using Superconducting Quantum-interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to a cavity. The present scheme, based on the adiabatic evolution of dark state, constitutes a decoherence-free method in the sense that spontaneous emission and cavity damping are avoided. Besides, the standard GHZ state can be directly obtained without measurement or any auxiliary SQUIDs and the construction of the SWAP gate does not require a composition of elementary gates from a universal set. Thus the procedure is simplified and decoherence is greatly suppressed.

  20. "Quantum Interference with Slits" Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Tony; Boughn, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Marcella has presented a straightforward technique employing the Dirac formalism to calculate single- and double-slit interference patterns. He claims that no reference is made to classical optics or scattering theory and that his method therefore provides a purely quantum mechanical description of these experiments. He also presents his…

  1. "Quantum Interference with Slits" Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Tony; Boughn, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Marcella has presented a straightforward technique employing the Dirac formalism to calculate single- and double-slit interference patterns. He claims that no reference is made to classical optics or scattering theory and that his method therefore provides a purely quantum mechanical description of these experiments. He also presents his…

  2. Generation of entangled state using superconducting quantum interference devices%利用超导量子相干装置制备纠缠态的方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马驰; 叶柳; 王戴木

    2007-01-01

    本文提出用两个超导量子相干装置在一个单模大失谐腔中制备一个最大纠缠态的新方案,在这个方案里,腔场态处于虚激发,在超导量子相干装置和腔场之间没有信息传递,因此对腔的品质要求大大减低.%We propose a new scheme to generate a maximally entangled state of twosuperconducting quantum interference devices with a nonresonant cavity. In this scheme, the cavity field is virtually excited, no quantum-information transfer exists between the SQUIDs system and the cavity field, thus the requirement on the quality factor of the cavity is greatly relaxed.

  3. Magnetic measurements at pressures above 10 GPa in a miniature ceramic anvil cell for a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateiwa, Naoyuki; Haga, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Tatsuma D; Fisk, Zachary

    2012-05-01

    A miniature ceramic anvil high pressure cell (mCAC) was earlier designed by us for magnetic measurements at pressures up to 7.6 GPa in a commercial superconducting quantum interference magnetometer [N. Tateiwa et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 053906 (2011)]. Here, we describe methods to generate pressures above 10 GPa in the mCAC. The efficiency of the pressure generation is sharply improved when the Cu-Be gasket is sufficiently preindented. The maximum pressure for the 0.6 mm culet anvils is 12.6 GPa when the Cu-Be gasket is preindented from the initial thickness of 300-60 μm. The 0.5 mm culet anvils were also tested with a rhenium gasket. The maximum pressure attainable in the mCAC is about 13 GPa. The present cell was used to study YbCu(2)Si(2) which shows a pressure induced transition from the non-magnetic to magnetic phases at 8 GPa. We confirm a ferromagnetic transition from the dc magnetization measurement at high pressure. The mCAC can detect the ferromagnetic ordered state whose spontaneous magnetic moment is smaller than 1 μ(B) per unit cell. The high sensitivity for magnetic measurements in the mCAC may result from the simplicity of cell structure. The present study shows the availability of the mCAC for precise magnetic measurements at pressures above 10 GPa.

  4. Technology of Quantum Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Razeghi, Manijeh

    2010-01-01

    Technology of Quantum Devices offers a multi-disciplinary overview of solid state physics, photonics and semiconductor growth and fabrication. Readers will find up-to-date coverage of compound semiconductors, crystal growth techniques, silicon and compound semiconductor device technology, in addition to intersubband and semiconductor lasers. Recent findings in quantum tunneling transport, quantum well intersubband photodetectors (QWIP) and quantum dot photodetectors (QWDIP) are described, along with a thorough set of sample problems.

  5. ``Quantum'' interference with bouncing drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens

    2013-11-01

    In a series of recent papers (most recently) Yves Couder and collaborators have explored the dynamics of walking drops on the surface of a vibrated bath of silicon oil and have demonstrated a close analogy to quantum phenomena. The bouncing drop together with the surface wave that it excites seems to be very similar to the pilot wave envisaged by de Broglie for quantum particles. In particular, have studied a double slit experiment with walking drops, where an interference pattern identical to the quantum version is found even though it is possible to follow the orbits of the drops and unambigously determine which slit it goes through, something which in quantum mechanics would be ruled out by the Heisenberg uncertainly relations. We have repeated the experiment and present a somewhat more complicated picture. Theoretically, we study a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localised ``particle'' being simultaneously guided by the wave. We present simple solutions to such a field theory and discuss the fundamental difficulties met by such a theory in order to comply with quantum mechanics.

  6. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonThat, Dinh M.; Clarke, John

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect 27Al NQR signals in ruby (Al2O3[Cr3+]) at 359 and 714 kHz.

  7. Magnetic characteristics measurements of ethanol-water mixtures using a hybrid-type high-temperature superconducting quantum-interference device magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Keiji; Matsunaga, Yasuaki; Isshiki, Ryota; Nakamura, Yuta; Sakai, Kenji; Kiwa, Toshihiko

    2017-05-01

    The magnetic characteristics of ethanol-water mixtures were investigated using our newly developed hybrid-type magnetometer based on a high-temperature superconducting quantum-interference device. The magnetization (M-H) curves of ethanol-water mixtures show good diamagnetic characteristics. The magnetic moments of the mixture show ethanol concentration dependence. However, the variation in magnetic moment differs from the characteristics expected by considering the magnetic moment ratio between water and ethanol, and volume-reduction rate. It showed two decrement regions separated at approximately 50-60% concentration values. It is also observed that the concentration dependence of the magnetic moment measured using the sample vibration method under a uniform magnetic field and that by the sample rotation method showed slightly different characteristics. These anomalies are attributed to the formation of clustered structures in the mixture.

  8. Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) thin film dc SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference device)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racah, Daniel

    1991-03-01

    Direct current superconducting quantum interferometers (SQUIDs) based on HTSC thin films have been measured and characterized. The thin films used were of different quality: (1) Granular films on Sapphire substrates, prepared either by e-gun evaporation, by laser ablation or by MOCVD (metal oxide chemical vapor deposition), (2) Epitaxial films on MgO substrates. Modulations of the voltage on the SQUIDs as a function of the applied flux have been observed in a wide range of temperatures. The nature of the modulation was found to be strongly dependent on the morphology of the film and on its critical current. The SQUIDs based on granular films were relatively noisy, hysteretic and with a complicated V-phi shape. Those devices based on low quality (lowIc) granular films could be measured only at low temperatures (much lower than 77 K). While those of higher quality (granular films with high Ic) could be measured near to the superconductive transition. The SQUID based on high quality epitaxial film was measured near Tc and showed an anomalous, time dependent behavior.

  9. Heterostructures and quantum devices

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1994-01-01

    Heterostructure and quantum-mechanical devices promise significant improvement in the performance of electronic and optoelectronic integrated circuits (ICs). Though these devices are the subject of a vigorous research effort, the current literature is often either highly technical or narrowly focused. This book presents heterostructure and quantum devices to the nonspecialist, especially electrical engineers working with high-performance semiconductor devices. It focuses on a broad base of technical applications using semiconductor physics theory to develop the next generation of electrical en

  10. General Quantum Interference Principle and Duality Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Gui-Lu

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we propose a general principle of quantum interference for quantum system, and based on this we propose a new type of computing machine, the duality computer, that may outperform in principle both classical computer and the quantum computer. According to the general principle of quantum interference, the very essence of quantum interference is the interference of thesub-waves of the quantum system itself. A quantum system considered here can be any quantum system: a single microscopic particle, a composite quantum system such as an atom or a molecule, or a loose collection of a few quantum objects such as two independent photons. In the duality computer,the wave of the duality computer is split into several sub-waves and they pass through different routes, where different computing gate operations are performed. These sub-waves are then re-combined to interfere to give the computational results. The quantum computer, however, has only used the particle nature of quantum object. In a duality computer,it may be possible to find a marked item from an unsorted database using only a single query, and all NP-complete problems may have polynomial algorithms. Two proof-of-the-principle designs of the duality computer are presented:the giant molecule scheme and the nonlinear quantum optics scheme. We also propose thought experiment to check the related fundamental issues, the measurement efficiency of a partial wave function.

  11. Quantum interference in an interfacial superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Srijit; Mulazimoglu, Emre; Monteiro, Ana M. R. V. L.; Wölbing, Roman; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Blanter, Ya. M.; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Caviglia, Andrea D.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional superconductor that forms at the interface between the complex oxides lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (Tc; ref. 7), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high-Tc superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities that probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable the in situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understanding the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.

  12. 基于SQUIDs和腔场相互作用传送量子信息的方案%Quantum information transfer with superconducting quantum interference device qubits in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴韬; 何娟; 倪致祥

    2009-01-01

    本文提出了一个基于SQUIDs和腔场的大失谐相互作用传送量子信息的方案,此方案可以直接地、百分之百地实现量子信息的传送.该方案中腔场和SQUIDs系统之间没有量子信息的传递,腔场只是虚激发,这样对腔的品质因子的要求大大的降低了.同时也可以在SQUIDs之间建立传送量子信息的量子网络.%We propose a scheme for transferring Quantum information via superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits and cavity field interaction with a large detuning.In the scheme,no quantum information is transferred between the SQUIDs and the cavities,the cavity-fields are only virtually excited,thus the requirement on the quality factor of the cavities is greatly relaxed.In addition,in the scheme the quantum information can be directly transferred with a successful probability of 100% in a simple manner.And meanwhile we can establish a network for transferring quantum information between SQUID qubits.

  13. Cross-conjugation and quantum interference: a general correlation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valkenier, Hennie; Guedon, Constant M.; Markussen, Troels

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the relationship between the pi-conjugation pattern, molecular length, and charge transport properties of molecular wires, both from an experimental and a theoretical viewpoint. Specifically, we focus on the role of quantum interference in the conductance properties of cross-conjugated...... interference occurs can be tuned by the choice of side group. The latter provides an outlook for future devices in this fascinating field connecting chemistry and physics....

  14. Fluctuations in quantum devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Haken

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Logical gates can be formalized by Boolean algebra whose elementary operations can be realized by devices that employ the interactions of macroscopic numbers of elementary excitations such as electrons, holes, photons etc. With increasing miniaturization to the nano scale and below, quantum fluctuations become important and can no longer be ignored. Based on Heisenberg equations of motion for the creation and annihilation operators of elementary excitations, I determine the noise sources of composite quantum systems.

  15. Gravitational and rotational effects in quantum interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anandan, J.

    1977-03-15

    The phase shift due to gravitation and rotation in the quantum interference of two coherent beams is obtained relativistically and compared with the recent experiment of Colella, Overhauser, and Werner. A general expression relating the quantum phase shift to the transverse acceleration of a classical particle in the plane of interference for an arbitrary interaction with any external field is given. This can serve as a correspondence principle between quantum physics and classical physics. The phase shift due to the coupling of spin to curvature of space-time is deduced and written explicitly for the special case of a Schwarzschild field. The last result implies that a massless spinning particle can have at most two helicity states and its world line in a gravitational field is a null geodesic. Finally, new experiments are proposed to test the effect of rotation on quantum interference and to obtain direct evidence of the equivalence principle in quantum mechanics.

  16. Quantum interference from remotely trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S; Rotter, D; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rohde, F; Schuck, C; Almendros, M; Gehr, R; Dubin, F; Eschner, J [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av del Canal OlImpic, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain)], E-mail: francois.dubin@icfo.es

    2009-01-15

    We observe quantum interference of photons emitted by two continuously laser-excited single ions, independently trapped in distinct vacuum vessels. High contrast two-photon interference is observed in two experiments with different ion species, Ca{sup +} and Ba{sup +}. Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by Bloch equation calculations. In particular, we show that the coherence of the individual resonance fluorescence light field is determined from the observed interference.

  17. Scattering Induced Quantum Interference of Multiple Quantum Optical States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger;

    2011-01-01

    Using a discrete mode theory for propagation of quantum optical states, we investigate the consequences of multiple scattering on the degree of quadrature entanglement and quantum interference. We report that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering. We furthermore show that quantum...... interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium will persist even after averaging over an ensemble of scattering samples....

  18. Synthesis and characterization of YBa2Cu3O7(Y123) via sol-gel method for development of superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Noorhana; Zakariah, Muhammad Hanis

    2012-10-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) waves transmitted by Horizontal Electric Dipole (HED) source to detect contrasts in subsurface resistivity termed Seabed Logging (SBL) is now an established method for hydrocarbon exploration. However, currently used EM wave detectors for SBL have several challenges including the sensitivity and its bulk size. This work exploits the benefit of superconductor technology in developing a magnetometer termed Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) which can potentially be used for SBL. A SQUID magnetometer was fabricated using hexagon shape-niobium wire with YBa2Cu37O, (YBCO) as a barrier. The YBa2Cu37O, samples were synthesized by sol-gel method and were sintered using a furnace and conventional microwave oven. The YBCO gel was dried at 120 degrees C in air for 72 hours. It was then ground and divided into 12 parts. Four samples were sintered at 750 degrees C, 850 degrees C, 900 degrees C, and 950 degrees C for 12 hours in a furnace to find the optimum temperature. The other eight samples were sintered in a microwave with 1100 Watt (W) with a different sintering time, 5, 15, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1 hour 15 minutes, 1 hour 30 minutes, 1 hour 45 minutes and 2 hours. A DEWAR container was designed and fabricated using fiberglass material. It was filled with liquid nitrogen (LN2) to ensure the superconducting state of the magnetometer. XRD results showed that the optimum sintering temperature for the formation of orthorhombic Y-123 phase was at 950 degrees C with the crystallite size of 67 nm. The morphology results from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) showed that the grains had formed a rod shape with an average diameter of 60 nm. The fabricated SQUID magnetometer was able to show an increment of approximately 249% in the intensity of the EM waves when the source receiver offset was one meter apart.

  19. On the magnetization relaxation of ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films as determined by superconducting quantum interference device measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hai-hu; Ziemann, Paul; Radovan, Henri A.; Herzog, Thomas

    1998-09-01

    By using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), the temporal relaxation of the magnetization was determined for ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films at various temperatures between 10 K and 80 K in magnetic fields ranging from 2 mT to 0.3 T. Based on these data, a detailed analysis has been performed related to the following methods or models: (1) Fitting the data to the thermally activated flux motion and collective pinning model; (2) Applying the Generalized Inversion Scheme to extract the temperature dependence of the unrelaxed critical current density jc( T) and pinning potential Uc( T); (3) Testing a modified Maley's method to obtain the current dependent activation energy for flux motion; (4) 2D vortex glass scaling. It is found that, for low fields (2 mT, 10 mT, 40 mT) the experimental data can be described by an elastic flux motion, most probably due to 3D single vortex creep. At higher fields (0.1 T, 0.2 T, 0.3 T), the observed behavior can be interpreted in terms of plastic flux motion which is probably governed by dislocation mediated flux creep. These high field data can also be consistently described by the 2D vortex glass scaling with scaling parameters ν2D, T0 and p being consistent with those derived from corresponding transport measurement. Also, results are presented demonstrating the importance of optimizing the scan length of the sample in a moving sample SQUID magnetometer to avoid artifacts.

  20. Quantum Radiation Reaction: From Interference to Incoherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, Victor; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-01-29

    We investigate quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron interactions across different energy and intensity regimes. Using a fully quantum approach which also accounts exactly for the effect of the strong laser pulse on the electron motion, we identify in particular a regime in which radiation reaction is dominated by quantum interference. We find signatures of quantum radiation reaction in the electron spectra which have no classical analogue and which cannot be captured by the incoherent approximations typically used in the high-intensity regime. These signatures are measurable with presently available laser and accelerator technology.

  1. Quantum radiation reaction: from interference to incoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Dinu, Victor; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2015-01-01

    We investigate quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron interactions across different energy and intensity regimes. Using a fully quantum approach which also accounts exactly for the effect of the strong laser pulse on the electron motion, we identify in particular a regime in which radiation reaction is dominated by quantum interference. We find signatures of quantum radiation reaction in the electron spectra which have no classical analogue and which cannot be captured by the incoherent approximations typically used in the high-intensity regime. These signatures are measurable with presently available laser and accelerator technology.

  2. Quantum interference between transverse spatial waveguide modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Aseema; Zhang, Mian; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has the potential to markedly reduce the footprint and resource requirements of quantum information processing systems, but its practical implementation demands broader utilization of the available degrees of freedom within the optical field. To date, integrated photonic quantum systems have primarily relied on path encoding. However, in the classical regime, the transverse spatial modes of a multi-mode waveguide have been easily manipulated using the waveguide geometry to densely encode information. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference between the transverse spatial modes within a single multi-mode waveguide using quantum circuit-building blocks. This work shows that spatial modes can be controlled to an unprecedented level and have the potential to enable practical and robust quantum information processing.

  3. Quantum interference between transverse spatial waveguide modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Aseema; Zhang, Mian; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has the potential to markedly reduce the footprint and resource requirements of quantum information processing systems, but its practical implementation demands broader utilization of the available degrees of freedom within the optical field. To date, integrated photonic quantum systems have primarily relied on path encoding. However, in the classical regime, the transverse spatial modes of a multi-mode waveguide have been easily manipulated using the waveguide geometry to densely encode information. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference between the transverse spatial modes within a single multi-mode waveguide using quantum circuit-building blocks. This work shows that spatial modes can be controlled to an unprecedented level and have the potential to enable practical and robust quantum information processing. PMID:28106036

  4. Understanding quantum interference in General Nonlocality

    CERN Document Server

    Wanng, Hai-Jhun

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to give an understanding of quantum double-slit interference of fermions in the framework of General Nonlocality (GN) [J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)] by studying the self-interaction of matter wave. From the metric of the GN, we derive a special formalism to interpret the interference contrast when the self-interaction is perturbative. According to the formalism, the characteristic of interference pattern is in agreement with experiment qualitatively. As examples, we apply the formalism to the cases governed by Schr\\"odinger current and Dirac current respectively, both of which are relevant to topology. The gap between these two cases corresponds to a spin-current effect, which is possible to test in the near future. In addition, a general interference formalism for both perturbative and non-perturbative self-interactions is presented. By analyzing the general formalism we predict that in the nonperturbative limit there is no interference at all.

  5. Measurement of liver iron concentration by superconducting quantum interference device biomagnetic liver susceptometry validates serum ferritin as prognostic parameter for allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Nicole; Herich, Lena

    2016-10-01

    There are conflicting data regarding the role of serum ferritin (SF) as surrogate parameter for iron overload as an independent prognostic factor for outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) biomagnetic liver susceptometry, a noninvasive measurement of iron overload, allows measurement of the interference of an exteriorly applied small but highly constant magnetic field by the paramagnetic liver storage iron. By measuring the true iron load of patients through SQUID, we wanted to assess the effect of iron overload on patients undergoing SCT. We conducted a single-center retrospective analysis (1994-2010), comparing the effect of SF and liver iron content measured by SQUID shortly before transplantation on overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and transplant-related mortality (TRM) in 142 patients (median age 54.5 yr, range 5.6-75 yr) undergoing SCT (80% reduced intensity regimen). Patients were subdivided into five groups: myelodysplastic syndrome, de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML), secondary AML, primary myelofibrosis, and others. Correlation between SF and SQUID was significant (r = 0.6; P 1000 ng/mL (P = 0.003). A significant association between SQUID and fungal infection was also seen (P = 0.004). For patients with SQUID ≥1000, the risk of proven fungal infection was increased 3.08-fold (95% CI 1.43-6.63). A similar association between SF >1000 and fungal infection was shown (P = 0.01). In univariate analysis, age was a prognostic factor for TRM (P = 0.034, HR 1.04, CI 1.00-1.08). SF ≥1000 was associated with OS (P = 0.033, HR 2.09, CI 1.06-4.11) and EFS (P = 0.016, HR 2.15, 95% CI 1.15-4.10). In multivariate analysis on EFS, only age and SF >1000 remained as independent factors (HR 1.027, P = 0.040, 95% CI 1.001-1.054 and HR 2.058, P = 0.034, 95% CI 1.056-4.008, respectively). The multivariate analysis on TRM left age and SQUID values ≥1000 in the final model (HR 1.045, P

  6. Nonclassical Paths in Quantum Interference Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rahul; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna; Sinha, Urbasi

    2014-09-01

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly equal to the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well-known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption that is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from nonclassical paths in quantum interference experiments that provide a measurable deviation from a naive application of the superposition principle. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these nonclassical paths is difficult to present. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence.

  7. Heuristic explanation of quantum interference experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Guowen, W

    2005-01-01

    A particle is described as a non-spreading wave packet satisfying a linear equation within the framework of special relativity. Young's and other interference experiments are explained with a hypothesis that there is a coupling interaction between the peaked and non-peaked pieces of the wave packet. This explanation of the interference experiments provides a realistic interpretation of quantum mechanics. The interpretation implies that there is physical reality of particles and no wave function collapse. It also implies that neither classical mechanics nor current quantum mechanics is a complete theory for describing physical reality and the Bell inequalities are not the proper touchstones for reality and locality. The problems of the boundary between the macro-world and micro-world and the de-coherence in the transition region (meso-world) between the two are discussed. The present interpretation of quantum mechanics is consistent with the physical aspects of the Copenhagen interpretation, such as, the super...

  8. Many-body quantum interference on hypercubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittel, Christoph; Keil, Robert; Weihs, Gregor

    2017-03-01

    Beyond the regime of distinguishable particles, many-body quantum interferences influence quantum transport in an intricate manner. However, symmetries of the single-particle transformation matrix alleviate this complexity and even allow the analytic formulation of suppression laws, which predict final states to occur with a vanishing probability due to total destructive interference. Here we investigate the symmetries of hypercube graphs and their generalisations with arbitrary identical subgraphs on all vertices. We find that initial many-particle states, which are invariant under self-inverse symmetries of the hypercube, lead to a large number of suppressed final states. The condition for suppression is determined solely by the initial symmetry, while the fraction of suppressed states is given by the number of independent symmetries of the initial state. Our findings reveal new insights into particle statistics for ensembles of indistinguishable bosons and fermions and may represent a first step towards many-particle quantum protocols in higher-dimensional structures.

  9. Radio VLBI and the quantum interference paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    We address here the question of interference of radio signals from astronomical sources like distant quasars, in a very long baseline interferometer (VLBI), where two (or more) distantly located radio telescopes (apertures), receive simultaneous signal from the sky. In an equivalent optical two-slit experiment, it is generally argued that for the photons involved in the interference pattern on the screen, it is not possible, even in principle, to ascertain which of the two slits a particular photon went through. It is argued that any procedure to ascertain this destroys the interference pattern. But in the case of the modern radio VLBI, it is a routine matter to record the phase and amplitude of the voltage outputs from the two radio antennas on a recording media separately and then do the correlation between the two recorded signals later in an offline manner. Does this not violate the quantum interference principle? We provide a resolution of this problem here.

  10. Quantum Interference of Multiple Beams Induced by Multiple Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, N. Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging.......We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging....

  11. Spiral holographic imaging through quantum interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jie; Ming, Yang; Hu, Wei; Lu, Yan-qing

    2017-07-01

    Spiral holographic imaging in the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference scheme is introduced. Using spontaneous parametric down-conversion as a source of photon pairs, we analyze the joint orbital angular momentum spectrum of a reference photon and the photon encoding information of the object. The first-order interference of light beams in standard holographic imaging is replaced by the quantum interference of two-photon probability amplitudes. The difficulty in retrieving the amplitude and phase structure of an unknown photon is thereby avoided as classical interferometric techniques such as optical holography do not apply. Our results show that the full information of the object's transmission function can be recorded in the spiral hologram, which originates directly from the joint orbital angular momentum spectrum. This presents a lateral demonstration of compressive imaging and can potentially be used for remote sensing.

  12. Strong Correlation of Fluorescence Photons without Quantum Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiang-Ming; WANG Fei

    2007-01-01

    It has been predicted that a driven three-level V atom can emit strongly correlated fluorescence photons in the presence of quantum interference. Here we examine the effects of quantum interference on the intensity correlation of fluorescence photons emitted from a driven three-level A atom. Unexpectedly, strong correlation occurs without quantum interference. The quantum interference tends to reduce the correlation function to a normal level. The essential difference between these two cases is traced to the different effects of quantum interference on coherent population trapping (CPT). For the V atom, quantum interference and coherent excitation combine to lead to CPT. For the A atom, however, the quantum interference tends to spoil CPT while the coherent excitation induces the effect.

  13. Complete three photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference at a three port device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mährlein, Simon; von Zanthier, Joachim; Agarwal, Girish S

    2015-06-15

    We report the possibility of completely destructive interference of three indistinguishable photons on a three port device providing a generalisation of the well known Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of two indistinguishable photons on a two port device. Our analysis is based on the underlying mathematical framework of SU(3) transformations rather than SU(2) transformations. We show the completely destructive three photon interference for a large range of parameters of the three port device and point out the physical origin of such interference in terms of the contributions from different quantum paths. As each output port can deliver zero to three photons the device generates higher dimensional entanglement. In particular, different forms of entangled states of qudits can be generated depending on the device parameters. Our system is different from a symmetric three port beam splitter which does not exhibit a three photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference.

  14. Quantum Interference and Entanglement Induced by Multiple Scattering of Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We report on the effects of quantum interference induced by the transmission of an arbitrary number of optical quantum states through a multiple-scattering medium. We identify the role of quantum interference on the photon correlations and the degree of continuous variable entanglement between tw...

  15. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagana, Antonio A; Lohe, Max A; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer.

  16. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A Lagana

    Full Text Available We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer.

  17. On-chip interference of single photons from an embedded quantum dot and an external laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prtljaga, N., E-mail: n.prtljaga@sheffield.ac.uk; Bentham, C.; O' Hara, J.; Royall, B.; Wilson, L. R.; Skolnick, M. S.; Fox, A. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Clarke, E. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-20

    In this work, we demonstrate the on-chip two-photon interference between single photons emitted by a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot and an external laser. The quantum dot is embedded within one arm of an air-clad directional coupler which acts as a beam-splitter for incoming light. Photons originating from an attenuated external laser are coupled to the second arm of the beam-splitter and then combined with the quantum dot photons, giving rise to two-photon quantum interference between dissimilar sources. We verify the occurrence of on-chip Hong-Ou-Mandel interference by cross-correlating the optical signal from the separate output ports of the directional coupler. This experimental approach allows us to use a classical light source (laser) to assess in a single step the overall device performance in the quantum regime and probe quantum dot photon indistinguishability on application realistic time scales.

  18. Multilayer MgB2 superconducting quantum interference filter magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Elias; Melbourne, Thomas; Davidson, Bruce A.; Xi, X. X.; Chen, Ke

    2016-04-01

    We report two types of all-MgB2 superconductive quantum interference filter (SQIF) magnetometers that can measure absolute magnetic fields with high sensitivity. In one configuration, the SQIFs were made of 20 multilayer nonplanar all-MgB2 superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) connected in parallel with loop areas ranging in size from 0.4 to 3.6 μm2. These devices are sensitive to magnetic fields parallel to the substrate and show a single antipeak from 3 to 16 K with a maximum transfer function of ˜16 V/T at 3 K and a field noise of ˜110 pT/Hz1/2 above 100 Hz at 10 K. In a second configuration, the SQIFs were made with 16 planar SQUIDs connected in parallel with loop areas ranging in size from 4 μm2 to 25 μm2 and are sensitive to the magnetic fields perpendicular to the substrate. The planar SQIF shows a single antipeak from 10 to 22 K with a maximum transfer function of 7800 V/T at 10 K and a field noise of ˜70 pT/Hz1/2 above 100 Hz at 20 K.

  19. Time-domain quantum interference in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Gagnon, Denis; Lefebvre, Catherine; MacLean, Steve

    2016-09-01

    The electron momentum density obtained from the Schwinger-like mechanism is evaluated for a graphene sample immersed in a homogeneous time-dependent electric field. Based on the analogy between graphene low-energy electrons and quantum electrodynamics (QED), numerical techniques borrowed from strong field QED are employed and compared to approximate analytical approaches. It is demonstrated that for some range of experimentally accessible parameters, the pair production proceeds by sequences of adiabatic evolutions followed by nonadiabatic Landau-Zener transitions, reminiscent of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism describing topological defect density in second order phase transitions. For some field configurations, this yields interference patterns in momentum space which are explained in terms of the adiabatic-impulse model and the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry.

  20. Classical and quantum interference in multiband optical Bloch oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, S

    2010-01-01

    Classical and quantum interference of light propagating in arrays of coupled waveguides and undergoing multiband optical Bloch oscillations (BOs) with negligible Zener tunneling is theoretically investigated. In particular, it is shown that Mach-Zehnder-like interference effects spontaneously arise in multiband BOs owing to beam splitting and subsequent beam recombination occurring in one BO cycle. As a noteworthy example of quantum interference, we discuss the doubling of interference fringes in photon counting rates for a correlated photon pair undergoing two-band BOs, a phenomenon analogous to the manifestation of the de Broglie wavelength of an entangled biphoton state observed in quantum Mach-Zehnder interferometry.

  1. A parabolic model to control quantum interference in T-shaped molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Sevincli, Haldun; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.;

    2013-01-01

    Quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular devices have drawn increasing attention over the past years due to their unique features observed in the conductance spectrum. For the further development of single molecular devices exploiting QI effects, it is of great theoretical and practical int...... and the main conduction channel from measurements in the case of orthogonal basis. The results obtained within the parabolic model are validated using density-functional based quantum transport calculations in realistic T-shaped molecular junctions....

  2. Ruling Out Multi-Order Interference in Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Urbasi; Jennewein, Thomas; Laflamme, Raymond; Weihs, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanics and gravitation are two pillars of modern physics. Despite their success in describing the physical world around us, they seem to be incompatible theories. There are suggestions that one of these theories must be generalized to achieve unification. For example, Born's rule, one of the axioms of quantum mechanics could be violated. Born's rule predicts that quantum interference, as shown by a double slit diffraction experiment, occurs from pairs of paths. A generalized version of quantum mechanics might allow multi-path, i.e. higher order interferences thus leading to a deviation from the theory. We performed a three slit experiment with photons and bounded the magnitude of three path interference to less than 10-2 of the expected two-path interference, thus ruling out third and higher order interference and providing a bound on the accuracy of Born's rule. Our experiment is consistent with the postulate both in semi-classical and quantum regimes.

  3. Ruling out multi-order interference in quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Urbasi; Couteau, Christophe; Jennewein, Thomas; Laflamme, Raymond; Weihs, Gregor

    2010-07-23

    Quantum mechanics and gravitation are two pillars of modern physics. Despite their success in describing the physical world around us, they seem to be incompatible theories. There are suggestions that one of these theories must be generalized to achieve unification. For example, Born's rule--one of the axioms of quantum mechanics--could be violated. Born's rule predicts that quantum interference, as shown by a double-slit diffraction experiment, occurs from pairs of paths. A generalized version of quantum mechanics might allow multipath (i.e., higher-order) interference, thus leading to a deviation from the theory. We performed a three-slit experiment with photons and bounded the magnitude of three-path interference to less than 10(-2) of the expected two-path interference, thus ruling out third- and higher-order interference and providing a bound on the accuracy of Born's rule. Our experiment is consistent with the postulate both in semiclassical and quantum regimes.

  4. Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-30

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS " Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices" 6. AUTHOR(S) ,DftftLo3-91-6-oo 7 David K. Ferry 7. PERFORMING...OF ABSTRACT UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UL NZIN 1540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev 2-89) PrinCrlt>• oy ANSI SIC Z39-18 QUANTUM ... TRANSPORT IN SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Final Report on DAAL03-91-G-0067 (28461-EL) David K. Ferry, Principal Investigator Department of Electrical Engineering

  5. Implementing quantum Fourier transform with integrated photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabia, Gelo Noel

    2014-03-01

    Many quantum algorithms that exhibit exponential speedup over their classical counterparts employ the quantum Fourier transform, which is used to solve interesting problems such as prime factorization. Meanwhile, nonclassical interference of single photons achieved on integrated platforms holds the promise of achieving large-scale quantum computation with multiport devices. An optical multiport device can be built to realize any quantum circuit as a sequence of unitary operations performed by beam splitters and phase shifters on path-encoded qudits. In this talk, I will present a recursive scheme for implementing quantum Fourier transform with a multimode interference photonic integrated circuit. Research at Perimeter Institute is supported by the Government of Canada through Industry Canada and by the Province of Ontario through the Ministry of Research and Innovation.

  6. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of "clocks"

    CERN Document Server

    Zych, Magdalena; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of "clocks", which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. "Clock" interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  7. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Heterostructures to Study Quantum Interference Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    MBE growth and regrowth of heterostructures for quantum interference transistors and a detailed study of the physical mechanisms and the limitations imposed by them in such devices. We have investigated in detail the suitability of the MBE regrowth process for such applications. Very encouraging progress has been made. The performance characteristics of dual-channel quantum interference devices grown in our laboratory and defined by e-beam lithography have been measured and reported. From this work it is clear that to achieve enhanced performance and to demonstrate a large

  8. Enhanced Kerr nonlinearity via quantum interference from spontaneous emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asadpour, S.H., E-mail: S.Hosein.Asadpour@gmail.com [Young Researchers Club, Bandar Anzali Branch, Islamic Azad University, Bandar Anzali (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sahrai, M. [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltani, A. [School of Engineering and Emerging Technologies, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamedi, H.R. [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-02

    A novel atom configuration is proposed for a giant Kerr nonlinearity in zero linear and nonlinear probe absorption. It is shown that without coherent control field and just by quantum interference of spontaneous emission, a giant Kerr nonlinearity can be obtained. -- Highlights: ► The quantum interference from spontaneous emission is considered in a four-level medium. ► The giant Kerr nonlinearity in the zero linear and nonlinear absorption is obtained. ► The quantum interference effect on group velocity is then investigated.

  9. Interference and interactions in open quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, J P; Ferry, D K; Moura, A P S; Lai, Y C; Indlekofer, K M

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we review the results of our joint experimental and theoretical studies of electron-interference, and interaction, phenomena in open electron cavities known as quantum dots. The transport through these structures is shown to be heavily influenced by the remnants of their discrete density of states, elements of which remain resolved in spite of the strong coupling that exists between the cavity and its reservoirs. The experimental signatures of this density of states are discussed at length in this report, and are shown to be related to characteristic wavefunction scarring, involving a small number of classical orbits. A semiclassical analysis of this behaviour shows it to be related to the effect of dynamical tunnelling, in which electrons are injected into the dot tunnel through classically forbidden regions of phase space, to access isolated regular orbits. The dynamical tunnelling gives rise to the formation of long-lived quasi-bound states in the open dots, and the many-body implications a...

  10. The Study of Quantum Interference in Metallic Photonic Crystals Doped with Four-Level Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatef Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, the absorption coefficient of a metallic photonic crystal doped with nanoparticles has been obtained using numerical simulation techniques. The effects of quantum interference and the concentration of doped particles on the absorption coefficient of the system have been investigated. The nanoparticles have been considered as semiconductor quantum dots which behave as a four-level quantum system and are driven by a single coherent laser field. The results show that changing the position of the photonic band gap about the resonant energy of the two lower levels directly affects the decay rate, and the system can be switched between transparent and opaque states if the probe laser field is tuned to the resonance frequency. These results provide an application for metallic nanostructures in the fabrication of new optical switches and photonic devices.

  11. Interference and inequality in quantum decision theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Taksu, E-mail: taksu.cheon@kochi-tech.ac.j [Laboratory of Physics, Kochi University of Technology, Tosa Yamada, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Takahashi, Taiki, E-mail: ttakahashi@lynx.let.hokudai.ac.j [Laboratory of Social Psychology, Department of Behavioral Science, Faculty of Letters, Hokkaido University, N.10, W.7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2010-12-01

    The quantum decision theory is examined in its simplest form of two-condition two-choice setting. A set of inequalities to be satisfied by any quantum conditional probability describing the decision process is derived. Experimental data indicating the breakdown of classical explanations are critically examined with quantum theory using the full set of quantum phases.

  12. Optimization of the detection coil of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance for discriminating a minimum amount of liver tumor of rats in microtesla fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Huang, Kai-Wen; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er; Liao, Shu-Hsien

    2013-08-01

    This study presents an optimization of the detection coil of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in microtesla fields for discriminating a minimum amount of liver tumor in rats by characterizing the longitudinal relaxation rate, T1-1, of tested samples. The detection coil, which was coupled to the SQUID through a flux transformer, was optimized by varying the copper wires' winding turns and diameters. When comparing the measured NMR signals, we found that the simulated NMR signal agrees with simulated signals. When discriminating liver tumors in rats, the averaged longitudinal relaxation rate was observed to be T1-1 = 3.3 s-1 for cancerous liver tissue and T1-1 = 6.6 s-1 for normal liver tissue. The results suggest that it can be used to successfully discriminate cancerous liver tissue from normal liver tissues in rats. The minimum amount of samples that can be detected is 0.2 g for liver tumor and 0.4 g for normal liver tissue in 100 μT fields. The specimen was not damaged; it can be used for other pathological analyses. The proposed method provides more possibilities for examining undersized specimens.

  13. An electro-optic waveform interconnect based on quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Li-Guo; Gong, Shang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The ability to modulate an optical field via an electric field is regarded as a key function of electro-optic interconnects, which are used in optical communications and information processing systems. One of the main required devices for such interconnects is the electro-optic modulator (EOM). Current EOM based on the electro-optic effect and the electro-absorption effect often is bulky and power inefficient due to the weak electro-optic properties of its constituent materials. Here we propose a new mechanism to produce an arbitrary-waveform EOM based on the quantum interference, in which both the real and imaginary parts of the susceptibility are engineered coherently with the superhigh efficiency. Based on this EOM, a waveform interconnect from the voltage to the modulated optical absorption is realised. We expect that such a new type of electro-optic interconnect will have a broad range of applications including the optical communications and network.

  14. Quantum Interference between Transverse Spatial Waveguide Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, Aseema; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has drastically reduced the size of table-top optical experiments to the chip-scale, allowing for demonstrations of large-scale quantum information processing and quantum simulation. However, despite these advances, practical implementations of quantum photonic circuits remain limited because they consist of large networks of waveguide interferometers that path encode information which do not easily scale. Increasing the dimensionality of current quantum systems using higher degrees of freedom such as transverse spatial field distribution, polarization, time, and frequency to encode more information per carrier will enable scalability by simplifying quantum computational architectures, increasing security and noise tolerance in quantum communication channels, and simulating richer quantum phenomena. Here we demonstrate a scalable platform for photonic quantum information processing using waveguide quantum circuit building blocks based on the transverse spatial mode degree of freedom:...

  15. An update on mobile phones interference with medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud Pashazadeh, Ali; Aghajani, Mahdi; Nabipour, Iraj; Assadi, Majid

    2013-10-01

    Mobile phones' electromagnetic interference with medical devices is an important issue for the medical safety of patients who are using life-supporting medical devices. This review mainly focuses on mobile phones' interference with implanted medical devices and with medical equipment located in critical areas of hospitals. A close look at the findings reveals that mobile phones may adversely affect the functioning of medical devices, and the specific effect and the degree of interference depend on the applied technology and the separation distance. According to the studies' findings and the authors' recommendations, besides mitigating interference, using mobile phones at a reasonable distance from medical devices and developing technology standards can lead to their effective use in hospital communication systems.

  16. Quantum Interference and Selectivity through Biological Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Vahid; Naeij, Hamidreza; Shafiee, Afshin

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of selectivity in ion channels is still an open question in biology for more than half a century. Here, we suggest that quantum interference can be a solution to explain the selectivity mechanism in ion channels since interference happens between similar ions through the same size of ion channels. In this paper, we simulate two neighboring ion channels on a cell membrane with the famous double-slit experiment in physics to investigate whether there is any possibility of matter-wave interference of ions via movement through ion channels. Our obtained decoherence timescales indicate that the quantum states of ions can only survive for short times, i.e. ≈100 picoseconds in each channel and ≈17–53 picoseconds outside the channels, giving the result that the quantum interference of ions seems unlikely due to environmental decoherence. However, we discuss our results and raise few points, which increase the possibility of interference. PMID:28134331

  17. Inducing Strong Nonlinearities in a High-$Q$ System: Coupling of a Bulk Acoustic Wave Quartz Resonator to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    CERN Document Server

    Goryachev, Maxim; Galliou, Serge; Tobar, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    A system consisting of a SQUID amplifier coupled to a Bulk Acoustic Wave resonator is investigated experimentally from the small to large signal regimes. Both parallel and series connection topologies of the system are verified. The study reveals significant non-Duffing response that is associated with the nonlinear characteristics of Josephson junctions. The nonlinearity provides quasi-periodic structure of the spectrum in both incident power and frequency. The result gives an insight into the open loop behaviour of a future Cryogenic Quartz Oscillator operating with a SQUID amplifier as the active device.

  18. Quantum interference of independently generated telecom-band single photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Monika [Center for Photonic Communication and Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3112 (United States); Altepeter, Joseph B.; Huang, Yu-Ping; Oza, Neal N. [Center for Photonic Communication and Computing, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3118 (United States); Kumar, Prem [Center for Photonic Communication and Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3112, USA and Center for Photonic Communication and Computing, Department of Electrical Engineering (United States)

    2014-12-04

    We report on high-visibility quantum interference of independently generated telecom O-band (1310 nm) single photons using standard single-mode fibers. The experimental data are shown to agree well with the results of simulations using a comprehensive quantum multimode theory without the need for any fitting parameter.

  19. Complementarity in temporal ghost interference and temporal quantum eraser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kiyoung; Noh, Jaewoo

    2015-06-01

    We present a theory for the complementarity in temporal interference and quantum erasure. We consider the case of entangled biphoton where we can get the information of single photon's arrival time without making a disturbing measurement. We find a mathematical equation for the complementary relation for a temporal double slit experiment. We also propose a quantum eraser scheme that will elucidate that the complementarity is originated from the quantum entanglement.

  20. An exact factorization perspective on quantum interferences in nonadiabatic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curchod, Basile F. E.; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E. K. U.

    2016-07-01

    Nonadiabatic quantum interferences emerge whenever nuclear wavefunctions in different electronic states meet and interact in a nonadiabatic region. In this work, we analyze how nonadiabatic quantum interferences translate in the context of the exact factorization of the molecular wavefunction. In particular, we focus our attention on the shape of the time-dependent potential energy surface—the exact surface on which the nuclear dynamics takes place. We use a one-dimensional exactly solvable model to reproduce different conditions for quantum interferences, whose characteristic features already appear in one-dimension. The time-dependent potential energy surface develops complex features when strong interferences are present, in clear contrast to the observed behavior in simple nonadiabatic crossing cases. Nevertheless, independent classical trajectories propagated on the exact time-dependent potential energy surface reasonably conserve a distribution in configuration space that mimics one of the exact nuclear probability densities.

  1. An Exact Factorization Perspective on Quantum Interferences in Nonadiabatic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Curchod, Basile F E; Gross, E K U

    2016-01-01

    Nonadiabatic quantum interferences emerge whenever nuclear wavefunctions in different electronic states meet and interact in a nonadiabatic region. In this work, we analyze how nonadiabatic quantum interferences translate in the context of the exact factorization of the molecular wavefunction. In particular, we focus our attention on the shape of the time-dependent potential energy surface - the exact surface on which the nuclear dynamics takes place - using an exactly-solvable model to reproduce different conditions for quantum interferences. The time-dependent potential energy surface develops complex features when strong interferences are present, in clear contrast to the observed behavior in simple nonadiabatic crossing cases. Nevertheless, independent classical trajectories propagated on the exact time-dependent potential energy surface reasonably conserve a distribution in configuration space that mimics the one of the exact nuclear probability density.

  2. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of “clocks”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zych, M.; Pikovski, I.; Costa, F.; Brukner, Č.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of “clocks”, which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. “Clock” interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  3. Implantable rhythm devices and electromagnetic interference: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrda, Katia; Khairy, Paul

    2008-07-01

    Current medical guidelines have prompted implementation of increasing numbers of implantable rhythm devices, be they pacemakers, internal cardioverter-defibrillators or loop recorders. These devices rely on complex microcircuitry and use electromagnetic waves for communication. They are, therefore, susceptible to interference from surrounding electromagnetic radiation and magnetic energy. Hermetic shielding in metallic cases, filters, interference rejection circuits and bipolar sensing have contributed to their relative resistance to electromagnetic interference (EMI) in household and workplace environments. Device interactions have occurred in hospitals where EMI sources are ubiquitous, including radiation, electrocautery and MRI exposures. However, with rapidly evolving technology, devices and potential sources of EMI continue to change. This review provides a contemporary overview of the current state of knowledge regarding risks attributable to EMI; highlights current limitations of implantable rhythm devices; and attempts to distinguish myths from realities.

  4. Nonmonotonic quantum-to-classical transition in multiparticle interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ra, Young-Sik; Tichy, Malte; Lim, Hyang-Tag

    2013-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical wave–particle duality implies that probability distributions for granular detection events exhibit wave-like interference. On the single-particle level, this leads to self-interference—e.g., on transit across a double slit—for photons as well as for large, massive particles...... that interference fades away monotonically with increasing distinguishability—in accord with available experimental evidence on the single- and on the many-particle level. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that such monotonicity of the quantum-to-classical transition is the exception rather than...... the rule whenever more than two particles interfere. As the distinguishability of the particles is continuously increased, different numbers of particles effectively interfere, which leads to interference signals that are, in general, nonmonotonic functions of the distinguishability of the particles...

  5. Two-photon interference between disparate sources for quantum networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, A. R.; Labonté, L.; Clark, A. S.; Bell, B.; Alibart, O.; Martin, A.; Wadsworth, W. J.; Tanzilli, S.; Rarity, J. G.

    2013-06-01

    Quantum networks involve entanglement sharing between multiple users. Ideally, any two users would be able to connect regardless of the type of photon source they employ, provided they fulfill the requirements for two-photon interference. From a theoretical perspective, photons coming from different origins can interfere with a perfect visibility, provided they are made indistinguishable in all degrees of freedom. Previous experimental demonstrations of such a scenario have been limited to photon wavelengths below 900 nm, unsuitable for long distance communication, and suffered from low interference visibility. We report two-photon interference using two disparate heralded single photon sources, which involve different nonlinear effects, operating in the telecom wavelength range. The measured visibility of the two-photon interference is 80 +/- 4%, which paves the way to hybrid universal quantum networks.

  6. Thermo-mechanical challenges for quantum devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, A.W.J.; McKenzie, F.V.

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years Technical University of Delft, under leadership of Prof.dr.ir. Leo Kouwenhoven, has developed several successful concepts for quantum devices that are suitable for quantum computing and quantum communication. From a quantum research point of view we are still in a very fundamen

  7. A parabolic model to control quantum interference in T-shaped molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-09-07

    Quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular devices have drawn increasing attention over the past years due to their unique features observed in the conductance spectrum. For the further development of single molecular devices exploiting QI effects, it is of great theoretical and practical interest to develop simple methods controlling the emergence and the positions of QI effects like anti-resonances or Fano line shapes in conductance spectra. In this work, starting from a well-known generic molecular junction with a side group (T-shaped molecule), we propose a simple graphical method to visualize the conditions for the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti-resonances, in the conductance spectrum. By introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic diagram), we can easily visualize the relation between the electronic parameters and the positions of normal resonant peaks and anti-resonant peaks induced by quantum interference in the conductance spectrum. This parabolic model not only can predict the emergence and energetic position of quantum interference from a few electronic parameters but also can enable one to know the coupling between the side group and the main conduction channel from measurements in the case of orthogonal basis. The results obtained within the parabolic model are validated using density-functional based quantum transport calculations in realistic T-shaped molecular junctions.

  8. Direct observation of large quantum interference effect in anthraquinone solid-state junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabache, Vincent; Chaste, Julien; Petit, Philippe; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Martin, Pascal; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe; McCreery, Richard L; Lafarge, Philippe

    2013-07-17

    Quantum interference in cross-conjugated molecules embedded in solid-state devices was investigated by direct current-voltage and differential conductance transport measurements of anthraquinone (AQ)-based large area planar junctions. A thin film of AQ was grafted covalently on the junction base electrode by diazonium electroreduction, while the counter electrode was directly evaporated on top of the molecular layer. Our technique provides direct evidence of a large quantum interference effect in multiple CMOS compatible planar junctions. The quantum interference is manifested by a pronounced dip in the differential conductance close to zero voltage bias. The experimental signature is well developed at low temperature (4 K), showing a large amplitude dip with a minimum >2 orders of magnitude lower than the conductance at higher bias and is still clearly evident at room temperature. A temperature analysis of the conductance curves revealed that electron-phonon coupling is the principal decoherence mechanism causing large conductance oscillations at low temperature.

  9. Detector-device-independent quantum key distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Korzh, Boris; Martin, Anthony; Bussières, Félix; Thew, Rob; Zbinden, Hugo [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, Chemin de Pinchat 22, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2014-12-01

    Recently, a quantum key distribution (QKD) scheme based on entanglement swapping, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), was proposed to bypass all measurement side-channel attacks. While mdiQKD is conceptually elegant and offers a supreme level of security, the experimental complexity is challenging for practical systems. For instance, it requires interference between two widely separated independent single-photon sources, and the secret key rates are dependent on detecting two photons—one from each source. Here, we demonstrate a proof-of-principle experiment of a QKD scheme that removes the need for a two-photon system and instead uses the idea of a two-qubit single-photon to significantly simplify the implementation and improve the efficiency of mdiQKD in several aspects.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  11. Quantum Interference in Time-Delayed Nonsequential Double Ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, A S

    2015-01-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of quantum interference in nonsequential double ionization focusing on the recollision-excitation with subsequent ionization (RESI) mechanism, employing the strong-field approximation (SFA). We find that interference has a major influence on the shape, localization and symmetry of the correlated electron momentum distributions. In particular, the fourfold symmetry with regard to the parallel momentum components observed in previous SFA studies is broken. Two types of interference are observed and thoroughly analyzed, namely that caused by electron indistinguishability and intra-cycle events, and that stemming from different excitation channels. We find that interference is most prominent around the diagonal and anti-diagonal in the parallel-momentum plane and provide fully analytical expressions for most interference patterns encountered. We also show that this interference can be controlled by an appropriate choice of phase and excited-state geometry. This leads a to myriad o...

  12. Beyond Moore's law: towards competitive quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    A century after the invention of quantum theory and fifty years after Bell's inequality we see the first quantum devices emerge as products that aim to be competitive with the best classical computing devices. While a universal quantum computer of non-trivial size is still out of reach there exist a number commercial and experimental devices: quantum random number generators, quantum simulators and quantum annealers. In this colloquium I will present some of these devices and validation tests we performed on them. Quantum random number generators use the inherent randomness in quantum measurements to produce true random numbers, unlike classical pseudorandom number generators which are inherently deterministic. Optical lattice emulators use ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices to mimic typical models of condensed matter physics. In my talk I will focus especially on the devices built by Canadian company D-Wave systems, which are special purpose quantum simulators for solving hard classical optimization problems. I will review the controversy around the quantum nature of these devices and will compare them to state of the art classical algorithms. I will end with an outlook towards universal quantum computing and end with the question: which important problems that are intractable even for post-exa-scale classical computers could we expect to solve once we have a universal quantum computer?

  13. Devices That May Interfere with Pacemakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use Microwave ovens TV transmitters and remote control TV changers MP3 players (but headphones should be kept at least 1.2 inches or 3 cm away from the device) Office and light shop equipment : most pose no risk to your ...

  14. Spying on photons with photons: quantum interference and information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The quest to have both which-path knowledge and interference fringes in a double-slit experiment dates back to the inception of quantum mechanics (QM) and to the famous Einstein-Bohr debates. In this paper we propose and discuss an experiment able to spy on one photon's path with another photon. We modify the quantum state inside the interferometer as opposed to the traditional physical modification of the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setup. We are able to show that it is the ability to harvest or not which-path information that finally limits the visibility of the interference pattern and not the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setups. Remarkably, a full "particle-like" experimental setup is able to show interference fringes with 100% visibility if the quantum state is carefully engineered.

  15. Spying on photons with photons: quantum interference and information

    CERN Document Server

    Ataman, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The quest to have both which-path knowledge and interference fringes in a double-slit experiment dates back to the inception of quantum mechanics (QM) and to the famous Einstein-Bohr debates. In this paper we propose and discuss an experiment able to spy on one photon's path with another photon. We modify the quantum state inside the interferometer as opposed to the traditional physical modification of the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setup. We are able to show that it is the ability to harvest or not which-path information that finally limits the visibility of the interference pattern and not the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setups. Remarkably, a full "particle-like" experimental setup is able to show interference fringes with 100 % visibility if the quantum state is carefully engineered.

  16. Quantum interference of molecules -- probing the wave nature of matter

    CERN Document Server

    Venugopalan, Anu

    2012-01-01

    The double slit interference experiment has been famously described by Richard Feynman as containing the "only mystery of quantum mechanics". The history of quantum mechanics is intimately linked with the discovery of the dual nature of matter and radiation. While the double slit experiment for light is easily undertsood in terms of its wave nature, the very same experiment for particles like the electron is somewhat more difficult to comprehend. By the 1920s it was firmly established that electrons have a wave nature. However, for a very long time, most discussions pertaining to interference experiments for particles were merely gedanken experiments. It took almost six decades after the establishment of its wave nature to carry out a 'double slit interference' experiment for electrons. This set the stage for interference experiments with larger particles. In the last decade there has been spectacular progress in matter-wave interefernce experiments. Today, molecules with over a hundred atoms can be made to i...

  17. Superluminal light propagation via quantum interference in decay channels

    OpenAIRE

    Arun, R.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the propagation of a weak probe light through a coherently driven $Y$-type system. Under the condition that the excited atomic levels decay via same vacuum modes, the effects of quantum interference in decay channels are considered. It is found that the interference in decay channels results in a lossless anomalous dispersion between two gain peaks. We demonstrate that the probe pulse propagation can in principle be switched from subluminal to superluminal due to the decay-induced ...

  18. Phases, quantum interferences and effective vector meson masses in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyeur, M.

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the prospects for observing the mass of {rho}- and {omega}-mesons around nuclear matter density by studying their coherent photoproduction in nuclear targets and subsequent in-medium decay into e{sup +}e{sup -}pairs. The quantum interference of {rho} and {omega}-mesons in the e{sup +}e{sup -}channel and the interference between Bethe-Heitler pairs and dielectrons from vector meson decays are of particular interest. (author). 21 refs.

  19. Oscillatory quantum interference effects in narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillianfeld, R. B.; Kallaher, R. L.; Heremans, J. J.; Chen, Hong; Goel, N.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.; Van Roy, W.; Borghs, G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate quantum interference phenomena in narrow bandgap semiconductors under strong spin-orbit interaction, by measuring the magnetoresistance across mesoscopic closed-path structures fabricated in two-dimensional electron systems. We discuss our results in terms of four quantum interference effects brought about by geometric phases acquired by the electron wave functions: the Aharonov-Bohm phase, the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect, the Berry's phase due to the evolution of the spin degree of freedom, and the Aharonov-Casher phase.

  20. Nonmonotonic quantum-to-classical transition in multiparticle interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ra, Young-Sik; Tichy, Malte; Lim, Hyang-Tag

    2013-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical wave–particle duality implies that probability distributions for granular detection events exhibit wave-like interference. On the single-particle level, this leads to self-interference—e.g., on transit across a double slit—for photons as well as for large, massive particles...... that interference fades away monotonically with increasing distinguishability—in accord with available experimental evidence on the single- and on the many-particle level. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that such monotonicity of the quantum-to-classical transition is the exception rather than...

  1. Observation of quantum interference between separated mechanical oscillator wavepackets

    CERN Document Server

    Kienzler, D; Negnevitsky, V; Lo, H -Y; Marinelli, M; Nadlinger, D; Home, J P

    2015-01-01

    The ability of matter to be superposed at two different locations while being intrinsically connected by a quantum phase is among the most counterintuitive predictions of quantum physics. While such superpositions have been created for a variety of systems, the in-situ observation of the phase coherence has remained out of reach. Using a heralding measurement on a spin-oscillator entangled state, we project a mechanical trapped-ion oscillator into a superposition of two spatially separated states, a situation analogous to Schr\\"odinger's cat. Quantum interference is clearly observed by extracting the occupations of the energy levels. For larger states, we encounter problems in measuring the energy distribution, which we overcome by performing the analogous measurement in a squeezed Fock basis with each basis element stretched along the separation axis. Using 8 dB of squeezing we observe quantum interference for cat states with phase space separations of $\\Delta \\alpha = 15.6$, corresponding to wavepackets wit...

  2. Quantum Physics A First Encounter Interference, Entanglement, and Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Scarani, Valerio

    2006-01-01

    The essential features of quantum physics, largely debated since its discovery, are presented in this book, through the description (without mathematics) of recent experiments. Putting the accent on physical phenomena, this book clarifies the historical issues (delocalisation, interferences) and reaches out to modern topics (quantum cryptography, non-locality and teleportation); the debate on interpretations is serenely reviewed. - ;Quantum physics is often perceived as a weird and abstract theory, which physicists must use in order to make correct predictions. But many recent experiments have shown that the weirdness of the theory simply mirrors the weirdness of phenomena: it is Nature itself, and not only our description of it, that behaves in an astonishing way. This book selects those, among these typical quantum phenomena, whose rigorous description requires neither the formalism, nor an important. background in physics. The first part of the book deals with the phenomenon of single-particle interference...

  3. Quantum Interference in Cognition: Structural Aspects of the Brain

    CERN Document Server

    Aerts, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    We identify the presence of typically quantum effects, namely 'superposition' and 'interference', in what happens when human concepts are combined, and provide a quantum model in complex Hilbert space that represents faithfully experimental data measuring the situation of combining concepts. Our model shows how 'interference of concepts' explains the effects of underextension and overextension when two concepts combine to the disjunction of these two concepts. This result supports our earlier hypothesis that human thought has a superposed two-layered structure, one layer consisting of 'classical logical thought' and a superposed layer consisting of 'quantum conceptual thought'. Possible connections with recent findings of a 'grid-structure' for the brain are analyzed, and influences on the mind/brain relation, and consequences on applied disciplines, such as artificial intelligence and quantum computation, are considered.

  4. Collisional quantum interference on rotational energy transfer: physical interpretation of the differential interference angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yong-Qing; Li Jian; Ma Feng-Cai

    2006-01-01

    Collisional quantum interference (CQI) on the intramolecular rotational energy transfer is observed in an experiment with a static cell, and the integral interference angles are measured. To obtain more accurate information, an experiment with a molecular beam is carried out, and thereby the relationship between the differential interference angle and the scattering angle is obtained. Based on the first-Born approximation of time-dependent perturbation theory,the theoretical model of CQI is developed in an atom-diatom system in the condition of the molecular beam, with the long-range interaction potential taken into account. The method of measuring correctly the differential interference angle is presented. The tendencies of the differential interference angle changing with the impact parameter and relative velocity are discussed. The theoretical model presented here is important for understanding or performing the experiment in the molecular beam.

  5. Quantum superposition counterintuitive consequences of coherence, entanglement, and interference

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, M P

    2007-01-01

    Coherence, entanglement, and interference arise from quantum superposition, the most distinctive and puzzling feature of quantum physics. Silverman, whose extensive experimental and theoretical work has helped elucidate these processes, presents a clear and engaging discussion of the role of quantum superposition in diverse quantum phenomena such as the wavelike nature of particle propagation, indistinguishability of identical particles, nonlocal interactions of correlated particles, topological effects of magnetic fields, and chiral asymmetry in nature. He also examines how macroscopic quantum coherence may be able to extricate physics from its most challenging quandary, the collapse of a massive degenerate star to a singularity in space in which the laws of physics break down. Explained by a physicist with a concern for clarity and experimental achievability, the extraordinary nature of quantum superposition will fascinate the reader not only for its apparent strangeness, but also for its comprehensibility.

  6. Unruh effect and macroscopic quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Steane, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influence of Unruh radiation on matter-wave interferometry experiments using neutral objects modeled as dielectric spheres. The Unruh effect leads to a loss of coherence through momentum diffusion. This is a fundamental source of decoherence that affects all objects having electromagnetic interactions. However, the effect is not large enough to prevent the observation of interference for objects of any size, even when the path separation is larger than the size of the object. When the acceleration in the interferometer arms is large, inertial tidal forces will disrupt the material integrity of the interfering objects before the Unruh decoherence of the centre of mass motion is sufficient to prevent observable interference.

  7. Quantum interferences reconstruction with low homodyne detection efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Martina; Randi, Francesco [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Titimbo, Kelvin; Zimmermann, Klaus; Benatti, Fabio [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Kourousias, Georgios; Curri, Alessio [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); Floreanini, Roberto [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Parmigiani, Fulvio [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); University of Cologne, Institute of Physics II, Cologne (Germany); Fausti, Daniele [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Optical homodyne tomography consists in reconstructing the quantum state of an optical field from repeated measurements of its amplitude at different field phases (homodyne data). The experimental noise, which unavoidably affects the homodyne data, leads to a detection efficiency η<1. The problem of reconstructing quantum states from noisy homodyne data sets prompted an intense scientific debate about the presence or absence of a lower homodyne efficiency bound (η>0.5) below which quantum features, like quantum interferences, cannot be retrieved. Here, by numerical experiments, we demonstrate that quantum interferences can be effectively reconstructed also for low homodyne detection efficiency. In particular, we address the challenging case of a Schroedinger cat state and test the minimax and adaptive Wigner function reconstruction technique by processing homodyne data distributed according to the chosen state but with an efficiency η>0.5. By numerically reproducing the Schroedinger's cat interference pattern, we give evidence that quantum state reconstruction is actually possible in these conditions, and provide a guideline for handling optical tomography based on homodyne data collected by low efficiency detectors. (orig.)

  8. Observation of quantum interference in molecular charge transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guedon, Constant M.; Valkenier, Hennie; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    , phenomena such as giant magnetoresistance(5), Kondo effects(6) and conductance switching(7-11) have been observed in single molecules, and theorists have predicted that it should also be possible to observe quantum interference in molecular conductors(12-18), but until now all the evidence...

  9. Exploration of Quantum Interference in Document Relevance Judgement Discrepancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benyou Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum theory has been applied in a number of fields outside physics, e.g., cognitive science and information retrieval (IR. Recently, it has been shown that quantum theory can subsume various key IR models into a single mathematical formalism of Hilbert vector spaces. While a series of quantum-inspired IR models has been proposed, limited effort has been devoted to verify the existence of the quantum-like phenomenon in real users’ information retrieval processes, from a real user study perspective. In this paper, we aim to explore and model the quantum interference in users’ relevance judgement about documents, caused by the presentation order of documents. A user study in the context of IR tasks have been carried out. The existence of the quantum interference is tested by the violation of the law of total probability and the validity of the order effect. Our main findings are: (1 there is an apparent judging discrepancy across different users and document presentation orders, and empirical data have violated the law of total probability; (2 most search trials recorded in the user study show the existence of the order effect, and the incompatible decision perspectives in the quantum question (QQ model are valid in some trials. We further explain the judgement discrepancy in more depth, in terms of four effects (comparison, unfamiliarity, attraction and repulsion and also analyse the dynamics of document relevance judgement in terms of the evolution of the information need subspace.

  10. Dimerous Electron and Quantum Interference beyond the Probability Amplitude Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Kassandrov, Vladimir V

    2011-01-01

    We generalize the formerly proposed relationship between a special complex geometry (originating from the structure of biquaternion algebra) and induced real geometry of (extended) space-time. The primordial dynamics in complex space allows for a new realization of the "one electron Universe" of Wheeler-Feynman (the so called "ensemble of duplicons") and leads to a radical concept of "dimerous" (consisting of two identical matter pre-elements, "duplicons") electron. Using this concept, together with an additional phase-like invariant (arising from the complex pre-geometry), we manage to give a visual classical explanation for quantum interference phenomena and, in particular, for the canonical two-slit experiment. Fundamental relativistic condition of quantum interference generalizing the de Broglie relationship is obtained, and an experimentally verifiable distinction in predictions of quantum theory and presented algebrodynamical scheme is established.

  11. Two-photon interference from two blinking quantum emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöns, Klaus D.; Stensson, Katarina; Reindl, Marcus; Swillo, Marcin; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo; Björk, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of blinking on the two-photon interference measurement from two independent quantum emitters. We find that blinking significantly alters the statistics in the Hong-Ou-Mandel second-order intensity correlation function g(2 )(τ ) and the outcome of two-photon interference measurements performed with independent quantum emitters. We theoretically demonstrate that the presence of blinking can be experimentally recognized by a deviation from the gD(2 )(0 ) =0.5 value when distinguishable photons from two emitters impinge on a beam splitter. Our findings explain the significant differences between linear losses and blinking for correlation measurements between independent sources and are experimentally verified using a parametric down-conversion photon-pair source. We show that blinking imposes a mandatory cross-check measurement to correctly estimate the degree of indistinguishability of photons emitted by independent quantum emitters.

  12. Quantum interference in a thermal bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimov, Alexey [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Buchmueller, Wilfried; Mendizabal, Sebastian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Drewes, Marco [Inst. de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-01-15

    Thermal leptogenesis explains the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe in terms of neutrino masses, consistent with neutrino oscillation experiments. We present a full quantum mechanical calculation of the generated lepton asymmetry based on Kadanoff-Baym equations. Origin of the asymmetry is the departure of the statistical propagator of the heavy Majorana neutrino from the equilibrium propagator, together with CP violating couplings. The lepton asymmetry is calculated directly in terms of Green's functions without referring to 'number densities'. A detailed comparison with Boltzmann equations shows that conventional leptogenesis calculations have an uncertainty of at least one order of magnitude. (orig.)

  13. 超导量子干涉仪及其在低场核磁共振及成像中的应用%Superconducting Quantum Interference Device and Its Application in Low-Field Nuclear M agnetic Resonance & Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 蒋凤英; 金贻荣; 李绍; 邓辉; 田野; 任育峰; 郑东宁

    2013-01-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device ( SQUID) is a kind of ultra-sensitive flux detector based on macroscopic quantum interferencephenomenon of Josephson junctions .The principle of SQUID and advantages of its appli-cation in low-field nuclear magnetic resonance ( NMR) &imaging ( MRI) technologies are introduced, and some important experimental results are reported here .We built a low-field NMR&MRI system and obtained highly improved 1 H proton FID&Spin echo spectra.Pure J-coupling spectrum of 2, 2, 2-Trifluoroethyl was also measured and agreed well with high-field NMR results.In addition, we tried and successfully obtained 1D and 2D MRI images of water phantoms and bio-sam-ples.The influence of 8nm Fe3 O4 magnetic nanoparticles on longitudinal relaxation time of water was studied.Based on this property, we illustrated T1-contrast enhanced 2D imaging of water phantoms by using magnetic nanoparticles, which show evident contrast variation under different pre-polarization times.%超导量子干涉仪利用约瑟夫森结宏观量子干涉效应,是一种具有超高灵敏度的磁通探测器件。对超导量子干涉仪的基本原理及其在低场核磁共振/成像技术中的应用进行了简要介绍,并报道了在这方面的主要研究成果。搭建了一套低场核磁共振及成像系统并获得具有较高信噪比的水样品1 H质子NMR谱及三氟乙醇的纯J-耦合谱,同时还测到了清晰的自旋回波信号。在此基础上,采用直接背投影重建方法,尝试并成功获得了水样品和生物样品的一维及二维核磁共振像。采用8 nm粒径的超顺磁Fe3 O4磁性纳米粒子作为对比增强剂,研究了磁性纳米粒子对1 H核自旋纵向弛豫时间 T1的影响,据此演示了磁性纳米粒子T1加权对比度增强成像实验,所得二维核磁共振像随极化时间的不同显示出显著的对比度变化。

  14. Superconducting Quantum Interference based Electromechanical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etaki, S.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical sensors are essential tools for the detection of small forces. This thesis presents the dc SQUID as a detector for the displacement of embedded micromechanical resonators. The device geometry and basic operating principle are described. The SQUID displacement detector reaches an excellent

  15. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu, E-mail: zhy@yangtze.hku.hk; Chen, GuanHua, E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Yam, ChiYung [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  16. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  17. The differential interference angle in collisional quantum interference on rotational energy transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei-Li; Miao Gang; Chen Yue-Hui; Tang Dan; Ma Feng-Cai

    2008-01-01

    Collisional quantum interference (CQI) in the intramolecular rotational energy transfer was observed in experiment by Sha and co-workers.[1] The interference angle, which measuring the degree of the coherence, were measured in the experiment of the static cell. Based on the first Born approximation of time dependent perturbation theory, taking into accounts the anisotropic Lennard-Jones interaction potentials, this paper describes the theoretical model of CQI in intramolecular rotational energy transfer in an atom-diatom collision system. In the model, the differential interference angle for the experiment of the molecular beam is calculated, the changing tendencies of the differential interference angle with the impact parameter and collision partners are obtained. This theoretical model is important for understanding or performing this kind of experiments.

  18. Two-photon quantum interference in plasmonics: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S Dutta; Agarwal, G S

    2014-01-15

    We report perfect two-photon quantum interference with near-unity visibility in a resonant tunneling plasmonic structure in folded Kretschmann geometry. This is despite absorption-induced loss of unitarity in plasmonic systems. The effect is traced to perfect destructive interference between the squares of amplitude reflection and transmission coefficients. We further highlight yet another remarkable potential of coincidence measurements as a probe with better resolution as compared to standard spectroscopic techniques. The finer features show up in both angle resolved and frequency resolved studies.

  19. Cooling atomic motion with quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Morigi, G

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the quantum dynamics of the center of mass of trapped atoms, whose internal degrees of freedom are driven in a $\\Lambda$-shaped configuration with the lasers tuned at two-photon resonance. In the Lamb-Dicke regime, when the motional wave packet is well localized over the laser wavelenght, transient coherent population trapping occurs, cancelling transitions at the laser frequency. In this limit the motion can be efficiently cooled to the ground state of the trapping potential. We derive an equation for the center-of-mass motion by adiabatically eliminating the internal degrees of freedom. This treatment provides the theoretical background of the scheme presented in [G. Morigi {\\it et al}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 85}, 4458 (2000)] and implemented in [C.F. Roos {\\it et al}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 85}, 5547 (2000)]. We discuss the physical mechanisms determining the dynamics and identify new parameters regimes, where cooling is efficient. We discuss implementations of the scheme to case...

  20. Using charged defects in BN to create rewritable graphene quantum dots and visualize quantum interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Jairo, Jr.

    Heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (BN) are highly tunable platforms that enable the study of novel physical phenomena and technologically promising nanoelectronic devices. Common control schemes employed in these studies are electrostatic gating and chemical doping. However, these methods have significant drawbacks, such as complicated fabrication processes that introduce contamination and irreversible changes to material properties, as well as a lack of flexible control. To address these problems we have developed a new method that employs light and/or electric field excitation to control defect charge (from the single impurity level to ensembles) in the underlying BN. We have used optoelectronic and scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements to characterize these BN defects. We find that by manipulating defect charge in BN it is possible to create rewritable tip-induced doping patterns such as gate-tunable graphene pn junctions and quantum dots. This creates new opportunities for mapping the electronic states of confined electrons in graphene and to visualize their quantum interference behavior.

  1. Interference of Light in a Michelson-Morley Interferometer: A Quantum Optical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Langangen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal coherence interference properties of light as revealed by single detector intensity measurements in a Michelson-Morley interferometer (MMI is often described in terms of classical optics. We show, in a pedagogical manner, how such features of light also can be understood in terms of a more general quantum-optics framework. If a thermal reference source is used in the MMI local oscillator port in combination with a thermal source in the signal port, the interference pattern revealed by single detector intensity measurements shows a distinctive dependence on the differences in the temperature of the two sources. A related method has actually been used to perform high-precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The general quantum-optics framework allows us to consider any initial quantum state. As an example, we consider the interference of single photons as a tool to determine the peak angular-frequency of a single-photon pulse interfering with a single-photon reference pulse. A similar consideration for laser pulses, in terms of coherent states, leads to a different response in the detector. The MMI experimental setup is therefore an example of an optical device where one, in terms of intensity measurements, can exhibit the difference between classical and quantum-mechanical light.

  2. Probing electron-phonon excitations in molecular junctions by quantum interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessis, C; Della Rocca, M L; Barraud, C; Martin, P; Lacroix, J C; Markussen, T; Lafarge, P

    2016-02-11

    Electron-phonon coupling is a fundamental inelastic interaction in condensed matter and in molecules. Here we probe phonon excitations using quantum interference in electron transport occurring in short chains of anthraquinone based molecular junctions. By studying the dependence of molecular junction's conductance as a function of bias voltage and temperature, we show that inelastic scattering of electrons by phonons can be detected as features in conductance resulting from quenching of quantum interference. Our results are in agreement with density functional theory calculations and are well described by a generic two-site model in the framework of non-equilibrium Green's functions formalism. The importance of the observed inelastic contribution to the current opens up new ways for exploring coherent electron transport through molecular devices.

  3. Directly Measuring the Degree of Quantum Coherence using Interference Fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Tao; Tang, Jian-Shun; Wei, Zhi-Yuan; Yu, Shang; Ke, Zhi-Jin; Xu, Xiao-Ye; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-01-01

    Quantum coherence is the most distinguished feature of quantum mechanics. It lies at the heart of the quantum-information technologies as the fundamental resource and is also related to other quantum resources, including entanglement. It plays a critical role in various fields, even in biology. Nevertheless, the rigorous and systematic resource-theoretic framework of coherence has just been developed recently, and several coherence measures are proposed. Experimentally, the usual method to measure coherence is to perform state tomography and use mathematical expressions. Here, we alternatively develop a method to measure coherence directly using its most essential behavior—the interference fringes. The ancilla states are mixed into the target state with various ratios, and the minimal ratio that makes the interference fringes of the "mixed state" vanish is taken as the quantity of coherence. We also use the witness observable to witness coherence, and the optimal witness constitutes another direct method to measure coherence. For comparison, we perform tomography and calculate l1 norm of coherence, which coincides with the results of the other two methods in our situation. Our methods are explicit and robust, providing a nice alternative to the tomographic technique.

  4. Spatially resolving valley quantum interference of a donor in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salfi, J; Mol, J A; Rahman, R; Klimeck, G; Simmons, M Y; Hollenberg, L C L; Rogge, S

    2014-06-01

    Electron and nuclear spins of donor ensembles in isotopically pure silicon experience a vacuum-like environment, giving them extraordinary coherence. However, in contrast to a real vacuum, electrons in silicon occupy quantum superpositions of valleys in momentum space. Addressable single-qubit and two-qubit operations in silicon require that qubits are placed near interfaces, modifying the valley degrees of freedom associated with these quantum superpositions and strongly influencing qubit relaxation and exchange processes. Yet to date, spectroscopic measurements have only probed wavefunctions indirectly, preventing direct experimental access to valley population, donor position and environment. Here we directly probe the probability density of single quantum states of individual subsurface donors, in real space and reciprocal space, using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. We directly observe quantum mechanical valley interference patterns associated with linear superpositions of valleys in the donor ground state. The valley population is found to be within 5% of a bulk donor when 2.85 ± 0.45 nm from the interface, indicating that valley-perturbation-induced enhancement of spin relaxation will be negligible for depths greater than 3 nm. The observed valley interference will render two-qubit exchange gates sensitive to atomic-scale variations in positions of subsurface donors. Moreover, these results will also be of interest for emerging schemes proposing to encode information directly in valley polarization.

  5. Radiofrequency interference with medical devices. A technical information statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The past few years have seen increased reports that medical devices, such as pacemakers, apnea monitors, electrically powered wheelchairs, etc., have failed to operate correctly because of interference from various emitters of radiofrequency energy. This condition is called radiofrequency interference (RFI). The consequences of these failures range from inconvenience to serious injuries and death. Reasons for this problem are twofold: 1) increasing numbers of electronically controlled medical devices with inadequate electronic protection against RFI, and 2) a significant increase in the number of RF sources in the environment. Medical devices are widely used outside the hospital and may be attached to, or implanted in, patients. Portable wireless communications equipment, including cellular phones, handheld transceivers, and vehicle-mounted transceivers, comprise one of the largest sources of RFI. Some medical devices are especially sensitive to the type of digital modulation that some of the wireless communications devices utilize. The prevailing international standard for the RF immunity of medical devices is the 1993 revision of the International Electro-technical Commission (IEC) Standard IEC 60601-1-2. This standard sets a minimum immunity level of 3 volts per meter (V/m) in the 26-1000 MHz frequency range. For non-life supporting devices, testing is required only at the specific frequencies of 27.12, 40.68, and 915 MHz. Technology exists to protect, or "harden," most medical devices from RF fields that are much more intense than the 3 V/m level specified in present RFI standards. Most of these techniques, including shielding, grounding, and filtering, are not costly if they are incorporated into the initial design of the electronics system. COMAR recommends that the various parties involved in the manufacture and use of RFI-prone medical devices take steps to avoid serious RFI problems that may lead to safety hazards. Medical device manufacturers should

  6. Tunable quantum interference in a 3D integrated circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Zachary; Meany, Thomas; Helt, L G; Withford, Michael J; Steel, M J

    2015-04-27

    Integrated photonics promises solutions to questions of stability, complexity, and size in quantum optics. Advances in tunable and non-planar integrated platforms, such as laser-inscribed photonics, continue to bring the realisation of quantum advantages in computation and metrology ever closer, perhaps most easily seen in multi-path interferometry. Here we demonstrate control of two-photon interference in a chip-scale 3D multi-path interferometer, showing a reduced periodicity and enhanced visibility compared to single photon measurements. Observed non-classical visibilities are widely tunable, and explained well by theoretical predictions based on classical measurements. With these predictions we extract Fisher information approaching a theoretical maximum. Our results open a path to quantum enhanced phase measurements.

  7. Quantum dot devices for optical communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    . The main property of semiconductor quantum dots compared to bulk material or even quantum well structures is the discrete nature of the allowed states, which means that inversion of the medium can be obtained for very low electron densities. This has led to the fabrication of quantum dot lasers with record......-low threshold currents and amplifiers with record-high power levels. In this tutorial we will review the basic properties of quantum dots, emphasizing the properties which are important for laser and amplifier applications, as well as devices for all-optical signal processing. The high-speed properties...

  8. Using quantum mechanics to synthesize electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Petra; Levi, Anthony

    2005-03-01

    Adaptive quantum design [1] has been used to explore the possibility of creating new classes of electronic semiconductor devices. We show how non-equilibrium electron transmission through a synthesized conduction band potential profile can be used to obtain a desired current - voltage characteristic. We illustrate our methodology by designing a two-terminal linear resistive element in which current is limited by quantum mechanical transmission through a potential profile and power is dissipated non-locally in the electrodes. As electronic devices scale to dimensions in which the physics of operation is dominated by quantum mechanical effects, classical designs fail to deliver the desired functionality. Our device synthesis approach is a way to realize device functionality that may not otherwise be achieved. [1] Y.Chen, R.Yu, W.Li, O.Nohadani, S.Haas, A.F.J. Levi, Journal of Applied Physics, Vol.94, No.9, p6065, 2003

  9. Observing quantum interference in 3D integrated-photonic symmetric multiports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto; Ramponi, Roberta; Bentivegna, Marco; Flamini, Fulvio; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Viggianiello, Niko; Innocenti, Luca; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    The investigation of multi-photon quantum interference in symmetric multi-port splitters has both fundamental and applicative interest. Destructive quantum interference in devices with specific symmetry leads to the suppression of a large number of possible output states, generalizing the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect; simple suppression laws have been developed for interferometers implementing the Fourier or the Hadamard transform over the modes. In fact, these enhanced interference features in the output distribution can be used to assess the indistinguishability of single-photon sources, and symmetric interferometers have been envisaged as benchmark or validation devices for Boson-Sampling machines. In this work we devise an innovative approach to implement symmetric multi-mode interferometers that realize the Fourier and Hadamard transform over the optical modes, exploiting integrated waveguide circuits. Our design is based on the optical implementations of the Fast-Fourier and Fast-Hadamard transform algorithms, and exploits a novel three-dimensional layout which is made possible by the unique capabilities of femtosecond laser waveguide writing. We fabricate devices with m = 4 and m = 8 modes and we let two identical photons evolve in the circuit. By characterizing the coincidence output distribution we are able to observe experimentally the known suppression laws for the output states. In particular, we characterize the robustness of this approach to assess the photons' indistinguishability and to rule out alternative non-quantum states of light. The reported results pave the way to the adoption of symmetric multiport interferometers as pivotal tools in the diagnostics and certification of quantum photonic platforms.

  10. Color-tuned and transparent colloidal quantum dot solar cells via optimized multilayer interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinze, Ebuka S; Qiu, Botong; Palmquist, Nathan; Cheng, Yan; Lin, Yida; Nyirjesy, Gabrielle; Qian, Gary; Thon, Susanna M

    2017-02-20

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs), are a promising candidate material for realizing colored and semitransparent solar cells, due to their band gap tunability, near infrared responsivity and solution-based processing flexibility. CQD solar cells are typically comprised of several optically thin active and electrode layers that are optimized for their electrical properties; however, their spectral tunability beyond the absorption onset of the CQD layer itself has been relatively unexplored. In this study, we design, optimize and fabricate multicolored and transparent CQD devices by means of thin film interference engineering. We develop an optimization algorithm to produce devices with controlled color characteristics. We quantify the tradeoffs between attainable color or transparency and available photocurrent, calculate the effects of non-ideal interference patterns on apparent device color, and apply our optimization method to tandem solar cell design. Experimentally, we fabricate blue, green, yellow, red and semitransparent devices and achieve photocurrents ranging from 10 to 15.2 mA/cm2 for the colored devices. We demonstrate semitransparent devices with average visible transparencies ranging from 27% to 32%, which match our design simulation results. We discuss how our optimization method provides a general platform for custom-design of optoelectronic devices with arbitrary spectral profiles.

  11. Probing quantum interference effects in the work distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solinas, P.; Gasparinetti, S.

    2016-11-01

    What is the role of coherence in determining the distribution of work done on a quantum system? We approach this question from an operational perspective and consider a setup in which the internal energy of a closed system is recorded by a quantum detector before and after the system is acted upon by an external drive. We find that the resulting work distribution depends on the initial state of the detector as well as on the choice of the final measurement. We consider two complementary measurement schemes, both of which show clear signatures of quantum interference. We specifically discuss how to implement these schemes in the circuit QED architecture, using an artificial atom as the system and a quantized mode of the electromagnetic field as the detector. Different measurement schemes can be realized by preparing the field either in a superposition of Fock states or in a coherent state and exploiting state-of-the art techniques for the characterization of microwave radiation at the quantum level. More generally, the single bosonic mode we utilize is arguably the minimal quantum detector capable of capturing the complementary aspects of the work distribution discussed here.

  12. Quantum interference in an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, A.; Borghi, M.; Mancinelli, M.; Price, H. M.; Fontana, G.; Pavesi, L.

    2016-08-01

    A re-visitation of the well known free space Mach-Zehnder interferometer is reported here. The coexistence between one-photon and two-photons interference from collinear color entangled photon pairs is investigated. Thisarises from an arbitrarily small unbalance in the arm transmittance. The tuning of such asymmetry is reflected in dramatic changes in the coincidence detection, revealing beatings between one particle and two particle interference patterns. In particular, the role of the losses and of the intrinsic phase imperfectness of the lossy beamsplitter are explored in a single-port excited Mach-Zehnder interferometer. This configuration is especially useful for quantum optics on a chip, where the guiding geometry forces photons to travel in the same spatial mode.

  13. Quantum heat engines and refrigerators: continuous devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosloff, Ronnie; Levy, Amikam

    2014-01-01

    Quantum thermodynamics supplies a consistent description of quantum heat engines and refrigerators up to a single few-level system coupled to the environment. Once the environment is split into three (a hot, cold, and work reservoir), a heat engine can operate. The device converts the positive gain into power, with the gain obtained from population inversion between the components of the device. Reversing the operation transforms the device into a quantum refrigerator. The quantum tricycle, a device connected by three external leads to three heat reservoirs, is used as a template for engines and refrigerators. The equation of motion for the heat currents and power can be derived from first principles. Only a global description of the coupling of the device to the reservoirs is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Optimization of the devices leads to a balanced set of parameters in which the couplings to the three reservoirs are of the same order and the external driving field is in resonance. When analyzing refrigerators, one needs to devote special attention to a dynamical version of the third law of thermodynamics. Bounds on the rate of cooling when Tc→0 are obtained by optimizing the cooling current. All refrigerators as Tc→0 show universal behavior. The dynamical version of the third law imposes restrictions on the scaling as Tc→0 of the relaxation rate γc and heat capacity cV of the cold bath.

  14. Physical models of semiconductor quantum devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The science and technology relating to nanostructures continues to receive significant attention for its applications to various fields including microelectronics, nanophotonics, and biotechnology. This book describes the basic quantum mechanical principles underlining this fast developing field. From the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics to nanomaterial properties, from device physics to research and development of new systems, this title is aimed at undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, and researchers.

  15. Realization of Multi-qubit GHZ States in Superconducting Quantum-interference Devices via Double Raman Transition%通过双Raman作用在超导量子干涉器件中实现多比特GHZ态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹志明; 刘晓东; 张立辉; 石文星; 李星

    2011-01-01

    Propose a scheme to realize multi-qubit GHZ states in superconducting quantum-interference devices(SQUIDs) via double Raman transition.In this scheme,the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay can be ignored.The GHZ states are realized by using only two basic states of the SQUID system and the relaxation of excited state of the system are avoided.Base on the points mentioned above,the scheme should be easily realized on experiment.%在腔中通过双Raman作用,在超导量子干涉器件中实现多比特GHZ(Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger)态的制备.在制备过程中,由于腔场只是被虚激发的,所以腔模的衰减可以忽略.GHZ态的实现只用到了超导系统的两个基态,有效地避免了超导系统激发态的弛豫.

  16. Photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic devices with quantum barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2007-04-10

    A photovoltaic or thermophotovoltaic device includes a diode formed by p-type material and n-type material joined at a p-n junction and including a depletion region adjacent to said p-n junction, and a quantum barrier disposed near or in the depletion region of the p-n junction so as to decrease device reverse saturation current density while maintaining device short circuit current density. In one embodiment, the quantum barrier is disposed on the n-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to electrons while in another, the barrier is disposed on the p-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to holes. In another embodiment, both types of quantum barriers are used.

  17. Quantum localization through interference on homoclinic and heteroclinic circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    III, E L Sibert; Borondo, F [Departamento de Quimica C-IX and Instituto Mixto de Ciencias Matematicas CSIC-UAM-UC3M-UCM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Vergini, E; Benito, R M [Grupo de Sistemas Complejos and Departamento de FIsica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Agronomos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: sibert@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: eduardogerman.vergini@upm.es, E-mail: rosamaria.benito@upm.es, E-mail: f.borondo@uam.es

    2008-05-15

    Localization effects due to scarring constitute one of the clearest indications of the relevance of interference in the transport of quantum probability density along quantized closed circuits in phase space. The corresponding path can be obvious, such as the scarring periodic orbit (PO) itself which produces time recurrences at multiples of the period. However, there are others more elaborate which only close asymptotically, for example, those associated with homoclinic and heteroclinic orbits. In this paper, we demonstrate that these circuits are also able to produce recurrences but at (semiclassically) longer times, of the order of the Ehrenfest time. The most striking manifestation of this phenomenon is the accumulation of quantum probability density along the corresponding circuits. The discussion is illustrated with an example corresponding to a typical PO of the quartic two-dimensional oscillator.

  18. Epitaxy of advanced nanowire quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazibegovic, Sasa; Car, Diana; Zhang, Hao; Balk, Stijn C.; Logan, John A.; de Moor, Michiel W. A.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Schmits, Rudi; Xu, Di; Wang, Guanzhong; Krogstrup, Peter; Op Het Veld, Roy L. M.; Zuo, Kun; Vos, Yoram; Shen, Jie; Bouman, Daniël; Shojaei, Borzoyeh; Pennachio, Daniel; Lee, Joon Sue; van Veldhoven, Petrus J.; Koelling, Sebastian; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Palmstrøm, Chris J.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are ideal for realizing various low-dimensional quantum devices. In particular, topological phases of matter hosting non-Abelian quasiparticles (such as anyons) can emerge when a semiconductor nanowire with strong spin-orbit coupling is brought into contact with a superconductor. To exploit the potential of non-Abelian anyons—which are key elements of topological quantum computing—fully, they need to be exchanged in a well-controlled braiding operation. Essential hardware for braiding is a network of crystalline nanowires coupled to superconducting islands. Here we demonstrate a technique for generic bottom-up synthesis of complex quantum devices with a special focus on nanowire networks with a predefined number of superconducting islands. Structural analysis confirms the high crystalline quality of the nanowire junctions, as well as an epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor interface. Quantum transport measurements of nanowire ‘hashtags’ reveal Aharonov-Bohm and weak-antilocalization effects, indicating a phase-coherent system with strong spin-orbit coupling. In addition, a proximity-induced hard superconducting gap (with vanishing sub-gap conductance) is demonstrated in these hybrid superconductor-semiconductor nanowires, highlighting the successful materials development necessary for a first braiding experiment. Our approach opens up new avenues for the realization of epitaxial three-dimensional quantum architectures which have the potential to become key components of various quantum devices.

  19. Quantum dot devices for optical communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are often described as "artificial atoms": They are small nanometre-sized structures in which electrons only are allowed to exist at certain discrete levels due to size quantization, thus allowing the engineering of fundamental properties such as the coupling to light....... The main property of semiconductor quantum dots compared to bulk material or even quantum well structures is the discrete nature of the allowed states, which means that inversion of the medium can be obtained for very low electron densities. This has led to the fabrication of quantum dot lasers with record......-low threshold currents and amplifiers with record-high power levels. In this tutorial we will review the basic properties of quantum dots, emphasizing the properties which are important for laser and amplifier applications, as well as devices for all-optical signal processing. The high-speed properties...

  20. The Relation between Structure and Quantum Interference in Single Molecule Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Stadler, Robert; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    Quantum interference (QI) of electron pathways has recently attracted increased interest as an enabling tool for single-molecule electronic devices. Although various molecular systems have been shown to exhibit QI effects and a number of methods have been proposed for its analysis, simple...... the existence of QI-induced transmission antiresonances. The generality of the scheme, which is exact for a certain class of tight-binding models, is proved by a comparison to first-principles transport calculations for 10 different configurations of anthraquinone as well as a set of cross-conjugated molecular...

  1. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance and Anisotropic Tunneling Magnetoresistance due to Quantum Interference in Ferromagnetic Metal Break Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, Kirill; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Ralph, D

    2006-01-01

    We measure the low-temperature resistance of permalloy break junctions as a function of contact size and the magnetic field angle in applied fields large enough to saturate the magnetization. For both nanometer-scale metallic contacts and tunneling devices we observe large changes in resistance...... with the angle, as large as 25% in the tunneling regime. The pattern of magnetoresistance is sensitive to changes in bias on a scale of a few mV. We interpret the effect as a consequence of conductance fluctuations due to quantum interference....

  2. Real-time single-molecule imaging of quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Juffmann, Thomas; Müllneritsch, Michael; Asenbaum, Peter; Tsukernik, Alexander; Tüxen, Jens; Mayor, Marcel; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Arndt, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The observation of interference patterns in double-slit experiments with massive particles is generally regarded as the ultimate demonstration of the quantum nature of these objects. Such matter-wave interference has been observed for electrons, neutrons, atoms and molecules and it differs from classical wave-physics in that it can even be observed when single particles arrive at the detector one by one. The build-up of such patterns in experiments with electrons has been described as the "most beautiful experiment in physics". Here we show how a combination of nanofabrication and nanoimaging methods allows us to record the full two-dimensional build-up of quantum diffraction patterns in real-time for phthalocyanine molecules PcH2 and their tailored derivatives F24PcH2 with a mass of 1298 amu. A laser-controlled micro-evaporation source was used to produce a beam of molecules with the required intensity and coherence and the gratings were machined in 10 nm thick silicon nitride membranes to reduce the effect ...

  3. Optimal control and quantum simulations in superconducting quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel J.

    2014-10-31

    Quantum optimal control theory is the science of steering quantum systems. In this thesis we show how to overcome the obstacles in implementing optimal control for superconducting quantum bits, a promising candidate for the creation of a quantum computer. Building such a device will require the tools of optimal control. We develop pulse shapes to solve a frequency crowding problem and create controlled-Z gates. A methodology is developed for the optimisation towards a target non-unitary process. We show how to tune-up control pulses for a generic quantum system in an automated way using a combination of open- and closed-loop optimal control. This will help scaling of quantum technologies since algorithms can calibrate control pulses far more efficiently than humans. Additionally we show how circuit QED can be brought to the novel regime of multi-mode ultrastrong coupling using a left-handed transmission line coupled to a right-handed one. We then propose to use this system as an analogue quantum simulator for the Spin-Boson model to show how dissipation arises in quantum systems.

  4. Quantum computing with realistically noisy devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knill, E

    2005-03-03

    In theory, quantum computers offer a means of solving problems that would be intractable on conventional computers. Assuming that a quantum computer could be constructed, it would in practice be required to function with noisy devices called 'gates'. These gates cause decoherence of the fragile quantum states that are central to the computer's operation. The goal of so-called 'fault-tolerant quantum computing' is therefore to compute accurately even when the error probability per gate (EPG) is high. Here we report a simple architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computing, providing evidence that accurate quantum computing is possible for EPGs as high as three per cent. Such EPGs have been experimentally demonstrated, but to avoid excessive resource overheads required by the necessary architecture, lower EPGs are needed. Assuming the availability of quantum resources comparable to the digital resources available in today's computers, we show that non-trivial quantum computations at EPGs of as high as one per cent could be implemented.

  5. Photocurrent Control in a Magnetic Field through Quantum Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Murti

    Quantum-mechanical interference between excitation pathways can be used to inject photocurrents optically in semiconductors, the properties of which can be coherently controlled through the phases and polarizations of the optical pulses. In this thesis, coherent photocurrent control is investigated theoretically for two-dimensional semiconductor systems in a perpendicular magnetic field. The semiconductor systems are subjected to optical pulses with centre frequencies o 0 and 2o0, which excite interband transitions through one- and two-photon processes, selection rules for which are determined from envelope wave functions. It is shown using time-dependent perturbation theory that the interference between one- and two-photon pathways connecting a particular valence Landau level to two different but adjacent conduction Landau levels manifests itself as electron currents that rotate counterclockwise, while interference between pathways connecting two adjacent valence Landau levels to a particular conduction Landau level manifests itself as hole currents that rotate clockwise. The initial directions of the currents can be controlled by adjusting the polarizations and a relative phase parameter of the pulses. The analysis is performed for a GaAs quantum well, monolayer graphene and bilayer graphene. For GaAs, the equally spaced Landau levels in each band lead to electron currents rotating at a single frequency and hole currents rotating at a different frequency. Monolayer and bilayer graphene allow currents with multiple frequency components as well as other peculiarities resulting from additional interference processes not present for GaAs. The photocurrents in all of these systems radiate in the terahertz regime. This radiation is calculated for realistic experimental conditions, with scattering and relaxation processes accounted for phenomenologically. Finally, the effect of Coulomb interactions on the coherent control process is considered for an undoped Ga

  6. Superconductive quantum interference magnetometer with high sensitivity achieved by an induced resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoliere, A; Granata, C

    2014-08-01

    A fully integrated low noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in a magnetometer configuration is presented. An intrinsic high voltage responsivity as high as 500 μV/Φ0 has been obtained by introducing a resonance in the voltage - magnetic flux characteristic. This resonance is induced by an integrated superconducting coil surrounding the pick-up coil and connected to one end of the SQUID output. The SQUID magnetometer exhibits a spectral density of magnetic field noise as low as 3 fT/Hz(1/2). In order to verify the suitability of the magnetometer, measurements of bandwidth and slew rate have been performed and compared with those of the same device without the resonance and with additional positive feedback. Due to their good characteristics such devices can be employed in a large number of applications including biomagnetism.

  7. Semiconductor nanoparticles for quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, Victor; Carrara, Sandro; Amenitch, H.; Bernstorff, S.; Nicolini, Claudio

    1998-09-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles were synthesized by exposing fatty acid salt Langmuir-Blodgett films to the atmosphere of 0957-4484/9/3/004/img8. The particle sizes were characterized by small-angle x-ray scattering of their solutions using synchrotron radiation source at higher resolution, as it was impossible previously to study it with usual laboratory x-ray sources. The particle sizes were found to correspond with the demands of single-electron and quantum junctions. Semiconductor heterostructures were grown by self-aggregation of these particles of different types. Electrical properties of these nanostructures were studied by using STM. Voltage-current characteristics revealed the presence of differential negative resistance. Measurements confirmed the formation of semiconductor superlattices directed towards a development of new nanodevices, such as tunnelling diodes and semiconductor lasers.

  8. Measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthoor, Ittoop Vergheese; Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Curty, Marcos; Andersson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Digital signatures play an important role in software distribution, modern communication, and financial transactions, where it is important to detect forgery and tampering. Signatures are a cryptographic technique for validating the authenticity and integrity of messages, software, or digital documents. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. Quantum digital signatures (QDS), on the other hand, provide information-theoretic security based on the laws of quantum physics. Recent work on QDS Amiri et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 032325 (2016);, 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032325 Yin, Fu, and Zeng-Bing, Phys. Rev. A 93, 032316 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032316 shows that such schemes do not require trusted quantum channels and are unconditionally secure against general coherent attacks. However, in practical QDS, just as in quantum key distribution (QKD), the detectors can be subjected to side-channel attacks, which can make the actual implementations insecure. Motivated by the idea of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), we present a measurement-device-independent QDS (MDI-QDS) scheme, which is secure against all detector side-channel attacks. Based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our MDI-QDS protocol could also be experimentally implemented, since it requires a similar experimental setup.

  9. Quantum Interference Phenomena and Novel Switching in Split Gate High Electron Mobility Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jong-Ching

    Nanometer scales electronic channels with and without a discontinuity were made in modulation-doped AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunctions using a split-gate technique. Quantum interference phenomena in an electron cavity, and fast switching behavior due to hot electron effects in a lateral double potential barrier structure were explored. First, one-dimensional channels with a double bend discontinuity were examined in the mK temperature range. Low-field ac-conductance measurements have evidenced quantum wave guide effects: resonant features were observed in the one-dimensional conductance plateaus in which the number of peaks was directly related to the geometry of the double bend. Temperature and magnetic field studies, along with a standing wave model have provided a better understanding of quantum interference phenomena in electron wave guide and cavity structures. Secondly, a structure containing two cascaded double bend discontinuities was studied. The structure behaves as a constricted cavity coupling two point-contacts, in which the depletion by the split gate was used to form and control the lateral double potential barriers. The low temperature source-drain characteristics exhibited a pronounced S-shaped negative differential conductance that can be attributed to a nonlinear electron temperature effect along the conducting path. The data presented show two types of conducting state: electron tunneling in the off state and hot electron conduction (thermionic emission) in the on state. The estimated switching speed of the device could be as fast as 5 ps due to short transit time.

  10. 1D Josephson quantum interference grids: diffraction patterns and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucci, M.; Badoni, D.; Corato, V.; Merlo, V.; Ottaviani, I.; Salina, G.; Cirillo, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic response of transmission lines with embedded Josephson junctions and thus generating a 1D underdamped array. The measured multi-junction interference patterns are compared with the theoretical predictions for Josephson supercurrent modulations when an external magnetic field couples both to the inter-junction loops and to the junctions themselves. The results provide a striking example of the analogy between Josephson phase modulation and 1D optical diffraction grid. The Fiske resonances in the current-voltage characteristics with voltage spacing {Φ0}≤ft(\\frac{{\\bar{c}}}{2L}\\right) , where L is the total physical length of the array, {Φ0} the magnetic flux quantum and \\bar{c} the speed of light in the transmission line, demonstrate that the discrete line supports stable dynamic patterns generated by the ac Josephson effect interacting with the cavity modes of the line.

  11. Phase sensitive quantum interference on forbidden transition in ladder scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Koganov, Gennady A

    2014-01-01

    A three level ladder system is analyzed and the coherence of initially electric-dipole forbidden transition is calculated. Due to the presence of two laser fields the initially dipole forbidden transition becomes dynamically permitted due to ac Stark effect. It is shown that such transitions exhibit quantum-interference-related phenomena, such as electromagnetically induced transparency, gain without inversion and enhanced refractive index. Gain and dispersion characteristics of such transitions strongly depend upon the relative phase between the driving and the probe fields. Unlike allowed transitions, gain/absorption behavior of ac-Stark allowed transitions exhibit antisymmetric feature on the Rabi sidebands. It is found that absorption/gain spectra possess extremely narrow sub-natural resonances on these ac Stark allowed forbidden transitions. An interesting finding is simultaneous existence of gain and negative dispersion at Autler-Townes transition which may lead to both reduction of the group velocity a...

  12. Controllable valley splitting in silicon quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Srijit; Slinker, K. A.; Friesen, Mark; McGuire, L. M.; Truitt, J. L.; Tahan, Charles; Klein, L. J.; Chu, J. O.; Mooney, P. M.; van der Weide, D. W.; Joynt, Robert; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon has many attractive properties for quantum computing, and the quantum-dot architecture is appealing because of its controllability and scalability. However, the multiple valleys in the silicon conduction band are potentially a serious source of decoherence for spin-based quantum-dot qubits. Only when a large energy splits these valleys do we obtain well-defined and long-lived spin states appropriate for quantum computing. Here, we show that the small valley splittings observed in previous experiments on Si-SiGe heterostructures result from atomic steps at the quantum-well interface. Lateral confinement in a quantum point contact limits the electron wavefunctions to several steps, and enhances the valley splitting substantially, up to 1.5meV. The combination of electrostatic and magnetic confinement produces a valley splitting larger than the spin splitting, which is controllable over a wide range. These results improve the outlook for realizing spin qubits with long coherence times in silicon-based devices.

  13. Molecular spintronics: destructive quantum interference controlled by a gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva-Souza, Aldilene; Smeu, Manuel; Zhang, Lei; Souza Filho, Antonio Gomes; Guo, Hong; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-10-22

    The ability to control the spin-transport properties of a molecule bridging conducting electrodes is of paramount importance to molecular spintronics. Quantum interference can play an important role in allowing or forbidding electrons from passing through a system. In this work, the spin-transport properties of a polyacetylene chain bridging zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) are studied with nonequilibrium Green's function calculations performed within the density functional theory framework (NEGF-DFT). ZGNR electrodes have inherent spin polarization along their edges, which causes a splitting between the properties of spin-up and spin-down electrons in these systems. Upon adding an imidazole donor group and a pyridine acceptor group to the polyacetylene chain, this causes destructive interference features in the electron transmission spectrum. Particularly, the donor group causes a large antiresonance dip in transmission at the Fermi energy EF of the electrodes. The application of a gate is investigated and found to provide control over the energy position of this feature making it possible to turn this phenomenon on and off. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of this system are also calculated, showing near ohmic scaling for spin-up but negative differential resistance (NDR) for spin-down.

  14. Phase Interference in a Multi-level Quantum-Dot System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu-Ming; CHEN Xiao-Shuang; LU Wei

    2009-01-01

    @@ Considering phase interference, we investigate coherent transport in a quantum dot by using a thermopower. In the single process of the electronic transport through the quantum dot, it is shown that the phase interference between the levels of a quantum dot is like the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The result indicates that the thermopower is very sensitive to phase interference. It is also found that the phase-difference change of the different levels of the quantum dot can determine the shape of the thermopower.

  15. Terahertz detection using double quantum well devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodier, Majid; Christodoulou, Christos G.; Simmons, Jerry A.

    2001-12-01

    This paper discusses the principle of operation of an electrically tunable THz detector, working around 2.54 THz, integrated with a bowtie antenna. The detection is based on the idea of photon-assisted tunneling (PAT) in a double quantum well (DQW) device. The bowtie antenna is used to collect the THz radiation and feed it to the detector for processing. The Bowtie antenna geometry is integrated with the DQW device to achieve broadband characteristic, easy design, and compatibility with the detector fabrication process. The principle of operation of the detector is introduced first. Then, results of different bowtie antenna layouts are presented and discussed.

  16. Efficient self-consistent quantum transport simulator for quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, X., E-mail: xngao@sandia.gov; Mamaluy, D.; Nielsen, E.; Young, R. W.; Lilly, M. P.; Bishop, N. C.; Carroll, M. S.; Muller, R. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, 1515 Eubank SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Shirkhorshidian, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, 1515 Eubank SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2014-04-07

    We present a self-consistent one-dimensional (1D) quantum transport simulator based on the Contact Block Reduction (CBR) method, aiming for very fast and robust transport simulation of 1D quantum devices. Applying the general CBR approach to 1D open systems results in a set of very simple equations that are derived and given in detail for the first time. The charge self-consistency of the coupled CBR-Poisson equations is achieved by using the predictor-corrector iteration scheme with the optional Anderson acceleration. In addition, we introduce a new way to convert an equilibrium electrostatic barrier potential calculated from an external simulator to an effective doping profile, which is then used by the CBR-Poisson code for transport simulation of the barrier under non-zero biases. The code has been applied to simulate the quantum transport in a double barrier structure and across a tunnel barrier in a silicon double quantum dot. Extremely fast self-consistent 1D simulations of the differential conductance across a tunnel barrier in the quantum dot show better qualitative agreement with experiment than non-self-consistent simulations.

  17. Testing Quantum Devices: Practical Entanglement Verification in Bipartite Optical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Häseler, Hauke; Moroder, Tobias; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    We present a method to test quantum behavior of quantum information processing devices, such as quantum memories, teleportation devices, channels and quantum key distribution protocols. The test of quantum behavior can be phrased as the verification of effective entanglement. Necessary separability criteria are formulated in terms of a matrix of expectation values in conjunction with the partial transposition map. Our method is designed to reduce the resources for entanglement verification. A...

  18. Towards noise engineering: Recent insights in low-frequency excess flux noise of superconducting quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Sebastian; Ferring, Anna; Enss, Christian

    2016-10-01

    The comprehensive analysis of low-frequency excess flux noise both in terms of magnetic flux noise S Φ , 1 / f and energy sensitivity ɛ1/f of 84 superconducting quantum devices studied at temperatures below 1 K reveals a universal behavior. When analyzing data in terms of ɛ1/f, we find that noise spectra of independent devices cross each other all at certain crossing frequencies fc. Besides this main result of our paper, we further show that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) arrays systematically feature higher noise exponents than single SQUIDs and give evidence for a material and device type dependence of low-frequency excess flux noise. The latter results facilitate to engineer the shape of magnetic flux noise spectra and thus to experimentally modify key properties such as coherence or measurement times of superconducting quantum devices.

  19. Quantum Interference Induced Photon Blockade in a Coupled Single Quantum Dot-Cavity System

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jing; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to implement a strong photon blockade with a single quantum dot coupled to a nanocavity. The photon blockade effect can be tremendously enhanced by driving the cavity and the quantum dot simultaneously with two classical laser fields. This enhancement of photon blockade is ascribed to the quantum interference effect to avoid two-photon excitation of the cavity field. Comparing with Jaynes-Cummings model, the second-order correlation function at zero time delay $g^{(2)}(0)$ in our scheme can be reduced by two orders of magnitude and the system sustains a large intracavity photon number. A red (blue) cavity-light detuning asymmetry for photon quantum statistics with bunching or antibunching characteristics is also observed. The photon blockade effect has a controllable flexibility by tuning the relative phase between the two pumping laser fields and the Rabi coupling strength between the quantum dot and the pumping field. Moreover, the photon blockade scheme based on quantum in...

  20. Quantum transport in nanowire-based hybrid devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenel, Haci Yusuf

    2013-05-08

    the Andreev reflection of quasiparticles at single interface, by suppressing the superconductivity of Al with small magnetic fields, as well as at double interface for zero magnetic field. The junction geometry was further changed by replacing the InAs nanowire with the InAs tube. In this case the GaAs/InAs core/shell tubular nanowires were contacted by two superconducting Nb electrodes. For this junction geometry we have demonstrated the interference of phase conjugated electron-hole pairs in the presence of coaxial magnetic. The effect of temperature, constant dc bias current and gate voltage on the magnetoresistance oscillations were examined. In the last part of this thesis, we have fabricated and characterized the single crystal Au nanowire-based proximity superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID).

  1. Thermodynamics Properties of Mesoscopic Quantum Nanowire Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Attia A.AwadAlla; Adel H.Phillips

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics properties of mesoscopic quantum nanowire devices, such as the effect of electron-phonon relaxation time, Peltier coefficient, carrier concentration, frequency of this field, and channel width. The influence of time-varying fields on the transport through such device has been taken into consideration. This device is modelled as nanowires connecting to two reservoirs. The two-dimensional electron gas in a GaAs-AlGaAs heterojunction has a Fermi wave length which is a hundred times larger than that in a metal. The results show the oscillatory behaviour of dependence of the thermo power on frequency of the induced field. These results agree with the existing experiments and may be important for electronic nanodevices.

  2. Physics of Quantum Structures in Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Andersen, John D.

    2005-01-01

    There has been considerable activity recently regarding the possibilities of using various nanostructures and nanomaterials to improve photovoltaic conversion of solar energy. Recent theoretical results indicate that dramatic improvements in device efficiency may be attainable through the use of three-dimensional arrays of zero-dimensional conductors (i.e., quantum dots) in an ordinary p-i-n solar cell structure. Quantum dots and other nanostructured materials may also prove to have some benefits in terms of temperature coefficients and radiation degradation associated with space solar cells. Two-dimensional semiconductor superlattices have already demonstrated some advantages in this regard. It has also recently been demonstrated that semiconducting quantum dots can also be used to improve conversion efficiencies in polymeric thin film solar cells. Improvement in thin film cells utilizing conjugated polymers has also be achieved through the use of one-dimensional quantum structures such as carbon nanotubes. It is believed that carbon nanotubes may contribute to both the disassociation as well as the carrier transport in the conjugated polymers used in certain thin film photovoltaic cells. In this paper we will review the underlying physics governing some of the new photovoltaic nanostructures being pursued, as well as the the current methods being employed to produce III-V, II-VI, and even chalcopyrite-based nanomaterials and nanostructures for solar cells.

  3. Quantum-engineered interband cascade photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Hinkey, Robert T.; Ye, Hao; Klem, John F.; Lei, L.; Mishima, T. D.; Keay, J. C.; Santos, M. B.; Johnson, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Quantum-engineered multiple stage photovoltaic (PV) devices are explored based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb interband cascade (IC) structures. These ICPV devices employ multiple discrete absorbers that are connected in series by widebandgap unipolar barriers using type-II heterostructure interfaces for facilitating carrier transport between cascade stages similar to IC lasers. The discrete architecture is beneficial for improving the collection efficiency and for spectral splitting by utilizing absorbers with different bandgaps. As such, the photo-voltages from each individual cascade stage in an ICPV device add together, creating a high overall open-circuit voltage, similar to conventional multi-junction tandem solar cells. Furthermore, photo-generated carriers can be collected with nearly 100% efficiency in each stage. This is because the carriers travel over only a single cascade stage, designed to be shorter than a typical diffusion length. The approach is of significant importance for operation at high temperatures where the diffusion length is reduced. Here, we will present our recent progress in the study of ICPV devices, which includes the demonstration of ICPV devices at room temperature and above with narrow bandgaps (e.g. 0.23 eV) and high open-circuit voltages.

  4. Interference with a quantum dot single-photon source and a laser at telecom wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felle, M. [Toshiba Research Europe Limited, Cambridge Research Laboratory, 208 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Huwer, J., E-mail: jan.huwer@crl.toshiba.co.uk; Stevenson, R. M.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Ward, M. B.; Shields, A. J. [Toshiba Research Europe Limited, Cambridge Research Laboratory, 208 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Penty, R. V. [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-28

    The interference of photons emitted by dissimilar sources is an essential requirement for a wide range of photonic quantum information applications. Many of these applications are in quantum communications and need to operate at standard telecommunication wavelengths to minimize the impact of photon losses and be compatible with existing infrastructure. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the quantum interference of telecom-wavelength photons from an InAs/GaAs quantum dot single-photon source and a laser; an important step towards such applications. The results are in good agreement with a theoretical model, indicating a high degree of indistinguishability for the interfering photons.

  5. Prediction of quantum interference in molecular junctions using a parabolic diagram: Understanding the origin of Fano and anti- resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-03-01

    Recently the interest in quantum interference (QI) phenomena in molecular devices (molecular junctions) has been growing due to the unique features observed in the transmission spectra. In order to design single molecular devices exploiting QI effects as desired, it is necessary to provide simple rules for predicting the appearance of QI effects such as anti-resonances or Fano line shapes and for controlling them. In this study, we derive a transmission function of a generic molecular junction with a side group (T-shaped molecular junction) using a minimal toy model. We developed a simple method to predict the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti- resonances, and its position in the conductance spectrum by introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic model). Using it we can easily visualize the relation between the key electronic parameters and the positions of normal resonant peaks and anti-resonant peaks induced by quantum interference in the conductance spectrum. We also demonstrate Fano and anti-resonance in T-shaped molecular junctions using a simple tight-binding model. This parabolic model enables one to infer on-site energies of T-shaped molecules and the coupling between side group and main conduction channel from transmission spectra.

  6. Programmable two-photon quantum interference in $10^3$ channels in opaque scattering media

    CERN Document Server

    Wolterink, Tom A W; Ctistis, Georgios; Vos, Willem L; Boller, Klaus -J; Pinkse, Pepijn W H

    2015-01-01

    We investigate two-photon quantum interference in an opaque scattering medium that intrinsically supports $10^6$ transmission channels. By adaptive spatial phase-modulation of the incident wavefronts, the photons are directed at targeted speckle spots or output channels. From $10^3$ experimentally available coupled channels, we select two channels and enhance their transmission, to realize the equivalent of a fully programmable $2\\times2$ beam splitter. By sending pairs of single photons from a parametric down-conversion source through the opaque scattering medium, we observe two-photon quantum interference. The programmed beam splitter need not fulfill energy conservation over the two selected output channels and hence could be non-unitary. Consequently, we have the freedom to tune the quantum interference from bunching (Hong-Ou-Mandel-like) to antibunching. Our results establish opaque scattering media as a platform for high-dimensional quantum interference that is notably relevant for boson sampling and ph...

  7. Programmable two-photon quantum interference in 103 channels in opaque scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterink, Tom A. W.; Uppu, Ravitej; Ctistis, Georgios; Vos, Willem L.; Boller, Klaus-J.; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate two-photon quantum interference in an opaque scattering medium that intrinsically supports a large number of transmission channels. By adaptive spatial phase modulation of the incident wave fronts, the photons are directed at targeted speckle spots or output channels. From 103 experimentally available coupled channels, we select two channels and enhance their transmission to realize the equivalent of a fully programmable 2 ×2 beam splitter. By sending pairs of single photons from a parametric down-conversion source through the opaque scattering medium, we observe two-photon quantum interference. The programed beam splitter need not fulfill energy conservation over the two selected output channels and hence could be nonunitary. Consequently, we have the freedom to tune the quantum interference from bunching (Hong-Ou-Mandel-like) to antibunching. Our results establish opaque scattering media as a platform for high-dimensional quantum interference that is notably relevant for boson sampling and physical-key-based authentication.

  8. Quantum device prospects of superconducting nanodiamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtsuko, D.; Churochkin, D.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured semiconducting carbon system, described by as a superlattice-like structure demonstrated its potential in switching device applications based on the quantum tunneling through the insulating carbon layer. This switching property can be enhanced further with the association of Josephson's tunneling between two superconducting carbon (diamond) grains separated by a very thin layer of carbon which holds the structure of the film firmly. The superconducting nanodiamond heterostructures form qubits which can lead to the development of quantum computers provided the effect of disorder present in these structure can be firmly understood. Presently we concentrate on electrical transport properties of heavily boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films around the superconducting transition temperature measured as a function of magnetic fields and the applied bias current. Microstructure of these films is described by a two dimensional superlattice system which can also contain paramagnetic impurities. We report observation of anomalous negative Hall resistance in these films close to the superconductor-insulator-normal phase transition in the resistance versus temperature plots at low bias currents at zero and low magnetic field. The negative Hall effect is found to be suppressed as the bias current increase. Magnetoresistance study shows a distinct peak at zero field when measured in the low current regimes which suggest a superconductor-insulator-superconductor structure of films. Current vs. voltage characteristics show signature of π-Josephson like behaviour which can give rise to a characteristic frequency of several hundred of gigahertz. Signature of spin flipping also shows novel spintronic device applications.

  9. Completely device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Edgar A.; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Kofler, Johannes; Pawłowski, Marcin

    2016-08-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a provably secure way for two distant parties to establish a common secret key, which then can be used in a classical cryptographic scheme. Using quantum entanglement, one can reduce the necessary assumptions that the parties have to make about their devices, giving rise to device-independent QKD (DIQKD). However, in all existing protocols to date the parties need to have an initial (at least partially) random seed as a resource. In this work, we show that this requirement can be dropped. Using recent advances in the fields of randomness amplification and randomness expansion, we demonstrate that it is sufficient for the message the parties want to communicate to be (partially) unknown to the adversaries—an assumption without which any type of cryptography would be pointless to begin with. One party can use her secret message to locally generate a secret sequence of bits, which can then be openly used by herself and the other party in a DIQKD protocol. Hence our work reduces the requirements needed to perform secure DIQKD and establish safe communication.

  10. Interference Between Cellular Telephones and Implantable Rhythm Devices: A Review on Recent Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac pacemakers and implantable defibrillators are potentially susceptible to electromagnetic interferences as they have complex circuitry for sensing and communication purposes. Cellular telephones being an important source of electromagnetic waves are likely to cause interference in the function of these devices. Methods: A systematic analysis of studies on interaction between cellular telephones and implantable devices was done using professional databases for literature. Related articles and references of relevant articles were also searched for suitable studies. Results: Fourteen studies on pacemakers and eight studies on implantable defibrillators were identified. No dangerous malfunction was found in any of the analyzed studies, but most of the studies noted interference with device function when the phone was operated very close to the device. Interference was minimally in those devices with built in feed-through filters for eliminating electromagnetic interference. Device programming and interrogation were the most susceptible phases of operation. Summary: Cellular phones are likely to interfere with implantable rhythm devices if operated in close proximity or during programming of the device. Patients with implanted devices can safely use cellular phones if they are not carried close to the implanted devices or operated near them. Carrying the cellular phones in the belt position, receiving calls in the ear opposite to the side of the implanted device and keeping the phone as far away as possible while dialing can be considered a safe practice. Interrogation of the devices should take place exclusively in areas where utilization of cellular phones is strictly prohibited. Studies on pacemakers published in the current decade have shown much lesser rates of interference, possibly due to improvement in device technology.

  11. A quantum dynamic belief model to explain the interference effects of categorization on decision making

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zichang; Jiang, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Categorization is necessary for many decision making tasks. However, the categorization process may interfere the decision making result and the law of total probability can be violated in some situations. To predict the interference effect of categorization, some model based on quantum probability has been proposed. In this paper, a new quantum dynamic belief (QDB) model is proposed. Considering the precise decision may not be made during the process, the concept of uncertainty is introduced...

  12. Quantum random walks with multiphoton interference and high order correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Gard, Bryan T; Anisimov, Petr M; Lee, Hwang; Dowling, Jonathan P

    2011-01-01

    We show a simulation of quantum random walks with multiple photons using a staggered array of 50/50 beam splitters with a bank of detectors at any desired level. We discuss the multiphoton interference effects that are inherent to this setup, and introduce one, two, and threefold coincidence detection schemes. The use of Feynman diagrams are used to intuitively explain the unique multiphoton interference effects of these quantum random walks.

  13. Quantum interference between two single photons emitted by independently trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Beugnon, J; Dingjan, J; Darquié, B; Messin, G; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P; Beugnon, Jerome; Jones, Matthew; Dingjan, Jos; Darqui\\'{e}, Benoit; Messin, Gaetan; Browaeys, Antoine; Grangier, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    When two indistinguishable single photons are fed into the two input ports of a beam splitter, the photons will coalesce and leave together from the same output port. This is a quantum interference effect, which occurs because the two possible paths where the photons leave in different output ports interfere destructively. This effect was first observed in parametric downconversion by Hong, Ou and Mandel, and then with single photons produced one after the other by the same quantum emitter. With the recent development of quantum information, a lot of attention has been devoted to this coalescence effect as a resource for quantum data processing using linear optics techniques. To ensure the scalability of schemes based on these ideas, it is crucial that indistinguishable photons are emitted by a collection of synchronized, but otherwise independent sources. In this paper, we demonstrate the quantum interference of two single photons emitted by two independently trapped single atoms, bridging the gap towards th...

  14. Quantum interference effects at room temperature in OPV-based single-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arroyo, Carlos R.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper;

    2013-01-01

    Interference effects on charge transport through an individual molecule can lead to a notable modulation and suppression on its conductance. In this letter, we report the observation of quantum interference effects occurring at room temperature in single-molecule junctions based on oligo(3...

  15. Molecular internal dynamics studied by quantum path interferences in high order harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaïr, Amelle, E-mail: azair@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Siegel, Thomas; Sukiasyan, Suren; Risoud, Francois; Brugnera, Leonardo; Hutchison, Christopher [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Diveki, Zsolt; Auguste, Thierry [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molécules, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tisch, John W.G. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Salières, Pascal [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molécules, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ivanov, Misha Y.; Marangos, Jonathan P. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-12

    Highlights: ► Electronic trajectories in high order harmonic generation encodes attosecond and femtosecond molecular dynamical information. ► The observation of these quantum paths allows us to follow nuclear motion after ionization. ► Quantum paths interference encodes a signature of superposition of ionization channels. ► Quantum paths interference encodes a signature of transfer of population between channels due to laser coupling. ► Quantum paths interference is a promising technique to resolve ultra-fast dynamical processes after ionization. - Abstract: We investigate how short and long electron trajectory contributions to high harmonic emission and their interferences give access to information about intra-molecular dynamics. In the case of unaligned molecules, we show experimental evidence that the long trajectory contribution is more dependent upon the molecular species than the short one, providing a high sensitivity to cation nuclear dynamics from 100’s of as to a few fs after ionisation. Using theoretical approaches based on the strong field approximation and numerical integration of the time dependent Schrödinger equation, we examine how quantum path interferences encode electronic motion when the molecules are aligned. We show that the interferences are dependent upon which ionisation channels are involved and any superposition between them. In particular, quantum path interferences can encode signatures of electron dynamics if the laser field drives a coupling between the channels. Hence, molecular quantum path interferences are a promising method for attosecond spectroscopy, allowing the resolution of ultra-fast charge migration in molecules after ionisation in a self-referenced manner.

  16. Investigating and Improving Student Understanding of Quantum Mechanics in the Context of Single Photon Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-01-01

    Single photon experiments involving a Mach-Zehnder interferometer can illustrate the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, e.g., the wave-particle duality of a single photon, single photon interference, and the probabilistic nature of quantum measurement involving single photons. These experiments explicitly make the connection between the…

  17. Quantum interference and diffraction of parametric down-converted biphotons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ryosuke Shimizu; Keiichi Edamatsu; Tadashi Itoh

    2002-08-01

    We present two-photon diffraction and interference experiments utilizing parametric down-converted photon pairs (biphotons) and a transmission grating. The biphoton exhibits a diffraction-interference pattern equivalent to an effective single particle with half wavelength of the constituent photons.

  18. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Wood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI. We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs – optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection – that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt. We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs.

  19. Device-independent certification of high-dimensional quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Sciarrino, Fabio; Barra, Johanna F; Lima, Gustavo; Cabello, Adán

    2014-04-11

    An important problem in quantum information processing is the certification of the dimension of quantum systems without making assumptions about the devices used to prepare and measure them, that is, in a device-independent manner. A crucial question is whether such certification is experimentally feasible for high-dimensional quantum systems. Here we experimentally witness in a device-independent manner the generation of six-dimensional quantum systems encoded in the orbital angular momentum of single photons and show that the same method can be scaled, at least, up to dimension 13.

  20. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects.

  1. Exploring quantum interference in heteroatom-substituted graphene-like molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangtarash, Sara; Sadeghi, Hatef; Lambert, Colin J.

    2016-07-01

    If design principles for controlling quantum interference in single molecules could be elucidated and verified, then this will lay the foundations for exploiting such effects in nanoscale devices and thin-film materials. When the core of a graphene-like polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) is weakly coupled to external electrodes by atoms i and j, the single-molecule electrical conductance σij depends on the choice of connecting atoms i,j. Furthermore, provided the Fermi energy is located between the HOMO and LUMO, conductance ratios σij/σlm corresponding to different connectivities i,j and l,m are determined by quantum interference within the PAH core. In this paper, we examine how such conductance ratios change when one of the carbon atoms within the `parent' PAH core is replaced by a heteroatom to yield a `daughter' molecule. For bipartite parental cores, in which odd-numbered sites are connected to even-numbered sites only, the effect of heteroatom substitution onto an odd-numbered site is summarized by the following qualitative rules: (a) when i and j are odd, both parent and daughter have low conductances, (b) when i is odd and j is even, or vice versa both parent and daughter have high conductances and (c) when i,j are both even, the parent has a low conductance and the daughter a high conductance. These rules are verified by comparison with density-functional calculations on naphthalene, anthracene, pyrene and anthanthrene cores connected via two different anchor groups to gold electrodes.If design principles for controlling quantum interference in single molecules could be elucidated and verified, then this will lay the foundations for exploiting such effects in nanoscale devices and thin-film materials. When the core of a graphene-like polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) is weakly coupled to external electrodes by atoms i and j, the single-molecule electrical conductance σij depends on the choice of connecting atoms i,j. Furthermore, provided the Fermi energy is

  2. Computational electronics semiclassical and quantum device modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Vasileska, Dragica; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the simplest semiclassical approaches and ending with the description of complex fully quantum-mechanical methods for quantum transport analysis of state-of-the-art devices, Computational Electronics: Semiclassical and Quantum Device Modeling and Simulation provides a comprehensive overview of the essential techniques and methods for effectively analyzing transport in semiconductor devices. With the transistor reaching its limits and new device designs and paradigms of operation being explored, this timely resource delivers the simulation methods needed to properly model state-of

  3. High-rate measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Ottaviani, Carlo; Spedalieri, Gaetana

    2015-01-01

    Quantum cryptography achieves a formidable task - the remote distribution of secret keys by exploiting the fundamental laws of physics. Quantum cryptography is now headed towards solving the practical problem of constructing scalable and secure quantum networks. A significant step in this direction...... than those currently achieved. Our protocol could be employed to build high-rate quantum networks where devices securely connect to nearby access points or proxy servers....

  4. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    CERN Document Server

    Schuck, Carsten; Fan, Linran; Ma, Xiao-Song; Poot, Menno; Tang, Hong X

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standa...

  5. Quantum interferences and their classical limit in laser driven coherent control scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Ignacio, E-mail: ifranco@chem.northwestern.edu [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada); Spanner, Michael; Brumer, Paul [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2010-05-12

    Graphical abstract: The analogy between Young's double-slit experiment with matter and laser driven coherent control schemes is investigated, and shown to be limited. To do so, a general decomposition of observables in the Heisenberg picture into direct terms and interference contributions is introduced, and formal quantum-classical correspondence arguments in the Heisenberg picture are employed to define classical analogs of quantum interference terms. While the classical interference contributions in the double-slit experiment are shown to be zero, they can be nonzero in laser driven coherent control schemes and lead to laser control in the classical limit. This classical limit is interpreted in terms of nonlinear response theory arguments. - Abstract: The analogy between Young's double-slit experiment with matter and laser driven coherent control schemes is investigated, and shown to be limited. To do so, a general decomposition of observables in the Heisenberg picture into direct terms and interference contributions is introduced, and formal quantum-classical correspondence arguments in the Heisenberg picture are employed to define classical analogs of quantum interference terms. While the classical interference contributions in the double-slit experiment are shown to be zero, they can be nonzero in laser driven coherent control schemes and lead to laser control in the classical limit. This classical limit is interpreted in terms of nonlinear response theory arguments.

  6. ∧-related Quantum Interference of 2Π [Case(a)] Diatom on Rotational Energy Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li; Yan-qing Ni; Yong-qing Li; Wei-li Wang; Feng-cai Ma

    2009-01-01

    To study theoretically the relationship between the integral interference angle and the scat-tering angle in collisional quantum interference, the integral interference angle of atom-2Π[case(a)] diatomic molecules system is described. To simulate the experiment theoret-ically, the theoretical model on collision-induced rotational energy transfer in an atom-2Π[case(a)]diatom system is presented based on .the first order Born approximation tak-ing into account of the long-range interaction potential. For the 2Π electronic state in the Hund's case(a) diatom, the degree of the interference is discussed. The interference angles of collision-induced rotational energy transfer of CN(A2Π) in Hund's case(a) with He, Ne, and Ar are calculated quantitatively. The key parameters in the determination of integral interference angles are obtained.

  7. Device-independent randomness expansion secure against quantum adversaries

    CERN Document Server

    Pironio, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Measurements on entangled quantum systems necessarily yield outcomes that are intrinsically unpredictable if they violate a Bell inequality. This property is at the basis of device-independent randomness expansion, in which a certified private random string is generated from a shorter one without making assumptions about the internal working of the quantum devices used in the protocol. We show here that the privacy of the output string can be guaranteed even against adversaries that possess quantum side information about the devices. This opens the possibility for highly efficient concatenated protocols in which a random string produced by a given pair of Bell-violating devices is used as a seed for another pair of devices. In particular, such concatenated protocols can produce an amount of randomness doubly exponential in the number of pairs of devices starting from a finite initial string and can produce an exponential amount of randomness in the length of the initial seed using two pairs of devices.

  8. Local Gate Control in Carbon Nanotube Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biercuk, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit many properties which make them ideal candidates for applications in coherent electronic devices for quantum computation.We have made significant technological advancements in device fabrication,for the creation of multiple spatially localized electrostatic gates on a single nanotube device. These advancements permit a previously unattainable level of device control in the quantum regime, essential forelectronic logic operations. Our measurements have demonstrated independent gate control in nanotube double quantum dots defined by naturally occurring tunnel barriers [1], as well as the controllable formation of intratube quantum point contacts [2]. In these devices conductance quantization is evident in units of e2/h, suggesting that both band and spin degeneracies may be lifted at zero magnetic field. Local gating has also permitted the fabrication of fully gate-defined intratube quantum dots with gate-tunable tunnel barriers. Multiple quantum dots with independent control over charge number and tunneling rates have been demonstrated [3], raising the functionality of carbon nanotube devices to match that of standard semiconductor heterostructures. New devices incorporating integrated RF-SETs, and microwave studies of gate-defined intratube quantum dots will be discussed.[1] Science 303 p.655, 20042] PRL in press, cond-mat/04066523] To be published

  9. Quantum Computing with Very Noisy Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Knill, E

    2004-01-01

    There are quantum algorithms that can efficiently simulate quantum physics, factor large numbers and estimate integrals. As a result, quantum computers can solve otherwise intractable computational problems. One of the main problems of experimental quantum computing is to preserve fragile quantum states in the presence of errors. It is known that if the needed elementary operations (gates) can be implemented with error probabilities below a threshold, then it is possible to efficiently quantum compute with arbitrary accuracy. Here we give evidence that for independent errors the theoretical threshold is well above 3%, which is a significant improvement over that of earlier calculations. However, the resources required at such high error probabilities are excessive. Fortunately, they decrease rapidly with decreasing error probabilities. If we had quantum resources comparable to the considerable resources available in today's digital computers, we could implement non-trivial quantum algorithms at error probabil...

  10. Electrochemical control of quantum interference in anthraquinone-based molecular switches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Schiøtz, Jakob; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations we analyze the electronic transport properties of a recently proposed anthraquinone-based electrochemical switch. Robust conductance on/off ratios of several orders of magnitude are observed due to destructive quantum interference present in the anthraquinone b...... of hopping via the localized orbitals. The topology of the tight-binding model, which is dictated by the symmetries of the molecular orbitals, determines the amount of quantum interference.......Using first-principles calculations we analyze the electronic transport properties of a recently proposed anthraquinone-based electrochemical switch. Robust conductance on/off ratios of several orders of magnitude are observed due to destructive quantum interference present in the anthraquinone...

  11. Quantum Dots in Vertical Nanowire Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Weert, M.

    2010-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is aimed at constructing a quantum interface between a single electron spin and a photon, using a nanowire quantum dot. Such a quantum interface enables information transfer from a local electron spin to the polarization of a photon for long distance readout.

  12. Interference-Limited Device-to-Device Multi-User Cooperation Scheme for Optimization of Edge Networking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Cheng Huang; Jie Zhang; Zu-Fan Zhang; Zhong-Yang Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Device-to-device (D2D) communication is an emerging technology for improving cellular networks, which plays an important role in realizing Internet of Things (IoT). The spectrum efficiency, energy efficiency and throughput of network can be enhanced by the cooperation among multiple D2D users in a self-organized method. In order to limit the interference of D2D users and load off the energy consumption of D2D users without decreasing communication quality, an interference-limited multi-user cooperation scheme is proposed for multiple D2D users to solve the energy problem and the interference problem in this paper. Multiple D2D users use non-orthogonal spectrums to form clusters by self-organized method. Multiple D2D users are divided into different cooperative units. There is no interference among different cooperative units so as to limit the interference of each D2D user in cooperative units. When the link capacity cannot meet the requirements of the user rate, it will produce an interrupt event. In order to evaluate the communication quality, the outrage probability of D2D link is derived by considering link delay threshold, data rate and interference. Besides the energy availability and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of each D2D user, the distance between D2D users is considered when selecting the relaying D2D users so as to enhance the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of D2D receiving users. Combining the derived outrage probability, the relationships among the average link delay threshold, the efficiency of energy and the efficiency of capacity are studied. The simulation results show that the interference-limited multiple D2D users cooperation scheme can not only help to offload energy consumption and limit the interference of D2D users, but also enhance the efficiency of energy and the efficiency of capacity.

  13. Radio-Frequency Field-Induced Quantum Interference Effects in Cold Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙全; 周蜀渝; 周善钰; 王育竹

    2001-01-01

    We propose constructing a quantum interference configuration for cold atoms in a magneto-optical trap by applying a radio frequency field, which coherently couples adjacent Zeeman sublevels, in combination with a repumping laser field. One effect of this interference is that a dip exists in the absorption of the repumping light when the radio frequency is scanned. Our prediction has been indirectly detected through the fluorescence of cold atoms in a preliminary experiment.

  14. Interference control of nonlinear excitation in a multi-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guoqing; Tan, Zheng; Zou, Bichen; Zhu, Yifu

    2014-12-01

    We show that by manipulating quantum interference in a multi-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system, the nonlinear excitation of the cavity-atom polariton can be resonantly enhanced while the linear excitation is suppressed. Under the appropriate conditions, it is possible to selectively enhance or suppress the polariton excitation with two free-pace laser fields. We report on an experiment with cold Rb atoms in an optical cavity and present experimental results that demonstrate such interference control of the CQED excitation and its direct application to studies of all-optical switching and cross-phase modulation of the cavity-transmitted light.

  15. Quantum interference between two single photons emitted by independently trapped atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugnon, J; Jones, M P A; Dingjan, J; Darquié, B; Messin, G; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P

    2006-04-06

    When two indistinguishable single photons are fed into the two input ports of a beam splitter, the photons will coalesce and leave together from the same output port. This is a quantum interference effect, which occurs because two possible paths-in which the photons leave by different output ports-interfere destructively. This effect was first observed in parametric downconversion (in which a nonlinear crystal splits a single photon into two photons of lower energy), then from two separate downconversion crystals, as well as with single photons produced one after the other by the same quantum emitter. With the recent developments in quantum information research, much attention has been devoted to this interference effect as a resource for quantum data processing using linear optics techniques. To ensure the scalability of schemes based on these ideas, it is crucial that indistinguishable photons are emitted by a collection of synchronized, but otherwise independent sources. Here we demonstrate the quantum interference of two single photons emitted by two independently trapped single atoms, bridging the gap towards the simultaneous emission of many indistinguishable single photons by different emitters. Our data analysis shows that the observed coalescence is mainly limited by wavefront matching of the light emitted by the two atoms, and to a lesser extent by the motion of each atom in its own trap.

  16. A triple quantum dot based nano-electromechanical memory device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozner, R.; Lifshitz, E. [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Solid State Institute, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Peskin, U., E-mail: uri@tx.technion.ac.il [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Lise Meitner Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-09-14

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are free-standing nano-structures with chemically tunable electronic properties. This tunability offers intriguing possibilities for nano-electromechanical devices. In this work, we consider a nano-electromechanical nonvolatile memory (NVM) device incorporating a triple quantum dot (TQD) cluster. The device operation is based on a bias induced motion of a floating quantum dot (FQD) located between two bound quantum dots (BQDs). The mechanical motion is used for switching between two stable states, “ON” and “OFF” states, where ligand-mediated effective interdot forces between the BQDs and the FQD serve to hold the FQD in each stable position under zero bias. Considering realistic microscopic parameters, our quantum-classical theoretical treatment of the TQD reveals the characteristics of the NVM.

  17. Principles and applications of superconducting quantum interference devices

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    Principles and applications of SQUIDs serves as a textbook and a multi-author collection of critical reviews. Providing both basic aspects and recent progress in SQUIDs technology, it offers a realistic and stimulating picture of the state of the art. It can also contribute to a further development of the field for commercial applications.

  18. Nano-Bio Quantum Technology for Device-Specific Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.

    2009-01-01

    The areas discussed are still under development: I. Nano structured materials for TE applications a) SiGe and Be.Te; b) Nano particles and nanoshells. II. Quantum technology for optical devices: a) Quantum apertures; b) Smart optical materials; c) Micro spectrometer. III. Bio-template oriented materials: a) Bionanobattery; b) Bio-fuel cells; c) Energetic materials.

  19. Quantum dot heterojunction solar cells: the mechanism of device operation and impacts of quantum dot oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Ihly, Rachelle

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores the understanding of the chemistry and physics of colloidal quantum dots for practical solar energy photoconversion. Solar cell devices that make use of PbS quantum dots generally rely on constant and unchanged optical properties such that band gap energies remain tuned within the device. The design and development of unique experiments to ascertain mechanisms of optical band gap shifts occurring in PbS quantum dot thin-films exposed to air are discussed. The systematic s...

  20. Quantum Interference: How to Measure the Wavelength of a Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of wave-particle duality in quantum theory is difficult to grasp because it attributes particle-like properties to classical waves and wave-like properties to classical particles. There seems to be an inconsistency involved with the notion that particle-like or wave-like attributes depend on how you look at an entity. The concept comes…

  1. A quantum computer based on recombination processes in microelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoropoulos, K.; Ntalaperas, D.; Petras, I.; Konofaos, N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a quantum computer based on the recombination processes happening in semiconductor devices is presented. A "data element" and a "computational element" are derived based on Schokley-Read-Hall statistics and they can later be used to manifest a simple and known quantum computing process. Such a paradigm is shown by the application of the proposed computer onto a well known physical system involving traps in semiconductor devices.

  2. A quantum computer based on recombination processes in microelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodoropoulos, K [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Ntalaperas, D [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Research Academic Computer Technology Institute, Riga Feraiou 61, 26110, Patras (Greece); Petras, I [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Konofaos, N [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a quantum computer based on the recombination processes happening in semiconductor devices is presented. A 'data element' and a 'computational element' are derived based on Schokley-Read-Hall statistics and they can later be used to manifest a simple and known quantum computing process. Such a paradigm is shown by the application of the proposed computer onto a well known physical system involving traps in semiconductor devices.

  3. SU(4) Kondo entanglement in double quantum dot devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazzola, Rodrigo; Andrade, J. A.; Facio, Jorge I.; García, D. J.; Cornaglia, Pablo S.

    2017-08-01

    We analyze, from a quantum information theory perspective, the possibility of realizing an SU(4) entangled Kondo regime in semiconductor double quantum dot devices. We focus our analysis on the ground-state properties and consider the general experimental situation where the coupling parameters of the two quantum dots differ. We model each quantum dot with an Anderson-type Hamiltonian including an interdot Coulomb repulsion and tunnel couplings for each quantum dot to independent fermionic baths. We find that the spin and pseudospin entanglements can be made equal, and the SU(4) symmetry recovered, if the gate voltages are chosen in such a way that the average charge occupancies of the two quantum dots are equal, and the double occupancy on the double quantum dot is suppressed. We present density matrix renormalization group numerical results for the spin and pseudospin entanglement entropies, and analytical results for a simplified model that captures the main physics of the problem.

  4. Mini array of quantum Hall devices based on epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, S.; Lebedeva, N.; Hämäläinen, J.; Iisakka, I.; Immonen, P.; Manninen, A. J.; Satrapinski, A.

    2016-05-01

    Series connection of four quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices based on epitaxial graphene films was studied for realization of a quantum resistance standard with an up-scaled value. The tested devices showed quantum Hall plateaux RH,2 at a filling factor v = 2 starting from a relatively low magnetic field (between 4 T and 5 T) when the temperature was 1.5 K. The precision measurements of quantized Hall resistance of four QHE devices connected by triple series connections and external bonding wires were done at B = 7 T and T = 1.5 K using a commercial precision resistance bridge with 50 μA current through the QHE device. The results showed that the deviation of the quantized Hall resistance of the series connection of four graphene-based QHE devices from the expected value of 4×RH,2 = 2 h/e2 was smaller than the relative standard uncertainty of the measurement (resistance bridge.

  5. Kondo Resonance versus Fano Interference in Double Quantum Dots Coupled to a Two-Lead One-Ring System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiong-Wen; SHI Zhen-Gang; CHEN Bao-Ju; SONG Ke-Hui

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the transport properties of a coupled double quantum dot (DQD) device with one of the dots (QD1) coupled to metallic leads and the other (QD2) embedded in an Aharonov-Bhom (A-B) ring by means of the slave-boson mean-Geld theory. It is found that in this system, the Kondo resonance and the Fano interference exist simultaneously, the enhancing Kondo effect and the increasing hopping of the QD2-Ring destroy the localized electron state in the QD2 for the QD1-leads, and accordingly, the Fano interference between the DQD-leads and the QD1-leads are suppressed. Under some conditions, the Fano interference can be quenched fully and the single Kondo resonance of the QD1-leads comes into being. Moreover, when the magnetic flux of the A-B ring is zero, the influence of the parity of the A-B ring on the transport properties is very weak, but this inSuence becomes more obvious with non-zero magnetic flux. Thus this model may be a candidate for future device applications.

  6. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Low - Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hong

    The realization of a two-dimensional electron gas in semiconductor heterostructures due to advanced epitaxial growth techniques has led to novel high-speed devices such as modulation-doped field effect transistors and quantum well lasers. High resolution lithography and pattern transfer techniques now make it possible to further restrict the electronic motion to lower dimensions. A variety of interesting quantum confinement phenomena have been observed in these mesoscopic systems. This thesis describes the design principle, fabrication technique, and transport characterization of various low-dimensional quantum devices. Nanostructure fabrication techniques are presented in detail in the thesis, from high resolution electron beam lithography, pattern transfer techniques, to various one-dimensional (1D) and zero-dimensional (0D) structures with dimensions in the nanometer scale. The effective wire width as well as sidewall damage for both deep etched and shallow etched quantum wires are characterized by the electrical conductance measurement. Artificial lateral surface superlattice (LSSL) structures of line and dot arrays are fabricated using multilayer resist techniques. A typical 1D quantized conductance of rm 2e^2/h is shown in an airbridge split gate device. Plateaulike transport characteristics are demonstrated in airbridge LSSL gate devices due to electrostatic confinement modulation. Laterally tunable single-gate quantum dot and double-bend quantum dot devices are fabricated and investigated. Negative differential conductance is observed at various drain bias conditions in both of these quantum dot devices. Conductance oscillations observed at a temperature as high as 10 K are, to our understanding, the highest temperature reported in similar laterally confined quantum dot devices.

  7. Phonon-Assisted Two-Photon Interference from Remote Quantum Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindl, Marcus; Jöns, Klaus D; Huber, Daniel; Schimpf, Christian; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo

    2017-07-12

    Photonic quantum technologies are on the verge of finding applications in everyday life with quantum cryptography and quantum simulators on the horizon. Extensive research has been carried out to identify suitable quantum emitters and single epitaxial quantum dots have emerged as near-optimal sources of bright, on-demand, highly indistinguishable single photons and entangled photon-pairs. In order to build up quantum networks, it is essential to interface remote quantum emitters. However, this is still an outstanding challenge, as the quantum states of dissimilar "artificial atoms" have to be prepared on-demand with high fidelity and the generated photons have to be made indistinguishable in all possible degrees of freedom. Here, we overcome this major obstacle and show an unprecedented two-photon interference (visibility of 51 ± 5%) from remote strain-tunable GaAs quantum dots emitting on-demand photon-pairs. We achieve this result by exploiting for the first time the full potential of a novel phonon-assisted two-photon excitation scheme, which allows for the generation of highly indistinguishable (visibility of 71 ± 9%) entangled photon-pairs (fidelity of 90 ± 2%), enables push-button biexciton state preparation (fidelity of 80 ± 2%) and outperforms conventional resonant two-photon excitation schemes in terms of robustness against environmental decoherence. Our results mark an important milestone for the practical realization of quantum repeaters and complex multiphoton entanglement experiments involving dissimilar artificial atoms.

  8. Genuine quantum interference in interacting bosonic fields: The semiclassical propagator in Fock space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbina, Juan Diego; Engl, Thomas; Richter, Klaus [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Arguelles, Arturo [Department of Physics, University of Liege (Belgium); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Dujardin, Julien; Schlagheck, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Liege (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    We present a semiclassical theory of quantum interference effects in interacting bosonic fields. We make special emphasis on the difference between genuine quantum interference (due to the superposition principle in the many-body Hilbert space), and classical interference effects due to the wave character of the classical limit. First, we discuss how the usual approaches to this problem are unable to provide the characteristic sum of oscillatory terms, each asociated with a solution of the classical equations of motion, required to semiclassically address interference effects. We show then how to solve this problems by a formal construction of the van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator for bosonic fields as a sum over paths in the associated Fock space and we identify the classical limit as a Gross-Pitaevskii equation with boundary conditions and multiple solutions. The theory predicts effects akin to weak localization to take place in Fock space, and in particular the enhancement of quantum probability of return due to interference between time-reversed paths there. We support our claims with extensive numerical calculations for a discrete version of an interacting bosonic field.

  9. Probing Electron-Phonon Interaction through Two-Photon Interference in Resonantly Driven Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigue, Antoine; Iles-Smith, Jake; Lux, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of photon coherence properties through two-photon interference (TPI) measurements from a single quantum dot (QD) under resonant excitation. We show that the loss of indistinguishability is related only to the electron-phonon coupling and is not affected...

  10. Engineering two-photon high-dimensional states through quantum interference

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zhang, YI

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available the storage and processing potential of quantum information systems. We demonstrate the controlled engineering of two-photon high-dimensional states entangled in their orbital angular momentum through Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We prepare a large range...

  11. Nonlinear optical effects and Hong-Ou-Mandel interference in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Imran M.; van Enk, Steven J.

    Pure quantum interference among single photons is one of the key ingredients to perform linear optics quantum computation (LOQC). The Hong-Ou-Mandel interference (HOMI) [C. K. Hong, Z. Y. Ou and L. Mandel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, (18), 2044-2046 (1987)] i.e. complete destructive interference between two identical and indistinguishable photons simultaneously entering input ports of a 50/50 beam splitter, is a well-known example in this context. In this talk, I'll present our theoretical study of HOMI in a coupled Jaynes-Cummings array. In particular and by applying quantum jump/trajectory formalism, I'll focus on how partial quantum interference between two photons survive both non-linearities produced by two-level emitter and spectral filtering due to optical cavities in our coupled cavity array setup [Imran M. Mirza and Steven J. van Enk, Opt. Comm. 343, 172-177 (2015)]. Along with LOQC, this work is crucial from the perspective of exploiting coupled cavity arrays to store single photons reliably (without altering their temporal and spectral traits) [Imran M. Mirza, Steven J. van Enk and Jeff Kimble, JOSA B, 10, 2640-2649, (2013)].

  12. Low contact resistance in epitaxial graphene devices for quantum metrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Yager

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate Ti/Au contacts to monolayer epitaxial graphene on SiC (0001 for applications in quantum resistance metrology. Using three-terminal measurements in the quantum Hall regime we observed variations in contact resistances ranging from a minimal value of 0.6 Ω up to 11 kΩ. We identify a major source of high-resistance contacts to be due bilayer graphene interruptions to the quantum Hall current, whilst discarding the effects of interface cleanliness and contact geometry for our fabricated devices. Moreover, we experimentally demonstrate methods to improve the reproducibility of low resistance contacts (<10 Ω suitable for high precision quantum resistance metrology.

  13. Low contact resistance in epitaxial graphene devices for quantum metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yager, Tom, E-mail: yager@chalmers.se, E-mail: ywpark@snu.ac.kr; Lartsev, Arseniy; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Kubatkin, Sergey [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology Göteborg, S-412 96 (Sweden); Cedergren, Karin [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW-2052 (Australia); Yakimova, Rositsa [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University Linköping, S-581 83 (Sweden); Panchal, Vishal; Kazakova, Olga [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Tzalenchuk, Alexander [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Kim, Kyung Ho; Park, Yung Woo, E-mail: yager@chalmers.se, E-mail: ywpark@snu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    We investigate Ti/Au contacts to monolayer epitaxial graphene on SiC (0001) for applications in quantum resistance metrology. Using three-terminal measurements in the quantum Hall regime we observed variations in contact resistances ranging from a minimal value of 0.6 Ω up to 11 kΩ. We identify a major source of high-resistance contacts to be due bilayer graphene interruptions to the quantum Hall current, whilst discarding the effects of interface cleanliness and contact geometry for our fabricated devices. Moreover, we experimentally demonstrate methods to improve the reproducibility of low resistance contacts (<10 Ω) suitable for high precision quantum resistance metrology.

  14. Quantum Interference and Superposition in Cognition: Development of a Theory for the Disjunction of Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Aerts, Diederik

    2007-01-01

    We elaborate a theory for the modeling of concepts using the mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. Items and concepts are represented by vectors in the complex Hilbert space of quantum mechanics and membership weights of items are modeled by quantum weights calculated following the quantum rules. We apply this theory to model the disjunction of concepts and show that the predictions of our theory for the membership weights of items with respect to the disjunction of concepts match with great accuracy the results of an experiment conducted by Hampton (1988b). It is the quantum effects of interference and superposition that are at the origin of the effects of overextension and underextension observed by Hampton as deviations from a classical use of the disjunction. We show that the complex numbers of the Hilbert space are essential to obtaining the experimental predictions, i.e. vector space models over real numbers do not provide predictions matching the experimental data. We put forward an explanation ...

  15. Multiple-path Quantum Interference Effects in a Double-Aharonov-Bohm Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang XF

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigate quantum interference effects in a double-Aharonov-Bohm (AB interferometer consisting of five quantum dots sandwiched between two metallic electrodes in the case of symmetric dot-electrode couplings by the use of the Green’s function equation of motion method. The analytical expression for the linear conductance at zero temperature is derived to interpret numerical results. A three-peak structure in the linear conductance spectrum may evolve into a double-peak structure, and two Fano dips (zero conductance points may appear in the quantum system when the energy levels of quantum dots in arms are not aligned with one another. The AB oscillation for the magnetic flux threading the double-AB interferometer is also investigated in this paper. Our results show the period of AB oscillation can be converted from 2π to π by controlling the difference of the magnetic fluxes threading the two quantum rings.

  16. Undoped Heterostructure Materials for SiGe Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. S.; Borselli, M. G.; Huang, B.; Holabird, K. S.; Hazard, T. M.; Kiselev, A. A.; Deelman, P. W.; Alvarado-Rodriguez, I.; Schmitz, A. E.; Sokolich, M.; Hunter, A. T.; Gyure, M. F.

    2011-03-01

    Quantum well heterostructures, widely used for the fabrication of quantum dots and related devices, typically make use of modulation doping. Removal of the dopants, by use of globally ``field-gated'' and/or back-gated heterostructure designs, eliminates the dominant sources of scattering, charge noise and instability in devices intended for low-temperature operation. In this talk we present recent progress in designing and fabricating undoped quantum well heterostructures in sSi/SiGe. A combination of simulation based modeling and experimental work has enabled us to successfully engineer materials for stable and quiet quantum dot operation. Specific topics to be presented include the important role of substrate and buffer layer background doping, concurrent MOS accumulation, leakage to front and back gates via barrier tunneling, and the expected range of electric fields that determine valley mixing in quantum dots. Sponsored by United States Department of Defense. Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited.

  17. Quantum interference between H + D2 quasiclassical reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Herráez-Aguilar, Diego; Aoiz, F Javier; Sneha, Mahima; Jankunas, Justinas; Zare, Richard N

    2015-08-01

    Interferences are genuine quantum phenomena that appear whenever two seemingly distinct classical trajectories lead to the same outcome. They are common in elastic scattering but are seldom observable in chemical reactions. Here we report experimental measurements of the state-to-state angular distribution for the H + D2 reaction using the 'photoloc' technique. For products in low rotational and vibrational states, a characteristic oscillation pattern governs backward scattering. The comparison between the experiments, rigorous quantum calculations and classical trajectories on an accurate potential energy surface allows us to trace the origin of that structure to the quantum interference between different quasiclassical mechanisms, a phenomenon analogous to that observed in the double-slit experiment.

  18. Optimization of semiconductor quantum devices by evolutionary search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoni, G; Rossi, F

    2000-07-15

    A novel simulation strategy is proposed for searching for semiconductor quantum devices that are optimized with respect to required performances. Based on evolutionary programming, a technique that implements the paradigm of genetic algorithms in more-complex data structures than strings of bits, the proposed algorithm is able to deal with quantum devices with preset nontrivial constraints (e.g., transition energies, geometric requirements). Therefore our approach allows for automatic design, thus avoiding costly by-hand optimizations. We demonstrate the advantages of the proposed algorithm through a relevant and nontrivial application, the optimization of a second-harmonic-generation device working in resonance conditions.

  19. Exploiting quantum interference in dye sensitized solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggio, Emanuele; Solomon, Gemma C.; Troisi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    A strategy to hinder the charge recombination process in dye sensitized solar cells is developed in analogy with similar approaches to modulate charge transport across nanostructures. The system studied is a TiO2 (anatase)-chromophore interface, with an unsaturated carbon bridge connecting the two...... subunits. A theory for nonadiabatic electron transfer is employed in order to take explicitly into account the contribution from the bridge states mediating the process. If a cross-conjugated fragment is present in the bridge, it is possible to suppress the charge recombination by negative interference...... of the possible tunnelling path. Calculations carried out on realistic molecules at the DFT level of theory show how the recombination lifetime can be modulated by changes in the electron-withdrawing (donating) character of the groups connected to the cross-conjugated bridge. Tight binding calculations...

  20. Potential GPRS 900/180-MHz and WCDMA 1900-MHz interference to medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskra, Steve; Thomas, Barry W; McKenzie, Ray; Rowley, Jack

    2007-10-01

    This study compared the potential for interference to medical devices from radio frequency (RF) fields radiated by GSM 900/1800-MHz, general packet radio service (GPRS) 900/1800-MHz, and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA) 1900-MHz handsets. The study used a balanced half-wave dipole antenna, which was energized with a signal at the standard power level for each technology, and then brought towards the medical device while noting the distance at which interference became apparent. Additional testing was performed with signals that comply with the requirements of the international immunity standard to RF fields, IEC 61000-4-3. The testing provides a sense of the overall interference impact that GPRS and WCDMA (frequency division duplex) may have, relative to current mobile technologies, and to the internationally recognized standard for radiated RF immunity. Ten medical devices were tested: two pulse oximeters, a blood pressure monitor, a patient monitor, a humidifier, three models of cardiac defibrillator, and two models of infusion pump. Our conclusion from this and a related study on consumer devices is that WCDMA handsets are unlikely to be a significant interference threat to medical electronics at typical separation distances.

  1. Fabrication of quantum-dot devices in graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Moriyama, Yoshifumi Morita, Eiichiro Watanabe, Daiju Tsuya, Shinya Uji, Maki Shimizu and Koji Ishibashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe our recent experimental results on the fabrication of quantum-dot devices in a graphene-based two-dimensional system. Graphene samples were prepared by micromechanical cleavage of graphite crystals on a SiO2/Si substrate. We performed micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements to determine the number of layers of graphene flakes during the device fabrication process. By applying a nanofabrication process to the identified graphene flakes, we prepared a double-quantum-dot device structure comprising two lateral quantum dots coupled in series. Measurements of low-temperature electrical transport show the device to be a series-coupled double-dot system with varied interdot tunnel coupling, the strength of which changes continuously and non-monotonically as a function of gate voltage.

  2. Control of optical bistability and third-order nonlinearity via tunneling induced quantum interference in triangular quantum dot molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Si-Cong, E-mail: tiansicong@ciomp.ac.cn; Tong, Cun-Zhu, E-mail: tongcz@ciomp.ac.cn; Zhang, Jin-Long; Shan, Xiao-Nan; Fu, Xi-Hong; Zeng, Yu-Gang; Qin, Li; Ning, Yong-Qiang [State Key laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Wan, Ren-Gang [School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The optical bistability of a triangular quantum dot molecules embedded inside a unidirectional ring cavity is studied. The type, the threshold and the hysteresis loop of the optical bistability curves can be modified by the tunneling parameters, as well as the probe laser field. The linear and nonlinear susceptibilities of the medium are also studied to interpret the corresponding results. The physical interpretation is that the tunneling can induce the quantum interference, which modifies the linear and the nonlinear response of the medium. As a consequence, the characteristics of the optical bistability are changed. The scheme proposed here can be utilized for optimizing and controlling the optical switching process.

  3. Interference of Light in Michelson-Morley Interferometer: A Quantum Optical Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Langangen, O; Vaskinn, A

    2011-01-01

    We investigate how the temporal coherence interference properties of light in a Michelson-Morley interferometer (MMI), using only a single-photon detector, can be understood in a quantum-optics framework in a straightforward and pedagogical manner. For this purpose we make use of elementary quantum field theory and Glaubers theory for photon detection in order to calculate the expected interference pattern in the MMI. If a thermal reference source is used in the MMI local oscillator port in combination with a thermal source in the signal port, the interference pattern revealed by such an intensity measurement shows a distinctive dependence on the differences in the temperature of the two sources. The MMI can therefore be used in order to perform temperature measurements. A related method was actually used to carry out high precision measurements of the cosmic micro-wave background radiation on board of the COBE satellite. The theoretical framework allows us to consider any initial quantum state. The interfere...

  4. Multiplexed charge-locking device for large arrays of quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puddy, R. K., E-mail: rkp27@cam.ac.uk; Smith, L. W; Chong, C. H.; Farrer, I.; Griffiths, J. P.; Ritchie, D. A.; Smith, C. G. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Al-Taie, H.; Kelly, M. J. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, Electrical Engineering Division, Department of Engineering, 9 J. J. Thomson Avenue, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Pepper, M. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    We present a method of forming and controlling large arrays of gate-defined quantum devices. The method uses an on-chip, multiplexed charge-locking system and helps to overcome the restraints imposed by the number of wires available in cryostat measurement systems. The device architecture that we describe here utilises a multiplexer-type scheme to lock charge onto gate electrodes. The design allows access to and control of gates whose total number exceeds that of the available electrical contacts and enables the formation, modulation and measurement of large arrays of quantum devices. We fabricate such devices on n-type GaAs/AlGaAs substrates and investigate the stability of the charge locked on to the gates. Proof-of-concept is shown by measurement of the Coulomb blockade peaks of a single quantum dot formed by a floating gate in the device. The floating gate is seen to drift by approximately one Coulomb oscillation per hour.

  5. Multiplexed charge-locking device for large arrays of quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddy, R. K.; Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Chong, C. H.; Farrer, I.; Griffiths, J. P.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Pepper, M.; Smith, C. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a method of forming and controlling large arrays of gate-defined quantum devices. The method uses an on-chip, multiplexed charge-locking system and helps to overcome the restraints imposed by the number of wires available in cryostat measurement systems. The device architecture that we describe here utilises a multiplexer-type scheme to lock charge onto gate electrodes. The design allows access to and control of gates whose total number exceeds that of the available electrical contacts and enables the formation, modulation and measurement of large arrays of quantum devices. We fabricate such devices on n-type GaAs/AlGaAs substrates and investigate the stability of the charge locked on to the gates. Proof-of-concept is shown by measurement of the Coulomb blockade peaks of a single quantum dot formed by a floating gate in the device. The floating gate is seen to drift by approximately one Coulomb oscillation per hour.

  6. Coherence Factors and Quantum Interferences in Excitonic Condensation of Ta2NiSe5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Koudai; Kaneko, Tatsuya; Ohta, Yukinori

    2017-04-01

    In order to elucidate whether Ta2NiSe5 is in an excitonic condensation state or not, we study macroscopic quantum interferences in ultrasonic attenuation rate and nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rate. Using the three-chain model describing the excitonic condensation of Ta2NiSe5, we demonstrate analytically that the ultrasonic attenuation rate shows a characteristic peak just below the transition temperature of the excitonic condensation, while the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rate shows a rapid drop. In particular, we find that the constructive interference originates from the hybridization between the conduction and valence bands induced by an external field.

  7. Control of quantum interference of an excitonic wave in a chlorophyll chain with a chlorophyll ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Suc-Kyoung; Nam, Seog-Woo [Korea University, Jochiwon, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Yeon, Kyu-Hwang [Chungbuk National University, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The quantum interference of an excitonic wave and its coherent control in a nanochain with a nanoring are studied. The nanochain is comprised of six chlorophylls, where four chlorophylls compose the nanoring and two chlorophylls are attached at two opposite sites on the nanoring. The exciton dynamics and the correlation of the excitation between chlorophylls are analyzed for a given configurational arrangement and dipolar orientation of the chlorophylls. The results of this study show that the excitation at specified chlorophylls is suppressed or enhanced by destructive or constructive interference of the excitonic wave in the chlorophyll nanochain.

  8. Experimental device-independent tests of classical and quantum entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Sijing; You, Lixing; Wang, Zhen; Huang, Yidong

    2016-12-01

    In quantum information processing, it is important to witness the entropy of the message in the device-independent way which was proposed recently [R. Chaves, J. B. Brask, and N. Brunner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 110501 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.110501]. In this paper, we theoretically obtain the minimal quantum entropy for three widely used linear dimension witnesses, which is considered "a difficult question." Then we experimentally test the classical and quantum entropy in a device-independent manner. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical analysis, demonstrating that entropy is needed in quantum systems that is lower than the entropy needed in classical systems with the given value of the dimension witness.

  9. Quantum confined laser devices optical gain and recombination in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Blood, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The semiconductor laser, invented over 50 years ago, has had an enormous impact on the digital technologies that now dominate so many applications in business, commerce and the home. The laser is used in all types of optical fibre communication networks that enable the operation of the internet, e-mail, voice and skype transmission. Approximately one billion are produced each year for a market valued at around $5 billion. Nearly all semiconductor lasers now use extremely thin layers of light emitting materials (quantum well lasers). Increasingly smaller nanostructures are used in the form of quantum dots. The impact of the semiconductor laser is surprising in the light of the complexity of the physical processes that determine the operation of every device. This text takes the reader from the fundamental optical gain and carrier recombination processes in quantum wells and quantum dots, through descriptions of common device structures to an understanding of their operating characteristics. It has a consistent...

  10. Experimental device-independent tests of classical and quantum dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Johan; Badziag, Piotr; Cabello, Adán; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2012-08-01

    A fundamental resource in any communication and computation task is the amount of information that can be transmitted and processed. The classical information encoded in a set of states is limited by the number of distinguishable states or classical dimension dc of the set. The sets used in quantum communication and information processing contain states that are neither identical nor distinguishable, and the quantum dimension dq of the set is the dimension of the Hilbert space spanned by these states. An important challenge is to assess the (classical or quantum) dimension of a set of states in a device-independent way, that is, without referring to the internal working of the device generating the states. Here we experimentally test dimension witnesses designed to efficiently determine the minimum dimension of sets of (three or four) photonic states from the correlations originated from measurements on them, and distinguish between classical and quantum sets of states.

  11. Interference control of perfect photon absorption in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Liyong; Zhu, Yifu; Agarwal, G S

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme for controlling coherent photon transmission and reflection in a cavity-quantum-electrodynamics (CQED) system consisting of an optical resonator coupled with three-level atoms coherently prepared by a control laser from free space. When the control laser is off and the cavity is excited by two identical light fields from two ends of the cavity, the two input light fields can be completely absorbed by the CQED system and the light energy is converted into the excitation of the polariton states, but no light can escape from the cavity. Two distinct cases of controlling the perfect photon absorption are analyzed: (a) when the control laser is tuned to the atomic resonance and creates electromagnetically induced transparency, the prefect photon absorption is suppressed and the input light fields are nearly completely transmitted through the cavity; (b) when the control laser is tuned to the polariton state resonance and inhibits the polariton state excitation, the perfect photon ab...

  12. Measurement-device-independent entanglement-based quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Wei, Kejin; Ma, Haiqiang; Sun, Shihai; Liu, Hongwei; Yin, Zhenqiang; Li, Zuohan; Lian, Shibin; Du, Yungang; Wu, Lingan

    2016-05-01

    We present a quantum key distribution protocol in a model in which the legitimate users gather statistics as in the measurement-device-independent entanglement witness to certify the sources and the measurement devices. We show that the task of measurement-device-independent quantum communication can be accomplished based on monogamy of entanglement, and it is fairly loss tolerate including source and detector flaws. We derive a tight bound for collective attacks on the Holevo information between the authorized parties and the eavesdropper. Then with this bound, the final secret key rate with the source flaws can be obtained. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over 144 km can be made secure using only standard threshold detectors.

  13. Conformation-driven quantum interference effects mediated by through-space conjugation in self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotti, Marco; Kovalchuk, Andrii; Wächter, Tobias; Qiu, Xinkai; Zharnikov, Michael; Chiechi, Ryan C.

    2016-12-01

    Tunnelling currents through tunnelling junctions comprising molecules with cross-conjugation are markedly lower than for their linearly conjugated analogues. This effect has been shown experimentally and theoretically to arise from destructive quantum interference, which is understood to be an intrinsic, electronic property of molecules. Here we show experimental evidence of conformation-driven interference effects by examining through-space conjugation in which π-conjugated fragments are arranged face-on or edge-on in sufficiently close proximity to interact through space. Observing these effects in the latter requires trapping molecules in a non-equilibrium conformation closely resembling the X-ray crystal structure, which we accomplish using self-assembled monolayers to construct bottom-up, large-area tunnelling junctions. In contrast, interference effects are completely absent in zero-bias simulations on the equilibrium, gas-phase conformation, establishing through-space conjugation as both of fundamental interest and as a potential tool for tuning tunnelling charge-transport in large-area, solid-state molecular-electronic devices.

  14. Quantum interference of highly-dispersive surface plasmons (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokpanov, Yury S.; Fakonas, James S.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-09-01

    Previous experiments have shown that surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) preserve their entangled state and do not cause measurable decoherence. However, essentially all of them were done using SPPs whose dispersion was in the linear "photon-like" regime. We report in this presentation on experiments showing how transition to "true-plasmon" non-linear dispersion regime, which occurs near SPP resonance frequency, will affect quantum coherent properties of light. To generate a polarization-entangled state we utilize type-I parametric down-conversion, occurring in a pair of non-linear crystals (BiBO), glued together and rotated by 90 degrees with respect to each other. For state projection measurements, we use a pair of polarizers and single-photon avalanche diode coincidence count detectors. We interpose a plasmonic hole array in the path of down-converted light before the polarizer. Without the hole array, we measure visibility V=99-100% and Bell's number S=2.81±0.03. To study geometrical effects we fabricated plasmonic hole arrays (gold on optically polished glass) with elliptical holes (axes are 190nm and 240nm) using focused ion beam. When we put this sample in our system we measured the reduction of visibility V=86±5% using entangled light. However, measurement using classical light gave exactly the same visibility; hence, this reduction is caused only by the difference in transmission coefficients of different polarizations. As samples with non-linear dispersion we fabricated two-layer (a-Si - Au) and three-layer (a-Si - Au - a-Si) structures on optically polished glass with different pitches and circular holes. The results of measurements with these samples will be discussed along with the theoretical investigations.

  15. Electron transport through a linear tri-quantum-dot molecule Aharonov-Bohm interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jiyuan; He, Zelong; Li, Li; Ye, Shujiang; Sun, Weimin

    2017-09-01

    Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function technique, electron transport properties through a two-terminal linear tri-quantum-dot molecule Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) interference are investigated. The conductance as a function of electron energy is numerically calculated. The influence of magnetic flux and interdot coupling strength on the conductance is researched. Fano resonances emerge in the conductance spectrum, and two bound states in the continuum form simultaneously when the interdot couplings take appropriate values. A conductance dip is observed and evolves into an antiresonance band with increasing magnetic flux. The system can be designed as a quantum switch by adjusting the intramolecular couplings.

  16. Beyond Quantum interference and Optical pumping: invoking a Closed-loop phase

    CERN Document Server

    Kani, A

    2016-01-01

    Atomic coherence effects arising from coherent light-atom interaction are conventionally known to be governed by quantum interference and optical pumping mechanisms. However, anisotropic nonlinear response driven by optical field involves another fundamental effect arising from closed-loop multiphoton transitions. This closed-loop phase dictates the tensorial structure of the nonlinear susceptibility as it governs the principal coordinate system in determining, whether the light field will either compete or cooperate with the external magnetic field stimulus. Such a treatment provides deeper understanding of all magneto-optical anisotropic response. The magneto-optical response in all atomic systems is classified using closed-loop phase. The role of quantum interference in obtaining electromagnetically induced transparency or electromagnetically induced absorption in multi-level systems is identified.

  17. Constructive quantum interference in a bis-copper six-porphyrin nanoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richert, Sabine; Cremers, Jonathan; Kuprov, Ilya; Peeks, Martin D.; Anderson, Harry L.; Timmel, Christiane R.

    2017-03-01

    The exchange interaction, J, between two spin centres is a convenient measure of through bond electronic communication. Here, we investigate quantum interference phenomena in a bis-copper six-porphyrin nanoring by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy via measurement of the exchange coupling between the copper centres. Using an analytical expression accounting for both dipolar and exchange coupling to simulate the time traces obtained in a double electron electron resonance experiment, we demonstrate that J can be quantified to high precision even in the presence of significant through-space coupling. We show that the exchange coupling between two spin centres is increased by a factor of 4.5 in the ring structure with two parallel coupling paths as compared to an otherwise identical system with just one coupling path, which is a clear signature of constructive quantum interference.

  18. Vacuum-Induced Quantum Interference in a Trapped ∧-Configuration Three-Level System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng-Ling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ In consideration of quantization of centre-of-mass motion, we derive the second-order solution of the dynamic equation of a ∧-configuration three-level atom confined in an approximately harmonic trap by using the timedependent perturbation theory. It is found that there are a series of dark lines in the second-order probability spectrum with multi-peak structures, which is the result of the quantum interference from the same vacuum mode in the spontaneous decay process of the trapped atom from the upper level to the two nearby lower levels. Our study shows that the second-order spectrum may be modified by the oscillation frequency Ω of the trap and the frequency difference △ between two lower levels of the three-level atom, and the depth of the dark lines from the vacuum-induced quantum interference effect is strongly dependent on the above two parameters (Ω and △).

  19. Experimental Demonstration of Quantum State Multi-meter and One-qubit Fingerprinting in a Single Quantum Device

    CERN Document Server

    Du, J; Kwek, L C; Oh, C H; Ekert, A; Du, Jiangfeng; Zou, Ping; Ekert, Artur

    2004-01-01

    Utilizing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Technology, we implement an efficient quantum device that can be used as a useful multi-meter for extracting certain properties of unknown quantum states without resource to quantum tomography. This device has many potential applications ranging from direct state determinations and engenvalue/eigenvector estimations to purity test of a quantum system, it can also provide a direct estimation of the overlap of any two unknown quantum states. Moreover, using the same device, we demonstrate one-qubit quantum fingerprinting as a proof-in-principle of one quantum communication complexity protocol.

  20. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum random-number generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, You-Qi; Guan, Jian-Yu; Zhou, Hongyi; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-12-01

    The randomness from a quantum random-number generator (QRNG) relies on the accurate characterization of its devices. However, device imperfections and inaccurate characterizations can result in wrong entropy estimation and bias in practice, which highly affects the genuine randomness generation and may even induce the disappearance of quantum randomness in an extreme case. Here we experimentally demonstrate a measurement-device-independent (MDI) QRNG based on time-bin encoding to achieve certified quantum randomness even when the measurement devices are uncharacterized and untrusted. The MDI-QRNG is randomly switched between the regular randomness generation mode and a test mode, in which four quantum states are randomly prepared to perform measurement tomography in real time. With a clock rate of 25 MHz, the MDI-QRNG generates a final random bit rate of 5.7 kbps. Such implementation with an all-fiber setup provides an approach to construct a fully integrated MDI-QRNG with trusted but error-prone devices in practice.

  1. Effects of Quantum Interference on the Profile of Excitation Spectra in the Atomic Sodium D1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongfang; ZHANG Xiangyang; SUN Jianfeng; ZHAO Yongmei; WANG Yongchang; ZHANG Yanliang; DING Liang’en; WANG Zugeng

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, an experiment in a sodium vapor cell with cw laser pumping is reported. Two dips in the excitation spectrum profile of the sodium \\$D1\\$ line are observed. Theoretically excitation spectra in the three-level system are calculated in detail and results are identical with experiments. It is demonstrated that the appearance of the two dips in the excitation spectrum is close connected with quantum interference effect.

  2. Effects of quantum interference in spectra of cascade spontaneous emission from multilevel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, A. A.; Yudson, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    A general expression for the spectrum of cascade spontaneous emission from an arbitrary multilevel system is presented. Effects of the quantum interference of photons emitted in different transitions are analyzed. These effects are especially essential when the transition frequencies are close. Several examples are considered: (i) Three-level system; (ii) Harmonic oscillator; (iii) System with equidistant levels and equal rates of the spontaneous decay for all the transitions; (iv) Dicke superradiance model.

  3. Fast scheme for generating quantum-interference states and G HZ state of N trapped ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Xiao-Juan; Fang Mao-Fa; Liao Xiang-Ping; Cai Jian-Wu; Cao Shuai

    2007-01-01

    We propose a fast scheme to generate the quantum-interference states of N trapped ions. In the scheme the ions are driven by a standing-wave laser beam whose carrier frequency is tuned such that the ion transition can take place.We also propose a simple and fast scheme to produce the GHZ state of N hot trapped ions and this scheme is insensitive to the heating of vibrational motion, which is important from the viewpoint of decoherence.

  4. Memory attacks on device-independent quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jonathan; Colbeck, Roger; Kent, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Device-independent quantum cryptographic schemes aim to guarantee security to users based only on the output statistics of any components used, and without the need to verify their internal functionality. Since this would protect users against untrustworthy or incompetent manufacturers, sabotage, or device degradation, this idea has excited much interest, and many device-independent schemes have been proposed. Here we identify a critical weakness of device-independent protocols that rely on public communication between secure laboratories. Untrusted devices may record their inputs and outputs and reveal information about them via publicly discussed outputs during later runs. Reusing devices thus compromises the security of a protocol and risks leaking secret data. Possible defenses include securely destroying or isolating used devices. However, these are costly and often impractical. We propose other more practical partial defenses as well as a new protocol structure for device-independent quantum key distribution that aims to achieve composable security in the case of two parties using a small number of devices to repeatedly share keys with each other (and no other party).

  5. Quantum interference by localized scattering waves of gapless helical modes in narrow strips of topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum interference in scattering from a potential offset is investigated in narrow strips of two-dimensional systems described by the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang Hamiltonian. Attention is focused on the situations where the transmission in the scattering region takes place around the Dirac point of topological insulators when the hybridization energy gap is eliminated by utilizing transverse interference. Apart from conventional periodic transmission modulation that takes place when the length of the potential offset region is varied, resonant disappearances of reflection occur for short potential offsets. The anomalous resonance appears not only for the four-band Hamiltonian but also for the two-band Hamiltonian, manifesting the generality of the phenomenon. Evanescent-like waves excited around the potential steps are indicated to be responsible for the anomalous behavior. The interference states can couple with each other and generic reduction in the amplitude of transmission modulation occurs upon coupling with the periodic modulation.

  6. Multiphoton Interference in Quantum Fourier Transform Circuits and Applications to Quantum Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zu-En; Li, Yuan; Rohde, Peter P.; Huang, He-Liang; Wang, Xi-Lin; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-08-01

    Quantum Fourier transforms (QFTs) have gained increased attention with the rise of quantum walks, boson sampling, and quantum metrology. Here, we present and demonstrate a general technique that simplifies the construction of QFT interferometers using both path and polarization modes. On that basis, we first observe the generalized Hong-Ou-Mandel effect with up to four photons. Furthermore, we directly exploit number-path entanglement generated in these QFT interferometers and demonstrate optical phase supersensitivities deterministically.

  7. Josephson junction devices: Model quantum mechanical systems and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Josephine

    In this dissertation, three experiments using Josephson junction devices are described. In Part I, the effect of dissipation on tunneling between charge states in a superconducting single-electron transistor (sSET) was studied. The sSET was fabricated on top of a semi-conductor heterostructure with a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) imbedded beneath the surface. The 2DEG acted as a dissipative ground plane. The sheet resistance of the 2DEG could be varied in situ by applying a large voltage to a gate on the back of the substrate. The zero-bias conductance of the sSET was observed to increase with increasing temperature and 2DEG resistance. Some qualitative but not quantitative agreement was found with theoretical calculations of the functional dependence of the conductance on temperature and 2DEG resistance. Part II describes a series of experiments performed on magnesium diboride point-contact junctions. The pressure between the MgB2 tip and base pieces could be adjusted to form junctions with different characteristics. With light pressure applied between the two pieces, quasiparticle tunneling in superconductor-insulator-superconductor junctions was measured. From these data, a superconducting gap of approximately 2 meV and a critical temperature of 29 K were estimated. Increasing the pressure between the MgB2 pieces formed junctions with superconductor-normal metal-superconductor characteristics. We used these junctions to form MgB2 superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS). Noise levels as low as 35 fT/Hz1/2 and 4 muphi 0/Hz1/2 at 1 kHz were measured. In Part III, we used a SQUID-based instrument to acquire magnetocardiograms (MCG), the magnetic field signal measured from the human heart. We measured 51 healthy volunteers and 11 cardiac patients both at rest and after treadmill exercise. We found age and sex related differences in the MCG of the healthy volunteers that suggest that these factors should be considered when evaluating the MCG for

  8. Interference of cardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator activity during electronic dental device use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedig, Jason J; Shah, Jignesh; Elayi, Claude Samy; Miller, Craig S

    2010-05-01

    The authors conducted a study to determine if electromagnetic interference of cardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) activity occurs during the operation of electronic dental devices. The authors tested nine electronic dental devices in vitro to assess their ability to interfere with the function of two pacemakers and two ICDs as determined by electrocardiographic telemetry. The pacing activity of both pacemakers and the dual-chamber ICD were inhibited during operation of the battery-operated composite curing light at between 2 and 10 centimeters from the generator or leads. The use of the ultrasonic scaler interfered with the pacing activity of the dual-chamber pacemaker at between 17 and 23 cm from the generator or leads, the single-chamber pacemaker at 15 cm from the generator or leads and both ICDs at 7 cm from the leads. The operation of the ultrasonic cleaning system interfered with the activity of the dual-chamber pacemaker at between 15 and 23 cm from the generator or leads, and of the single-chamber pacemaker at 12 cm. Operation of the electric toothbrush, electrosurgical unit, electric pulp tester, high- and low-speed handpieces, and an amalgamator did not alter pacing function. Select electronic dental devices interfere with pacemakers' and ICDs' sensing and pacing activity in vitro. Use of the ultrasonic scaler, ultrasonic cleaning system and battery-operated composite curing light may produce deleterious effects in patients who have pacemakers or ICDs.

  9. Quantum view on contextual logic of composite intelligent devices

    CERN Document Server

    Vol, E D

    2013-01-01

    Based on the ideas of quantum theory of open systems (QTOS) we propose the consistent approach to study probabilistic many-valued propositional logic of intelligent devices that are composed from separate but interconnected logical units. In this preliminary communication we consider only the simplest example of such systems, namely, four- valued probabilistic logical device composed of two logical subsystems. We demonstrate that similar devices can generate two classes of probabilistic propositions:1) decomposable propositions, which in fact are equivalent to certain ordered pair of propositions in device subsystems and 2) indecomposable propositions which are connected with inherent logical interaction between device units. The indecomposable propositions are undoubtedly of greatest interest since they, as shown in the paper, provide powerful additional logical resource compared to standard parallel processing in composite intelligent systems. The contextual logic of composite devices proposed in this paper...

  10. Fault-tolerant architectures for nanoelectronic and quantum devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, J.

    2004-01-01

    The progress in CMOS technology has entered the sub-micron realm, and the technology will approach its limits within about 15 years. Already various novel information processing devices, based on quantum mechanical effects at the nanometer scale, have been widely investigated and some have been succ

  11. Influence of the material parameters on quantum cascade devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, E.; Vasanelli, A.; Delteil, A.; Devenson, J.; Teissier, R.; Baranov, A.; Andrews, A. M.; Strasser, G.; Sagnes, I.; Sirtori, C.

    2008-09-01

    An experimental investigation on the influence of the material systems on the optical properties of quantum cascade structures is presented. Three electroluminescent quantum cascade devices have been grown using GaAs /AlGaAs, GaInAs /AlInAs, and InAs /AlSb heterostructures. The devices emit at 10μm and are based on a similar bandstructure design. Our results verify that the optical quantum efficiency has the predicted dependence on the electron effective mass. We also demonstrate that the shape of the electroluminescence spectra is independent from the particular material parameters and mainly depends on the tunnel coupling between the injector state and the upper state of the radiative transition.

  12. Two-photon interference of weak coherent laser pulses recalled from separate solid-state quantum memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jeongwan; Slater, Joshua A.; Saglamyurek, Erhan; Sinclair, Neil; George, Mathew; Ricken, Raimund; Oblak, Daniel; Sohler, Wolfgang; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Quantum memories allowing reversible transfer of quantum states between light and matter are central to quantum repeaters, quantum networks and linear optics quantum computing. Significant progress regarding the faithful transfer of quantum information has been reported in recent years. However, none of these demonstrations confirm that the re-emitted photons remain suitable for two-photon interference measurements, such as C-NOT gates and Bell-state measurements, which constitute another key ingredient for all aforementioned applications. Here, using pairs of laser pulses at the single-photon level, we demonstrate two-photon interference and Bell-state measurements after either none, one or both pulses have been reversibly mapped to separate thulium-doped lithium niobate waveguides. As the interference is always near the theoretical maximum, we conclude that our solid-state quantum memories, in addition to faithfully mapping quantum information, also preserve the entire photonic wavefunction. Hence, our memories are generally suitable for future applications of quantum information processing that require two-photon interference.

  13. Studying Quantum Phase-Based Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-15

    variety of different III-V material configurations, (4) and treat transient transport in silicon and germanium heterostructures. It is capable of studying...nonuniform field distribution may prevent the appearance of NDR . TRANSPORT IN ULTRA-SUBMICRON DEVICES The entire discussion of transport has been predicated...differential resistance. Indeed, the calculations .ugpt that it is the significantly reduced velocity at resonance that is resjponsible for NDR . The low

  14. Memory-assisted measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayi, Christiana; Razavi, Mohsen; Ma, Xiongfeng; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    A protocol with the potential of beating the existing distance records for conventional quantum key distribution (QKD) systems is proposed. It borrows ideas from quantum repeaters by using memories in the middle of the link, and that of measurement-device-independent QKD, which only requires optical source equipment at the user's end. For certain memories with short access times, our scheme allows a higher repetition rate than that of quantum repeaters with single-mode memories, thereby requiring lower coherence times. By accounting for various sources of nonideality, such as memory decoherence, dark counts, misalignment errors, and background noise, as well as timing issues with memories, we develop a mathematical framework within which we can compare QKD systems with and without memories. In particular, we show that with the state-of-the-art technology for quantum memories, it is potentially possible to devise memory-assisted QKD systems that, at certain distances of practical interest, outperform current QKD implementations.

  15. Nonreciprocal quantum interactions and devices via autonomous feedforward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelmann, A.; Clerk, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In a recent work [A. Metelmann and A. A. Clerk, Phys. Rev. X 5, 021025 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.021025], a general reservoir engineering approach for generating nonreciprocal quantum interactions and devices was described. We show here how in many cases this general recipe can be viewed as an example of autonomous feedforward: the full dissipative evolution is identical to the unconditional evolution in a setup where an observer performs an ideal quantum measurement of one system, and then uses the results to drive a second system. We also extend the application of this approach to nonreciprocal quantum amplifiers, showing the added functionality possible when using two engineered reservoirs. In particular, we demonstrate how to construct an ideal phase-preserving cavity-based amplifier which is fully nonreciprocal, quantum limited, and free of any fundamental gain-bandwidth constraint.

  16. Quantum Dot Devices for Optical Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui

    . Additional to the static linear amplication properties, we focus on exploring the gain dynamics on the time scale ranging from sub-picosecond to nanosecond. In terms of optical signals that have been investigated, one is the simple sinusoidally modulated optical carrier with a typical modulation frequency...... range of 1-100 gigahertz. Our simulations reveal the role of ultrafast intradot carrier dynamics in enhancing modulation bandwidth of quantum dot semiconductor optical ampliers. Moreover, the corresponding coherent gain response also provides rich dispersion contents over a broad bandwidth. One...... important implementation is recently boosted by the research in slow light. The idea is to migrate such dynamical gain knowledge for the investigation of microwave phase shifter based on semiconductor optical waveguide. Our study reveals that phase shifting based on the conventional semiconductor optical...

  17. Quantum dot heterojunction solar cells: The mechanism of device operation and impacts of quantum dot oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihly, Rachelle

    This thesis explores the understanding of the chemistry and physics of colloidal quantum dots for practical solar energy photoconversion. Solar cell devices that make use of PbS quantum dots generally rely on constant and unchanged optical properties such that band gap energies remain tuned within the device. The design and development of unique experiments to ascertain mechanisms of optical band gap shifts occurring in PbS quantum dot thin-films exposed to air are discussed. The systematic study of the absorption properties of PbS quantum dot films exposed to air, heat, and UV illumination as a function of quantum dot size has been described. A method to improve the air-stability of films with atomic layer deposition of alumina is demonstrated. Encapsulation of quantum dot films using a protective layer of alumina results in quantum dot solids that maintain tuned absorption for 1000 hours. This thesis focuses on the use of atomic force microscopy and electrical variants thereof to study the physical and electrical characteristics of quantum dot arrays. These types of studies have broad implications in understanding charge transport mechanisms and solar cell device operation, with a particular emphasis on quantum dot transistors and solar cells. Imaging the channel potential of a PbSe quantum dot thin-film in a transistor showed a uniform distribution of charge coinciding with the transistor current voltage characteristics. In a second study, solar cell device operation of ZnO/PbS heterojunction solar cells was investigated by scanning active cross-sections with Kelvin probe microscopy as a function of applied bias, illumination and device architecture. This technique directly provides operating potential and electric field profiles to characterize drift and diffusion currents occurring in the device. SKPM established a field-free region occurring in the quantum dot layer, indicative of diffusion-limited transport. These results provide the path to optimization of

  18. Quantum interference and control of the optical response in quantum dot molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, H. S.; Sanz, L.; Villas-Boas, J. M.; Alcalde, A. M. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38400-902 Uberlândia-MG (Brazil)

    2013-11-25

    We discuss the optical response of a quantum molecule under the action of two lasers fields. Using a realistic model and parameters, we map the physical conditions to find three different phenomena reported in the literature: the tunneling induced transparency, the formation of Autler-Townes doublets, and the creation of a Mollow-like triplet. We found that the electron tunneling between quantum dots is responsible for the different optical regime. Our results not only explain the experimental results in the literature but also give insights for future experiments and applications in optics using quantum dots molecules.

  19. Quantum interferences of a single quantum dot in the case of detuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Stufler, Stefan; Wegner, Sven-Ake; Ester, Patrick; Zrenner, Artur [Universitaet Paderborn, Warburger Strasse 100, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Bichler, Max [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    We report on highly phase sensitive measurements with a slightly detuned excitation of a quantum mechanical two-level system. It is formed by the single exciton ground state of a single quantum dot, which is incorporated in a n-i-Schottky diode. We excited the two-level system by two partly overlapping laser pulses with variable phase shift. To investigate the properties of the quantum system we determine its occupancy by measuring the photocurrent. The experimental data is compared to a numerical simulation of the system. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Mini array of quantum Hall devices based on epitaxial graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, S.; Lebedeva, N. [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Aalto University, Micronova, Tietotie 3, Espoo (Finland); Hämäläinen, J.; Iisakka, I.; Immonen, P.; Manninen, A. J.; Satrapinski, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Centre for Metrology MIKES, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

    2016-05-07

    Series connection of four quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices based on epitaxial graphene films was studied for realization of a quantum resistance standard with an up-scaled value. The tested devices showed quantum Hall plateaux R{sub H,2} at a filling factor v = 2 starting from a relatively low magnetic field (between 4 T and 5 T) when the temperature was 1.5 K. The precision measurements of quantized Hall resistance of four QHE devices connected by triple series connections and external bonding wires were done at B = 7 T and T = 1.5 K using a commercial precision resistance bridge with 50 μA current through the QHE device. The results showed that the deviation of the quantized Hall resistance of the series connection of four graphene-based QHE devices from the expected value of 4×R{sub H,2} = 2 h/e{sup 2} was smaller than the relative standard uncertainty of the measurement (<1 × 10{sup −7}) limited by the used resistance bridge.

  1. Novel Photovoltaic Devices Using Ferroelectric Material and Colloidal Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Young Hun

    As the global concern for the financial and environmental costs of traditional energy resources increases, research on renewable energy, most notably solar energy, has taken center stage. Many alternative photovoltaic (PV) technologies for 'the next generation solar cell' have been extensively studied to overcome the Shockley-Queisser 31% efficiency limit as well as tackle the efficiency vs. cost issues. This dissertation focuses on the novel photovoltaic mechanism for the next generation solar cells using two inorganic nanomaterials, nanocrystal quantum dots and ferroelectric nanoparticles. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) materials are widely studied and easy to synthesize using solution based chemistry. One of the fascinating properties of the PZT material is a Bulk Photovoltaic effect (BPVE). This property has been spotlighted because it can produce very high open circuit voltage regardless of the electrical bandgap of the materials. However, the poor optical absorption of the PZT materials and the required high temperature to form the ferroelectric crystalline structure have been obstacles to fabricate efficient photovoltaic devices. Colloidal quantum dots also have fascinating optical and electrical properties such as tailored absorption spectrum, capability of the bandgap engineering due to the wide range of material selection and quantum confinement, and very efficient carrier dynamics called multiple exciton generations. In order to utilize these properties, many researchers have put numerous efforts in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic research and there has been remarkable progress in the past decade. However, several drawbacks are still remaining to achieve highly efficient photovoltaic device. Traps created on the large surface area, low carrier mobility, and lower open circuit voltage while increasing the absorption of the solar spectrum is main issues of the nanocrystal based photovoltaic effect. To address these issues and to take the advantages of

  2. Ultrafast universal quantum control of a quantum-dot charge qubit using Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Li, Hai-Ou; Tu, Tao; Wang, Li; Zhou, Cheng; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    A basic requirement for quantum information processing is the ability to universally control the state of a single qubit on timescales much shorter than the coherence time. Although ultrafast optical control of a single spin has been achieved in quantum dots, scaling up such methods remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate complete control of the quantum-dot charge qubit on the picosecond scale [corrected], orders of magnitude faster than the previously measured electrically controlled charge- or spin-based qubits. We observe tunable qubit dynamics in a charge-stability diagram, in a time domain, and in a pulse amplitude space of the driven pulse. The observations are well described by Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference. These results establish the feasibility of a full set of all-electrical single-qubit operations. Although our experiment is carried out in a solid-state architecture, the technique is independent of the physical encoding of the quantum information and has the potential for wider applications.

  3. Ultrafast universal quantum control of a quantum-dot charge qubit using Landau–Zener–Stückelberg interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Li, Hai-Ou; Tu, Tao; Wang, Li; Zhou, Cheng; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    A basic requirement for quantum information processing is the ability to universally control the state of a single qubit on timescales much shorter than the coherence time. Although ultrafast optical control of a single spin has been achieved in quantum dots, scaling up such methods remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate complete control of the quantum-dot charge qubit on the picosecond scale, orders of magnitude faster than the previously measured electrically controlled charge- or spin-based qubits. We observe tunable qubit dynamics in a charge-stability diagram, in a time domain, and in a pulse amplitude space of the driven pulse. The observations are well described by Landau–Zener–Stückelberg interference. These results establish the feasibility of a full set of all-electrical single-qubit operations. Although our experiment is carried out in a solid-state architecture, the technique is independent of the physical encoding of the quantum information and has the potential for wider applications. PMID:23360992

  4. Graphene nano-heterostructures for quantum devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bischoff

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ten years ago, the exfoliation of graphene started the field of layered two-dimensional materials. Today, there is a huge variety of two-dimensional materials available for both research and applications. The different dimensionality compared to their bulk relatives is responsible for a wealth of novel properties of these layered two-dimensional materials. The true strength of two-dimensional materials is however the possibility to stack different layers on top of each other to engineer new heterostructures with specifically tailored properties. Known as van-der-Waals heterostructures, they enable the experimental observation of a variety of new phenomena. By patterning the individual layers laterally into nanostructures, additional functionality can be added to the devices. This review provides a glimpse at the future opportunities offered by van-der-Waals stacked nanodevices.

  5. Device and Method of Scintillating Quantum Dots for Radiation Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Eric R. (Inventor); DeHaven, Stanton L. (Inventor); Williams, Phillip A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A radiation imaging device includes a radiation source and a micro structured detector comprising a material defining a surface that faces the radiation source. The material includes a plurality of discreet cavities having openings in the surface. The detector also includes a plurality of quantum dots disclosed in the cavities. The quantum dots are configured to interact with radiation from the radiation source, and to emit visible photons that indicate the presence of radiation. A digital camera and optics may be used to capture images formed by the detector in response to exposure to radiation.

  6. Wonder of nanotechnology quantum optoelectronic devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Razeghi, Manijeh; von Klitzing, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    When you look closely, Nature is nanotechnology at its finest. From a single cell, a factory all by itself, to complex systems, such as the nervous system or the human eye, each is composed of specialized nanostructures that exist to perform a specific function. This same beauty can be mirrored when we interact with the tiny physical world that is the realm of quantum mechanics.The Wonder of Nanotechnology: Quantum Optoelectronic Devices and Applications, edited by Manijeh Razeghi, Leo Esaki, and Klaus von Klitzing focuses on the application of nanotechnology to modern semiconductor optoelectr

  7. Dissecting contact mechanics from quantum interference in single-molecule junctions of stilbene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Meisner, Jeffrey S; Krikorian, Markrete; Ahn, Seokhoon; Parameswaran, Radha; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2012-03-14

    Electronic factors in molecules such as quantum interference and cross-conjugation can lead to dramatic modulation and suppression of conductance in single-molecule junctions. Probing such effects at the single-molecule level requires simultaneous measurements of independent junction properties, as conductance alone cannot provide conclusive evidence of junction formation for molecules with low conductivity. Here, we compare the mechanics of the conducting para-terminated 4,4'-di(methylthio)stilbene and moderately conducting 1,2-bis(4-(methylthio)phenyl)ethane to that of insulating meta-terminated 3,3'-di(methylthio)stilbene single-molecule junctions. We simultaneously measure force and conductance across single-molecule junctions and use force signatures to obtain independent evidence of junction formation and rupture in the meta-linked cross-conjugated molecule even when no clear low-bias conductance is measured. By separately quantifying conductance and mechanics, we identify the formation of atypical 3,3'-di(methylthio)stilbene molecular junctions that are mechanically stable but electronically decoupled. While theoretical studies have envisaged many plausible systems where quantum interference might be observed, our experiments provide the first direct quantitative study of the interplay between contact mechanics and the distinctively quantum mechanical nature of electronic transport in single-molecule junctions.

  8. Quantum Fluctuation Theorem in an Interacting Setup: Point Contacts in Fractional Quantum Hall Edge State Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komnik, A.; Saleur, H.

    2011-09-01

    We verify the validity of the Cohen-Gallavotti fluctuation theorem for the strongly correlated problem of charge transfer through an impurity in a chiral Luttinger liquid, which is realizable experimentally as a quantum point contact in a fractional quantum Hall edge state device. This is accomplished via the development of an analytical method to calculate the full counting statistics of the problem in all the parameter regimes involving the temperature, the Hall voltage, and the gate voltage.

  9. Electronic Properties of Nano and Molecular Quantum Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Owaedi, Oday Arkan Abbas

    2016-01-01

    The exploring and understanding the electronic properties of molecules connected to metallic leads is a vital part of nanoscience if molecule is to have a future. This thesis documents a study for various families of organic and organometallic molecules, which offer unique concepts and new insights into the electronic properties of molecular junctions. Different families of molecules were studied using a combination of density functional theory DFT and nonequilibrium Greens function formalism of transport theory.The main results of this thesis are as follows. A quantum circuit rule for combining quantum interference effects in the conductive properties of oligo phenyleneethynylene OPE type molecules possessing three aromatic rings was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical and experimental studies of conductance and the decay of conductance as a function of molecular length within a homologous series of oligoynes. The single molecule conductances of a series of bis-terpyridine com...

  10. Principles And Design Of Multibeam Interference Devices: A Microelectromechanical-Systems Segment-Deformable-Mirror-Based Adaptive Spectrum Attenuator

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Z.Y.; Zhu, Y. Z.; Wang, Anbo

    2005-01-01

    Fourier analysis of multibeam interference shows that the total electric field and relative time delay of the beams form a Fourier-transform pair. Fourier-analysis-based multibeam interference analysis and device design is discussed in detail. The principle of the proposed segment-deformable-mirror-based adaptive spectrum attenuator is illustrated. (c) 2005 Optical Society of America.

  11. Atom-by-Atom Construction of a Quantum Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petta, Jason R

    2017-03-28

    Scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) are conventionally used to probe surfaces with atomic resolution. Recent advances in STM include tunneling from spin-polarized and superconducting tips, time-domain spectroscopy, and the fabrication of atomically precise Si nanoelectronics. In this issue of ACS Nano, Tettamanzi et al. probe a single-atom transistor in silicon, fabricated using the precision of a STM, at microwave frequencies. While previous studies have probed such devices in the MHz regime, Tettamanzi et al. probe a STM-fabricated device at GHz frequencies, which enables excited-state spectroscopy and measurements of the excited-state lifetime. The success of this experiment will enable future work on quantum control, where the wave function must be controlled on a time scale that is much shorter than the decoherence time. We review two major approaches that are being pursued to develop spin-based quantum computers and highlight some recent progress in the atom-by-atom fabrication of donor-based devices in silicon. Recent advances in STM lithography may enable practical bottom-up construction of large-scale quantum devices.

  12. Quantum transport in bilayer graphene. Fabry-Perot interferences and proximity-induced superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Renjun

    2015-10-30

    Bilayer graphene (BLG) p-n junctions made of hBN-BLG-hBN (hexagonal boron nitride) heterostructures enable ballistic transport over long distances. We investigate Fabry-Perot interferences, and detect that the bilayer-like anti-Klein tunneling transits into single-layer-like Klein tunneling when tuning the Fermi level towards the band edges. Furthermore, the proximity-induced superconductivity has been studied in these devices with Al leads.

  13. Quantum control study of ultrafast optical responses in semiconductor quantum dot devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jung Y; Lin, Chien Y; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Chyi, Jen-Inn

    2014-12-15

    Two quantum control spectroscopic techniques were applied to study InAs quantum dot (QD) devices, which contain different strain-reducing layers. By adaptively control light matter interaction, a delayed resonant response from the InAs QDs was found to be encoded into the optimal phase profile of ultrafast optical pulse used. We verified the delayed resonant response to originate from excitons coupled to acoustic phonons of InAs QDs with two-dimensional coherent spectroscopy. Our study yields valuable dynamical information that can deepen our understanding of the coherent coupling process of exciton in the quantum-confined systems.

  14. 0.54 {\\mu}m resolution two-photon interference with dispersion cancellation for quantum optical coherence tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Okano, Masayuki; Okamoto, Ryo; Nishizawa, Norihiko; Kurimura, Sunao; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information technologies harness the intrinsic nature of quantum theory to beat the limitations of the classical methods for information processing and communication. Recently, the application of quantum features to metrology has attracted much attention. Quantum optical coherence tomography (QOCT), which utilizes two-photon interference between entangled photon pairs, is a promising approach to overcome the problem with optical coherence tomography (OCT): As the resolution of OCT becomes higher, degradation of the resolution due to dispersion within the medium becomes more critical. Here we report on the realization of 0.54 $\\mu$m resolution two-photon interference, which surpasses the current record resolution 0.75 $\\mu$m of low-coherence interference for OCT. In addition, the resolution for QOCT showed almost no change against the dispersion of a 1 mm thickness of water inserted in the optical path, whereas the resolution for OCT dramatically degrades. For this experiment, a highly-efficient chirpe...

  15. Quantum interference of virtual and real amplitudes in a semiconductor exciton system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Y H; Choe, S B; Woo, J C; Kim, D S; Cundiff, S T; Shacklette, J M; Lim, Y S

    2002-12-02

    By two-color pulse shaping, we simultaneously create virtual and real amplitudes for excitons in GaAs quantum wells, and monitor population and amplitude by pump-probe and four-wave mixing spectroscopies. Excited-state probability amplitude can be induced by the off-resonant, virtual excitations as well as by the resonant, real excitations. Population modulation in time-domain results from the interference between the virtual and real amplitudes, and the modulation depth reveals the relative contributions of these two amplitudes. The fact that virtual and real amplitudes have a phase difference of 90 degrees is demonstrated directly in time-domain.

  16. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with quantum interference in a three-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amitabh; Serna, Juan D.

    2017-06-01

    Spontaneously generated coherence and enhanced dispersion in a V-type, three-level atomic system interacting with a single mode field can considerably reduce the radiative and cavity decay rates. This may eliminate the use of high finesse, miniaturized cavities in optical cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments under strong atom-field coupling conditions.

  17. Holographic quantum imaging: reconstructing spatial properties via two-particle interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Nils; Ferenczi, Gergely; Croke, Sarah; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2017-05-01

    Two particle interference phenomena, such as the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect, are a direct manifestation of the nature of the symmetry properties of indistinguishable particles as described by quantum mechanics. The HOM effect has recently been applied as a tool for pure state tomography of a single photon. In this article, we generalize the method to extract additional information for a pure state and extend this to the full tomography of mixed states as well. The formalism is kept general enough to apply to both boson and fermion based interferometry. Our theoretical discussion is accompanied by two proposals of interferometric setups that allow the measurement of a tomographically complete set of observables for single photon quantum states.

  18. The impact of quantum interferences between different J-levels on scattering polarization in spectral lines

    CERN Document Server

    Belluzzi, Luca

    2011-01-01

    The spectral line polarization produced by optically pumped atoms contains a wealth of information on the thermal and magnetic structure of a variety of astrophysical plasmas, including that of the solar atmosphere. A correct decoding of such information from the observed Stokes profiles requires a clear understanding of the effects that radiatively induced quantum interferences (or coherences) between pairs of magnetic sublevels produce on these observables, in the absence and in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary strength. Here we present a detailed theoretical investigation on the role of coherences between pairs of sublevels pertaining to different fine-structure J-levels, clarifying when they can be neglected for facilitating the modeling of the linear polarization produced by scattering processes in spectral lines. To this end, we apply the quantum theory of spectral line polarization and calculate the linear polarization patterns of the radiation scattered at 90 degrees by a slab of stellar a...

  19. Matrix method analysis of quantum Hall effect device connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolano, M.; Callegaro, L.

    2012-02-01

    The modelling of electrical connections of single, or several, multiterminal quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices is relevant for electrical metrology: it is known, in fact, that certain particular connections allow (i) the realization of multiples or fractions of the quantized resistance, or (ii) the rejection of stray impedances, so that the configuration maintains the status of quantum standard. Ricketts-Kemeny and Delahaye equivalent circuits are known to be accurate models of the QHE: however, the numerical or analytical solution of electrical networks including these equivalent circuits can be difficult. In this paper, we introduce a method of analysis based on the representation of a QHE device by means of the indefinite admittance matrix: external connections are then represented with another matrix, easily written by inspection. Some examples, including the solution of double- and triple-series connections, are shown.

  20. Matrix method analysis of quantum Hall effect device connections

    CERN Document Server

    Ortolano, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The modelling of electrical connections of single, or several, multiterminal quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices is relevant for electrical metrology: it is known, in fact, that certain particular connections allow i) the realization of multiples or fractions of the quantised resistance, or ii) the rejection of stray impedances, so that the configuration maintains the status of quantum standard. Ricketts-Kemeny and Delahaye equivalent circuits are known to be accurate models of the QHE: however, the numerical or analytical solution of electrical networks including these equivalent circuits can be difficult. In this paper, we introduce a method of analysis based on the representation of a QHE device by means of the \\emph{indefinite admittance matrix}: external connections are then represented with another matrix, easily written by inspection. Some examples, including the solution of double- and triple-series connections, are shown.

  1. A multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics method for device simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, ChiYung; Meng, Lingyi; Zhang, Yu; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-07

    Multiscale modeling has become a popular tool for research applying to different areas including materials science, microelectronics, biology, chemistry, etc. In this tutorial review, we describe a newly developed multiscale computational method, incorporating quantum mechanics into electronic device modeling with the electromagnetic environment included through classical electrodynamics. In the quantum mechanics/electromagnetics (QM/EM) method, the regions of the system where active electron scattering processes take place are treated quantum mechanically, while the surroundings are described by Maxwell's equations and a semiclassical drift-diffusion model. The QM model and the EM model are solved, respectively, in different regions of the system in a self-consistent manner. Potential distributions and current densities at the interface between QM and EM regions are employed as the boundary conditions for the quantum mechanical and electromagnetic simulations, respectively. The method is illustrated in the simulation of several realistic systems. In the case of junctionless field-effect transistors, transfer characteristics are obtained and a good agreement between experiments and simulations is achieved. Optical properties of a tandem photovoltaic cell are studied and the simulations demonstrate that multiple QM regions are coupled through the classical EM model. Finally, the study of a carbon nanotube-based molecular device shows the accuracy and efficiency of the QM/EM method.

  2. Towards room temperature solid state quantum devices at the edge of quantum chaos for long-living quantum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Enrico

    2015-07-01

    Long living coherent quantum states have been observed in biological systems up to room temperature. Light harvesting in chromophoresis realized by excitonic systems living at the edge of quantum chaos, where energy level distribution becomes semi-Poissonian. On the other hand, artificial materials suffer the loss of coherence of quantum states in quantum information processing, but semiconductor materials are known to exhibit quantum chaotic conditions, so the exploitation of similar conditions are to be considered. The advancements of nanofabrication, together with the control of implantation of individual atoms at nanometric precision, may open the experimental study of such special regime at the edge of the phase transitions for the electronic systems obtained by implanting impurity atoms in a silicon transistor. Here I review the recent advancements made in the field of theoretical description of the light harvesting in biological system in its connection with phase transitions at the few atoms scale and how it would be possible to achieve transition point to quantum chaotic regime. Such mechanism may thus preserve quantum coherent states at room temperature in solid state devices, to be exploited for quantum information processing as well as dissipation-free quantum electronics.

  3. Displacement detection with a vibrating rf superconducting interference device: beating the standard linear limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buks, Eyal; Zaitsev, Stav; Segev, Eran; Abdo, Baleegh; Blencowe, M P

    2007-08-01

    We study a configuration for displacement detection consisting of a nanomechanical resonator coupled to both a radio frequency superconducting interference device and to a superconducting stripline resonator. We employ an adiabatic approximation and rotating wave approximation and calculate the displacement sensitivity. We study the performance of such a displacement detector when the stripline resonator is driven into a region of nonlinear oscillations. In this region the system exhibits noise squeezing in the output signal when homodyne detection is employed for readout. We show that displacement sensitivity of the device in this region may exceed the upper bound imposed upon the sensitivity when operating in the linear region. On the other hand, we find that the high displacement sensitivity is accompanied by a slowing down of the response of the system, resulting in a limited bandwidth.

  4. Electromagnetic interference of implantable cardiac devices from a shoulder massage machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Saeko; Fujiwara, Kousaku; Kohira, Satoshi; Hirose, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    Shoulder massage machines have two pads that are driven by solenoid coils to perform a per cussive massage on the shoulders. There have been concerns that such machines might create electromagnetic interference (EMI) in implantable cardiac devices because of the time-varying magnetic fields produced by the alternating current in the solenoid coils. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential EMI from one such shoulder massage machine on implantable cardiac devices. We measured the distribution profile of the magnetic field intensity around the massage machine. Furthermore, we performed an inhibition test and an asynchronous test on an implantable cardiac pacemaker using the standardized Irnich human body model. We examined the events on an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) using a pacemaker programmer while the massage machine was in operation. The magnetic field distribution profile exhibited a peak intensity of 212 (A/m) in one of the solenoid coils. The maximal interference distance between the massage machine and the implantable cardiac pacemaker was 28 cm. Ventricular fibrillation was induced when the massage machine was brought near the electrode of the ICD and touched the Irnich human body model. It is necessary to provide a "don't use" warning on the box or the exterior of the massage machines or in the user manuals and to caution patients with implanted pacemakers about the dangers and appropriate usage of massage machines.

  5. Role of inter-tube coupling and quantum interference on electrical transport in carbon nanotube junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Srijeet; Bhattacharyya, Tarun Kanti

    2016-09-01

    Due to excellent transport properties, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) show a lot of promise in sensor and interconnect technology. However, recent studies indicate that the conductance in CNT/CNT junctions are strongly affected by the morphology and orientation between the tubes. For proper utilization of such junctions in the development of CNT based technology, it is essential to study the electronic properties of such junctions. This work presents a theoretical study of the electrical transport properties of metallic Carbon nanotube homo-junctions. The study focuses on discerning the role of inter-tube interactions, quantum interference and scattering on the transport properties on junctions between identical tubes. The electronic structure and transport calculations are conducted with an Extended Hückel Theory-Non Equilibrium Green's Function based model. The calculations indicate conductance to be varying with a changing crossing angle, with maximum conductance corresponding to lattice registry, i.e. parallel configuration between the two tubes. Further calculations for such parallel configurations indicate onset of short and long range oscillations in conductance with respect to changing overlap length. These oscillations are attributed to inter-tube coupling effects owing to changing π orbital overlap, carrier scattering and quantum interference of the incident, transmitted and reflected waves at the inter-tube junction.

  6. Destructive quantum interference in electron transport: A reconciliation of the molecular orbital and the atomic orbital perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Geskin, Victor; Stadler, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Destructive quantum interference (DQI) in single molecule electronics is a purely quantum mechanical effect and is entirely defined by the inherent properties of the molecule in the junction such as its structure and symmetry. This definition of DQI by molecular properties alone suggests its relation to other more general concepts in chemistry as well as the possibility of deriving simple models for its understanding and molecular device design. Recently, two such models have gained a wide spread attention, where one was a graphical scheme based on visually inspecting the connectivity of the carbon sites in conjugated π systems in an atomic orbital (AO) basis and the other one puts the emphasis on the amplitudes and signs of the frontier molecular orbitals (MOs). There have been discussions on the range of applicability for these schemes, but ultimately conclusions from topological molecular Hamiltonians should not depend on whether they are drawn from an AO or a MO representation, as long as all the orbitals are taken into account. In this article, we clarify the relation between both models in terms of the zeroth order Green's function and compare their predictions for a variety of systems. From this comparison, we conclude that for a correct description of DQI from a MO perspective, it is necessary to include the contributions from all MOs rather than just those from the frontier orbitals. The cases where DQI effects can be successfully predicted within a frontier orbital approximation we show them to be limited to alternant even-membered hydrocarbons, as a direct consequence of the Coulson-Rushbrooke pairing theorem in quantum chemistry.

  7. Interference features in scanning gate conductance maps of quantum point contacts with disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasiński, K.; Szafran, B.; Brun, B.; Sellier, H.

    2016-08-01

    We consider quantum point contact (QPC) defined within a disordered two-dimensional electron gas as studied by scanning gate microscopy. We evaluate the conductance maps in the Landauer approach with a wave-function picture of electron transport for samples with both low and high electron mobility at finite temperatures. We discuss the spatial distribution of the impurities in the context of the branched electron flow. We reproduce the surprising temperature stability of the experimental interference fringes far from the QPC. Next, we discuss funnel-shaped features that accompany splitting of the branches visible in previous experiments. Finally, we study elliptical interference fringes formed by an interplay of scattering by the pointlike impurities and by the scanning probe. We discuss the details of the elliptical features as functions of the tip voltage and the temperature, showing that the first interference fringe is very robust against the thermal widening of the Fermi level. We present a simple analytical model that allows for extraction of the impurity positions and the electron-gas depletion radius induced by the negatively charged tip of the atomic force microscope, and apply this model on experimental scanning gate images showing such elliptical fringes.

  8. Quantum devices using SiGe/Si heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karunasiri, R.P.G.; Wang, K.L. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    Strained-layer Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si heterostructures have created a great deal of interest due to the potential of integration with the conventional silicon very large scale integrated technology. With the current advances in silicon molecular beam epitaxy (Si-MBE) and other low-temperature epitaxial techniques, many Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si heterojunction devices have been realized. For example, among those realized are avalanche photodiodes, modulation-doped field-effect transistors, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and more recently, resonant tunneling structures, hot-carrier transistors, and quantum well metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. In this paper several quantum size effects in strained Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} layers and their potential in device applications will be reviewed. Among those to be discussed are resonant tunneling, miniband transport, and intersubband absorption in Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si superlattice structures, optical properties of monolayer Si{sub m}Ge{sub n} superlattices, and observation of large Stark effect associated with interband transition between quantized states in Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si quantum well structures.

  9. (Nanotechnology Initiative) Revision of Quantum Engineering of Nanostructures for Optoelectronic Devices with Optimum Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    Colloidal Quantum Dots (QDs) in Optoelectronic Devices --- Solar Cells ...Li, Vaishnavi Narayanamurthy, Kitt Reinhardt, and Michael A. Stroscio, Colloidal Quantum Dots (QDs) in Optoelectronic Devices --- Solar Cells ...Mitra Dutta, and Michael A. Stroscio, Photodetector Based on GaN Double-Barrier Resonant Tunneling Diode Coupled with Colloidal Quantum Dots ,

  10. Temporal Purity and Quantum Interference of Single Photons from Two Independent Cold Atomic Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Peng; Gu, Zhenjie; Cao, Rong; Wen, Rong; Ou, Z. Y.; Chen, J. F.; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-07-01

    The temporal purity of single photons is crucial to the indistinguishability of independent photon sources for the fundamental study of the quantum nature of light and the development of photonic technologies. Currently, the technique for single photons heralded from time-frequency entangled biphotons created in nonlinear crystals does not guarantee the temporal-quantum purity, except using spectral filtering. Nevertheless, an entirely different situation is anticipated for narrow-band biphotons with a coherence time far longer than the time resolution of a single-photon detector. Here we demonstrate temporally pure single photons with a coherence time of 100 ns, directly heralded from the time-frequency entangled biphotons generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in cold atomic ensembles, without any supplemented filters or cavities. A near-perfect purity and indistinguishability are both verified through Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference using single photons from two independent cold atomic ensembles. The time-frequency entanglement provides a route to manipulate the pure temporal state of the single-photon source.

  11. Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena and Topological Phase Interference Effects in Single-Domain Magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Rong; ZHU Jialin

    2001-01-01

    The tunneling of macroscopic object is one of the most fascinating phenomena in condensed matter physics.During the last decade,the problem of quantum tunneling of magnetization in nanometer-scale magnets has attracted a great deal of theoretical and experimental interest.A review of recent theoretical research of the macroscopic quantum phenomena in nanometer-scale single-domain magnets is presented in this paper.It includes macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) and coherence (MQC) in single-domain magnetic particles,the topological phase interference or spin-parity effects,and tunneling of magnetization in an arbitrarily directed magnetic field.The general formulas are shown to evaluate the tunneling rate and the tunneling level splitting for single-domain AFM particles.A nontrivial generalization of Kramers degeneracy for double-well system is provided to coherently spin tunneling for spin systems with m-fold rotational symmetry.The effects induced by the external magnetic field have been studied,where the field is along the easy,medium,hard axis,or arbitrary direction.

  12. Anomalous Quantum Interference Induced by Landau-Zener Transitions in a Strongly Driven rf-SQUID Qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yiwen; Wen, Xueda; Pan, Cheng; Sun, Guozhu; Chen, Jian; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Yu, Yang; Wu, Peiheng

    2009-01-01

    We irradiated an rf-SQUID qubit with large-amplitude and high frequency electromagnetic field. Population transitions between macroscopic distinctive quantum states due to Landau-Zener transitions at energy-level avoided crossings were observed. The qubit population on the excited states as a function of flux detuning and microwave power exhibits interference patterns. Some novel features are found in the interference and a model based on rate equations can well address the features.

  13. Mesoscopic quantum interference experiments in InGaAs and GaAs two-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shaola

    The study of quantum interference in solid-state systems yields insight in fundamental properties of mesoscopic systems. Electron quantum interference constitutes an important method to explore mesoscopic physics and quantum decoherence. This dissertation focuses on two-dimensional (2D) electron systems in delta-Si doped n-type In0:64Ga0:36As/In 0:45Al0:55As, 2D hole systems in Si-doped p-type GaAs/Al 0:35Ga0:65As and C-doped p-type GaAs/Al0:24Ga 0:76As heterostructures. The low temperature experiments study the magnetotransport of nano- and micro-scale lithographically defined devices fabricated on the heterostructures. These devices include a single ring interferometer and a ring interferometer array in 2D electron system, Hall bar geometries and narrow wires in 2D hole systems. The single ring interferometer yields pronounced Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations with magnetic flux periodicity of h/e over a wide range of magnetic field. The periodicity was confirmed by Fourier transformation of the oscillations. The AB oscillation amplitude shows a quasi-periodic modulation over applied magnetic field due to local magnetic flux threading through the interferometer arms. Further study of current and temperature dependence of the amplitude of the oscillations indicates that the Thouless energy forms the measure of excitation energies giving quantum decoherence. An in-plane magnetic field was applied to the single ring interferometer to study the Berry's phase and the Aharonov-Casher effect. The ring interferometer array yields both AB oscillations and Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) oscillations, the latter with magnetic flux periodicity of h/2e. The AAS oscillations require time-reversal symmetry and hence can be used to qualify time-reversal symmetry breaking. More importantly, the fundamental mesoscopic dephasing length associated with time-reversal symmetry breaking under applied magnetic field, an effective magnetic length, can be obtained by the analysis of the AAS

  14. Multi-band model of quantum electron devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Mehmet Burcin

    Wigner function equations for multi-band quantum devices are presented in this presentation. These quantum transport equations are derived from the equations of motion of non-equilibrium Green's function with the generalized Kadanoff Baym ansatz, and the multi-band k.p Hamiltonian including the spin-orbit interaction. The results are applied to a two-band resonant inter-band tunneling structure. A Wigner function representation is developed for the quantum transport theory of the conduction band electrons in Rashba effect resonant tunneling structures with a phonon bath. In narrow band gap heterostructures, spin splitting occurs mainly as a result of inversion asymmetry in the spatial dependence of the potential or as a result of external electric field. This "zero magnetic field spin splitting" is due to the Rashba term in the effective mass Hamiltonian. A theoretical study of the spin-dependent resonant tunneling structure based on multi-band non-equilibrium Green's functions is also presented in this work. Again, the quantum transport equations are derived using multiband non-equilibrium Green's function formulation in generalized Kadanoff-Baym ansatz. Finally, numerical results are presented based on the multi-band Wigner-Poisson code. This code is able to simulate multi-band resonant tunneling structures.

  15. Effect of Quantum Interference from Incoherent Pumping Field and Spontaneous Emission on Controlling the Optical Bistability and Multi-Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.R.Hamedi; Ali Sari; M.Sahrai; S.H.Asadpour

    2013-01-01

    Optical bistability (OB) and optical multi-stability (OM) of a four-level A-type atomic system with two fold lower levels inside a unidirectional ring cavity is investigated.The effect of quantum interference arising from spontaneous emission and incoherent pumping on OB and OM is discussed.It is found that the threshold of OB and OM can be controlled by quantum interference mechanisms.In addition intensity of coupling field and the rate of an incoherent pumping field on behavior of OB and OM are then discussed.

  16. Prediction of quantum interference in molecular junctions using a parabolic diagram: Understanding the origin of Fano and anti-resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Sevincli, Haldun;

    2013-01-01

    to predict the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti- resonances, and its position in the conductance spectrum by introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic model). Using it we can easily visualize the relation between the key electronic parameters and the positions...... of normal resonant peaks and anti-resonant peaks induced by quantum interference in the conductance spectrum. We also demonstrate Fano and anti-resonance in T-shaped molecular junctions using a simple tight-binding model. This parabolic model enables one to infer on-site energies of T-shaped molecules...

  17. Feasible attack on detector-device-independent quantum key distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kejin; Liu, Hongwei; Ma, Haiqiang; Yang, Xiuqing; Zhang, Yong; Sun, Yongmei; Xiao, Jinghua; Ji, Yuefeng

    2017-03-27

    Recently, to bridge the gap between security of Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) and a high key rate, a novel protocol, the so-called detector-device-independent QKD (DDI-QKD), has been independently proposed by several groups and has attracted great interest. A higher key rate is obtained, since a single photon bell state measurement (BSM) setup is applied to DDI-QKD. Subsequently, Qi has proposed two attacks for this protocol. However, the first attack, in which Bob's BSM setup is assumed to be completely a "black box", is easily prevented by using some additional monitoring devices or by specifically characterizing the BSM. The second attack, which combines the blinding attack and the detector wavelength-dependent efficiency, is not explicitly discussed, and its feasibility is not experimentally confirmed. Here, we show that the second attack is not technically viable because of an intrinsically wavelength-dependent property of a realistic beam splitter, which is an essential component in DDI-QKD. Moreover, we propose a feasible attack that combines a well-known attack-detector blinding attack with intrinsic imperfections of single-photon detectors. The experimental measurement and proof-of-principle test results confirm that our attack can allow Eve to get a copy of quantum keys without being detected and that it is feasible with current technology.

  18. Polarization-Dependent Interference of Coherent Scattering from Orthogonal Dipole Moments of a Resonantly Excited Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Disheng; Lander, Gary R.; Solomon, Glenn S.; Flagg, Edward B.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant photoluminescence excitation (RPLE) spectra of a neutral InGaAs quantum dot show unconventional line shapes that depend on the detection polarization. We characterize this phenomenon by performing polarization-dependent RPLE measurements and simulating the measured spectra with a three-level quantum model. The spectra are explained by interference between fields coherently scattered from the two fine structure split exciton states, and the measurements enable extraction of the steady-state coherence between the two exciton states.

  19. Nuclear wave packet quantum interference in the intense laser dissociation of the $\\mathrm{D}_{2}^{+}$ molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Halász, Gábor J; Moiseyev, Nimrod; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2013-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that electronic conical intersections in molecular systems can be induced by laser light even in diatomics. As is known a direct consequence of these accidental degeneracies is the appearence of nonadiabatic effects which has a strong impact on the nuclear quantum dynamics. Studying the photodissociation process of the $\\mathrm{D}_{2}^{+}$ molecule, we report here some novel and observable quantum interference phenomena that arise from the topological singularity induced by a strong laser field.

  20. Quantum transport through complex networks - from light-harvesting proteins to semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreisbeck, Christoph

    2012-06-18

    Electron transport through small systems in semiconductor devices plays an essential role for many applications in micro-electronics. One focus of current research lies on establishing conceptually new devices based on ballistic transport in high mobility AlGaAs/AlGa samples. In the ballistic regime, the transport characteristics are determined by coherent interference effects. In order to guide experimentalists to an improved device design, the characterization and understanding of intrinsic device properties is crucial. We develop a time-dependent approach that allows us to simulate experimentally fabricated, complex devicegeometries with an extension of up to a few micrometers. Particularly, we explore the physical origin of unexpected effects that have been detected in recent experiments on transport through Aharonov-Bohm waveguide-interferometers. Such interferometers can be configured as detectors for transfer properties of embedded quantum systems. We demonstrate that a four-terminal waveguide-ring is a suitable setup for measuring the transmission phase of a harmonic quantum dot. Quantum effects are not restricted exclusively to artificial devices but have been found in biological systems as well. Pioneering experiments reveal quantum effects in light-harvesting complexes, the building blocks of photosynthesis. We discuss the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex, which is a network of coupled bacteriochlorophylls. It acts as an energy wire in the photosynthetic apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. Recent experimental findings suggest that energy transfer takes place in the form of coherent wave-like motion, rather than through classical hopping from one bacteriochlorophyll to the next. However, the question of why and how coherent transfer emerges in light-harvesting complexes is still open. The challenge is to merge seemingly contradictory features that are observed in experiments on two-dimensional spectroscopy into a consistent theory. Here, we provide such a

  1. Alternative schemes for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiongfeng

    2012-01-01

    A practical scheme for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution using phase and path/time encoding is presented. In addition to immunity to existing loopholes in detection systems, our setup employs simple encoding and decoding modules without relying on polarization maintenance or optical switches. Moreover, by handling, with a modified sifting technique, the dead time limitations in single-photon detectors, our scheme can be run with only two single-photon detectors. With a phase-post-selection technique, a decoy-state variant of our scheme is also proposed, whose secret key generation rate scales linearly with the channel transmittance.

  2. Self-assembling hybrid diamond-biological quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, A.; Koplovitz, G.; Retzker, A.; Jelezko, F.; Yochelis, S.; Porath, D.; Nevo, Y.; Shoseyov, O.; Paltiel, Y.; Plenio, M. B.

    2014-09-01

    The realization of scalable arrangements of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond remains a key challenge on the way towards efficient quantum information processing, quantum simulation and quantum sensing applications. Although technologies based on implanting NV-centers in bulk diamond crystals or hybrid device approaches have been developed, they are limited by the achievable spatial resolution and by the intricate technological complexities involved in achieving scalability. We propose and demonstrate a novel approach for creating an arrangement of NV-centers, based on the self-assembling capabilities of biological systems and their beneficial nanometer spatial resolution. Here, a self-assembled protein structure serves as a structural scaffold for surface functionalized nanodiamonds, in this way allowing for the controlled creation of NV-structures on the nanoscale and providing a new avenue towards bridging the bio-nano interface. One-, two- as well as three-dimensional structures are within the scope of biological structural assembling techniques. We realized experimentally the formation of regular structures by interconnecting nanodiamonds using biological protein scaffolds. Based on the achievable NV-center distances of 11 nm, we evaluate the expected dipolar coupling interaction with neighboring NV-centers as well as the expected decoherence time. Moreover, by exploiting these couplings, we provide a detailed theoretical analysis on the viability of multiqubit quantum operations, suggest the possibility of individual addressing based on the random distribution of the NV intrinsic symmetry axes and address the challenges posed by decoherence and imperfect couplings. We then demonstrate in the last part that our scheme allows for the high-fidelity creation of entanglement, cluster states and quantum simulation applications.

  3. Microscopic quantum interference in excitonic condensation of Ta2NiSe5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Koudai; Kaneko, Tatsuya; Ohta, Yukinori

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic quantum interference associated with excitonic condensation in Ta2NiSe5 is studied in a BCS-type mean-field approximation. We show that in ultrasonic attenuation the coherence peak appears just below the transition temperature Tc, whereas in NMR spin-lattice relaxation the rate rapidly decreases below Tc; these observations can offer a crucial experimental test for the validity of the excitonic condensation scenario in Ta2NiSe5 . We also show that excitonic condensation manifests itself in a jump of the heat capacity at Tc as well as in a softening of the elastic shear constant, in accordance with the second-order phase transition observed in Ta2NiSe5 .

  4. Constructive interference between disordered couplings enhances multiparty entanglement in quantum Heisenberg spin glass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Utkarsh; Rakshit, Debraj; Prabhu, R.; Sen(De, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2016-08-01

    Disordered systems form one of the centrestages of research in many body sciences and lead to a plethora of interesting phenomena and applications. A paradigmatic disordered system consists of a one-dimensional array of quantum spin-1/2 particles, governed by the Heisenberg spin glass Hamiltonian with natural or engineered quenched disordered couplings in an external magnetic field. These systems allow disorder-induced enhancement for bipartite and multipartite observables. Here we show that simultaneous application of independent quenched disorders results in disorder-induced enhancement, while the same is absent with individual application of the same disorders. We term the phenomenon as constructive interference and the corresponding parameter stretches as the Venus regions. Interestingly, it has only been observed for multiparty entanglement and is absent for the single- and two-party physical quantities.

  5. Manipulation of Spontaneous Emission via Quantum Interference in an Elliptically Polarized Laser Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Chun-Ling; LI Jia-Hua; YU Rong; ZHANG Duo; YANG Xiao-Xue

    2013-01-01

    Manipulation of spontaneous emission from an atom confined in three kinds of modified reservoirs has been investigated by means of an elliptically polarized laser field.Some interesting phenomena such as the multi-peak structure,extreme spectral narrowing,and cancellation of spontaneous emission can be observed by adjusting controllable system parameters.Moreover,these phenomena depend on the constructive or destructive quantum interference between multiple decay channels and which can be changed appreciably by varying the phase difference between the two circularly polarized components of the probe field.These results demonstrate the importance of an elliptically polarized laser field in controlling the spontaneous emission and its potential applications in high-precision spectroscopy.

  6. Generation of continuous-wave THz radiation by use of quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Korsunsky, E A

    1999-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generation of continuous-wave THz radiation. The scheme requires a medium where three discrete states in a $\\Lambda $ configuration can be selected, with the THz-frequency transition between the two lower metastable states. We consider the propagation of three-frequency continuous-wave electromagnetic (e.m.) radiation through a $\\Lambda $ medium. Under resonant excitation, the medium absorption can be strongly reduced due to quantum interference of transitions, while the nonlinear susceptibility is enhanced. This leads to very efficient energy transfer between the e.m. waves providing a possibility for THz generation. We demonstrate that the photon conversion efficiency is approaching unity in this technique.

  7. Phase-dependent quantum interference between different pathways in bichromatic harmonic generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Jun; Wang Li-Ming; Qiao Hao-Xue

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the harmonic generation of the hydrogen atom subjected to a collinear bichromatic laser field by numerically solving the time-dependent Schr(o)dinger equation using the split-operator pseudo-spectral method.By adding a frequency variation to the additional field,the contributions of different pathways to particular order harmonic generation can be isolated.The quantum interference pattern between harmonic pathways,which influences the harmonic intensity,is found to be either constructive or destructive with respect to different relative phase of the two field components.Detailed description of up to the 35th-order harmonics and the harmonic pathways for a wide range of field parameters is presented.

  8. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    , which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......, the electrons can tunnel in- elastically from the left to the right electrode. This is the process behind inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS), which is a single-molecule spectroscopic method, where the vibrational ngerprint of a molecule is di- rectly observed by the tunnelling current......-conjugated molecules. We nd that the vibrational modes that would be expected to dominate, following the propensity, rules are very weak. Instead, other modes are found to be the dominant ones. We study this phenomenon for a number of cross-conjugated molecules, and link these ndings to the anti...

  9. Cosmic Structure as the Quantum Interference of a Coherent Dark Wave

    CERN Document Server

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Broadhurst, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The conventional cold, particle interpretation of dark matter (CDM) still lacks laboratory support and struggles with the basic properties of common dwarf galaxies, which have surprisingly uniform central masses and shallow density profiles. In contrast, galaxies predicted by CDM extend to much lower masses, with steeper, singular profiles. This tension motivates cold, wavelike dark matter ($\\psi$DM) composed of a non-relativistic Bose-Einstein condensate, so the uncertainty principle counters gravity below a Jeans scale. Here we achieve the first cosmological simulations of this quantum state at unprecedentedly high resolution capable of resolving dwarf galaxies, with only one free parameter, $\\bf{m_B}$, the boson mass. We demonstrate the large scale structure of this $\\psi$DM simulation is indistinguishable from CDM, as desired, but differs radically inside galaxies. Connected filaments and collapsed haloes form a large interference network, with gravitationally self-bound solitonic cores inside every galax...

  10. Quantum Interference between a Single-Photon Fock State and a Coherent State

    CERN Document Server

    Windhager, Armin; Pacher, Christoph; Peev, Momtchil; Poppe, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the single mode quantum field state at the individual output ports of a beam splitter when a single-photon Fock state and a coherent state are incident on the input ports. The output states turn out to be a statistical mixture between a displaced Fock state and a coherent state. Consequently we are able to find an analytical expression for the corresponding Wigner function. Because of the generality of our calculations the obtained results are valid for all passive and lossless optical four port devices. We show further how the results can be adapted to the case of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In addition we consider the case for which the single-photon Fock state is replaced with a general input state: a coherent input state displaces each general quantum state at the output port of a beam splitter with the displacement parameter being the amplitude of the coherent state.

  11. Quantum interference between a single-photon Fock state and a coherent state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhager, A.; Suda, M.; Pacher, C.; Peev, M.; Poppe, A.

    2011-04-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the single mode quantum field state at the individual output ports of a beam splitter when a single-photon Fock state and a coherent state are incident on the input ports. The output states turn out to be a statistical mixture between a displaced Fock state and a coherent state. Consequently we are able to find an analytical expression for the corresponding Wigner function. Because of the generality of our calculations the obtained results are valid for all passive and lossless optical four port devices. We show further how the results can be adapted to the case of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In addition we consider the case for which the single-photon Fock state is replaced with a general input state: a coherent input state displaces each general quantum state at the output port of a beam splitter with the displacement parameter being the amplitude of the coherent state.

  12. Rigidity of quantum steering and one-sided device-independent verifiable quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, Alexandru; Wallden, Petros; Kashefi, Elham

    2017-02-01

    The relationship between correlations and entanglement has played a major role in understanding quantum theory since the work of Einstein et al (1935 Phys. Rev. 47 777–80). Tsirelson proved that Bell states, shared among two parties, when measured suitably, achieve the maximum non-local correlations allowed by quantum mechanics (Cirel’son 1980 Lett. Math. Phys. 4 93–100). Conversely, Reichardt et al showed that observing the maximal correlation value over a sequence of repeated measurements, implies that the underlying quantum state is close to a tensor product of maximally entangled states and, moreover, that it is measured according to an ideal strategy (Reichardt et al 2013 Nature 496 456–60). However, this strong rigidity result comes at a high price, requiring a large number of entangled pairs to be tested. In this paper, we present a significant improvement in terms of the overhead by instead considering quantum steering where the device of the one side is trusted. We first demonstrate a robust one-sided device-independent version of self-testing, which characterises the shared state and measurement operators of two parties up to a certain bound. We show that this bound is optimal up to constant factors and we generalise the results for the most general attacks. This leads us to a rigidity theorem for maximal steering correlations. As a key application we give a one-sided device-independent protocol for verifiable delegated quantum computation, and compare it to other existing protocols, to highlight the cost of trust assumptions. Finally, we show that under reasonable assumptions, the states shared in order to run a certain type of verification protocol must be unitarily equivalent to perfect Bell states.

  13. The quantum interference effects in the Sc II 4247 $\\AA$ line of the Second Solar Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Smitha, H N; Stenflo, J O; Bianda, M; Ramelli, R

    2014-01-01

    The Sc II 4247 $\\AA$ line formed in the chromosphere is one of the lines well known, like the Na I D$_2$ and Ba II D$_2$, for its prominent triple peak structure in $Q/I$ and the underlying quantum interference effects governing it. In this paper, we try to study the nature of this triple peak structure using the theory of $F$-state interference including the effects of partial frequency redistribution (PRD) and radiative transfer (RT). We compare our results with the observations taken in a quiet region near the solar limb. In spite of accounting for PRD and RT effects it has not been possible to reproduce the observed triple peak structure in $Q/I$. While the two wing PRD peaks (on either side of central peak) and the near wing continuum can be reproduced, the central peak is completely suppressed by the enhanced depolarization resulting from the hyperfine structure splitting. This suppression remains for all the tested widely different 1D model atmospheres or for any multi-component combinations of them. W...

  14. Aharonov-Bohm-type quantum interference effects in narrow gap semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillianfeld, R. B.; Kallaher, R. L.; Heremans, J. J.; Chen, Hong; Goel, N.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.; van Roy, W.; Borghs, G.

    2009-03-01

    We present experiments on quantum interference phenomena in semiconductors with strong spin-orbit interaction, using mesoscopic parallel ring arrays fabricated on InSb/InAlSb and InAs/AlGaSb heterostructures. Both external electric field effects and temperature dependence of the ring magnetoresistance are examined. Top-gate voltage-dependent oscillations in ring resistance in the absence of an external magnetic field are suggestive of Aharonov-Casher interference. At low magnetic fields the ring magnetoresistance is dominated by oscillations with h/2e periodicity characteristic of Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) oscillations, whereas the h/e periodicity characteristic of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations persists to high magnetic fields. Fourier spectra (FS) reveal AB amplitudes on the same order as AAS amplitudes at low fields, and in some samples reveal a splitting of the AB peaks, which has been interpreted as a signature of Berry's phase. The FS are also used to quantify the temperature dependence of the oscillation amplitudes (NSF DMR-0618235, DOE DE-FG02-08ER46532, NSF DMR-0520550).

  15. Generating entangled quantum microwaves in a Josephson-photonics device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambach, Simon; Kubala, Björn; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    When connecting a voltage-biased Josephson junction in series to several microwave cavities, a Cooper-pair current across the junction gives rise to a continuous emission of strongly correlated photons into the cavity modes. Tuning the bias voltage to the resonance where a single Cooper pair provides the energy to create an additional photon in each of the cavities, we demonstrate the entangling nature of these creation processes by simple witnesses in terms of experimentally accessible observables. To characterize the entanglement properties of the such created quantum states of light to the fullest possible extent, we then proceed to more elaborate entanglement criteria based on the knowledge of the full density matrix and provide a detailed study of bi- and multipartite entanglement. In particular, we illustrate how due to the relatively simple design of these circuits changes of experimental parameters allow one to access a wide variety of entangled states differing, e.g., in the number of entangled parties or the dimension of state space. Such devices, besides their promising potential to act as a highly versatile source of entangled quantum microwaves, may thus represent an excellent natural testbed for classification and quantification schemes developed in quantum information theory.

  16. Effective potential for moment-method simulation of quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriman, A. M.; Zhou, J.-R.; Kluksdahl, N. C.; Choi, H. H.; Ferry, D. K.

    1989-12-01

    In the simulation of submicron devices, complete quantum descriptions can be extremely computationally intensive, and reduced descriptions are desirable. One such description utilizes a few low-order moments of the momentum distribution that are defined by the Wigner function. Two major difficulties occur in applying this moment method: (i) An independent calculation is required to find quantum mechanically accurate initial conditions. (ii) For a system in a mixed state, the hierarchy of time evolution equations for the moments does not close. We describe an approach to solve these problems. The initial distribution is determined in equilibrium by means of a new effective potential, chosen for its ability to treat the sharp potential features which occur in heterostructures. It accurately describes barrier penetration and repulsion, as well as quantum broadening of the momentum distribution. The moment equation hierarchy is closed at the level of the second-moment time evolution equation, using a closure that is exact for a shifted Fermi distribution. Band-bending is included by simultaneous self-consistent determination of all the moments.

  17. Unravelling the role of quantum interference in the weak-field laser phase modulation control of photofragment distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Vela, Alberto; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2016-01-01

    The role played by quantum interference in the laser phase modulation coherent control of photofragment distributions in the weak-field regime is investigated in detail in this work. The specific application involves realistic wave packet calculations of the transient vibrational populations of t...

  18. First observation of quantum interference in the process phi -> KS KL ->pi+pi-pi+pi-: a test of quantum mechanics and CPT symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Bowring, D; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Incagli, M; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Sibidanov, A L; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2006-01-01

    We present the first observation of quantum interference in the process phi -> KS KL ->pi+pi-pi+pi-. This analysis is based on data collected with the KLOE detector at the e^+e^- collider DAFNE in 2001--2002 for an integrated luminosity of about 380pb^-1. Fits to the distribution of Delta t, the difference between the two kaon decay times, allow tests of the validity of quantum mechanics and CPT symmetry. No deviations from the expectations of quantum mechanics and CPT symmetry have been observed. New or improved limits on various decoherence and CPT violation parameters have been obtained

  19. Device-dependent and device-independent quantum key distribution without a shared reference frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Joshua A.; Branciard, Cyril; Brunner, Nicolas; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Standard quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols typically assume that the distant parties share a common reference frame. In practice, however, establishing and maintaining a good alignment between distant observers is rarely a trivial issue, which may significantly restrain the implementation of long-distance quantum communication protocols. Here we propose simple QKD protocols that do not require the parties to share any reference frame, and study their security and feasibility in both the usual device-dependent (DD) case—in which the two parties use well characterized measurement devices—as well as in the device-independent (DI) case—in which the measurement devices can be untrusted, and the security relies on the violation of a Bell inequality. To illustrate the practical relevance of these ideas, we present a proof-of-principle demonstration of our protocols using polarization entangled photons distributed over a coiled 10-km long optical fiber. We consider two situations, in which either the fiber spool's polarization transformation freely drifts, or randomly chosen polarization transformations are applied. The correlations obtained from measurements allow, with high probability, to generate positive asymptotic secret key rates in both the DD and DI scenarios (under the fair-sampling assumption for the latter case).

  20. Modeling the quantum interference signatures of the Ba II D2 4554 A line in the second solar spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Smitha, H N; Stenflo, J O; Sampoorna, M

    2013-01-01

    Quantum interference effects play a vital role in shaping the linear polarization profiles of solar spectral lines. The Ba II D2 line at 4554 A is a prominent example, where the F-state interference effects due to the odd isotopes produce polarization profiles, which are very different from those of the even isotopes that have no F-state interference. It is therefore necessary to account for the contributions from the different isotopes to understand the observed linear polarization profiles of this line. Here we do radiative transfer modeling with partial frequency redistribution (PRD) of such observations while accounting for the interference effects and isotope composition. The Ba II D2 polarization profile is found to be strongly governed by the PRD mechanism. We show how a full PRD treatment succeeds in reproducing the observations, while complete frequency redistribution (CRD) alone fails to produce polarization profiles that have any resemblance with the observed ones. However, we also find that the li...

  1. Microbial detection in microfluidic devices through dual staining of quantum dots-labeled immunoassay and RNA hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qing [Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Blk E1A, 07-03, Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Zhu Liang [Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Blk E1A, 07-03, Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Feng Hanhua [Institute of Microelectronics (Singapore); Ang, Simon [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (United States); Chau, F.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Liu, W.-T. [Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Blk E1A, 07-03, Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: cveliuwt@nus.edu.sg

    2006-01-18

    This paper reported the development of a microfludic device for the rapid detection of viable and nonviable microbial cells through dual labeling by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantum dots (QDs)-labeled immunofluorescent assay (IFA). The coin sized device consists of a microchannel and filtering pillars (gap = 1-2 {mu}m) and was demonstrated to effectively trap and concentrate microbial cells (i.e. Giardia lamblia). After sample injection, FISH probe solution and QDs-labeled antibody solution were sequentially pumped into the device to accelerate the fluorescent labeling reactions at optimized flow rates (i.e. 1 and 20 {mu}L/min, respectively). After 2 min washing for each assay, the whole process could be finished within 30 min, with minimum consumption of labeling reagents and superior fluorescent signal intensity. The choice of QDs 525 for IFA resulted in bright and stable fluorescent signal, with minimum interference with the Cy3 signal from FISH detection.

  2. Quantum Electrodynamic Modeling of Silicon-Based Active Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyuan Shi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a time-domain analysis of an active medium based on a coupled quantum mechanical and electromagnetic model to accurately simulate the dynamics of silicon-based photonic devices. To fully account for the nonlinearity of an active medium, the rate equations of a four-level atomic system are introduced into the electromagnetic polarization vector. With these auxiliary differential equations, we solve the time evolution of the electromagnetic waves and atomic population densities using the FDTD method. The developed simulation approach has been used to model light amplification and amplified spontaneous emission in silicon nanocrystals, as well as the lasing dynamics in a novel photonic crystal-based silicon microcavity.

  3. Loss-tolerant measurement-device-independent quantum private queries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang-Yuan; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Qian, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Quantum private queries (QPQ) is an important cryptography protocol aiming to protect both the user’s and database’s privacy when the database is queried privately. Recently, a variety of practical QPQ protocols based on quantum key distribution (QKD) have been proposed. However, for QKD-based QPQ the user’s imperfect detectors can be subjected to some detector- side-channel attacks launched by the dishonest owner of the database. Here, we present a simple example that shows how the detector-blinding attack can damage the security of QKD-based QPQ completely. To remove all the known and unknown detector side channels, we propose a solution of measurement-device-independent QPQ (MDI-QPQ) with single- photon sources. The security of the proposed protocol has been analyzed under some typical attacks. Moreover, we prove that its security is completely loss independent. The results show that practical QPQ will remain the same degree of privacy as before even with seriously uncharacterized detectors.

  4. Weak-Light, Zero to -\\pi Lossless Kerr-Phase Gate in Quantum-well System via Tunneling Interference Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Y L; Wu, J X; Zhu, C J; Xu, J P; Yang, Y P

    2015-01-01

    We examine a Kerr phase gate in a semiconductor quantum well structure based on the tunnelling interference effect. We show that there exist a specific signal field detuning, at which the absorption/amplification of the probe field will be eliminated with the increase of the tunnelling interference. Simultaneously, the probe field will acquire a -\\pi phase shift at the exit of the medium. We demonstrate with numerical simulations that a complete 180^\\circ phase rotation for the probe field at the exit of the medium is achieved, which may result in many applications in information science and telecommunication.

  5. Device-independent quantum key distribution based on measurement inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Ramij; Parker, Matthew G.; Mironowicz, Piotr; Pawłowski, Marcin

    2015-12-01

    We provide an analysis of a family of device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols that has the following features. (a) The bits used for the secret key do not come from the results of the measurements on an entangled state but from the choices of settings. (b) Instead of a single security parameter (a violation of some Bell inequality) a set of them is used to estimate the level of trust in the secrecy of the key. The main advantage of these protocols is a smaller vulnerability to imperfect random number generators made possible by feature (a). We prove the security and the robustness of such protocols. We show that using our method it is possible to construct a QKD protocol which retains its security even if the source of randomness used by communicating parties is strongly biased. As a proof of principle, an explicit example of a protocol based on the Hardy's paradox is presented. Moreover, in the noiseless case, the protocol is secure in a natural way against any type of memory attack, and thus allows one to reuse the device in subsequent rounds. We also analyze the robustness of the protocol using semidefinite programming methods. Finally, we present a postprocessing method, and observe a paradoxical property that rejecting some random part of the private data can increase the key rate of the protocol.

  6. Three-dimensional dynamic photonic crystal creation by four laser beams interference in colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. M.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Ezhova, K. V.; Tikhonov, I. V.; Dneprovskii, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a simple way to create dynamic photonic crystals with different lattice symmetry by interference of four non-coplanar laser beams in colloidal solution of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The formation of dynamic photonic crystal was confirmed by the observed diffraction of the beams that have excited photonic crystal at the angles equal to that calculated for the corresponding three-dimensional lattice (self-diffraction regime). Self-diffraction from an induced 3D transient photonic crystal has been discovered in the case of resonant excitation of the excitons (electron - hole transitions) in CdSe/ZnS QDs (highly absorbing colloidal solution) by powerful beams of mode-locked laser with picosecond pulse duration. Self-diffraction arises for four laser beams intersecting in the cell with colloidal CdSe/ZnS QDs due to the induced 3D dynamic photonic crystal. The physical processes that arise in CdSe/ZnS QDs and are responsible for the observed self-action effects are discussed.

  7. Probing Electron-Phonon Interaction through Two-Photon Interference in Resonantly Driven Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigue, Antoine; Iles-Smith, Jake; Lux, Fabian; Monniello, Léonard; Bernard, Mathieu; Margaillan, Florent; Lemaitre, Aristide; Martinez, Anthony; McCutcheon, Dara P. S.; Mørk, Jesper; Hostein, Richard; Voliotis, Valia

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of photon coherence properties through two-photon interference (TPI) measurements from a single quantum dot (QD) under resonant excitation. We show that the loss of indistinguishability is related only to the electron-phonon coupling and is not affected by spectral diffusion. Through these measurements and a complementary microscopic theory, we identify two independent separate decoherence processes, both of which are associated with phonons. Below 10 K, we find that the relaxation of the vibrational lattice is the dominant contribution to the loss of TPI visibility. This process is non-Markovian in nature and corresponds to real phonon transitions resulting in a broad phonon sideband in the QD emission spectra. Above 10 K, virtual phonon transitions to higher lying excited states in the QD become the dominant dephasing mechanism, this leads to a broadening of the zero phonon line, and a corresponding rapid decay in the visibility. The microscopic theory we develop provides analytic expressions for the dephasing rates for both virtual phonon scattering and non-Markovian lattice relaxation.

  8. Spin-dependent quantum interference in photoemission process from spin-orbit coupled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaji, Koichiro; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Harasawa, Ayumi; Ishida, Yukiaki; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Kobayashi, Katsuyoshi; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2017-01-01

    Spin–orbit interaction entangles the orbitals with the different spins. The spin–orbital-entangled states were discovered in surface states of topological insulators. However, the spin–orbital-entanglement is not specialized in the topological surface states. Here, we show the spin–orbital texture in a surface state of Bi(111) by laser-based spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (laser-SARPES) and describe three-dimensional spin-rotation effect in photoemission resulting from spin-dependent quantum interference. Our model reveals that, in the spin–orbit-coupled systems, the spins pointing to the mutually opposite directions are independently locked to the orbital symmetries. Furthermore, direct detection of coherent spin phenomena by laser-SARPES enables us to clarify the phase of the dipole transition matrix element responsible for the spin direction in photoexcited states. These results permit the tuning of the spin polarization of optically excited electrons in solids with strong spin–orbit interaction. PMID:28232721

  9. Close relation between quantum interference in molecular conductance and diradical existence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald; Strange, Mikkel; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-01-26

    An empirical observation of a relationship between a striking feature of electronic transmission through a π-system, destructive quantum interference (QI), on one hand, and the stability of diradicals on the other, leads to the proof of a general theorem that relates the two. Subject to a number of simplifying assumptions, in a π-electron system, QI occurs when electrodes are attached to those positions of an N-carbon atom N-electron closed-shell hydrocarbon where the matrix elements of the Green's function vanish. These zeros come in two types, which are called easy and hard. Suppose an N+2 atom, N+2 electron hydrocarbon is formed by substituting 2 CH2 groups at two atoms, where the electrodes were. Then, if a QI feature is associated with electrode attachment to the two atoms of the original N atom system, the resulting augmented N+2 molecule will be a diradical. If there is no QI feature, i.e., transmission of current is normal if electrodes are attached to the two atoms, the resulting hydrocarbon will not be a diradical but will have a classical closed-shell electronic structure. Moreover, where a diradical exists, the easy zero is associated with a nondisjoint diradical, and the hard zero is associated with a disjoint one. A related theorem is proven for deletion of two sites from a hydrocarbon.

  10. Quantum Interference of Dual-Channel Excited Magnons in Spin-1 Bose—Einstein Condensates Atomic Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu; Zhao, Xing-Dong; Zhou, Lu; Jing, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Ping

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the quantum interference of spin wave excitations of a spin-1 atomic Bose condensate confined in an optical lattice. Single-channel and dual-channel interactions are employed in our system, and their induced excitations are compared. Also we consider the interplay of magneto-optical excitations, which leads to a constructive or destructive effect for the creation of magnons based on background excitations. The population distributions of excited magnons can be well controlled by steering the long-range dipole-dipole interactions. Such a scheme can be used to demonstrate conventional quantum-optical phenomena like dynamical Casimir effect at finite temperatures.

  11. Quantum Interference of Dual-Channel Excited Magnons in Spin-1 Bose-Einstein Condensates Atomic Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xu; ZHAO Xing-Dong; ZHOU Lu; JING Hui; ZHANG Wei-Ping

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the quantum interference of spin wave excitations of a spin-1 atomic Bose condensate confined in an optical lattice.Single-channel and dual-channel interactions are employed in our system,and their induced excitations are compared.Also we consider the interplay of magneto-optical excitations,which leads to a constructive or destructive effect for the creation of magnons based on background excitations.The population distributions of excited magnons can be well controlled by steering the long-range dipole-dipole interactions.Such a scheme can be used to demonstrate conventional quantum-optical phenomena like dynamical Casimir effect at finite temperatures.

  12. Partial Wave Analysis of Scattering with Nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Anomalous Cross Section induced by Quantum Interference

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, D H

    2003-01-01

    Partial wave theory of a three dmensional scattering problem for an arbitray short range potential and a nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm magnetic flux is established. The scattering process of a ``hard shere'' like potential and the magnetic flux is examined. An anomalous total cross section is revealed at the specific quantized magnetic flux at low energy which helps explain the composite fermion and boson model in the fractional quantum Hall effect. Since the nonlocal quantum interference of magnetic flux on the charged particles is universal, the nonlocal effect is expected to appear in quite general potential system and will be useful in understanding some other phenomena in mesoscopic phyiscs.

  13. Modeling of detective quantum efficiency considering scatter-reduction devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Woong; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Ho Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The reduction of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) cannot be restored and thus has become a severe issue in digital mammography.1 Therefore, antiscatter grids are typically used in mammography. Scatter-cleanup performance of various scatter-reduction devices, such as air gaps,2 linear (1D) or cellular (2D) grids,3, 4 and slot-scanning devices,5 has been extensively investigated by many research groups. In the present time, a digital mammography system with the slotscanning geometry is also commercially available.6 In this study, we theoretically investigate the effect of scattered photons on the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) performance of digital mammography detectors by using the cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) approach. We show a simple DQE formalism describing digital mammography detector systems equipped with scatter reduction devices by regarding the scattered photons as additive noise sources. The LFD increased with increasing PMMA thickness, and the amounts of LFD indicated the corresponding SF. The estimated SFs were 0.13, 0.21, and 0.29 for PMMA thicknesses of 10, 20, and 30 mm, respectively. While the solid line describing the measured MTF for PMMA with 0 mm was the result of least-squares of regression fit using Eq. (14), the other lines were simply resulted from the multiplication of the fit result (for PMMA with 0 mm) with the (1-SF) estimated from the LFDs in the measured MTFs. Spectral noise-power densities over the entire frequency range were not much changed with increasing scatter. On the other hand, the calculation results showed that the spectral noise-power densities increased with increasing scatter. This discrepancy may be explained by that the model developed in this study does not account for the changes in x-ray interaction parameters for varying spectral shapes due to beam hardening with increasing PMMA thicknesses.

  14. A reconfigurable spintronic device for quantum and classical logic

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Debanjan; Sarkar, Angik; Bhattacharyya, Tarun Kanti

    2010-01-01

    Quantum superposition and entanglement of physical states can be harnessed to solve some problems which are intractable on a classical computer implementing binary logic. Several algorithms have been proposed to utilize the quantum nature of physical states and solve important problems. For example, Shor's quantum algorithm is extremely important in the field of cryptography since it factors large numbers exponentially faster than any known classical algorithm. Another celebrated example is the Grovers quantum algorithm. These algorithms can only be implemented on a quantum computer which operates on quantum bits (qubits). Rudimentary implementations of quantum processor have already been achieved through linear optical components, ion traps, NMR etc. However demonstration of a solid state quantum processor had been elusive till DiCarlo et al demonstrated two qubit algorithms in superconducting quantum processor. Though this has been a significant step, scalable semiconductor based room temperature quantum co...

  15. Suppression and Enhancement in Parametric Two-Photon Resonant Nondegenerate Four-Wave Mixing via Quantum Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jiang; MI Xin; YU Zu-He; JIANG Qian; ZUO Zhan-Chun; WANG Yan-Bang; WU Ling-An; FU Pan-Ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ Quantum interference may lead to suppression and enhancement of the two-photon resonant nondegenerate fourwave mixing signal in a cascade four-level system. Such phenomena are demonstrated in Ba through inducing atomic coherence between the ground state 6s2 and the doubly excited autoionizing Rydberg state 6pnd. This method can be used as a new spectroscopic tool for measuring the transition dipole moment between two highly excited atomic states.

  16. Device Characterization of High Performance Quantum Dot Comb Laser

    KAUST Repository

    Rafi, Kazi

    2012-02-01

    The cost effective comb based laser sources are considered to be one of the prominent emitters used in optical communication (OC) and photonic integrated circuits (PIC). With the rising demand for delivering triple-play services (voice, data and video) in FTTH and FTTP-based WDM-PON networks, metropolitan area network (MAN), and short-reach rack-to-rack optical computer communications, a versatile and cost effective WDM transmitter design is required, where several DFB lasers can be replaced by a cost effective broadband comb laser to support on-chip optical signaling. Therefore, high performance quantum dot (Q.Dot) comb lasers need to satisfy several challenges before real system implementations. These challenges include a high uniform broadband gain spectrum from the active layer, small relative intensity noise with lower bit error rate (BER) and better temperature stability. Thus, such short wavelength comb lasers offering higher bandwidth can be a feasible solution to address these challenges. However, they still require thorough characterization before implementation. In this project, we briefly characterized the novel quantum dot comb laser using duty cycle based electrical injection and temperature variations where we have observed the presence of reduced thermal conductivity in the active layer. This phenomenon is responsible for the degradation of device performance. Hence, different performance trends, such as broadband emission and spectrum stability were studied with pulse and continuous electrical pumping. The tested comb laser is found to be an attractive solution for several applications but requires further experiments in order to be considered for photonic intergraded circuits and to support next generation computer-communications.

  17. Noise in Quantum Devices: A Unified Computational Approach for Different Scattering Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Damiano; Colomés, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    When talking about noise in quantum devices two issues must be faced: how to model the evolution of an electronic system with scattering and how this noise is practically computed in a quantum device simulator. In the present paper, we address both problems from a practical and computational point of view. In particular, as the electronic quantum subsystem is an open (normally far from equilibrium) system, we use the notion of conditional wave function, the wave function of a subsystem in Bohmian mechanics, an alternative version of quantum mechanics which along with the wave function posited definite positions for the particles. This allows us to define an effective equation in several physical situations, ranging from the simple tunneling barrier to the interaction with a bath of phonons. Finally, we present how this development can be used to compute quantum noise in a quantum device simulator.

  18. Evaluation of electromagnetic interference and exposure assessment from s-health solutions based on Wi-Fi devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; Aguirre, Erik; Lopez Iturri, Peio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Roldán, José; Falcone, Francisco; Ramos, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade the number of wireless devices operating at the frequency band of 2.4 GHz has increased in several settings, such as healthcare, occupational, and household. In this work, the emissions from Wi-Fi transceivers applicable to context aware scenarios are analyzed in terms of potential interference and assessment on exposure guideline compliance. Near field measurement results as well as deterministic simulation results on realistic indoor environments are presented, providing insight on the interaction between the Wi-Fi transceiver and implantable/body area network devices as well as other transceivers operating within an indoor environment, exhibiting topological and morphological complexity. By following approaches (near field estimation/deterministic estimation), colocated body situations as well as large indoor emissions can be determined. The results show in general compliance with exposure levels and the impact of overall network deployment, which can be optimized in order to reduce overall interference levels while maximizing system performance.

  19. Influence of carrier dynamics on the modulation bandwidth of quantum-dot based nanocavity devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorke, Michael; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the modulation response of quantum-dot based nanocavity light emitting devices. For high Purcell enhancement factors, our theory predicts the possibility of decreasing the modulation bandwidth with increasing scattering rate into the lasing quantum-dot state. This cou......We theoretically investigate the modulation response of quantum-dot based nanocavity light emitting devices. For high Purcell enhancement factors, our theory predicts the possibility of decreasing the modulation bandwidth with increasing scattering rate into the lasing quantum-dot state...

  20. Evaluation of electromagnetic interference and exposure assessment from s-Health solutions based on Wi-Fi devices

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia de Miguel-Bilbao; Erik Aguirre; Peio Lopez Iturri; Leire Azpilicueta; José Roldán; Francisco Falcone; Victoria Ramos

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade the number of wireless devices operating at the frequency band of 2.4 GHz has increased in several settings, such as healthcare, occupational, and household. In this work, the emissions from Wi-Fi transceivers applicable to context aware scenarios are analyzed in terms of potential interference and assessment on exposure guideline compliance. Near field measurement results as well as deterministic simulation results on realistic indoor environments are presented, providing ...

  1. Bandgap Engineering of 1300 nm Quantum Dots/Quantum Well Nanostructures Based Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Alhashim, Hala H.

    2016-05-29

    The main objectives of this thesis are to develop viable process and/or device technologies for bandgap tuning of 1300-nm InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot (QD) laser structures, and broad linewidth 1300-nm InGaAsP/InP quantum well (QW) superluminescent diode structures. The high performance bandgap-engineered QD laser structures were achieved by employing quantum-dot intermixing (QDI) based on impurity free vacancy diffusion (IFVD) technique for eventual seamless active-passive integration, and bandgap-tuned lasers. QDI using various dielectric-capping materials, such as HfO2, SrTiO3, TiO2, Al2O3 and ZnO, etc, were experimented in which the resultant emission wavelength can be blueshifted to ∼ 1100 nm ─ 1200 nm range depending on process conditions. The significant results extracted from the PL characterization were used to perform an extensive laser characterization. The InAs/GaAs quantum-dot lasers with QDs transition energies were blueshifted by ~185 nm, and lasing around ~1070 – 1190 nm was achieved. Furthermore, from the spectral analysis, a simultaneous five-state lasing in the InAs/InGaAs intermixed QD laser was experimentally demonstrated for the first time in the very important wavelength range from 1030 to 1125 nm. The QDI methodology enabled the facile formation of a plethora of devices with various emission wavelengths suitable for a wide range of applications in the infrared. In addition, the wavelength range achieved is also applicable for coherent light generation in the green – yellow – orange visible wavelength band via frequency doubling, which is a cost-effective way of producing compact devices for pico-projectors, semiconductor laser based solid state lighting, etc. [1, 2] In QW-based superluminescent diode, the problem statement lies on achieving a flat-top and ultra-wide emission bandwidth. The approach was to design an inhomogeneous active region with a comparable simultaneous emission from different transition states in the QW stacks, in

  2. Fundamental properties of devices for quantum information technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Kær

    This thesis reports a theoretical investigation of the influence of the electronphonon interaction on semiconductor cavity quantum electrodynamical systems, specifically a quantum dot coupled to an optical microcavity. We develop a theoretical description of the decay dynamics of the quantum dot ...

  3. Single-Ion Implantation for the Development of Si-Based MOSFET Devices with Quantum Functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C. McCallum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in single-ion implantation is driven in part by research into development of solid-state devices that exhibit quantum behaviour in their electronic or optical characteristics. Here, we provide an overview of international research work on single ion implantation and single ion detection for development of electronic devices for quantum computing. The scope of international research into single ion implantation is presented in the context of our own research in the Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology in Australia. Various single ion detection schemes are presented, and limitations on dopant placement accuracy due to ion straggling are discussed together with pathways for scale-up to multiple quantum devices on the one chip. Possible future directions for ion implantation in quantum computing and communications are also discussed.

  4. Direct measurement on the geometric phase of a double quantum dot qubit via quantum point contact device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao; Zhang, Feng-Yang; Song, Jie; Song, He-Shan

    2015-01-01

    We propose a direct measurement scheme to read out the geometric phase of a coupled double quantum dot system via a quantum point contact(QPC) device. An effective expression of the geometric phase has been derived, which relates the geometric phase of the double quantum dot qubit to the current through QPC device. All the parameters in our expression are measurable or tunable in experiment. Moreover, since the measurement process affects the state of the qubit slightly, the geometric phase can be protected. The feasibility of the scheme has been analyzed. Further, as an example, we simulate the geometrical phase of a qubit when the QPC device is replaced by a single electron transistor(SET). PMID:26121538

  5. Two-photon interference at telecom wavelengths for time-bin-encoded single photons from quantum-dot spin qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Leo; Natarajan, Chandra M.; Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Langrock, Carsten; Pelc, Jason S.; Tanner, Michael G.; Abe, Eisuke; Maier, Sebastian; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Hadfield, Robert H.; Fejer, Martin M.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Practical quantum communication between remote quantum memories rely on single photons at telecom wavelengths. Although spin-photon entanglement has been demonstrated in atomic and solid-state qubit systems, the produced single photons at short wavelengths and with polarization encoding are not suitable for long-distance communication, because they suffer from high propagation loss and depolarization in optical fibres. Establishing entanglement between remote quantum nodes would further require the photons generated from separate nodes to be indistinguishable. Here, we report the observation of correlations between a quantum-dot spin and a telecom single photon across a 2-km fibre channel based on time-bin encoding and background-free frequency downconversion. The downconverted photon at telecom wavelengths exhibits two-photon interference with another photon from an independent source, achieving a mean wavepacket overlap of greater than 0.89 despite their original wavelength mismatch (900 and 911 nm). The quantum-networking operations that we demonstrate will enable practical communication between solid-state spin qubits across long distances.

  6. Chemical compass for avian magnetoreception as a quantum coherent device

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    It is known that more than 50 species use the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation. Intensive studies particularly behavior experiments with birds provide support for a chemical compass based on magnetically sensitive free radical reactions as a source of this sense. However, the fundamental question of whether and how quantum coherence plays an essential role in such a chemical compass model of avian magnetoreception yet remains controversial. Here, we show that the essence of the chemical compass model can be understood in analogy to a quantum interferometer exploiting quantum coherence. Within the framework of quantum metrology, we quantify quantum coherence and demonstrate that it is a resource for chemical magnetoreception. Our results allow us to understand and predict how various factors can affect the performance of a chemical compass from the unique perspective of quantum coherence assisted metrology. This represents a crucial step to affirm avian magnetoreception as an example of qu...

  7. Ultrafast dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers and all-optical processing: Bulk versus quantum dot devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Berg, Tommy Winther; Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the dynamical properties of semiconductor optical amplifiers and the importance for all-optical signal processing. In particular, the dynamics of quantum dot amplifiers is considered and it is suggested that these may be operated at very high bit-rates without significant patterning...... effects, as opposed to quantum well or bulk devices....

  8. Quantum Synchronization of Conjugated Variables in a Superconducting Device Leads to the Fundamental Resistance Quantization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hriscu, A.M.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a way to achieve quantum synchronization of two canonically conjugated variables. For this, we employ a superconducting device where the synchronization of Josephson and Bloch oscillations results in the quantization of transresistance similar to that in the (fractional) quantum Hall effe

  9. Temperature characteristics of quantum dot devices: Rate vs. Master Equation Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Bischoff, Svend; Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg;

    2001-01-01

    The change of transparency current with temperature for quantum dot devices depends strongly on whether a rate or master equation model is used. The master equation model successfully explains experimental observations of negative characteristic temperatures.......The change of transparency current with temperature for quantum dot devices depends strongly on whether a rate or master equation model is used. The master equation model successfully explains experimental observations of negative characteristic temperatures....

  10. Quantum Description of Optical Devices Used in Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kucera

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A quantum-mechanical description of the phase shifters, retarders, mirrors and beam splitters is given in the paper. The description is then applied on two types of states. On a coherent state, a classical-like state, and on a number state, hence the strict quantum state. The quantum description of a beam splitter can be found in the literature. However the description does not treat with the polarization concept. The paper is aimed to introduce quantum description of an arbitrary oriented retarder and give a description of a beam splitter which treats with the polarization.

  11. Bright hybrid white light-emitting quantum dot device with direct charge injection into quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jin; Xie, Jing-Wei; Wei, Xiang; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Chao-Ping; Wang, Zi-Xing; Jhun, Chulgyu

    2016-12-01

    A bright white quantum dot light-emitting device (white-QLED) with 4-[4-(1-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenyl]-2- [3-(tri-phenylen-2-yl)phen-3-yl]quinazoline deposited on a thin film of mixed green/red-QDs as a bilayer emitter is fabricated. The optimized white-QLED exhibits a turn-on voltage of 3.2 V and a maximum brightness of 3660 cd/m2@8 V with the Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity in the region of white light. The ultra-thin layer of QDs is proved to be critical for the white light generation in the devices. Excitation mechanism in the white-QLEDs is investigated by the detailed analyses of electroluminescence (EL) spectral and the fluorescence lifetime of QDs. The results show that charge injection is a dominant mechanism of excitation in the white-QLED. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21302122) and the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 13ZR1416600).

  12. Theory of quantum frequency translation of light in optical fiber: application to interference of two photons of different color

    CERN Document Server

    McGuinness, H J; McKinstrie, C J

    2011-01-01

    We study quantum frequency translation and two-color photon interference enabled by the Bragg scattering four-wave mixing process in optical fiber. Using realistic model parameters, we computationally and analytically determine the Green function and Schmidt modes for cases with various pump-pulse lengths. These cases can be categorized as either "non-discriminatory" or "discriminatory" in regards to their propensity to exhibit high-efficiency translation or high-visibility two-photon interference for many different shapes of input wave packets or for only a few input wave packets, respectively. Also, for a particular case, the Schmidt mode set was found to be nearly equal to a Hermite-Gaussian function set. The methods and results also apply with little modification to frequency conversion by sum-frequency conversion in optical crystals.

  13. Quantum interference in laser-assisted photo-ionization excited by a femtosecond x-ray pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yu-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The photoelectron energy spectra (PESs) excited by monochromatic femtosecond x-ray pulses in the presence of a femtosecond laser are investigated. APES is composed of a set of separate peaks, showing interesting comb-like structures. These structures result from the quantum interferences between photoelectron wave packets generated at different times. The width and the localization of each peak as well as the number of peaks are determined by all the laser and x-ray parameters. Most of peak heights of the PES are higher than the classical predictions.

  14. Multiple lobes in the far-field distribution of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers due to self-interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Röben, B., E-mail: roeben@pdi-berlin.de; Wienold, M.; Schrottke, L.; Grahn, H. T. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Leibniz-Institut im Forschungsverbund Berlin e. V., Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The far-field distribution of the emission intensity of terahertz (THz) quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) frequently exhibits multiple lobes instead of a single-lobed Gaussian distribution. We show that such multiple lobes can result from self-interference related to the typically large beam divergence of THz QCLs and the presence of an inevitable cryogenic operation environment including optical windows. We develop a quantitative model to reproduce the multiple lobes. We also demonstrate how a single-lobed far-field distribution can be achieved.

  15. Beating of magnetic oscillations in a graphene device probed by quantum capacitance

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2012-07-05

    We report the quantum capacitance of a monolayergraphene device in an external perpendicular magnetic field including the effects of Rashba spin-orbit interaction(SOI). The SOI mixes the spin up and spin down states of neighbouring Landau levels into two (unequally spaced) energy branches. In order to investigate the role of the SOI for the electronic transport, we study the density of states to probe the quantum capacitance of monolayergraphene.SOIeffects on the quantum magnetic oscillations (Shubnikov de Haas and de Hass-van Alphen) are deduced from the quantum capacitance.

  16. Study on Wide-gap Gallium-nitride Based Films and Their Quantum-dots Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-05

    propose that the size controlled GaN based quantum dot LED for the prospective white light source cold be used to simulate the sun light for higher Lumen...compositions, the quantum dots of InGaN or InN could emit light to cover the whole visible spectrum. The quantum dot based white light device could...wavelength could be shifted from red to the blue region. The high efficiency, quantum dot size-controlled, white light LED could thus be produced

  17. Programming and Tuning a Quantum Annealing Device to Solve Real World Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; O'Gorman, Bryan; Fluegemann, Joseph; Smelyanskiy, Vadim

    2015-03-01

    Solving real-world applications with quantum algorithms requires overcoming several challenges, ranging from translating the computational problem at hand to the quantum-machine language to tuning parameters of the quantum algorithm that have a significant impact on the performance of the device. In this talk, we discuss these challenges, strategies developed to enhance performance, and also a more efficient implementation of several applications. Although we will focus on applications of interest to NASA's Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the methods and concepts presented here apply to a broader family of hard discrete optimization problems, including those that occur in many machine-learning algorithms.

  18. Radiation-damage-free quantum crystallography and resolution-enhanced x-ray imaging techniques using quantum multipath interference of thermal light

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Medvedev, Nikita; Wang, Fenglin; Chapman, Henry N; Shih, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Using higher order coherence of thermal light sources, we can achieve enhancement of resolution of standard x-ray imaging techniques, such as x-ray diffraction and phase contrast imaging. The cost of implementing such schemes is minimal comparing to the schemes using entangled two-photon pairs. The proposed diffractive quan- tum crystallography using multipath interference of thermal light can be eventually free of radiation damage, because the diffraction pattern could be formed by using low energy photons of optical wavelength. Thus it is promising to apply the proposed quantum crystallography scheme to nanocrystalline or non-crystalline samples that are too difficult to be crystallized.

  19. Quantum Boltzmann equation solved by Monte Carlo method for nano-scale semiconductor devices simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Gang; Liu Xiao-Yan; Han Ru-Qi

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) full band self-consistent ensemble Monte Carlo (MC) method for solving the quantum Boltzmann equation, including collision broadening and quantum potential corrections, is developed to extend the MC method to the study of nano-scale semiconductor devices with obvious quantum mechanical (QM) effects. The quantum effects both in real space and momentum space in nano-scale semiconductor devices can be simulated. The effective mobility in the inversion layer of n and p channel MOSFET is simulated and compared with experimental data to verify this method. With this method 50nm ultra thin body silicon on insulator MOSFET are simulated. Results indicate that this method can be used to simulate the 2D QM effects in semiconductor devices including tunnelling effect.

  20. Influence of Disassociation Probability on External Quantum Efficiency in Organic Electrophosphorescent Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-hua; OU YANG Jun; LI Xue-yong; LI Hong-jian

    2007-01-01

    An analytical model is presented to calculate the disassociation probability and the external quantum efficiency at high field in doped organic electrophosphorescence(EPH) devices. The charge recombination process and the triplet(T)-triplet(T) annihilation processes are taken into account in this model. The influences of applied voltage and the thickness of the device on the disassociation probability, and of current density and the thickness of the device on the external quantum efficiency are studied thoroughly by including and ignoring the disassociation of excitons. It is found that the dissociation probability of excitons will come close to 1 at high electric field, and the external EPH quantum efficiency is almost the same at low electric field. There is a large discrepancy of the external EPH quantum efficiency at high electric field for including or ignoring the disassociation of excitons.

  1. Few-photon Non-linearities in Nanophotonic Devices for Quantum Information Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders

    In this thesis we investigate few-photon non-linearities in all-optical, on-chip circuits, and we discuss their possible applications in devices of interest for quantum information technology, such as conditional two-photon gates and single-photon sources. In order to propose efficient devices...

  2. Spatially and spectrally resolved quantum path interference with chirped driving pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Preclíková, Jana; Lorek, Eleonora; Larsen, Esben Witting; Heyl, Christoph M; Paleček, David; Zigmantas, Donatas; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B; Mauritsson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    We measure spectrally and spatially resolved high-order harmonics generated in argon using chirped multi-cycle laser pulses. Using a very stable, high-repetition rate laser we are able to clearly observe the interference between light emitted from the two shortest trajectories and study this interference structure systematically. The interference structure is clearly observed over a large range of harmonic orders, ranging from harmonic 11, which is below the ionization threshold of argon, to harmonic 25. The interference pattern contains more information than just the relative phase of the light from the two trajectories, since it is both spatially and spectrally resolved. We can access this additional information by changing the chirp of the driving laser pulses which affects both the spatial and the spectral phases of the two trajectories differently, allowing us to reconstruct the dipole phase parameters for the short ($\\alpha_s$) and long ($\\alpha_l$) trajectories from the data. The reconstruction is done...

  3. Kondo effect in quantum dots and molecular devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lang; LI Hongxiang; HU Wenping; ZHU Daoben

    2005-01-01

    Kondo effect is a very important many-body phenomenon in condensed matter physics,which explains why the resistance increases as the temperature is lowered (usually <10 K) in dilute magnetic alloy, and why the conductance increases as temperature is decreased in quantum dots. This paper simply introduces equilibrium and non- equilibrium Kondo effects in quantum dots together with the Kondo effect in quantum dots with even number of electrons (when the singlet and triplet states are degenerate). Furthermore, Kondo effect in single atom/molecular transistors is introduced, which indicates a new way to study Kondo effect.

  4. Quantum dot doped solid polymer electrolyte for device application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pramod K.; Kim, Kang Wook; Rhee, Hee-Woo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea)

    2009-06-15

    ZnS capped CdSe quantum dots embedded in PEO:KI:I{sub 2} polymer electrolyte matrix have been synthesized and characterized for dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) application. The complex impedance spectroscopy shows enhance in ionic conductivity ({sigma}) due to charges provide by quantum dots (QD) while AFM affirm the uniform distribution of QD into polymer electrolyte matrix. Cyclic voltammetry revealed the possible interaction between polymer electrolyte, QD and iodide/iodine. The photovoltaic performances of the DSSC containing quantum dots doped polymer electrolyte was also found to improve. (author)

  5. Direct method for measuring and witnessing quantum entanglement of arbitrary two-qubit states through Hong-Ou-Mandel interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Chimczak, Grzegorz; Lemr, Karel

    2017-02-01

    We describe a direct method for experimental determination of the negativity of an arbitrary two-qubit state with 11 measurements performed on multiple copies of the two-qubit system. Our method is based on the experimentally accessible sequences of singlet projections performed on up to four qubit pairs. In particular, our method permits the application of the Peres-Horodecki separability criterion to an arbitrary two-qubit state. We explicitly demonstrate that measuring entanglement in terms of negativity requires three measurements more than detecting two-qubit entanglement. The reported minimal set of interferometric measurements provides a complete description of bipartite quantum entanglement in terms of two-photon interference. This set is smaller than the set of 15 measurements needed to perform a complete quantum state tomography of an arbitrary two-qubit system. Finally, we demonstrate that the set of nine Makhlin's invariants needed to express the negativity can be measured by performing 13 multicopy projections. We demonstrate both that these invariants are a useful theoretical concept for designing specialized quantum interferometers and that their direct measurement within the framework of linear optics does not require performing complete quantum state tomography.

  6. Cooperative biexciton generation and destructive interference in coupled quantum dots using adiabatic rapid passage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renaud, N.; Grozema, F.C.

    2014-01-01

    We report numerical simulations of biexciton generation in coupled quantum dots (CQDs) placed in a static electric field and excited by a chirped laser pulse. Our simulations explicitly account for exciton-phonon interactions at finite temperature using a non-Markovian quantum jump approach to solve

  7. Advanced Epitaxial Lift-Off Quantum Dot Photovoltaic Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a high-efficiency, triple-junction, epitaxial lift-off (ELO) solar cell by incorporating quantum dots (QDs) within the current-limiting...

  8. Quantum dot lasers and integrated guided wave devices on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Mi, Zetian; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2007-02-01

    We have studied the growth and characteristics of self-organized InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers and their monolithic integration with waveguides and quantum well electroabsorption modulators on Si. Utilizing multiple layers of InAs quantum dots as effective dislocation filters near the GaAs-Si interface, we have demonstrated high performance quantum dot lasers grown directly on Si that exhibit, for the first time, relatively low threshold current (J th = 900 A/cm2), large characteristic temperature (T 0 = 278 K), and output slope efficiency ( >=0.3 W/A). Focused-ion-beam milling has been used to form high-quality facets for the cavity mirror and coupling groove of an integrated laser/waveguide system on Si. We have also achieved a groove-coupled laser/modulator system on Si that exhibits a coupling coefficient greater than 20% and a modulation depth of ~ 100% at 5 V reverse bias.

  9. Optical Biosensors: A Revolution Towards Quantum Nanoscale Electronics Device Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The dimension of biomolecules is of few nanometers, so the biomolecular devices ought to be of that range so a better understanding about the performance of the electronic biomolecular devices can be obtained at nanoscale. Development of optical biomolecular device is a new move towards revolution of nano-bioelectronics. Optical biosensor is one of such nano-biomolecular devices that has a potential to pave a new dimension of research and device fabrication in the field of optical and biomedical fields. This paper is a very small report about optical biosensor and its development and importance in various fields.

  10. Molecular Orbital Rule for Quantum Interference in Weakly Coupled Dimers: Low-Energy Giant Conductivity Switching Induced by Orbital Level Crossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Lücke, Andreas; Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    2017-02-16

    Destructive quantum interference (QI) in molecular junctions has attracted much attention in recent years. It can tune the conductance of molecular devices dramatically, which implies numerous potential applications in thermoelectric and switching applications. There are several schemes that address and rationalize QI in single molecular devices. Dimers play a particular role in this respect because the QI signal may disappear, depending on the dislocation of monomers. We derive a simple rule that governs the occurrence of QI in weakly coupled dimer stacks of both alternant and nonalternant polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and extends the Tada-Yoshizawa scheme. Starting from the Green's function formalism combined with the molecular orbital expansion approach, it is shown that QI-induced antiresonances and their energies can be predicted from the amplitudes of the respective monomer terminal molecular orbitals. The condition is illustrated for a toy model consisting of two hydrogen molecules and applied within density functional calculations to alternant dimers of oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) and nonalternant PAHs. Minimal dimer structure modifications that require only a few millielectronvolts and lead to an energy crossing of the essentially preserved monomer orbitals are shown to result in giant conductance switching ratios.

  11. Handheld deep ultraviolet emission device based on aluminum nitride quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Iwayama, Sho; Saito, Takao; Kawakami, Yasuyuki; Kubo, Fumio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2012-10-22

    We report the successful fabrication of a compact deep ultraviolet emission device via a marriage of AlGaN quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field electron emitters. The device demonstrated a 20-mW deep ultraviolet output power and an approximately 4% power efficiency. The performance of this device may lead toward the realization of an environmentally friendly, convenient and practical deep ultraviolet light source.

  12. Nanosecond-timescale spin transfer using individual electrons in a quadruple-quantum-dot device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baart, T. A.; Jovanovic, N.; Vandersypen, L. M. K. [QuTech and Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-25

    The ability to coherently transport electron-spin states between different sites of gate-defined semiconductor quantum dots is an essential ingredient for a quantum-dot-based quantum computer. Previous shuttles using electrostatic gating were too slow to move an electron within the spin dephasing time across an array. Here, we report a nanosecond-timescale spin transfer of individual electrons across a quadruple-quantum-dot device. Utilizing enhanced relaxation rates at a so-called hot spot, we can upper bound the shuttle time to at most 150 ns. While actual shuttle times are likely shorter, 150 ns is already fast enough to preserve spin coherence in, e.g., silicon based quantum dots. This work therefore realizes an important prerequisite for coherent spin transfer in quantum dot arrays.

  13. A heterogeneous III-V/silicon integration platform for on-chip quantum photonic circuits with single quantum dot devices

    CERN Document Server

    Davanco, Marcelo; Sapienza, Luca; Zhang, Chen-Zhao; Cardoso, Jose Vinicius De Miranda; Verma, Varun; Mirin, Richard; Nam, Sae Woo; Liu, Liu; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Photonic integration is an enabling technology for photonic quantum science, offering greater scalability, stability, and functionality than traditional bulk optics. Here, we describe a scalable, heterogeneous III-V/silicon integration platform to produce Si$_3$N$_4$ photonic circuits incorporating GaAs-based nanophotonic devices containing self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots. We demonstrate pure singlephoton emission from individual quantum dots in GaAs waveguides and cavities - where strong control of spontaneous emission rate is observed - directly launched into Si$_3$N$_4$ waveguides with > 90 % efficiency through evanescent coupling. To date, InAs/GaAs quantum dots constitute the most promising solidstate triggered single-photon sources, offering bright, pure and indistinguishable emission that can be electrically and optically controlled. Si$_3$N$_4$ waveguides offer low-loss propagation, tailorable dispersion and high Kerr nonlinearities, desirable for linear and nonlinear optical signal processing d...

  14. Evaluation of Electromagnetic Interference and Exposure Assessment from s-Health Solutions Based on Wi-Fi Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia de Miguel-Bilbao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the number of wireless devices operating at the frequency band of 2.4 GHz has increased in several settings, such as healthcare, occupational, and household. In this work, the emissions from Wi-Fi transceivers applicable to context aware scenarios are analyzed in terms of potential interference and assessment on exposure guideline compliance. Near field measurement results as well as deterministic simulation results on realistic indoor environments are presented, providing insight on the interaction between the Wi-Fi transceiver and implantable/body area network devices as well as other transceivers operating within an indoor environment, exhibiting topological and morphological complexity. By following approaches (near field estimation/deterministic estimation, colocated body situations as well as large indoor emissions can be determined. The results show in general compliance with exposure levels and the impact of overall network deployment, which can be optimized in order to reduce overall interference levels while maximizing system performance.

  15. Quantum devices in silicon/silicon germanium heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinker, Keith A.

    This thesis presents the fabrication and characterization of silicon/silicon-germanium quantum wells, quantum dots, and quantum point contacts. These systems are promising for quantum computing applications due to the long predicted spin lifetimes. In addition, the valley states in Si/SiGe two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) are a novel phenomenon in regards to nanostructures, and characterizing these states is also necessary for potential computing applications. However, working with these heterostructures---especially in regards to metal Schottky gating---has proved historically challenging such that single electron transistors had not been achieved at the onset of this research. The first quantum dots in Si/SiGe are presented, defined completely by CF4 reactive ion etch without the use of metal gates. Etch-defined 2DEG side gates are used to modulate the potential of the quantum dot. Results for various metal gating schemes are also presented, culminating in the first Schottky-gated quantum dots in Si/SiGe. Differing from the etch-defined dots, the tunnel junctions of the metal-etch hybrid dot are fully tunable by the voltage applied to the top gates. Hall measurements of multiple heterostructures are presented, providing evidence that many of the challenges associated with gating Si/SiGe can be attributed to undepleted dopants in the supply layer. These dopants screen the top gates but can be detected as a parallel conduction channel in Hall measurements taken at a 2 K. A fully top-gate defined quantum dot was fabricated on an optimized Si/SiGe heterostructure, and the single particle excited states were resolved for the first time in Si/SiGe. Finally, quantum point contacts were defined by metal top gates, and the conduction was mapped out over a large range of magnetic field and voltages on the gates. The positions of the conductance steps are used to extract the valley splitting---a quantity that had been measured in a bulk 2DEG but not in a nanostructure

  16. Experimental Device-independent Tests of Classical and Quantum Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Badziag, Johan Ahrens Piotr; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental resource in any communication and computation task is the amount of information that can be transmitted and processed. Information encoded in a classical system is limited by the dimension d_c of the system, i.e., the number of distinguishable states. A system with d_c=2^n classical states can carry n bits of classical information. Information encoded in a quantum system is limited by the dimension d_q of the Hilbert space of the system, i.e., the number of perfectly distinguishable quantum states. A system with d_q=2^n perfectly distinguishable quantum states can carry n qubits of quantum information. Physical systems of higher dimensions may enable more efficient and powerful information processing protocols. The dimension is fundamental in quantum cryptography and random number generation, where the security of many schemes [1,2,3] crucially relies on the system's dimension. From a fundamental perspective, the dimension can be used to quantify the non-classicality of correlations, since class...

  17. New method to simulate quantum interference using deterministic processes and application to event-based simulation of quantum computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; De Raedt, K.; Michielsen, K.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that networks of locally connected processing units with a primitive learning capability exhibit behavior that is usually only attributed to quantum systems. We describe networks that simulate single-photon beam-splitter and Mach-Zehnder interferometer experiments on a causal, event-b

  18. Anisotropy-Induced Quantum Interference and Population Trapping between Orthogonal Quantum Dot Exciton States in Semiconductor Cavity Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen; Agarwal, Girish S

    2017-02-10

    We describe how quantum dot semiconductor cavity systems can be engineered to realize anisotropy-induced dipole-dipole coupling between orthogonal dipole states in a single quantum dot. Quantum dots in single-mode cavity structures as well as photonic crystal waveguides coupled to spin states or linearly polarized excitons are considered. We demonstrate how the dipole-dipole coupling can control the radiative decay rate of excitons and form pure entangled states in the long time limit. We investigate both field-free entanglement evolution and coherently pumped exciton regimes, and show how a double-field pumping scenario can completely eliminate the decay of coherent Rabi oscillations and lead to population trapping. In the Mollow triplet regime, we explore the emitted spectra from the driven dipoles and show how a nonpumped dipole can take on the form of a spectral triplet, quintuplet, or a singlet, which has applications for producing subnatural linewidth single photons and more easily accessing regimes of high-field quantum optics and cavity-QED.

  19. Quantum interference and Kondo effects in an Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interferometer containing a laterally coupled double quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, T.; Tokura, Y.; Tarucha, S.

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate spin-dependent electron transport through an Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interferometer containing a laterally coupled double quantum dot. In particular, we numerically calculate the Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher oscillations of the linear conductance in the Kondo regime. We show that the AC oscillation in the Kondo regime deviates from the sinusoidal form.

  20. Electron Interference in Ballistic Graphene Nanoconstrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baringhaus, Jens; Settnes, Mikkel; Aprojanz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    We realize nanometer size constrictions in ballistic graphene nanoribbons grown on sidewalls of SiC mesa structures. The high quality of our devices allows the observation of a number of electronic quantum interference phenomena. The transmissions of Fabry-Perot-like resonances are probed...

  1. Deterministic multimode photonic device for quantum-information processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ersbak Bang; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We propose the implementation of a light source that can deterministically generate a rich variety of multimode quantum states. The desired states are encoded in the collective population of different ground hyperfine states of an atomic ensemble and converted to multimode photonic states...... by excitation to optically excited levels followed by cooperative spontaneous emission. Among our examples of applications, we demonstrate how two-photon-entangled states can be prepared and implemented in a protocol for a reference-frame-free quantum key distribution and how one-dimensional as well as higher...

  2. N-dimensional measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with N + 1 un-characterized sources: zero quantum-bit-error-rate case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Won-Young; Su, Hong-Yi; Bae, Joonwoo

    2016-01-01

    We study N-dimensional measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol where one checking state is used. Only assuming that the checking state is a superposition of other N sources, we show that the protocol is secure in zero quantum-bit-error-rate case, suggesting possibility of the protocol. The method may be applied in other quantum information processing.

  3. Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) Devices For Monolithic Integrated Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Thomas H.

    1988-05-01

    Semiconductor MQWs represent a new technology for opto-electronics. These MQWs have an electroabsorption effect approximately 50 times larger than conventional semiconductors. They are compatible with existing source and detector material systems and produce devices that are compact and high speed, which makes them useful for monolithic integrated optoelectronic devices.

  4. W-state Analyzer and Multi-party Measurement-device-independent Quantum Key Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changhua; Xu, Feihu; Pei, Changxing

    2015-12-01

    W-state is an important resource for many quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we for the first time propose a multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on W-state. With linear optics, we design a W-state analyzer in order to distinguish the four-qubit W-state. This analyzer constructs the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Moreover, we derived a complete security proof of the four-party MDI-QKD, and performed a numerical simulation to study its performance. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 150 km standard telecom fiber with off-the-shelf single photon detectors. This work takes an important step towards multi-party quantum communication and a quantum network.

  5. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures over a metropolitan network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Wang, Wei-Long; Tang, Yan-Lin; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Hui; Sun, Xiang-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Li, Hao; Puthoor, Ittoop Vergheese; You, Li-Xing; Andersson, Erika; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Xiao; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Qiang; Curty, Marcos; Chen, Teng-Yun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Quantum digital signatures (QDSs) provide a means for signing electronic communications with information-theoretic security. However, all previous demonstrations of quantum digital signatures assume trusted measurement devices. This renders them vulnerable against detector side-channel attacks, just like quantum key distribution. Here we exploit a measurement-device-independent (MDI) quantum network, over a metropolitan area, to perform a field test of a three-party MDI QDS scheme that is secure against any detector side-channel attack. In so doing, we are able to successfully sign a binary message with a security level of about 10-7. Remarkably, our work demonstrates the feasibility of MDI QDSs for practical applications.

  6. Theoretical Proposals of Quantum Phase-slip Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hriscu, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of theoretical proposals of novel circuits that embed ultrathin superconducting nanowires with coherent quantum phase-slips (QPS). The motivation for our proposals is twofold: firstly, to facilitate unambiguous experimental verification of coherent phase-slips. Secondl

  7. Field-effect transistor self-electrooptic effect device integrated photodiode, quantum well modulator and transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.A.B.; Feuer, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Shunk, S.C.; Henry, J.E.; Burrows, D.J.; Chemla, D.S.

    1989-03-01

    The authors propose and demonstrate the integration of a photodiode, a quantum-confined Stark effect quantum well optical modulator and a metal-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MESFET), to make a field-effect transistor self-electrooptic effect device. This integration allows optical inputs and outputs on the surface of a GaAs-integrated circuit chip, compatible with standard MESFET processing. As an illustration of feasibility, the authors demonstrate optical signal amplification with a single MESFET.

  8. Dependence of the modulation response of quantum dot based nanocavity devices on the number of emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorke, Michael; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    A microscopic theory is used to study the dynamical properties of semiconductor quantum dot based nanocavity laser systems. The carrier kinetics and photon populations are determined using a fully quantum mechanical treatment of the light‐matter coupling. In this work, we investigate the dependen...... of the modulation response in such devices on the number of emitters coupled to the cavity mode. (© 2011 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)...

  9. Advances in colloidal quantum dot solar cells: The depleted-heterojunction device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Illan J.; Pattantyus-Abraham, Andras G.; Barkhouse, Aaron R.; Wang, Xihua [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Rd., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Konstantatos, Gerasimos [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Rd., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); ICFO - Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain); Debnath, Ratan; Levina, Larissa [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Rd., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Raabe, Ines; Nazeeruddin, Md. K.; Graetzel, Michael [Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Sargent, Edward H., E-mail: ted.sargent@utoronto.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Rd., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)

    2011-08-31

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaics combine low-cost solution processibility with quantum size-effect tunability to match absorption with the solar spectrum. Recent advances in CQD photovoltaics have led to 3.6% AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies. Here we report CQD photovoltaic devices on transparent conductive oxides and show that our devices rely on the establishment of a depletion region for field-driven charge transport and separation. The resultant depleted-heterojunction solar cells provide a 5.1% AM1.5 power conversion efficiency. The devices employ infrared-bandgap size-effect-tuned PbS colloidal quantum dots, enabling broadband harvesting of the solar spectrum.

  10. Recent progress in InAs/InP quantum dash nanostructures and devices

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-03-24

    In this talk, we will give an outline and introduction to the broad inter-band emission devices focusing on the InAs/InP quantum dash material system, device physics and establishment of ultrabroad stimulated emission behavior. In addition, technologies for growing these nanostructures as well as engineer the bandgap of quantum dash based system using epitaxy growth techniques and postgrowth intermixing methods will be presented. At device level, we will focus our discussion on our recent progress in extending the ultra-broad lasing emission from quantum dash lasers, and achievements in broad gain semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA), mode locked lasers, comb-lasers, wide band superluminsect diodes fabricated on this material system. © 2015 IEEE.

  11. RETRACTED: Advances in colloidal quantum dot solar cells: The depleted-heterojunction device

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2011-08-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaics combine low-cost solution processibility with quantum size-effect tunability to match absorption with the solar spectrum. Recent advances in CQD photovoltaics have led to 3.6% AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies. Here we report CQD photovoltaic devices on transparent conductive oxides and show that our devices rely on the establishment of a depletion region for field-driven charge transport and separation. The resultant depleted-heterojunction solar cells provide a 5.1% AM1.5 power conversion efficiency. The devices employ infrared-bandgap size-effect-tuned PbS colloidal quantum dots, enabling broadband harvesting of the solar spectrum. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  12. A transfer hamiltonian model for devices based on quantum dot arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illera, S; Prades, J D; Cirera, A; Cornet, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a model of electron transport through a random distribution of interacting quantum dots embedded in a dielectric matrix to simulate realistic devices. The method underlying the model depends only on fundamental parameters of the system and it is based on the Transfer Hamiltonian approach. A set of noncoherent rate equations can be written and the interaction between the quantum dots and between the quantum dots and the electrodes is introduced by transition rates and capacitive couplings. A realistic modelization of the capacitive couplings, the transmission coefficients, the electron/hole tunneling currents, and the density of states of each quantum dot have been taken into account. The effects of the local potential are computed within the self-consistent field regime. While the description of the theoretical framework is kept as general as possible, two specific prototypical devices, an arbitrary array of quantum dots embedded in a matrix insulator and a transistor device based on quantum dots, are used to illustrate the kind of unique insight that numerical simulations based on the theory are able to provide.

  13. A Transfer Hamiltonian Model for Devices Based on Quantum Dot Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Illera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a model of electron transport through a random distribution of interacting quantum dots embedded in a dielectric matrix to simulate realistic devices. The method underlying the model depends only on fundamental parameters of the system and it is based on the Transfer Hamiltonian approach. A set of noncoherent rate equations can be written and the interaction between the quantum dots and between the quantum dots and the electrodes is introduced by transition rates and capacitive couplings. A realistic modelization of the capacitive couplings, the transmission coefficients, the electron/hole tunneling currents, and the density of states of each quantum dot have been taken into account. The effects of the local potential are computed within the self-consistent field regime. While the description of the theoretical framework is kept as general as possible, two specific prototypical devices, an arbitrary array of quantum dots embedded in a matrix insulator and a transistor device based on quantum dots, are used to illustrate the kind of unique insight that numerical simulations based on the theory are able to provide.

  14. Novel interference effects and a new quantum phase in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Singha Deo; A M Jayannavar

    2001-02-01

    Mesoscopic systems have provided an opportunity to study quantum effects beyond the atomic realm. In these systems quantum coherence prevails over the entire sample. We discuss several novel effects related to persistent currents in open systems which do not have analogues in closed systems. Some phenomena arising simultaneously due to two non-classical effects namely, Aharonov–Bohm effect and quantum tunneling are presented. Simple analysis of sharp phase jumps observed in double-slit Aharonov–Bohm experiments is given. Some consequences of parity violation are elaborated. Finally, we briefly describe the dephasing of Aharonov–Bohm oscillations in Aharonov–Bohm ring geometry due to spin-flip scattering in one of the arms. Several experimental manifestations of these phenomena and their applications are given.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of an undoped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming, E-mail: maaxiao@ustc.edu.cn; You, Jie; Wei, Da; Tu, Tao; Guo, Guang-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping, E-mail: gpguo@ustc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, CAS, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jiang, Hong-Wen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    We demonstrate the development of a double quantum dot with an integrated charge sensor fabricated in undoped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures using a double top-gated design. Based on the evaluation of the integrated charge sensor, the double quantum dot can be tuned to a few-electron region. Additionally, the inter-dot coupling of the double quantum dot can be tuned to a large extent according to the voltage on the middle gate. The quantum dot is shown to be tunable from a single dot to a well-isolated double dot. To assess the stability of such design, the potential fluctuation induced by 1/f noise was measured. Based on the findings herein, the quantum dot design developed in the undoped GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor shows potential for the future exploitation of nano-devices.

  16. Optimization of Quantum-Dot Molecular Beam Epitaxy for Broad Spectral Bandwidth Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Majid, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The optimization of the key growth parameters for broad spectral bandwidth devices based on quantum dots is reported. A combination of atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence of test samples, and optoelectronic characterization of superluminescent diodes (SLDs) is used to optimize the growth conditions to obtain high-quality devices with large spectral bandwidth, radiative efficiency (due to a reduced defective-dot density), and thus output power. The defective-dot density is highlighted as being responsible for the degradation of device performance. An SLD device with 160 nm of bandwidth centered at 1230 nm is demonstrated.

  17. Graphene and Carbon Quantum Dot-Based Materials in Photovoltaic Devices: From Synthesis to Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Paulo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Graphene and carbon quantum dots have extraordinary optical and electrical features because of their quantum confinement properties. This makes them attractive materials for applications in photovoltaic devices (PV. Their versatility has led to their being used as light harvesting materials or selective contacts, either for holes or electrons, in silicon quantum dot, polymer or dye-sensitized solar cells. In this review, we summarize the most common uses of both types of semiconducting materials and highlight the significant advances made in recent years due to the influence that synthetic materials have on final performance.

  18. Gaussian-modulated coherent-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiang-Chun; Sun, Shi-Hai; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Gui, Ming; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2014-04-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), leaving the detection procedure to the third partner and thus being immune to all detector side-channel attacks, is very promising for the construction of high-security quantum information networks. We propose a scheme to implement MDI-QKD, but with continuous variables instead of discrete ones, i.e., with the source of Gaussian-modulated coherent states, based on the principle of continuous-variable entanglement swapping. This protocol not only can be implemented with current telecom components but also has high key rates compared to its discrete counterpart; thus it will be highly compatible with quantum networks.

  19. Influence of electromagnetic interference on implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Motoyuki; Mizutani, Noboru; Waseda, Katsuhisa

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the susceptibility of implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices to electromagnetic interference in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car [High-Speed Surface Transport (HSST)]. During the study, cardiac devices were connected to a phantom model that had similar characteristics to the human body. Three pacemakers from three manufacturers and one implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) were evaluated in and around the magnetically levitated vehicle. The system is based on a normal conductive system levitated by the attractive force of magnets and propelled by a linear induction motor without wheels. The magnetic field strength at 40 cm from the vehicle in the nonlevitating state was 0.12 mT and that during levitation was 0.20 mT. The magnetic and electric field strengths on a seat close to the variable voltage/variable frequency inverter while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.13 mT, 2.95 V/m and 0.04 mT, 0.36 V/m, respectively. Data recorded on a seat close to the reactor while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.09 mT, 2.45 V/m and 0.05 mT, 1.46 V/m, respectively. Measured magnetic and electric field strengths both inside and outside the linear motor car were too low to result in device inactivation. No sensing, pacing, or arrhythmic interactions were noted with any pacemaker or ICD programmed in either bipolar and unipolar configurations. In conclusion, our data suggest that a permanent programming change or a device failure is unlikely to occur and that the linear motor car system is probably safe for patients with one of the four implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices used in this study under the conditions tested.

  20. Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference, Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects for Optical Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-26

    performed. 2.0 INTRODUCTION Three dimensional (3D) photonic crystals and their optical properties have attracted a lot of attention in the past decade... physical phenomena. The band gap frequency of this system can be varied to tailor to the electronic transition levels of a gain medium such as InAs...quantum dot or an InGaAs quantum well. The band gap can be varied in addition to include either one or two electronic levels of a multi-level system

  1. Quantum measurements are physical processes. Comment on "Consciousness and the double-slit interference pattern: Six experiments," By Dean Radin et al. [Physics Essays 25, 2 (2012)

    CERN Document Server

    de Bianchi, Massimiliano Sassoli

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the assertion that some recent double-slit interference experiments, conducted by Radin et al., would have tested the possible role of the experimenter's mind in the collapse of the quantum wave function, is questioned. It is emphasized that quantum mechanics doesn't need any psychophysical ingredient to explain the measurement processes, and therefore parapsychologists shouldn't resort to the latter to support the possibility of psychokinesis, but search for more convincing explanations.

  2. Electrode-stress-induced nanoscale disorder in Si quantum electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Ahn, Y.; Tilka, J. A.; Sampson, K. C.; Savage, D. E.; Prance, J. R.; Simmons, C. B.; Lagally, M. G.; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.; Holt, M. V.; Evans, P. G.

    2016-06-01

    Disorder in the potential-energy landscape presents a major obstacle to the more rapid development of semiconductor quantum device technologies. We report a large-magnitude source of disorder, beyond commonly considered unintentional background doping or fixed charge in oxide layers: nanoscale strain fields induced by residual stresses in nanopatterned metal gates. Quantitative analysis of synchrotron coherent hard x-ray nanobeam diffraction patterns reveals gate-induced curvature and strains up to 0.03% in a buried Si quantum well within a Si/SiGe heterostructure. Electrode stress presents both challenges to the design of devices and opportunities associated with the lateral manipulation of electronic energy levels.

  3. Hybrid Quantum Device with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond Coupled to Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-Bo; Xiang, Ze-Liang; Rabl, Peter; Nori, Franco

    2016-07-01

    We show that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond interfaced with a suspended carbon nanotube carrying a dc current can facilitate a spin-nanomechanical hybrid device. We demonstrate that strong magnetomechanical interactions between a single NV spin and the vibrational mode of the suspended nanotube can be engineered and dynamically tuned by external control over the system parameters. This spin-nanomechanical setup with strong, intrinsic, and tunable magnetomechanical couplings allows for the construction of hybrid quantum devices with NV centers and carbon-based nanostructures, as well as phonon-mediated quantum information processing with spin qubits.

  4. Combined atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence imaging to select single InAs/GaAs quantum dots for quantum photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Luca; Liu, Jin; Song, Jin Dong; Fält, Stefan; Wegscheider, Werner; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2017-07-24

    We report on a combined photoluminescence imaging and atomic force microscopy study of single, isolated self-assembled InAs quantum dots. The motivation of this work is to determine an approach that allows to assess single quantum dots as candidates for quantum nanophotonic devices. By combining optical and scanning probe characterization techniques, we find that single quantum dots often appear in the vicinity of comparatively large topographic features. Despite this, the quantum dots generally do not exhibit significant differences in their non-resonantly pumped emission spectra in comparison to quantum dots appearing in defect-free regions, and this behavior is observed across multiple wafers produced in different growth chambers. Such large surface features are nevertheless a detriment to applications in which single quantum dots are embedded within nanofabricated photonic devices: they are likely to cause large spectral shifts in the wavelength of cavity modes designed to resonantly enhance the quantum dot emission, thereby resulting in a nominally perfectly-fabricated single quantum dot device failing to behave in accordance with design. We anticipate that the approach of screening quantum dots not only based on their optical properties, but also their surrounding surface topographies, will be necessary to improve the yield of single quantum dot nanophotonic devices.

  5. Hydride generation – in-atomizer collection of Pb in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device for atomic absorption spectrometry – an interference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotný, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); High School in Hořice, Husova 1414, 508 01 Hořice (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-01-01

    Interferences of selected hydride forming elements (As, Sb, Bi, Se and Sn) on lead determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were extensively studied in both on-line atomization and preconcentration (collection) modes. The commonly used on-line atomization mode was found free of significant interferences, whereas strong interference from Bi was observed when employing the preconcentration mode with plumbane collection in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device. Interference of Bi seems to take place in the preconcentration step. Interference of Bi in the collection mode cannot be reduced by increased hydrogen radical amount in the trap and/or the atomizer. - Highlights: ► Interference study on Pb determination by in-atomizer trapping was performed for the first time. ► Bi was found as a severe interferent in the preconcentration mode (Pb:Bi ratio 1:100). ► No interference was found in the on-line atomization (no preconcentration). ► Bi interference occurs during preconcentration.

  6. Large-scale simulations of error-prone quantum computation devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trieu, Doan Binh

    2009-07-01

    The theoretical concepts of quantum computation in the idealized and undisturbed case are well understood. However, in practice, all quantum computation devices do suffer from decoherence effects as well as from operational imprecisions. This work assesses the power of error-prone quantum computation devices using large-scale numerical simulations on parallel supercomputers. We present the Juelich Massively Parallel Ideal Quantum Computer Simulator (JUMPIQCS), that simulates a generic quantum computer on gate level. It comprises an error model for decoherence and operational errors. The robustness of various algorithms in the presence of noise has been analyzed. The simulation results show that for large system sizes and long computations it is imperative to actively correct errors by means of quantum error correction. We implemented the 5-, 7-, and 9-qubit quantum error correction codes. Our simulations confirm that using error-prone correction circuits with non-fault-tolerant quantum error correction will always fail, because more errors are introduced than being corrected. Fault-tolerant methods can overcome this problem, provided that the single qubit error rate is below a certain threshold. We incorporated fault-tolerant quantum error correction techniques into JUMPIQCS using Steane's 7-qubit code and determined this threshold numerically. Using the depolarizing channel as the source of decoherence, we find a threshold error rate of (5.2{+-}0.2) x 10{sup -6}. For Gaussian distributed operational over-rotations the threshold lies at a standard deviation of 0.0431{+-}0.0002. We can conclude that quantum error correction is especially well suited for the correction of operational imprecisions and systematic over-rotations. For realistic simulations of specific quantum computation devices we need to extend the generic model to dynamic simulations, i.e. time-dependent Hamiltonian simulations of realistic hardware models. We focus on today's most advanced

  7. Long-distance quantum key distribution with imperfect devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Piparo, Nicoló; Razavi, Mohsen [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-04

    Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters is addressed. We compare, under practical assumptions, two such schemes in terms of their secure key generation rate per memory, R{sub QKD}. The two schemes under investigation are the one proposed by Duan et al. in [Nat. 414, 413 (2001)] and that of Sangouard et al. proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 76, 050301 (2007)]. We consider various sources of imperfections in the latter protocol, such as a nonzero double-photon probability for the source, dark count per pulse, channel loss and inefficiencies in photodetectors and memories, to find the rate for different nesting levels. We determine the maximum value of the double-photon probability beyond which it is not possible to share a secret key anymore. We find the crossover distance for up to three nesting levels. We finally compare the two protocols.

  8. Long-distance quantum key distribution with imperfect devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Piparo, Nicoló; Razavi, Mohsen

    2014-12-01

    Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters is addressed. We compare, under practical assumptions, two such schemes in terms of their secure key generation rate per memory, RQKD. The two schemes under investigation are the one proposed by Duan et al. in [Nat. 414, 413 (2001)] and that of Sangouard et al. proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 76, 050301 (2007)]. We consider various sources of imperfections in the latter protocol, such as a nonzero double-photon probability for the source, dark count per pulse, channel loss and inefficiencies in photodetectors and memories, to find the rate for different nesting levels. We determine the maximum value of the double-photon probability beyond which it is not possible to share a secret key anymore. We find the crossover distance for up to three nesting levels. We finally compare the two protocols.

  9. Source-Device-Independent Ultrafast Quantum Random Number Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, Davide G.; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Secure random numbers are a fundamental element of many applications in science, statistics, cryptography and more in general in security protocols. We present a method that enables the generation of high-speed unpredictable random numbers from the quadratures of an electromagnetic field without any assumption on the input state. The method allows us to eliminate the numbers that can be predicted due to the presence of classical and quantum side information. In particular, we introduce a procedure to estimate a bound on the conditional min-entropy based on the entropic uncertainty principle for position and momentum observables of infinite dimensional quantum systems. By the above method, we experimentally demonstrated the generation of secure true random bits at a rate greater than 1.7 Gbit /s .

  10. An integrated quantum photonic sensor based on Hong-Ou-Mandel interference

    CERN Document Server

    Basiri-Esfahani, Sahar; Armin, Ardalan; Combes, Joshua; Milburn, Gerard J

    2015-01-01

    Photonic-crystal-based integrated optical systems have been used for a broad range of sensing applications with great success. This has been motivated by several advantages such as high sensitivity, miniaturization, remote sensing, selectivity and stability. Many photonic crystal sensors have been proposed with various fabrication designs that result in improved optical properties. Here we propose a novel multi-purpose sensor architecture that can be used for force, refractive index and possibly local temperature detection. In this scheme, two coupled cavities behave as an "effective beam splitter". The sensor works based on fourth order interference (the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect) and requires a sequence of single photon pulses and consequently has low pulse power. Changes in the parameter to be measured induce variations in the effective beam splitter reflectivity and result in changes to the visibility of interference. We demonstrate this generic scheme in coupled L3 photonic crystal cavities as an example and...

  11. Innovative Ge Quantum Dot Functional Sensing/Metrology Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-20

    on Fiber Optics and Photonics, Kharagpur, India , 13 - 16 December, 2014. (2) P. W. Li, (Invited Talk) 2014, “Designer germanium quantum dots for...disclosure/ Patent (title, date submitted): (1) “Method for manufacturing gate stack structure in insta-metal-oxide-semiconductor Field-effect-transistor...by Wei-Ting Lai, T. George, and P. W. Li, Taiwan and US patents , (Pending), Dec. 2014. (2) “Method For Forming a Thermoelectric Film Having a Micro

  12. Play building blocks on population distribution of multilevel superconducting flux qubit with quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Xueda; Yu, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments on Landau-Zener interference in multilevel superconducting flux qubits revealed various interesting characteristics, which have been studied theoretically in our recent work by simply using rate equation method [PRB 79, 094529, (2009)]. In this note we extend this method to the same system but with larger driving amplitude and higher driving frequency. The results show various anomalous characteristics, some of which have been observed in a recent work.

  13. Quantum interferences in swift highly-charged dressed-ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, J M; Rivarola, R D [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Fainstein, P D [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (RN) (Argentina)], E-mail: jmonti@ifir.edu.ar

    2008-10-28

    Ionization of He targets by impact of partially stripped nuclei is investigated. A unified theoretical model, based on the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state approximation, is employed to describe the appearance of structures in the experimental doubly differential spectra. These structures are interpreted in terms of coherent interference of short- and long-range contributions of the perturbative projectile potential. (fast track communication)

  14. CdSe Quantum Dots for Solar Cell Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Kashyout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CdSe quantum dots have been prepared with different sizes and exploited as inorganic dye to sensitize a wide bandgap TiO2 thin films for QDs solar cells. The synthesis is based on the pyrolysis of organometallic reagents by injection into a hot coordinating solvent. This provides temporally discrete nucleation and permits controlled growth of macroscopic quantities of nanocrystallites. XRD, HRTEM, UV-visible, and PL were used to characterize the synthesized quantum dots. The results showed CdSe quantum dots with sizes ranging from 3 nm to 6 nm which enabled the control of the optical properties and consequently the solar cell performance. Solar cell of 0.08% performance under solar irradiation with a light intensity of 100 mW/cm2 has been obtained. CdSe/TiO2 solar cells without and with using mercaptopropionic acid (MPA as a linker between CdSe and TiO2 particles despite a Voc of 428 mV, Jsc of 0.184 mAcm-2, FF of 0.57, and η of 0.05% but with linker despite a Voc of 543 mV, Jsc of 0.318 mAcm-2 , FF of 0.48, and η of 0.08%, respectively.

  15. Quantum Dot/Liquid Crystal Nanocomposites in Photonic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L. Rodarte

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot/liquid crystal nano-composites are promising new materials for a variety of applications in energy harvesting, displays and photonics including the liquid crystal laser. To realize many applications, however, we need to control and stabilize nano-particle dispersion in different liquid crystal host phases and understand how the particles behave in an anisotropic fluid. An ideal system will allow for the controlled assembly of either well-defined nano-particle clusters or a uniform particle distribution. In this paper, we investigate mesogen-functionalized quantum dots for dispersion in cholesteric liquid crystal. These nanoparticles are known to assemble into dense stable packings in the nematic phase, and such structures, when localized in the liquid crystal defects, can potentially enhance the coupling between particles and a cholesteric cavity. Controlling the dispersion and assembly of quantum dots using mesogenic surface ligands, we demonstrate how resonant fluid photonic cavities can result from the co-assembly of luminescent nanoparticles in the presence of cholesteric liquid crystalline ordering.

  16. Measurement of gravitation-induced quantum interference for neutrons in a spin-echo spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, V.O.; Plomp, J.; Van Well, A.A.; Rekveldt, M.T.; Hasegawa, Y.H.; Dalgliesh, R.M.; Steinke, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    With a neutron spin-echo reflectometer (OffSpec at ISIS, UK) it is possible to measure the gravitation-induced quantum phase difference between the two spin states of the neutron wave function in a magnetic field. In the small-angle approximation, this phase depends linearly on the inclination angle

  17. Quantum dot-block copolymer hybrids with improved properties and their application to quantum dot light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Matthias; Bae, Wan Ki; Kwak, Jeonghun; Lee, Hyemin; Lee, Changhee; Zentel, Rudolf; Char, Kookheon

    2009-05-26

    To combine the optical properties of CdSe@ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with the electrical properties of semiconducting polymers, we prepared QD/polymer hybrids by grafting a block copolymer (BCP) containing thiol-anchoring moieties (poly(para-methyl triphenylamine-b-cysteamine acrylamide)) onto the surfaces of QDs through the ligand exchange procedure. The prepared QD/polymer hybrids possess improved processability such as enhanced solubility in various organic solvents as well as the film formation properties along with the improved colloidal stability derived from the grafted polymer shells. We also demonstrated light-emitting diodes based on QD/polymer hybrids, exhibiting the improved device performance (i.e., 3-fold increase in the external quantum efficiency) compared with the devices prepared by pristine (unmodified) QDs.

  18. Single-molecule phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle-based optoelectronic switch functioning as a quantum-interference-effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2012-11-02

    This work proposes a new type of optoelectronic switch, the phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle-based single-molecule transistor, which utilizes photon-assisted tunneling and destructive quantum interference. The analysis uses single-particle Green's functions along with Floquet theory. Without the optical field, phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle exhibits a wide range of strong antiresonance between its frontier orbitals. The simulations show large on-off ratios (over 10(4)) and measurable currents (~10(-11) A) enabled by photon-assisted tunneling in a weak optical field (~2 × 10(5) V/cm) and at a small source-drain voltage (~0.05 V). Field amplitude power scaling laws and a range of field intensities are given for operating one- and two-photon assisted tunneling in phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle-based single-molecule transistors. This development opens up a new direction for creating molecular switches.

  19. Quantum interference effects on the probe amplification without and with inversion in a four-level system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bing; Xu Wei-Hua; Zhang Hui-Fang; Gao Jin-Yue

    2004-01-01

    A four-level system driven by two coherent fields is considered. It is shown that in the presence of an incoherent pump, the probe gain at a short wavelength can be achieved due to the quantum interference. Our density matrix calculation provides the conditions for probe amplification from different origins, including gain without population inversion on any state basis, gain with population inversion on the dressed-state basis, and gain with population inversion on the bare-state basis. Also, by controlling the Rabi frequency of the coupling field a total change from non-inversion to inversion can be achieved which does not depend on the intensity of the incoherent pump.

  20. Unique properties of graphene quantum dots and their applications in photonic/electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suk-Ho

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been recognized as an attractive building block for electronic, photonic, and bio-molecular device applications. This paper reports the current status of studies on the novel properties of GQDs and their hybrids with conventional and low-dimensional materials for device applications. In this review, more emphasis is placed on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of GQDs, and device structures based on the combination of GQDs with various semiconducting/insulating materials such as graphene, silicon dioxide, Si quantum dots, silica nanoparticles, organic materials, and so on. Because of GQDs’ unique properties, their hybrid structures are employed in high-efficiency devices, including photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, flash memory, and sensors.

  1. Complete Bell state measurement with controlled photon absorption and quantum interference

    OpenAIRE

    Tomita, A.

    2000-01-01

    A solid state device to discriminate all the four Bell states is proposed. The device is composed of controlled absorption crystals, rotators, and retarders. The controlled absorption, where the state of one photon affects the absorption of the other photon, is realized by two photon absorption in a cubic crystal. The controlled absorption crystal detects a particular Bell state and is transparent for the other Bell states. The rotators and retarders transform a Bell state to another. This de...

  2. Few-electron Qubits in Silicon Quantum Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    3.1). Ohmic contacts are made by thermally evaporating a 20/1/30/1/70 nm stack of Au/Sb/Au/Sb/Au and annealing at 390 ◦C for 10 min. Low-frequency ac...electron temperature, and Ω = √ ε2 + 4t2c is the qubit energy splitting [45]. With VN = 225 mV, the interdot charge transition is thermally broadened...quantum well layer and ρ is the density of Si. Ξu and Ξd are the shear and dilation potential constants and Q̂ are the phonon unit wave vectors [99]. The

  3. Quantum Interference of Surface States in Bismuth Nanowires in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopko, L. A.; Huber, T. E.; Nikolaeva, A. A.; Burceacov, L. A.

    2013-06-01

    We report the results of studies of the magnetoresistance (MR) and electric field effect (EFE) of single-crystal Bi nanowires with diameter dMurakami, bismuth bilayers can exhibit the quantum spin Hall effect. A Bi crystal can be viewed as a stacking of bilayers with a honeycomblike lattice structure along the [111] direction. An interpretation of transverse MR oscillations with using this theory is presented.

  4. Thermo-mechanical effects in majorana type quantum devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, A.W.J.; Mackenzie, F.O. Valega

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multi-scale model, consisting of an atomistic model in LAMMPS of an InSb nanowire, and a continuum model in COMSOL of a socalled Majorana research device, to study the effects of thermo-mechanical deformations during the cool down from room temperature to the operating temperatur

  5. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Non Q. (San Diego, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  6. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  7. Ballistic transport and quantum interference in InSb nanowire devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Huang, Guang-Yao; Guo, Jing-Kun; Kang, Ning; Caroff, Philippe; Xu, Hong-Qi

    2017-02-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Key Basic Research and Development Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2016YFA0300601) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91221202, 91421303, 11374019, and 61321001).

  8. Large voltage modulation in superconducting quantum interference devices with submicron-scale step-edge junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Simon K. H.

    2017-09-01

    A promising direction to improve the sensitivity of a SQUID is to increase its junction's normal resistance value, Rn, as the SQUID modulation voltage scales linearly with Rn. As a first step to develop highly sensitive single layer SQUID, submicron scale YBCO grain boundary step edge junctions and SQUIDs with large Rn were fabricated and studied. The step-edge junctions were reduced to submicron scale to increase their Rn values using focus ion beam, FIB and the measurement of transport properties were performed from 4.3 to 77 K. The FIB induced deposition layer proves to be effective to minimize the Ga ion contamination during the FIB milling process. The critical current-normal resistance value of submicron junction at 4.3 K was found to be 1-3 mV, comparable to the value of the same type of junction in micron scale. The submicron junction Rn value is in the range of 35-100 Ω, resulting a large SQUID modulation voltage in a wide temperature range. This performance promotes further investigation of cryogen-free, high field sensitivity SQUID applications at medium low temperature, e.g. at 40-60 K.

  9. Quantum Interference in Spontaneous Emission from a V-Type Three-Level Atom in a Two-Band Photonic Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ya-Ping; Chen Hong; ZHU Shi-Yao

    2000-01-01

    The spontaneous emission from a V-type three-level atom embedded in a two-band photonic crystal is studied.Due to the quantum interference between the two transitions and existence of two bands, the populations in the upper levels display some novel behavior: anti-trapping, population oscillation, and population inversion.

  10. Quantum interference and radiative coupling in two-atom single-photon emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurizki, G.; Ben-Reuven, A.

    1985-10-01

    The recent experiment by Grangier, Aspect, and Vigue on interference in the emission from fragments of electronically photodissociated molecules is treated as a special case of cooperative fluorescence (CF) from products of various molecular processes. This treatment relates time-resolved features of the CF to characteristics (such as orbital symmetry) of the dissociating parent molecule (PM), suggests various PM state preparations (including formation of subradiant states), and discusses the persistence of CF in systems of nonidentical fragments. The diagnostic potentialities of such studies are emphasized.

  11. Quantum interferences in single ionization of He by highly charged dressed-ions impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, J M; Rivarola, R D [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Fainstein, P D, E-mail: rivarola@fceia.unr.edu.ar [Comision Nacional de EnergIa Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-06-15

    Ionization of He targets by impact of partially stripped ions is investigated by means of an extension to the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state model with a particular representation of the projectile potential. Structures appearing superimposed on the binary encounter peak are interpreted in terms of coherent interference of short- and long-range contributions of the perturbative projectile potential. The case of 600 keV u{sup -1}Au{sup 11+} ions impinging on He is presented and discussed.

  12. Nonlinear optical spectra having characteristics of Fano interferences in coherently coupled lowest exciton biexciton states in semiconductor quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Gotoh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical nonlinear effects are examined using a two-color micro-photoluminescence (micro-PL method in a coherently coupled exciton-biexciton system in a single quantum dot (QD. PL and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (PLE are employed to measure the absorption spectra of the exciton and biexciton states. PLE for Stokes and anti-Stokes PL enables us to clarify the nonlinear optical absorption properties in the lowest exciton and biexciton states. The nonlinear absorption spectra for excitons exhibit asymmetric shapes with peak and dip structures, and provide a distinct contrast to the symmetric dip structures of conventional nonlinear spectra. Theoretical analyses with a density matrix method indicate that the nonlinear spectra are caused not by a simple coherent interaction between the exciton and biexciton states but by coupling effects among exciton, biexciton and continuum states. These results indicate that Fano quantum interference effects appear in exciton-biexciton systems at QDs and offer important insights into their physics.

  13. Physics-based mathematical models for quantum devices via experimental system identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirmer, S G; Oi, D K L; Devitt, S J [Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Rd, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan)], E-mail: sgs29@cam.ac.uk

    2008-03-15

    We consider the task of intrinsic control system identification for quantum devices. The problem of experimental determination of subspace confinement is considered, and simple general strategies for full Hamiltonian identification and decoherence characterization of a controlled two-level system are presented.

  14. Highly entangled photons from hybrid piezoelectric-semiconductor quantum dot devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Wildmann, Johannes S; Zallo, Eugenio; Schmidt, Oliver G; Rastelli, Armando

    2014-06-11

    Entanglement resources are key ingredients of future quantum technologies. If they could be efficiently integrated into a semiconductor platform, a new generation of devices could be envisioned, whose quantum-mechanical functionalities are controlled via the mature semiconductor technology. Epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) embedded in diodes would embody such ideal quantum devices, but a fine-structure splitting (FSS) between the bright exciton states lowers dramatically the degree of entanglement of the sources and hampers severely their real exploitation in the foreseen applications. In this work, we overcome this hurdle using strain-tunable optoelectronic devices, where any QD can be tuned for the emission of photon pairs featuring the highest degree of entanglement ever reported for QDs, with concurrence as high as 0.75 ± 0.02. Furthermore, we study the evolution of Bell's parameters as a function of FSS and demonstrate for the first time that filtering-free violation of Bell's inequalities requires the FSS to be smaller than 1 μeV. This upper limit for the FSS also sets the tuning range of exciton energies (∼1 meV) over which our device operates as an energy-tunable source of highly entangled photons. A moderate temporal filtering further increases the concurrence and the tunability of exciton energies up to 0.82 and 2 meV, respectively, though at the expense of 60% reduction of count rate.

  15. Observation and Interpretation of Motional Sideband Asymmetry in a Quantum Electromechanical Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Weinstein

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantum electromechanical systems offer a unique opportunity to probe quantum noise properties in macroscopic devices, properties that ultimately stem from Heisenberg’s uncertainty relations. A simple example of this behavior is expected to occur in a microwave parametric transducer, where mechanical motion generates motional sidebands corresponding to the up-and-down frequency conversion of microwave photons. Because of quantum vacuum noise, the rates of these processes are expected to be unequal. We measure this fundamental imbalance in a microwave transducer coupled to a radio-frequency mechanical mode, cooled near the ground state of motion. We also discuss the subtle origin of this imbalance: depending on the measurement scheme, the imbalance is most naturally attributed to the quantum fluctuations of either the mechanical mode or of the electromagnetic field.

  16. Nanostructured Quantum Dots or Dashes in Photovoltaic Devices and Methods Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaele, Ryne P. (Inventor); Wilt, David M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A photovoltaic device includes one or more structures, an array of at least one of quantum dots and quantum dashes, at least one groove, and at least one conductor. Each of the structures comprises an intrinsic layer on one of an n type layer and a p type layer and the other one of the n type layer and the p type layer on the intrinsic layer. The array of at least one of quantum dots and quantum dashes is located in the intrinsic layer in at least one of the structures. The groove extends into at least one of the structures and the conductor is located along at least a portion of the groove.

  17. Trustworthiness of measurement devices in round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhu; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-02-01

    Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution (RRDPS QKD) has been proposed to raise the noise tolerability of the channel. However, in practice, the measurement device in RRDPS QKD may be imperfect. Here, we show that, with these imperfections, the security of RRDPS may be damaged by proposing two attacks for RRDPS systems with uncharacterized measurement devices. One is valid even for a system with unit total efficiency, while the other is valid even when a single-photon state is sent. To prevent these attacks, either security arguments need to be fundamentally revised or further practical assumptions on the measurement device should be put.

  18. Semi-device independent random number expansion protocol with n to 1 quantum random access codes

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hong-Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2011-01-01

    We study random number expansion protocols based on the n to 1 quantum random access codes (QRACs). We consider them in the semi-device independent scenario where the inner workings of the devices are unknown to us but we can certify the dimensions of the systems being communicated. This approach does not require the use of the entanglement and makes the physical realization of these protocols much easier than in the standard device independent scenario. We calculate the dependence of the effectiveness of the randomness generation on $n$ and find it optimal for n=3. We provide the explanation for this fact.

  19. Colloidal quantum dot based solar cells: from materials to devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jung Hoon; Jeong, Sohee

    2017-08-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have attracted attention as a next-generation of photovoltaics (PVs) capable of a tunable band gap and low-cost solution process. Understanding and controlling the surface of CQDs lead to the significant development in the performance of CQD PVs. Here we review recent progress in the realization of low-cost, efficient lead chalcogenide CQD PVs based on the surface investigation of CQDs. We focus on improving the electrical properties and air stability of the CQD achieved by material approaches and growing the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the CQD PV obtained by structural approaches. Finally, we summarize the manners to improve the PCE of CQD PVs through optical design. The various issues mentioned in this review may provide insight into the commercialization of CQD PVs in the near future.

  20. Minimum energy surface required by quantum memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Wim; Nguyen, Hieu D

    2013-06-21

    We address the question of what physical resources are required and sufficient to store classical information. While there is no lower bound on the required energy or space to store information, we find that there is a nonzero lower bound for the product P = of these two resources. Specifically, we prove that any physical system of mass m and d degrees of freedom that stores S bits of information will have a lower bound on the product P that is proportional to d2/m(exp(S/d) - 1)2. This result is obtained in a nonrelativistic, quantum mechanical setting, and it is independent of earlier thermodynamical results such as the Bekenstein bound on the entropy of black holes.