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Sample records for quantum heat engines

  1. Quantum heat engine with coupled superconducting resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardal, Ali Ümit Cemal; Aslan, Nur; Wilson, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a quantum heat engine composed of two superconducting transmission line resonators interacting with each other via an optomechanical-like coupling. One resonator is periodically excited by a thermal pump. The incoherently driven resonator induces coherent oscillations in the other one...... the signatures of quantum behavior in the statistical and thermodynamic properties of the system. We find evidence of a quantum enhancement in the power output of the engine at low temperatures....

  2. Heat engine driven by purely quantum information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Jun; Kim, Kang-Hwan; Sagawa, Takahiro; Kim, Sang Wook

    2013-12-06

    The key question of this Letter is whether work can be extracted from a heat engine by using purely quantum mechanical information. If the answer is yes, what is its mathematical formula? First, by using a bipartite memory we show that the work extractable from a heat engine is bounded not only by the free energy change and the sum of the entropy change of an individual memory but also by the change of quantum mutual information contained inside the memory. We then find that the engine can be driven by purely quantum information, expressed as the so-called quantum discord, forming a part of the quantum mutual information. To confirm it, as a physical example we present the Szilard engine containing a diatomic molecule with a semipermeable wall.

  3. Heat engine driven by purely quantum information

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Jun; Kim, Kang-Hwan; Sagawa, Takahiro; Kim, Sang Wook

    2013-01-01

    The key question of this paper is whether work can be extracted from a heat engine by using purely quantum mechanical information. If the answer is yes, what is its mathematical formula? First, by using a bipartite memory we show that the work extractable from a heat engine is bounded not only by the free energy change and the sum of the entropy change of an individual memory but also by the change of quantum mutual information contained inside the memory. We then find that the engine can be ...

  4. Quantum heat engine with coupled superconducting resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardal, Ali Ümit Cemal; Aslan, Nur; Wilson, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    the differences between the quantum and classical descriptions of our system by solving the quantum master equation and classical Langevin equations. Specifically, we calculate the mean number of excitations, second-order coherence, as well as the entropy, temperature, power, and mean energy to reveal......We propose a quantum heat engine composed of two superconducting transmission line resonators interacting with each other via an optomechanical-like coupling. One resonator is periodically excited by a thermal pump. The incoherently driven resonator induces coherent oscillations in the other one...... the signatures of quantum behavior in the statistical and thermodynamic properties of the system. We find evidence of a quantum enhancement in the power output of the engine at low temperatures....

  5. Quantum heat engines and refrigerators: continuous devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosloff, Ronnie; Levy, Amikam

    2014-01-01

    Quantum thermodynamics supplies a consistent description of quantum heat engines and refrigerators up to a single few-level system coupled to the environment. Once the environment is split into three (a hot, cold, and work reservoir), a heat engine can operate. The device converts the positive gain into power, with the gain obtained from population inversion between the components of the device. Reversing the operation transforms the device into a quantum refrigerator. The quantum tricycle, a device connected by three external leads to three heat reservoirs, is used as a template for engines and refrigerators. The equation of motion for the heat currents and power can be derived from first principles. Only a global description of the coupling of the device to the reservoirs is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Optimization of the devices leads to a balanced set of parameters in which the couplings to the three reservoirs are of the same order and the external driving field is in resonance. When analyzing refrigerators, one needs to devote special attention to a dynamical version of the third law of thermodynamics. Bounds on the rate of cooling when Tc→0 are obtained by optimizing the cooling current. All refrigerators as Tc→0 show universal behavior. The dynamical version of the third law imposes restrictions on the scaling as Tc→0 of the relaxation rate γc and heat capacity cV of the cold bath.

  6. Quantum optomechanical piston engines powered by heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, A.; Farace, A.; Giovannetti, V.

    2015-09-01

    We study two different models of optomechanical systems where a temperature gradient between two radiation baths is exploited for inducing self-sustained coherent oscillations of a mechanical resonator. From a thermodynamic perspective, such systems represent quantum instances of self-contained thermal machines converting heat into a periodic mechanical motion and thus they can be interpreted as nano-scale analogues of macroscopic piston engines. Our models are potentially suitable for testing fundamental aspects of quantum thermodynamics in the laboratory and for applications in energy efficient nanotechnology.

  7. Quantum optomechanical piston engines powered by heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mari, A; Farace, A; Giovannetti, V

    2015-01-01

    We study two different models of optomechanical systems where a temperature gradient between two radiation baths is exploited for inducing self-sustained coherent oscillations of a mechanical resonator. From a thermodynamic perspective, such systems represent quantum instances of self-contained thermal machines converting heat into a periodic mechanical motion and thus they can be interpreted as nano-scale analogues of macroscopic piston engines. Our models are potentially suitable for testing fundamental aspects of quantum thermodynamics in the laboratory and for applications in energy efficient nanotechnology. (paper)

  8. Quantum heat engine with coupled superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Aslan, Nur; Wilson, C. M.; Müstecaplıoǧlu, Özgür E.

    2017-12-01

    We propose a quantum heat engine composed of two superconducting transmission line resonators interacting with each other via an optomechanical-like coupling. One resonator is periodically excited by a thermal pump. The incoherently driven resonator induces coherent oscillations in the other one due to the coupling. A limit cycle, indicating finite power output, emerges in the thermodynamical phase space. The system implements an all-electrical analog of a photonic piston. Instead of mechanical motion, the power output is obtained as a coherent electrical charging in our case. We explore the differences between the quantum and classical descriptions of our system by solving the quantum master equation and classical Langevin equations. Specifically, we calculate the mean number of excitations, second-order coherence, as well as the entropy, temperature, power, and mean energy to reveal the signatures of quantum behavior in the statistical and thermodynamic properties of the system. We find evidence of a quantum enhancement in the power output of the engine at low temperatures.

  9. Quantum dynamical framework for Brownian heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G. S.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2013-07-01

    We present a self-contained formalism modeled after the Brownian motion of a quantum harmonic oscillator for describing the performance of microscopic Brownian heat engines such as Carnot, Stirling, and Otto engines. Our theory, besides reproducing the standard thermodynamics results in the steady state, enables us to study the role dissipation plays in determining the efficiency of Brownian heat engines under actual laboratory conditions. In particular, we analyze in detail the dynamics associated with decoupling a system in equilibrium with one bath and recoupling it to another bath and obtain exact analytical results, which are shown to have significant ramifications on the efficiencies of engines involving such a step. We also develop a simple yet powerful technique for computing corrections to the steady state results arising from finite operation time and use it to arrive at the thermodynamic complementarity relations for various operating conditions and also to compute the efficiencies of the three engines cited above at maximum power. Some of the methods and exactly solvable models presented here are interesting in their own right and could find useful applications in other contexts as well.

  10. Non-Markovian Investigation of an Autonomous Quantum Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ketan

    A systematic study of a quantum heat engine is presented in this thesis. In particular, we study heat conduction through a two-two level composite system, which is then connected to a photon cavity to extract work, forming an autonomous quantum heat engine. The question as to what extent quantum effects such as quantum coherence and correlations impact thermodynamic properties of such a system is addressed. The investigated heat engine has been previously studied using the popular Born-Markovian quantum master equation under weak internal coupling approximation. However, we show that the used approach is quite limited in addressing such problems as it is incapable of correctly accounting for the quantum effects. By using a non-Markovian approach involving hierarchical equations of motion, we show that quantum coherence and correlations between system and environments play a significant role in energy transfer processes of heat conduction and work.

  11. Quantum thermodynamic cycles and quantum heat engines. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, H T

    2009-04-01

    We study the quantum-mechanical generalization of force or pressure, and then we extend the classical thermodynamic isobaric process to quantum-mechanical systems. Based on these efforts, we are able to study the quantum version of thermodynamic cycles that consist of quantum isobaric processes, such as the quantum Brayton cycle and quantum Diesel cycle. We also consider the implementation of the quantum Brayton cycle and quantum Diesel cycle with some model systems, such as single particle in a one-dimensional box and single-mode radiation field in a cavity. These studies lay the microscopic (quantum-mechanical) foundation for Szilard-Zurek single-molecule engine.

  12. A quantum heat engine based on Tavis-Cummings model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai-Wei; Li, Ran; Zhang, Guo-Feng

    2017-09-01

    This paper will investigate a four-stroke quantum heat engine based on the Tavis-Cummings model. The cycle of the heat engine is similar to the Otto cycle in classical thermodynamics. The relationship between output power as well as cycle efficiency and external physical system parameters are given. Under this condition, the entanglement behavior of the system will be studied. The system can show considerable entanglement by strictly controlling relevant parameters. Unlike common two-level quantum heat engines, efficiency is a function of temperature, showing interesting and unexpected phenomena. Several ways to adjust engine properties by external parameters are proposed, with which the output power and efficiency can be optimized. The heat engine model exhibits high efficiency and output power with the participation of a small number of photons, and decay rapidly as the number of photons increases in entangled area but shows interesting behaviors in non-entangled area of photon numbers.

  13. Optimal power and efficiency of quantum Stirling heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yong; Chen, Lingen; Wu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    A quantum Stirling heat engine model is established in this paper in which imperfect regeneration and heat leakage are considered. A single particle which contained in a one-dimensional infinite potential well is studied, and the system consists of countless replicas. Each particle is confined in its own potential well, whose occupation probabilities can be expressed by the thermal equilibrium Gibbs distributions. Based on the Schrödinger equation, the expressions of power output and efficiency for the engine are obtained. Effects of imperfect regeneration and heat leakage on the optimal performance are discussed. The optimal performance region and the optimal values of important parameters of the engine cycle are obtained. The results obtained can provide some guidelines for the design of a quantum Stirling heat engine.

  14. Maximum Power Output of Quantum Heat Engine with Energy Bath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The difference between quantum isoenergetic process and quantum isothermal process comes from the violation of the law of equipartition of energy in the quantum regime. To reveal an important physical meaning of this fact, here we study a special type of quantum heat engine consisting of three processes: isoenergetic, isothermal and adiabatic processes. Therefore, this engine works between the energy and heat baths. Combining two engines of this kind, it is possible to realize the quantum Carnot engine. Furthermore, considering finite velocity of change of the potential shape, here an infinite square well with moving walls, the power output of the engine is discussed. It is found that the efficiency and power output are both closely dependent on the initial and final states of the quantum isothermal process. The performance of the engine cycle is shown to be optimized by control of the occupation probability of the ground state, which is determined by the temperature and the potential width. The relation between the efficiency and power output is also discussed.

  15. Endoreversible quantum heat engines in the linear response regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honghui; He, Jizhou; Wang, Jianhui

    2017-07-01

    We analyze general models of quantum heat engines operating a cycle of two adiabatic and two isothermal processes. We use the quantum master equation for a system to describe heat transfer current during a thermodynamic process in contact with a heat reservoir, with no use of phenomenological thermal conduction. We apply the endoreversibility description to such engine models working in the linear response regime and derive expressions of the efficiency and the power. By analyzing the entropy production rate along a single cycle, we identify the thermodynamic flux and force that a linear relation connects. From maximizing the power output, we find that such heat engines satisfy the tight-coupling condition and the efficiency at maximum power agrees with the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency known as the upper bound in the linear response regime.

  16. Irreversible performance of a quantum harmonic heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezek, Yair; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2006-05-01

    The unavoidable irreversible loss of power in a heat engine is found to be of quantum origin. Following thermodynamic tradition, a model quantum heat engine operating in an Otto cycle is analysed, where the working medium is composed of an ensemble of harmonic oscillators and changes in volume correspond to changes in the curvature of the potential well. Equations of motion for quantum observables are derived for the complete cycle of operation. These observables are sufficient to determine the state of the system and with it all thermodynamical variables. Once the external controls are set, the engine settles to a limit cycle. Conditions for optimal work, power and entropy production are derived. At high temperatures and quasistatic operating conditions, the efficiency at maximum power coincides with the endoreversible result \\eta_q=1-\\sqrt{{T_c}/{T_h}} . The optimal compression ratio varies from {\\cal C} =\\sqrt{T_h/T_c} in the quasistatic limit where the irreversibility is dominated by heat conductance to {\\cal C} =(T_h/T_c)^{1/4} in the sudden limit when the irreversibility is dominated by friction. When the engine deviates from adiabatic conditions, the performance is subject to friction. The origin of this friction can be traced to the noncommutability of the kinetic and potential energy of the working medium.

  17. Thermoelectric properties of an interacting quantum dot based heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, Paolo Andrea; Mazza, Francesco; Bosisio, Riccardo; Benenti, Giuliano; Fazio, Rosario; Taddei, Fabio

    2017-06-01

    We study the thermoelectric properties and heat-to-work conversion performance of an interacting, multilevel quantum dot (QD) weakly coupled to electronic reservoirs. We focus on the sequential tunneling regime. The dynamics of the charge in the QD is studied by means of master equations for the probabilities of occupation. From here we compute the charge and heat currents in the linear response regime. Assuming a generic multiterminal setup, and for low temperatures (quantum limit), we obtain analytical expressions for the transport coefficients which account for the interplay between interactions (charging energy) and level quantization. In the case of systems with two and three terminals we derive formulas for the power factor Q and the figure of merit Z T for a QD-based heat engine, identifying optimal working conditions which maximize output power and efficiency of heat-to-work conversion. Beyond the linear response we concentrate on the two-terminal setup. We first study the thermoelectric nonlinear coefficients assessing the consequences of large temperature and voltage biases, focusing on the breakdown of the Onsager reciprocal relation between thermopower and Peltier coefficient. We then investigate the conditions which optimize the performance of a heat engine, finding that in the quantum limit output power and efficiency at maximum power can almost be simultaneously maximized by choosing appropriate values of electrochemical potential and bias voltage. At last we study how energy level degeneracy can increase the output power.

  18. Rabi model as a quantum coherent heat engine: From quantum biology to superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ferdi; Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoǧlu, Özgür E.

    2015-02-01

    We propose a multilevel quantum heat engine with a working medium described by a generalized Rabi model which consists of a two-level system coupled to a single-mode bosonic field. The model is constructed to be a continuum limit of a quantum biological description of light-harvesting complexes so that it can amplify quantum coherence by a mechanism which is a quantum analog of classical Huygens clocks. The engine operates in a quantum Otto cycle where the working medium is coupled to classical heat baths in the isochoric processes of the four-stroke cycle, while either the coupling strength or the resonance frequency is changed in the adiabatic stages. We found that such an engine can produce work with an efficiency close to the Carnot bound when it operates at low temperatures and in the ultrastrong-coupling regime. The interplay of the effects of quantum coherence and quantum correlations on the engine performance is discussed in terms of second-order coherence, quantum mutual information, and the logarithmic negativity of entanglement. We point out that the proposed quantum Otto engine can be implemented experimentally with modern circuit quantum electrodynamic systems where flux qubits can be coupled ultrastrongly to superconducting transmission-line resonators.

  19. Quantum Heat Engine and Negative Boltzmann Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Jing-Yi; Quan Hai-Tao

    2017-01-01

    To clarify the ambiguity on negative Boltzmann temperature in literature, we study the Carnot and the Otto cycle with one of the heat reservoirs at the negative Boltzmann temperature based on a canonical ensemble description. The work extraction, entropy production and the efficiency of these cycles are explored. Conditions for constructing and properties of these thermodynamic cycles are elucidated. We find that the apparent “violation” of the second law of thermodynamics in these cycles are due to the fact that the traditional definition of thermodynamic efficiency is inappropriate in this situation. When properly understanding the efficiency and the adiabatic processes, in which the system crosses over “absolute ZERO” in a limit sense, the Carnot cycle with one of the heat reservoirs at a negative Boltzmann temperature can be understood straightforwardly, and it contradicts neither the second nor the third law of thermodynamics. Hence, negative Boltzmann temperature is a consistent concept in thermodynamics. We use a two-level system and an Ising spin system to illustrate our central results. (paper)

  20. Role of quantum correlations in light-matter quantum heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, G. Alvarado; Albarrán-Arriagada, F.; Cárdenas-López, F. A.; Romero, G.; Retamal, J. C.

    2017-11-01

    We study a quantum Otto engine embedding a working substance composed of a two-level system interacting with a harmonic mode. The physical properties of the substance are described by a generalized quantum Rabi model arising in superconducting circuit realizations. We show that light-matter quantum correlation reduction during the hot bath stage and adiabatic stages act as an indicator for enhanced work extraction and efficiency, respectively. Also, we demonstrate that the anharmonic spectrum of the working substance has a direct impact on the transition from heat engine into refrigerator as the light-matter coupling is increased. These results shed light on the search for optimal conditions in the performance of quantum heat engines.

  1. Ecological optimization of an irreversible quantum Carnot heat engine with spin-1/2 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaowei; Chen Lingen; Wu Feng; Sun Fengrui

    2010-01-01

    A model of a quantum heat engine with heat resistance, internal irreversibility and heat leakage and many non-interacting spin-1/2 systems is established in this paper. The quantum heat engine cycle is composed of two isothermal processes and two irreversible adiabatic processes and is referred to as a spin quantum Carnot heat engine. Based on the quantum master equation and the semi-group approach, equations of some important performance parameters, such as power output, efficiency, entropy generation rate and ecological function (a criterion representing the optimal compromise between exergy output rate and exergy loss rate), for the irreversible spin quantum Carnot heat engine are derived. The optimal ecological performance of the heat engine in the classical limit is analyzed with numerical examples. The effects of internal irreversibility and heat leakage on ecological performance are discussed in detail.

  2. A quantum Szilard engine without heat from a thermal reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed Mohammady, M.; Anders, Janet

    2017-11-01

    We study a quantum Szilard engine that is not powered by heat drawn from a thermal reservoir, but rather by projective measurements. The engine is constituted of a system { S }, a weight { W }, and a Maxwell demon { D }, and extracts work via measurement-assisted feedback control. By imposing natural constraints on the measurement and feedback processes, such as energy conservation and leaving the memory of the demon intact, we show that while the engine can function without heat from a thermal reservoir, it must give up at least one of the following features that are satisfied by a standard Szilard engine: (i) repeatability of measurements; (ii) invariant weight entropy; or (iii) positive work extraction for all measurement outcomes. This result is shown to be a consequence of the Wigner-Araki-Yanase theorem, which imposes restrictions on the observables that can be measured under additive conservation laws. This observation is a first-step towards developing ‘second-law-like’ relations for measurement-assisted feedback control beyond thermality.

  3. Phase-space interference in extensive and nonextensive quantum heat engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardal, Ali Ümit Cemal; Paternostro, Mauro; Mustecaplioglu, Ozgur E.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum interference is at the heart of what sets the quantum and classical worlds apart. We demonstrate that quantum interference effects involving a many-body working medium is responsible for genuinely nonclassical features in the performance of a quantum heat engine. The features with which...

  4. Multilevel quantum Otto heat engines with identical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X. L.; Guo, D. Y.; Wu, S. L.; Yi, X. X.

    2018-02-01

    A quantum Otto heat engine is studied with multilevel identical particles trapped in one-dimensional box potential as working substance. The symmetrical wave function for Bosons and the anti-symmetrical wave function for Fermions are considered. In two-particle case, we focus on the ratios of W^i (i=B,F) to W_s, where W^B and W^F are the work done by two Bosons and Fermions, respectively, and W_s is the work output of a single particle under the same conditions. Due to the symmetrical of the wave functions, the ratios are not equal to 2. Three different regimes, low-temperature regime, high-temperature regime, and intermediate-temperature regime, are analyzed, and the effects of energy level number and the differences between the two baths are calculated. In the multiparticle case, we calculate the ratios of W^i_M/M to W_s, where W^i_M/M can be seen as the average work done by a single particle in multiparticle heat engine. For other working substances whose energy spectrum has the form of E_n˜ n^2, the results are similar. For the case E_n˜ n, two different conclusions are obtained.

  5. Heat-machine control by quantum-state preparation: from quantum engines to refrigerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, D; Kurizki, G

    2014-08-01

    We explore the dependence of the performance bounds of heat engines and refrigerators on the initial quantum state and the subsequent evolution of their piston, modeled by a quantized harmonic oscillator. Our goal is to provide a fully quantized treatment of self-contained (autonomous) heat machines, as opposed to their prevailing semiclassical description that consists of a quantum system alternately coupled to a hot or a cold heat bath and parametrically driven by a classical time-dependent piston or field. Here, by contrast, there is no external time-dependent driving. Instead, the evolution is caused by the stationary simultaneous interaction of two heat baths (having distinct spectra and temperatures) with a single two-level system that is in turn coupled to the quantum piston. The fully quantized treatment we put forward allows us to investigate work extraction and refrigeration by the tools of quantum-optical amplifier and dissipation theory, particularly, by the analysis of amplified or dissipated phase-plane quasiprobability distributions. Our main insight is that quantum states may be thermodynamic resources and can provide a powerful handle, or control, on the efficiency of the heat machine. In particular, a piston initialized in a coherent state can cause the engine to produce work at an efficiency above the Carnot bound in the linear amplification regime. In the refrigeration regime, the coefficient of performance can transgress the Carnot bound if the piston is initialized in a Fock state. The piston may be realized by a vibrational mode, as in nanomechanical setups, or an electromagnetic field mode, as in cavity-based scenarios.

  6. The second law of thermodynamics and quantum heat engines: Is the law strictly enforced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    A quantum heat engine is a construct having a working medium which is cyclically processed through a pair of control variables of state involving a Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in which a heat input is converted into a work output. Of interest is a first species of quantum heat engine in which the working medium is macroscopic in the sense the size scale is sufficiently large that the BEC is not volumetrically coherent. In this first species of quantum heat engine, near Carnot efficiencies may be possible. Of particular interest is a second species of quantum heat engine in which the working medium is mesoscopic in the sense that the size scale is sufficiently small that the BEC is volumetrically coherent. In this second species of quantum heat engine, the resulting in-process non-equilibrium condition affects the finally arrived at control variables of state such that Carnot efficiencies and beyond may be possible. A Type I superconductor is used to model the first and second species of quantum heat engine.

  7. Quantum Stirling heat engine and refrigerator with single and coupled spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Li; Niu, Xin-Ya; Xiu, Xiao-Ming; Yi, Xue-Xi

    2014-02-01

    We study the reversible quantum Stirling cycle with a single spin or two coupled spins as the working substance. With the single spin as the working substance, we find that under certain conditions the reversed cycle of a heat engine is NOT a refrigerator, this feature holds true for a Stirling heat engine with an ion trapped in a shallow potential as its working substance. The efficiency of quantum Stirling heat engine can be higher than the efficiency of the Carnot engine, but the performance coefficient of the quantum Stirling refrigerator is always lower than its classical counterpart. With two coupled spins as the working substance, we find that a heat engine can turn to a refrigerator due to the increasing of the coupling constant, this can be explained by the properties of the isothermal line in the magnetic field-entropy plane.

  8. Quantum heat engine operating between thermal and spin reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jackson S. S. T.; Gould, Tim; Carvalho, André R. R.; Bedkihal, Salil; Vaccaro, Joan A.

    2018-05-01

    Landauer's erasure principle is a cornerstone of thermodynamics and information theory [R. Landauer, IBM J. Res. Dev. 5, 183 (1961), 10.1147/rd.53.0183]. According to this principle, erasing information incurs a minimum energy cost. Recently, Vaccaro and Barnett [J. A. Vaccaro and S. M. Barnett, Proc. R. Soc. A 467, 1770 (2011), 10.1098/rspa.2010.0577] explored information erasure in the context of multiple conserved quantities and showed that the erasure cost can be solely in terms of spin angular momentum. As Landauer's erasure principle plays a fundamental role in heat engines, their result considerably widens the possible configurations that heat engines can have. Motivated by this, we propose here an optical heat engine that operates under a single thermal reservoir and a spin angular momentum reservoir coupled to a three-level system with two energy degenerate ground states. The proposed heat engine operates without producing waste heat and goes beyond the traditional Carnot engine where the working fluid is subjected to two thermal baths at different temperatures.

  9. Ecological optimization of quantum spin-1/2 heat engine at the classical limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T-H

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a study of finite-time thermodynamics applied to evaluate the ecological performance of a quantum heat engine which operates between two thermal reservoirs using the working substance of spin-1/2 systems. The quantum heat engine cycle is composed of two isothermal processes, an adiabatic process and an isomagnetic field process. A sequence of time evolution was determined from the quantum angular momentum rate based on the semigroup approach and the quantum master equation. The individual time duration is added to account for the total cycle time. The objective ecological function representing a compromise between power output and irreversibility is maximized with respect to cycle temperature ratio. Effects of thermal reservoir temperature ratio and magnetic field ratio on the ecological function have been discussed. A comparison of quantum heat engine performance under maximum ecological function and maximum power conditions is also presented

  10. A quantum Otto engine with finite heat baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozas-Kerstjens, Alejandro; Brown, Eric G.; Hovhannisyan, Karen V.

    2018-01-01

    We study a driven harmonic oscillator operating an Otto cycle by strongly interacting with two thermal baths of finite size. Using the tools of Gaussian quantum mechanics, we directly simulate the dynamics of the engine as a whole, without the need to make any approximations. This allows us...... to understand the non-equilibrium thermodynamics of the engine not only from the perspective of the working medium, but also as it is seen from the thermal baths' standpoint. For sufficiently large baths, our engine is capable of running a number of perfect cycles, delivering finite power while operating very...... close to maximal efficiency. Thereafter, having traversed the baths, the perturbations created by the interaction abruptly deteriorate the engine's performance. Weadditionally study the correlations generated in the system, and, in particular, we find a direct connection between the build up of bath...

  11. The Second Law of Thermodynamics in a Quantum Heat Engine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ting; Cai Lifeng; Chen Pingxing; Li Chengzu

    2006-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics has been proven by many facts in classical world. Is there any new property of it in quantum world? In this paper, we calculate the change of entropy in T.D. Kieu's model for quantum heat engine (QHE) and prove the broad validity of the second law of thermodynamics. It is shown that the entropy of the quantum heat engine neither decreases in a whole cycle, nor decreases in either stage of the cycle. The second law of thermodynamics still holds in this QHE model. Moreover, although the modified quantum heat engine is capable of extracting more work, its efficiency does not improve at all. It is neither beyond the efficiency of T.D. Kieu's initial model, nor greater than the reversible Carnot efficiency.

  12. Quantum lubrication: Suppression of friction in a first-principles four-stroke heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Tova; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2006-02-01

    A quantum model of a heat engine resembling the Otto cycle is employed to explore strategies to suppress frictional losses. These losses are caused by the inability of the engine’s working medium to follow adiabatically the change in the Hamiltonian during the expansion and compression stages. By adding external noise to the engine frictional losses can be suppressed.

  13. Scaling-Up Quantum Heat Engines Efficiently via Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Beau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The finite-time operation of a quantum heat engine that uses a single particle as a working medium generally increases the output power at the expense of inducing friction that lowers the cycle efficiency. We propose to scale up a quantum heat engine utilizing a many-particle working medium in combination with the use of shortcuts to adiabaticity to boost the nonadiabatic performance by eliminating quantum friction and reducing the cycle time. To this end, we first analyze the finite-time thermodynamics of a quantum Otto cycle implemented with a quantum fluid confined in a time-dependent harmonic trap. We show that nonadiabatic effects can be controlled and tailored to match the adiabatic performance using a variety of shortcuts to adiabaticity. As a result, the nonadiabatic dynamics of the scaled-up many-particle quantum heat engine exhibits no friction, and the cycle can be run at maximum efficiency with a tunable output power. We demonstrate our results with a working medium consisting of particles with inverse-square pairwise interactions that includes non-interacting and hard-core bosons as limiting cases.

  14. Comparing Two Definitions of Work for a Biological Quantum Heat Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu You-Yang; Zhao Shun-Cai; Liu Juan

    2015-01-01

    Systems of photosynthetic reaction centres have been modelled as heat engines, while it has also been reported that the efficiency and power of such heat engines can be enhanced by quantum interference — a trait that has attracted much interest. We compare two definitions of the work of such a photosynthetic heat engine, i.e. definition A used by Weimer et al. and B by Dorfman et al. We also introduce a coherent interaction between donor and acceptor (CIDA) to demonstrate a reversible energy transport. We show that these two definitions of work can impart contradictory results, that is, CIDA enhances the power and efficiency of the photosynthetic heat engine with definition B but not with A. Additionally, we find that both reversible and irreversible excitation-energy transport can be described with definition A, but definition B can only model irreversible transport. As a result, we conclude that definition A is more suitable for photosynthetic systems than definition B. (paper)

  15. Efficiency versus speed in quantum heat engines: Rigorous constraint from Lieb-Robinson bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Naoto; Tajima, Hiroyasu

    2017-08-01

    A long-standing open problem whether a heat engine with finite power achieves the Carnot efficiency is investgated. We rigorously prove a general trade-off inequality on thermodynamic efficiency and time interval of a cyclic process with quantum heat engines. In a first step, employing the Lieb-Robinson bound we establish an inequality on the change in a local observable caused by an operation far from support of the local observable. This inequality provides a rigorous characterization of the following intuitive picture that most of the energy emitted from the engine to the cold bath remains near the engine when the cyclic process is finished. Using this description, we prove an upper bound on efficiency with the aid of quantum information geometry. Our result generally excludes the possibility of a process with finite speed at the Carnot efficiency in quantum heat engines. In particular, the obtained constraint covers engines evolving with non-Markovian dynamics, which almost all previous studies on this topic fail to address.

  16. The performance of a quantum heat engine working with spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jincan; Lin Bihong; Hua Ben

    2002-01-01

    It is considered that the cycle of a quantum heat engine working with many non-interacting spin-1/2 systems is composed of two isothermal and two isomagnetic field processes. The performance of the cycle is investigated, based on the quantum master equation and semi-group approach. The general expressions of the efficiency and power output are given. The regenerative losses in two isomagnetic field processes are calculated. The influence of non-perfect regeneration is analysed. Some interesting cases are discussed in detail. The results obtained are further generalized, so that they may be directly used to describe the performance of the quantum heat engine using spin-J systems as the working substance. (author)

  17. Superconducting-circuit quantum heat engine with frequency resolved thermal baths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Patrick P.; Souquet, Jean-René; Clerk, Aashish A.

    The study of quantum heat engines promises to unravel deep, fundamental concepts in quantum thermodynamics. With this in mind, we propose a novel, realistic device that efficiently converts heat into work while maintaining reasonably large output powers. The key concept in our proposal is a highly peaked spectral density in both the thermal baths as well as the working fluid. This allows for a complete separation of the heat current from the working fluid. In our setup, Cooper pairs tunnelling across a Josephson junction serve as the the working fluid, while two resonant cavities coupled to the junction act as frequency-resolved thermal baths. The device is operated such that a heat flux carried entirely by the photons induces an electrical current against a voltage bias, providing work.

  18. Performance of a multilevel quantum heat engine of an ideal N-particle Fermi system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Jianhui; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli

    2012-08-01

    We generalize the quantum heat engine (QHE) model which was first proposed by Bender et al. [J. Phys. A 33, 4427 (2000)] to the case in which an ideal Fermi gas with an arbitrary number N of particles in a box trap is used as the working substance. Besides two quantum adiabatic processes, the engine model contains two isoenergetic processes, during which the particles are coupled to energy baths at a high constant energy E(h) and a low constant energy E(c), respectively. Directly employing the finite-time thermodynamics, we find that the power output is enhanced by increasing particle number N (or decreasing minimum trap size L(A)) for given L(A) (or N), without reduction in the efficiency. By use of global optimization, the efficiency at possible maximum power output (EPMP) is found to be universal and independent of any parameter contained in the engine model. For an engine model with any particle-number N, the efficiency at maximum power output (EMP) can be determined under the condition that it should be closest to the EPMP. Moreover, we extend the heat engine to a more general multilevel engine model with an arbitrary 1D power-law potential. Comparison between our engine model and the Carnot cycle shows that, under the same conditions, the efficiency η = 1 - E(c)/E(h) of the engine cycle is bounded from above the Carnot value η(c) =1 - T(c)/T(h).

  19. Angle-dependent quantum Otto heat engine based on coherent dipole-dipole coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shan-He; Luo, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jin-Can; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between molecules or within a molecule have been widely observed in biological systems and exhibit broad application for molecular structural studies. Quantum delocalization of molecular dipole moments has inspired researchers to explore new avenues to utilize this physical effect for energy harvesting devices. Herein, we propose a simple model of the angle-dependent quantum Otto heat engine which seeks to facilitate the conversion of heat to work. Unlike previous studies, the adiabatic processes are accomplished by varying only the directions of the magnetic field. We show that the heat engine continues to generate power when the angle relative to the vector r joining the centres of coupled dipoles departs from the magic angle θm where the static coupling vanishes. A significant improvement in the device performance has to be attributed to the presence of the quantum delocalized levels associated with the coherent dipole-dipole coupling. These results obtained may provide a promising model for the biomimetic design and fabrication of quantum energy generators.

  20. Achieving the classical Carnot efficiency in a strongly coupled quantum heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. Y.; Chen, B.; Liu, J.

    2018-02-01

    Generally, the efficiency of a heat engine strongly coupled with a heat bath is less than the classical Carnot efficiency. Through a model-independent method, we show that the classical Carnot efficiency is achieved in a strongly coupled quantum heat engine. First, we present the first law of quantum thermodynamics in strong coupling. Then, we show how to achieve the Carnot cycle and the classical Carnot efficiency at strong coupling. We find that this classical Carnot efficiency stems from the fact that the heat released in a nonequilibrium process is balanced by the absorbed heat. We also analyze the restrictions in the achievement of the Carnot cycle. The first restriction is that there must be two corresponding intervals of the controllable parameter in which the corresponding entropies of the work substance at the hot and cold temperatures are equal, and the second is that the entropy of the initial and final states in a nonequilibrium process must be equal. Through these restrictions, we obtain the positive work conditions, including the usual one in which the hot temperature should be higher than the cold, and a new one in which there must be an entropy interval at the hot temperature overlapping that at the cold. We demonstrate our result through a paradigmatic model—a two-level system in which a work substance strongly interacts with a heat bath. In this model, we find that the efficiency may abruptly decrease to zero due to the first restriction, and that the second restriction results in the control scheme becoming complex.

  1. The Influences of Quantum Coherence on the Positive Work and the Efficiency of Quantum Heat Engine with Working Substance of Two-Qubit Heisenberg XXX Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hu-Ping; Fang, Mao-Fa; Yu, Min; Zou, Hong-Mei

    2018-03-01

    We study the influences of quantum coherence on the positive work and the efficiency of quantum heat engine (QHE) based on working substance of two-qubit Heisenberg model under a constant external magnetic field. By using analytical and numerical solution, we give the relation expressions for both the positive work and the efficiency with quantum coherence, and in detail discuss the effects of the quantum coherence on the positive work and the efficiency of QHE in the absence or presence of external magnetic field, respectively.

  2. The Influences of Quantum Coherence on the Positive Work and the Efficiency of Quantum Heat Engine with Working Substance of Two-Qubit Heisenberg XXX Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hu-Ping; Fang, Mao-Fa; Yu, Min; Zou, Hong-Mei

    2018-06-01

    We study the influences of quantum coherence on the positive work and the efficiency of quantum heat engine (QHE) based on working substance of two-qubit Heisenberg model under a constant external magnetic field. By using analytical and numerical solution, we give the relation expressions for both the positive work and the efficiency with quantum coherence, and in detail discuss the effects of the quantum coherence on the positive work and the efficiency of QHE in the absence or presence of external magnetic field, respectively.

  3. Boosting work characteristics and overall heat-engine performance via shortcuts to adiabaticity: quantum and classical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiawen; Wang, Qing-hai; Liu, Zhihao; Hänggi, Peter; Gong, Jiangbin

    2013-12-01

    Under a general framework, shortcuts to adiabatic processes are shown to be possible in classical systems. We study the distribution function of the work done on a small system initially prepared at thermal equilibrium. We find that the work fluctuations can be significantly reduced via shortcuts to adiabatic processes. For example, in the classical case, probabilities of having very large or almost zero work values are suppressed. In the quantum case, negative work may be totally removed from the otherwise non-positive-definite work values. We also apply our findings to a micro Otto-cycle-based heat engine. It is shown that the use of shortcuts, which directly enhances the engine output power, can also increase the heat-engine efficiency substantially, in both quantum and classical regimes.

  4. Engineering quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Doyeol

    2011-01-01

    A clear introduction to quantum mechanics concepts Quantum mechanics has become an essential tool for modern engineering, particularly due to the recent developments in quantum computing as well as the rapid progress in optoelectronic devices. Engineering Quantum Mechanics explains the fundamentals of this exciting field, providing broad coverage of both traditional areas such as semiconductor and laser physics as well as relatively new yet fast-growing areas such as quantum computation and quantum information technology. The book begins with basic quantum mechanics, reviewing measurements and probability, Dirac formulation, the uncertainty principle, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum eigenstates, and perturbation theory. Then, quantum statistical mechanics is explored, from second quantization and density operators to coherent and squeezed states, coherent interactions between atoms and fields, and the Jaynes-Cummings model. From there, the book moves into elementary and modern applications, discussing s...

  5. Boosting work characteristics and overall heat engine performance via shortcuts to adiabaticity: quantum and classical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Jiawen; Wang, Qing-hai; Liu, Zhihao; Hanggi, Peter; Gong, Jiangbin

    2013-01-01

    Under a general framework, shortcuts to adiabatic processes are shown to be possible in classical systems. We then study the distribution function of the work done on a small system initially prepared at thermal equilibrium. It is found that the work fluctuations can be significantly reduced via shortcuts to adiabatic processes. For example, in the classical case probabilities of having very large or almost zero work values are suppressed. In the quantum case negative work may be totally remo...

  6. Quantum-limited heat conduction over macroscopic distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Matti; Tan, Kuan Yen; Govenius, Joonas; Lake, Russell E.; Mäkelä, Miika K.; Tanttu, Tuomo; Möttönen, Mikko

    2016-05-01

    The emerging quantum technological apparatuses, such as the quantum computer, call for extreme performance in thermal engineering. Cold distant heat sinks are needed for the quantized electric degrees of freedom owing to the increasing packaging density and heat dissipation. Importantly, quantum mechanics sets a fundamental upper limit for the flow of information and heat, which is quantified by the quantum of thermal conductance. However, the short distance between the heat-exchanging bodies in the previous experiments hinders their applicability in quantum technology. Here, we present experimental observations of quantum-limited heat conduction over macroscopic distances extending to a metre. We achieved this improvement of four orders of magnitude in the distance by utilizing microwave photons travelling in superconducting transmission lines. Thus, it seems that quantum-limited heat conduction has no fundamental distance cutoff. This work establishes the integration of normal-metal components into the framework of circuit quantum electrodynamics, which provides a basis for the superconducting quantum computer. Especially, our results facilitate remote cooling of nanoelectronic devices using faraway in situ-tunable heat sinks. Furthermore, quantum-limited heat conduction is important in contemporary thermodynamics. Here, the long distance may lead to ultimately efficient mesoscopic heat engines with promising practical applications.

  7. Irreversible Brownian Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Mesfin Asfaw

    2017-10-01

    We model a Brownian heat engine as a Brownian particle that hops in a periodic ratchet potential where the ratchet potential is coupled with a linearly decreasing background temperature. We show that the efficiency of such Brownian heat engine approaches the efficiency of endoreversible engine η =1-√{{Tc/Th}} [23]. On the other hand, the maximum power efficiency of the engine approaches η ^{MAX}=1-({Tc/Th})^{1\\over 4}. It is shown that the optimized efficiency always lies between the efficiency at quasistatic limit and the efficiency at maximum power while the efficiency at maximum power is always less than the optimized efficiency since the fast motion of the particle comes at the expense of the energy cost. If the heat exchange at the boundary of the heat baths is included, we show that such a Brownian heat engine has a higher performance when acting as a refrigerator than when operating as a device subjected to a piecewise constant temperature. The role of time on the performance of the motor is also explored via numerical simulations. Our numerical results depict that the time t and the external load dictate the direction of the particle velocity. Moreover, the performance of the heat engine improves with time. At large t (steady state), the velocity, the efficiency and the coefficient of performance of the refrigerator attain their maximum value. Furthermore, we study the effect of temperature by considering a viscous friction that decreases exponentially as the background temperature increases. Our result depicts that the Brownian particle exhibits a fast unidirectional motion when the viscous friction is temperature dependent than that of constant viscous friction. Moreover, the efficiency of this motor is considerably enhanced when the viscous friction is temperature dependent. On the hand, the motor exhibits a higher performance of the refrigerator when the viscous friction is taken to be constant.

  8. Revisiting the quantum Szilard engine with fully quantum considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hai [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); School of Information and Electronics Engineering, Shandong Institute of Business and Technology, Yantai 264000 (China); Zou, Jian, E-mail: zoujian@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Li, Jun-Gang; Shao, Bin [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wu, Lian-Ao [Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science, The Basque Country University (EHU/UPV), P.O. Box 644, ES-48080 Bilbao (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, ES-48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    By considering level shifting during the insertion process we revisit the quantum Szilard engine (QSZE) with fully quantum consideration. We derive the general expressions of the heat absorbed from thermal bath and the total work done to the environment by the system in a cycle with two different cyclic strategies. We find that only the quantum information contributes to the absorbed heat, and the classical information acts like a feedback controller and has no direct effect on the absorbed heat. This is the first demonstration of the different effects of quantum information and classical information for extracting heat from the bath in the QSZE. Moreover, when the well width L{yields}{infinity} or the temperature of the bath T{yields}{infinity} the QSZE reduces to the classical Szilard engine (CSZE), and the total work satisfies the relation W{sub tot}=k{sub B}Tln2 as obtained by Sang Wook Kim et al. [S.W. Kim, T. Sagawa, S. De Liberato, M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 (2011) 070401] for one particle case. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the first time analyze the QSZE by considering energy level shifts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Find different roles played by classical and quantum information in the QSZE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of work extracted depends on the cyclic strategies of the QSZE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Verify that the QSZE will reduce to the CSZE in the classical limits.

  9. Multiple-state quantum Otto engine, 1D box system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latifah, E., E-mail: enylatifah@um.ac.id [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics and Natural Philosophy, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, ITS, Surabaya, Indonesia and Physics Department, Malang State University (Indonesia); Purwanto, A. [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics and Natural Philosophy, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, ITS, Surabaya (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Quantum heat engines produce work using quantum matter as their working substance. We studied adiabatic and isochoric processes and defined the general force according to quantum system. The processes and general force are used to evaluate a quantum Otto engine based on multiple-state of one dimensional box system and calculate the efficiency. As a result, the efficiency depends on the ratio of initial and final width of system under adiabatic processes.

  10. Shape memory heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzbrenner, R.

    1984-06-01

    The mechanical shape memory effect associated with a thermoelastic martensitic transformation can be used to convert heat directly into mechanical work. Laboratory simulation of two types of heat engine cycles (Stirling and Ericsson) has been performed to measure the amount of work available/cycle in a Ni-45 at. pct Ti alloy. Tensile deformations at ambient temperature induced martensite, while a subsequent increase in temperature caused a reversion to the parent phase during which a load was carried through the strain recovery (i.e., work was accomplished). The amount of heat necessary to carry the engines through a cycle was estimated from calorimeter measurements and the work performed/cycle. The measured efficiency of the system tested reached a maximum of 1.4 percent, which was well below the theoretical (Carnot) maximum efficiency of 35.6 percent.

  11. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  12. Multiphoton quantum optics and quantum state engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Anno, Fabio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, CNISM and CNR-INFM Coherentia, and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy)]. E-mail: dellanno@sa.infn.it; De Siena, Silvio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, CNISM and CNR-INFM Coherentia, and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (SA) (Italy)]. E-mail: desiena@sa.infn.it; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, CNISM and CNR-INFM Coherentia, and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (SA) (Italy)]. E-mail: illuminati@sa.infn.it

    2006-05-15

    We present a review of theoretical and experimental aspects of multiphoton quantum optics. Multiphoton processes occur and are important for many aspects of matter-radiation interactions that include the efficient ionization of atoms and molecules, and, more generally, atomic transition mechanisms; system-environment couplings and dissipative quantum dynamics; laser physics, optical parametric processes, and interferometry. A single review cannot account for all aspects of such an enormously vast subject. Here we choose to concentrate our attention on parametric processes in nonlinear media, with special emphasis on the engineering of nonclassical states of photons and atoms that are relevant for the conceptual investigations as well as for the practical applications of forefront aspects of modern quantum mechanics. We present a detailed analysis of the methods and techniques for the production of genuinely quantum multiphoton processes in nonlinear media, and the corresponding models of multiphoton effective interactions. We review existing proposals for the classification, engineering, and manipulation of nonclassical states, including Fock states, macroscopic superposition states, and multiphoton generalized coherent states. We introduce and discuss the structure of canonical multiphoton quantum optics and the associated one- and two-mode canonical multiphoton squeezed states. This framework provides a consistent multiphoton generalization of two-photon quantum optics and a consistent Hamiltonian description of multiphoton processes associated to higher-order nonlinearities. Finally, we discuss very recent advances that by combining linear and nonlinear optical devices allow to realize multiphoton entangled states of the electromagnetic field, either in discrete or in continuous variables, that are relevant for applications to efficient quantum computation, quantum teleportation, and related problems in quantum communication and information.

  13. Multiphoton quantum optics and quantum state engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2006-01-01

    We present a review of theoretical and experimental aspects of multiphoton quantum optics. Multiphoton processes occur and are important for many aspects of matter-radiation interactions that include the efficient ionization of atoms and molecules, and, more generally, atomic transition mechanisms; system-environment couplings and dissipative quantum dynamics; laser physics, optical parametric processes, and interferometry. A single review cannot account for all aspects of such an enormously vast subject. Here we choose to concentrate our attention on parametric processes in nonlinear media, with special emphasis on the engineering of nonclassical states of photons and atoms that are relevant for the conceptual investigations as well as for the practical applications of forefront aspects of modern quantum mechanics. We present a detailed analysis of the methods and techniques for the production of genuinely quantum multiphoton processes in nonlinear media, and the corresponding models of multiphoton effective interactions. We review existing proposals for the classification, engineering, and manipulation of nonclassical states, including Fock states, macroscopic superposition states, and multiphoton generalized coherent states. We introduce and discuss the structure of canonical multiphoton quantum optics and the associated one- and two-mode canonical multiphoton squeezed states. This framework provides a consistent multiphoton generalization of two-photon quantum optics and a consistent Hamiltonian description of multiphoton processes associated to higher-order nonlinearities. Finally, we discuss very recent advances that by combining linear and nonlinear optical devices allow to realize multiphoton entangled states of the electromagnetic field, either in discrete or in continuous variables, that are relevant for applications to efficient quantum computation, quantum teleportation, and related problems in quantum communication and information

  14. Quantum Mechanics for Electrical Engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Dennis M

    2011-01-01

    The main topic of this book is quantum mechanics, as the title indicates.  It specifically targets those topics within quantum mechanics that are needed to understand modern semiconductor theory.   It begins with the motivation for quantum mechanics and why classical physics fails when dealing with very small particles and small dimensions.  Two key features make this book different from others on quantum mechanics, even those usually intended for engineers:   First, after a brief introduction, much of the development is through Fourier theory, a topic that is at

  15. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Luis A

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N-2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  16. Engineering quantum dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Viola, Lorenza

    2002-01-01

    The ability to perform measurements on a quantum system, combined with the ability to feed back the measurement results via coherent control, allows one to control the system to follow any desired coherent or incoherent quantum dynamics. Such universal dynamical control can be achieved, in principle, through the repeated application of only two coherent control operations and a simple 'Yes-No' measurement. As a consequence, a quantum computer can simulate an arbitrary open-system dynamics using just one qubit more than required to simulate closed-system dynamics

  17. Efficiency bounds for nonequilibrium heat engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the efficiency of thermal engines (either quantum or classical) working with a single heat reservoir like an atmosphere. The engine first gets an energy intake, which can be done in an arbitrary nonequilibrium way e.g. combustion of fuel. Then the engine performs the work and returns to the initial state. We distinguish two general classes of engines where the working body first equilibrates within itself and then performs the work (ergodic engine) or when it performs the work before equilibrating (non-ergodic engine). We show that in both cases the second law of thermodynamics limits their efficiency. For ergodic engines we find a rigorous upper bound for the efficiency, which is strictly smaller than the equivalent Carnot efficiency. I.e. the Carnot efficiency can be never achieved in single reservoir heat engines. For non-ergodic engines the efficiency can be higher and can exceed the equilibrium Carnot bound. By extending the fundamental thermodynamic relation to nonequilibrium processes, we find a rigorous thermodynamic bound for the efficiency of both ergodic and non-ergodic engines and show that it is given by the relative entropy of the nonequilibrium and initial equilibrium distributions. These results suggest a new general strategy for designing more efficient engines. We illustrate our ideas by using simple examples. -- Highlights: ► Derived efficiency bounds for heat engines working with a single reservoir. ► Analyzed both ergodic and non-ergodic engines. ► Showed that non-ergodic engines can be more efficient. ► Extended fundamental thermodynamic relation to arbitrary nonequilibrium processes

  18. Life explained by heat engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, A.W.J.; Seckbach, J.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are in essence fuel cells that use organics as reductant and oxygen as oxidant. In engineering, increasing attention is being given to the replacement of the internal combustion engine by the fuel cell. According to the Thermosynthesis theory, a similar replacement of heat engines by

  19. Quantum Information Processing and Quantum Error Correction An Engineering Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Djordjevic, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Quantum Information Processing and Quantum Error Correction is a self-contained, tutorial-based introduction to quantum information, quantum computation, and quantum error-correction. Assuming no knowledge of quantum mechanics and written at an intuitive level suitable for the engineer, the book gives all the essential principles needed to design and implement quantum electronic and photonic circuits. Numerous examples from a wide area of application are given to show how the principles can be implemented in practice. This book is ideal for the electronics, photonics and computer engineer

  20. Single-temperature quantum engine without feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Juyeon; Talkner, Peter; Kim, Yong Woon

    2017-08-01

    A cyclically working quantum-mechanical engine that operates at a single temperature is proposed. Its energy input is delivered by a quantum measurement. The functioning of the engine does not require any feedback control. We analyze work, heat, and the efficiency of the engine for the case of a working substance that is governed by the laws of quantum mechanics and that can be adiabatically compressed and expanded. The obtained general expressions are exemplified for a spin in an adiabatically changing magnetic field and a particle moving in a potential with slowly changing shape.

  1. Work production of quantum rotor engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Stella; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Scarani, Valerio

    2018-04-01

    We study the mechanical performance of quantum rotor heat engines in terms of common notions of work using two prototypical models: a mill driven by the heat flow from a hot to a cold mode, and a piston driven by the alternate heating and cooling of a single working mode. We evaluate the extractable work in terms of ergotropy, the kinetic energy associated to net directed rotation, as well as the intrinsic work based on the exerted torque under autonomous operation, and we compare them to the energy output for the case of an external dissipative load and for externally driven engine cycles. Our results connect work definitions from both physical and information-theoretical perspectives. In particular, we find that apart from signatures of angular momentum quantization, the ergotropy is consistent with the intuitive notion of work in the form of net directed motion. It also agrees with the energy output to an external load or agent under optimal conditions. This sets forth a consistent thermodynamical description of rotating quantum motors, flywheels, and clocks.

  2. Engineering heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, J.R.

    1974-01-01

    The basic concepts of heat transfer are covered with special emphasis on up-to-date techniques for formulating and solving problems in the field. The discussion progresses logically from phenomenology to problem solving, and treats numerical, integral, and graphical methods as well as traditional analytical ones. The book is unique in its thorough coverage of the fundamentals of numerical analysis appropriate to solving heat transfer problems. This coverage includes several complete and readable examples of numerical solutions, with discussions and interpretations of results. The book also contains an appendix that provides students with physical data for often-encountered materials. An index is included. (U.S.)

  3. Taub–Bolt heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Clifford V.

    2018-02-01

    It is shown that aspects of the extended thermodynamic properties of the Taub–Bolt–AdS spacetime in four dimensions are similar to those of the Schwarzschild–AdS black hole. In a high temperature expansion, the equations of state begin to deviate only at next-to-subleading orders. By analogy with what has been done for black holes, Taub–Bolt’s thermodynamic equations are used to define holographic heat engines, the first examples of gravitational heat engines defined using a spacetime that is not a black hole. As a further comparison, the Taub–Bolt engine efficiency is computed for two special kinds of engine cycle and compared to the results for analogous Schwarzschild black hole engine cycles.

  4. An adjustable Brownian heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asfaw, Mesfin; Bekele, Mulugeta

    2002-09-01

    A microscopic heat engine is modeled as a Brownian particle in a sawtooth potential (with load) moving through a highly viscous medium driven by the thermal kick it gets from alternately placed hot and cold heat reservoirs. We found a closed form expression for the current as a function of the parameters characterizing the model. Depending on the values these model parameters take, the engine is also found to function as a refrigerator. Expressions for the efficiency as well as for the refrigerator performance are also reported. Study of how these quantities depend on the model parameters enabled us in identifying the points in the parameter space where the engine performs either with maximum power or with optimized efficiency. The corresponding efficiencies of the engine are then compared with those of the endoreversible and Carnot engines. (author)

  5. Quantum engineering of continuous variable quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabuncu, Metin

    2009-01-01

    Quantum information with continuous variables is a field attracting increasing attention recently. In continuous variable quantum information one makes use of the continuous information encoded into the quadrature of a quantized light field instead of binary quantities such as the polarization state of a single photon. This brand new research area is witnessing exciting theoretical and experimental achievements such as teleportation, quantum computation and quantum error correction. The rapid development of the field is mainly due higher optical data rates and the availability of simple and efficient manipulation tools in continuous-variable quantum information processing. We in this thesis extend the work in continuous variable quantum information processing and report on novel experiments on amplification, cloning, minimal disturbance and noise erasure protocols. The promising results we obtain in these pioneering experiments indicate that the future of continuous variable quantum information is bright and many advances can be foreseen. (orig.)

  6. Quantum engineering of continuous variable quantum states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabuncu, Metin

    2009-10-29

    Quantum information with continuous variables is a field attracting increasing attention recently. In continuous variable quantum information one makes use of the continuous information encoded into the quadrature of a quantized light field instead of binary quantities such as the polarization state of a single photon. This brand new research area is witnessing exciting theoretical and experimental achievements such as teleportation, quantum computation and quantum error correction. The rapid development of the field is mainly due higher optical data rates and the availability of simple and efficient manipulation tools in continuous-variable quantum information processing. We in this thesis extend the work in continuous variable quantum information processing and report on novel experiments on amplification, cloning, minimal disturbance and noise erasure protocols. The promising results we obtain in these pioneering experiments indicate that the future of continuous variable quantum information is bright and many advances can be foreseen. (orig.)

  7. Engineering heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Annaratone, Donatello

    2010-01-01

    This book is a generalist textbook; it is designed for anybody interested in heat transmission, including scholars, designers and students. Two criteria constitute the foundation of Annaratone's books, including the present one. The first one consists of indispensable scientific rigor without theoretical exasperation. The inclusion in the book of some theoretical studies, even if admirable for their scientific rigor, would have strengthened the scientific foundation of this publication, yet without providing the reader with further applicable know-how. The second criterion is to deliver practi

  8. Finite-size effect on optimal efficiency of heat engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Hayashi, Masahito

    2017-07-01

    The optimal efficiency of quantum (or classical) heat engines whose heat baths are n-particle systems is given by the strong large deviation. We give the optimal work extraction process as a concrete energy-preserving unitary time evolution among the heat baths and the work storage. We show that our optimal work extraction turns the disordered energy of the heat baths to the ordered energy of the work storage, by evaluating the ratio of the entropy difference to the energy difference in the heat baths and the work storage, respectively. By comparing the statistical mechanical optimal efficiency with the macroscopic thermodynamic bound, we evaluate the accuracy of the macroscopic thermodynamics with finite-size heat baths from the statistical mechanical viewpoint. We also evaluate the quantum coherence effect on the optimal efficiency of the cycle processes without restricting their cycle time by comparing the classical and quantum optimal efficiencies.

  9. Heat transfer operators associated with quantum operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksak, C; Turgut, S

    2011-01-01

    Any quantum operation applied on a physical system is performed as a unitary transformation on a larger extended system. If the extension used is a heat bath in thermal equilibrium, the concomitant change in the state of the bath necessarily implies a heat exchange with it. The dependence of the average heat transferred to the bath on the initial state of the system can then be found from the expectation value of a Hermitian operator, which is named as the heat transfer operator (HTO). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relation between the HTOs and the associated quantum operations. Since any given quantum operation on a system can be realized by different baths and unitaries, many different HTOs are possible for each quantum operation. On the other hand, there are also strong restrictions on the HTOs which arise from the unitarity of the transformations. The most important of these is the Landauer erasure principle. This paper is concerned with the question of finding a complete set of restrictions on the HTOs that are associated with a given quantum operation. An answer to this question has been found only for a subset of quantum operations. For erasure operations, these characterizations are equivalent to the generalized Landauer erasure principle. For the case of generic quantum operations, however, it appears that the HTOs obey further restrictions which cannot be obtained from the entropic restrictions of the generalized Landauer erasure principle.

  10. Quantum engine efficiency bound beyond the second law of thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Mukherjee, Victor; Ghosh, Arnab; Kofman, Abraham G; Kurizki, Gershon

    2018-01-11

    According to the second law, the efficiency of cyclic heat engines is limited by the Carnot bound that is attained by engines that operate between two thermal baths under the reversibility condition whereby the total entropy does not increase. Quantum engines operating between a thermal and a squeezed-thermal bath have been shown to surpass this bound. Yet, their maximum efficiency cannot be determined by the reversibility condition, which may yield an unachievable efficiency bound above unity. Here we identify the fraction of the exchanged energy between a quantum system and a bath that necessarily causes an entropy change and derive an inequality for this change. This inequality reveals an efficiency bound for quantum engines energised by a non-thermal bath. This bound does not imply reversibility, unless the two baths are thermal. It cannot be solely deduced from the laws of thermodynamics.

  11. Floquet Engineering in Quantum Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennes, D. M.; de la Torre, A.; Ron, A.; Hsieh, D.; Millis, A. J.

    2018-03-01

    We consider a one-dimensional interacting spinless fermion model, which displays the well-known Luttinger liquid (LL) to charge density wave (CDW) transition as a function of the ratio between the strength of the interaction U and the hopping J . We subject this system to a spatially uniform drive which is ramped up over a finite time interval and becomes time periodic in the long-time limit. We show that by using a density matrix renormalization group approach formulated for infinite system sizes, we can access the large-time limit even when the drive induces finite heating. When both the initial and long-time states are in the gapless (LL) phase, the final state has power-law correlations for all ramp speeds. However, when the initial and final state are gapped (CDW phase), we find a pseudothermal state with an effective temperature that depends on the ramp rate, both for the Magnus regime in which the drive frequency is very large compared to other scales in the system and in the opposite limit where the drive frequency is less than the gap. Remarkably, quantum defects (instantons) appear when the drive tunes the system through the quantum critical point, in a realization of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  12. Irreversible thermodynamic analysis and application for molecular heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto; Açıkkalp, Emin

    2017-09-01

    Is there a link between the macroscopic approach to irreversibility and microscopic behaviour of the systems? Consumption of free energy keeps the system away from a stable equilibrium. Entropy generation results from the redistribution of energy, momentum, mass and charge. This concept represents the essence of the thermodynamic approach to irreversibility. Irreversibility is the result of the interaction between systems and their environment. The aim of this paper is to determine lost works in a molecular engine and compare results with macro (classical) heat engines. Firstly, irreversible thermodynamics are reviewed for macro and molecular cycles. Secondly, irreversible thermodynamics approaches are applied for a quantum heat engine with -1/2 spin system. Finally, lost works are determined for considered system and results show that macro and molecular heat engines obey same limitations. Moreover, a quantum thermodynamic approach is suggested in order to explain the results previously obtained from an atomic viewpoint.

  13. Maxwell's demon, Szilard's engine and quantum measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorek, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    The author proposes and analyzes a quantum version of Szilard's one-molecule engine. In particular, the author recovers, in the quantum context, Szilard's conclusion concerning the free energy ''cost'' of measurements (delta /sub F/ is greater than or equal to k/sub b/T1n2) per bit of information. A cycle of Szilard's engine is illustrated for both the original and quantum versions. The measurement of the location of the molecule is essential in the process of extracting work in both classical and quantum design. Measurements are made by the classical Maxwell's demon

  14. Quantum mechanics for applied physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fromhold, Albert T

    2011-01-01

    This excellent text, directed to upper-level undergraduates and graduate students in engineering and applied physics, introduces the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, emphasizing those aspects of quantum mechanics and quantum statistics essential to an understanding of solid-state theory. A heavy background in mathematics and physics is not required beyond basic courses in calculus, differential equations, and calculus-based elementary physics.The first three chapters introduce quantum mechanics (using the Schrödinger equations), quantum statistics, and the free-electron theory of metals. Ch

  15. Heat Pipes Reduce Engine-Exhaust Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Increased fuel vaporization raises engine efficiency. Heat-pipe technology increased efficiency of heat transfer beyond that obtained by metallic conduction. Resulted in both improved engine operation and reduction in fuel consumption. Raw material conservation through reduced dependence on strategic materials also benefit from this type of heat-pipe technology. Applications result in improved engine performance and cleaner environment.

  16. Performance of heat engines with non-zero heat capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odes, Ron; Kribus, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Finite heat capacity is a second irreversibility mechanism in addition to thermal resistance. ► Heat capacity introduces thermal transients and reverse heat flow. ► Engine maximum power and efficiency are lower for finite heat capacity. ► Implementing the optimal engine cycle requires active control. - Abstract: The performance of a heat engine is analyzed subject to two types of irreversibility: a non-zero heat capacity, together with the more common finite heat transfer rate between the engine and the external heat reservoirs. The heat capacity represents an engine body that undergoes significant temperature variations during the engine cycle. An option to cut off the heat exchange between the engine and the external surrounding for part of the engine cycle is also explored. A variational approach was taken to find the engine’s internal temperature profile (which defines the internal thermodynamic cycle) that would produce maximum power. The maximum power is shown to be lower than the case of zero heat capacity, due to a loss of heat that is stored in the engine body and then lost, bypassing the thermodynamic cycle. The maximum efficiency and the efficiency at maximum power are also lower than the zero heat capacity case. Similar to the Curzon–Ahlborn analysis, power can be traded for increased efficiency, but for high heat capacity, the range of efficiency that is available for such a trade is diminished. Isolating the engine during part of the cycle reduces maximum power, but the efficiency at maximum power and the maximum efficiency are improved, due to better exploitation of heat stored in the engine body. This might be useful for real engines that are limited by the internal energy change during a single engine cycle or by the operating frequency, leading to a broader power–efficiency curve.

  17. Superconducting Qubits as Mechanical Quantum Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachtleben, Kewin; Mazon, Kahio T; Rego, Luis G C

    2017-09-01

    We propose the equivalence of superconducting qubits with a pistonlike mechanical quantum engine. The work reports a study on the nature of the nonequilibrium work exchanged with the quantum-nonadiabatic working medium, which is modeled as a multilevel coupled quantum well system subject to an external control parameter. The quantum dynamics is solved for arbitrary control protocols. It is shown that the work output has two components: one that depends instantaneously on the level populations and another that is due to the quantum coherences built in the system. The nonadiabatic coherent dynamics of the quantum engine gives rise to a resistance (friction) force that decreases the work output. We consider the functional equivalence of such a device and a rf-SQUID flux qubit.

  18. Maxwell's Demon, Szilard's Engine and Quantum Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2003-01-01

    We propose and analyze a quantum version of Szilard's ``one-molecule engine.'' In particular, we recover, in the quantum context, Szilard's conclusion concerning the free energy ``cost'' of measurements: $\\Delta F \\geq k_B T\\ln2$ per bit of information.

  19. Combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  20. Optimization of a relativistic quantum mechanical engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Francisco J; Ferré, Michel; Orellana, P A; Rojas, René G; Vargas, P

    2016-08-01

    We present an optimal analysis for a quantum mechanical engine working between two energy baths within the framework of relativistic quantum mechanics, adopting a first-order correction. This quantum mechanical engine, with the direct energy leakage between the energy baths, consists of two adiabatic and two isoenergetic processes and uses a three-level system of two noninteracting fermions as its working substance. Assuming that the potential wall moves at a finite speed, we derive the expression of power output and, in particular, reproduce the expression for the efficiency at maximum power.

  1. Quantum state transfer and network engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M

    2013-01-01

    Faithful communication is a necessary precondition for large-scale quantum information processing and networking, irrespective of the physical platform. Thus, the problems of quantum-state transfer and quantum-network engineering have attracted enormous interest over the last years, and constitute one of the most active areas of research in quantum information processing. The present volume introduces the reader to fundamental concepts and various aspects of this exciting research area, including links to other related areas and problems. The implementation of state-transfer schemes and the en

  2. Quantum state transfer and network engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M.; Jex, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Presents the basics of large-scale quantum information processing and networking. Covers most aspects of the problems of state transfer and quantum network engineering. Reflects the interdisciplinary nature of the field. Presents various theoretical approaches as well as possible implementations and related experiments. Faithful communication is a necessary precondition for large-scale quantum information processing and networking, irrespective of the physical platform. Thus, the problems of quantum-state transfer and quantum-network engineering have attracted enormous interest over the last years, and constitute one of the most active areas of research in quantum information processing. The present volume introduces the reader to fundamental concepts and various aspects of this exciting research area, including links to other related areas and problems. The implementation of state-transfer schemes and the engineering of quantum networks are discussed in the framework of various quantum optical and condensed matter systems, emphasizing the interdisciplinary character of the research area. Each chapter is a review of theoretical or experimental achievements on a particular topic, written by leading scientists in the field. The volume aims at both newcomers as well as experienced researchers.

  3. Nonlinearities in reservoir engineering: Enhancing quantum correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangming; Hu, Qingping; Li, Lingchao; Huang, Chen; Rao, Shi

    2017-12-01

    There are two decisive factors for quantum correlations in reservoir engineering, but they are strongly reversely dependent on the atom-field nonlinearities. One is the squeezing parameter for the Bogoliubov modes-mediated collective interactions, while the other is the dissipative rates for the engineered collective dissipations. Exemplifying two-level atomic ensembles, we show that the moderate nonlinearities can compromise these two factors and thus enhance remarkably two-mode squeezing and entanglement of different spin atomic ensembles or different optical fields. This suggests that the moderate nonlinearities of the two-level systems are more advantageous for applications in quantum networks associated with reservoir engineering.

  4. Engineering arbitrary pure and mixed quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechen, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Controlled manipulation by atomic- and molecular-scale quantum systems has attracted a lot of research attention in recent years. A fundamental problem is to provide deterministic methods for controlled engineering of arbitrary quantum states. This work proposes a deterministic method for engineering arbitrary pure and mixed states of a wide class of quantum systems. The method exploits a special combination of incoherent and coherent controls (incoherent and coherent radiation) and has two properties which are specifically important for manipulating by quantum systems: it realizes the strongest possible degree of their state control, complete density matrix controllability, meaning the ability to steer arbitrary pure and mixed initial states into any desired pure or mixed final state, and it is all-to-one, such that each particular control transfers all initial system states into one target state.

  5. Surface engineering and heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    This book is the proceedings of a Conference organised jointly by The Institute of Metals and The Centre for Exploitation of Science and Technology (CEST). It sets out to review this role and point the way to the future by collecting together a series of invited papers written by noted authorities in their fields. The opening review by CEST highlights the economic and industrial importance of Surface Engineering and is followed by a group of four articles devoted to specific branches of industry. Several technical papers then describe various aspects of the development of heat treatment over the last twenty-five years. These are followed by papers describing advances made possible by new technologies such as plasma, laser and ion beam. A separate abstract has been prepared for a paper on materials aspects of ion beam technology. (author)

  6. Nonconservative Forces via Quantum Reservoir Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuglar, Shanon L.; Zhdanov, Dmitry V.; Cabrera, Renan; Seideman, Tamar; Jarzynski, Christopher; Bondar, Denys I.

    2018-06-01

    A systematic approach is given for engineering dissipative environments that steer quantum wave packets along desired trajectories. The methodology is demonstrated with several illustrative examples: environment-assisted tunneling, trapping, effective mass assignment, and pseudorelativistic behavior. Nonconservative stochastic forces do not inevitably lead to decoherence—we show that purity can be well preserved. These findings highlight the flexibility offered by nonequilibrium open quantum dynamics.

  7. Quantum Nanomechanics: State Engineering and Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolley, M. J.; Milburn, G. J.; Doherty, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    There has recently been a surge of interest in the study of mechanical systems near the quantum limit. Such experiments are motivated by both fundamental interest in studying quantum mechanics with macroscopic engineered systems and potential applications as ultra-sensitive transducers, or even in quantum information processing. A particularly promising system is a microwave cavity optomechanical system, in which a nanomechanical resonator is embedded within (and capacitively coupled to) a superconducting microwave cavity. Here we discuss two schemes for the generation and measurement of quantum states of the nanomechanical resonator. A quantum squeezed state may be generated via mechanical parametric amplification, while a number state may be conditionally generated via continuous measurement and feedback control mediated by a superconducting qubit.

  8. Quantum Szilard Engine with Attractively Interacting Bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, J.; Tengstrand, M. Nilsson; Wacker, A.; Samuelsson, P.; Ueda, M.; Linke, H.; Reimann, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    We show that a quantum Szilard engine containing many bosons with attractive interactions enhances the conversion between information and work. Using an ab initio approach to the full quantum-mechanical many-body problem, we find that the average work output increases significantly for a larger number of bosons. The highest overshoot occurs at a finite temperature, demonstrating how thermal and quantum effects conspire to enhance the conversion between information and work. The predicted effects occur over a broad range of interaction strengths and temperatures.

  9. Decoherence by engineered quantum baths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossini, Davide [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Calarco, Tommaso [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento and BEC-CNR-INFM, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Giovannetti, Vittorio [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Montangero, Simone [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Fazio, Rosario [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-07-13

    Optical lattices can be used to simulate quantum baths and hence they can be of fundamental help to study, in a controlled way, the emergence of decoherence in quantum systems. Here we show how to implement a pure dephasing model for a two-level system coupled to an interacting spin bath. In this scheme it is possible to implement a large variety of spin environments embracing Ising, XY and Heisenberg universality classes. After having introduced the model, we calculate exactly the decoherence for the Ising and the XY spin bath model. We find universal features depending on the critical behaviour of the spin bath, both in the short- and long-time limits. The rich scenario that emerges can be tested experimentally and can be of importance for the understanding of the coherence loss in open quantum systems.

  10. Novikov Engine with Fluctuating Heat Bath Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Karsten; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2018-04-01

    The Novikov engine is a model for heat engines that takes the irreversible character of heat fluxes into account. Using this model, the maximum power output as well as the corresponding efficiency of the heat engine can be deduced, leading to the well-known Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency. The classical model assumes constant heat bath temperatures, which is not a reasonable assumption in the case of fluctuating heat sources. Therefore, in this article the influence of stochastic fluctuations of the hot heat bath's temperature on the optimal performance measures is investigated. For this purpose, a Novikov engine with fluctuating heat bath temperature is considered. Doing so, a generalization of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency is found. The results can help to quantify how the distribution of fluctuating quantities affects the performance measures of power plants.

  11. Heat Exchanger Lab for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Jonathan W.; Evans, Edward A.; Chase, George G.

    2015-01-01

    Third year chemical engineering undergraduate students at The University of Akron designed and fabricated a heat exchanger for a stirred tank as part of a Chemical Engineering Laboratory course. The heat exchanger portion of this course was three weeks of the fifteen week long semester. Students applied concepts of scale-up and dimensional…

  12. Advanced radioisotope heat source for Stirling Engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobry, T.J.; Walberg, G.

    2001-01-01

    The heat exchanger on a Stirling Engine requires a thermal energy transfer from a heat source to the engine through a very limited area on the heater head circumference. Designing an effective means to assure maximum transfer efficiency is challenging. A single General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS), which has been qualified for space operations, would satisfy thermal requirements for a single Stirling Engine that would produce 55 electrical watts. However, it is not efficient to transfer its thermal energy to the engine heat exchanger from its rectangular geometry. This paper describes a conceptual design of a heat source to improve energy transfer for Stirling Engines that may be deployed to power instrumentation on space missions

  13. Coupled qubits as a quantum heat switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, B.; Pekola, J. P.; Campisi, M.; Fazio, R.

    2017-12-01

    We present a quantum heat switch based on coupled superconducting qubits, connected to two LC resonators that are terminated by resistors providing two heat baths. To describe the system, we use a standard second order master equation with respect to coupling to the baths. We find that this system can act as an efficient heat switch controlled by the applied magnetic flux. The flux influences the energy level separations of the system, and under some conditions, the finite coupling of the qubits enhances the transmitted power between the two baths, by an order of magnitude under realistic conditions. At the same time, the bandwidth at maximum power of the switch formed of the coupled qubits is narrowed.

  14. Engineered quantum tunnelling in extended periodic potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wimberger, Sandro; Ciampini, Donatella; Morsch, Oliver; Mannella, Riccardo; Arimondo, Ennio [CNR-INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica ' Enrico Fermi' , Largo Pontecorvo 3, 1-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    Quantum tunnelling from a tilted, but otherwise periodic potential is studied. Our theoretical and experimental results show that, by controlling the system's parameters, we can engineer the escape rate of a Bose-Einstein condensate to an exceptional degree. Possible applications of this atom-optics realization of the open Wannier-Stark system are discussed.

  15. Engineering scalable fault-tolerant quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimchi-Schwartz, Mollie; Danna, Rosenberg; Kim, David; Yoder, Jonilyn; Kjaergaard, Morten; Das, Rabindra; Grover, Jeff; Gustavsson, Simon; Oliver, William

    Recent demonstrations of quantum protocols comprising on the order of 5-10 superconducting qubits are foundational to the future development of quantum information processors. A next critical step in the development of resilient quantum processors will be the integration of coherent quantum circuits with a hardware platform that is amenable to extending the system size to hundreds of qubits and beyond. In this talk, we will discuss progress toward integrating coherent superconducting qubits with signal routing via the third dimension. This research was funded in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  16. Catalysis of heat-to-work conversion in quantum machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Latune, C. L.; Davidovich, L.; Kurizki, G.

    2017-11-01

    We propose a hitherto-unexplored concept in quantum thermodynamics: catalysis of heat-to-work conversion by quantum nonlinear pumping of the piston mode which extracts work from the machine. This concept is analogous to chemical reaction catalysis: Small energy investment by the catalyst (pump) may yield a large increase in heat-to-work conversion. Since it is powered by thermal baths, the catalyzed machine adheres to the Carnot bound, but may strongly enhance its efficiency and power compared with its noncatalyzed counterparts. This enhancement stems from the increased ability of the squeezed piston to store work. Remarkably, the fraction of piston energy that is convertible into work may then approach unity. The present machine and its counterparts powered by squeezed baths share a common feature: Neither is a genuine heat engine. However, a squeezed pump that catalyzes heat-to-work conversion by small investment of work is much more advantageous than a squeezed bath that simply transduces part of the work invested in its squeezing into work performed by the machine.

  17. Quantum Markov Chain Mixing and Dissipative Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is the fruit of investigations on the extension of ideas of Markov chain mixing to the quantum setting, and its application to problems of dissipative engineering. A Markov chain describes a statistical process where the probability of future events depends only on the state...... of the system at the present point in time, but not on the history of events. Very many important processes in nature are of this type, therefore a good understanding of their behaviour has turned out to be very fruitful for science. Markov chains always have a non-empty set of limiting distributions...... (stationary states). The aim of Markov chain mixing is to obtain (upper and/or lower) bounds on the number of steps it takes for the Markov chain to reach a stationary state. The natural quantum extensions of these notions are density matrices and quantum channels. We set out to develop a general mathematical...

  18. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.

  19. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-11-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound.

  20. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-01-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound. (paper)

  1. Engineering quantum hyperentangled states in atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Mehwish; -Islam, Rameez-ul; Abbas, Tasawar; Ikram, Manzoor

    2017-11-01

    Hyperentangled states have boosted many quantum informatics tasks tremendously due to their high information content per quantum entity. Until now, however, the engineering and manipulation of such states were limited to photonic systems only. In present article, we propose generating atomic hyperentanglement involving atomic internal states as well as atomic external momenta states. Hypersuperposition, hyperentangled cluster, Bell and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states are engineered deterministically through resonant and off-resonant Bragg diffraction of neutral two-level atoms. Based on the characteristic parameters of the atomic Bragg diffraction, such as comparatively large interaction times and spatially well-separated outputs, such decoherence resistant states are expected to exhibit good overall fidelities and offer the evident benefits of full controllability, along with extremely high detection efficiency, over the counterpart photonic states comprised entirely of flying qubits.

  2. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  3. Engineering calculations in radiative heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, W A; Hopkins, D W

    1974-01-01

    Engineering Calculations in Radiative Heat Transfer is a six-chapter book that first explains the basic principles of thermal radiation and direct radiative transfer. Total exchange of radiation within an enclosure containing an absorbing or non-absorbing medium is then described. Subsequent chapters detail the radiative heat transfer applications and measurement of radiation and temperature.

  4. Characteristic functions of quantum heat with baths at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurell, Erik

    2018-06-01

    This paper is about quantum heat defined as the change in energy of a bath during a process. The presentation takes into account recent developments in classical strong-coupling thermodynamics and addresses a version of quantum heat that satisfies quantum-classical correspondence. The characteristic function and the full counting statistics of quantum heat are shown to be formally similar. The paper further shows that the method can be extended to more than one bath, e.g., two baths at different temperatures, which opens up the prospect of studying correlations and heat flow. The paper extends earlier results on the expected quantum heat in the setting of one bath [E. Aurell and R. Eichhorn, New J. Phys. 17, 065007 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/6/065007; E. Aurell, Entropy 19, 595 (2017), 10.3390/e19110595].

  5. Externally heated valve engine a new approach to piston engines

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierski, Zbyszko

    2016-01-01

    This book reports on a novel approach for generating mechanical energy from different, external heat sources using the body of a typical piston engine with valves. By presenting simple yet effective numerical models, the authors show how this new approach, which combines existing internal combustion technology with a lubrication system, is able to offer an economic solution to the problem of mechanical energy generation in piston engines. Their results also show that a stable heat generation process can be guaranteed outside of the engine. The book offers a detailed report on physical and numerical models of 4-stroke and 2-stroke versions of the EHVE together with different models of heat exchange, valves and results of their simulations. It also delivers the test results of an engine prototype run in laboratory conditions. By presenting a novel theoretical framework and providing readers with extensive knowledge of both the advantages and challenges of the method, this book is expected to inspire academic re...

  6. Heat pump heating with heat pumps driven by combustion engines or turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, K

    1977-01-27

    The heat pump described is driven by a gas Otto cycle engine, or a gas- or light- or heavy-oil fired Diesel engine. The claim refers to the use of waste heat of the engines by feeding into the input circuit of the heat pump. In addition, a drive by an electrical motor-generator or power production can be selected at times of peak load in the electrical supply network.

  7. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially.

  8. Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. This advanced materials technology is being developed in parallel and close coordination with the ongoing DOE and industry proof of concept engine development programs. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. Abstracts prepared for appropriate papers.

  9. Elements of quantum computing history, theories and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Akama, Seiki

    2015-01-01

    A quantum computer is a computer based on a computational model which uses quantum mechanics, which is a subfield of physics to study phenomena at the micro level. There has been a growing interest on quantum computing in the 1990's, and some quantum computers at the experimental level were recently implemented. Quantum computers enable super-speed computation, and can solve some important problems whose solutions were regarded impossible or intractable with traditional computers. This book provides a quick introduction to quantum computing for readers who have no backgrounds of both theory of computation and quantum mechanics. “Elements of Quantum Computing” presents the history, theories, and engineering applications of quantum computing. The book is suitable to computer scientists, physicist, and software engineers.

  10. Specific heat in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanlı, A. M.; Ibragimov, B. G.

    2017-11-01

    In the present paper, we have calculated the specific heat and magnetization of a quantum ring of a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) material in the presence of magnetic field. We take into account the effect of Rashba spin-orbital interaction, the exchange interaction and the Zeeman term on the specific heat. We have calculated the energy spectrum of the electrons in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum ring. Moreover we have calculated the specific heat dependency on the magnetic field and Mn concentration at finite temperature of a diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum ring.

  11. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  12. Integrated Heat Exchange For Recuperation In Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    combustion engines conduct heat transfer in the exhaust system. The exhaust valves have hollow stems containing sodium, which act as heat pipes with...is the use of heat pipes in internal combustion engines . Internal combustion engines have combustion chambers with temperatures as high as 2700 K...accomplished using evaporative heat pipes . This study explores the feasibility of embedding this heat exchange system within engines using a

  13. Single-particle stochastic heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Shubhashis; Pal, P. S.; Saha, Arnab; Jayannavar, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    We have performed an extensive analysis of a single-particle stochastic heat engine constructed by manipulating a Brownian particle in a time-dependent harmonic potential. The cycle consists of two isothermal steps at different temperatures and two adiabatic steps similar to that of a Carnot engine. The engine shows qualitative differences in inertial and overdamped regimes. All the thermodynamic quantities, including efficiency, exhibit strong fluctuations in a time periodic steady state. The fluctuations of stochastic efficiency dominate over the mean values even in the quasistatic regime. Interestingly, our system acts as an engine provided the temperature difference between the two reservoirs is greater than a finite critical value which in turn depends on the cycle time and other system parameters. This is supported by our analytical results carried out in the quasistatic regime. Our system works more reliably as an engine for large cycle times. By studying various model systems, we observe that the operational characteristics are model dependent. Our results clearly rule out any universal relation between efficiency at maximum power and temperature of the baths. We have also verified fluctuation relations for heat engines in time periodic steady state.

  14. Heat transfer applications for the practicing engineer

    CERN Document Server

    Theodore, Louis

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a training tool for individuals in industry and academia involved with heat transfer applications. Although the literature is inundated with texts emphasizing theory and theoretical derivations, the goal of this book is to present the subject of heat transfer from a strictly pragmatic point of view. The book is divided into four Parts: Introduction, Principles, Equipment Design Procedures and Applications, and ABET-related Topics. The first Part provides a series of chapters concerned with introductory topics that are required when solving most engineering problems, inclu

  15. Experimental Study of the Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump with Engine Heat Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas engine driven heat pumps (GEHPs represent one of practical solutions to effectively utilize fossil fuel energy and reduce environmental pollution. In this paper, the performance characteristics of the GEHP were investigated experimentally with engine heat recovery. A GEHP test facility was set up for this purpose. The effects of several important factors including engine speed, ambient temperature, condenser water flow rate, and condenser water inlet temperature on the system performance were studied over a wide range of operating conditions. The results showed that the engine waste heat accounted for about 40–50% of the total heat capacity over the studied operating conditions. It also showed that engine speed and ambient temperature had significant effects on the GEHP performance. The coefficient of performance (COP and the primary energy ratio (PER decreased by 14% and 12%, respectively, as engine speed increased from 1400 rpm to 2000 rpm. On the other hand, the COP and PER of the system increased by 22% and 16%, respectively, with the ambient temperature increasing from 3 to 12°C. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the condenser water flow rate and condenser water inlet temperature had little influence on the COP of the heat pump and the PER of the GEHP system.

  16. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  17. Recommender engine for continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Yang, Yi-feng; Wang, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Recommender systems play an essential role in the modern business world. They recommend favorable items such as books, movies, and search queries to users based on their past preferences. Applying similar ideas and techniques to Monte Carlo simulations of physical systems boosts their efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. Exploiting the quantum to classical mapping inherent in the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo methods, we construct a classical molecular gas model to reproduce the quantum distributions. We then utilize powerful molecular simulation techniques to propose efficient quantum Monte Carlo updates. The recommender engine approach provides a general way to speed up the quantum impurity solvers.

  18. Universal Trade-Off between Power, Efficiency, and Constancy in Steady-State Heat Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Seifert, Udo

    2018-05-01

    Heat engines should ideally have large power output, operate close to Carnot efficiency and show constancy, i.e., exhibit only small fluctuations in this output. For steady-state heat engines, driven by a constant temperature difference between the two heat baths, we prove that out of these three requirements only two are compatible. Constancy enters quantitatively the conventional trade-off between power and efficiency. Thus, we rationalize and unify recent suggestions for overcoming this simple trade-off. Our universal bound is illustrated for a paradigmatic model of a quantum dot solar cell and for a Brownian gyrator delivering mechanical work against an external force.

  19. Testing a Quantum Heat Pump with a Two-Level Spin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Correa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Once in its non-equilibrium steady state, a nanoscale system coupled to several heat baths may be thought of as a “quantum heat pump”. Depending on the direction of its stationary heat flows, it may function as, e.g., a refrigerator or a heat transformer. These continuous heat devices can be arbitrarily complex multipartite systems, and yet, their working principle is always the same: they are made up of several elementary three-level stages operating in parallel. As a result, it is possible to devise external “black-box” testing strategies to learn about their functionality and performance regardless of any internal details. In particular, one such heat pump can be tested by coupling a two-level spin to one of its “contact transitions”. The steady state of this external probe contains information about the presence of heat leaks and internal dissipation in the device and, also, about the direction of its steady-state heat currents. Provided that the irreversibility of the heat pump is low, one can further estimate its coefficient of performance. These techniques may find applications in the emerging field of quantum thermal engineering, as they facilitate the diagnosis and design optimization of complex thermodynamic cycles.

  20. Superconductor Particles As The Working Media Of A Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Peter D.

    2011-12-01

    A heat engine is presented in which the working media comprises a multiplicity of mutually isolated particles of Type I superconductor which are selectively processed through H-T phase space so as to convert a heat influx from a high temperature heat reservoir into a useful work output, wherein no heat is rejected to a low temperature heat reservoir.

  1. Sorption heat engines: simple inanimate negative entropy generators

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Anthonie W. J.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    The name 'sorption heat engines' is proposed for simple negative entropy generators that are driven by thermal cycling and work on alternating adsorption and desorption. These generators are in general not explicitly recognized as heat engines. Their mechanism is applicable to the fields of engineering, physics, chemistry, geology, and biology, in particular the origin of life. Four kinds of sorption heat engines are distinguished depending on the occurrence of changes in the adsorbent or ads...

  2. Molecular wires acting as quantum heat ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Fei; Li, Nianbei; Kohler, Sigmund; Hänggi, Peter

    2009-12-01

    We explore heat transfer in molecular junctions between two leads in the absence of a finite net thermal bias. The application of an unbiased time-periodic temperature modulation of the leads entails a dynamical breaking of reflection symmetry, such that a directed heat current may emerge (ratchet effect). In particular, we consider two cases of adiabatically slow driving, namely, (i) periodic temperature modulation of only one lead and (ii) temperature modulation of both leads with an ac driving that contains a second harmonic, thus, generating harmonic mixing. Both scenarios yield sizable directed heat currents, which should be detectable with present techniques. Adding a static thermal bias allows one to compute the heat current-thermal load characteristics, which includes the ratchet effect of negative thermal bias with positive-valued heat flow against the thermal bias, up to the thermal stop load. The ratchet heat flow in turn generates also an electric current. An applied electric stop voltage, yielding effective zero electric current flow, then mimics a solely heat-ratchet-induced thermopower ("ratchet Seebeck effect"), although no net thermal bias is acting. Moreover, we find that the relative phase between the two harmonics in scenario (ii) enables steering the net heat current into a direction of choice.

  3. Quantum state engineering in hybrid open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chaitanya; Larson, Jonas; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a possibility to generate nonclassical states in light-matter coupled noisy quantum systems, namely, the anisotropic Rabi and Dicke models. In these hybrid quantum systems, a competing influence of coherent internal dynamics and environment-induced dissipation drives the system into nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs). Explicitly, for the anisotropic Rabi model, the steady state is given by an incoherent mixture of two states of opposite parities, but as each parity state displays light-matter entanglement, we also find that the full state is entangled. Furthermore, as a natural extension of the anisotropic Rabi model to an infinite spin subsystem, we next explored the NESS of the anisotropic Dicke model. The NESS of this linearized Dicke model is also an inseparable state of light and matter. With an aim to enrich the dynamics beyond the sustainable entanglement found for the NESS of these hybrid quantum systems, we also propose to combine an all-optical feedback strategy for quantum state protection and for establishing quantum control in these systems. Our present work further elucidates the relevance of such hybrid open quantum systems for potential applications in quantum architectures.

  4. Quantum state engineering in hybrid open quantum systems

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Chaitanya; Larson, Jonas; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a possibility to generate nonclassical states in light-matter coupled noisy quantum systems, namely, the anisotropic Rabi and Dicke models. In these hybrid quantum systems, a competing influence of coherent internal dynamics and environment-induced dissipation drives the system into nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs). Explicitly, for the anisotropic Rabi model, the steady state is given by an incoherent mixture of two states of opposite parities, but as each parity state disp...

  5. Molecular wires acting as quantum heat ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Fei; Li, Nianbei; Kohler, Sigmund; Hänggi, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We explore heat transfer in molecular junctions between two leads in the absence of a finite net thermal bias. The application of an unbiased, time-periodic temperature modulation of the leads entails a dynamical breaking of reflection symmetry, such that a directed heat current may emerge (ratchet effect). In particular, we consider two cases of adiabatically slow driving, namely (i) periodic temperature modulation of only one lead and (ii) temperature modulation of both leads with an ac dri...

  6. Currents and fluctuations of quantum heat transport in harmonic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motz, T; Ankerhold, J; Stockburger, J T

    2017-01-01

    Heat transport in open quantum systems is particularly susceptible to the modeling of system–reservoir interactions. It thus requires us to consistently treat the coupling between a quantum system and its environment. While perturbative approaches are successfully used in fields like quantum optics and quantum information, they reveal deficiencies—typically in the context of thermodynamics, when it is essential to respect additional criteria such as fluctuation-dissipation theorems. We use a non-perturbative approach for quantum dissipative dynamics based on a stochastic Liouville–von Neumann equation to provide a very general and extremely efficient formalism for heat currents and their correlations in open harmonic chains. Specific results are derived not only for first- but also for second-order moments, which requires us to account for both real and imaginary parts of bath–bath correlation functions. Spatiotemporal patterns are compared with weak coupling calculations. The regime of stronger system–reservoir couplings gives rise to an intimate interplay between reservoir fluctuations and heat transfer far from equilibrium. (paper)

  7. Fluctuation relation for heat exchange in Markovian open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, M.; Golshani, M.; Rezakhani, A. T.

    2018-04-01

    A fluctuation relation for the heat exchange of an open quantum system under a thermalizing Markovian dynamics is derived. We show that the probability that the system absorbs an amount of heat from its bath, at a given time interval, divided by the probability of the reverse process (releasing the same amount of heat to the bath) is given by an exponential factor which depends on the amount of heat and the difference between the temperatures of the system and the bath. Interestingly, this relation is akin to the standard form of the fluctuation relation (for forward-backward dynamics). We also argue that the probability of the violation of the second law of thermodynamics in the form of the Clausius statement (i.e., net heat transfer from a cold system to its hot bath) drops exponentially with both the amount of heat and the temperature differences of the baths.

  8. Effect of finite heat input on the power performance of micro heat engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khu, Kerwin; Jiang, Liudi; Markvart, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Micro heat engines have attracted considerable interest in recent years for their potential exploitation as micro power sources in microsystems and portable devices. Thermodynamic modeling can predict the theoretical performance that can be potentially achieved by micro heat engine designs. An appropriate model can not only provide key information at the design stage but also indicate the potential room for improvement in existing micro heat engines. However, there are few models reported to date which are suitable for evaluating the power performance of micro heat engines. This paper presents a new thermodynamic model for determining the theoretical limit of power performance of micro heat engines with consideration to finite heat input and heat leakage. By matching the model components to those of a representative heat engine layout, the theoretical power, power density, and thermal efficiency achievable for a micro heat engine can be obtained for a given set of design parameters. The effects of key design parameters such as length and thermal conductivity of the engine material on these theoretical outputs are also investigated. Possible trade-offs among these performance objectives are discussed. Performance results derived from the developed model are compared with those of a working micro heat engine (P3) as an example. -- Highlights: → Thermodynamic model for micro heat engines. → Effect of different parameters on potential performance. → Tradeoffs for determining optimal size of micro engines.

  9. Holographic heat engine within the framework of massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong; Li, Gu-Qiang

    2018-05-01

    Heat engine models are constructed within the framework of massive gravity in this paper. For the four-dimensional charged black holes in massive gravity, it is shown that the existence of graviton mass improves the heat engine efficiency significantly. The situation is more complicated for the five-dimensional neutral black holes since the constant which corresponds to the third massive potential also contributes to the efficiency. It is also shown that the existence of graviton mass can improve the heat engine efficiency. Moreover, we probe how the massive gravity influences the behavior of the heat engine efficiency approaching the Carnot efficiency.

  10. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  11. Silicon Carbide Defect Qubits/Quantum Memory with Field-Tuning: OSD Quantum Science and Engineering Program (QSEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 3073 August 2017 Silicon Carbide Defect Qubits/Quantum Memory with Field-tuning: OSD Quantum Science and Engineering Program...Quantum Science and Engineering Program) by the Advanced Concepts and Applied Research Branch (Code 71730), the Energy and Environmental Sustainability...the Secretary of Defense (OSD) Quantum Science and Engineering Program (QSEP). Their collaboration topic was to examine the effect of electric-field

  12. Quantum Optical Heating in Sonoluminescence Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurcz, Andreas; Capolupo, Antonio; Beige, Almut

    2009-01-01

    Sonoluminescence occurs when tiny bubbles rilled with noble gas atoms are driven by a sound wave. Each cycle of the driving field is accompanied by a collapse phase in which the bubble radius decreases rapidly until a short but very strong light flash is emitted. The spectrum of the light corresponds to very high temperatures and hints at the presence of a hot plasma core. While everyone accepts that the effect is real, the main energy focussing mechanism is highly controversial. Here we suggest that the heating of the bubble might be due to a weak but highly inhomogeneous electric field as it occurs during rapid bubble deformations [A. Kurcz et al.(submitted)]. It is shown that such a field couples the quantised motion of the atoms to their electronic states, thereby resulting in very high heating rates.

  13. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-08

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  14. Black holes in massive gravity as heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendi, S. H.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.; Liu, H.; Meng, X.-H.

    2018-06-01

    The paper at hand studies the heat engine provided by black holes in the presence of massive gravity. The main motivation is to investigate the effects of massive gravity on different properties of the heat engine. It will be shown that massive gravity parameters modify the efficiency of engine on a significant level. Furthermore, it will be pointed out that it is possible to have a heat engine for non-spherical black holes in massive gravity, and therefore, we will study the effects of horizon topology on the properties of heat engine. Surprisingly, it will be shown that the highest efficiency for the heat engine belongs to black holes with the hyperbolic horizon, while the lowest one belongs to the spherical black holes.

  15. Active control of a plasmonic metamaterial for quantum state engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriri, S. A.; Tashima, T.; Zhang, X.; Asano, M.; Bechu, M.; Güney, D. Ö.; Yamamoto, T.; Özdemir, Ş. K.; Wegener, M.; Tame, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the active control of a plasmonic metamaterial operating in the quantum regime. A two-dimensional metamaterial consisting of unit cells made from gold nanorods is investigated. Using an external laser, we control the temperature of the metamaterial and carry out quantum process tomography on single-photon polarization-encoded qubits sent through, characterizing the metamaterial as a variable quantum channel. The overall polarization response can be tuned by up to 33% for particular nanorod dimensions. To explain the results, we develop a theoretical model and find that the experimental results match the predicted behavior well. This work goes beyond the use of simple passive quantum plasmonic systems and shows that external control of plasmonic elements enables a flexible device that can be used for quantum state engineering.

  16. Quantum heating as an alternative of reheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Emil T.; Bascone, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    To model a realistic situation for the beginning we consider massive real scalar ϕ4 theory in a (1 +1 )-dimensional asymptotically static Minkowski spacetime with an intermediate stage of expansion. To have an analytic headway we assume that scalars have a big mass. At past and future infinities of the background we have flat Minkowski regions which are joint by the inflationary expansion region. We use the tree-level Keldysh propagator in the theory in question to calculate the expectation value of the stress-energy tensor which is, thus, due to the excitations of the zero-point fluctuations. Then we show that even for large mass, if the de Sitter expansion stage is long enough, the quantum loop corrections to the expectation value of the stress-energy tensor are not negligible in comparison with the tree-level contribution. That is revealed itself via the excitation of the higher-point fluctuations of the exact modes: during the expansion stage a nonzero particle number density for the exact modes is generated. This density is not Planckian and serves as a quench which leads to a thermalization in the out Minkowski stage.

  17. Heat engine development for solar thermal power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, H. Q.; Jaffe, L. D.

    The parabolic dish solar collector systems for converting sunlight to electrical power through a heat engine will, require a small heat engine of high performance long lifetime to be competitive with conventional power systems. The most promising engine candidates are Stirling, high temperature Brayton, and combined cycle. Engines available in the current market today do not meet these requirements. The development of Stirling and high temperature Brayton for automotive applications was studied which utilizes much of the technology developed in this automotive program for solar power engines. The technical status of the engine candidates is reviewed and the components that may additional development to meet solar thermal system requirements are identified.

  18. Engineering high-order nonlinear dissipation for quantum superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhada, S. O.; Grimm, A.; Touzard, S.; Shankar, S.; Minev, Z. K.; Vool, U.; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.

    Engineering nonlinear driven-dissipative processes is essential for quantum control. In the case of a harmonic oscillator, nonlinear dissipation can stabilize a decoherence-free manifold, leading to protected quantum information encoding. One possible approach to implement such nonlinear interactions is to combine the nonlinearities provided by Josephson circuits with parametric pump drives. However, it is usually hard to achieve strong nonlinearities while avoiding undesired couplings. Here we propose a scheme to engineer a four-photon drive and dissipation in a harmonic oscillator by cascading experimentally demonstrated two-photon processes. We also report experimental progress towards realization of such a scheme. Work supported by: ARO, ONR, AFOSR and YINQE.

  19. Quantum engineering. Confining the state of light to a quantum manifold by engineered two-photon loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leghtas, Z; Touzard, S; Pop, I M; Kou, A; Vlastakis, B; Petrenko, A; Sliwa, K M; Narla, A; Shankar, S; Hatridge, M J; Reagor, M; Frunzio, L; Schoelkopf, R J; Mirrahimi, M; Devoret, M H

    2015-02-20

    Physical systems usually exhibit quantum behavior, such as superpositions and entanglement, only when they are sufficiently decoupled from a lossy environment. Paradoxically, a specially engineered interaction with the environment can become a resource for the generation and protection of quantum states. This notion can be generalized to the confinement of a system into a manifold of quantum states, consisting of all coherent superpositions of multiple stable steady states. We have confined the state of a superconducting resonator to the quantum manifold spanned by two coherent states of opposite phases and have observed a Schrödinger cat state spontaneously squeeze out of vacuum before decaying into a classical mixture. This experiment points toward robustly encoding quantum information in multidimensional steady-state manifolds. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to 2D symmetric potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belfaqih, Idrus Husin; Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka Putra; Prayitno, T. B.; Sulaksono, Anto

    2015-01-01

    Carnot model of heat engine is the most efficient cycle consisting of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Although ideal gas usually used as a working fluid in the Carnot engine, Bender used quantum particle confined in 1D potential well as a working fluid. In this paper, by following Bender we generalize the situation to 2D symmetric potential well. The efficiency is express as the ratio of the initial length of the system to the final length of the compressed system. The result then is shown that for the same ratio, 2D potential well is more efficient than 1D potential well

  1. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to 2D symmetric potential well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belfaqih, Idrus Husin, E-mail: idrushusin21@gmail.com; Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka Putra, E-mail: trengginas.eka@gmail.com; Prayitno, T. B., E-mail: teguh-budi@unj.ac.id [Department of Physics, Universitas Negeri Jakarta, Jl. Pemuda Rawamangun, Jakarta Timur, 13220 (Indonesia); Sulaksono, Anto, E-mail: anto.sulaksono@sci.ui.ac.id [Department of Physics, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Jawa Barat, 164242 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Carnot model of heat engine is the most efficient cycle consisting of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Although ideal gas usually used as a working fluid in the Carnot engine, Bender used quantum particle confined in 1D potential well as a working fluid. In this paper, by following Bender we generalize the situation to 2D symmetric potential well. The efficiency is express as the ratio of the initial length of the system to the final length of the compressed system. The result then is shown that for the same ratio, 2D potential well is more efficient than 1D potential well.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of a new Marnoch Heat Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saneipoor, P.; Dincer, I.; Naterer, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, recovery of waste heat from an industrial facility with a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) is examined. The MHE can be operated with temperature differentials below 100 K. A flowing liquid transfers heat from the heat source into heat exchangers and then removes heat from cold heat exchangers. Compressed dry air is used as a working medium in the heat engine. In this paper, the mechanical configuration of the heat engine is presented and analyzed. A thermodynamic model is developed to study the performance of the heat engine under various operating conditions. The results show that the exergy efficiency of the MHE reaches up to 17%. The major sources of exergy loss are presented and discussed, in order to optimize the system performance. -- Highlights: ► To develop a thermodynamic model to study the performance of a Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE). ► To investigate the effects of changing operational conditions on the MHE's efficiency. ► To assess the application of the MHE's commercial viability

  3. Role of measurement in feedback-controlled quantum engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Juyeon; Kim, Yong Woon

    2018-01-01

    In feedback controls, measurement is an essential step in designing protocols according to outcomes. For quantum mechanical systems, measurement has another effect; to supply energy to the measured system. We verify that in feedback-controlled quantum engines, measurement plays a dual role; not only as an auxiliary to perform feedback control but also as an energy supply to drive the engines. We consider a specific engine cycle exploiting feedback control followed by projective measurement and show that the maximum bound of the extractable work is set by both the efficacy of the feedback control and the energy change caused by projective measurement. We take a concrete example of an engine using an immobile spin-1/2 particle as a working substance and suggest two possible scenarios for work extraction.

  4. Nanoscale phase engineering of thermal transport with a Josephson heat modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornieri, Antonio; Blanc, Christophe; Bosisio, Riccardo; D'Ambrosio, Sophie; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Macroscopic quantum phase coherence has one of its pivotal expressions in the Josephson effect, which manifests itself both in charge and energy transport. The ability to master the amount of heat transferred through two tunnel-coupled superconductors by tuning their phase difference is the core of coherent caloritronics, and is expected to be a key tool in a number of nanoscience fields, including solid-state cooling, thermal isolation, radiation detection, quantum information and thermal logic. Here, we show the realization of the first balanced Josephson heat modulator designed to offer full control at the nanoscale over the phase-coherent component of thermal currents. Our device provides magnetic-flux-dependent temperature modulations up to 40 mK in amplitude with a maximum of the flux-to-temperature transfer coefficient reaching 200 mK per flux quantum at a bath temperature of 25 mK. Foremost, it demonstrates the exact correspondence in the phase engineering of charge and heat currents, breaking ground for advanced caloritronic nanodevices such as thermal splitters, heat pumps and time-dependent electronic engines.

  5. The Application of Quantum Energy Saver on Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce diesel fuel consumption, this paper conducts the research in view of a new type of quantum energy saving device, and then produce the sample and applied on automobile engine, Detect fuel use of an automobile by automobile fuel saving technology as-sessment methods from the department of transportation. Compare the changes of fuel use be-fore and after installation of quantum energy saving device on the same car, and give the feed-back of energy saving capability. The result shows, after installed quantum energy saver, both fuel consumption and the smoke of tail gas has decreased. The analysis and application of this paper carry out the conclusion that the quantum energy saver can play an important role in en-ergy saving and emission reduction, and provide a reference for other related research.

  6. Efficient quantum state transfer in an engineered chain of quantum bits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Martin; Knill, Emanuel; Kapit, Eliot; Vissers, Michael R.; Pappas, David P.

    2016-03-01

    We present a method of performing quantum state transfer in a chain of superconducting quantum bits. Our protocol is based on engineering the energy levels of the qubits in the chain and tuning them all simultaneously with an external flux bias. The system is designed to allow sequential adiabatic state transfers, resulting in on-demand quantum state transfer from one end of the chain to the other. Numerical simulations of the master equation using realistic parameters for capacitive nearest-neighbor coupling, energy relaxation, and dephasing show that fast, high-fidelity state transfer should be feasible using this method.

  7. On the question of heat engine cycles optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Костянтин Ігорович Ткаченко

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the efficiency of heat engines nowadays isn’t more than 50-60% for prototypes and maximum possible efficiency of a heat engine is considered Carnot cycle efficiency Thus, at least 40% of the disposable amount of heat is lost in the surrounding medium, unless the waste gases heat is utilized somehow. General idea of heat engines cycles is the transfer of energy from the heater (both external and internal to a working fluid, obtaining mechanical work from expanding of the working fluid, and returning the working fluid to the initial state by compression and excess heat discharge into a cooler. In this paper the combination of a heat engine operating according to the standard Edwards cycle and consisting of isochor, adiabat and isotherm, and the heat pump, using the reverse Carnot cycle is investigated. The heat pump partially picks out the heat of the working fluid at its isothermal compression, and returns it to the equivalent working fluid or regenerator cap, at the beginning of isochoric heating. The efficiency coefficient of the heat pump, and thus the work to putting it into action is calculated by proper equations at the constant temperature of the low-potential heat source (working fluid and variable temperature of the heated equivalent of the working fluid or the regenerator cap. Taking as an example selected quantitative parameters of the Edwards cycle it has been proved that the use of the heat pump increases the effective efficiency of combined cycle as compared to the basic one. In addition, it has been shown that the dependence of the efficiency on the degree of heat return is not monotonic and has a maximum

  8. Heat pipes to reduce engine exhaust emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A fuel combustor is presented that consists of an elongated casing with an air inlet conduit portion at one end, and having an opposite exit end. An elongated heat pipe is mounted longitudinally in the casing and is offset from and extends alongside the combustion space. The heat pipe is in heat transmitting relationship with the air intake conduit for heating incoming air. A guide conduit structure is provided for conveying the heated air from the intake conduit into the combustion space. A fuel discharge nozzle is provided to inject fuel into the combustion space. A fuel conduit from a fuel supply source has a portion engaged in heat transfer relationship of the heat pipe for preheating the fuel. The downstream end of the heat pipe is in heat transfer relationship with the casing and is located adjacent to the downstream end of the combustion space. The offset position of the heat pipe relative to the combustion space minimizes the quenching effect of the heat pipe on the gaseous products of combustion, as well as reducing coking of the fuel on the heat pipe, thereby improving the efficiency of the combustor.

  9. Negative specific heat with trapped ultracold quantum gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzys, M. P.; Anglin, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics normally prescribes that heat tends to disperse, but in certain cases it instead implies that heat will spontaneously concentrate. The spontaneous formation of stars out of cold cosmic nebulae, without which the universe would be dark and dead, is an example of this phenomenon. Here we show that the counter-intuitive thermodynamics of spontaneous heat concentration can be studied experimentally with trapped quantum gases, by using optical lattice potentials to realize weakly coupled arrays of simple dynamical subsystems, so that under the standard assumptions of statistical mechanics, the behavior of the whole system can be predicted from ensemble properties of the isolated components. A naive application of the standard statistical mechanical formalism then identifies the subsystem excitations as heat in this case, but predicts them to share the peculiar property of self-gravitating protostars, of having negative micro-canonical specific heat. Numerical solution of real-time evolution equations confirms the spontaneous concentration of heat in such arrays, with initially dispersed energy condensing quickly into dense ‘droplets’. Analysis of the nonlinear dynamics in adiabatic terms allows it to be related to familiar modulational instabilities. The model thus provides an example of a dictionary mesoscopic system, in which the same non-trivial phenomenon can be understood in both thermodynamical and mechanical terms.

  10. Quantum engineering of transistors based on 2D materials heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Colombo, Luigi; Fiori, Gianluca

    2018-03-01

    Quantum engineering entails atom-by-atom design and fabrication of electronic devices. This innovative technology that unifies materials science and device engineering has been fostered by the recent progress in the fabrication of vertical and lateral heterostructures of two-dimensional materials and by the assessment of the technology potential via computational nanotechnology. But how close are we to the possibility of the practical realization of next-generation atomically thin transistors? In this Perspective, we analyse the outlook and the challenges of quantum-engineered transistors using heterostructures of two-dimensional materials against the benchmark of silicon technology and its foreseeable evolution in terms of potential performance and manufacturability. Transistors based on lateral heterostructures emerge as the most promising option from a performance point of view, even if heterostructure formation and control are in the initial technology development stage.

  11. Quantum engineering of transistors based on 2D materials heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Colombo, Luigi; Fiori, Gianluca

    2018-03-01

    Quantum engineering entails atom-by-atom design and fabrication of electronic devices. This innovative technology that unifies materials science and device engineering has been fostered by the recent progress in the fabrication of vertical and lateral heterostructures of two-dimensional materials and by the assessment of the technology potential via computational nanotechnology. But how close are we to the possibility of the practical realization of next-generation atomically thin transistors? In this Perspective, we analyse the outlook and the challenges of quantum-engineered transistors using heterostructures of two-dimensional materials against the benchmark of silicon technology and its foreseeable evolution in terms of potential performance and manufacturability. Transistors based on lateral heterostructures emerge as the most promising option from a performance point of view, even if heterostructure formation and control are in the initial technology development stage.

  12. Engineering integrated photonics for heralded quantum gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meany, Thomas; Biggerstaff, Devon N; Broome, Matthew A; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Delanty, Michael; Steel, M J; Gilchrist, Alexei; Marshall, Graham D; White, Andrew G; Withford, Michael J

    2016-06-10

    Scaling up linear-optics quantum computing will require multi-photon gates which are compact, phase-stable, exhibit excellent quantum interference, and have success heralded by the detection of ancillary photons. We investigate the design, fabrication and characterisation of the optimal known gate scheme which meets these requirements: the Knill controlled-Z gate, implemented in integrated laser-written waveguide arrays. We show device performance to be less sensitive to phase variations in the circuit than to small deviations in the coupler reflectivity, which are expected given the tolerance values of the fabrication method. The mode fidelity is also shown to be less sensitive to reflectivity and phase errors than the process fidelity. Our best device achieves a fidelity of 0.931 ± 0.001 with the ideal 4 × 4 unitary circuit and a process fidelity of 0.680 ± 0.005 with the ideal computational-basis process.

  13. Engineering integrated photonics for heralded quantum gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meany, Thomas; Biggerstaff, Devon N.; Broome, Matthew A.; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Delanty, Michael; Steel, M. J.; Gilchrist, Alexei; Marshall, Graham D.; White, Andrew G.; Withford, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    Scaling up linear-optics quantum computing will require multi-photon gates which are compact, phase-stable, exhibit excellent quantum interference, and have success heralded by the detection of ancillary photons. We investigate the design, fabrication and characterisation of the optimal known gate scheme which meets these requirements: the Knill controlled-Z gate, implemented in integrated laser-written waveguide arrays. We show device performance to be less sensitive to phase variations in the circuit than to small deviations in the coupler reflectivity, which are expected given the tolerance values of the fabrication method. The mode fidelity is also shown to be less sensitive to reflectivity and phase errors than the process fidelity. Our best device achieves a fidelity of 0.931 ± 0.001 with the ideal 4 × 4 unitary circuit and a process fidelity of 0.680 ± 0.005 with the ideal computational-basis process.

  14. Barrier Engineered Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    251108. 6. Barve, Ajit V., Saumya Sengupta, Jun Oh Kim, John Montoya , Brianna Klein, Mohammad Ali Shirazi, Marziyeh Zamiri et al., "Barrier selection... H . Kim, Z-B. Tian, and Sanjay Krishna. "Barrier Engineered Infrared Photodetectors Based on Type-II InAs/GaSb Strained Layer Superlattices." (2013

  15. The heat engine cycle, the heat removal cycle, and ergonomics of the control room displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltracchi, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses and illustrates the ergonomics of an integrated display, which will allow operators to monitor the heat engine cycle during normal operation of the plant, and the heat removal cycle during emergency operation of the plant. A computer-based iconic display is discussed as an overview to monitor these cycles. Specific emphasis is placed upon the process variables and process functions within each cycle, and the action of control systems and engineered safeguard systems within each cycle. This paper contains examples of display formats for the heat engine cycle and the heat removal cycle in a pressurized water reactor

  16. Heat Transfer Analysis of a Diesel Engine Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Diviš

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the research carried out at the Josef Božek Research Center of Engine and Automotive Engineering dealing with extended numerical stress/deformation analyses of engines parts loaded by heat and mechanical forces. It contains a detailed description of a C/28 series diesel engine head FE model and a discussion of heat transfer analysis tunning and results. The head model consisting of several parts allows a description of contact interaction in both thermal and mechanical analysis.

  17. Electric field engineering using quantum-size-effect-tuned heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Adinolfi, V.

    2013-07-03

    A quantum junction solar cell architecture was recently reported that employs colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) on each side of the p-n junction. This architecture extends the range of design opportunities for CQD photovoltaics, since the bandgap can be tuned across the light-absorbing semiconductor layer via control over CQD size, employing solution-processed, room-temperature fabricated materials. We exploit this feature by designing and demonstrating a field-enhanced heterojunction architecture. We optimize the electric field profile within the solar cell through bandgap engineering, thereby improving carrier collection and achieving an increased open circuit voltage, resulting in a 12% improvement in power conversion efficiency.

  18. Engineering squeezed states of microwave radiation with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Pengbo; Li Fuli

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a squeezed state source for microwave radiation with tunable parameters in circuit quantum electrodynamics. We show that when a superconducting artificial multilevel atom interacting with a transmission line resonator is suitably driven by external classical fields, two-mode squeezed states of the cavity modes can be engineered in a controllable fashion from the vacuum state via adiabatic following of the ground state of the system. This scheme appears to be robust against decoherence and is realizable with present techniques in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  19. A Study of Ballast Water Treatment Using Engine Waste Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Rajoo; Yaakob, Omar; Koh, Kho King; Adnan, Faizul Amri bin; Ismail, Nasrudin bin; Ahmad, Badruzzaman bin; Ismail, Mohd Arif bin

    2018-05-01

    Heat treatment of ballast water using engine waste heat can be an advantageous option complementing any proven technology. A treatment system was envisaged based on the ballast system of an existing, operational crude carrier. It was found that the available waste heat could raise the temperatures by 25 °C and voyage time requirements were found to be considerable between 7 and 12 days to heat the high volumes of ballast water. Further, a heat recovery of 14-33% of input energies from exhaust gases was recorded while using a test rig arrangement representing a shipboard arrangement. With laboratory level tests at temperature ranges of around 55-75 °C, almost complete species mortalities for representative phytoplankton, zooplankton and bacteria were observed while the time for exposure varied from 15 to 60 s. Based on the heat availability analyses for harvesting heat from the engine exhaust gases(vessel and test rig), heat exchanger designs were developed and optimized using Lagrangian method applying Bell-Delaware approaches. Heat exchanger designs were developed to suit test rig engines also. Based on these designs, heat exchanger and other equipment were procured and erected. The species' mortalities were tested in this mini-scale arrangement resembling the shipboard arrangement. The mortalities realized were > 95% with heat from jacket fresh water and exhaust gases alone. The viability of the system was thus validated.

  20. Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuen-Sen Lin

    2008-12-31

    Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data

  1. Quantum Optics 6 - Quantum Engineering of Atoms and Photons - Conference Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The conference organized by Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics and Warsaw University, sponsored by European Science Foundation, was held in Krynica (120 km south-east of Cracow), Poland, June 13-18 2005. This was the sixth conference of the cycle, the previous one was held in Koscielisko, Poland in 2001. This time the main subject of the conference was: Quantum Engineering of Atoms and Photons. The meeting was focused on the physics of ultracold quantum gases, which without doubts determines the frontiers of the modern atomic, molecular and optical physics. Special attention was also be given to quantum information processing, both from theoretical and experimental point of view, including possible realizations in ultracold quantum gases. The conference consisted of invited lectures and a poster session. Competition for the best poster was held, sponsored by Journal of Optics B and Journal of Physics B - for more on this, including the results of the competition visit. (author)

  2. Effect of different heat transfer models on HCCI engine simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshat, Elaheh; Saray, Rahim Khoshbakhti

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new multi zone model is developed for HCCI combustion modeling. • New heat transfer model is used for prediction of heat transfer in HCCI engines. • Model can predict engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics well. • Appropriate mass and heat transfer models cause to accurate prediction of CO, UHC and NOx. - Abstract: Heat transfer from engine walls has an important role on engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics. The main focus of this study is offering a new relation for calculation of convective heat transfer from in-cylinder charge to combustion chamber walls of HCCI engines and providing the ability of new model in comparison with the previous models. Therefore, a multi zone model is developed for homogeneous charge compression ignition engine simulation. Model consists of four different types of zones including core zone, boundary layer zone, outer zones, which are between core and boundary layer, and crevice zone. Conductive heat transfer and mass transfer are considered between neighboring zones. For accurate calculation of initial conditions at inlet valve closing, multi zone model is coupled with a single zone model, which simulates gas exchange process. Various correlations are used as convective heat transfer correlations. Woschni, modified Woschni, Hohenberg and Annand correlations are used as convective heat transfer models. The new convection model, developed by authors, is used, too. Comparative analyses are done to recognize the accurate correlation for prediction of engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics in a wide range of operating conditions. The results indicate that utilization of various heat transfer models, except for new convective heat transfer model, leads to significant differences in prediction of in-cylinder pressure and exhaust emissions. Using Woschni, Chang and new model, convective heat transfer coefficient increases near top dead center, sharply

  3. Generalized irreversible heat-engine experiencing a complex heat-transfer law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lingen; Li Jun; Sun Fengrui

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental optimal relation between optimal power-output and efficiency of a generalized irreversible Carnot heat-engine is derived based on a generalized heat-transfer law, including a generalized convective heat-transfer law and a generalized radiative heat-transfer law, q ∝ (ΔT n ) m . The generalized irreversible Carnot-engine model incorporates several internal and external irreversibilities, such as heat resistance, bypass heat-leak, friction, turbulence and other undesirable irreversibility factors. The added irreversibilities, besides heat resistance, are characterized by a constant parameter and a constant coefficient. The effects of heat-transfer laws and various loss terms are analyzed. The results obtained corroborate those in the literature

  4. Evaluation of heat transfer correlations for HCCI engine modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soyhan, H.S.; Yasar, H.; Walmsley, H.; Head, B.; Kalghatgi, G.T.; Sorusbay, C.

    2009-01-01

    Combustion in HCCI engines is a controlled auto-ignition of well-mixed fuel, air and residual gas. The thermal conditions of the combustion chamber are governed by chemical kinetics strongly coupled with heat transfer from the hot gas to the walls. The heat losses have a critical effect on HCCI

  5. Design procedures for heat-straightening repair : an engineering guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes over four years of research on heat-straightening repairs and provides a prototype engineering guide for the application of heat-straightening to bridge structures. It is based on the research results detailed in a companion re...

  6. Performance analysis of diesel engine heat pump incorporated with heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, N.N.; Huang, M.J.; Hewitt, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Diesel engine heat pump with heat recovery. • Water-to-water source heat pump based on R134a. • Possibility for different flow temperature for heat distribution system. • Possible retrofit application in off-gas or weak electricity network area. • Potential to diversify use of fossil fuel, primary energy and CO_2 emission savings. - Abstract: This paper presents experimental study of diesel engine heat pump (DEHP) system to find potential as retrofit technology in off-gas or weak electricity network area to replace existing gas/oil/electric heating system in domestic sector. Test set-up of diesel engine driven water-to-water heat pump system was built which included heat recovery arrangement from the engine coolant & exhaust gas. The system was designed to meet typical house heating demand in Northern Ireland. Performance of DEHP was evaluated to meet house-heating demand at different flow temperature (35, 45, 55 & 65 °C), a typical requirement of underfloor space heating, medium/high temperature radiators and domestic hot water. The performance was evaluated against four-evaporator water inlet temperature (0, 5, 10 & 15 °C) and at three different engine speed 1600, 2000 & 2400 rpm. Experiment results were analysed in terms of heating/cooling capacity, heat recovery, total heat output, primary energy ratio (PER), isentropic efficiency, etc. Test results showed that DEHP is able to meet house-heating demand with help of heat recovery with reduced system size. Heat recovery contributed in a range of 22–39% in total heat output. It is possible to achieve high flow temperature in a range of 74 °C with help of heat recovery. Overall system PER varied in a range of 0.93–1.33. Speed increment and flow temperature has significant impact on heat recovery, total heat output and PER. A case scenario with different flow temperature to match house-heating demand has been presented to show working potential with different heat distribution system

  7. Geothermal heating a handbook of engineering economics

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, R; Smarason, O B

    2013-01-01

    To date all books on geothermics have emphasized its use for generating electricity, with applications of lower grade resources for direct heating meriting only a brief chapter. This book brings together research from a range of scientific journals and 'grey' literature to produce the first comprehensive text on geothermal heating. Economics form an important part of the book. It provides a step by step analysis of the various ways in which thermal waters can be used to provide space heating and of the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches. The final section of the book provides

  8. Heat flux and quantum correlations in dissipative cascaded systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Salvatore; Farace, Alessandro; Ciccarello, Francesco; Palma, G. Massimo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2015-02-01

    We study the dynamics of heat flux in the thermalization process of a pair of identical quantum systems that interact dissipatively with a reservoir in a cascaded fashion. Despite that the open dynamics of the bipartite system S is globally Lindbladian, one of the subsystems "sees" the reservoir in a state modified by the interaction with the other subsystem and hence it undergoes a non-Markovian dynamics. As a consequence, the heat flow exhibits a nonexponential time behavior which can greatly deviate from the case where each party is independently coupled to the reservoir. We investigate both thermal and correlated initial states of S and show that the presence of correlations at the beginning can considerably affect the heat-flux rate. We carry out our study in two paradigmatic cases—a pair of harmonic oscillators with a reservoir of bosonic modes and two qubits with a reservoir of fermionic modes—and compare the corresponding behaviors. In the case of qubits and for initial thermal states, we find that the trace distance discord is at any time interpretable as the correlated contribution to the total heat flux.

  9. Quantum gates by inverse engineering of a Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Alan C.

    2018-01-01

    Inverse engineering of a Hamiltonian (IEH) from an evolution operator is a useful technique for the protocol of quantum control with potential applications in quantum information processing. In this paper we introduce a particular protocol to perform IEH and we show how this scheme can be used to implement a set of quantum gates by using minimal quantum resources (such as entanglement, interactions between more than two qubits or auxiliary qubits). Remarkably, while previous protocols request three-qubit interactions and/or auxiliary qubits to implement such gates, our protocol requires just two-qubit interactions and no auxiliary qubits. By using this approach we can obtain a large class of Hamiltonians that allow us to implement single and two-qubit gates necessary for quantum computation. To conclude this article we analyze the performance of our scheme against systematic errors related to amplitude noise, where we show that the free parameters introduced in our scheme can be useful for enhancing the robustness of the protocol against such errors.

  10. Fuel system for diesel engine with multi-stage heated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, Yu N.; Kuznetsov, Yu A.; Kolomeichenko, A. V.; Kuznetsov, I. S.; Solovyev, R. Yu; Sharifullin, S. N.

    2017-09-01

    The article describes a fuel system of a diesel engine with a construction tractor multistage heating, allowing the use of pure rapeseed oil as a diesel engine fuel. The paper identified the kinematic viscosity depending on the temperature and composition of the mixed fuel, supplemented by the existing recommendations on the use of mixed fuels based on vegetable oils and developed the device allowing use as fuel for diesel engines of biofuels based on vegetable oils.

  11. Reverse electrodialysis heat engine for sustainable power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamburini, A.; Tedesco, M.; Cipollina, A.; Micale, G.; Ciofalo, M.; Papapetrou, M.; Van Baak, W.; Piacentino, A.

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: State of the art technologies for the conversion of heat into power. Grey circles refer to technologies at very early stage of development and non-available at industrial level. The Carnot efficiency (on the secondary horizontal axis) is evaluated assuming a cold sink temperature of 25 °C. SRC-hot gases: Steam Rankine Cycle integrated with gas turbine/other topping cycles; SRC-fuel: Steam Rankine Cycle directly fuelled by oil, coal or other fuels; KC: Kalina Cycle; ORC: Organic Rankine Cycle; TEG: Thermoelectric Generation; PEPG: Piezoelectric Power Generation with waste heat-powered expansion/compression cycle; OHE: Osmotic Heat Engine; REDHE, Reverse Electrodialysis Heat Engine (this paper). Display Omitted -- Highlights: •For the first time, the potential of Reverse Electrodialysis Heat Engine is assessed. •An overview of the possible regeneration methods is presented. •Performance of the RED unit fed by different salty solutions was suitably optimized. •Three different RED Heat Engine scenarios were studied. •Exergetic efficiency of about 85% could be achieved in the foreseen future. -- Abstract: Reverse Electrodialysis Heat Engine (REDHE) is a promising technology to convert waste heat at temperatures lower than 100 °C into electric power. In the present work an overview of the possible regeneration methods is presented and the technological challenges for the development of the RED Heat Engine (REDHE) are identified. The potential of this power production cycle was investigated through a simplified mathematical model. In the first part of the work, several salts were singularly modelled as possible solutes in aqueous solutions feeding the RED unit and the corresponding optimal conditions were recognized via an optimization study. In the second part, three different RED Heat Engine scenarios were studied. Results show that power densities much higher than those relevant to NaCl-water solutions can be obtained by using different

  12. Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

  13. Analysis of pre-heated fuel combustion and heat-emission dynamics in a diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, S. A.; Kartashevich, A. N.; Buzikov, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article explores the feasibility of diesel fuel pre-heating. The research goal was to obtain and analyze the performance diagrams of a diesel engine fed with pre-heated fuel. The engine was tested in two modes: at rated RPMs and at maximum torque. To process the diagrams the authors used technique developed by the Central Diesel Research Institute (CDRI). The diesel engine’s heat emission curves were obtained. The authors concluded that fuel pre-heating shortened the initial phase of the combustion process and moderated the loads, thus making it possible to boost a diesel engine’s mean effective pressure.

  14. Heat exchanger operation in the externally heated air valve engine with separated settling chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimierski, Zbyszko; Wojewoda, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    The crucial role in the externally heated air valve engine is played by its heat exchangers which work in a closed cycle. These are: a heater and a cooler and they are subject to a numerical analysis in the paper. Both of them are equipped with fixed volumes that are separate settling chambers causing that heat exchangers behave as almost stationary recuperators and analysis of the stationary behaviour is the main goal of the paper. Power and efficiency of the engine must be not lower than their averaged values for the same engine working in unsteady conditions. The results of calculations confirm such a statement. The pressure drop in the exchanger is another natural phenomenon presented. It has been overcome by use of additional blowers and the use of them is an additional focus of the presented analysis. A separation of settling chambers and additional blowers is a novelty in the paper. There is also a pre-heater applied in the engine which does not differ from well-known heat exchangers met in energy generation devices. The main objective of the paper is to find the behaviour of the engine model under stationary conditions of the heat exchangers and compare it with the non-stationary ones. - Highlights: • Externally heated air engine combined with forced working gas flow (supercharging). • Separate settling chambers allow for achieving stable and constant heat exchange parameters. • Pressure drop in heat exchangers overcome by additional blowers. • Reciprocating piston air engine, cam governing system, standard lubrication for externally heated engine. • Different fuels: oil, coal, gas, biomass also solar or nuclear energy

  15. Atmospheric Circulations of Rocky Planets as Heat Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koll, D. D. B.

    2017-12-01

    Rocky planets are extremely common in the galaxy and include Earth, Mars, Venus, and hundreds of exoplanets. To understand and compare the climates of these planets, we need theories that are general enough to accommodate drastically different atmospheric and planetary properties. Unfortunately, few such theories currently exist.For Earth, there is a well-known principle that its atmosphere resembles a heat engine - the atmosphere absorbs heat near the surface, at a hot temperature, and emits heat to space in the upper troposphere, at a cold temperature, which allows it to perform work and balance dissipative processes such as friction. However, previous studies also showed that Earth's hydrological cycle uses up a large fraction of the heat engine's work output, which makes it difficult to view other atmospheres as heat engines.In this work I extend the heat engine principle from Earth towards other rocky planets. I explore both dry and moist atmospheres in an idealized general circulation model (GCM), and quantify their work output using entropy budgets. First, I show that convection and turbulent heat diffusion are important entropy sources in dry atmospheres. I develop a scaling that accounts for its effects, which allows me to predict the strength of frictional dissipation in dry atmospheres. There are strong parallels between my scaling and so-called potential intensity theory, which is a seminal theory for understanding tropical cyclones on Earth. Second, I address how moisture affects atmospheric heat engines. Moisture modifies both the thermodynamic properties of air and releases latent heat when water vapor condenses. I explore the impact of both effects, and use numerical simulations to explore the difference between dry and moist atmospheric circulations across a wide range of climates.

  16. Nanoscale magnetic heat pumps and engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, G.E.W.; Bretzel, S.; Brataas, A.; Tserkovnyak, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We present the linear-response matrix for a sliding domain wall in a rotatable magnetic nanowire, which is driven out of equilibrium by temperature and voltage bias, mechanical torque, and magnetic field. An expression for heat-current-induced domain-wall motion is derived. Application of Onsager’s

  17. Dual Expander Cycle Rocket Engine with an Intermediate, Closed-cycle Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, William D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A dual expander cycle (DEC) rocket engine with an intermediate closed-cycle heat exchanger is provided. A conventional DEC rocket engine has a closed-cycle heat exchanger thermally coupled thereto. The heat exchanger utilizes heat extracted from the engine's fuel circuit to drive the engine's oxidizer turbomachinery.

  18. Design of Heat Exchanger for Ericsson-Brayton Piston Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Durcansky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined power generation or cogeneration is a highly effective technology that produces heat and electricity in one device more efficiently than separate production. Overall effectiveness is growing by use of combined technologies of energy extraction, taking heat from flue gases and coolants of machines. Another problem is the dependence of such devices on fossil fuels as fuel. For the combustion turbine is mostly used as fuel natural gas, kerosene and as fuel for heating power plants is mostly used coal. It is therefore necessary to seek for compensation today, which confirms the assumption in the future. At first glance, the obvious efforts are to restrict the use of largely oil and change the type of energy used in transport. Another significant change is the increase in renewable energy—energy that is produced from renewable sources. Among machines gaining energy by unconventional way belong mainly the steam engine, Stirling engine, and Ericsson engine. In these machines, the energy is obtained by external combustion and engine performs work in a medium that receives and transmits energy from combustion or flue gases indirectly. The paper deals with the principle of hot-air engines, and their use in combined heat and electricity production from biomass and with heat exchangers as primary energy transforming element.

  19. Design of heat exchanger for Ericsson-Brayton piston engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcansky, Peter; Papucik, Stefan; Jandacka, Jozef; Holubcik, Michal; Nosek, Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Combined power generation or cogeneration is a highly effective technology that produces heat and electricity in one device more efficiently than separate production. Overall effectiveness is growing by use of combined technologies of energy extraction, taking heat from flue gases and coolants of machines. Another problem is the dependence of such devices on fossil fuels as fuel. For the combustion turbine is mostly used as fuel natural gas, kerosene and as fuel for heating power plants is mostly used coal. It is therefore necessary to seek for compensation today, which confirms the assumption in the future. At first glance, the obvious efforts are to restrict the use of largely oil and change the type of energy used in transport. Another significant change is the increase in renewable energy--energy that is produced from renewable sources. Among machines gaining energy by unconventional way belong mainly the steam engine, Stirling engine, and Ericsson engine. In these machines, the energy is obtained by external combustion and engine performs work in a medium that receives and transmits energy from combustion or flue gases indirectly. The paper deals with the principle of hot-air engines, and their use in combined heat and electricity production from biomass and with heat exchangers as primary energy transforming element.

  20. Optimization of Heat Exchangers for Intercooled Recuperated Aero Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Misirlis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the European research project LEMCOTEC, a section was devoted to the further optimization of the recuperation system of the Intercooled Recuperated Aero engine (IRA engine concept, of MTU Aero Engines AG. This concept is based on an advanced thermodynamic cycle combining both intercooling and recuperation. The present work is focused only on the recuperation process. This is carried out through a system of heat exchangers mounted inside the hot-gas exhaust nozzle, providing fuel economy and reduced pollutant emissions. The optimization of the recuperation system was performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD computations, experimental measurements and thermodynamic cycle analysis for a wide range of engine operating conditions. A customized numerical tool was developed based on an advanced porosity model approach. The heat exchangers were modeled as porous media of predefined heat transfer and pressure loss behaviour and could also incorporate major and critical heat exchanger design decisions in the CFD computations. The optimization resulted in two completely new innovative heat exchanger concepts, named as CORN (COnical Recuperative Nozzle and STARTREC (STraight AnnulaR Thermal RECuperator, which provided significant benefits in terms of fuel consumption, pollutants emission and weight reduction compared to more conventional heat exchanger designs, thus proving that further optimization potential for this technology exists.

  1. A thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine: detailed study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus; Swift

    2000-06-01

    A new type of thermoacoustic engine based on traveling waves and ideally reversible heat transfer is described. Measurements and analysis of its performance are presented. This new engine outperforms previous thermoacoustic engines, which are based on standing waves and intrinsically irreversible heat transfer, by more than 50%. At its most efficient operating point, it delivers 710 W of acoustic power to its resonator with a thermal efficiency of 0.30, corresponding to 41% of the Carnot efficiency. At its most powerful operating point, it delivers 890 W to its resonator with a thermal efficiency of 0.22. The efficiency of this engine can be degraded by two types of acoustic streaming. These are suppressed by appropriate tapering of crucial surfaces in the engine and by using additional nonlinearity to induce an opposing time-averaged pressure difference. Data are presented which show the nearly complete elimination of the streaming convective heat loads. Analysis of these and other irreversibilities show which components of the engine require further research to achieve higher efficiency. Additionally, these data show that the dynamics and acoustic power flows are well understood, but the details of the streaming suppression and associated heat convection are only qualitatively understood.

  2. A thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine: Detailed study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backhaus, S.; Swift, G. W.

    2000-01-01

    A new type of thermoacoustic engine based on traveling waves and ideally reversible heat transfer is described. Measurements and analysis of its performance are presented. This new engine outperforms previous thermoacoustic engines, which are based on standing waves and intrinsically irreversible heat transfer, by more than 50%. At its most efficient operating point, it delivers 710 W of acoustic power to its resonator with a thermal efficiency of 0.30, corresponding to 41% of the Carnot efficiency. At its most powerful operating point, it delivers 890 W to its resonator with a thermal efficiency of 0.22. The efficiency of this engine can be degraded by two types of acoustic streaming. These are suppressed by appropriate tapering of crucial surfaces in the engine and by using additional nonlinearity to induce an opposing time-averaged pressure difference. Data are presented which show the nearly complete elimination of the streaming convective heat loads. Analysis of these and other irreversibilities show which components of the engine require further research to achieve higher efficiency. Additionally, these data show that the dynamics and acoustic power flows are well understood, but the details of the streaming suppression and associated heat convection are only qualitatively understood. (c) 2000 Acoustical Society of America

  3. Computational Quantum Mechanics for Materials Engineers The EMTO Method and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Vitos, L

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, new materials have been developed by empirically correlating their chemical composition, and the manufacturing processes used to form them, with their properties. Until recently, metallurgists have not used quantum theory for practical purposes. However, the development of modern density functional methods means that today, computational quantum mechanics can help engineers to identify and develop novel materials. Computational Quantum Mechanics for Materials Engineers describes new approaches to the modelling of disordered alloys that combine the most efficient quantum-level th

  4. Molecular engineering problems in heat and mass transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotake, S.

    1991-01-01

    As for developing, manufacturing and applying new materials of advanced functions such as high-performance devices and high-temperature materials, fundamental understanding of the phenomena from the standpoint of molecular and atomic levels has been required. In these problems, the processes of heat and mass transfer play an important role, being one of the rate-controlling factors. But the energy levels associated with heat and mass transfer are of the orders much less than those of chemical reaction, and it is not easy to understand the thermal problems on the molecular and atomic basis. This paper views the processes of heat and mass transfer from the dynamical motions of atom and molecule for thermal engineering problems. Especially, problems are considered of heat conduction in fine-ceramics, sintered materials of high heat conductivity or high heat-insulation, phase change of condensation in vapor deposition processes such as CVD and PVD, and radiation in laser processing

  5. Work and power fluctuations in a critical heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubec, Viktor; Ryabov, Artem

    2017-09-01

    We investigate fluctuations of output work for a class of Stirling heat engines with working fluid composed of interacting units and compare these fluctuations to an average work output. In particular, we focus on engine performance close to a critical point where Carnot's efficiency may be attained at a finite power as reported by M. Campisi and R. Fazio [Nat. Commun. 7, 11895 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms11895]. We show that the variance of work output per cycle scales with the same critical exponent as the heat capacity of the working fluid. As a consequence, the relative work fluctuation diverges unless the output work obeys a rather strict scaling condition, which would be very hard to fulfill in practice. Even under this condition, the fluctuations of work and power do not vanish in the infinite system size limit. Large fluctuations of output work thus constitute inseparable and dominant element in performance of the macroscopic heat engines close to a critical point.

  6. Work and power fluctuations in a critical heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubec, Viktor; Ryabov, Artem

    2017-09-01

    We investigate fluctuations of output work for a class of Stirling heat engines with working fluid composed of interacting units and compare these fluctuations to an average work output. In particular, we focus on engine performance close to a critical point where Carnot's efficiency may be attained at a finite power as reported by M. Campisi and R. Fazio [Nat. Commun. 7, 11895 (2016)2041-172310.1038/ncomms11895]. We show that the variance of work output per cycle scales with the same critical exponent as the heat capacity of the working fluid. As a consequence, the relative work fluctuation diverges unless the output work obeys a rather strict scaling condition, which would be very hard to fulfill in practice. Even under this condition, the fluctuations of work and power do not vanish in the infinite system size limit. Large fluctuations of output work thus constitute inseparable and dominant element in performance of the macroscopic heat engines close to a critical point.

  7. Heat Transfer in Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent

    Heat transfer between the cylinder gas and the piston surface during combustion in large two-stroke uniflow scavenged marine diesel engines has been investigated in the present work. The piston surface experiences a severe thermal load during combustion due to the close proximity of the combustion...... zone to the surface. At the same time, cooling of the piston crown is relatively complicated. This can cause large thermal stresses in the piston crown and weakening of the material strength, which may be critical as it can lead to formation of cracks. Information about the piston surface heat transfer...... is thus important for the engine manufactures. The piston surface heat transfer was studied in the event of impingement of hot combustion products on the piston during combustion, and an estimate was obtained of the peak heat flux level experienced on the piston surface. The investigation was carried out...

  8. Thermodynamic and heat transfer analysis of heat recovery from engine test cell by Organic Rankine Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokati, Naser; Mohammadkhani, Farzad; Farrokhi, Navid; Ranjbar, Faramarz

    2014-12-01

    During manufacture of engines, evaluation of engine performance is essential. This is accomplished in test cells. During the test, a significant portion of heat energy released by the fuel is wasted. In this study, in order to recover these heat losses, Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is recommended. The study has been conducted assuming the diesel oil to be composed of a single hydrocarbon such as C12H26. The composition of exhaust gases (products of combustion) have been computed (and not determined experimentally) from the stoichiometric equation representing the combustion reaction. The test cell heat losses are recovered in three separate heat exchangers (preheater, evaporator and superheater). These heat exchangers are separately designed, and the whole system is analyzed from energy and exergy viewpoints. Finally, a parametric study is performed to investigate the effect of different variables on the system performance characteristics such as the ORC net power, heat exchangers effectiveness, the first law efficiency, exergy destruction and heat transfer surfaces. The results of the study show that by utilizing ORC, heat recovery equivalent to 8.85 % of the engine power is possible. The evaporator has the highest exergy destruction rate, while the pump has the lowest among the system components. Heat transfer surfaces are calculated to be 173.6, 58.7, and 11.87 m2 for the preheater, evaporator and superheater, respectively.

  9. Insoluble Coatings for Stirling Engine Heat Pipe Condenser Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussinger, Peter M.; Lindemuth, James E.

    1997-01-01

    The principal objective of this Phase 2 SBIR program was to develop and demonstrate a practically insoluble coating for nickel-based superalloys for Stirling engine heat pipe applications. Specific technical objectives of the program were: (1) Determine the solubility corrosion rates for Nickel 200, Inconel 718, and Udimet 72OLI in a simulated Stirling engine heat pipe environment, (2) Develop coating processes and techniques for capillary groove and screen wick structures, (3) Evaluate the durability and solubility corrosion rates for capillary groove and screen wick structures coated with an insoluble coating in cylindrical heat pipes operating under Stirling engine conditions, and (4) Design and fabricate a coated full-scale, partial segment of the current Stirling engine heat pipe for the Stirling Space Power Convertor program. The work effort successfully demonstrated a two-step nickel aluminide coating process for groove wick structures and interior wall surfaces in contact with liquid metals; demonstrated a one-step nickel aluminide coating process for nickel screen wick structures; and developed and demonstrated a two-step aluminum-to-nickel aluminide coating process for nickel screen wick structures. In addition, the full-scale, partial segment was fabricated and the interior surfaces and wick structures were coated. The heat pipe was charged with sodium, processed, and scheduled to be life tested for up to ten years as a Phase 3 effort.

  10. Nonstationary heat flow in the piston of the turbocharged engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr GUSTOF

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the numeric computations of nonstationary heat flow in form of temperature distribution on characteristic surfaces of the piston of the turbocharged engine at the beginning phase its work was presented. The computations were performed for fragmentary load engine by means of the two-zone combustion model, the boundary conditions of III kind and the finite elements method (FEM by using of COSMOS/M program.

  11. Heat recovery from a cement plant with a Marnoch Heat Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saneipoor, P.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) that recovers waste heat from within a typical cement plant. Two MHE units with compressed air as the working fluid are installed to recover the waste heat. The first unit on the main stack has four pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers. The second heat recovery unit is installed on a clinker quenching system. This unit operates with three pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers. The recovered heat is converted to electricity through the MHE system and used internally within the cement plant. A predictive model and results are presented and discussed. The results show the promising performance of the MHE's capabilities for efficient generation of electricity from waste heat sources in a cement plant. The new heat recovery system increases the efficiency of the cement plant and lowers the CO 2 emissions from the clinker production process. Moreover, it reduces the amount of waste heat to the environment and lowers the temperature of the exhaust gases. - Highlights: → This paper examines the thermodynamic performance of a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) that recovers waste heat to produce electricity and improve the operating efficiency of a typical cement plant. → The first unit of the MHE on the main stack has four pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers and the second heat recovery unit is installed on a clinker quenching system. → Both predicted and experimental results demonstrate the promising performance of the MHE's capabilities for efficient generation of electricity from waste heat sources in a cement plant.

  12. Waste Heat Recovery from a High Temperature Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jonas E.

    Government-mandated improvements in fuel economy and emissions from internal combustion engines (ICEs) are driving innovation in engine efficiency. Though incremental efficiency gains have been achieved, most combustion engines are still only 30-40% efficient at best, with most of the remaining fuel energy being rejected to the environment as waste heat through engine coolant and exhaust gases. Attempts have been made to harness this waste heat and use it to drive a Rankine cycle and produce additional work to improve efficiency. Research on waste heat recovery (WHR) demonstrates that it is possible to improve overall efficiency by converting wasted heat into usable work, but relative gains in overall efficiency are typically minimal ( 5-8%) and often do not justify the cost and space requirements of a WHR system. The primary limitation of the current state-of-the-art in WHR is the low temperature of the engine coolant ( 90 °C), which minimizes the WHR from a heat source that represents between 20% and 30% of the fuel energy. The current research proposes increasing the engine coolant temperature to improve the utilization of coolant waste heat as one possible path to achieving greater WHR system effectiveness. An experiment was performed to evaluate the effects of running a diesel engine at elevated coolant temperatures and to estimate the efficiency benefits. An energy balance was performed on a modified 3-cylinder diesel engine at six different coolant temperatures (90 °C, 100 °C, 125 °C, 150 °C, 175 °C, and 200 °C) to determine the change in quantity and quality of waste heat as the coolant temperature increased. The waste heat was measured using the flow rates and temperature differences of the coolant, engine oil, and exhaust flow streams into and out of the engine. Custom cooling and engine oil systems were fabricated to provide adequate adjustment to achieve target coolant and oil temperatures and large enough temperature differences across the

  13. VHTR engineering design study: intermediate heat exchanger program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-11-01

    The work reported is the result of a follow-on program to earlier Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) studies. The primary use of the VHTR is to provide heat for various industrial processes, such as hydrocarbon reforming and coal gasification. For many processes the use of an intermediate heat transfer barrier between the reactor coolant and the process is desirable; for some processes it is mandatory. Various intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) concepts for the VHTR were investigated with respect to safety, cost, and engineering design considerations. The reference processes chosen were steam-hydrocarbon reforming, with emphasis on the chemical heat pipe, and steam gasification of coal. The study investigates the critically important area of heat transfer between the reactor coolant, helium, and the various chemical processes

  14. Optimal Control of Diesel Engines with Waste Heat Recovery System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Donkers, M.C.F.; Kupper, F.

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for a Euro-VI diesel engine with Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue

  15. Optimal control of diesel engines with waste heat recovery systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Donkers, M.C.F.; Kupper, F.; Waschl, H.; Kolmanovsky, I.; Steinbuch, M.; Del Re, L.

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for a Euro-VI diesel engine with Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO 2 - NO x trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue

  16. Optimization of powered Stirling heat engine with finite speed thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Mohammad Ali; Pourfayaz, Fathollah; Bidi, Mokhtar; Hosseinzade, Hadi; Feidt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Based on finite speed method and direct method, the optimal performance is investigated. • The effects of major parameters on the optimal performance are investigated. • The accuracy of the results was compared with previous works. - Abstract: Popular thermodynamic analyses including finite time thermodynamic analysis was lately developed based upon external irreversibilities while internal irreversibilities such as friction, pressure drop and entropy generation were not considered. The aforementioned disadvantage reduces the reliability of the finite time thermodynamic analysis in the design of an accurate Stirling engine model. Consequently, the finite time thermodynamic analysis could not sufficiently satisfy researchers for implementing in design and optimization issues. In this study, finite speed thermodynamic analysis was employed instead of finite time thermodynamic analysis for studying Stirling heat engine. The finite speed thermodynamic analysis approach is based on the first law of thermodynamics for a closed system with finite speed and the direct method. The effects of heat source temperature, regenerating effectiveness, volumetric ratio, piston stroke as well as rotational speed are included in the analysis. Moreover, maximum output power in optimal rotational speed was calculated while pressure losses in the Stirling engine were systematically considered. The result reveals the accuracy and the reliability of the finite speed thermodynamic method in thermodynamic analysis of Stirling heat engine. The outcomes can help researchers in the design of an appropriate and efficient Stirling engine.

  17. Engineering and economic aspects of centalized heating from nuclear boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel'yanov, I.Ya.; Baturov, B.B.; Korytnikov, V.P.; Koryakin, Yu.I.; Chernyaev, V.A.; Kovylyanskij, Ya.A.; Galaktionov, I.V.

    1979-01-01

    Some engineering and economic aspects for deployment of centralized nuclear boilers (NB) in the USSR are considered. Engineering, maintenance and economic features of NB as compared to organic-fuelled boilers and nuclear thermal power plants are discussed. Among major factors governing economic efficiency of NB underlined are oraganic fuel costs, reactor unit power, location relative to heat-consuming centres and capacity factor. It is concluded that NB can be economical for heating large consumers (more than 1500 G kal/hr). At the periphery NB can be competitive already at reactor unit power of several MWth. The development of HTGR type reactor-based nuclear-chemical boilers and lines for heat transport in a chemically bound state (e.g., CH 4 → H 2 +CO 2 +CO → CH 4 ) opens the way for a substantial breakthrow in the centralized NB efficiency

  18. Performance analysis of a thermosize micro/nano heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Wenjie; He Jizhou

    2008-01-01

    In a recent paper [A. Sisman, I. Muller, Phys. Lett. A 320 (2004) 360] the thermodynamic properties of ideal gases confined in a narrow box were examined theoretically. The so-called 'thermosize effects' similar to thermoelectric effects, such as Seebeck-like thermosize effect, Peltier-like thermosize effect and Thomson-like thermosize effect, were analyzed. Like the thermoelectric generator, based on the thermosize effects we have established a model of micro/nano scaled ideal gas heat engine cycle which includes two isothermal and two isobaric processes. The expressions of power output and efficiency of this cycle in the two cases of reversible and irreversible heat exchange are derived and the optimal performance characteristics of the heat engine is discussed by some numerical example. The results obtained here will provide theoretical guidance for the design of micro/nano scaled device

  19. Heat engine in the three-dimensional spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lingnan Normal University,Zhanjiang, 524048, Guangdong (China); Department of Physics, Lingnan Normal University,Zhanjiang, 524048, Guangdong (China); Liang, Feng [Department of Physics, Lingnan Normal University,Zhanjiang, 524048, Guangdong (China); Li, Gu-Qiang [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lingnan Normal University,Zhanjiang, 524048, Guangdong (China); Department of Physics, Lingnan Normal University,Zhanjiang, 524048, Guangdong (China)

    2017-03-02

    We define a kind of heat engine via three-dimensional charged BTZ black holes. This case is quite subtle and needs to be more careful. The heat flow along the isochores does not equal to zero since the specific heat C{sub V}≠0 and this point completely differs from the cases discussed before whose isochores and adiabats are identical. So one cannot simply apply the paradigm in the former literatures. However, if one introduces a new thermodynamic parameter associated with the renormalization length scale, the above problem can be solved. We obtain the analytical efficiency expression of the three-dimensional charged BTZ black hole heat engine for two different schemes. Moreover, we double check with the exact formula. Our result presents the first specific example for the sound correctness of the exact efficiency formula. We argue that the three-dimensional charged BTZ black hole can be viewed as a toy model for further investigation of holographic heat engine. Furthermore, we compare our result with that of the Carnot cycle and extend the former result to three-dimensional spacetime. In this sense, the result in this paper would be complementary to those obtained in four-dimensional spacetime or ever higher. Last but not the least, the heat engine efficiency discussed in this paper may serve as a criterion to discriminate the two thermodynamic approaches introduced in ref. https://www.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.92.124069 and our result seems to support the approach which introduces a new thermodynamic parameter R=r{sub 0}.

  20. Utilisation of diesel engine waste heat by Organic Rankine Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kölsch, Benedikt; Radulovic, Jovana

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, three different organic liquids were investigated as potential working fluids in an Organic Rankine Cycle. Performance of Methanol, Toluene and Solkatherm SES36 was modelled in an ORC powered by a diesel engine waste heat. The ORC model consists of a preheater, evaporator, superheater, turbine, pump and two condensers. With variable maximum cycle temperatures and high cycle pressures, the thermal efficiency, net power output and overall heat transfer area have been evaluated. Methanol was found to have the best thermal performance, but also required the largest heat transfer area. While Toluene achieved lower thermal efficiency, it showed great work potential at high pressures and relatively low temperatures. Our model identified the risks associated with employing these fluids in an ORC: methanol condensing during the expansion and toluene not sufficiently superheated at the turbine inlet, which can compromise the cycle operation. The best compromise between the size of heat exchanger and thermodynamic performance was found for Methanol ORC at intermediate temperatures and high pressures. Flammability and toxicity, however, remain the obstacles for safe implementation of both fluids in ORC systems. - Highlights: • ORC powered by diesel-engine waste heat was developed. • Methanol, Toluene and Solkatherm were considered as working fluids. • Methanol was selected due to the best overall thermal performance. • Optimal cycle operating parameters and heat exchanger area were evaluated

  1. The study of the heat-engineering characteristics of a solar heat collector based on aluminum heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairnasov, S.M.; Zaripov, V.K.; Passamakin, B.M. et al.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of studies into the heat-engineering characteristics of a flat heat solar collector based on aluminum heat pipes that is designed to be used in building facades. The principle of work and the structure of the solar collector are considered; the results of its comparison with a traditional flat solar collector are presented. The studies were performed at a heat carrier temperature range of +10 - +30 degree C and at a solar heat flow density of 400 - 1000 W/m 2 . The obtained experimental heat-engineering characteristics of the collector based on heat pipes show that they are at a level of traditional flow solar collectors; for example, its efficiency is 0.65 - 0.73. Meanwhile, the hydraulic resistance of the structure with heat pipes is by a factor of 2 - 2.4 smaller and ensures a high level of scalability, reliability, and maintainability, which is important when using it as an element of facade constructions of solar heat systems. (author)

  2. Heat transfer characteristics of some oils used for engine cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Ziyan, Hosny Z.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation of heat transfer from a cast iron test specimen to engine oils under boiling conditions. The work is aimed at evaluating the thermal characteristics of some engine oils in contact with high temperature parts in internal combustion engines. Three mono-grade oils and two multi-grade oils are examined at heat fluxes from about 30 to more than 400 kW/m 2 for bulk temperatures of 40, 60, 80, 100, 125, 150 and 175 deg. C. The considered oils are analyzed and tested according to some ASTM standards to determine their additives concentration and to obtain some of their thermophysical properties. The results indicated that oil additives, oil properties and bulk temperatures have substantial effects on the oil characteristics. The boiling heat flux, for the best oil, rises by a factor of 1.65 as the bulk temperature decreases from 175 to 40 deg. C. The mono-grade oils produce superior heat transfer characteristics compared to those produced by multi-grade oils. The oil with the best additive concentrations produces boiling heat fluxes up to 4.44 times higher than those produced by some other oils. Comparing the results of the tested oils revealed that the oil that has the largest concentrations of boron, magnesium, phosphorus and zinc with low concentration of calcium yields the best heat transport characteristics among the other tested oils. These additives provide superior detergent and dispersant characteristics, reflected in the large alkalinity and low corrosivity of the oil. On the other side, calcium has a negative interaction with other additives and yields an adverse effect on heat transfer characteristics even when it exists in oil with large concentrations of boron, magnesium, phosphorus and zinc

  3. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    .... Focusing on applications of quantum optics, the textbook covers recent developments such as engineering of quantum states, quantum optics on a chip, nano-mechanical mirrors, quantum entanglement...

  4. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  5. SrF2 capsule design for heat engine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, D.H.

    1976-04-01

    A number of design changes were considered to improve heat transfer characteristics of the WESF capsule. This capsule was evaluated in a design concept for use as a heat source in a helium-working fluid, Stirling heat engine. Throughout the study a heat block concept was used. The helium was assumed to be at 1200 0 F and 200 atm. The upper temperature limit at the fuel-metal interface was assumed to be 800 0 C because of material compatibility considerations. A 0.6-in. thick outer can was considered since it may be required for impact resistance and high pressure accident environments. The modifications considered were: (1) filling all gaps with helium rather than air, (2) filling gaps with powdered metal, and (3) adding a third can to the existing capsule. Also, enhancement of emissivity on metal surfaces was considered as a possible modification

  6. Hybrid heat recovery - flat plate Stirling engine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanizh, A.M.; Budin, R.; Sutlovizh, I.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the possibility of process condensate heat recovery for boiler water preheating as well as for combined heat and power production for chosen process in textile industry has been investigated. The garment industry requires low pressure process steam or hot water for which production expensive fossil fuel should be used. Fuel usage can be reduced by various energy conservation methods. During the process a great quantity of hot condensate or waste hot water is rejected in the sewage system. To reduce heat wastes and improve technological process this condensate could be returned to the boiler for feed water preheating. When 60% condensate is returned to the steam generator about 8 % natural gas is saved. The rest of the condensate should be used for driving low temperature flat plate Stirling motor the advantage of the flat plate Stirling engine is ability to work at low temperatures. This engine produces electrical energy which can put in motion an electrogenerator in the same plant. While Stirling engine can be used electrical power and economical effect could be much greater using such a hybrid system the process waste heat is not only converted into useful work but at the same time thermal pollution is greatly diminished. (Author)

  7. Size dependence of efficiency at maximum power of heat engine

    KAUST Repository

    Izumida, Y.; Ito, N.

    2013-01-01

    We perform a molecular dynamics computer simulation of a heat engine model to study how the engine size difference affects its performance. Upon tactically increasing the size of the model anisotropically, we determine that there exists an optimum size at which the model attains the maximum power for the shortest working period. This optimum size locates between the ballistic heat transport region and the diffusive heat transport one. We also study the size dependence of the efficiency at the maximum power. Interestingly, we find that the efficiency at the maximum power around the optimum size attains a value that has been proposed as a universal upper bound, and it even begins to exceed the bound as the size further increases. We explain this behavior of the efficiency at maximum power by using a linear response theory for the heat engine operating under a finite working period, which naturally extends the low-dissipation Carnot cycle model [M. Esposito, R. Kawai, K. Lindenberg, C. Van den Broeck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 150603 (2010)]. The theory also shows that the efficiency at the maximum power under an extreme condition may reach the Carnot efficiency in principle.© EDP Sciences Società Italiana di Fisica Springer-Verlag 2013.

  8. Size dependence of efficiency at maximum power of heat engine

    KAUST Repository

    Izumida, Y.

    2013-10-01

    We perform a molecular dynamics computer simulation of a heat engine model to study how the engine size difference affects its performance. Upon tactically increasing the size of the model anisotropically, we determine that there exists an optimum size at which the model attains the maximum power for the shortest working period. This optimum size locates between the ballistic heat transport region and the diffusive heat transport one. We also study the size dependence of the efficiency at the maximum power. Interestingly, we find that the efficiency at the maximum power around the optimum size attains a value that has been proposed as a universal upper bound, and it even begins to exceed the bound as the size further increases. We explain this behavior of the efficiency at maximum power by using a linear response theory for the heat engine operating under a finite working period, which naturally extends the low-dissipation Carnot cycle model [M. Esposito, R. Kawai, K. Lindenberg, C. Van den Broeck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 150603 (2010)]. The theory also shows that the efficiency at the maximum power under an extreme condition may reach the Carnot efficiency in principle.© EDP Sciences Società Italiana di Fisica Springer-Verlag 2013.

  9. A novel heat engine for magnetizing superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, T A; Hong, Z; Zhu, X [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Krabbes, G [IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2008-03-01

    The potential of bulk melt-processed YBCO single domains to trap significant magnetic fields (Tomita and Murakami 2003 Nature 421 517-20; Fuchs et al 2000 Appl. Phys. Lett. 76 2107-9) at cryogenic temperatures makes them particularly attractive for a variety of engineering applications including superconducting magnets, magnetic bearings and motors (Coombs et al 1999 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 9 968-71; Coombs et al 2005 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 15 2312-5). It has already been shown that large fields can be obtained in single domain samples at 77 K. A range of possible applications exist in the design of high power density electric motors (Jiang et al 2006 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 1164-8). Before such devices can be created a major problem needs to be overcome. Even though all of these devices use a superconductor in the role of a permanent magnet and even though the superconductor can trap potentially huge magnetic fields (greater than 10 T) the problem is how to induce the magnetic fields. There are four possible known methods: (1) cooling in field; (2) zero field cooling, followed by slowly applied field; (3) pulse magnetization; (4) flux pumping. Any of these methods could be used to magnetize the superconductor and this may be done either in situ or ex situ. Ideally the superconductors are magnetized in situ. There are several reasons for this: first, if the superconductors should become demagnetized through (i) flux creep, (ii) repeatedly applied perpendicular fields (Vanderbemden et al 2007 Phys. Rev. B 75 (17)) or (iii) by loss of cooling then they may be re-magnetized without the need to disassemble the machine; secondly, there are difficulties with handling very strongly magnetized material at cryogenic temperatures when assembling the machine; thirdly, ex situ methods would require the machine to be assembled both cold and pre-magnetized and would offer significant design difficulties. Until room temperature superconductors can be prepared, the

  10. A novel heat engine for magnetizing superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coombs, T A; Hong, Z; Zhu, X; Krabbes, G

    2008-01-01

    The potential of bulk melt-processed YBCO single domains to trap significant magnetic fields (Tomita and Murakami 2003 Nature 421 517-20; Fuchs et al 2000 Appl. Phys. Lett. 76 2107-9) at cryogenic temperatures makes them particularly attractive for a variety of engineering applications including superconducting magnets, magnetic bearings and motors (Coombs et al 1999 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 9 968-71; Coombs et al 2005 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 15 2312-5). It has already been shown that large fields can be obtained in single domain samples at 77 K. A range of possible applications exist in the design of high power density electric motors (Jiang et al 2006 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 1164-8). Before such devices can be created a major problem needs to be overcome. Even though all of these devices use a superconductor in the role of a permanent magnet and even though the superconductor can trap potentially huge magnetic fields (greater than 10 T) the problem is how to induce the magnetic fields. There are four possible known methods: (1) cooling in field; (2) zero field cooling, followed by slowly applied field; (3) pulse magnetization; (4) flux pumping. Any of these methods could be used to magnetize the superconductor and this may be done either in situ or ex situ. Ideally the superconductors are magnetized in situ. There are several reasons for this: first, if the superconductors should become demagnetized through (i) flux creep, (ii) repeatedly applied perpendicular fields (Vanderbemden et al 2007 Phys. Rev. B 75 (17)) or (iii) by loss of cooling then they may be re-magnetized without the need to disassemble the machine; secondly, there are difficulties with handling very strongly magnetized material at cryogenic temperatures when assembling the machine; thirdly, ex situ methods would require the machine to be assembled both cold and pre-magnetized and would offer significant design difficulties. Until room temperature superconductors can be prepared, the

  11. A heating system for piglets in farrowing house using waste heat from biogas engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payungsak Junyusen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to design and test a heating system for piglets in farrowing house by utilising the waste heat from a biogas engine as a heat source. The study was separated into three parts: the study on the biogas combined heat and power plant, the investigation on the properties of the heat panel, and the installation and testing of the heating system. From the experiment, the condition producing 60 kW of electrical power was a proper one, in which electrical efficiency and specific fuel consumption were 14% and 1.22 m3/kWh respectively. Generating both electricity and heat increased the overall efficiency to 37.7% and decreased the specific fuel consumption to 0.45 m3/kWh. The heat panel, which was made of a plastic material, had a thermal conductivity of 0.58 W/mC and the maximum compressive force and operating pressure of 8.1 kN and 0.35 bar respectively. The surface temperature of the panel was dependent on the inlet water temperature. When hot water of 44C was supplied into the farrowing house with room temperature of 26C, the average surface temperature was 33C. The developed heating system could provide heat for 4.3 farrowing houses. The payback period of this project was 2.5 years.

  12. Improving Engine Oil Warm Up through Waste Heat Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Di Battista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the transportation sector, engine oil thermal management has not yet received the attention it deserves in the path towards carbon dioxide and pollutants reduction. During the homologation cycle (which represents a typical daily trip, oil temperature reaches its thermal steady value, which insures best performances in terms of viscosity, only in the final part of the trip, when most part of the harmful emissions have been already emitted; therefore, a warm up acceleration would surely represent a strong beneficial action. In this paper, a faster warming up of the lubricant oil was done using the heat owned by the exhaust gases, which was almost immediately ready after the engine ignition, in the early part of a driving cycle. An experimental activity has been developed in a turbocharged engine (F1C 3L IVECO, modifying the oil circuit in order to heat up the oil during the cold phase of a homologation cycle by the exhaust gases. A significant reduction of fuel consumption and pollutant emissions savings has been experimentally demonstrated. Also, the interaction between the modified oil circuit, engine, coolant circuit, and exhaust line has been investigated in order to have a system view of the new heating oil technology.

  13. Performance of discrete heat engines and heat pumps in finite time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann; Kosloff

    2000-05-01

    The performance in finite time of a discrete heat engine with internal friction is analyzed. The working fluid of the engine is composed of an ensemble of noninteracting two level systems. External work is applied by changing the external field and thus the internal energy levels. The friction induces a minimal cycle time. The power output of the engine is optimized with respect to time allocation between the contact time with the hot and cold baths as well as the adiabats. The engine's performance is also optimized with respect to the external fields. By reversing the cycle of operation a heat pump is constructed. The performance of the engine as a heat pump is also optimized. By varying the time allocation between the adiabats and the contact time with the reservoir a universal behavior can be identified. The optimal performance of the engine when the cold bath is approaching absolute zero is studied. It is found that the optimal cooling rate converges linearly to zero when the temperature approaches absolute zero.

  14. Coupled-Double-Quantum-Dot Environmental Information Engines: A Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-06-01

    We conduct numerical simulations for an autonomous information engine comprising a set of coupled double quantum dots using a simple model. The steady-state entropy production rate in each component, heat and electron transfer rates are calculated via the probability distribution of the four electronic states from the master transition-rate equations. We define an information-engine efficiency based on the entropy change of the reservoir, implicating power generators that employ the environmental order as a new energy resource. We acquire device-design principles, toward the realization of corresponding practical energy converters, including that (1) higher energy levels of the detector-side reservoir than those of the detector dot provide significantly higher work production rates by faster states' circulation, (2) the efficiency is strongly dependent on the relative temperatures of the detector and system sides and becomes high in a particular Coulomb-interaction strength region between the quantum dots, and (3) the efficiency depends little on the system dot's energy level relative to its reservoir but largely on the antisymmetric relative amplitudes of the electronic tunneling rates.

  15. Heat transfers through diesel-engine cylinder liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R T; Jambunathan, K; Probert, S D

    1983-01-01

    A computer package has been developed, using a finite-element technique, to predict the steady-state rate of heat transfer radially through the cylinder liner, or other axisymmetric components, of a medium-speed diesel engine. Comparisons between experimentally measured and computer predicted results have been made: better corroboration occurs for engine loads above 1034 k N m/sup -2/ BMEP. The predictive computer package DIESHT needs only a simple 'user input' and produces a complete graphical output of generated mesh and computed isotherms. Computational storage requirements are modest so that the program can be used with a CAD system, if required, in order to facilitate an interactive design procedure.

  16. Modern thermodynamics from heat engines to dissipative structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kondepudi, Dilip

    2014-01-01

    Modern Thermodynamics: From Heat Engines to Dissipative Structures, Second Edition presents a comprehensive introduction to 20th century thermodynamics that can be applied to both equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems, unifying what was traditionally divided into 'thermodynamics' and 'kinetics' into one theory of irreversible processes. This comprehensive text, suitable for introductory as well as advanced courses on thermodynamics, has been widely used by chemists, physicists, engineers and geologists.  Fully revised and expanded, this new edition includes the following updates and featur

  17. Engineering drag currents in Coulomb coupled quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jong Soo; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2018-02-01

    The Coulomb drag phenomenon in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot system is revisited with a simple model that highlights the importance of simultaneous tunneling of electrons. Previously, cotunneling effects on the drag current in mesoscopic setups have been reported both theoretically and experimentally. However, in both cases the sequential tunneling contribution to the drag current was always present unless the drag level position were too far away from resonance. Here, we consider the case of very large Coulomb interaction between the dots, whereby the drag current needs to be assisted by cotunneling events. As a consequence, a quantum coherent drag effect takes place. Further, we demonstrate that by properly engineering the tunneling probabilities using band tailoring it is possible to control the sign of the drag and drive currents, allowing them to flow in parallel or antiparallel directions. We also show that the drag current can be manipulated by varying the drag gate potential and is thus governed by electron- or hole-like transport.

  18. Characterizing and engineering tunable spin functionality inside indium arsenide/gallium arsenide quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiwen

    The continual downsizing of the basic functional units used in the electronics industry has motivated the study of the quantum computation and related topics. To overcome the limitations of classical physics and engineering, some unique quantum mechanical features, especially entanglement and superpositions have begun to be considered as important properties for future bits. Including these quantum mechanical features is attractive because the ability to utilize quantum mechanics can dramatically enhance computational power. Among the various ways of constructing the basic building blocks for quantum computation, we are particularly interested in using spins inside epitaxially grown InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules as quantum bits (qubits). The ability to design and engineer nanostructures with tailored quantum properties is critical to engineering quantum computers and other novel electro-optical devices and is one of the key challenges for scaling up new ideas for device application. In this thesis, we will focus on how the structure and composition of quantum dot molecules can be used to control spin properties and charge interactions. Tunable spin and charge properties can enable new, more scalable, methods of initializing and manipulating quantum information. In this thesis, we demonstrate one method to enable electric-field tunability of Zeeman splitting for a single electron spin inside a quantum dot molecules by using heterostructure engineering techniques to modify the barrier that separates quantum dots. We describe how these structural changes to the quantum dot molecules also change charge interactions and propose ways to use this effect to enable accurate measurement of coulomb interactions and possibly charge occupancy inside these complicated quantum dot molecules.

  19. Recovery of Exhaust Waste Heat for ICE Using the Beta Type Stirling Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Aladayleh, Wail; Alahmer, Ali

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential of utilizing the exhaust waste heat using an integrated mechanical device with internal combustion engine for the automobiles to increase the fuel economy, the useful power, and the environment safety. One of the ways of utilizing waste heat is to use a Stirling engine. A Stirling engine requires only an external heat source as wasted heat for its operation. Because the exhaust gas temperature may reach 200 to 700°C, Stirling engine will work effectively....

  20. On introduction of artificial intelligence elements to heat power engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregalin, A. F.; Nazyrova, R. R.

    1993-10-01

    The basic problems of 'the thermodynamic intelligence' of personal computers have been outlined. The thermodynamic intellect of personal computers as a concept has been introduced to heat processes occurring in engines of flying vehicles. In particular, the thermodynamic intellect of computers is determined by the possibility of deriving formal relationships between thermodynamic functions. In chemical thermodynamics, a concept of a characteristic function has been introduced.

  1. Isobaric Expansion Engines: New Opportunities in Energy Conversion for Heat Engines, Pumps and Compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Glushenkov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Isobaric expansion (IE engines are a very uncommon type of heat-to-mechanical-power converters, radically different from all well-known heat engines. Useful work is extracted during an isobaric expansion process, i.e., without a polytropic gas/vapour expansion accompanied by a pressure decrease typical of state-of-the-art piston engines, turbines, etc. This distinctive feature permits isobaric expansion machines to serve as very simple and inexpensive heat-driven pumps and compressors as well as heat-to-shaft-power converters with desired speed/torque. Commercial application of such machines, however, is scarce, mainly due to a low efficiency. This article aims to revive the long-known concept by proposing important modifications to make IE machines competitive and cost-effective alternatives to state-of-the-art heat conversion technologies. Experimental and theoretical results supporting the isobaric expansion technology are presented and promising potential applications, including emerging power generation methods, are discussed. It is shown that dense working fluids with high thermal expansion at high process temperature and low compressibility at low temperature make it possible to operate with reasonable thermal efficiencies at ultra-low heat source temperatures (70–100 °C. Regeneration/recuperation of heat can increase the efficiency notably and extend the area of application of these machines to higher heat source temperatures. For heat source temperatures of 200–600 °C, the efficiency of these machines can reach 20–50% thus making them a flexible, economical and energy efficient alternative to many today’s power generation technologies, first of all organic Rankine cycle (ORC.

  2. Quantum elasticity of graphene: Thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmistrov, I.S.; Gornyi, I.V.; Kachorovskii, V.Y.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Mirlin, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore thermodynamics of a quantum membrane, with a particular application to suspended graphene membrane and with a particular focus on the thermal expansion coefficient. We show that an interplay between quantum and classical anharmonicity-controlled fluctuations leads to unusual elastic

  3. Osmotic heat engine using thermally responsive ionic liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Zhong, Yujiang

    2017-07-11

    The osmotic heat engine (OHE) is a promising technology for converting low grade heat to electricity. Most of the existing studies have focused on thermolytic salt systems. Herein, for the first time, we proposed to use thermally responsive ionic liquids (TRIL) that have either an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) or lower critical solution temperature (LCST) type of phase behavior as novel thermolytic osmotic agents. Closed-loop TRIL-OHEs were designed based on these unique phase behaviors to convert low grade heat to work or electricity. Experimental studies using two UCST-type TRILs, protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethyl sulfonyl)imide ([Hbet][Tf2N]) and choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Choline][Tf2N]) showed that (1) the specific energy of the TRIL-OHE system could reach as high as 4.0 times that of the seawater and river water system, (2) the power density measured from a commercial FO membrane reached up to 2.3 W/m2, and (3) the overall energy efficiency reached up to 2.6% or 18% of the Carnot efficiency at no heat recovery and up to 10.5% or 71% of the Carnet efficiency at 70% heat recovery. All of these results clearly demonstrated the great potential of using TRILs as novel osmotic agents to design high efficient OHEs for recovery of low grade thermal energy to work or electricity.

  4. Specific heat of parabolic quantum dot with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjeev Kumar, D., E-mail: sanjeevchs@gmail.com; Chatterjee, Ashok [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India - 500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [DVR College of Engineering & Technology, Kashipur, Medak, India - 502285 (India)

    2016-04-13

    The heat capacity of a two electron quantum dot with parabolic confinement in magnetic field in the presence of electron-electron interaction, Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction (DSOI) has been studied. The electron-electron interaction has been treated by a model potential which makes the Hamiltonian to be soluble exactly. The RSOI has been treated by a unitary transformation and the terms up to second order in DSOI constants have been considered. The heat capacity is obtained by canonical averaging. So far no study has been reported in literature on the effect of DSOI on the heat capacity of quantum dot.

  5. Engine and radiator: fetal and placental interactions for heat dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, H J; Power, G G

    1997-03-01

    The 'engine' of fetal metabolism generates heat (3-4 W kg-1 in fetal sheep) which has to be dissipated to the maternal organism. Fetal heat may move through the amniotic/allantoic fluids to the uterine wall (conductive pathway; total conductance, 1.1 W degrees C-1 kg-1) and with the umbilical arterial blood flow (convective pathway) to the placenta. Because resistance to heat flow is larger than zero fetal temperature exceeds maternal temperature by about 0.5 degree C (0.3-1 degree C). Probably 85% of fetal heat is lost to the maternal organism through the placenta, which thus serves as the main 'radiator'. Placental heat conductivity appears to be extremely high and this may lead to impaired heat exchange (guinea-pig placenta). A computer simulation demonstrates that fetal temperature is essentially clamped to maternal temperature, and that fetal thermoregulatory efforts to gain thermal independence would be futile. Indeed, when the late gestational fetus in utero is challenged by cold stress, direct and indirect indicators of (non-shivering) thermogenesis (oxygen consumption, increase of plasma glycerol and free fatty acid levels) change only moderately. In prematurely delivered lambs, however, cold stress provokes summit metabolism and maximum heat production. Only when birth is imitated in utero (by cord clamping, external artificial lung ventilation and cooling) do thermogenic efforts approach levels typical of extra-uterine life. This suggests the presence of inhibitors of thermogenesis of placental origin, e.g. prostaglandins and adenosine. When the synthesis of prostaglandins is blocked by pretreatment with indomethacin, sheep fetuses react to intra-uterine cooling with vigorous thermogenic responses, which can be subdued by infusion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Since the sheep placenta is known to produce sufficient amounts of PGE2, it seems that the placenta controls fetal thermogenic responses to some extent. This transforms the fetus into an ectothermic

  6. Performance characteristics of a combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  7. Sliding seal materials for low heat rejection engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Kevin; Lankford, James; Vinyard, Shannon

    1989-01-01

    Sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising piston seal materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, and loading conditions that are representative of the low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine environment. These materials included carbides, oxides, and nitrides. In addition, silicon nitride and partially stablized zirconia disks (cylinder liners) were ion-implanted with TiNi, Ni, Co, and Cr, and subsequently run against carbide pins (piston rings), with the objective of producing reduced friction via solid lubrication at elevated temperature. Friction and wear measurements were obtained using pin-on-disk laboratory experiments and a unique engine friction test rig. Unmodified ceramic sliding couples were characterized at all temperatures by friction coefficients of 0.24 and above during the pin-on-disk tests. The coefficient at 800 C in an oxidizing environment was reduced to below 0.1, for certain material combination, by the ion-implantation of TiNi or Co. This beneficial effect was found to derive from the lubricious Ti, Ni, and Co oxides. Similar results were demonstrated on the engine friction test rig at lower temperatures. The structural integrity and feasibility of engine application with the most promising material combination were demonstrated during a 30-hour single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine test.

  8. Band structure engineering for ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The energy band structure fundamentally influences the physical properties of a periodic system. It may give rise to highly exotic phenomena in yet uncharted physical regimes. Ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices provide an ideal playground for the investigation of a large variety of such intriguing effects. Experiments presented here address several issues that require the systematic manipulation of energy band structures in optical lattices with diverse geometries. These artificial crystals of light, generated by interfering laser beams, allow for an unprecedented degree of control over a wide range of parameters. A major part of this thesis employs time-periodic driving to engineer tunneling matrix elements and, thus, the dispersion relation for bosonic quantum gases in optical lattices. Resonances emerging in the excitation spectrum due to the particularly strong forcing can be attributed to multi-photon transitions that are investigated systematically. By changing the sign of the tunneling, antiferromagnetic spin-spin interactions can be emulated. In a triangular lattice this leads to geometrical frustration with a doubly degenerate ground state as the simultaneous minimization of competing interactions is inhibited. Moreover, complex-valued tunneling matrix elements can be generated with a suitable breaking of time-reversal symmetry in the driving scheme. The associated Peierls phases mimic the presence of an electromagnetic vector gauge potential acting on charged particles. First proof-of-principle experiments reveal an excellent agreement with theoretical calculations. In the weakly interacting superfluid regime, these artificial gauge fields give rise to an Ising-XY model with tunable staggered magnetic fluxes and a complex interplay between discrete and continuous symmetries. A thermal phase transition from an ordered ferromagnetic- to an unordered paramagnetic state could be observed. In the opposite hard-core boson limit of strong interactions

  9. Robust quantum state engineering through coherent localization in biased-coin quantum walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majury, Helena [Queen' s University, Centre for Secure Information Technologies (CSIT), Belfast (United Kingdom); Queen' s University, Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Belfast (United Kingdom); Boutari, Joelle [University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Elizabeth [Queen' s University, Centre for Secure Information Technologies (CSIT), Belfast (United Kingdom); Ferraro, Alessandro; Paternostro, Mauro [Queen' s University, Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2018-12-15

    We address the performance of a coin-biased quantum walk as a generator for non-classical position states of the walker. We exploit a phenomenon of coherent localization in the position space - resulting from the choice of small values of the coin parameter and assisted by post-selection - to engineer large-size coherent superpositions of position states of the walker. The protocol that we design appears to be remarkably robust against both the actual value taken by the coin parameter and strong dephasing-like noise acting on the spatial degree of freedom. We finally illustrate a possible linear-optics implementation of our proposal, suitable for both bulk and integrated-optics platforms. (orig.)

  10. A comparative study of open and closed heat-engines for small-scale CHP applications

    OpenAIRE

    Eames, Ian W.; Evans, Kieran; Pickering, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast open and closed-cycle heat engines. First of all, by way of example and to aid discussion, the performance of proprietary externally heated closed-cycle Stirling engines is compared with that of internally heated open Otto cycle engines. Both types of engine have disadvantages and merits and this suggested that in order to accommodate the best of both engine types an externally-heated open-cycle engine might offer a more satisfactory solution for...

  11. An experimental study of the enhanced heating capacity of an electric heat pump (EHP) using the heat recovered from a gas engine generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Min; Chang, Se Dong [HAC R and D Laboratory, LG Electronics, 327-23 Gasan-Dong, Geumcheon-gu, Seoul 153-802 (Korea); Lee, Jaekeun; Hwang, Yujin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30, Changjeon-Dong, Keumjeong-Ku, Busan 609-735 (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    This paper is concerned with the effect of recovered heat on the heating capacity of an Electric Heat Pump (EHP), which is supplied with electric power and recovered heat from a gas engine generator system. Two methods of supplying recovery heat are examined: (i) to the refrigerant with the discharge line heat exchanger (HEX), and (ii) to the refrigerant of the evaporator with the sub-evaporator. Heating capacity, input power and coefficient of performance (COP) were investigated and compared for each heat recovery method. Conclusively, we found that the second method was most reasonable to recover wasted heat and increased system COP by 215%. (author)

  12. Engineering design aspects of the heat-pipe power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capell, B.M.; Houts, M.G.; Poston, D.I.; Berte, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Heat-pipe Power System (HPS) is a near-term, low-cost space power system designed at Los Alamos that can provide up to 1,000 kWt for many space nuclear applications. The design of the reactor is simple, modular, and adaptable. The basic design allows for the use of a variety of power conversion systems and reactor materials (including the fuel, clad, and heat pipes). This paper describes a project that was undertaken to develop a database supporting many engineering aspects of the HPS design. The specific tasks discussed in this paper are: the development of an HPS materials database, the creation of finite element models that will allow a wide variety of investigations, and the verification of past calculations

  13. Engineering design aspects of the heat-pipe power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, B. M.; Houts, M. G.; Poston, D. I.; Berte, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Heat-pipe Power System (HPS) is a near-term, low-cost space power system designed at Los Alamos that can provide up to 1,000 kWt for many space nuclear applications. The design of the reactor is simple, modular, and adaptable. The basic design allows for the use of a variety of power conversion systems and reactor materials (including the fuel, clad, and heat pipes). This paper describes a project that was undertaken to develop a database supporting many engineering aspects of the HPS design. The specific tasks discussed in this paper are: the development of an HPS materials database, the creation of finite element models that will allow a wide variety of investigations, and the verification of past calculations.

  14. Convective Heating of the LIFE Engine Target During Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdener, D S; Tillack, M S; Wang, X R

    2011-10-24

    Target survival in the hostile, high temperature xenon environment of the proposed Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine is critical. This work focuses on the flow properties and convective heat load imposed upon the surface of the indirect drive target while traveling through the xenon gas. While this rarefied flow is traditionally characterized as being within the continuum regime, it is approaching transition where conventional CFD codes reach their bounds of operation. Thus ANSYS, specifically the Navier-Stokes module CFX, will be used in parallel with direct simulation Monte Carlo code DS2V and analytically and empirically derived expressions for heat transfer to the hohlraum for validation. Comparison of the viscous and thermal boundary layers of ANSYS and DS2V were shown to be nearly identical, with the surface heat flux varying less than 8% on average. From the results herein, external baffles have been shown to reduce this heat transfer to the sensitive laser entrance hole (LEH) windows and optimize target survival independent of other reactor parameters.

  15. Implementing quantum logic gates with gradient ascent pulse engineering: principles and practicalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Benjamin; Jones, Jonathan A

    2012-10-13

    We briefly describe the use of gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) pulses to implement quantum logic gates in nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computers, and discuss a range of simple extensions to the core technique. We then consider a range of difficulties that can arise in practical implementations of GRAPE sequences, reflecting non-idealities in the experimental systems used.

  16. Height control of self-assembled quantum dots by strain engineering during capping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossi, D.; Smereka, P.; Keizer, J.G.; Ulloa, J.M.; Koenraad, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Strain engineering during the capping of III-V quantum dots has been explored as a means to control the height of strained self-assembled quantum dots. Results of Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are confronted with cross-sectional Scanning Tunnel Microscopy (STM) measurements performed on InAs

  17. Optimal control of the power adiabatic stroke of an optomechanical heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathaee, M; Bahrampour, A R

    2016-08-01

    We consider the power adiabatic stroke of the Otto optomechanical heat engine introduced in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150602 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150602. We derive the maximum extractable work of both optomechanical normal modes in the minimum time while the system experiences quantum friction effects. We show that the total work done by the system in the power adiabatic stroke is optimized by a bang-bang control. The time duration of the power adiabatic stroke is of the order of the inverse of the effective optomechanical-coupling coefficient. The optimal phase-space trajectory of the Otto cycle for both optomechanical normal modes is also obtained.

  18. The effect of quantum correction on plasma electron heating in ultraviolet laser interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, S.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir; Anvari, A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani, E. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2015-04-14

    The interaction of the sub-picosecond UV laser in sub-relativistic intensities with deuterium is investigated. At high plasma temperatures, based on the quantum correction in the collision frequency, the electron heating and the ion block generation in plasma are studied. It is found that due to the quantum correction, the electron heating increases considerably and the electron temperature uniformly reaches up to the maximum value of 4.91 × 10{sup 7 }K. Considering the quantum correction, the electron temperature at the laser initial coupling stage is improved more than 66.55% of the amount achieved in the classical model. As a consequence, by the modified collision frequency, the ion block is accelerated quicker with higher maximum velocity in comparison with the one by the classical collision frequency. This study proves the necessity of considering a quantum mechanical correction in the collision frequency at high plasma temperatures.

  19. Heat capacity for systems with excited-state quantum phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejnar, Pavel; Stránský, Pavel, E-mail: stransky@ipnp.troja.mff.cuni.cz

    2017-03-18

    Heat capacities of model systems with finite numbers of effective degrees of freedom are evaluated using canonical and microcanonical thermodynamics. Discrepancies between both approaches, which are observed even in the infinite-size limit, are particularly large in systems that exhibit an excited-state quantum phase transition. The corresponding irregularity of the spectrum generates a singularity in the microcanonical heat capacity and affects smoothly the canonical heat capacity. - Highlights: • Thermodynamics of systems with excited-state quantum phase transitions • ESQPT-generated singularities of the microcanonical heat capacity • Non-monotonous dependences of the canonical heat capacity • Discord between canonical and microcanonical pictures in the infinite-size limit.

  20. Two-phase plate-fin heat exchanger modeling for waste heat recovery systems in diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Jager, de A.G.; Willems, F.P.T.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling and model validation for a modular two-phase heat exchanger that recovers energy in heavy-duty diesel engines. The model is developed for temperature and vapor quality prediction and for control design of the waste heat recovery system. In the studied waste heat

  1. Non-classical state engineering for quantum networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, Christina E.

    2014-01-01

    The wide field of quantum information processing and quantum networks has developed very fast in the last two decades. Besides the regime of discrete variables, which was developed first, the regime of continuous variables represents an alternative approach to realize many quantum applications. Non-classical states of light, like squeezed or entangled states, are a fundamental resource for quantum applications like quantum repeaters, quantum memories, quantum key distribution, quantum spectroscopy, and quantum metrology. These states can be generated successfully in the infrared wavelength regime. However, for some tasks other wavelengths, especially in the visible wavelength regime, are desirable. To generate non-classical states of light in this wavelength regime frequency up-conversion can be used, since all quantum properties are maintained in this process. The first part of this thesis deals with the experimental frequency up-conversion of quantum states. Squeezed vacuum states of light at 1550 nm were up-converted to 532 nm and a noise reduction of -1.5 dB at 532 nm was achieved. These states can be used for increasing the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors or spectroscopic measurements. Furthermore, one part of an entangled state at 1550 nm was up-converted to 532 nm and, thus, entanglement between these two wavelengths was generated and characterized to -1.4 dB following Duan et al. With such a quantum link it is possible to establish a quantum network, which takes advantage of the low optical loss at 1550 nm for information transmission and of atomic transitions around 532 nm for a quantum memory in a quantum repeater. For quantum networks the distribution of entanglement and especially of a quantum key is essential. In the second part of this thesis the experimental distribution of entanglement by separable states is demonstrated. The underlying protocol requires a special three-mode state, which is separable in two of the three splittings. With

  2. Non-classical state engineering for quantum networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, Christina E.

    2014-01-24

    The wide field of quantum information processing and quantum networks has developed very fast in the last two decades. Besides the regime of discrete variables, which was developed first, the regime of continuous variables represents an alternative approach to realize many quantum applications. Non-classical states of light, like squeezed or entangled states, are a fundamental resource for quantum applications like quantum repeaters, quantum memories, quantum key distribution, quantum spectroscopy, and quantum metrology. These states can be generated successfully in the infrared wavelength regime. However, for some tasks other wavelengths, especially in the visible wavelength regime, are desirable. To generate non-classical states of light in this wavelength regime frequency up-conversion can be used, since all quantum properties are maintained in this process. The first part of this thesis deals with the experimental frequency up-conversion of quantum states. Squeezed vacuum states of light at 1550 nm were up-converted to 532 nm and a noise reduction of -1.5 dB at 532 nm was achieved. These states can be used for increasing the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors or spectroscopic measurements. Furthermore, one part of an entangled state at 1550 nm was up-converted to 532 nm and, thus, entanglement between these two wavelengths was generated and characterized to -1.4 dB following Duan et al. With such a quantum link it is possible to establish a quantum network, which takes advantage of the low optical loss at 1550 nm for information transmission and of atomic transitions around 532 nm for a quantum memory in a quantum repeater. For quantum networks the distribution of entanglement and especially of a quantum key is essential. In the second part of this thesis the experimental distribution of entanglement by separable states is demonstrated. The underlying protocol requires a special three-mode state, which is separable in two of the three splittings. With

  3. Many-objective thermodynamic optimization of Stirling heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Vivek; Savsani, Vimal; Mudgal, Anurag

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a rigorous investigation of many-objective (four-objective) thermodynamic optimization of a Stirling heat engine. Many-objective optimization problem is formed by considering maximization of thermal efficiency, power output, ecological function and exergy efficiency. Multi-objective heat transfer search (MOHTS) algorithm is proposed and applied to obtain a set of Pareto-optimal points. Many objective optimization results form a solution in a four dimensional hyper objective space and for visualization it is represented on a two dimension objective space. Thus, results of four-objective optimization are represented by six Pareto fronts in two dimension objective space. These six Pareto fronts are compared with their corresponding two-objective Pareto fronts. Quantitative assessment of the obtained Pareto solutions is reported in terms of spread and the spacing measures. Different decision making approaches such as LINMAP, TOPSIS and fuzzy are used to select a final optimal solution from Pareto optimal set of many-objective optimization. Finally, to reveal the level of conflict between these objectives, distribution of each decision variable in their allowable range is also shown in two dimensional objective spaces. - Highlights: • Many-objective (i.e. four objective) optimization of Stirling engine is investigated. • MOHTS algorithm is introduced and applied to obtain a set of Pareto points. • Comparative results of many-objective and multi-objectives are presented. • Relationship of design variables in many-objective optimization are obtained. • Optimum solution is selected by using decision making approaches.

  4. The potential of quantum technology gravity sensors in civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckwell, G.; Metje, N.; Boddice, D.; Usher, C.

    2017-12-01

    Potential field techniques have advantages over active geophysical techniques as they are not limited to the depth they can image features, provided the signals of interest are detectable amongst the other variations recorded by the instrument. A new generation of gravity instruments based on quantum technology promise greatly increased measurement sensitivity, but with this comes significant challenges in data processing and noise suppression. In the UK Innovate UK funded SIGMA project (http://www.rsksigma.co.uk/) the field of opportunity for a step change in gravity sensor accuracy has been evaluated by comparison with existing geophysical sensors, identifying the range of targets and depths of interest to commercial end users that are currently undetectable and might become visible. Forward modelling was used to quantify the potential of a Quantum Technology (QT) gravity and gravity gradiometer sensor. A substantive improvement in detectability of targets is predicted, which can be considered as a factor of 1.5 to 2 increase in the depth of detectability, or in the reduction of the size of the feature of interest. To take further advantage of new instrument sensitivity, new survey workflows are required. The accuracy of measured gravity maps is limited by environmental vibration noise, and by the accuracy with which tidal variations and terrain signals can be removed. It is still common practice in engineering scale surveys for gravity values to be reduced to Bouguer residuals. However, with a more sensitive instrument comes the need to measure the terrain more accurately. This can be achieved within a commercially viable workflow using a laser scanner for rapid data acquisition and advanced processing to produce an accurate DEM. Initial tests on 4 commercial sites have shown that an improvement of 10s of mGal can be achieved if applying a full digital terrain model correction to the microgravity data even on sites with very minor topographic height variations

  5. Recovery of Exhaust Waste Heat for ICE Using the Beta Type Stirling Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wail Aladayleh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the potential of utilizing the exhaust waste heat using an integrated mechanical device with internal combustion engine for the automobiles to increase the fuel economy, the useful power, and the environment safety. One of the ways of utilizing waste heat is to use a Stirling engine. A Stirling engine requires only an external heat source as wasted heat for its operation. Because the exhaust gas temperature may reach 200 to 700°C, Stirling engine will work effectively. The indication work, real shaft power and specific fuel consumption for Stirling engine, and the exhaust power losses for IC engine are calculated. The study shows the availability and possibility of recovery of the waste heat from internal combustion engine using Stirling engine.

  6. 9 CFR 91.22 - Protection from heat of boilers and engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection from heat of boilers and... Protection from heat of boilers and engines. No animals shall be stowed along the alleyways leading to the engine or boiler rooms unless the sides of said engine or boiler rooms are covered by a tongue and groove...

  7. Bandgap Engineering of 1300 nm Quantum Dots/Quantum Well Nanostructures Based Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Alhashim, Hala H.

    2016-05-29

    The main objectives of this thesis are to develop viable process and/or device technologies for bandgap tuning of 1300-nm InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot (QD) laser structures, and broad linewidth 1300-nm InGaAsP/InP quantum well (QW) superluminescent diode structures. The high performance bandgap-engineered QD laser structures were achieved by employing quantum-dot intermixing (QDI) based on impurity free vacancy diffusion (IFVD) technique for eventual seamless active-passive integration, and bandgap-tuned lasers. QDI using various dielectric-capping materials, such as HfO2, SrTiO3, TiO2, Al2O3 and ZnO, etc, were experimented in which the resultant emission wavelength can be blueshifted to ∼ 1100 nm ─ 1200 nm range depending on process conditions. The significant results extracted from the PL characterization were used to perform an extensive laser characterization. The InAs/GaAs quantum-dot lasers with QDs transition energies were blueshifted by ~185 nm, and lasing around ~1070 – 1190 nm was achieved. Furthermore, from the spectral analysis, a simultaneous five-state lasing in the InAs/InGaAs intermixed QD laser was experimentally demonstrated for the first time in the very important wavelength range from 1030 to 1125 nm. The QDI methodology enabled the facile formation of a plethora of devices with various emission wavelengths suitable for a wide range of applications in the infrared. In addition, the wavelength range achieved is also applicable for coherent light generation in the green – yellow – orange visible wavelength band via frequency doubling, which is a cost-effective way of producing compact devices for pico-projectors, semiconductor laser based solid state lighting, etc. [1, 2] In QW-based superluminescent diode, the problem statement lies on achieving a flat-top and ultra-wide emission bandwidth. The approach was to design an inhomogeneous active region with a comparable simultaneous emission from different transition states in the QW stacks, in

  8. Finite speed heat transport in a quantum spin chain after quenched local cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Pascal; Hinrichsen, Haye

    2017-04-01

    We study the dynamics of an initially thermalized spin chain in the quantum XY-model, after sudden coupling to a heat bath of lower temperature at one end of the chain. In the semi-classical limit we see an exponential decay of the system-bath heatflux by exact solution of the reduced dynamics. In the full quantum description however, we numerically find the heatflux to reach intermediate plateaus where it is approximately constant—a phenomenon that we attribute to the finite speed of heat transport via spin waves.

  9. The atmospheric heat engine response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauluis, O. M.

    2014-12-01

    Moist convection is characterized by complex interactions between dynamics and thermodynamics. As air parcels within the atmosphere, they experience multiple thermodynamic transformations, such as compression and expansion, diabatic heating and cooling, condensation and mixing. These transformations correspond to those of a heat engine that produces kinetic energy while transporting energy from a warm source to a colder sink. This atmospheric heat engine is however directly affected by moist processes. First, falling precipitation acts as a break on the circulation by dissipating a significant amount of kinetic energy. Second, evaporation of unsaturated water and diffusion of water vapor are irrevesible processes that also reduce the amount of work that can be produced. An important challenge is to quantify the impacts that these two effects have on the generation of kinetic energy. Here, I will introduce a new technique - the Mean Air Flow As Lagragian Dynamics Approximation (MAFALDA) - that can be used to systematically analyze the thermodynamic behavior of complex atmospheric flows. This approach relies on sorting the upward mass transport in terms of the equivalent potential temperature of the air parcels to obtain an isentropic streamfunction. This streamfunction is then used to determine the thermodynamic evolution of air parcels as they move through the atmosphere. This approach is applied to analyze how convective systems would behave in a warmer climate. It is shown that an increase in atmospheric temperature lead to a significant increase of the amount of kinetic energy that is produced per unit of mass of air transported. At the same time, the total generation of kinetic energy is only slightly affected. Taken together, these findings imply that, in a warming atmosphere, the number of intense convective events will be reduced, while their intensity should increase. I will also discuss the new possibility of systematically studying the thermodynamic

  10. Performance Analysis and Optimization of a Solar Powered Stirling Engine with Heat Transfer Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-En Ho

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the optimization of the performance of a solar powered Stirling engine based on finite-time thermodynamics. Heat transference in the heat exchangers between a concentrating solar collector and the Stirling engine is studied. The irreversibility of a Stirling engine is considered with the heat transfer following Newton's law. The power generated by a Stirling engine is used as an objective function for maximum power output design with the concentrating solar collector temperature and the engine thermal efficiency as the optimization parameters. The maximum output power of engine and its corresponding system parameters are determined using a genetic algorithm.

  11. Quantum State Engineering Via Coherent-State Superpositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janszky, Jozsef; Adam, P.; Szabo, S.; Domokos, P.

    1996-01-01

    The quantum interference between the two parts of the optical Schrodinger-cat state makes possible to construct a wide class of quantum states via discrete superpositions of coherent states. Even a small number of coherent states can approximate the given quantum states at a high accuracy when the distance between the coherent states is optimized, e. g. nearly perfect Fock state can be constructed by discrete superpositions of n + 1 coherent states lying in the vicinity of the vacuum state.

  12. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. [Integral Technologies, Inc., Westmont, IL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  13. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. (Integral Technologies, Inc., Westmont, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  14. Nonadiabatic effect on the quantum heat flux control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Chikako

    2014-05-01

    We provide a general formula of quantum transfer that includes the nonadiabatic effect under periodic environmental modulation by using full counting statistics in Hilbert-Schmidt space. Applying the formula to an anharmonic junction model that interacts with two bosonic environments within the Markovian approximation, we find that the quantum transfer is divided into the adiabatic (dynamical and geometrical phases) and nonadiabatic contributions. This extension shows the dependence of quantum transfer on the initial condition of the anharmonic junction just before the modulation, as well as the characteristic environmental parameters such as interaction strength and cut-off frequency of spectral density. We show that the nonadiabatic contribution represents the reminiscent effect of past modulation including the transition from the initial condition of the anharmonic junction to a steady state determined by the very beginning of the modulation. This enables us to tune the frequency range of modulation, whereby we can obtain the quantum flux corresponding to the geometrical phase by setting the initial condition of the anharmonic junction.

  15. Phonon excess heating in electronic relaxation theory in quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Lin, Ch. Y.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 20 (2008), s. 3439-3460 ISSN 0217-9792 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 866 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : quantum dots * electron -phonon interaction * electron ic transport Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.558, year: 2008

  16. Biogas Engine Waste Heat Recovery Using Organic Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Benato

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Italy is a leading country in the biogas sector. Energy crops and manure are converted into biogas using anaerobic digestion and, then, into electricity using internal combustion engines (ICEs. Therefore, there is an urgent need for improving the efficiency of these engines taking the real operation into account. To this purpose, in the present work, the organic Rankine cycle (ORC technology is used to recover the waste heat contained in the exhaust gases of a 1 MWel biogas engine. The ICE behavior being affected by the biogas characteristics, the ORC unit is designed, firstly, using the ICE nameplate data and, then, with data measured during a one-year monitoring activity. The optimum fluid and the plant configuration are selected in both cases using an “in-house” optimization tool. The optimization goal is the maximization of the net electric power while the working fluid is selected among 115 pure fluids and their mixtures. Results show that a recuperative ORC designed using real data guarantees a 30% higher net electric power than the one designed with ICE nameplate conditions.

  17. Efficiencies and coefficients of performance of heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps with friction: a universal limiting behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarro, João P S; Rodrigues, Paulo

    2012-11-01

    For work-producing heat engines, or work-consuming refrigerators and heat pumps, the percentage decrease caused by friction in their efficiencies, or coefficients of performance (COP's), is approximately given by the ratio W(fric)/W between the work spent against friction forces and the work performed by, or delivered to, the working fluid. This universal scaling, which applies in the limit of small friction (W(fric)/W heat-engine efficiencies), allows a simple and quick estimate of the impact that friction losses can have on the FOM's of thermal engines and plants, or of the level of those losses from the observed and predicted FOM's. In the case of refrigerators and heat pumps, if W(fric)/W heat engines), the COP percentage decrease due to friction approaches asymptotically (W(fric)/W)/(1+W(fric)/W) instead of W(fric)/W. Estimates for the level of frictional losses using the Carnot (or, for heat engines and power plants only, the Curzon-Ahlborn) predictions and observed FOM's of real power plants, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps show that they usually operate in domains where these behaviors are valid.

  18. Study of heat insulated turbo compound engine. Shanetsugata tabo konpaundo engine to tomoni ayumu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, K [Isuzu Motors Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Ceramics Research Lab.

    1994-02-01

    For a main purpose of development of the heat insulated turbo compound engine using the ceramics, the Isuzu Ceramics Inst. Co., Ltd. was established by the Isuzu Motors Ltd. in 1988. The main study subjects take up various topics such as a development of the new engine system for actualizing a low fuel consumption and low emission, an improvement of deteriorated combustion caused by the insulation, a development of energy recovery facility for utilizing effectively the exhaust energy from the engines, a development of power electronics technology for controlling the recovery facility, a study and development of ceramics as the insulation material and so forth. The outstanding characteristics of this institute are that a development of the heat insulated turbo compound engine is set as the main study subject, but at the same time that a commercialization of the various derivation technology derived from this study. Even just the main study subjects currently under way are counted up to a number close to 10 items, and consequently the efforts are being continued in each field assigned for solving the subjects. 6 figs.

  19. Consideration on nuclear fusion in plasma by the magnetic confinement as a heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Yoshio

    1990-01-01

    In comparing nuclear fusion in plasma by the magnetic confinement with nuclear fission and chemical reactions, the power density and the function of a heat engine are discussed using a new parameter G introduced as an eigenvalue of a reaction and the value of q introduced to estimate the thermal efficiency of a heat engine. It is shown that the fusion reactor by the magnetic confinement is very difficult to be a modern heat engine because of the lack of some indispensable functions as a modern heat engine. The value of G and q have the important role in the consideration. (author)

  20. Heat engines for dilatonic Born-Infeld black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhamidipati, Chandrasekhar; Yerra, Pavan Kumar [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, School of Basic Sciences, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2017-08-15

    In the context of dilaton coupled Einstein gravity with a negative cosmological constant and a Born-Infeld field, we study heat engines where a charged black hole is the working substance. Using the existence of a notion of thermodynamic mass and volume (which depend on the dilaton coupling), the mechanical work takes place via the pdV terms present in the first law of extended gravitational thermodynamics. The efficiency is analyzed as a function of dilaton and Born-Infeld couplings, and the results are compared with analogous computations in the related conformal solutions in the Brans-Dicke-Born-Infeld theory and black holes in anti-de Sitter space-time. (orig.)

  1. Advanced materials for alternative fuel capable directly fired heat engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, J.W.; Stringer, J. (eds.)

    1979-12-01

    The first conference on advanced materials for alternative fuel capable directly fired heat engines was held at the Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, Maine. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy) and the Electric Power Research Institute, (Division of Fossil Fuel and Advanced Systems). Forty-four papers from the proceedings have been entered into EDB and ERA and one also into EAPA; three had been entered previously from other sources. The papers are concerned with US DOE research programs in this area, coal gasification, coal liquefaction, gas turbines, fluidized-bed combustion and the materials used in these processes or equipments. The materials papers involve alloys, ceramics, coatings, cladding, etc., and the fabrication and materials listing of such materials and studies involving corrosion, erosion, deposition, etc. (LTN)

  2. Heat transfer in a compact tubular heat exchanger with application to the engine struts of the national aerospace plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors constructed an apparatus to measure heat transfer coefficients in compact heat exchangers which are candidate cooling jackets for the engine struts of the National Aerospace Plane. This paper reports measurements on a tube specimen heat exchanger. The heat exchanger consisted of 20 nickel tubes (2 mm OD, 1 mm ID, 15.2 cm heated length), brazed to a 3 mm thick nickel plate. The tubes lay parallel to one another, 3.8 mm on-center separation. The heat exchanger was heated on one side in a radiative furnace at heat fluxes of 3.4 to 54 W/cm 2 over a normal area of 7.8 cm by 15.2 cm. The coolant fluid was helium gas at Reynolds numbers of 3000 to 35 000 and 3.50 MPa pressure. For high heat flux and low

  3. Optimum performance analysis of an irreversible Diesel heat engine affected by variable heat capacities of working fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yingru; Chen, Jincan

    2007-01-01

    An irreversible cycle model of the Diesel heat engine is established in which the temperature dependent heat capacities of the working fluid, the irreversibilities resulting from non-isentropic compression and expansion processes and heat leak losses through the cylinder wall are taken into account. The adiabatic equation of ideal gases with temperature dependent heat capacity is strictly deduced without using the additional approximation condition in the relevant literature and is used to analyze the performance of the Diesel heat engine. Expressions for the work output and efficiency of the cycle are derived by introducing the pressure ratio and the compression and expansion efficiencies. The performance characteristic curves of the Diesel heat engine are presented for a set of given parameters. The optimum criteria of some important parameters such as the work output, efficiency, pressure ratio and temperatures of the working fluid are obtained. Moreover, the influence of the compression and expansion efficiencies, variable heat capacities, heat leak and other parameters on the performance of the cycle is discussed in detail. The results obtained may provide a theoretical basis for both optimal design and operation of real Diesel heat engines

  4. Equipment for heating the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines in order to improve afterburning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaki,

    1976-04-15

    The device described here serves to heat exhaust gases of internal combustion engines by heat exchange with hot gases and also, in cold engines, to raise the temperature of the fuel-air mixture drawn in by the engine. The device is installed next to the outlet opening of the engine. It consists of a burner to generate the hot gas, as well as a heat exchanger permitting heat supply to the exhaust gases and a hot-gas line leading to the intake line. Heating of the air is taken in leads to a better atomization of the mixture and thus to improved combustion. Heating of the exhaust gases improves afterburning. The burner generating the hot gas is shut off when the normal operational temperature of the engine is reached. The temperature is controlled by means of a temperature sensor installed in the device.

  5. An investigation of heat recovery of submarine diesel engines for combined cooling, heating and power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daghigh, Roonak; Shafieian, Abdellah

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The power output of the cycle is about 53 kW in the mass flow rate of 0.6 kg/s. • The output cooling water temperature of evaporator is 3.64 °C. • The absorption chiller has a coefficient of performance equal to 0.94. - Abstract: High temperature and mass flow rate of the exhaust gases of submarine diesel engines provide an appropriate potential for their thermal recovery. The current study introduces a combined cooling, heating and power system for thermal recovery of submarine diesel engines. The cooling system is composed of a mixed effect absorption chiller with two high and low pressure generators. The exhaust of the diesel engine is used in the high pressure generator, and the low pressure generator was divided into two parts. The required heat for the first and second compartments is supplied by the cooling water of the engine and condensation of the vapor generated in the high pressure generator, respectively. The power generation system is a Rankine cycle with an organic working fluid, which is considered a normal thermal system to supply hot water. The whole system is encoded based on mass stability, condensation and energy equations. The obtained findings showed that the maximum heat recovery for the power cycle occurs in exhaust gas mass ratio of 0.23–0.29 and working fluid mass flow rate of 0.45–0.57 kg/s. Further, for each specific mass ratio of exhaust gas, only a certain range of working fluid mass flow rate is used. In the refrigerant mass flow rate of 0.6 kg/s and exhaust gas mass ratio of 0.27, the power output of the cycle is 53 kW, which can also be achieved by simultaneous increase of refrigerant mass flow rate and exhaust gas mass ratio in a certain range of higher powers. In the next section, the overall distribution diagram of output water temperature of the thermal system is obtained according to the exhaust gas mass ratio in various mass flow rates, which can increase the potential of designing and controlling the

  6. Optimum performance characteristics of a solar-driven Stirling heat engine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Tianjun; Lin, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: T–S diagram of the SHE cycle. - Highlights: • Based on Lagrange multiplier method, the optimal performance are investigated. • The energy balance between the absorber and the hot side of Stirling heat engine is considered. • The effects of major parameters on the optimal performance are investigated. - Abstract: A solar-driven Stirling heat engine system composed of a Stirling heat engine, a solar collector, and a heat sink is presented, in which the radiation and convection heat losses of the solar collector, the heat-leak between the thermal absorber and heat sink, the regenerative losses of the Stirling heat engine, and the energy balance between the thermal absorber and the high isothermal process of the Stirling heat engine are taken into consideration. Based on the irreversible thermodynamics and Lagrange multiplier method, the maximum power output and the corresponding optimal efficiency of the system are determined and the absorber temperature that maximizes the optimal system efficiency is calculated numerically. The influences of some system parameters such as the concentrating ratio, the volume ratio during the regenerative processes and irreversibilities of heat exchange processes on the optimal efficiency are analyzed in details. The results obtained here may provide a new idea to design practical solar-driven Stirling heat engine system

  7. Confining the state of light to a quantum manifold by engineered two-photon loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leghtas, Z.; Touzard, S.; Pop, I. M.; Kou, A.; Vlastakis, B.; Petrenko, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Narla, A.; Shankar, S.; Hatridge, M. J.; Reagor, M.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.

    2015-02-01

    Physical systems usually exhibit quantum behavior, such as superpositions and entanglement, only when they are sufficiently decoupled from a lossy environment. Paradoxically, a specially engineered interaction with the environment can become a resource for the generation and protection of quantum states. This notion can be generalized to the confinement of a system into a manifold of quantum states, consisting of all coherent superpositions of multiple stable steady states. We have confined the state of a superconducting resonator to the quantum manifold spanned by two coherent states of opposite phases and have observed a Schrödinger cat state spontaneously squeeze out of vacuum before decaying into a classical mixture. This experiment points toward robustly encoding quantum information in multidimensional steady-state manifolds.

  8. Cumulants of heat transfer across nonlinear quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanan; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Li, Baowen; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    We consider thermal conduction across a general nonlinear phononic junction. Based on two-time observation protocol and the nonequilibrium Green's function method, heat transfer in steady-state regimes is studied, and practical formulas for the calculation of the cumulant generating function are obtained. As an application, the general formalism is used to study anharmonic effects on fluctuation of steady-state heat transfer across a single-site junction with a quartic nonlinear on-site pinning potential. An explicit nonlinear modification to the cumulant generating function exact up to the first order is given, in which the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation symmetry is found still valid. Numerically a self-consistent procedure is introduced, which works well for strong nonlinearity.

  9. Molecular engineering with artificial atoms: designing a material platform for scalable quantum spintronics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Matthew F.; Ma, Xiangyu; Zide, Joshua M. O.; Bryant, Garnett W.

    2017-09-01

    Self-assembled InAs Quantum Dots (QDs) are often called "artificial atoms" and have long been of interest as components of quantum photonic and spintronic devices. Although there has been substantial progress in demonstrating optical control of both single spins confined to a single QD and entanglement between two separated QDs, the path toward scalable quantum photonic devices based on spins remains challenging. Quantum Dot Molecules, which consist of two closely-spaced InAs QDs, have unique properties that can be engineered with the solid state analog of molecular engineering in which the composition, size, and location of both the QDs and the intervening barrier are controlled during growth. Moreover, applied electric, magnetic, and optical fields can be used to modulate, in situ, both the spin and optical properties of the molecular states. We describe how the unique photonic properties of engineered Quantum Dot Molecules can be leveraged to overcome long-standing challenges to the creation of scalable quantum devices that manipulate single spins via photonics.

  10. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to cubic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka P., E-mail: trengginas.eka@gmail.com; Belfaqih, Idrus H., E-mail: idrushusin21@gmail.com; Prayitno, T. B., E-mail: teguh-budi@unj.ac.id [Department of Physics, State University of Jakarta, Jl. Pemuda No.10, Rawamangun, Jakarta Timur 13220 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Carnot cycle consists of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Using analogy in quantum mechanics, these processes can be well explained by replacing variables in classical process with a quantum system. Quantum system which is shown in this paper is a particle that moves under the influence of a cubic potential which is restricted only to the state of the two energy levels. At the end, the efficiency of the system is shown as a function of the width ratio between the initial conditions and the farthest wall while expanding. Furthermore, the system efficiency will be considered 1D and 2D cases. The providing efficiencies are different due to the influence of the degeneration of energy and the degrees of freedom of the system.

  11. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to cubic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka P.; Belfaqih, Idrus H.; Prayitno, T. B.

    2015-01-01

    Carnot cycle consists of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Using analogy in quantum mechanics, these processes can be well explained by replacing variables in classical process with a quantum system. Quantum system which is shown in this paper is a particle that moves under the influence of a cubic potential which is restricted only to the state of the two energy levels. At the end, the efficiency of the system is shown as a function of the width ratio between the initial conditions and the farthest wall while expanding. Furthermore, the system efficiency will be considered 1D and 2D cases. The providing efficiencies are different due to the influence of the degeneration of energy and the degrees of freedom of the system

  12. Optical Properties of Quantum Vacuum. Space-Time Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorkyan, A. S.; Gevorkyan, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in the vacuum is considered taking into account quantum fluctuations in the limits of Maxwell-Langevin (ML) type stochastic differential equations. For a model of fluctuations, type of 'white noise', using ML equations a partial differential equation of second order is obtained which describes the quantum distribution of virtual particles in vacuum. It is proved that in order to satisfy observed facts, the Lamb Shift etc, the virtual particles should be quantized in unperturbed vacuum. It is shown that the quantized virtual particles in toto (approximately 86 percent) are condensed on the 'ground state' energy level. It is proved that the extension of Maxwell electrodynamics with inclusion of quantum vacuum fluctuations may be constructed on a 6D space-time continuum, where 4D is Minkowski space-time and 2D is a compactified subspace. In detail is studied of vacuum's refraction indexes under the influence of external electromagnetic fields.

  13. Piston surface heat transfer during combustion in large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    In the design process of large marine diesel engines information on the maximum heat load on the piston surface experienced during the engine cycle is an important parameter. The peak heat load occurs during combustion when hot combustion products impinge on the piston surface. Although the maximum...... heat load is only present for a short time of the total engine cycle, it is a severe thermal load on the piston surface. At the same time, cooling of the piston crown is generally more complicated than cooling of the other components of the combustion chamber. This can occasionally cause problems...... with burning off piston surface material. In this work the peak heat load on the piston surface of large marine diesel engines during combustion was investigated. Measurements of the instantaneous surface temperature and surface heat flux on pistons in large marine engines are difficult due to expensive...

  14. International workshop on interfacial effects in quantum engineering systems (IEQES-96). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In the international workshop on 'interfacial effects in quantum engineering systems (IEQES-96)' organized by Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, the University of Tokyo and held on August 21-23, 1996, 108 items were discussed in following 3 sessions. In the first session, on interfacial effects in fusion energy systems, 29 items on Plasma-surface interactions in fusion devices and 14 items on blanket breeder-hydrogen isotope interactions were investigated. In the second session, 38 items on interfacial effects in fission energy systems were discussed. Furthermore, in the third session, 27 items of quantum beam-material interactions were investigated. (G.K.)

  15. Quantum group and symmetry of the heat equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, P.K.; Tripathy, K.C.

    1992-07-01

    The symmetry associated with the heat equation is re-examined using Lie's method. Under suitable choice of the arbitrary parameters in the Lie field, it is shown that the system exhibits SL(2,R) symmetry. On inspection of the q-analogue of the principal solution, we find broadening of the Gaussian-flow curve when q is varied from 1 to 0.002. The q-analogue of the general solution predicts the existence of additional degeneracy. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  16. Performance and efficiency evaluation and heat release study of a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Addy, H. E.; Bond, T. H.; Lee, C. M.; Chun, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    A computer simulation which models engine performance of the Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engines was used to study the effect of variations in engine design and operating parameters on engine performance and efficiency of an Outboard Marine Corporation (OMC) experimental rotary combustion engine. Engine pressure data were used in a heat release analysis to study the effects of heat transfer, leakage, and crevice flows. Predicted engine data were compared with experimental test data over a range of engine speeds and loads. An examination of methods to improve the performance of the rotary engine using advanced heat engine concepts such as faster combustion, reduced leakage, and turbocharging is also presented.

  17. On the importance of specific heats as regards efficiency increases for highly dilute IC engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caton, Jerald A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Importance of specific heats towards increasing engine efficiency was quantified. • Decreases of specific heats contribute 3.5–6.3% (abs) to the efficiency. • Dilute engines benefit from decreases of specific heats due to lower temperatures. - Abstract: Engineering and scientific efforts continue with the development of advanced, IC engines using highly dilute mixtures, and relatively high compression ratios. Such engines are known to provide opportunities for low emissions as well as high efficiencies. The main features of these engines include higher compression ratios, lean operation, use of EGR, and shorter burn durations. First, this study reviews the quantitative contributions of each of these features as determined by an engine cycle simulation. Second, this study provides the quantitative contributions to the increased efficiency in terms of fundamental thermodynamic considerations. An automotive engine operated at 2000 rpm was selected for this study. For the conditions examined, the net indicated thermal efficiency increased from 37.0% (conventional engine) to 53.9% (high efficiency engine) – for an incremental increase of 16.9% (absolute). The contribution of increases of the ratio of specific heats towards the final thermal efficiency is quantified. This aspect has been well known, but has not been quantified for actual engines. For the various conditions examined, 21–35% of the total efficiency improvement was estimated to be due to the increase of the ratio of specific heats

  18. Engineering two-photon high-dimensional states through quantum interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingwen; Roux, Filippus S.; Konrad, Thomas; Agnew, Megan; Leach, Jonathan; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Many protocols in quantum science, for example, linear optical quantum computing, require access to large-scale entangled quantum states. Such systems can be realized through many-particle qubits, but this approach often suffers from scalability problems. An alternative strategy is to consider a lesser number of particles that exist in high-dimensional states. The spatial modes of light are one such candidate that provides access to high-dimensional quantum states, and thus they increase the storage and processing potential of quantum information systems. We demonstrate the controlled engineering of two-photon high-dimensional states entangled in their orbital angular momentum through Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We prepare a large range of high-dimensional entangled states and implement precise quantum state filtering. We characterize the full quantum state before and after the filter, and are thus able to determine that only the antisymmetric component of the initial state remains. This work paves the way for high-dimensional processing and communication of multiphoton quantum states, for example, in teleportation beyond qubits. PMID:26933685

  19. Fundamentals of quantum physics. Textbook for students of science and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra Padilla, Pedro [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico City (Mexico). Fisica Teorica y Materia Condensada

    2012-07-01

    A clearly written basic textbook with a good balance between basic explanations and applications. Supplies new views on eigenvalues and eigenfunctions in quantum mechanics. Gives background needed to understand quantum cryptography, teleportation and computation. Provides a clear and consistent understanding of quantum concepts and quantum phenomenology. This book presents a comprehensive course of quantum mechanics for undergraduate and graduate students. After a brief outline of the innovative ideas that lead up to the quantum theory, the book reviews properties of the Schroedinger equation, the quantization phenomena and the physical meaning of wave functions. The book discusses, in a direct and intelligible style, topics of the standard quantum formalism like the dynamical operators and their expected values, the Heisenberg and matrix representation, the approximate methods, the Dirac notation, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum and hydrogen atom, the spin-field and spin-orbit interactions, identical particles and Bose-Einstein condensation etc. Special emphasis is devoted to study the tunneling phenomena, transmission coefficients, phase coherence, energy levels splitting and related phenomena, of interest for quantum devices and heterostructures. The discussion of these problems and the WKB approximation is done using the transfer matrix method, introduced at a tutorial level. This book is a textbook for upper undergraduate physics and electronic engineering students.

  20. Fundamentals of quantum physics. Textbook for students of science and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereyra Padilla, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    A clearly written basic textbook with a good balance between basic explanations and applications. Supplies new views on eigenvalues and eigenfunctions in quantum mechanics. Gives background needed to understand quantum cryptography, teleportation and computation. Provides a clear and consistent understanding of quantum concepts and quantum phenomenology. This book presents a comprehensive course of quantum mechanics for undergraduate and graduate students. After a brief outline of the innovative ideas that lead up to the quantum theory, the book reviews properties of the Schroedinger equation, the quantization phenomena and the physical meaning of wave functions. The book discusses, in a direct and intelligible style, topics of the standard quantum formalism like the dynamical operators and their expected values, the Heisenberg and matrix representation, the approximate methods, the Dirac notation, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum and hydrogen atom, the spin-field and spin-orbit interactions, identical particles and Bose-Einstein condensation etc. Special emphasis is devoted to study the tunneling phenomena, transmission coefficients, phase coherence, energy levels splitting and related phenomena, of interest for quantum devices and heterostructures. The discussion of these problems and the WKB approximation is done using the transfer matrix method, introduced at a tutorial level. This book is a textbook for upper undergraduate physics and electronic engineering students.

  1. Universality of energy conversion efficiency for optimal tight-coupling heat engines and refrigerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Shiqi; Tu, Z C

    2013-01-01

    A unified χ-criterion for heat devices (including heat engines and refrigerators), which is defined as the product of the energy conversion efficiency and the heat absorbed per unit time by the working substance (de Tomás et al 2012 Phys. Rev. E 85 010104), is optimized for tight-coupling heat engines and refrigerators operating between two heat baths at temperatures T c and T h ( > T c ). By taking a new convention on the thermodynamic flux related to the heat transfer between two baths, we find that for a refrigerator tightly and symmetrically coupled with two heat baths, the coefficient of performance (i.e., the energy conversion efficiency of refrigerators) at maximum χ asymptotically approaches √(ε C ) when the relative temperature difference between two heat baths ε C -1 ≡(T h -T c )/T c is sufficiently small. Correspondingly, the efficiency at maximum χ (equivalent to maximum power) for a heat engine tightly and symmetrically coupled with two heat baths is proved to be η C /2+η C 2 /8 up to the second order term of η C ≡ (T h − T c )/T h , which reverts to the universal efficiency at maximum power for tight-coupling heat engines operating between two heat baths at small temperature difference in the presence of left–right symmetry (Esposito et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 130602). (fast track communication)

  2. Engineering the Optical Properties of Nanowire Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwes Bavinck, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    In the future world of quantum communication and computing, infomation cannot be hacked and computers solve difficult problems, such as factorizing large number or searching in a large databases, much faster than possible with ordinary computers. However, to realize such systems still much research

  3. Stirling engine or heat pump having an improved seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Maurice A.; Riggle, Peter; Emigh, Stuart G.

    1985-01-01

    A Stirling Engine or Heat Pump having two relatively movable machine elements for power transmission purposes includes a hermetic seal bellows interposed between the elements for separating a working gas from a pressure compensating liquid that balances pressure across the bellows to reduce bellows stress and to assure long bellows life. The volume of pressure compensating liquid displaced due to relative movement between the machine elements is minimized by enclosing the compensating liquid within a region exposed to portions of both machine elements at one axial end of a slidable interface presented between them by a clearance seal having an effective diameter of the seal bellows. Pressure equalization across the bellows is achieved by a separate hermetically sealed compensator including a movable enclosed bellows. The interior of the compensator bellows is in communication with one side of the seal bellows, and its exterior is in communication with the remaining side of the seal bellows. A buffer gas or additional liquid region can be provided at the remaining axial end of the clearnace seal, along with valved arrangements for makeup of liquid leakage through the clearance seal.

  4. Possible directions for using bran in heat-power engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaydabrus Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In connection with the necessity of providing of ecofriendlyness of energy the researches sent to the increase of stake of biomass in fuel and energy balance are actual direction of science and technique. The aim of work is put the study of heating engineering properties of bran and research of possibility of briquetting as it applies to the power use in the stratified fire-box devices. Research methods included standard methodologies of ISO and physical experiment. It is shown as a result of research that bran on the warmth of combustion is comparable with brown coals, but has a less ash-content considerably. However shallow factious composition of bran and caking in the process of ashing will result in high operating costs at their incineration in a natural kind. The variant of the power use of bran is considered as the preforms got the thermal pressing, and the optimal temperature of pressing, equal 150°C. On the example of pressing of shell of cedar nuts possibility of the use of bran is shown as connective, is set here.

  5. Reversible and irreversible heat engine and refrigerator cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Harvey S.

    2018-05-01

    Although no reversible thermodynamic cycles exist in nature, nearly all cycles covered in textbooks are reversible. This is a review, clarification, and extension of results and concepts for quasistatic, reversible and irreversible processes and cycles, intended primarily for teachers and students. Distinctions between the latter process types are explained, with emphasis on clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) cycles. Specific examples of each are examined, including Carnot, Kelvin and Stirling cycles. For the Stirling cycle, potentially useful task-specific efficiency measures are proposed and illustrated. Whether a cycle behaves as a traditional refrigerator or heat engine can depend on whether it is reversible or irreversible. Reversible and irreversible-quasistatic CW cycles both satisfy Carnot's inequality for thermal efficiency, η ≤ η C a r n o t . Irreversible CCW cycles with two reservoirs satisfy the coefficient of performance inequality K ≤ K C a r n o t . However, an arbitrary reversible cycle satisfies K ≥ K C a r n o t when compared with a reversible Carnot cycle operating between its maximum and minimum temperatures, a potentially counterintuitive result.

  6. Cascade fuzzy control for gas engine driven heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuze; Zhang Wugao; Zhang Rongrong; Lv Dexu; Huang Zhen

    2005-01-01

    In addition to absorption chillers, today's gas cooling technology includes gas engine driven heat pump systems (GEHP) in a range of capacities and temperature capacities suitable for most commercial air conditioning and refrigeration applications. Much is expected from GEHPs as a product that would help satisfy the air conditioning system demand from medium and small sized buildings, restrict electric power demand peaks in summer and save energy in general. This article describes a kind of control strategy for a GEHP, a cascade fuzzy control. GEHPs have large and varying time constants and their dynamic modeling cannot be easily achieved. A cascade control strategy is effective for systems that have large time constants and disturbances, and a fuzzy control strategy is fit for a system that lacks an accurate model. This cascade fuzzy control structure brings together the best merits of fuzzy control and cascade control structures. The performance of the cascade fuzzy control is compared to that of a cascade PI (proportional and integral) control strategy, and it is shown by example that the cascade fuzzy control strategy gives a better performance, reduced reaction time and smaller overshoot temperature

  7. Quantum thermodynamics from the nonequilibrium dynamics of open systems: Energy, heat capacity, and the third law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiang, J-T; Chou, C H; Subaşı, Y; Hu, B L

    2018-01-01

    In a series of papers, we intend to take the perspective of open quantum systems and examine from their nonequilibrium dynamics the conditions when the physical quantities, their relations, and the laws of thermodynamics become well defined and viable for quantum many-body systems. We first describe how an open-system nonequilibrium dynamics (ONEq) approach is different from the closed combined system +  environment in a global thermal state (CGTs) setup. Only after the open system equilibrates will it be amenable to conventional thermodynamics descriptions, thus quantum thermodynamics (QTD) comes at the end rather than assumed in the beginning. The linkage between the two comes from the reduced density matrix of ONEq in that stage having the same form as that of the system in the CGTs. We see the open-system approach having the advantage of dealing with nonequilibrium processes as many experiments in the near future will call for. Because it spells out the conditions of QTD's existence, it can also aid us in addressing the basic issues in quantum thermodynamics from first principles in a systematic way. We then study one broad class of open quantum systems where the full nonequilibrium dynamics can be solved exactly, that of the quantum Brownian motion of N strongly coupled harmonic oscillators, interacting strongly with a scalar-field environment. In this paper, we focus on the internal energy, heat capacity, and the third law. We show for this class of physical models, amongst other findings, the extensive property of the internal energy, the positivity of the heat capacity, and the validity of the third law from the perspective of the behavior of the heat capacity toward zero temperature. These conclusions obtained from exact solutions and quantitative analysis clearly disprove claims of negative specific heat in such systems and dispel allegations that in such systems the validity of the third law of thermodynamics relies on quantum entanglement. They are

  8. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  9. Comparison of a Novel Organic-Fluid Thermofluidic Heat Converter and an Organic Rankine Cycle Heat Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph J.W. Kirmse

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Up-THERM heat converter is an unsteady, two-phase thermofluidic oscillator that employs an organic working fluid, which is currently being considered as a prime-mover in small- to medium-scale combined heat and power (CHP applications. In this paper, the Up-THERM heat converter is compared to a basic (sub-critical, non-regenerative organic Rankine cycle (ORC heat engine with respect to their power outputs, thermal efficiencies and exergy efficiencies, as well as their capital and specific costs. The study focuses on a pre-specified Up-THERM design in a selected application, a heat-source temperature range from 210 °C to 500 °C and five different working fluids (three n-alkanes and two refrigerants. A modeling methodology is developed that allows the above thermo-economic performance indicators to be estimated for the two power-generation systems. For the chosen applications, the power output of the ORC engine is generally higher than that of the Up-THERM heat converter. However, the capital costs of the Up-THERM heat converter are lower than those of the ORC engine. Although the specific costs (£/kW of the ORC engine are lower than those of the Up-THERM converter at low heat-source temperatures, the two systems become progressively comparable at higher temperatures, with the Up-THERM heat converter attaining a considerably lower specific cost at the highest heat-source temperatures considered.

  10. Analysis on the heating performance of a gas engine driven air to water heat pump based on a steady-state model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.R.; Lu, X.S.; Li, S.Z.; Lin, W.S.; Gu, A.Z.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the heating performance of a gas engine driven air to water heat pump was analyzed using a steady state model. The thermodynamic model of a natural gas engine is identified by the experimental data and the compressor model is created by several empirical equations. The heat exchanger models are developed by the theory of heat balance. The system model is validated by comparing the experimental and simulation data, which shows good agreement. To understand the heating characteristic in detail, the performance of the system is analyzed in a wide range of operating conditions, and especially the effect of engine waste heat on the heating performance is discussed. The results show that engine waste heat can provide about 1/3 of the total heating capacity in this gas engine driven air to water heat pump. The performance of the engine, heat pump and integral system are analyzed under variations of engine speed and ambient temperature. It shows that engine speed has remarkable effects on both the engine and heat pump, but ambient temperature has little influence on the engine's performance. The system and component performances in variable speed operating conditions is also discussed at the end of the paper

  11. Modeling of electrical and mesoscopic circuits at quantum nanoscale from heat momentum operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2018-04-01

    We develop a new method to study electrical circuits at quantum nanoscale by introducing a heat momentum operator which reproduces quantum effects similar to those obtained in Suykens's nonlocal-in-time kinetic energy approach for the case of reversible motion. The series expansion of the heat momentum operator is similar to the momentum operator obtained in the framework of minimal length phenomenologies characterized by the deformation of Heisenberg algebra. The quantization of both LC and mesoscopic circuits revealed a number of motivating features like the emergence of a generalized uncertainty relation and a minimal charge similar to those obtained in the framework of minimal length theories. Additional features were obtained and discussed accordingly.

  12. Physics and engineering of compact quantum dot-based lasers for biophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Rafailov, Edik U

    2013-01-01

    Written by a team of European experts in the field, this book addresses the physics, the principles, the engineering methods, and the latest developments of efficient and compact ultrafast lasers based on novel quantum-dot structures and devices, as well as their applications in biophotonics. Recommended reading for physicists, engineers, students and lecturers in the fields of photonics, optics, laser physics, optoelectronics, and biophotonics.

  13. Dictionary of combustion engineering and heating engineering. Pt. 1. Woerterbuch der Feuerungs- und Heizungstechnik. T. 1. - Encyclopedie de la technique de combustion et de chauffage. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, M

    1984-01-01

    The dictionary lists technical terms of the fields of combustion engineering and heating engineering. The heating engineering part was kept as short as possible; only those terms are listed, that are directly or indirectly related to combustion engineering. Contents: Definitions, standard nomenclature, burner systems, treatment systems, burner components, dictionary, SI-units, drawings with translations. 26 figs.

  14. Optimization of the dynamic and thermal performance of a resonant micro heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardaweel, H K; Richards, R F; Richards, C D; Anderson, M J

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a flexing membrane micro heat engine is presented. The micro heat engine consists of a cavity filled with a saturated, two-phase working fluid bounded on the top by a flexible expander membrane and on the bottom by a stiff evaporator membrane. A lumped parameter model is developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of the micro heat engine. First, the model is validated against experimental data. Then, the model is used to investigate the effect of the duration of the heat addition process, the mass of the expander membrane and the thermal storage or thermal inertia associated with the engine cavity on the dynamic behavior of the micro engine. The results show the optimal duration for the heat addition process to be less than 10% of the engine cycle period. Increasing the mass of the flexible expander membrane is shown to reduce the resonant frequency of the engine to 130 Hz. Operating the engine at resonance leads to increased power output. The thermal storage or thermal inertia associated with the engine cavity is shown to have a strong effect on engine performance

  15. Unifying quantum heat transfer in a nonequilibrium spin-boson model with full counting statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Ren, Jie; Cao, Jianshu

    2017-02-01

    To study the full counting statistics of quantum heat transfer in a driven nonequilibrium spin-boson model, we develop a generalized nonequilibrium polaron-transformed Redfield equation with an auxiliary counting field. This enables us to study the impact of qubit-bath coupling ranging from weak to strong regimes. Without external modulations, we observe maximal values of both steady-state heat flux and noise power in moderate coupling regimes, below which we find that these two transport quantities are enhanced by the finite-qubit-energy bias. With external modulations, the geometric-phase-induced heat flux shows a monotonic decrease upon increasing the qubit-bath coupling at zero qubit energy bias (without bias). While under the finite-qubit-energy bias (with bias), the geometric-phase-induced heat flux exhibits an interesting reversal behavior in the strong coupling regime. Our results unify the seemingly contradictory results in weak and strong qubit-bath coupling regimes and provide detailed dissections for the quantum fluctuation of nonequilibrium heat transfer.

  16. Electron Acceptor Materials Engineering in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Huan

    2011-07-15

    Lead sulfide colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells with a solar power conversion efficiency of 5.6% are reported. The result is achieved through careful optimization of the titanium dioxide electrode that serves as the electron acceptor. Metal-ion-doped sol-gel-derived titanium dioxide electrodes produce a tunable-bandedge, well-passivated materials platform for CQD solar cell optimization. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Experimental assessment for instantaneous temperature and heat flux measurements under Diesel motored engine conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torregrosa, A.J.; Bermúdez, V.; Olmeda, P.; Fygueroa, O.

    2012-01-01

    Higlights: ► We measured in-cylinder wall heat fluxes. ► We examine the effects of different engine parameters. ► Increasing air mass flow increase heat fluxes. ► The effect of engine speed can be masked by the effect of volumetric efficiency. ► Differences among the different walls have been found. - Abstract: The main goal of this work is to validate an innovative experimental facility and to establish a methodology to evaluate the influence of some of the engine parameters on local engine heat transfer behaviour under motored steady-state conditions. Instantaneous temperature measurements have been performed in order to estimate heat fluxes on a modified Diesel single cylinder combustion chamber. This study was divided into two main parts. The first one was the design and setting on of an experimental bench to reproduce Diesel conditions and perform local-instantaneous temperature measurements along the walls of the combustion chamber by means of fast response thermocouples. The second one was the development of a procedure for temperature signal treatment and local heat flux calculation based on one-dimensional Fourier analysis. A thermodynamic diagnosis model has been employed to characterise the modified engine with the new designed chamber. As a result of the measured data coherent findings have been obtained in order to understand local behaviour of heat transfer in an internal combustion engine, and the influence of engine parameters on local instantaneous temperature and heat flux, have been analysed.

  18. Simulating quantum state engineering in spontaneous parametric down-conversion using classical light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zhang, Y

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available range of pump beams for quantum state engineering and confirm that the results are in agreement with theory. Our approach offers high photon count rates, is quick to yield results and can easily be converted back to a SPDC setup. It is likely to be a...

  19. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Heat transfer comparison between methane and hydrogen in a spark ignited engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierens, Roger; Demuynck, Joachim; Paepe, Michel de; Verhelst, Sebastian [Ghent Univ. (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen is one of the alternative fuels which are being investigated at Ghent University. NO{sub x} emissions will occur at high engine loads and they are a constraint for power and efficiency optimization. The formation of NO{sub x} emissions is temperature dependent. Consequently, the heat transfer from the burning gases to the cylinder walls has to be accurately modelled if precise computer calculations of the emissions are wanted. Several engine heat transfer models exist but they have been cited to be inaccurate for hydrogen. We have measured the heat flux in a spark ignited engine with a commercially available heat flux sensor. This paper investigates the difference between the heat transfer of hydrogen and a fossil fuel, in this case methane. Measurements with the same indicated power output are compared and the effect of the heat loss on the indicated efficiency is investigated. The power output of hydrogen combustion is lowered by burning lean in contrast to using a throttle in the case of methane. Although the peak in the heat flux of hydrogen is 3 times higher compared to methane for a high engine power output, the indicated efficiency is only 3% lower. The heat loss for hydrogen at a low engine load is smaller than that of methane which results in a higher indicated efficiency. The richness of the hydrogen-air mixture has a great influence on the heat transfer process in contrast to the in-cylinder mass in the case of methane. (orig.)

  1. Malone-brayton cycle engine/heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Thomas A.

    1994-07-01

    A machine, such as a heat pump, and having an all liquid heat exchange fluid, operates over a more nearly ideal thermodynamic cycle by adjustment of the proportionality of the volumetric capacities of a compressor and an expander to approximate the proportionality of the densities of the liquid heat exchange fluid at the chosen working pressures. Preferred forms of a unit including both the compressor and the expander on a common shaft employs difference in axial lengths of rotary pumps of the gear or vane type to achieve the adjustment of volumetric capacity. Adjustment of the heat pump system for differing heat sink conditions preferably employs variable compression ratio pumps.

  2. Brownian micro-engines and refrigerators in a spatially periodic temperature field: Heat flow and performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai Baoquan; Wang Liqiu; Liu Lianggang

    2006-01-01

    We study the thermodynamic features of a thermal motor driven by temperature differences, which consists of a Brownian particle moving in a sawtooth potential with an external load. The motor can work as a heat engine or a refrigerator under different conditions. The heat flow driven by both potential and kinetic energy is considered. The former is reversible when the engine works quasistatically and the latter is always irreversible. The efficiency of the heat engine (Coefficient Of Performance (COP) of a refrigerator) can never approach Carnot efficiency (COP)

  3. Performance analysis of irreversible molten carbonate fuel cell – Braysson heat engine with ecological objective approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Açıkkalp, Emin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An irreversible MCFC - Braysson heat engine is considered. • Its performance is investigated with ecological approach. • A new ecological criteria are presented called as modified ecological function. • Result are obtained numerically and discussed. - Abstract: An irreversible hybrid molten carbonate fuel cell-Braysson heat engine is taken into account. Basic thermodynamics parameters including power output, efficiency and exergy destruction rate are considered. In addition ecological function and new criteria, which is based on ecological function, for heat engines called as modified ecological function is suggested. Optimum conditions for mentioned parameters above are determined. Numerical results are obtained and plotted. Finally, results are discussed.

  4. Effects of irreversibility and economics on the performance of a heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, O.M.; Klein, S.A.; Mitchell, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, optimization of the power output of an internally irreversible heat engine is considered for finite capacitance rates of the external fluid streams. The method of Lagrange multipliers is used to solve for working fluid temperatures which yield maximum power. Analytical expressions for the maximum power and the cycle efficiency at miximum power are obtained. The effects of irreversibility and economics on the performance of a heat engine are investigated. A relationship between the maximum power point and economically optimum design is identified. It is demonstrated that, with certain reasonable economic assumptions, the maximum power point of a heat engine corresponds to a point of minimum life-cycle costs

  5. Enhanced heat rectification effect in a quantum dot connected to ferromagnetic leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Feng, E-mail: chifeng@semi.ac.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Inner Mongolia University, Huhehaote 010023 (China); College of Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121013 (China); Sun, Lian-Liang [College of Science, North China University of Technology, Beijing 100041 (China); Zheng, Jun; Guo, Yu [College of Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121013 (China)

    2015-06-15

    We study theoretically the heat generation by electric current in an interacting single level quantum-dot connected to ferromagnetic leads. The heat is transferred between the dot and the lattice vibration of its host material (phonon reservoir). Particular attention is paid on the heat's rectification effect achieved by properly arranging the dot level and the bias voltage. We find that this effect is remarkably enhanced when the two leads' magnetic moments are in antiparallel configuration, i.e., the magnitude of the heat generation is reduced (amplified) in the negative (positive) bias regime as compared to the cases of parallel configuration and nonmagnetic leads. The rectification effect is even enhanced when one of the lead's spin polarization approaches to unit, during which the negative differential of the heat generation is weakened due to the change of the spin-dependent electron occupation numbers on the dot. The found results may be used for thermal transistor in the newly emerged research subject of phononics. - Highlights: • Heat flow between electrons and phonons is controlled by interaction between them. • A thermal diode or rectifier is proposed to work under electrical bias. • The heat rectification effect can be enhanced by the leads' ferromagnetism.

  6. Cold molecules: Progress in quantum engineering of chemistry and quantum matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, John L.; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Cooling atoms to ultralow temperatures has produced a wealth of opportunities in fundamental physics, precision metrology, and quantum science. The more recent application of sophisticated cooling techniques to molecules, which has been more challenging to implement owing to the complexity of molecular structures, has now opened the door to the longstanding goal of precisely controlling molecular internal and external degrees of freedom and the resulting interaction processes. This line of research can leverage fundamental insights into how molecules interact and evolve to enable the control of reaction chemistry and the design and realization of a range of advanced quantum materials.

  7. Thin film heat flux sensor for Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbine environment stresses engine components to their design limits and beyond. The extremely high temperatures and rapid temperature cycling can easily cause parts to fail if they are not properly designed. Thin film heat flux sensors can provide heat loading information with almost no disturbance of gas flows or of the blade. These sensors can provide steady state and transient heat flux information. A thin film heat flux sensor is described which makes it easier to measure small temperature differences across very thin insulating layers.

  8. Design and evaluation of fluidized bed heat recovery for diesel engine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, J. R.; Newby, R. A.; Vidt, E. J.; Lippert, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The potential of utilizing fluidized bed heat exchangers in place of conventional counter-flow heat exchangers for heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engine exhaust gas streams was studied. Fluidized bed heat recovery systems were evaluated in three different heavy duty transport applications: (1) heavy duty diesel truck; (2) diesel locomotives; and (3) diesel marine pushboat. The three applications are characterized by differences in overall power output and annual utilization. For each application, the exhaust gas source is a turbocharged-adiabatic diesel core. Representative subposed exhaust gas heat utilization power cycles were selected for conceptual design efforts including design layouts and performance estimates for the fluidized bed heat recovery heat exchangers. The selected power cycles were: organic rankine with RC-1 working fluid, turbocompound power turbine with steam injection, and stirling engine. Fuel economy improvement predictions are used in conjunction with capital cost estimates and fuel price data to determine payback times for the various cases.

  9. Bloch-wave engineering of quantum dot-micropillars for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lermer, Matthias; Gregersen, Niels; Dunzer, Florian

    2012-01-01

    scattering loss leads to record-high visibility of the strong coupling in MPs with modest oscillator strength quantum dots. A quality factor of 13,600 and a Rabi splitting of 85 \\mueV with an estimated visibility v of 0.38 are observed for a small mode volume MP with a diameter dc of 850 nm....

  10. Controllable gaussian-qubit interface for extremal quantum state engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Campbell, Steve; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Paternostro, Mauro

    2010-06-18

    We study state engineering through bilinear interactions between two remote qubits and two-mode gaussian light fields. The attainable two-qubit states span the entire physically allowed region in the entanglement-versus-global-purity plane. Two-mode gaussian states with maximal entanglement at fixed global and marginal entropies produce maximally entangled two-qubit states in the corresponding entropic diagram. We show that a small set of parameters characterizing extremally entangled two-mode gaussian states is sufficient to control the engineering of extremally entangled two-qubit states, which can be realized in realistic matter-light scenarios.

  11. A combined thermodynamic cycle based on methanol dissociation for IC (internal combustion) engine exhaust heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jianqin; Liu, Jingping; Xu, Zhengxin; Ren, Chengqin; Deng, Banglin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach for exhaust heat recovery was proposed to improve IC (internal combustion) engine fuel efficiency and also to achieve the goal for direct usage of methanol as IC engine fuel. An open organic Rankine cycle system using methanol as working medium is coupled to IC engine exhaust pipe for exhaust heat recovery. In the bottom cycle, the working medium first undergoes dissociation and expansion processes, and is then directed back to IC engine as fuel. As the external bottom cycle and the IC engine main cycle are combined together, this scheme forms a combined thermodynamic cycle. Then, this concept was applied to a turbocharged engine, and the corresponding simulation models were built for both of the external bottom cycle and the IC engine main cycle. On this basis, the energy saving potential of this combined cycle was estimated by parametric analyses. Compared to the methanol vapor engine, IC engine in-cylinder efficiency has an increase of 1.4–2.1 percentage points under full load conditions, while the external bottom cycle can increase the fuel efficiency by 3.9–5.2 percentage points at the working pressure of 30 bar. The maximum improvement to the IC engine global fuel efficiency reaches 6.8 percentage points. - Highlights: • A combined thermodynamic cycle using methanol as working medium for IC engine exhaust heat recovery is proposed. • The external bottom cycle of exhaust heat recovery and IC engine working cycle are combined together. • IC engine fuel efficiency could be improved from both in-cylinder working cycle and external bottom cycle. • The maximum improvement to the IC engine global fuel efficiency reaches 6.8 percentage points at full load

  12. Shape-engineered epitaxial InGaAs quantum rods for laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L. H.; Ridha, P.; Chauvin, N.; Fiore, A.; Patriarche, G.

    2008-01-01

    We apply artificial shape engineering of epitaxial semiconductor nanostructures to demonstrate InGaAs quantum rods (QRs), nanocandles, and quantum dots-in-rods on a GaAs substrate. The evolution of the QRs from a zero-dimensional to one-dimensional confinement is evidenced by systematically measuring the photoluminescence and photoluminescence decay as a function of the rod length. Lasers based on a three-stack QR active region are demonstrated at room temperature, validating the applicability of the QRs in the real devices

  13. Quasiparticle engineering and entanglement propagation in a quantum many-body system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurcevic, P; Lanyon, B P; Hauke, P; Hempel, C; Zoller, P; Blatt, R; Roos, C F

    2014-07-10

    The key to explaining and controlling a range of quantum phenomena is to study how information propagates around many-body systems. Quantum dynamics can be described by particle-like carriers of information that emerge in the collective behaviour of the underlying system, the so-called quasiparticles. These elementary excitations are predicted to distribute quantum information in a fashion determined by the system's interactions. Here we report quasiparticle dynamics observed in a quantum many-body system of trapped atomic ions. First, we observe the entanglement distributed by quasiparticles as they trace out light-cone-like wavefronts. Second, using the ability to tune the interaction range in our system, we observe information propagation in an experimental regime where the effective-light-cone picture does not apply. Our results will enable experimental studies of a range of quantum phenomena, including transport, thermalization, localization and entanglement growth, and represent a first step towards a new quantum-optic regime of engineered quasiparticles with tunable nonlinear interactions.

  14. Cylinder pressure, performance parameters, heat release, specific heats ratio and duration of combustion for spark ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shehata, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental work were conducted for investigating cylinder pressure, performance parameters, heat release, specific heat ratio and duration of combustion for multi cylinder spark ignition engine (SIE). Ccylinder pressure was measured for gasoline, kerosene and Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) separately as a fuel for SIE. Fast Fourier Transformations (FFT) was used to cylinder pressure data transform from time domain into frequency domain to develop empirical correlation for calculating cylinder pressures at different engine speeds and different fuels. In addition, Inverse Fast Fourier Transformations (IFFT) was used to cylinder pressure reconstruct into time domain. The results gave good agreement between the measured cylinder pressure and the reconstructed cylinder pressure in time domain with different engine speeds and different fuels. The measured cylinder pressure and hydraulic dynamotor were the sours of data for calculating engine performance parameters. First law of thermodynamics and single zone heat release model with temperature dependant specific heat ratio γ(T) were the main tools for calculating heat release and heat transfer to cylinder walls. Third order empirical correlation for calculating γ(T) was one of the main gains of the present study. The correlation gave good agreement with other researchers with wide temperatures range. For kerosene, cylinder pressure is higher than for gasoline and LPG due to high volumetric efficiency where kerosene density (mass/volume ratio) is higher than gasoline and LPG. In addition, kerosene heating value is higher than gasoline that contributes in heat release rate and pressure increases. Duration of combustion for different engine speeds was determined using four different methods: (I) Mass fuel burnt, (II) Entropy change, (III) Temperature dependant specific heat ratio γ(T), and (IV) Logarithmic scale of (P and V). The duration of combustion for kerosene is smaller than for gasoline and LPG due to high

  15. Cylinder pressure, performance parameters, heat release, specific heats ratio and duration of combustion for spark ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehata, M.S. [Mechanical Engineering Technology Department, Higher Institute of Technology, Banha University, 4Zagalol Street, Benha, Galubia 1235 Z (Egypt)

    2010-12-15

    An experimental work were conducted for investigating cylinder pressure, performance parameters, heat release, specific heat ratio and duration of combustion for multi cylinder spark ignition engine (SIE). Ccylinder pressure was measured for gasoline, kerosene and Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) separately as a fuel for SIE. Fast Fourier Transformations (FFT) was used to cylinder pressure data transform from time domain into frequency domain to develop empirical correlation for calculating cylinder pressures at different engine speeds and different fuels. In addition, Inverse Fast Fourier Transformations (IFFT) was used to cylinder pressure reconstruct into time domain. The results gave good agreement between the measured cylinder pressure and the reconstructed cylinder pressure in time domain with different engine speeds and different fuels. The measured cylinder pressure and hydraulic dynamotor were the source of data for calculating engine performance parameters. First law of thermodynamics and single zone heat release model with temperature dependant specific heat ratio {gamma}(T) were the main tools for calculating heat release and heat transfer to cylinder walls. Third order empirical correlation for calculating {gamma}(T) was one of the main gains of the present study. The correlation gave good agreement with other researchers with wide temperatures range. For kerosene, cylinder pressure is higher than for gasoline and LPG due to high volumetric efficiency where kerosene density (mass/volume ratio) is higher than gasoline and LPG. In addition, kerosene heating value is higher than gasoline that contributes in heat release rate and pressure increases. Duration of combustion for different engine speeds was determined using four different methods: (I) Mass fuel burnt, (II) Entropy change, (III) Temperature dependant specific heat ratio {gamma}(T), and (IV) Logarithmic scale of (P and V). The duration of combustion for kerosene is smaller than for gasoline and

  16. Engineering local optimality in quantum Monte Carlo algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, Lode; Van Houcke, Kris; Rombouts, Stefan M. A.

    2007-08-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo algorithms based on a world-line representation such as the worm algorithm and the directed loop algorithm are among the most powerful numerical techniques for the simulation of non-frustrated spin models and of bosonic models. Both algorithms work in the grand-canonical ensemble and can have a winding number larger than zero. However, they retain a lot of intrinsic degrees of freedom which can be used to optimize the algorithm. We let us guide by the rigorous statements on the globally optimal form of Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations in order to devise a locally optimal formulation of the worm algorithm while incorporating ideas from the directed loop algorithm. We provide numerical examples for the soft-core Bose-Hubbard model and various spin- S models.

  17. On the thermodynamics of waste heat recovery from internal combustion engine exhaust gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    The ideal internal combustion (IC) engine (Otto Cycle) efficiency ηIC = 1-(1/r)(γ - 1) is only a function of engine compression ratio r =Vmax/Vmin and exhaust gas specific heat ratio γ = cP/cV. Typically r = 8, γ = 1.4, and ηIC = 56%. Unlike the Carnot Cycle where ηCarnot = 1-(TC/TH) for a heat engine operating between hot and cold heat reservoirs at TH and TC, respectively, ηIC is not a function of the exhaust gas temperature. Instead, the exhaust gas temperature depends only on the intake gas temperature (ambient), r, γ, cV, and the combustion energy. The ejected exhaust gas heat is thermally decoupled from the IC engine and conveyed via the exhaust system (manifold, pipe, muffler, etc.) to ambient, and the exhaust system is simply a heat engine that does no useful work. The maximum fraction of fuel energy that can be extracted from the exhaust gas stream as useful work is (1-ηIC) × ηCarnot = 32% for TH = 850 K (exhaust) and TC = 370 K (coolant). This waste heat can be recovered using a heat engine such as a thermoelectric generator (TEG) with ηTEG> 0 in the exhaust system. A combined IC engine and TEG system can generate net useful work from the exhaust gas waste heat with efficiency ηWH = (1-ηIC) × ηCarnot ×ηTEG , and this will increase the overall fuel efficiency of the total system. Recent improvements in TEGs yield ηTEG values approaching 15% giving a potential total waste heat conversion efficiency of ηWH = 4.6%, which translates into a fuel economy improvement approaching 5%. This work is supported by the US DOE under DE-EE0005432.

  18. Heat Transfer in Two-Stroke Diesel Engines for Large Ship Propulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Caspar Ask

    Demands on reducing the fuel consumption and harmful emissions from the compression ignition engines (diesel engines) have been continuously increasing in recent years. To comply with this, better modeling tools for the diesel combustion process are desired from the engine developers. A very......%, 30% and 50% load) was performed on a MAN Diesel & Turbo SE test engine, which shows very promising results for further investigations of dynamic temperature and heat flux in large bore engines. Instantaneous heat flux is derived using both an analytical and a numerical model and compared. More...... was investigated by computer simulations using a 3-D numerical finite volume model made in STAR-CD. General trends are observed from the temperature measurements in the limited part load range. These include among others: local increase in mean surface temperature and mean surface heat flux with increasing load...

  19. Improving the engineering strength of heat strengthened glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, YM

    2016-01-01

    Although glass is increasingly used as a structural material, glass is not produced to strength standards, like steel and concrete. Of the three types of glass: annealed, heat strengthened and fully tempered, only heat strengthened glass has the properties to function as a safe structural material.

  20. Engineering economic assessment of residential wood heating in NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    We provide insight into the recent resurgence in residential wood heating in New York by: (i) examining the lifetime costs of outdoor wood hydronic heaters (OWHHs) and other whole-house residential wood heat devices,(ii) comparing these lifetime costs with those of competing tech...

  1. Integration of a wood pellet burner and a Stirling engine to produce residential heat and power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardozo, Evelyn; Erlich, Catharina; Malmquist, Anders; Alejo, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    The integration a Stirling engine with a pellet burner is a promising alternative to produce heat and power for residential use. In this context, this study is focused on the experimental evaluation of the integration of a 20 kW th wood pellet burner and a 1 kW e Stirling engine. The thermal power not absorbed by the engine is used to produce hot water. The evaluation highlights the effects of pellet type, combustion chamber length and cycling operation on the Stirling engine temperatures and thermal power absorbed. The results show that the position of the Stirling engine is highly relevant in order to utilize as much as possible of the radiative heat from the burner. Within this study, only a 5 cm distance change between the Stirling engine and the pellet burner could result in an increase of almost 100 °C in the hot side of the engine. However, at a larger distance, the temperature of the hot side is almost unchanged suggesting dominating convective heat transfer from the hot flue gas. Ash accumulation decreases the temperature of the hot side of the engine after some cycles of operation when a commercial pellet burner is integrated. The temperature ratio, which is the relation between the minimum and maximum temperatures of the engine, decreases when using Ø8 mm wood pellets in comparison to Ø6 mm pellets due to higher measured temperatures on the hot side of the engine. Therefore, the amount of heat supplied to the engine is increased for Ø8 mm wood pellets. The effectiveness of the engine regenerator is increased at higher pressures. The relation between temperature of the hot side end and thermal power absorbed by the Stirling engine is nearly linear between 500 °C and 660 °C. Higher pressure inside the Stirling engine has a positive effect on the thermal power output. Both the chemical and thermal losses increase somewhat when integrating a Stirling engine in comparison to a stand-alone boiler for only heat production. The overall efficiency

  2. Exergy, Economic and Environmental Analysis for Simple and Combined Heat and Power IC Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Aliehyaei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the results of exergy, economic and environmental analyses of simple and combined heat and power internal combustion engines. Values of entropy production, second law efficiency are calculated, and an objective function, including initial, operation, maintenance and fuel costs, as well as the external costs of environmental pollutants, such as CO2, CO and NOx, are presented for the flue gas of the internal combustion engine. The results show that entropy generation in the combined heat and power mode is 30% lower than that in the simple internal combustion engine. Also, by excessively increasing the air ratio, the system entropy generation decreases in both cases of simple and combined heat and power IC engines. The greatest portion of entropy generation is related to the combined heat and power internal combustion engine. The gas heat exchanger generates more entropy than the jacket heat exchanger. Lower values of electricity cost and external costs of air pollution are provided by higher values of molar air to fuel ratio. The environmental aspects depend on location of the system and time of engine operation.

  3. Gradient heat flux measurement as monitoring method for the diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, S. Z.; Mityakov, V. Yu; Mityakov, A. V.; Vintsarevich, A. V.; Pavlov, A. V.; Nalyotov, I. D.

    2017-11-01

    The usage of gradient heat flux measurement for monitoring of heat flux on combustion chamber surface and optimization of diesel work process is proposed. Heterogeneous gradient heat flux sensors can be used at various regimes for an appreciable length of time. Fuel injection timing is set by the position of the maximum point on the angular heat flux diagram however, the value itself of the heat flux may not be considered. The development of such an approach can be productive for remote monitoring of work process in the cylinders of high-power marine engines.

  4. Performance optimum analysis of an irreversible molten carbonate fuel cell–Stirling heat engine hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liwei; Zhang, Houcheng; Gao, Songhua; Yan, Huixian

    2014-01-01

    A new hybrid system mainly consists of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and a Stirling heat engine is established, where the Stirling heat engine is driven by the high-quality waste heat generated in the MCFC. Based on the electrochemistry and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, analytical expressions for the efficiency and power output of the hybrid system are derived by taking various irreversible losses into account. It shows that the performance of the MCFC can be greatly enhanced by coupling a Stirling heat engine to further convert the waste heat for power generation. By employing numerical calculations, not only the influences of multiple irreversible losses on the performance of the hybrid system are analyzed, but also the impacts of some operating conditions such as the operating temperature, input gas compositions and operating pressure on the performance of the hybrid system are also discussed. The investigation method in the present paper is feasible for some other similar energy conversion systems as well. - Highlights: • A model of MCFC–Stirling heat engine hybrid system is established. • Analytical expressions for the efficiency and power output are derived. • MCFC performance can be greatly enhanced by coupling a Stirling heat engine. • Effects of some operating conditions on the performance are discussed. • Optimum operation regions are subdivided by multi-objective optimization method

  5. Heat exchanger design for hot air ericsson-brayton piston engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ďurčanský P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the solutions without negative consequences for the increasing energy consumption in the world may be use of alternative energy sources in micro-cogeneration. Currently it is looking for different solutions and there are many possible ways. Cogeneration is known for long time and is widely used. But the installations are often large and the installed output is more suitable for cities or industry companies. When we will speak about decentralization, the small machines have to be used. The article deals with the principle of hot-air engines, their use in combined heat and electricity production from biomass and with heat exchangers as primary energy transforming element. In the article is hot air engine presented as a heat engine that allows the conversion of heat into mechanical energy while heat supply can be external. In the contribution are compared cycles of hot-air engine. Then are compared suitable heat exchangers for use with hot air Ericsson-Brayton engine. In the final part is proposal of heat exchanger for use in closed Ericsson-Brayton cycle.

  6. Heat exchanger design for hot air ericsson-brayton piston engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďurčanský, P.; Lenhard, R.; Jandačka, J.

    2014-03-01

    One of the solutions without negative consequences for the increasing energy consumption in the world may be use of alternative energy sources in micro-cogeneration. Currently it is looking for different solutions and there are many possible ways. Cogeneration is known for long time and is widely used. But the installations are often large and the installed output is more suitable for cities or industry companies. When we will speak about decentralization, the small machines have to be used. The article deals with the principle of hot-air engines, their use in combined heat and electricity production from biomass and with heat exchangers as primary energy transforming element. In the article is hot air engine presented as a heat engine that allows the conversion of heat into mechanical energy while heat supply can be external. In the contribution are compared cycles of hot-air engine. Then are compared suitable heat exchangers for use with hot air Ericsson-Brayton engine. In the final part is proposal of heat exchanger for use in closed Ericsson-Brayton cycle.

  7. Optimization of solar-powered Stirling heat engine with finite-time thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaqi, Li [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Xi' an Research Institute of Hi-Tech, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710025 (China); Yaling, He; Weiwei, Wang [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2011-01-15

    A mathematical model for the overall thermal efficiency of the solar-powered high temperature differential dish-Stirling engine with finite-rate heat transfer, regenerative heat losses, conductive thermal bridging losses and finite regeneration processes time is developed. The model takes into consideration the effect of the absorber temperature and the concentrating ratio on the thermal efficiency; radiation and convection heat transfer between the absorber and the working fluid as well as convection heat transfer between the heat sink and the working fluid. The results show that the optimized absorber temperature and concentrating ratio are at about 1100 K and 1300, respectively. The thermal efficiency at optimized condition is about 34%, which is not far away from the corresponding Carnot efficiency at about 50%. Hence, the present analysis provides a new theoretical guidance for designing dish collectors and operating the Stirling heat engine system. (author)

  8. Finite-Time Thermoeconomic Optimization of a Solar-Driven Heat Engine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Angulo-Brown

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the thermoeconomic optimization of an irreversible solar-driven heat engine model has been carried out by using finite-time/finite-size thermodynamic theory. In our study we take into account losses due to heat transfer across finite time temperature differences, heat leakage between thermal reservoirs and internal irreversibilities in terms of a parameter which comes from the Clausius inequality. In the considered heat engine model, the heat transfer from the hot reservoir to the working fluid is assumed to be Dulong-Petit type and the heat transfer to the cold reservoir is assumed of the Newtonian type. In this work, the optimum performance and two design parameters have been investigated under two objective functions: the power output per unit total cost and the ecological function per unit total cost. The effects of the technical and economical parameters on the thermoeconomic performance have been also discussed under the aforementioned two criteria of performance.

  9. Evaporation and condensation devices for passive heat removal systems in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershuni, A.N.; Pis'mennyj, E.N.; Nishchik, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    The paper justifies advantages of evaporation and condensation heat transfer devices as means of passive heat removal and thermal shielding in nuclear power engineering. The main thermophysical factors that limit heat transfer capacity of evaporation and condensation systems have been examined in the research. The results of experimental studies of heat engineering properties of elongated (8-m) vertically oriented evaporation and condensation devices (two-phase thermosyphons), which showed a high enough heat transfer capacity, as well as stability and reliability both in steady state and in start-up modes, are provided. The paper presents the examples of schematic designs of evaporation and condensation systems for passive heat removal and thermal shielding in application to nuclear power equipment

  10. Waste heat recovery system for recapturing energy after engine aftertreatment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-06-17

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery (WHR) system including a Rankine cycle (RC) subsystem for converting heat of exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine, and an internal combustion engine including the same. The WHR system includes an exhaust gas heat exchanger that is fluidly coupled downstream of an exhaust aftertreatment system and is adapted to transfer heat from the exhaust gas to a working fluid of the RC subsystem. An energy conversion device is fluidly coupled to the exhaust gas heat exchanger and is adapted to receive the vaporized working fluid and convert the energy of the transferred heat. The WHR system includes a control module adapted to control at least one parameter of the RC subsystem based on a detected aftertreatment event of a predetermined thermal management strategy of the aftertreatment system.

  11. Building an Understanding of Heat Transfer Concepts in Undergraduate Chemical Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottis, Katharyn E. K.; Prince, Michael J.; Vigeant, Margot A.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the distinctions among heat, energy and temperature can be difficult for students at all levels of instruction, including those in engineering. Misconceptions about heat transfer have been found to persist, even after students successfully complete relevant coursework. New instructional methods are needed to address these…

  12. The Amount of Regenerated Heat Inside the Regenerator of a Stirling Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Škorpík

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with analytical computing of the regenerated heat inside the regenerator of a Stirling engine. The total sum of the regenerated heat is constructed as a function of the crank angle in the case of Schmidt’s idealization. 

  13. Sales promotion and utilization of fuel. Engineering service of the heat industry for industrial companies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoen, E. (Ruhrgas A.G., Essen (Germany, F.R.). Abt. E-F)

    1978-01-01

    The contribution illustrates, from the industrial viewpoint, how one may produce process heat rationally and make optimum use of it using natural gas and how competing fuels can be supplanted. The heat economy engineering activities of a modern gas supply undertaking and a few practical examples to improve the industrial produce structure are shown.

  14. Fuel effects on knock, heat releases and CARS temperatures in a spark ignition engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalghatgi, G.T.; Golombok, M.; Snowdon, P.

    1995-01-01

    Net heat release, knock characteristics and temperature were derived from in-cylinder pressure and end-gas CARS measurements for different fuels in a single-cylinder engine. The maximum net heat release rate resulting from the final phase of autoignition is closely associated with knock intensity.

  15. Heat Transfer and Fluid Dynamics Measurements in the Expansion Space of a Stirling Cycle Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Simon, Terrence W.

    2006-01-01

    The heater (or acceptor) of a Stirling engine, where most of the thermal energy is accepted into the engine by heat transfer, is the hottest part of the engine. Almost as hot is the adjacent expansion space of the engine. In the expansion space, the flow is oscillatory, impinging on a two-dimensional concavely-curved surface. Knowing the heat transfer on the inside surface of the engine head is critical to the engine design for efficiency and reliability. However, the flow in this region is not well understood and support is required to develop the CFD codes needed to design modern Stirling engines of high efficiency and power output. The present project is to experimentally investigate the flow and heat transfer in the heater head region. Flow fields and heat transfer coefficients are measured to characterize the oscillatory flow as well as to supply experimental validation for the CFD Stirling engine design codes. Presented also is a discussion of how these results might be used for heater head and acceptor region design calculations.

  16. To capabilities of heat engines with gas working medium in closed cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.M.; Tikhomirov, L.N.; Rajkhanov, N.A.; Kotov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    The effort gives analysis of performance of engines and heat pumps with closed cycles based on use of well practiced adiabatic and isobaric processes. Advantages of theses cycles are demonstrated as compared to Stirling engines, and capabilities of their application in piston machines. (author)

  17. Engineered Quasi-Phase Matching for Nonlinear Quantum Optics in Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, Mackenzie A.

    Entanglement is the hallmark of quantum mechanics. Quantum entanglement--putting two or more identical particles into a non-factorable state--has been leveraged for applications ranging from quantum computation and encryption to high-precision metrology. Entanglement is a practical engineering resource and a tool for sidestepping certain limitations of classical measurement and communication. Engineered nonlinear optical waveguides are an enabling technology for generating entangled photon pairs and manipulating the state of single photons. This dissertation reports on: i) frequency conversion of single photons from the mid-infrared to 843nm as a tool for incorporating quantum memories in quantum networks, ii) the design, fabrication, and test of a prototype broadband source of polarization and frequency entangled photons; and iii) a roadmap for further investigations of this source, including applications in quantum interferometry and high-precision optical metrology. The devices presented herein are quasi-phase-matched lithium niobate waveguides. Lithium niobate is a second-order nonlinear optical material and can mediate optical energy conversion to different wavelengths. This nonlinear effect is the basis of both quantum frequency conversion and entangled photon generation, and is enhanced by i) confining light in waveguides to increase conversion efficiency, and ii) quasi-phase matching, a technique for engineering the second-order nonlinear response by locally altering the direction of a material's polarization vector. Waveguides are formed by diffusing titanium into a lithium niobate wafer. Quasi-phase matching is achieved by electric field poling, with multiple stages of process development and optimization to fabricate the delicate structures necessary for broadband entangled photon generation. The results presented herein update and optimize past fabrication techniques, demonstrate novel optical devices, and propose future avenues for device development

  18. Design and instrumentation of an automotive heat pump system using ambient air, engine coolant and exhaust gas as a heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoz, M.; Direk, M.; Yigit, K.S.; Canakci, M.; Alptekin, E.; Turkcan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Because the amount of waste heat used for comfort heating of the passenger compartment in motor vehicles decreases continuously as a result of the increasing engine efficiencies originating from recent developments in internal combustion engine technology, it is estimated that heat requirement of the passenger compartment in vehicles using future generation diesel engines will not be met by the waste heat taken from the engine coolant. The automotive heat pump (AHP) system can heat the passenger compartment individually, or it can support the present heating system of the vehicle. The AHP system can also be employed in electric vehicles, which do not have waste heat, as well as vehicles driven by a fuel cell. The authors of this paper observed that such an AHP system using ambient air as a heat source could not meet the heat requirement of the compartment when ambient temperature was extremely low. The reason is the decrease in the amount of heat taken from the ambient air as a result of low evaporating temperatures. Furthermore, the moisture condensed from air freezed on the evaporator surface, thus blocking the air flow through it. This problem can be solved by using the heat of engine coolant or exhaust gases. In this case, the AHP system can have a higher heating capacity and reuse waste heat. (author)

  19. Experimental study on heat storage system using phase-change material in a diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sangki; Woo, Seungchul; Shon, Jungwook; Lee, Kihyung

    2017-01-01

    Engines usually use only about 25% of the total fuel energy for power, and the rest is discarded to the cooling water and exhaust gas. Therefore, a technique for utilizing external waste heat is required to improve fuel efficiency in terms of total energy consumption. In this study, a heat storage system was built using a phase-change material in order to recover about 30% of the thermal energy wasted through engine cooling. The components of the heat storage system were divided into phase-change material, a heat exchanger, and a heat-insulating container. For each component, a phase-change material that is suitable for use in vehicles was selected based on the safety, thermal properties, and durability. As a result, a stearic acid of a fatty acid series with natural extracts was determined to be appropriate. In order to measure the reduction in engine fuel consumption, a thermal storage system designed for the actual engine was applied to realize a quick warm-up by releasing stored heat energy directly on the coolant during a cold start. This technique added about 95 calories of heat storage device warm-up time compared to the non-added state, which was reduced by about 18.1% to about 27.1%. - Highlights: • The diesel engine used phase-change material with heat storage system. • The thermal storage system designed for the actual engine. • A stearic acid of a fatty acid series was determined to be appropriate. • Applied heat storage system was reduced by about 18.1%–27.1%.

  20. Applicability of advanced automotive heat engines to solar thermal power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beremand, D. G.; Evans, D. G.; Alger, D. L.

    The requirements of a solar thermal power system are reviewed and compared with the predicted characteristics of automobile engines under development. A good match is found in terms of power level and efficiency when the automobile engines, designed for maximum powers of 65-100 kW (87 to 133 hp) are operated to the nominal 20-40 kW electric output requirement of the solar thermal application. At these reduced power levels it appears that the automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines have the potential to deliver the 40+ percent efficiency goal of the solar thermal program.

  1. Energy Efficient Waste Heat Recovery from an Engine Exhaust System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    costs for the operation of the ship. The types of boilers used in this process are specially built to have water flowing around thousands of tubes ...uneven heating of the water and metal heat exchanger, leading to damage or possible failure of the boiler . Since the merchant vessels operate at near...one of the central boiler tubes . Each of the sensors was individually adjusted to ensure that the readings were as accurate as possible to allow for

  2. Electrical performances of pyroelectric bimetallic strip heat engines describing a Stirling cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, A.; Boughaleb, J.; Monfray, S.; Boeuf, F.; Cugat, O.; Skotnicki, T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the analytical modeling of pyroelectric bimetallic strip heat engines. These devices are designed to exploit the snap-through of a thermo-mechanically bistable membrane to transform a part of the heat flowing through the membrane into mechanical energy and to convert it into electric energy by means of a piezoelectric layer deposited on the surface of the bistable membrane. In this paper, we describe the properties of these heat engines in the case when they complete a Stirling cycle, and we evaluate the performances (available energy, Carnot efficiency...) of these harvesters at the macro- and micro-scale.

  3. Determination and Application of Comprehensive Specific Frictional Resistance in Heating Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Tian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyze the deficiencies of specific frictional resistance in heating engineering. Based on economic specific frictional resistance, we put forward the concept of comprehensive specific frictional resistance, which considers the multiple factors of technology, economy, regulation modes, pipe segment differences, and medium pressure. Then, we establish a mathematical model of a heating network across its lifespan in order to develop a method for determining the comprehensive specific frictional resistance. Relevant conclusions can be drawn from the results. As an application, we have planned the heating engineering for Yangyuan County in China, which demonstrates the feasibility and superiority of the method.

  4. Optimal design of Stirling heat engine using an advanced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R V Rao

    The comparisons of the proposed algorithm are made with those obtained by using the decision-making methods like linear ... cooling water and had improved the thermal efficiency of ... integrated system of a free-piston Stirling engine and an.

  5. Engineering Intersubband Nonlinearities in GaN/AlGaN Coupled Quantum Wells for Optimised Performance in wide Bandwidth Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soref, Richard A; Sun, Gregory; Khurgin, Jacob B

    2005-01-01

    We investigate nonlinear optical properties of coup led GaN/AlGaN quantum wells and show that one can engineer the response time and nonlinear phase shift within wide limits and thus achieve optimized...

  6. Engineered Potentials and Dynamics of Ultracold Quantum Gases Under the Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER: DESCRIPTION OF MATERIAL INSTITUTION: PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paola Cappellaro TYPE REPORT: Ph.D. Dissertation PERIOD...CONTRACT NUMBER Engineered potentials and dynamics of ulu·acold quantum gases W911NF-11-1-0400 under the microscope Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM...Schnorrberger, M. Moreno- Cardoner , S. Fölling, and I. Bloch, “Counting atoms using interaction blockade in an optical superlat- tice,” Phys. Rev. Lett

  7. Experimental study of gas engine driven air to water heat pump in cooling mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgendy, E.; Schmidt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays a sustainable development for more efficient use of energy and protection of the environment is of increasing importance. Gas engine heat pumps represent one of the most practicable solutions which offer high energy efficiency and environmentally friendly for heating and cooling applications. In this paper, the performance characteristics of gas engine driven heat pump used in water cooling were investigated experimentally without engine heat recovery. The effects of several important factors (evaporator water inlet temperature, evaporator water volume flow rate, ambient air temperature, and engine speed) on the performance of gas engine driven heat pump were studied in a wide range of operating conditions. The results showed that primary energy ratio of the system increased by 22.5% as evaporator water inlet temperature increased from 13 o C to 24 o C. On the other hand, varying of engine speed from 1300 rpm to 1750 rpm led to decrease in system primary energy ratio by 13%. Maximum primary energy ratio has been estimated with a value of two over a wide range of operating conditions.

  8. Experimentally-determined external heat loss of automotive gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, P. R.; Wulf, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    An external heat balance was conducted on a 150 HP two-shaft automotive gas turbine engine. The engine was enclosed in a calorimeter box and the temperature change of cooling air passing through the box was measured. Cooling airflow ranges of 1.6 to 2.1 lb-per-second and 0.8 to 1.1 lb-per-second were used. The engine housing heat loss increased as the cooling airflow through the calorimeter box was increased, as would be the case in a moving automobile. The heat balance between the total energy input and the sum of shaft power output and various losses compared within 30 percent at engine idle speeds and within 7 percent at full power.

  9. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics: Engineered hierarchies of integrable potentials and related orthogonal polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balondo Iyela, Daddy; Govaerts, Jan; Hounkonnou, M. Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Within the context of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and its related hierarchies of integrable quantum Hamiltonians and potentials, a general programme is outlined and applied to its first two simplest illustrations. Going beyond the usual restriction of shape invariance for intertwined potentials, it is suggested to require a similar relation for Hamiltonians in the hierarchy separated by an arbitrary number of levels, N. By requiring further that these two Hamiltonians be in fact identical up to an overall shift in energy, a periodic structure is installed in the hierarchy which should allow for its resolution. Specific classes of orthogonal polynomials characteristic of such periodic hierarchies are thereby generated, while the methods of supersymmetric quantum mechanics then lead to generalised Rodrigues formulae and recursion relations for such polynomials. The approach also offers the practical prospect of quantum modelling through the engineering of quantum potentials from experimental energy spectra. In this paper, these ideas are presented and solved explicitly for the cases N= 1 and N= 2. The latter case is related to the generalised Laguerre polynomials, for which indeed new results are thereby obtained. In the context of dressing chains and deformed polynomial Heisenberg algebras, some partial results for N⩾ 3 also exist in the literature, which should be relevant to a complete study of the N⩾ 3 general periodic hierarchies

  10. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics: Engineered hierarchies of integrable potentials and related orthogonal polynomials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balondo Iyela, Daddy [International Chair in Mathematical Physics and Applications (ICMPA–UNESCO Chair), University of Abomey–Calavi, 072 B. P. 50 Cotonou, Republic of Benin (Benin); Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Institut de Recherche en Mathématique et Physique (IRMP), Université catholique de Louvain U.C.L., 2, Chemin du Cyclotron, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Département de Physique, Université de Kinshasa (UNIKIN), B.P. 190 Kinshasa XI, Democratic Republic of Congo (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Govaerts, Jan [International Chair in Mathematical Physics and Applications (ICMPA–UNESCO Chair), University of Abomey–Calavi, 072 B. P. 50 Cotonou, Republic of Benin (Benin); Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Institut de Recherche en Mathématique et Physique (IRMP), Université catholique de Louvain U.C.L., 2, Chemin du Cyclotron, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Hounkonnou, M. Norbert [International Chair in Mathematical Physics and Applications (ICMPA–UNESCO Chair), University of Abomey–Calavi, 072 B. P. 50 Cotonou, Republic of Benin (Benin)

    2013-09-15

    Within the context of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and its related hierarchies of integrable quantum Hamiltonians and potentials, a general programme is outlined and applied to its first two simplest illustrations. Going beyond the usual restriction of shape invariance for intertwined potentials, it is suggested to require a similar relation for Hamiltonians in the hierarchy separated by an arbitrary number of levels, N. By requiring further that these two Hamiltonians be in fact identical up to an overall shift in energy, a periodic structure is installed in the hierarchy which should allow for its resolution. Specific classes of orthogonal polynomials characteristic of such periodic hierarchies are thereby generated, while the methods of supersymmetric quantum mechanics then lead to generalised Rodrigues formulae and recursion relations for such polynomials. The approach also offers the practical prospect of quantum modelling through the engineering of quantum potentials from experimental energy spectra. In this paper, these ideas are presented and solved explicitly for the cases N= 1 and N= 2. The latter case is related to the generalised Laguerre polynomials, for which indeed new results are thereby obtained. In the context of dressing chains and deformed polynomial Heisenberg algebras, some partial results for N⩾ 3 also exist in the literature, which should be relevant to a complete study of the N⩾ 3 general periodic hierarchies.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of the heat regenerative cycle in porous medium engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongsheng; Xie Maozhao; Wu Dan

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of homogeneous combustion in internal combustion engines are well known all over the world. Recent years, porous medium (PM) engine has been proposed as a new type engine based on the technique of combustion in porous medium, which can fulfils all requirements to perform homogeneous combustion. In this paper, working processes of a PM engine are briefly introduced and an ideal thermodynamic model of the PM heat regeneration cycle in PM engine is developed. An expression for the relation between net work output and thermal efficiency is derived for the cycle. In order to evaluate of the cycle, the influences of the expansion ratio, initial temperature and limited temperature on the net work and efficiency are discussed, and the availability terms of the cycle are analyzed. Comparing the PM heat regenerative cycle of the PM engine against Otto cycle and Diesel cycle shows that PM heat regenerative cycle can improve net work output greatly with little drop of efficiency. The aim of this paper is to predict the thermodynamic performance of PM heat regeneration cycle and provide a guide to further investigations of the PM engine

  12. The effect of heat transfer laws and thermal conductances on the local stability of an endoreversible heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman-Vargas, L; Reyes-Ramirez, I; Sanchez, N

    2005-01-01

    In a recent paper (Santillan et al 2001 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 34 2068-72) the local stability of a Curzon-Ahlborn-Novikov (CAN) engine with equal conductances in the coupling with thermal baths was analysed. In this work, we present a local stability analysis of an endoreversible engine operating at maximum power output, for common heat transfer laws, and for different heat conductances α and β, in the isothermal couplings of the working substance with the thermal sources T 1 and T 2 (T 1 > T 2 ). We find that the relaxation times, in the cases analysed here, are a function of α, β, the heat capacity C, T 1 and T 2 . Besides, the eigendirections in a phase portrait are also functions of τ = T 1 /T 2 and the ratio β/α. From these findings, phase portraits for the trajectories after a small perturbation over the steady-state values of internal temperatures are presented, for some significant situations. Finally, we discuss the local stability and energetic properties of the endoreversible CAN heat engine

  13. Numerical study of heat transfer and combustion in IC engine with a porous media piston region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Lei; Xie, Mao-Zhao; Luo, Kai Hong

    2014-01-01

    Based on superadiabatic combustion in porous medium (PM), the porous medium engine as a new combustion concept is proposed to achieve high combustion efficiency and low emissions. In this paper, an axisymmetric model with detailed chemistry and two-temperature treatment is implemented into a variant of the KIVA-3V code to simulate the working process of the PM engine. Comparisons with the same engine but without PM are conducted. Temperature evolution of the PM and its effects are discussed in detail. Key factors affecting heat transfer, combustion and emissions of the PM engine, such as porosity, the initial PM temperature and equivalence ratio, are analyzed. The results show that the characteristics of heat transfer, emissions and combustion of the PM engine are superior to the engine without PM, providing valuable support for the PM engine concept. In particular, the PM engine is shown to sustain ultra lean combustion. - Graphical abstract: In the PM engine, a PM reactor is mounted on the piston head as shown in Fig. 1 which shows the schematic diagram of the computational domain. The heat exchange process between PM material and compressed air increases with upward motion of piston at compression stroke. At the TDC, almost all the air is compressed and closed to PM volume, meanwhile, the fuel is injected into PM chamber to achieve homogenization combustion. - Highlights: •Two-temperature treatment studies the working process of the PM engine. •Self-balancing temperature of the PM determines the continued and stable work. •Stronger heat exchange occurs between gas and PM with smaller porosity. •The PM engine can have lower levels of NO x , unburnt HC and CO emissions

  14. The Importance of Thermal Heat Bridges in Civil Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Tokar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the heat transfer characteristics of a construction, the expected temperatures along interior surfaces must be evaluated in order to predict (and avoid areas of potential moisture condensation. Beyond preventing damage to building materials caused by mould growth, adequate surface temperatures are also a relevant factor in the thermal comfort of an interior environment. An agreable climate in a room can be obtained, when relative humidity is between 40 and 60%. As the air in a room is warmer, the more vapor can absorb (and vice versa, influencing the thermal comfort index. Heat losses are influenced largely by thermal bridges of construction. The importance of the thermal heat bridges is strongly increasing today. In new developments the thermal optimization of junctions in today common low energy constructions receives very special standing. The subject of avoiding thermal bridges in passive houses became predominant.

  15. An analysis of geothermal heating and engineering cost in Tianjin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.

    1990-01-01

    Tianjin is a region with fairly rich low-temperature geothermal resources. Its climate and soaring price of raw coals have made geo heating in Tianjin develop rapidly over the past 5 years. The types of heating systems fall into 3 categories and the primary factors for using temperature drop are 5. According to economical analysis, the optimal discharge temperature in the space heating is about 43 degrees C and the minimum discharge temperature 35 degrees C approximately. This paper reports that an analysis of a typical engineering costs involved shows that the advantages of geo space heating are not notable when compared with burning coals. However, to reduce air pollution, the state and general public are ready to support the development of such geothermal wells as deep as 3,000 m for space heating irrespective of their sole engineering costs

  16. Analysis and assessment of a new organic Rankine based heat engine system with/without cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogerwaard, Janette; Dincer, Ibrahim; Zamfirescu, Calin

    2013-01-01

    A low-temperature heat driven heat engine is proposed as a cost-effective system for power and heat production for small scale applications. The external heat source allows flexibility in the design; the system may be coupled with various available renewable sources including biomass/biofuel/biogas combustion, geothermal heat, concentrated solar radiation, and industrial waste heat, by selecting appropriate off-the-shelf components from the HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning), refrigeration, and automotive industries for use in an ORC (organic Rankine cycle). A theoretical analysis and an experimental study are carried out for an ORC with R134a as the working fluid, utilizing a low-temperature heat source (T source < 150 °C), with focus on the expansion and boiling processes. The complete ORC model is comprised of models for the expander, working fluid pump, boiler, and condenser. Thermodynamic and heat transfer models are developed to calculate the local and averaged heat transfer coefficient of the working fluid throughout the boiling process, based on the geometry of the selected heat exchanger. Data collected for the experimental ORC test bench are used to validate the expander and boiler models. A case study is performed for the proposed ORC, for cogeneration of power and heat in a residential application. The results of the case study analysis for the proposed ORC system indicate a cycle efficiency of 0.05, exergy efficiency of 0.17, and energy and exergy cogeneration efficiency of 0.87, and 0.35, respectively. - Highlights: • Development and investigation of a scroll based Rankine heat engine operating with R134a. • Thermodynamic analyses of the system and its components. • Heat transfer analyses of boiler and condenser. • Dynamic analysis of expander. • Model validation through performed experiments on an ORC test bench

  17. Autonomous quantum rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Imparato, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    to a directed rotary motion. At variance with the classical case, the thermal fluctuations in the baths give rise to a non-vanishing average torque contribution; this is a genuine quantum effect akin to the Casimir effect. In the steady state the heat current flowing between the two baths is systematically......, the rotator cannot work either as a heat pump or as a heat engine. We finally use our exact results to extend an ab initio quantum simulation algorithm to the out-of-equilibrium regime. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2018...

  18. Physical principle and engineering features of the deep pool reactor for residential heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Gong; Zhao Zhaoyi; Guo Jingren; Tian Jiafu

    1999-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy for low temperature heating is confronted with challenges of safety and economy. The deep pool reactor, a low temperature heating reactor based on novel design principles, has been studied in detail. Results show that it has excellent safety and economic features, and is very suitable for low temperature heating purposes. The whole heating system including the nuclear reactor will be a simple and easy engineering system with the characteristics of reliability, safety and economy because the system and all its devices are based on low temperature and ordinary pressure

  19. Floquet prethermalization and regimes of heating in a periodically driven, interacting quantum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidinger, Simon; Knap, Michael

    We study the regimes of heating in the periodically driven O (N) -model, which represents a generic model for interacting quantum many-body systems. By computing the absorbed energy with a non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function approach, we establish three dynamical regimes: at short times a single-particle dominated regime, at intermediate times a stable Floquet prethermal regime in which the system ceases to absorb, and at parametrically late times a thermalizing regime. Our simulations suggest that in the thermalizing regime the absorbed energy grows algebraically in time with an the exponent that approaches the universal value of 1 / 2 , and is thus significantly slower than linear Joule heating. Our results demonstrate the parametric stability of prethermal states in a generic many-body system driven at frequencies that are comparable to its microscopic scales. This paves the way for realizing exotic quantum phases, such as time crystals or interacting topological phases, in the prethermal regime of interacting Floquet systems. We acknowledge support from the Technical University of Munich - Institute for Advanced Study, funded by the German Excellence Initiative and the European Union FP7 under Grant agreement 291763, and from the DFG Grant No. KN 1254/1-1.

  20. The engineering of a scalable multi-site communications system utilizing quantum key distribution (QKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tysowski, Piotr K.; Ling, Xinhua; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Mosca, Michele

    2018-04-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a means of generating keys between a pair of computing hosts that is theoretically secure against cryptanalysis, even by a quantum computer. Although there is much active research into improving the QKD technology itself, there is still significant work to be done to apply engineering methodology and determine how it can be practically built to scale within an enterprise IT environment. Significant challenges exist in building a practical key management service (KMS) for use in a metropolitan network. QKD is generally a point-to-point technique only and is subject to steep performance constraints. The integration of QKD into enterprise-level computing has been researched, to enable quantum-safe communication. A novel method for constructing a KMS is presented that allows arbitrary computing hosts on one site to establish multiple secure communication sessions with the hosts of another site. A key exchange protocol is proposed where symmetric private keys are granted to hosts while satisfying the scalability needs of an enterprise population of users. The KMS operates within a layered architectural style that is able to interoperate with various underlying QKD implementations. Variable levels of security for the host population are enforced through a policy engine. A network layer provides key generation across a network of nodes connected by quantum links. Scheduling and routing functionality allows quantum key material to be relayed across trusted nodes. Optimizations are performed to match the real-time host demand for key material with the capacity afforded by the infrastructure. The result is a flexible and scalable architecture that is suitable for enterprise use and independent of any specific QKD technology.

  1. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project: Semiannual progress report for April through September 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  2. Performance evaluation and experiment system for waste heat recovery of diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzhi, Gao; Junmeng, Zhai; Guanghua, Li; Qiang, Bian; Liming, Feng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a waste heat recovery system is proposed where a high speed turbocharged diesel engine acts as the topper of a combined cycle with exhaust gases used for a bottoming Rankine cycle. The paper describes a mathematical model to evaluate the performance of Rankine cycle system with a reciprocating piston expander. The paper focuses on the performance evaluation and parameter selection of the heat exchanger and reciprocating piston expander that are suitable to waste heat recovery of ICE (internal combustion engine). The paper also describes the experimental setup and the preliminary results. The simulation results show that a proper intake pressure should be 4–5 MPa at its given mass flow rate of 0.015–0.021 kg/s depending on the waste heat recovery of a turbocharged diesel engine (80 kW/2590 rpm). The net power and net power rise rate at various ICE rotation speeds are calculated. The result shows that introducing heat recovery system can increase the engine power output by 12%, when diesel engine operates at 80 kW/2590 rpm. The preliminary experimental results indirectly prove the simulation model by two negative work loops in the P–V curve, under a low intake pressure and steam flow rate condition. - Highlights: • We investigate waste heat recovery through secondary fluid power cycle. • We establish a thermodynamic model of reciprocating steam engine. • We conduct the performance evaluation and experimental system development. • Primary parameters of the heat exchangers and expander are determined

  3. Heat exchanger modeling and identification for control of waste heat recovery systems in diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Willems, F.P.T.; Rojer, C.; Jager, B. de; Steinbuch, M.

    2013-01-01

    To meet future CO2 emission targets, Waste Heat Recovery systems have recently attracted much attention for automotive applications, especially for long haul trucks. This paper focuses on the development of a dynamic counter-flow heat exchanger model for control purposes. The model captures the

  4. Computational modelling of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC waste heat recovery system for an aircraft engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadon S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Escalating fuel prices and carbon dioxide emission are causing new interest in methods to increase the thrust force of an aircraft engine with limitation of fuel consumption. One viable means is the conversion of exhaust engine waste heat to a more useful form of energy or to be used in the aircraft environmental system. A one-dimensional analysis method has been proposed for the organic Rankine cycle (ORC waste heat recovery system for turbofan engine in this paper. The paper contains two main parts: validation of the numerical model and a performance prediction of turbofan engine integrated to an ORC system. The cycle is compared with industrial waste heat recovery system from Hangzhou Chinen Steam Turbine Power CO., Ltd. The results show that thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC of the turbofan engine reach lowest value at 0.91 lbm/lbf.h for 7000 lbf of thrust force. When the system installation weight is applied, the system results in a 2.0% reduction in fuel burn. Hence implementation of ORC system for waste heat recovery to an aircraft engine can bring a great potential to the aviation industry.

  5. HEAT ENGINEERING TESTING OF AIR COOLING UNIT OF HORIZONTAL TYPE

    OpenAIRE

    Rohachov, Valerii Andriiovych; Semeniako, Oleksandr Volodymyrovych; Лазоренко, Р. О.; Середа, Р. М.; Parafeinyk, Volodymyr Petrovych

    2018-01-01

    The results of the thermal tests of the section of air cooler, the heat-exchange surface of which is made up of chess package of bimetal finned tubes are presented. The methods of research are presented, the experimental stand is described, the measurement errors are given. The efficiency of the experimental stand and the accuracy of the experimental data on it are confirmed. Proposed to use the stand for researches of air cooling units with other types and sections of finned tubes.

  6. Colloidal Engineering for Infrared-Bandgap Solution-Processed Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Amirreza

    Ever-increasing global energy demand and a diminishing fossil fuel supply have prompted the development of technologies for sustainable energy production. Solar photovoltaic (PV) devices have huge potential for energy harvesting and production since the sun delivers more energy to the earth in one hour than the global population consumes in one year. The solar cell industry is now dominated by silicon PV devices. The cost of silicon modules has decreased substantially over the past two decades and the number of installed silicon PV devices has increased dramatically. There remains a need for emerging solar technologies that can harvest the untapped portion of the solar spectrum and can be integrated on flexible and curved surfaces. This thesis focuses on colloidal quantum dot (CQD) PV devices. CQDs are nanoparticles fabricated using a low-temperature and cost-effective solution technique. These materials suffer from a high density of surface traps derived from the large surface-to-volume ratio of CQD nanoparticles, combined with limited carrier mobility. These result in a short carrier diffusion length, a main limiting factor in CQD solar cell performance. This thesis seeks to address the poor diffusion length in lead sulfide (PbS) CQD films and pave the way for new applications for CQD PV devices in infrared solar harvesting and waste heat recovery. A two-fold reduction in surface trap density is demonstrated using molecular halide treatment. Iodine molecules introduced prior to the film formation replace the otherwise unpassivated surface sulfur atoms. This results in a 35% increase in the diffusion length and enables charge extraction over thicker active layer leading to the world's most efficient CQD PV devices from June 2015 to July 2016 with the certified power conversion efficiency of 9.9%. This represents a 30% increase over the best-certified PCE (7.5%) prior to this thesis. The colloidal engineering highlighted herein enables infrared (IR) solar

  7. An improved CO_2-based transcritical Rankine cycle (CTRC) used for engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Gequn; Shi, Lingfeng; Tian, Hua; Li, Xiaoya; Huang, Guangdai; Chang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Propose an improved CTRC system (PR-CTRC) for engine waste heat recovery. • The PR-CTRC achieves a significant increase in thermodynamic performance. • The PR-CTRC possesses a strong coupling capability for high and low grade waste heat. • The PR-CTRC uses smaller turbine design parameters than ORC systems. • Total cooling load analysis of combined engine and recovery system was conducted. - Abstract: CO_2-based transcritical Rankine cycle (CTRC) is a promising technology for the waste heat recovery of an engine considering its safety and environment friendly characteristics, which also matchs the high temperature of the exhaust gas and satisfies the miniaturization demand of recovery systems. But the traditional CTRC system with a basic configuration (B-CTRC) has a poor thermodynamic performance. This paper introduces an improved CTRC system containing both a preheater and regenerator (PR-CTRC), for recovering waste heat in exhaust gas and engine coolant of an engine, and compares its performance with that of the B-CTRC system and also with that of the traditional excellent Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems using R123 as a working fluid. The utilization rate of waste heat, total cooling load, net power output, thermal efficiency, exergy loss, exergy efficiency and component size have been investigated. Results show that, the net power output of the PR-CTRC could reach up to 9.0 kW for a 43.8 kW engine, which increases by 150% compared with that of the B-CTRC (3.6 kW). The PR-CTRC also improves the thermal efficiency and exergy efficiency of the B-CTRC, with increases of 184% and 227%, respectively. Compared with the ORC system, the PR-CTRC shows the significant advantage of highly recycling the exhaust gas and engine coolant simultaneously due to the special property of supercritical CO_2’s specific heat capacity. The supercritical property of CO_2 also generates a better heat transfer and flowing performances. Meanwhile, the PR

  8. Numerical renormalization group calculation of impurity internal energy and specific heat of quantum impurity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, L.; Costi, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a method to obtain the specific heat of quantum impurity models via a direct calculation of the impurity internal energy requiring only the evaluation of local quantities within a single numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation for the total system. For the Anderson impurity model we show that the impurity internal energy can be expressed as a sum of purely local static correlation functions and a term that involves also the impurity Green function. The temperature dependence of the latter can be neglected in many cases, thereby allowing the impurity specific heat Cimp to be calculated accurately from local static correlation functions; specifically via Cimp=(∂Eionic)/(∂T)+(1)/(2)(∂Ehyb)/(∂T), where Eionic and Ehyb are the energies of the (embedded) impurity and the hybridization energy, respectively. The term involving the Green function can also be evaluated in cases where its temperature dependence is non-negligible, adding an extra term to Cimp. For the nondegenerate Anderson impurity model, we show by comparison with exact Bethe ansatz calculations that the results recover accurately both the Kondo induced peak in the specific heat at low temperatures as well as the high-temperature peak due to the resonant level. The approach applies to multiorbital and multichannel Anderson impurity models with arbitrary local Coulomb interactions. An application to the Ohmic two-state system and the anisotropic Kondo model is also given, with comparisons to Bethe ansatz calculations. The approach could also be of interest within other impurity solvers, for example, within quantum Monte Carlo techniques.

  9. Micro power/heat cogeneration incorporating a stirling engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luft, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Stirling-engine for CHP-purpose developed by SOLO is a trend-setting technology. It represents the most suspicious perspective apart from the fuel-cell technology in order to become suitable to the requirements of the future power supply in the focus of the sustainability and the decentralized energy supply. The charm of the Stirling technology is based on the external combustion: a so far not known variability with the primary energy choice as well as a life span substantially extending, wear-free operation are possible thereby. The external combustion reduces also the maintenance and the emissions in a measure not known with conventional engine technologies. The development steps are finished. The result is the world-wide first concept for the commercial, stationary application of decentralized micro-CHP on Stirling technology basis, which goes into series. (orig.) [de

  10. A thermoacoustic engine capable of utilizing multi-temperature heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Limin; Wang Bo; Sun Daming; Liu Yu; Steiner, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Low-grade energy is widespread. However, it cannot be utilized with high thermal efficiency directly. Following the principle of thermal energy cascade utilization, a thermoacoustic engine (TE) with a new regenerator that can be driven by multiple heat sources at different temperature levels is proposed. Taking a regenerator that utilizes heat sources at two temperatures as an example, theoretical research has been conducted on a traveling-wave TE with the new regenerator to predict its performance. Experimental verification is also done to demonstrate the benefits of the new regenerator. Results indicate that a TE with the new regenerator utilizing additional heat at a lower temperature experiences an increase in pressure ratio, acoustic power, efficiency, and exergy efficiency with proper heat input at an appropriate temperature at the mid-heater. A regenerator that uses multi-temperature heat sources can provide a means of recovering lower grade heat.

  11. Numerical study on steam injection in a turbocompound diesel engine for waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Rongchao; Li, Weihua; Zhuge, Weilin; Zhang, Yangjun; Yin, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Steam injection was adopted in a turbocompound engine to further recover waste heat. • Thermodynamics model for the turbocompound engine was established and calibrated. • Steam injection at CT inlet obtained lower engine BSFC than injection at PT inlet. • The optimal injected steam mass at different engine speeds was presented. • Turbocompounding combined with steam injection can reduce the BSFC by 6.0–11.2%. - Abstract: Steam injection and turbocompouding are both effective methods for engine waste heat recovery. The fuel saving potential obtained by the combination of the two methods is not clear. Based on a turbocompound engine developed in the previous study, the impacts of pre-turbine steam injection on the fuel saving potentials of the turbocompound engine were investigated in this paper. Firstly, thermodynamic cycle model for the baseline turbocompound engine is established using commercial software GT-POWER. The cycle model is calibrated with the experiment data of the turbocompound engine and achieves high accuracy. After that, the influences of steam mass flow rate, evaporating pressure and injection location on the engine performance are studied. In addition, the impacts of hot liquid water injection are also investigated. The results show that steam injection at the turbocharger turbine inlet can reduce the turbocompound engine BSFC at all speed conditions. The largest fuel reduction 6.15% is obtained at 1000 rpm condition. However, steam injection at power turbine inlet can only lower the BSFC at high speed conditions. Besides, it is found that hot liquid water injection in the exhaust cannot improve the engine performance. When compared with the conventional turbocharged engine, the combination of turbocompounding and steam injection can reduce the BSFC by 6.0–11.2% over different speeds.

  12. Modeling and dynamic control simulation of unitary gas engine heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yang; Haibo Zhao; Zheng Fang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the dynamic model of the gas engine heat pump (GEHP) system, an intelligent control simulation is presented to research the dynamic characteristics of the system in the heating operation. The GEHP system simulation model consists of eight models for its components including a natural gas engine, a compressor, a condenser, an expansion valve, an evaporator, a cylinder jacket heat exchanger, an exhaust gas heat exchanger and an auxiliary heater. The intelligent control model is composed of the prediction controller model and the combined controller model. The Runge-Kutta Fehlberg fourth-fifth order algorithms are used to solve the differential equations. The results show that the model is very effective in analyzing the effects of the control system, and the steady state accuracy of the intelligent control scheme is higher than that of the fuzzy controller

  13. The thermodynamics of heat- and mass exchange in chemical engineering. Vol. 1. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matz, G.

    1979-01-01

    The second and completely revised edition of the approved textbook 'The thermodynamics of heat- and mass exchange in chemical engineering' is devoted to students of technical and natural science disciplines as well as to practicians and scientists, which are confronted with thermodynamical problems of chemical engineering. Starting from the different phases and properties of matter, the first and the second law of thermodynamics are discussed together with many applications. After an introduction of the equilibrium state, the general principle of similarity for heat- and mass exchange is discussed, considering in particular the heat- and mass exchange in the counter flow between two phases. In a final chapter, the heat- and mass exchange between the vapor- and liquid phase is discussed, with special emphasis on problems as evaporation and drying. (orig./HK) [de

  14. Parametric analysis of a dual loop Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system for engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jian; Gu, Chun-wei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A dual loop ORC system is designed for engine waste heat recovery. • The two loops are coupled via a shared heat exchanger. • The influence of the HT loop condensation parameters on the LT loop is evaluated. • Pinch point locations determine the thermal parameters of the LT loop. - Abstract: This paper presents a dual loop Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system consisting of a high temperature (HT) loop and a low temperature (LT) loop for engine waste heat recovery. The HT loop recovers the waste heat of the engine exhaust gas, and the LT loop recovers that of the jacket cooling water in addition to the residual heat of the HT loop. The two loops are coupled via a shared heat exchanger, which means that the condenser of the HT loop is the evaporator of the LT loop as well. Cyclohexane, benzene and toluene are selected as the working fluids of the HT loop. Different condensation temperatures of the HT loop are set to maintain the condensation pressure slightly higher than the atmosphere pressure. R123, R236fa and R245fa are chosen for the LT loop. Parametric analysis is conducted to evaluate the influence of the HT loop condensation temperature and the residual heat load on the LT loop. The simulation results reveal that under different condensation conditions of the HT loop, the pinch point of the LT loop appears at different locations, resulting in different evaporation temperatures and other thermal parameters. With cyclohexane for the HT loop and R245fa for the LT loop, the maximum net power output of the dual loop ORC system reaches 111.2 kW. Since the original power output of the engine is 996 kW, the additional power generated by the dual loop ORC system can increase the engine power by 11.2%.

  15. A combined thermodynamic cycle used for waste heat recovery of internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Maogang; Zhang, Xinxin; Zeng, Ke; Gao, Ke

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a steady-state experiment, energy balance and exergy analysis of exhaust gas in order to improve the recovery of the waste heat of an internal combustion engine (ICE). Considering the different characteristics of the waste heat of exhaust gas, cooling water, and lubricant, a combined thermodynamic cycle for waste heat recovery of ICE is proposed. This combined thermodynamic cycle consists of two cycles: the organic Rankine cycle (ORC), for recovering the waste heat of lubricant and high-temperature exhaust gas, and the Kalina cycle, for recovering the waste heat of low-temperature cooling water. Based on Peng–Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS), the thermodynamic parameters in the high-temperature ORC were calculated and determined via an in-house computer program. Suitable working fluids used in high-temperature ORC are proposed and the performance of this combined thermodynamic cycle is analyzed. Compared with the traditional cycle configuration, more waste heat can be recovered by the combined cycle introduced in this paper. -- Highlights: ► We study the energy balance of fuel in internal combustion engine. ► Heat recovery effect of exhaust gas is good when ICE is at a high-load condition. ► We propose a new combined thermodynamic cycle for waste heat of ICE. ► The combined cycle has a higher recovery efficiency than previous configurations.

  16. Metal hydride heat pump engineering demonstration and evaluation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Franklin E.

    1993-01-01

    Future generations of portable life support systems (PLSS's) for space suites (extravehicular mobility units or EMU's) may require regenerable nonventing thermal sinks (RNTS's). For purposes of mobility, a PLSS must be as light and compact as possible. Previous venting PLSS's have employed water sublimators to reject metabolic and equipment heat from EMU's. It is desirable for long-duration future space missions to minimize the use of water and other consumables that need to be periodically resupplied. The emission of water vapor also interferes with some types of instrumentation that might be used in future space exploration. The test article is a type of RNTS based on a metal hydride heat pump (MHHP). The task of reservicing EMU's after use must be made less demanding in terms of time, procedures, and equipment. The capability for quick turnaround post-EVA servicing (30 minutes) is a challenging requirement for many of the RNTS options. The MHHP is a very simple option that can be regenerated in the airlock within the 30 minute limit by the application of a heating source and a cooling sink. In addition, advanced PLSS's must provide a greater degree of automatic control, relieving astronauts of the need to manually adjust temperatures in their liquid cooled ventilation garments (LCVG's). The MHHP includes automatic coolant controls with the ability to follow thermal load swings from minimum to maximum in seconds. The MHHP includes a coolant loop subsystem with pump and controls, regeneration equipment for post-EVA servicing, and a PC-based data acquisition and control system (DACS).

  17. Measurement of Heat Flow Transmitted through a Stacked-Screen Regenerator of Thermoacoustic Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Han Hsu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A stacked-screen regenerator is a key component in a thermoacoustic Stirling engine. Therefore, the choice of suitable mesh screens is important in the engine design. To verify the applicability of four empirical equations used in the field of thermoacoustic engines and Stirling engines, this report describes the measurements of heat flow rates transmitted through the stacked screen regenerator inserted in an experimental setup filled with pressurized Argon gas having mean pressure of 0.45 MPa. Results show that the empirical equations reproduce the measured heat flow rates to a mutually similar degree, although their derivation processes differ. Additionally, results suggest that two effective pore radii would be necessary to account for the viscous and thermal behaviors of the gas oscillating in the stacked-screen regenerators.

  18. Adaptive individual-cylinder thermal state control using intake air heating for a GDCI engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Gregory T.; Sellnau, Mark C.

    2016-08-09

    A system for a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine includes a plurality of heaters, at least one heater per cylinder, with each heater configured to heat air introduced into a cylinder. Independent control of the heaters is provided on a cylinder-by-cylinder basis. A combustion parameter is determined for combustion in each cylinder of the engine, and control of the heater for that cylinder is based on the value of the combustion parameter for combustion in that cylinder. A method for influencing combustion in a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine, including determining a combustion parameter for combustion taking place in a cylinder of the engine and controlling a heater configured to heat air introduced into that cylinder, is also provided.

  19. Steam generators and waste heat boilers for process and plant engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Ganapathy, V

    2014-01-01

    Incorporates Worked-Out Real-World ProblemsSteam Generators and Waste Heat Boilers: For Process and Plant Engineers focuses on the thermal design and performance aspects of steam generators, HRSGs and fire tube, water tube waste heat boilers including air heaters, and condensing economizers. Over 120 real-life problems are fully worked out which will help plant engineers in evaluating new boilers or making modifications to existing boiler components without assistance from boiler suppliers. The book examines recent trends and developments in boiler design and technology and presents novel idea

  20. Development and test of combustion chamber for Stirling engine heated by natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tie; Song, Xiange; Gui, Xiaohong; Tang, Dawei; Li, Zhigang; Cao, Wenyu

    2014-04-01

    The combustion chamber is an important component for the Stirling engine heated by natural gas. In the paper, we develop a combustion chamber for the Stirling engine which aims to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power. The combustion chamber includes three main components: combustion module, heat exchange cavity and thermal head. Its feature is that the structure can divide "combustion" process and "heat transfer" process into two apparent individual steps and make them happen one by one. Since natural gas can mix with air fully before burning, the combustion process can be easily completed without the second wind. The flame can avoid contacting the thermal head of Stirling engine, and the temperature fields can be easily controlled. The designed combustion chamber is manufactured and its performance is tested by an experiment which includes two steps. The experimental result of the first step proves that the mixture of air and natural gas can be easily ignited and the flame burns stably. In the second step of experiment, the combustion heat flux can reach 20 kW, and the energy utilization efficiency of thermal head has exceeded 0.5. These test results show that the thermal performance of combustion chamber has reached the design goal. The designed combustion chamber can be applied to a real Stirling engine heated by natural gas which is to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power.

  1. Gas engine driven freon-free heat supply system complying with multiple fuels (eco-energy city project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagyu, Sumio; Maekawa, Koich; Sugawara, Koich; Hayashida, Masaru; Fujishima, Ichiro; Fukuyama, Yuji; Morikawa, Tomoyuki; Yamato, Tadao; Obata, Norio [Advanced Technology Lab., Kubota Corp., Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes recent results at Kubota to develop a gas engine driven freon-free heat supply system. Utilizing a gas mixture which consists of CO and H{sub 2} supplied from a broad area energy utilization network, the system produces four heat sources (263 K, 280 K, 318 K, and 353 K) for air-conditioning, hot water supply, and refrigeration in a single system. It also conforms to fuel systems that utilize methane and hydrogen. This multi-functional heat supply system is composed of an efficient gas engine (methanol gas engine) and a freon-free heat pump (heat-assisted Stirling heat pump). The heat-assisted Stirling heat pump is mainly driven by engine shaft power and is partially assisted by thermal power provided by engine exhaust heat. By proportioning the two energy sources to match the characteristics of the driving engine, the heat pump is supplied with the maximum share of the original energy fueling the engine. Developing the system will establish freon-free thermal utilization system technology that satisfies both wide heat demands and various fuel systems. (orig.)

  2. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerke, Frank G.

    2001-01-01

    This cooperative program between the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology and Caterpillar, Inc. is aimed at demonstrating electric turbocompound technology on a Class 8 truck engine. This is a lab demonstration program, with no provision for on-truck testing of the system. The goal is to demonstrate the level of fuel efficiency improvement attainable with the electric turbocompound system. Also, electric turbocompounding adds an additional level of control to the air supply which could be a component in an emissions control strategy

  3. Performance characteristics of a glowplug assisted low heat rejection diesel engine using ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthikeyan, B.; Srithar, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 015 (India)

    2011-01-15

    Conventional diesel engines with ethanol as fuel are associated with problems due to high self-ignition temperature of the fuel. The hot surface ignition method, wherein a part of the injected fuel is made to touch an electrically heated hot surface (glowplug) for ignition, is an effective way of utilizing ethanol in conventional diesel engines. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of thermal insulation on ethanol fueled compression ignition engine. One of the important ethanol properties to be considered in the high compression ratio engine is the long ignition delay of the fuel, normally characterized by lower cetane number. In the present study, the ignition delay was controlled by partial insulation of the combustion chamber (low heat rejection engine) by plasma spray coating of yttria stabilized zirconia for a thickness of 300 {mu}m. Experiments were carried out on the glowplug assisted engine with and without insulation in order to find out the possible benefits of combustion chamber insulation in ethanol and diesel operation. Highest brake thermal efficiency of 32% was obtained with ethanol fuel by insulating the combustion chamber. Emissions of the unburnt hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxides were higher than that of diesel. But the smoke intensity and was less than that of diesel engine. Volumetric efficiency of the engine was reduced by a maximum of 9% in LHR mode of operation. (author)

  4. Electrical and engine driven heat pumps for effective utilisation of renewable energy resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aye, Lu; Charters, W.W.S

    2003-07-01

    Much of the energy used for domestic, commercial and industrial purposes is to provide efficient and effective heating of conditioned spaces and for specialist niche applications in process heat systems. Vapour compression heat pumps driven by electric motors or engines provide the real capability of upgrading low temperature sources of ambient and waste heat to match the desired load temperatures in such heating applications. Major source of ambient heat stem from the storage of solar energy in the ground, in lakes and rivers, and in atmospheric air. Heat pumps can therefore be used to effectively harness indirectly the daily solar radiation input. In addition many industries have major sources of waste low grade heat in the form of air or water discharged from the industrial process heat stream. Heat pumps are generally formally classified therefore as air source, ground source or water source units although there has also been considerable interest recently in hybrid units combining the attributes of two or more of these specific types mentioned above.

  5. Electrical and engine driven heat pumps for effective utilisation of renewable energy resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Aye [Melbourne Univ., Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Charters, W.W.S. [Melbourne Univ., Dept. of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Parkville, VIC (Australia)

    2003-07-01

    Much of the energy used for domestic, commercial and industrial purposes is to provide efficient and effective heating of conditioned spaces and for specialist niche applications in process heat systems. Vapour compression heat pumps driven by electric motors or engines provide the real capability of upgrading low temperature sources of ambient and waste heat to match the desired load temperatures in such heating applications. Major source of ambient heat stem from the storage of solar energy in the ground, in lakes and rivers, and in atmospheric air. Heat pumps can therefore be used to effectively harness indirectly the daily solar radiation input. In addition many industries have major sources of waste low grade heat in the form of air or water discharged from the industrial process heat stream. Heat pumps are generally formally classified therefore as air source, ground source or water source units although there has also been considerable interest recently in hybrid units combining the attributes of two or more of these specific types mentioned above. (Author)

  6. Waste heat recovery systems for internal combustion engines: classification and benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Marchenko, A.; Samoilenko, D.; Adel Hamzah, Ali; Adel Hamzah, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Recent trend about the best ways of using the deployable sources of energy in to useful work in order to reduce the rate of consumption of fossil fuel as well as pollution. Out of all the available sources, the internal combustion engines are the major consumer of fossil fuel around the globe. The remaining heat is expelled to the environment through exhaust gases and engine cooling systems, resulting in to entropy rise and serious environmental pollution, so it is required to utilized waste ...

  7. A novel split cycle internal combustion engine with integral waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Guangyu; Morgan, Robert; Heikal, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel engine thermodynamic cycle is proposed. • Theoretical analysis is applied to identify the key parameters of the thermodynamic cycle. • The key stages of the split cycle are analysed via one-dimensional modelling work. • The effecting mechanism of the split cycle efficiency is analysed. - Abstract: To achieve a step improvement in engine efficiency, a novel split cycle engine concept is proposed. The engine has separate compression and combustion cylinders and waste heat is recovered between the two. Quasi-isothermal compression of the charge air is realised in the compression cylinder while isobaric combustion of the air/fuel mixture is achieved in the combustion cylinder. Exhaust heat recovery between the compression and combustion chamber enables highly efficient recovery of waste heat within the cycle. Based on cycle analysis and a one-dimensional engine model, the fundamentals and the performance of the split thermodynamic cycle is estimated. Compared to conventional engines, the compression work can be significantly reduced through the injection of a controlled quantity of water in the compression cylinder, lowering the gas temperature during compression. Thermal energy can then be effectively recovered from the engine exhaust in a recuperator between the cooled compressor cylinder discharge air and the exhaust gas. The resulting hot high pressure air is then injected into a combustor cylinder and mixed with fuel, where near isobaric combustion leads to a low combustion temperature and reduced heat transferred from the cylinder wall. Detailed cycle simulation indicates a 32% efficiency improvement can be expected compared to the conventional diesel engines.

  8. Prediction and Validation of Heat Release Direct Injection Diesel Engine Using Multi-Zone Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anang Nugroho, Bagus; Sugiarto, Bambang; Prawoto; Shalahuddin, Lukman

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop simulation model which capable to predict heat release of diesel combustion accurately in efficient computation time. A multi-zone packet model has been applied to solve the combustion phenomena inside diesel cylinder. The model formulations are presented first and then the numerical results are validated on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine at various engine speed and timing injections. The model were found to be promising to fulfill the objective above.

  9. Conflict between internal combustion engine and thermoelectric generator during waste heat recovery in cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhuev, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    It is shown that an internal combustion engine and a thermoelectric generator (TEG) arranged on the exhaust pipe of this engine come into the conflict of thermal machines that is related to using the same energy resource. The conflict grows with increasing useful electric power W e of the TEG, which leads to the limitation of both the maximum TEG output power ( W {e/max}) and the possibility of waste heat recovery in cars.

  10. Analysis and optimization with ecological objective function of irreversible single resonance energy selective electron heat engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Junle; Chen, Lingen; Ding, Zemin; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-01-01

    Ecological performance of a single resonance ESE heat engine with heat leakage is conducted by applying finite time thermodynamics. By introducing Nielsen function and numerical calculations, expressions about power output, efficiency, entropy generation rate and ecological objective function are derived; relationships between ecological objective function and power output, between ecological objective function and efficiency as well as between power output and efficiency are demonstrated; influences of system parameters of heat leakage, boundary energy and resonance width on the optimal performances are investigated in detail; a specific range of boundary energy is given as a compromise to make ESE heat engine system work at optimal operation regions. Comparing performance characteristics with different optimization objective functions, the significance of selecting ecological objective function as the design objective is clarified specifically: when changing the design objective from maximum power output into maximum ecological objective function, the improvement of efficiency is 4.56%, while the power output drop is only 2.68%; when changing the design objective from maximum efficiency to maximum ecological objective function, the improvement of power output is 229.13%, and the efficiency drop is only 13.53%. - Highlights: • An irreversible single resonance energy selective electron heat engine is studied. • Heat leakage between two reservoirs is considered. • Power output, efficiency and ecological objective function are derived. • Optimal performance comparison for three objective functions is carried out.

  11. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalomba Mboyi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the emitting material with the radioisotope decay heat and by powering the different valves of the plasma rocket engine with the same radioisotope decay heat using a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. This rocket engine is then benchmarked against a 1 N hydrazine thruster configuration operated on one of the Pleiades-HR-1 constellation spacecraft. A maximal specific impulse and power saving of respectively 529 s and 32% are achieved with helium as propellant. Its advantages are its power saving capability, high specific impulses and simultaneous ease of storage and restart. It can however be extremely voluminous and potentially hazardous. The Kabila rocket is found to bring great benefits to the existing spacecraft and further research should optimize its geometric characteristics and investigate the physical principals of its operation.

  12. Elements of learning technologies designing of engineering networks heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorkina Irina G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern educational systems function as a medium fast analysis of shared information that defines them as analytical. The purpose of analytical information processing systems: working with distributed data on a global computer networks, mining and processing of semi structured information, knowledge. Existing mathematical and heuristic methods for the automated synthesis of electronic courses and their corresponding algorithms do not allow the full compliance of development realized in the form of adequate criteria for the totality of the properties distributed educational systems within acceptable time limits and characteristic. Therefore, the development of electronic educational applications must be accompanied by a variety of software support intelligent and adaptive functions. In addition, there is no theoretical justification for integrative aspects and their practical applications for intelligent and adaptive systems of designing distance learning courses. Currently, this type of problem may be considered as a potentially promising. The article presents the functionality of the e-learning course on the design engineering of thermal networks, process modeling in engineering networks with the solution of energy efficiency, detection of problem areas; identify the irrational layout of heaters and others.

  13. Study of SI engine fueled with methanol vapor and dissociation gas based on exhaust heat dissociating methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jianqin; Deng, Banglin; Liu, Jingping; Wang, Linjun; Xu, Zhengxin; Yang, Jing; Shu, Gequn

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The full load power decreases successively from gasoline engine, methanol vapor engine to dissociated methanol engine. • Both power and thermal efficiency of dissociated methanol engine can be improved by boosting pressure. • The conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy is largely influenced by the BMEP. • At the same BMEP, dissociated methanol engine has higher thermal efficiency than methanol vapor engine and gasoline engine. - Abstract: To improve the fuel efficiency of internal combustion (IC) engine and also achieve the goal of direct usage of methanol fuel on IC engine, an approach of exhaust heat dissociating methanol was investigated, which is a kind of method for IC engine exhaust heat recovery (EHR). A bottom cycle system is coupled with the IC engine exhaust system, which uses the exhaust heat to evaporate and dissociate methanol in its catalytic cracker. The methanol dissociation gas (including methanol vapor) is used as the fuel for IC engine. This approach was applied to both naturally aspirated (NA) engine and turbocharged engine, and the engine performance parameters were predicted by the software GT-power under various kinds of operating conditions. The improvement to IC engine performance and the conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy can be evaluated by comparing the performances of IC engine fueled with various kinds of fuels (or their compositions). Results show that, from gasoline engine, methanol vapor engine to dissociated methanol engine, the full load power decreases successively in the entire speed area due to the declining of volumetric efficiency, while it is contrary in the thermal efficiency at the same brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) level because of the improving of fuel heating value. With the increase of BMEP, the conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy is promoted. All those results indicate that the approach of exhaust heat dissociating methanol has large

  14. An assessment of CFD-based wall heat transfer models in piston engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-04-26

    The lack of accurate submodels for in-cylinder heat transfer has been identified as a key shortcoming in developing truly predictive, physics-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to develop combustion systems for advanced high-efficiency, low-emissions engines. Only recently have experimental methods become available that enable accurate near-wall measurements to enhance simulation capability via advancing models. Initial results show crank-angle dependent discrepancies with respect to previously used boundary-layer models of up to 100%. However, available experimental data is quite sparse (only few data points on engine walls) and limited (available measurements are those of heat flux only). Predictive submodels are needed for medium-resolution ("engineering") LES and for unsteady Reynolds-averaged simulations (URANS). Recently, some research groups have performed DNS studies on engine-relevant conditions using simple geometries. These provide very useful data for benchmarking wall heat transfer models under such conditions. Further, a number of new and more sophisticated models have also become available in the literature which account for these engine-like conditions. Some of these have been incorporated while others of a more complex nature, which include solving additional partial differential equations (PDEs) within the thin boundary layer near the wall, are underway. These models will then be tested against the available DNS/experimental data in both SI (spark-ignition) and CI (compression-ignition) engines.

  15. Exact analytical thermodynamic expressions for a Brownian heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Mesfin Asfaw

    2015-09-01

    The nonequilibrium thermodynamics feature of a Brownian motor operating between two different heat baths is explored as a function of time t . Using the Gibbs entropy and Schnakenberg microscopic stochastic approach, we find exact closed form expressions for the free energy, the rate of entropy production, and the rate of entropy flow from the system to the outside. We show that when the system is out of equilibrium, it constantly produces entropy and at the same time extracts entropy out of the system. Its entropy production and extraction rates decrease in time and saturate to a constant value. In the long time limit, the rate of entropy production balances the rate of entropy extraction, and at equilibrium both entropy production and extraction rates become zero. Furthermore, via the present model, many thermodynamic theories can be checked.

  16. Energy distributions in a diesel engine using low heat rejection (LHR) concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tingting; Caton, Jerald A.; Jacobs, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Altering coolant temperature was employed to devise low heat rejection concept. • The energy distributions at different engine coolant temperatures were analyzed. • Raising coolant temperature yields improvements in fuel conversion efficiency. • The exhaust energy is highly sensitive to the variations in exhaust temperature. • Effects of coolant temperature on mechanical efficiency were examined. - Abstract: The energy balance analysis is recognized as a useful method for aiding the characterization of the performance and efficiency of internal combustion (IC) engines. Approximately one-third of the total fuel energy is converted to useful work in a conventional IC engine, whereas the major part of the energy input is rejected to the exhaust gas and the cooling system. The idea of a low heat rejection (LHR) engine (also called “adiabatic engine”) was extensively developed in the 1980s due to its potential in improving engine thermal efficiency via reducing the heat losses. In this study, the LHR operating condition is implemented by increasing the engine coolant temperature (ECT). Experimentally, the engine is overcooled to low ECTs and then increased to 100 °C in an effort to get trend-wise behavior without exceeding safe ECTs. The study then uses an engine simulation of the conventional multi-cylinder, four-stroke, 1.9 L diesel engine operating at 1500 rpm to examine the five cases having different ECTs. A comparison between experimental and simulation results show the effects of ECT on fuel conversion efficiency. The results demonstrate that increasing ECT yields slight improvements in net indicated fuel conversion efficiency, with larger improvements observed in brake fuel conversion efficiency.

  17. Parametric study of power turbine for diesel engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Rongchao; Zhuge, Weilin; Zhang, Yangjun; Yin, Yong; Chen, Zhen; Li, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Turbocompounding is a promising technology to recover waste heat from the exhaust and reduce fuel consumption for internal combustion engine. The design of a power turbine plays a key role in turbocompound engine performance. This paper presents a set of parametric studies of power turbine performed on a turbocompound diesel engine by means of turbine through-flow model developed by the authors. This simulation model was verified and validated using engine performance test data and achieved reasonable accuracy. The paper first analyzed the influence of three key geometrical parameters (blade height, blade radius and nozzle exit blade angle) on turbine expansion ratio and engine fuel consumptions. After that, the impacts of the geometrical parameters on power distribution, air mass flow rate and exhaust temperature were analyzed. Results showed that these parameters had significant effects on engine BSFC and power. At high engine speeds, there existed an optimum value of geometry parameter to obtain the lowest BSFC. At low engine speeds, the engine BSFC kept increasing or decreasing continuously as the geometry parameters changed. Research also found that the engine BSFC was most sensitive to the nozzle exit blade angle, which should be considered carefully during the design process. This paper provides a useful method for matching and designing of a power turbine for turbocompound engine. - Highlights: •Through-flow model of axial-flow power turbine for turbocompound engine was established. •Turbocompound engine performance test was carried out to validate the cycle simulation model. •Influences of power turbine geometry parameters on engine BSFC and power were presented

  18. Spectral hole-burning and carrier-heating dynamics in quantum-dot amplifiers: Comparison with bulk amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, P.; Langbein, W.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    The ultrafast gain dynamics in an electrically pumped InAs/InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot amplifier are measured at room temperature with femtosecond resolution, and compared with results on an InGaAsP bulk amplifier. The role of spectral hole burning and carrier heating in the recovery of the gain...

  19. A chaotic quantum-behaved particle swarm approach applied to optimization of heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariani, Viviana Cocco; Klassen Duck, Anderson Rodrigo; Guerra, Fabio Alessandro; Santos Coelho, Leandro dos; Rao, Ravipudi Venkata

    2012-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) method is a population-based optimization technique of swarm intelligence field in which each solution called “particle” flies around in a multidimensional problem search space. During the flight, every particle adjusts its position according to its own experience, as well as the experience of neighboring particles, using the best position encountered by itself and its neighbors. In this paper, a new quantum particle swarm optimization (QPSO) approach combined with Zaslavskii chaotic map sequences (QPSOZ) to shell and tube heat exchanger optimization is presented based on the minimization from economic view point. The results obtained in this paper for two case studies using the proposed QPSOZ approach, are compared with those obtained by using genetic algorithm, PSO and classical QPSO showing the best performance of QPSOZ. In order to verify the capability of the proposed method, two case studies are also presented showing that significant cost reductions are feasible with respect to traditionally designed exchangers. Referring to the literature test cases, reduction of capital investment up to 20% and 6% for the first and second cases, respectively, were obtained. Therefore, the annual pumping cost decreased markedly 72% and 75%, with an overall decrease of total cost up to 30% and 27%, respectively, for the cases 1 and 2, respectively, showing the improvement potential of the proposed method, QPSOZ. - Highlights: ► Shell and tube heat exchanger is minimized from economic view point. ► A new quantum particle swarm optimization (QPSO) combined with Zaslavskii chaotic map sequences (QPSOZ) is proposed. ► Reduction of capital investment up to 20% and 6% for the first and second cases was obtained. ► Annual pumping cost decreased 72% and 75%, with an overall decrease of total cost up to 30% and 27% using QPSOZ.

  20. Performance and heat release analysis of a pilot-ignited natural gas engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, S.R.; Biruduganti, M.; Mo, Y.; Bell, S.R.; Midkiff, K.C. [Alabama Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The influence of engine operating variables on the performance, emissions and heat release in a compression ignition engine operating in normal diesel and dual-fuel modes (with natural gas fuelling) was investigated. Substantial reductions in NO{sub x} emissions were obtained with dual-fuel engine operation. There was a corresponding increase in unburned hydrocarbon emissions as the substitution of natural gas was increased. Brake specific energy consumption decreased with natural gas substitution at high loads but increased at low loads. Experimental results at fixed pilot injection timing have also established the importance of intake manifold pressure and temperature in improving dual-fuel performance and emissions at part load. (Author)

  1. Energy efficiency of gas engine driven heat pumps for heating and cooling applications; Energieeffizienter Einsatz von Gasmotorwaermepumpen fuer Heiz- und Kuehlanwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Juergen [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungstechnik und Thermodynamik

    2012-11-15

    Heat pumps are gaining in importance for a sustainable and ecological heat supply. Gas engine driven systems can contribute to a decentralized energy supply by power heat cogeneration. In the paper, a pilot plant, which offers high energy efficiency by simultaneous use of the heat of evaporation and condensation, is presented. The plant permits the testing of different operating modes and obtains high values above three for the primary energy ratio. (orig.)

  2. Second law analysis of a diesel engine waste heat recovery with a combined sensible and latent heat storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandiyarajan, V.; Chinnappandian, M.; Raghavan, V.; Velraj, R.

    2011-01-01

    The exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine carries away about 30% of the heat of combustion. The energy available in the exit stream of many energy conversion devices goes as waste. The major technical constraint that prevents successful implementation of waste heat recovery is due to intermittent and time mismatched demand for and availability of energy. The present work deals with the use of exergy as an efficient tool to measure the quantity and quality of energy extracted from a diesel engine and stored in a combined sensible and latent heat storage system. This analysis is utilized to identify the sources of losses in useful energy within the components of the system considered, and provides a more realistic and meaningful assessment than the conventional energy analysis. The energy and exergy balance for the overall system is quantified and illustrated using energy and exergy flow diagrams. In order to study the discharge process in a thermal storage system, an illustrative example with two different cases is considered and analyzed, to quantify the destruction of exergy associated with the discharging process. The need for promoting exergy analysis through policy decision in the context of energy and environment crisis is also emphasized. - Highlights: → WHR with TES system eliminates the mismatch between the supply of energy and demand. → A saving of 15.2% of energy and 1.6% of exergy is achieved with PCM storage. → Use of multiple PCMs with cascaded system increases energy and exergy efficiency.

  3. The Little Heat Engine: Heat Transfer in Solids, Liquids and Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an introductory exposition of the laws of thermodynamics and radiative heat transfer is presented while exploring the concepts of the ideal solid, the lattice, and the vibrational, translational, and rotational degrees of freedom. Analysis of heat transfer in this manner helps scientists to recognize that the laws of thermal radiation are strictly applicable only to the ideal solid. On the Earth, such a solid is best represented by either graphite or soot. Indeed, certain forms of graphite can approach perfect absorption over a relatively large frequency range. Nonetheless, in dealing with heat, solids will eventually sublime or melt. Similarly, liquids will give way to the gas phase. That thermal conductivity eventually decreases in the solid signals an inability to further dissipate heat and the coming breakdown of Planck’s law. Ultimately, this breakdown is reflected in the thermal emission of gases. Interestingly, total gaseous emissivity can de- crease with increasing temperature. Consequently, neither solids, liquids, or gases can maintain the behavior predicted by the laws of thermal emission. Since the laws of thermal emission are, in fact, not universal, the extension of these principles to non-solids constitutes a serious overextension of the work of Kirchhoff, Wien, Stefan and Planck.

  4. The influence of engine speed and load on the heat transfer between gases and in-cylinder walls at fired and motored conditions of an IDI diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanli, Ali; Ozsezen, Ahmet N.; Kilicaslan, Ibrahim; Canakci, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the heat transfer characteristics between gases and in-cylinder walls at fired and motored conditions in a diesel engine were investigated by using engine data obtained experimentally. For this investigation, a four-cylinder, indirect injection (IDI) diesel engine was tested under different engine speeds and loads. The heat transfer coefficient was calculated by using Woschni expression correlated for the IDI diesel engines, and also using Annand and Hohenberg expressions. The temperature of in-cylinder gases were determined from a basic model based on the first law of thermodynamics after measuring in-cylinder pressure experimentally. The results show that the heat transfer characteristics of the IDI diesel engine strongly depend on the engine speed and load as a function of crank angle at fired and motored conditions

  5. The influence of engine speed and load on the heat transfer between gases and in-cylinder walls at fired and motored conditions of an IDI diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanli, Ali; Kilicaslan, Ibrahim [Department of Mechanical Education, Kocaeli University, 41380 Izmit (Turkey); Ozsezen, Ahmet N.; Canakci, Mustafa [Department of Mechanical Education, Kocaeli University, 41380 Izmit (Turkey); Alternative Fuels R and D Center, Kocaeli University, 41040 Izmit (Turkey)

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the heat transfer characteristics between gases and in-cylinder walls at fired and motored conditions in a diesel engine were investigated by using engine data obtained experimentally. For this investigation, a four-cylinder, indirect injection (IDI) diesel engine was tested under different engine speeds and loads. The heat transfer coefficient was calculated by using Woschni expression correlated for the IDI diesel engines, and also using Annand and Hohenberg expressions. The temperature of in-cylinder gases were determined from a basic model based on the first law of thermodynamics after measuring in-cylinder pressure experimentally. The results show that the heat transfer characteristics of the IDI diesel engine strongly depend on the engine speed and load as a function of crank angle at fired and motored conditions. (author)

  6. Brayton cycle for internal combustion engine exhaust gas waste heat recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Galindo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An average passenger car engine effectively uses about one-third of the fuel combustion energy, while the two-thirds are wasted through exhaust gases and engine cooling. It is of great interest to automotive industry to recover some of this wasted energy, thus increasing the engine efficiency and lowering fuel consumption and contamination. Waste heat recovery for internal combustion engine exhaust gases using Brayton cycle machine was investigated. The principle problems of application of such a system in a passenger car were considered: compressor and expander machine selection, machine size for packaging under the hood, efficiency of the cycle, and improvement of engine efficiency. Important parameters of machines design have been determined and analyzed. An average 2-L turbocharged gasoline engine’s New European Driving Cycle points were taken as inlet points for waste heat recovery system. It is theoretically estimated that the recuperated power of 1515 W can be achieved along with 5.7% improvement in engine efficiency, at the point where engine power is 26550 W.

  7. Experimental characterization of mass, work and heat flows in an air cooled, single cylinder engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Blanco, H.

    2004-01-01

    Small air cooled engines, although large in numbers, receive scant attention in the literature. Experimental data for a four stroke, air cooled, single cylinder engine are presented in this report. Air to fuel ratios, indicated and output power, exhaust composition and heat loss are determined to result in suitable thermal and mechanical efficiencies. The data obtained are discussed with the perspective obtained from other literature references. Exhaust composition figures appear reasonable, but the measurement of the transient exhaust flows is still a concern. Based on the measurements, a graph illustrating the different energy transformations in the engine is produced. Undergraduate students in the curriculum routinely use the engine and the present work allows one to conclude that the measurement approach produces reasonable results. These results could be used by engine modelers and others interested in this wide field of technology

  8. Identifying Student Difficulties with Entropy, Heat Engines, and the Carnot Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Trevor I.; Christensen, Warren M.; Mountcastle, Donald B.; Thompson, John R.

    2015-01-01

    We report on several specific student difficulties regarding the second law of thermodynamics in the context of heat engines within upper-division undergraduate thermal physics courses. Data come from ungraded written surveys, graded homework assignments, and videotaped classroom observations of tutorial activities. Written data show that students…

  9. Integrated energy and emission management for heavy-duty diesel engines with waste heat recovery system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Kupper, F.; Rascanu, G.; Feru, E.

    2015-01-01

    Rankine-cycleWasteHeatRecovery (WHR)systems are promising solutions to reduce fuel consumption for trucks. Due to coupling between engine andWHR system, control of these complex systems is challenging. This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI Diesel

  10. Integrated energy and emission management for diesel engines with waste heat recovery using dynamic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Kupper, F.; Rascanu, G.C.; Feru, E.

    2015-01-01

    Rankine-cycle Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) systems are promising solutions to reduce fuel consumption for trucks. Due to coupling between engine and WHR system, control of these complex systems is challenging. This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI

  11. Integrated Energy & Emission Management for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines with Waste Heat Recovery System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Kupper, F.; Cloudt, R.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI diesel engine with Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue

  12. Control of a waste heat recovery system with decoupled expander for improved diesel engine efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Willems, F.P.T.; Jager, de A.G.; Steinbuch, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a switching Model Predictive Control strategy is proposed for a Waste Heat Recovery system in heavy-duty automotive application. The objective is to maximize the WHR system output power while satisfying the output constraints under highly dynamic engine variations. For control design,

  13. Surface engineering glass-metal coatings designed for induction heating of ceramic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2014-01-01

    The term Surface Engineering is of relatively recent origin and use, however, the use of coatings and treatments to render surfaces of materials more suitable for certain application or environment is not new. With the advent of Vacuum Technology, Surface Engineering has gained a whole new impetus, whereby expensive materials with adequate mechanical, chemical and thermal properties are being coated or treated on their surfaces in order to achieve what is called as Surface Engineered materials. The present paper presents an overview of recent achievements in Surface Engineering and gives a detailed view of a specific application where glass-metal composite coatings were deposited on ceramic components in order to render them sensitive to induction heating. Sintered glaze coatings containing silver particles in appropriate concentration can be used for the induction heating of porcelain. Mixtures of glass ceramic powders with silver are used to prepare self-transfer patterns, which are deposited over porcelain. Several configurations of these coatings, which are aesthetic to start with, are employed and heating patterns are recorded. The microstructure of these coatings is discussed in relation to the heating ability by a classical household induction system. The results show that this technique is practical and commercially viable

  14. Supervisory control of a heavy-duty diesel engine with an electrified waste heat recovery system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Murgovski, N.; de Jager, A.G.; Willems, F.P.T.

    This paper presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy, called Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC), for an Euro-VI diesel engine with an electrified waste heat recovery system. This strategy optimizes the CO2–NOxCO2–NOx trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with

  15. Integrated energy and emission management for heavy-duty diesel engines with waste heat recovery system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Kupper, F.; Cloudt, R.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI diesel engine with Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue

  16. Biodiesel From waste cooking oil for heating, lighting, or running diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico O. Cruz

    2009-01-01

    Biodiesel and its byproducts and blends can be used as alternative fuel in diesel engines and for heating, cooking, and lighting. A simple process of biodiesel production can utilize waste cooking oil as the main feedstock to the transesterification and cruzesterification processes. I currently make my own biodiesel for applications related to my nursery and greenhouse...

  17. Review of organic Rankine cycles for internal combustion engine exhaust waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprouse, Charles; Depcik, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Escalating fuel prices and future carbon dioxide emission limits are creating a renewed interest in methods to increase the thermal efficiency of engines beyond the limit of in-cylinder techniques. One promising mechanism that accomplishes both objectives is the conversion of engine waste heat to a more useful form of energy, either mechanical or electrical. This paper reviews the history of internal combustion engine exhaust waste heat recovery focusing on Organic Rankine Cycles since this thermodynamic cycle works well with the medium-grade energy of the exhaust. Selection of the cycle expander and working fluid are the primary focus of the review, since they are regarded as having the largest impact on system performance. Results demonstrate a potential fuel economy improvement around 10% with modern refrigerants and advancements in expander technology. -- Highlights: ► This review article focuses on engine exhaust waste heat recovery works. ► The organic Rankine cycle is superior for low to medium exergy heat sources. ► Working fluid and expander selection strongly influence efficiency. ► Several authors demonstrate viable systems for vehicle installation

  18. Effects of heating energy and heating position on the conversion characteristics of the catalyst of a four-stroke motorcycle engine in cold start conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, R.-F.; Chou, H.-M.; Hsu, T.-C.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of heating energy and heating position on the conversion efficiency of an electrically heated catalyst of a four stroke motorcycle engine under cold start conditions were investigated in this study. In general, during cold start, the operating temperatures of a four stroke motorcycle engine and its catalyst would not be optimized. It was found in this paper that by applying heat to the catalyst however, the reaction of the catalyst could be promoted, which, consequently, improved the conversion efficiency. The experimented parameters were heating energy, heating position, heating temperature and the carbon monoxide (CO) setting level. The heating temperatures included 100, 140 and 180 deg. C, while three different heating powers and six different heating positions were used. The CO levels were set as 1.0%, 1.8% and 2.3%. The best CO conversion efficiency was obtained by applying heating at the inlet of the catalyst. It was revealed that a high heating power induced a high temperature rising rate and, consequently, a high CO conversion efficiency. In terms of energy economy efficiency, however, heating at the mid-section of the catalyst gave the best results and through a relatively low heating power

  19. 3 kW Stirling engine for power and heat production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Jan Eric; Bovin, Jonas Kabell; Carlsen, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    A new 3 kW Beta-type Stirling engine has been developed. The engine uses natural gas as fuel and is designed for use as a small combined heat and power plant for single family houses. The electrical power is supplied to the grid. The engine is made as a hermetic device, where the crank mechanism...... and the alternator are built into a pressurized crank casing. The engine produces 3 kW of shaft power corresponding to 2.4 kW of electric power. The heat input is 10 kW representing a shaft efficiency of 30% and an electric efficiency of 24%. Helium at 8 MPa mean pressure is used as the working gas. The crank...... for X-heads. A grease-lubricated needle and ball bearings are used in the kinematic crank mechanism. The burner includes an air preheater and a water jacket which makes it possible to utilize nearly all of the heat from the combustion gases. The performance of the engine has been tested as a function...

  20. Stack Parameters Effect on the Performance of Anharmonic Resonator Thermoacoustic Heat Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Nouh, Mostafa A.

    2014-01-01

    A thermoacoustic heat engine (TAHE) converts heat into acoustic power with no moving parts. It exhibits several advantages over traditional engines, such as simple design, stable functionality, and environment-friendly working gas. In order to further improve the performance of TAHE, stack parameters need to be optimized. Stack\\'s position, length and plate spacing are the three main parameters that have been investigated in this study. Stack\\'s position dictates both the efficiency and the maximum produced acoustic power of the heat engine. Positioning the stack closer to the pressure anti-node might ensure high efficiency on the expense of the maximum produced acoustic power. It is noticed that the TAHE efficiency can further be improved by spacing the plates of the stack at a value of 2.4 of the thermal penetration depth, δk . Changes in the stack length will not affect the efficiency much as long as the temperature gradient across the stack, as a ratio of the critical temperature gradient ψ is more than 1. Upon interpreting the effect of these variations, attempts are made towards reaching the engine\\'s most powerful operating point.

  1. Membrane-based osmotic heat engine with organic solvent for enhanced power generation from low-grade heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaulsky, Evyatar; Boo, Chanhee; Lin, Shihong; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-05-05

    We present a hybrid osmotic heat engine (OHE) system that uses draw solutions with an organic solvent for enhanced thermal separation efficiency. The hybrid OHE system produces sustainable energy by combining pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) as a power generation stage and membrane distillation (MD) utilizing low-grade heat as a separation stage. While previous OHE systems employed aqueous electrolyte draw solutions, using methanol as a solvent is advantageous because methanol is highly volatile and has a lower heat capacity and enthalpy of vaporization than water. Hence, the thermal separation efficiency of a draw solution with methanol would be higher than that of an aqueous draw solution. In this study, we evaluated the performance of LiCl-methanol as a potential draw solution for a PRO-MD hybrid OHE system. The membrane transport properties as well as performance with LiCl-methanol draw solution were evaluated using thin-film composite (TFC) PRO membranes and compared to the results obtained with a LiCl-water draw solution. Experimental PRO methanol flux and maximum projected power density of 47.1 L m(-2) h(-1) and 72.1 W m(-2), respectively, were achieved with a 3 M LiCl-methanol draw solution. The overall efficiency of the hybrid OHE system was modeled by coupling the mass and energy flows between the thermal separation (MD) and power generation (PRO) stages under conditions with and without heat recovery. The modeling results demonstrate higher OHE energy efficiency with the LiCl-methanol draw solution compared to that with the LiCl-water draw solution under practical operating conditions (i.e., heat recovery<90%). We discuss the implications of the results for converting low-grade heat to power.

  2. Membrane-Based Osmotic Heat Engine with Organic Solvent for Enhanced Power Generation from Low-Grade Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaulsky, E; Boo, C; Lin, SH; Elimelech, M

    2015-05-05

    We present a hybrid osmotic heat engine (OHE) system that uses draw solutions with an organic solvent for enhanced thermal separation efficiency. The hybrid OHE system produces sustainable energy by combining pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) as a power generation stage and membrane distillation (MD) utilizing low-grade heat as a separation stage. While previous OHE systems employed aqueous electrolyte draw solutions, using methanol as a solvent is advantageous because methanol is highly volatile and has a lower heat capacity and enthalpy of vaporization than water. Hence, the thermal separation efficiency of a draw solution with methanol would be higher than that of an aqueous draw solution. In this study, we evaluated the performance of LiCl-methanol as a potential draw solution for a PRO-MD hybrid OHE system. The membrane transport properties as well as performance with LiCl methanol draw solution were evaluated using thin-film composite (TFC) PRO membranes and compared to the results obtained with a LiCl water draw solution. Experimental PRO methanol flux and maximum projected power density of 47.1 L m(-2) h(-1) and 72.1 W m(-2), respectively, were achieved with a 3 M LiCl-methanol draw solution. The overall efficiency of the hybrid OHE system was modeled by coupling the mass and energy flows between the thermal separation (MD) and power generation (PRO) stages under conditions with and without heat recovery. The modeling results demonstrate higher ORE energy efficiency with the LiCl methanol draw solution compared to that with the LiCl water draw solution under practical operating conditions (i.e., heat recovery <90%). We discuss the implications of the results for converting low-grade heat to power.

  3. Engineering a Robust Quantum Spin Hall State in Graphene via Adatom Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conan Weeks

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The 2007 discovery of quantized conductance in HgTe quantum wells delivered the field of topological insulators (TIs its first experimental confirmation. While many three-dimensional TIs have since been identified, HgTe remains the only known two-dimensional system in this class. Difficulty fabricating HgTe quantum wells has, moreover, hampered their widespread use. With the goal of breaking this logjam, we provide a blueprint for stabilizing a robust TI state in a more readily available two-dimensional material—graphene. Using symmetry arguments, density functional theory, and tight-binding simulations, we predict that graphene endowed with certain heavy adatoms realizes a TI with substantial band gap. For indium and thallium, our most promising adatom candidates, a modest 6% coverage produces an estimated gap near 80 K and 240 K, respectively, which should be detectable in transport or spectroscopic measurements. Engineering such a robust topological phase in graphene could pave the way for a new generation of devices for spintronics, ultra-low-dissipation electronics, and quantum information processing.

  4. Microwave-mediated heat transport in a quantum dot attached to leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Feng; Dubi, Yonatan

    2012-01-01

    The thermoelectric effect in a quantum dot (QD) attached to two leads in the presence of microwave fields is studied by using the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green function technique. When the microwave is applied only on the QD and in the linear response regime, the main peaks in the thermoelectric figure of merit and the thermopower are found to decrease, with the emergence of a set of photon-induced peaks. Under this condition the microwave field cannot generate heat current or electrical bias voltage. Surprisingly, when the microwave field is applied only to one (bright) lead and not to the other (dark) lead or the QD, heat flows mostly from the dark to the bright lead, almost irrespective of the direction of the thermal gradient. We attribute this effect to microwave-induced opening of additional transport channels below the Fermi energy. The microwave field can change both the magnitude and the sign of the electrical bias voltage induced by the temperature gradient. (paper)

  5. Modeling and Control of a Parallel Waste Heat Recovery System for Euro-VI Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Willems, F.P.T.; Jager, B. de; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling and control of a waste heat recovery system for a Euro-VI heavy-duty truck engine. The considered waste heat recovery system consists of two parallel evaporators with expander and pumps mechanically coupled to the engine crankshaft. Compared to previous work, the

  6. Modeling and control of a parallel waste heat recovery system for Euro-VI heavy-duty diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Willems, F.P.T.; Jager, de A.G.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling and control of a waste heat recovery systemfor a Euro-VI heavy-duty truck engine. The considered waste heat recovery system consists of two parallel evaporators with expander and pumps mechanically coupled to the engine crankshaft. Compared to previous work, the

  7. Comparative study of different exhaust heat exchangers effect on the performance and exergy analysis of a diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatami, M.; Boot, M.D.; Ganji, D.D.; Gorji-Bandpy, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the effect of three designed heat exchangers on the performance of an OM314 diesel engine and its exergy balance is investigated. Vortex generator heat exchanger (HEX), optimized finned-tube HEX and non-optimized HEX are considered and mounted on the exhaust of diesel engine.

  8. Mode Engineering of Single Photons from Cavity Spontaneous Parametric Down-Conversion Source and Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Uttam

    Over the past decade, much effort has been made in identifying and characterizing systems that can form a building block of quantum networks, among which semiconductor quantum dots (QD) and spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) source are two of the most promising candidates. The work presented in this thesis will be centered on investigating and engineering the mentioned systems for generating customizable single photons. A type-II SPDC source can generate a highly flexible pair of entangled photons that can be used to interface disparate quantum systems. In this thesis, we have successfully implemented a cavity-SPDC source that emits polarization correlated photons at 942 nm with a lifetime of 950-1050ps that mode matches closely with InAs/GaAs QD photons. The source emits 80 photon pairs per second per mW pump power within the 150MHz bandwidth. Though the detection of idler photons, the source is capable of emitting heralded photons with g2?0.5 for up to 40 mW pump power. For a low pump power of 5 mW, the heralded g2 is 0.06, indicating that the system is an excellent heralded single photon source. By directly exciting a single QD with cavity-SPDC photons, we have demonstrated a heralded-absorption of SPDC photons by QD, resulting in the coupling of the two systems. Due to the large pump bandwidth, the emitted source is highly multimode in nature, requiring us to post-filter the downconverted field, resulting in a lower photon pair emission rate. We propose placing an intra-cavity etalon to suppress the multi-mode emissions and increase the photon count rate. Understanding and experimentally implementing two-photon interference (HOM) measurements will be crucial for building a scalable quantum network. A detailed theoretical description of HOM measurements is given and is experimentally demonstrated using photons emitted by QD. Through HOM measurements we demonstrated that the QD sample in the study is capable of emitting indistinguishable photons, with

  9. Elastic strain engineering of quantum dot excitonic emission in nanomembranes and optical resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Fei; Plumhof, Johannes; Rastelli, Armando; Schmidt, Oliver [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden (Germany); Singh, Ranber; Zander, Tim; Bester, Gabriel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We study the effect of an external biaxial stress on the light emission of single InGaAs/GaAs(001) quantum dots (QD) embedded in a 200 nm-thick-membrane. Reversible and bi-directional spectral tuning of QD excitonic emission is demonstrated via a simple electro-mechanical device. The most intriguing finding is that biaxial strain is a reliable tool to engineer the QD electronic structure and reach color coincidence between exciton and biexciton emission, providing a vital prerequisite for the generation of polarization entangled photon pairs through a time reordering strategy. The physical origin of this new phenomenon is discussed based on the empirical pseudopotential calculations. With similar technique we study the effect of biaxial stress on single QDs embedded in microring resonators. The microrings can be reversibly stretched or squeezed, resulting in a controllable engineering of both QD emissions and optical modes. Our results open up a new tuning strategy to study cQED with semiconductor quantum dots.

  10. Two Quantum Polytropic Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Hernández, L. A.; Morales-Serrano, A. F.

    2002-11-01

    In this work we follow the Bender et al paper [1] to study the quantum analogues of the Stirling and Ericsson polytropic cycles. In the context of the classical thermodynamics, the Stirling and Ericsson cycles correspond to reversible heat engines with two isothermal processes joined by two polytropic branches which occur in a device called regenerator. If this device is an ideal one, the efficiency of these cycles is the Carnot efficiency. Here, we introduce the quantum analogues of the Stirling and Ericsson cycles, the first one based on a double square potential well with a finite potential barrier, since in this system the tunnel effect could be the analogue to the regeneration classical process, therefore the isochoric quantum branches would really correspond to an internal energy storage, and the last one with an unknown system where the isobaric quantum processes don't induce changes in its quantum state. With these systems the quantum engines have cycles consisting of polytropic and isothermal quantum processes analogues to the corresponding classical processes. We show that in both cases the quantum cycles have an efficiency given by ηCQM = 1 - EC/EH, which is the same expression for the quantum analogue of the Carnot cycle studied by Bender.

  11. Waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines by exhaust-driven Brayton cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of Bryton Bottoming Systems (BBS) as waste heat recovery devices for future adiabatic diesel engines in heavy duty trucks is presented. Parametric studies were performed to evaluate the influence of external and internal design parameters on BBS performance. Conceptual design and trade-off studies were undertaken to estimate the optimum configuration, size, and cost of major hardware components. The potential annual fuel savings of long-haul trucks equipped with BBS were estimated. The addition of a BBS to a turbocharged, nonaftercooled adiabatic engine would improve fuel economy by as much as 12%. In comparison with an aftercooled, turbocompound engine, the BBS-equipped turbocharged engine would offer a 4.4% fuel economy advantage. If installed in tandem with an aftercooled turbocompound engine, the BBS could effect a 7.2% fuel economy improvement. The cost of a mass-produced 38 Bhp BBS is estimated at about $6460 or 170/Bhp. Technical and economic barriers that hinder the commercial introduction of bottoming systems were identified. Related studies in the area of waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines and NASA-CR-168255 (Steam Rankine) and CR-168256 (Organic Rankine).

  12. Studies of dynamic contact of ceramics and alloys for advanced heat engines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaydos, P.A.; Dufrane, K.F. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Advanced materials and coatings for low heat rejection engines have been investigated for almost a decade. Much of the work has concentrated on the critical wear interface between the piston ring and cylinder liner. Simplified bench tests have identified families of coatings with high temperature wear performance that could meet or exceed that of conventional engine materials at today`s operating temperatures. More recently, engine manufacturers have begun to optimize material combinations and manufacturing processes so that the materials not only have promising friction and wear performance but are practical replacements for current materials from a materials and manufacturing cost standpoint. In this study, the advanced materials supplied by major diesel engine manufacturers were evaluated in an experimental apparatus that simulates many of the in-cylinder conditions of a low heat rejection diesel engine. Results include ring wear factors and average dynamic friction coefficients measured at intervals during the test. These results are compared with other advanced materials tested in the past as well as the baseline wear of current engines. Both fabricated specimens and sections of actual ring and cylinder liners were used in the testing. Observations and relative friction and wear performance of the individual materials are provided.

  13. An Experimental Investigation on the Combustion and Heat Release Characteristics of an Opposed-Piston Folded-Cranktrain Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukang Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In opposed-piston folded-cranktrain diesel engines, the relative movement rules of opposed-pistons, combustion chamber components and injector position are different from those of conventional diesel engines. The combustion and heat release characteristics of an opposed-piston folded-cranktrain diesel engine under different operating conditions were investigated. Four phases: ignition delay, premixed combustion, diffusion combustion and after combustion are used to describe the heat release process of the engine. Load changing has a small effect on premixed combustion duration while it influences diffusion combustion duration significantly. The heat release process has more significant isochoric and isobaric combustion which differs from the conventional diesel engine situation, except at high exhaust pressure and temperature, due to its two-stroke and uniflow scavenging characteristics. Meanwhile, a relatively high-quality exhaust heat energy is produced in opposed-piston folded-cranktrain diesel engines.

  14. Numerical investigation of two- and three-dimensional heat transfer in expander cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Robert L.; Cheung, Fan-Bill

    1993-01-01

    The concept of using tube canting for enhancing the hot-side convective heat transfer in a cross-stream tubular rocket combustion chamber is evaluated using a CFD technique in this study. The heat transfer at the combustor wall is determined from the flow field generated by a modified version of the PARC Navier-Stokes Code, using the actual dimensions, fluid properties, and design parameters of a split-expander demonstrator cycle engine. The effects of artificial dissipation on convergence and solution accuracy are investigated. Heat transfer results predicted by the code are presented. The use of CFD in heat transfer calculations is critically examined to demonstrate the care needed in the use of artificial dissipation for good convergence and accurate solutions.

  15. Spectral hole-burning and carrier-heating dynamics in InGaAs quantum-dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2000-01-01

    recovery of the spectral hole within ~100 fs is measured, comparable to bulk and quantum-well amplifiers, which is contradicting a carrier relaxation bottleneck in electrically pumped QD devices. The CH dynamics in the QD is quantitatively compared with results on an InGaAsP bulk amplifier. Reduced CH......The ultrafast gain and index dynamics in a set of InAs-InGaAs-GaAs quantum-dot (QD) amplifiers are measured at room temperature with femtosecond resolution. The role of spectral hole-burning (SHB) and carrier heating (CH) in the recovery of gain compression is investigated in detail. An ultrafast...

  16. Measurement improvements of heat flux probes for internal combustion engine; Nainen kikan ni okeru netsuryusokukei no kaihatsu to kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, H; Tasaka, H [Miyazaki University, Miyazaki (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    In heat flux measurement in engines, material properties of a heat flux probe and numerical prediction of those influence have been discussed rather than practical measurement accuracy. This study featured the process for the quantitative examination of heat flux probes. Although the process required direct comparison among all the probes and additional measurements in a constant volume bomb, precision of heat flux measurement was greatly improved so that the essential characteristics of heat transfer in engines can be detected. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Design, calibration and error analysis of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Tree, D. R.; Dewitt, D. P.; Wahiduzzaman, S. A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the methodology and uncertainty analyses of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines. Results are presented for determining the local wall heat flux in an internal combustion engine (using a surface thermocouple-type heat flux gage) and the apparent flame-temperature and soot volume fraction path length product in a diesel engine (using two-color pyrometry). It is shown that a surface thermocouple heat transfer gage suitably constructed and calibrated will have an accuracy of 5 to 10 percent. It is also shown that, when applying two-color pyrometry to measure the apparent flame temperature and soot volume fraction-path length, it is important to choose at least one of the two wavelengths to lie in the range of 1.3 to 2.3 micrometers. Carefully calibrated two-color pyrometer can ensure that random errors in the apparent flame temperature and in the soot volume fraction path length will remain small (within about 1 percent and 10-percent, respectively).

  18. Effects of system-bath coupling on a photosynthetic heat engine: A polaron master-equation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Zhao, X. L.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-07-01

    Stimulated by suggestions of quantum effects in energy transport in photosynthesis, the fundamental principles responsible for the near-unit efficiency of the conversion of solar to chemical energy became active again in recent years. Under natural conditions, the formation of stable charge-separation states in bacteria and plant reaction centers is strongly affected by the coupling of electronic degrees of freedom to a wide range of vibrational motions. These inspire and motivate us to explore the effects of the environment on the operation of such complexes. In this paper, we apply the polaron master equation, which offers the possibilities to interpolate between weak and strong system-bath coupling, to study how system-bath couplings affect the exciton-transfer processes in the Photosystem II reaction center described by a quantum heat engine (QHE) model over a wide parameter range. The effects of bath correlation and temperature, together with the combined effects of these factors are also discussed in detail. We interpret these results in terms of noise-assisted transport effect and dynamical localization, which correspond to two mechanisms underpinning the transfer process in photosynthetic complexes: One is resonance energy transfer and the other is the dynamical localization effect captured by the polaron master equation. The effects of system-bath coupling and bath correlation are incorporated in the effective system-bath coupling strength determining whether noise-assisted transport effect or dynamical localization dominates the dynamics and temperature modulates the balance of the two mechanisms. Furthermore, these two mechanisms can be attributed to one physical origin: bath-induced fluctuations. The two mechanisms are manifestations of the dual role played by bath-induced fluctuations depending on the range of parameters. The origin and role of coherence are also discussed. It is the constructive interplay between noise and coherent dynamics, rather

  19. Nonlinear dynamics analysis of a low-temperature-differential kinematic Stirling heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumida, Yuki

    2018-03-01

    The low-temperature-differential (LTD) Stirling heat engine technology constitutes one of the important sustainable energy technologies. The basic question of how the rotational motion of the LTD Stirling heat engine is maintained or lost based on the temperature difference is thus a practically and physically important problem that needs to be clearly understood. Here, we approach this problem by proposing and investigating a minimal nonlinear dynamic model of an LTD kinematic Stirling heat engine. Our model is described as a driven nonlinear pendulum where the motive force is the temperature difference. The rotational state and the stationary state of the engine are described as a stable limit cycle and a stable fixed point of the dynamical equations, respectively. These two states coexist under a sufficient temperature difference, whereas the stable limit cycle does not exist under a temperature difference that is too small. Using a nonlinear bifurcation analysis, we show that the disappearance of the stable limit cycle occurs via a homoclinic bifurcation, with the temperature difference being the bifurcation parameter.

  20. Stack Parameters Effect on the Performance of Anharmonic Resonator Thermoacoustic Heat Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Nouh, Mostafa A.; Arafa, Nadim M.; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab

    2014-01-01

    A thermoacoustic heat engine (TAHE) converts heat into acoustic power with no moving parts. It exhibits several advantages over traditional engines, such as simple design, stable functionality, and environment-friendly working gas. In order to further improve the performance of TAHE, stack parameters need to be optimized. Stack's position, length and plate spacing are the three main parameters that have been investigated in this study. Stack's position dictates both the efficiency and the maximum produced acoustic power of the heat engine. Positioning the stack closer to the pressure anti-node might ensure high efficiency on the expense of the maximum produced acoustic power. It is noticed that the TAHE efficiency can further be improved by spacing the plates of the stack at a value of 2.4 of the thermal penetration depth, δk . Changes in the stack length will not affect the efficiency much as long as the temperature gradient across the stack, as a ratio of the critical temperature gradient ψ is more than 1. Upon interpreting the effect of these variations, attempts are made towards reaching the engine's most powerful operating point.

  1. HEAT TRANSFER IN EXHAUST SYSTEM OF A COLD START ENGINE AT LOW ENVIRONMENTAL TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana D Petković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the engine cold start, there is a significantly increased emission of harmful engine exhaust gases, particularly at very low environmental temperatures. Therefore, reducing of emission during that period is of great importance for the reduction of entire engine emission. This study was conducted to test the activating speed of the catalyst at low environmental temperatures. The research was conducted by use of mathematical model and developed computer programme for calculation of non-stationary heat transfer in engine exhaust system. During the research, some of constructional parameters of exhaust system were adopted and optimized at environmental temperature of 22 C. The combination of design parameters giving best results at low environmental temperatures was observed. The results showed that the temperature in the environment did not have any significant influence on pre-catalyst light-off time.

  2. Designing a heat pipe to improve the exhaust emissions from petrol engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmabrouk, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The national engineering Laboratory and the Shell research laboratory have co-operated in applying the heat pipe to the problem of exhaust emission from petrol engine. It is known that the carbon monoxide CO, un-burnt hydrocarbons (H x C y ) and oxides of Nitrogen (NO x ) content of the exhaust will vary with air to fuel ratio as shown in figure (1), in a conventional car engine the maximum efficiency is achieved at 15:1 and maximum power is obtained at 12:1. It's known that as the air fuel ratio increases, the CO content decreases and H x C y , NO x go through a minimum and maximum respectively. A considerable important in both CO and NO x content could be chivied by selecting a very weak mixture, but this not possible in a standard engine carburetor system due to the ignition difficulty, because the fuel is not fully vaporized, and because the fuel is not distributed equally between the cylinders and the vapor content is not as high as it should be due to the pressure of liquid fuel. This problem could be solved by designing a heat pipe that can transferring a certain quantities of heat from the exhaust to the induction manifold at the carburetor outlet as shown in figure (2). Under this condition a mixture as lean as 22:1 will ignite with out difficulty. In this paper, a complete design of heat pipe is carried out, taking into account the necessary criteria to decide various geometrical parameters. The design has been carried out using basic formulas in thermodynamics, heat transfer and physics. The result of this design have been checked for various practical limits. (author)

  3. Study of working fluid selection of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, E.H.; Zhang, H.G.; Fan, B.Y.; Ouyang, M.G.; Zhao, Y.; Mu, Q.H.

    2011-01-01

    Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) could be used to recover low-grade waste heat. When a vehicle is running, the engine exhaust gas states have a wide range of variance. Defining the operational conditions of the ORC that achieve the maximum utilization of waste heat is important. In this paper the performance of different working fluids operating in specific regions was analyzed using a thermodynamic model built in Matlab together with REFPROP. Nine different pure organic working fluids were selected according to their physical and chemical properties. The results were compared in the regions when net power outputs were fixed at 10 kW. Safety levels and environmental impacts were also evaluated. The outcomes indicate that R11, R141b, R113 and R123 manifest slightly higher thermodynamic performances than the others; however, R245fa and R245ca are the most environment-friendly working fluids for engine waste heat-recovery applications. The optimal control principle of ORC under the transient process is discussed based on the analytical results. -- Highlights: → R11, R141b, R113 and R123 manifest the best thermodynamic performances. → R245fa and R245ca are the most environment-friendly working fluids for the engine waste heat-recovery application. → The condensing temperature has more important effect than the evaporating pressure to the performance of ORC. → The optimal control principle of ORC under the transient process was defined according to the calculation results for the vehicle engine waste heat-recovery application. → ORC thermodynamic model was built in Matlab together with REFPROP.

  4. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  5. An improved heat transfer configuration for a solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.S.; Walton, J.T.; Mcguire, M.L.

    1992-07-01

    Interrupted flow, impingement cooling, and axial power distribution are employed to enhance the heat-transfer configuration of a solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engine. Impingement cooling is introduced to increase the local heat-transfer coefficients between the reactor material and the coolants. Increased fuel loading is used at the inlet end of the reactor to enhance heat-transfer capability where the temperature differences are the greatest. A thermal-hydraulics computer program for an unfueled NERVA reactor core is employed to analyze the proposed configuration with attention given to uniform fuel loading, number of channels through the impingement wafers, fuel-element length, mass-flow rate, and wafer gap. The impingement wafer concept (IWC) is shown to have heat-transfer characteristics that are better than those of the NERVA-derived reactor at 2500 K. The IWC concept is argued to be an effective heat-transfer configuration for solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engines. 11 refs

  6. A novel cascade organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system for waste heat recovery of truck diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Tao; Zhuge, Weilin; Zhang, Yangjun; Zhang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A confluent cascade expansion ORC (CCE-ORC) system is proposed. • Cyclopentane is considered as the most suitable fluid for this system. • The CCE-ORC system performance under full operating conditions is analyzed. • The BSFC of diesel engine can be reduced by 9.2% with the CCE-ORC system. • Performance comparison of CCE-ORC and dual-loop ORC is conducted. - Abstract: Waste heat recovery (WHR) of engines has attracted increasingly more concerns recently, as it can improve engine thermal efficiency and help truck manufacturers meet the restrictions of CO_2 emission. The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) has been considered as the most potential technology of WHR. To take full advantage of waste heat energy, the waste heat in both exhaust gases and the coolant need to be recovered; however, conventional multi-source ORC systems are too complex for vehicle applications. This paper proposed a confluent cascade expansion ORC (CCE-ORC) system for engine waste heat recovery, which has simpler architecture, a smaller volume and higher efficiency compared with conventional dual-loop ORC systems. Cyclopentane is analyzed to be regarded as the most suitable working fluid for this novel system. A thermodynamic simulation method is established for this system, and off-design performance of main components and the working fluid side pressure drop in the condenser have been taken into consideration. System performance simulations under full engine operating conditions are conducted for the application of this system on a heavy-duty truck diesel engine. Results show that the engine peak thermal efficiency can be improved from 45.3% to 49.5% where the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) decreases from 185.6 g/(kW h) to 169.9 g/(kW h). The average BSFC in the frequently operating region can decrease by 9.2% from 187.9 g/(kW h) to 172.2 g/(kW h). Compared with the conventional dual-loop ORC system, the CCE-ORC system can generate 8% more net power, while the

  7. Heats of formation of phosphorus compounds determined by current methods of computational quantum chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Naomi L.; Bacskay, George B.

    2002-12-01

    The heats of formation of a range of phosphorus containing molecules (P2, P4, PH, PH2, PH3, P2H2, P2H4, PO, PO2, PO3, P2O, P2O2, HPO, HPOH, H2POH, H3PO, HOPO, and HOPO2) have been determined by high level quantum chemical calculations. The equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies were computed via density functional theory, utilizing the B3LYP/6-31G(2df,p) functional and basis set. Atomization energies were obtained by the application of ab initio coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations from (spin)-restricted Hartree-Fock reference states with perturbative correction for triples [CCSD(T)], in conjunction with cc-pVnZ basis sets (n=T, Q, 5) which include an extra d function on the phosphorus atoms and diffuse functions on the oxygens, as recommended by Bauschlicher [J. Phys. Chem. A 103, 11126 (1999)]. The valence correlated atomization energies were extrapolated to the complete basis limit and corrected for core-valence (CV) correlation and scalar relativistic effects, as well as for basis set superposition errors (BSSE) in the CV terms. This methodology is effectively the same as the one adopted by Bauschlicher in his study of PO, PO2, PO3, HPO, HOPO, and HOPO2. Consequently, for these molecules the results of this work closely match Bauschlicher's computed values. The theoretical heats of formation, whose accuracy is estimated as ranging from ±1.0 to ±2.5 kcal mol-1, are consistent with the available experimental data. The current set of theoretical data represent a convenient benchmark, against which the results of other computational procedures, such as G3, G3X, and G3X2, can be compared. Despite the fact that G3X2 [which is an approximation to the quadratic CI procedure QCISD(T,Full)/G3Xlarge] is a formally higher level theory than G3X, the heats of formation obtained by these two methods are found to be of comparable accuracy. Both reproduce the benchmark heats of formation on the average to within ±2 kcal mol-1 and, for these

  8. Quantum Einstein gravity. Advancements of heat kernel-based renormalization group studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, Kai

    2012-10-15

    The asymptotic safety scenario allows to define a consistent theory of quantized gravity within the framework of quantum field theory. The central conjecture of this scenario is the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point of the theory's renormalization group flow, that allows to formulate renormalization conditions that render the theory fully predictive. Investigations of this possibility use an exact functional renormalization group equation as a primary non-perturbative tool. This equation implements Wilsonian renormalization group transformations, and is demonstrated to represent a reformulation of the functional integral approach to quantum field theory. As its main result, this thesis develops an algebraic algorithm which allows to systematically construct the renormalization group flow of gauge theories as well as gravity in arbitrary expansion schemes. In particular, it uses off-diagonal heat kernel techniques to efficiently handle the non-minimal differential operators which appear due to gauge symmetries. The central virtue of the algorithm is that no additional simplifications need to be employed, opening the possibility for more systematic investigations of the emergence of non-perturbative phenomena. As a by-product several novel results on the heat kernel expansion of the Laplace operator acting on general gauge bundles are obtained. The constructed algorithm is used to re-derive the renormalization group flow of gravity in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation, showing the manifest background independence of the results. The well-studied Einstein-Hilbert case is further advanced by taking the effect of a running ghost field renormalization on the gravitational coupling constants into account. A detailed numerical analysis reveals a further stabilization of the found non-Gaussian fixed point. Finally, the proposed algorithm is applied to the case of higher derivative gravity including all curvature squared interactions. This establishes an improvement

  9. Quantum Einstein gravity. Advancements of heat kernel-based renormalization group studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, Kai

    2012-10-01

    The asymptotic safety scenario allows to define a consistent theory of quantized gravity within the framework of quantum field theory. The central conjecture of this scenario is the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point of the theory's renormalization group flow, that allows to formulate renormalization conditions that render the theory fully predictive. Investigations of this possibility use an exact functional renormalization group equation as a primary non-perturbative tool. This equation implements Wilsonian renormalization group transformations, and is demonstrated to represent a reformulation of the functional integral approach to quantum field theory. As its main result, this thesis develops an algebraic algorithm which allows to systematically construct the renormalization group flow of gauge theories as well as gravity in arbitrary expansion schemes. In particular, it uses off-diagonal heat kernel techniques to efficiently handle the non-minimal differential operators which appear due to gauge symmetries. The central virtue of the algorithm is that no additional simplifications need to be employed, opening the possibility for more systematic investigations of the emergence of non-perturbative phenomena. As a by-product several novel results on the heat kernel expansion of the Laplace operator acting on general gauge bundles are obtained. The constructed algorithm is used to re-derive the renormalization group flow of gravity in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation, showing the manifest background independence of the results. The well-studied Einstein-Hilbert case is further advanced by taking the effect of a running ghost field renormalization on the gravitational coupling constants into account. A detailed numerical analysis reveals a further stabilization of the found non-Gaussian fixed point. Finally, the proposed algorithm is applied to the case of higher derivative gravity including all curvature squared interactions. This establishes an improvement of

  10. Engineering for high heat loads on ALS [Advanced Light Source] beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiGennaro, R.; Swain, T.

    1989-08-01

    This paper discussed general thermal engineering problems and specific categories of thermal design issues for high photon flux beam lines at the LBL Advanced Light Source: thermal distortion of optical surfaces and elevated temperatures of thermal absorbers receiving synchrotron radiation. A generic design for water-cooled heat absorbers is described for use with ALS photon shutters, beam defining apertures, and heat absorbing masks. Also, results of in- situ measurements of thermal distortion of a water-cooled mirror in a synchrotron radiation beam line are compared with calculated performance estimates. 17 refs., 2 figs

  11. The universal power and efficiency characteristics for irreversible reciprocating heat engine cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Qin Xiao Yong; Sun Feng Rui; Wu Chih

    2003-01-01

    The performance of irreversible reciprocating heat engine cycles with heat transfer loss and friction-like term loss is analysed using finite-time thermodynamics. The universal relations between the power output and the compression ratio, between the thermal efficiency and the compression ratio, and the optimal relation between power output and the efficiency of the cycles are derived. Moreover, analysis and optimization of the model were carried out in order to investigate the effect of cycle processes on the performance of the cycle using numerical examples. The results obtained herein include the performance characteristics of irreversible reciprocating Diesel, Otto, Atkinson and Brayton cycles.

  12. Engineering Scoping Study of Thermoelectric Generator Systems for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, Terry [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choate, William T. [BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States)

    2006-11-01

    This report evaluates thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems with the intent to: 1) examine industrial processes in order to identify and quantify industrial waste heat sources that could potentially use TEGs; 2) describe the operating environment that a TEG would encounter in selected industrial processes and quantify the anticipated TEG system performance; 3) identify cost, design and/or engineering performance requirements that will be needed for TEGs to operate in the selected industrial processes; and 4) identify the research, development and deployment needed to overcome the limitations that discourage the development and use of TEGs for recovery of industrial waste heat.

  13. Numerical model and investigations of the externally heated valve Joule engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojewoda, Jerzy [University of Aberdeen, School of Engineering, Fraser Noble Bldg, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Kazimierski, Zbyszko [Technical University of Lodz, Institute of Turbomachinery, 219/223 Wolczanska Str., 93-005 Lodz (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    The mineral fuels used recently, i.e., oil and gas, will be soon exploited out. This paper presents an idea of the engine where any fuel or solar heat can be used as a source of energy. The proposed model is an externally heated, 2-stroke, valve engine (EHVE). This is a piston-type engine, entirely different from the well-known Stirling one, which is the best known example of such a solution. It works in a closed Joule cycle and is designed to produce a moderate amount of energy. The engine is composed of typical parts met in piston designs: an expander, a compressor, a heater, a cooler and, additionally, two recirculation blowers, which consume a small amount of produced power. An additional advantage is its working medium, which may be simply atmospheric air and the engine has a conventional crankshaft and an oil lubrication system. It has already been proven that operation of the EHVE is possible with satisfactory power and efficiency at the output. Comparisons of the EHVE action with and without recirculation blowers are performed. (author)

  14. Exhaust gas heat recovery through secondary expansion cylinder and water injection in an internal combustion engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassiri Toosi Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance thermal efficiency and increase performance of an internal combustion engine, a novel concept of coupling a conventional engine with a secondary 4-stroke cylinder and direct water injection process is proposed. The burned gases after working in a traditional 4-stroke combustion cylinder are transferred to a secondary cylinder and expanded even more. After re-compression of the exhaust gases, pre-heated water is injected at top dead center. The evaporation of injected water not only recovers heat from exhaust gases, but also increases the mass of working gas inside the cylinder, therefore improves the overall thermal efficiency. A 0-D/1-D model is used to numerically simulate the idea. The simulations outputs showed that the bottoming cycle will be more efficient at higher engines speeds, specifically in a supercharged/turbocharged engine, which have higher exhaust gas pressure that can reproduce more positive work. In the modeled supercharged engine, results showed that brake thermal efficiency can be improved by about 17%, and brake power by about 17.4%.

  15. Estimation of instantaneous heat transfer coefficients for a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. M.; Addy, H. E.; Bond, T. H.; Chun, K. S.; Lu, C. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The main objective of this report was to derive equations to estimate heat transfer coefficients in both the combustion chamber and coolant pasage of a rotary engine. This was accomplished by making detailed temperature and pressure measurements in a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine under a range of conditions. For each sppecific measurement point, the local physical properties of the fluids were calculated. Then an empirical correlation of the coefficients was derived by using a multiple regression program. This correlation expresses the Nusselt number as a function of the Prandtl number and Reynolds number.

  16. In Situ Passivation for Efficient PbS Quantum Dot Solar Cells by Precursor Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjie; Lu, Kunyuan; Han, Lu; Liu, Zeke; Shi, Guozheng; Fang, Honghua; Chen, Si; Wu, Tian; Yang, Fan; Gu, Mengfan; Zhou, Sijie; Ling, Xufeng; Tang, Xun; Zheng, Jiawei; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Ma, Wanli

    2018-04-01

    Current efforts on lead sulfide quantum dot (PbS QD) solar cells are mostly paid to the device architecture engineering and postsynthetic surface modification, while very rare work regarding the optimization of PbS synthesis is reported. Here, PbS QDs are successfully synthesized using PbO and PbAc 2  · 3H 2 O as the lead sources. QD solar cells based on PbAc-PbS have demonstrated a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 10.82% (and independently certificated values of 10.62%), which is significantly higher than the PCE of 9.39% for PbO-PbS QD based ones. For the first time, systematic investigations are carried out on the effect of lead precursor engineering on the device performance. It is revealed that acetate can act as an efficient capping ligands together with oleic acid, providing better surface coverage and replace some of the harmful hydroxyl (OH) ligands during the synthesis. Then the acetate on the surface can be exchanged by iodide and lead to desired passivation. This work demonstrates that the precursor engineering has great potential in performance improvement. It is also pointed out that the initial synthesis is an often neglected but critical stage and has abundant room for optimization to further improve the quality of the resultant QDs, leading to breakthrough efficiency. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Efficient protocols for Stirling heat engines at the micro-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo; Schwieger, Kay

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic efficiency of sub-micro-scale Stirling heat engines operating under the conditions described by overdamped stochastic thermodynamics. We show how to construct optimal protocols such that at maximum power the efficiency attains for constant isotropic mobility the universal law η=2 ηC/(4-ηC) , where ηC is the efficiency of an ideal Carnot cycle. We show that these protocols are specified by the solution of an optimal mass transport problem. Such solution can be determined explicitly using well-known Monge-Ampère-Kantorovich reconstruction algorithms. Furthermore, we show that the same law describes the efficiency of heat engines operating at maximum work over short time periods. Finally, we illustrate the straightforward extension of these results to cases when the mobility is anisotropic and temperature dependent.

  18. Novel thermoenvironmental evaluation criteria and comparing them for an actual heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özel, Gülcan; Açıkkalp, Emin; Savaş, Ahmet Fevzi; Yamık, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An irreversible Carnot cycle is considered. • Novel thermoenvironmental criteria are presented. • Calculation are conducted for irreversible cycles. • Numerical results are presented and discussed. - Abstract: In the present study, environmental impact analysis is used for the optimization to an actual heat engine. Four new thermoenvironmental evaluation criteria called as thermoenvironmental function, ecological based thermoenvironmental function, ecologicoenvironmental function and finite time exergoenvironmental criteria are developed and compared with the each other. Ecologicoenvironmental function is used to determine environmental impact at the maximum ecological function. It is defined as the most suitable criteria for an actual heat engine. Because, it has lower irreversibilities compared with others, its work output is equal to 90% of the maximum work and 60% energy efficiency at the optimum point and exergy destruction is lower than others at the optimum point.

  19. Energy Management of a Hybrid-Power Gas Engine-Driven Heat Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingkun Meng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid-power gas engine-driven heat pump (HPGHP combines hybrid power technology with a gas engine heat pump. The engine in the power system is capable of operating constantly with high thermal efficiency and low emissions during different operating modes. In this paper, the mathematical models of various components is established, including the engine thermal efficiency map and the motor efficiency map. The comprehensive charging/discharging efficiency model and energy management optimization strategy model which is proposed to maximize the efficiency of instantaneous HPGHP system are established. Then, different charging/discharging torque limits are obtained. Finally, a novel gas engine economical zone control strategy which combined with the SOC of battery in real time is put forward. The main operating parameters of HPGHP system under energy management are simulated by Matlab/Simulink and validated by experimental data, such as engine and motor operating torque, fuel consumption rate and comprehensive efficiency, etc. The results show that during 3600 s’ run-time, the SOC value of battery packs varies between 0.58 and 0.705, the fuel consumption rate reaches minimum values of approximately 291.3 g/(kW h when the compressor speed is nearly 1550 rpm in mode D, the engine thermal efficiency and comprehensive efficiency reach maximum values of approximately 0.2727 and 0.2648 when the compressor speed is 1575 rpm and 1475 rpm, respectively, in mode D. In general, the motor efficiency can be maintained above 0.85 in either mode.

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of an in-cylinder waste heat recovery system for internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Sipeng; Deng, Kangyao; Qu, Shuan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an in-cylinder waste heat recovery system especially for turbocharged engines is proposed to improve the thermal efficiencies of internal combustion engines. Simplified recovery processes can be described as follows: superheated steam generated by engine waste heat is injected into the pipe before the turbine to increase the boost pressure of the fresh air; intake valve close timing is adjusted to control the amount of fresh air as the original level, and thus the higher pressure charged air expands in the intake stroke and transfers the pressure energy directly to the crankshaft. In this way, the increased turbine output by the pre-turbine steam injection is finally recovered in the cylinder, which is different from the traditional Rankine cycle. The whole energy transfer processes are studied with thermodynamic analyses and numerical simulations. The results show that the mass flow rate of the injected steam has the biggest influence on the energy transfer processes followed by the temperature of the injected steam. With this in-cylinder waste heat recovery system, the fuel economy of a selected turbocharged diesel engine can be improved by 3.2% at the rated operating point when the injected mass flow ratio is set to be 0.1. - Highlights: • An in-cylinder waste heat recovery system is proposed. • Effects of injected parameters are studied with energy and exergy balance theories. • Variations of operating points on the compressor map are studied in detail. • The fuel economy is improved by 3.2% at the rated operating point

  1. Heat transfer modeling in exhaust systems of high-performance two-stroke engines

    OpenAIRE

    Lujan Martinez, José Manuel; Climent Puchades, Héctor; Olmeda González, Pablo Cesar; JIMENEZ MACEDO, VICTOR DANIEL

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from the hot gases to the wall in exhaust systems of high-performance two-stroke engines is underestimated using steady state with fully developed flow empirical correlations. This fact is detected when comparing measured and modeled pressure pulses in different positions in the exhaust system. This can be explained taking into account that classical expressions have been validated for fully developed flows, a situation that is far from the flow behavior in reciprocating interna...

  2. Implementing CDIO project-based learning in training of Heat and Power engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, E. A.; Shishmarev, P. V.; Karabarin, D. I.; Yanov, S. R.; Pikalova, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the experience and current results of CDIO standards implementation in training of bachelors in Heat and Power Engineering at Thermal Power Stations academic department in Siberian Federal University. It provides information on methodology of modernization of educational programs, curricula and programs of disciplines in transition to CDIO project-based learning technology. Preliminary assessment and analysis of lessons learned and scaling perspectives are given.

  3. Modelling of the heat load in the piston of turbo diesel engine - continuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr GUSTOF

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the mathematical description of characteristic surfaces of the heat exchange of the piston and temperature distribution of the turbo diesel engine at the beginning phase its work was presented. The computations were performed by means of the two-zone combustion model, the boundary conditions of III kind and the finite elements method (MES by using of COSMOS/M program.

  4. Effect of heat stress on contractility of tissue-engineered artificial skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shunya; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Fujisato, Toshia

    2018-01-23

    The effects of heat stress on tissue like skeletal muscle have been widely studied. However, the mechanism responsible for the effect of heat stress is still unclear. A useful experimental tissue model is necessary because muscle function in cell culture may differ from native muscle and measuring its contractility is difficult. We previously reported three-dimensional tissue-engineered artificial skeletal muscle (TEM) that can be easily set in a measurement apparatus for quantitative evaluation of contractility. We have now applied TEM to the investigation of heat stress. We analyzed contractility immediately after thermal exposure at 39 °C for 24 or 48 h to evaluate the acute effects and after thermal exposure followed by normal culture to evaluate the aftereffects. Peak twitch contractile force and time-to-peak twitch were used as contractile parameters. Heat stress increased the TCF in the early stage (1 week) after normal culture; the TCF decreased temporarily in the middle to late stages (2-3 weeks). These results suggest that heat stress may affect both myoblast fusion and myotube differentiation in the early stage of TEM culture, but not myotube maturation in the late stage. The TCF increase rate with thermal exposure was significantly higher than that without thermal exposure. Although detailed analysis at the molecular level is necessary for further investigation, our artificial skeletal muscle may be a promising tool for heat stress investigation.

  5. Ecological optimization and performance study of irreversible Stirling and Ericsson heat engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, S K; Kaushik, S C; Salhotra, R

    2002-01-01

    The concept of finite time thermodynamics is used to determine the ecological function of irreversible Stirling and Ericsson heat engine cycles. The ecological function is defined as the power output minus power loss (irreversibility), which is the ambient temperature times, the entropy generation rate. The ecological function is maximized with respect to cycle temperature ratio and the expressions for the corresponding power output and thermal efficiency are derived at the optimal operating conditions. The effect of different operating parameters, the effectiveness on the hot, cold and the regenerative side heat exchangers, the cycle temperature ratio, heat capacitance ratio and the internal irreversibility parameter on the maximum ecological function are studied. It is found that the effect of regenerator effectiveness is more than the hot and cold side heat exchangers and the effect of the effectiveness on cold side heat exchanger is more than the effectiveness on the hot side heat exchanger on the maximum ecological function. It is also found that the effect of internal irreversibility parameter is more than the other parameters not only on the maximum ecological function but also on the corresponding power output and the thermal efficiency

  6. Ecological optimization and performance study of irreversible Stirling and Ericsson heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, S. K.; Kaushik, S. C.; Salhotra, R.

    2002-10-01

    The concept of finite time thermodynamics is used to determine the ecological function of irreversible Stirling and Ericsson heat engine cycles. The ecological function is defined as the power output minus power loss (irreversibility), which is the ambient temperature times, the entropy generation rate. The ecological function is maximized with respect to cycle temperature ratio and the expressions for the corresponding power output and thermal efficiency are derived at the optimal operating conditions. The effect of different operating parameters, the effectiveness on the hot, cold and the regenerative side heat exchangers, the cycle temperature ratio, heat capacitance ratio and the internal irreversibility parameter on the maximum ecological function are studied. It is found that the effect of regenerator effectiveness is more than the hot and cold side heat exchangers and the effect of the effectiveness on cold side heat exchanger is more than the effectiveness on the hot side heat exchanger on the maximum ecological function. It is also found that the effect of internal irreversibility parameter is more than the other parameters not only on the maximum ecological function but also on the corresponding power output and the thermal efficiency.

  7. Quantum single oscillator with a (mod X) sup(#betta#) - type potential : energy eigenvalues and specific heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariz, A.M.; Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal; Tsallis, C.

    1982-01-01

    The quantum single one-dimensional oscillator associated with a potential proportional to /X/ sup(#betta#) (#betta# > 0) is discussed. The exact energy eigenvalues recently established by Turschner are further elaborated and convenient exact as well as asymptotic relations are exhibited. The exact T → 0 and T → infinite specific heat is discussed and numerical results for typical values of #betta# and intermediate temperature are presented. (Author) [pt

  8. Gradient ascent pulse engineering approach to CNOT gates in donor electron spin quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, D.-B.; Goan, H.-S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) optimal control methods can be implemented on donor electron spin qubits in semiconductors with an architecture complementary to the original Kane's proposal. We focus on the high fidelity controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and we explicitly find the digitized control sequences for a controlled-NOT gate by optimizing its fidelity using the effective, reduced donor electron spin Hamiltonian with external controls over the hyperfine A and exchange J interactions. We then simulate the CNOT-gate sequence with the full spin Hamiltonian and find that it has an error of 10 -6 that is below the error threshold of 10 -4 required for fault-tolerant quantum computation. Also the CNOT gate operation time of 100 ns is 3 times faster than 297 ns of the proposed global control scheme.

  9. Engineering Surface Critical Behavior of (2 +1 )-Dimensional O(3) Quantum Critical Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chengxiang; Zhang, Long; Guo, Wenan

    2018-06-01

    Surface critical behavior (SCB) refers to the singularities of physical quantities on the surface at the bulk phase transition. It is closely related to and even richer than the bulk critical behavior. In this work, we show that three types of SCB universality are realized in the dimerized Heisenberg models at the (2 +1 )-dimensional O(3) quantum critical points by engineering the surface configurations. The ordinary transition happens if the surface is gapped in the bulk disordered phase, while the gapless surface state generally leads to the multicritical special transition, even though the latter is precluded in classical phase transitions because the surface is in the lower critical dimension. An extraordinary transition is induced by the ferrimagnetic order on the surface of the staggered Heisenberg model, in which the surface critical exponents violate the results of the scaling theory and thus seriously challenge our current understanding of extraordinary transitions.

  10. Enhanced and tunable optical quantum efficiencies from plasmon bandwidth engineering in bimetallic CoAg nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Malasi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanoparticles are amongst the most effective ways to resonantly couple optical energy into and out of nanometer sized volumes. However, controlling and/or tuning the transfer of this incident energy to the surrounding near and far field is one of the most interesting challenges in this area. Due to the dielectric properties of metallic silver (Ag, its nanoparticles have amongst the highest radiative quantum efficiencies (η, i.e., the ability to radiatively transfer the incident energy to the surrounding. Here we report the discovery that bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag made with immiscible and plasmonically weak Co metal can show comparable and/or even higher η values. The enhancement is a result of the narrowing of the plasmon bandwidth from these bimetal systems. The phenomenological explanation of this effect based on the dipolar approximation points to the reduction in radiative losses within the Ag nanoparticles when in contact with cobalt. This is also supported by a model of coupling between poor and good conductors based on the surface to volume ratio. This study presents a new type of bandwidth engineering, one based on using bimetal nanostructures, to tune and/or enhance the quality factor and quantum efficiency for near and far-field plasmonic applications.

  11. Regressed relations for forced convection heat transfer in a direct injection stratified charge rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi M.; Schock, Harold J.

    1988-01-01

    Currently, the heat transfer equation used in the rotary combustion engine (RCE) simulation model is taken from piston engine studies. These relations have been empirically developed by the experimental input coming from piston engines whose geometry differs considerably from that of the RCE. The objective of this work was to derive equations to estimate heat transfer coefficients in the combustion chamber of an RCE. This was accomplished by making detailed temperature and pressure measurements in a direct injection stratified charge (DISC) RCE under a range of conditions. For each specific measurement point, the local gas velocity was assumed equal to the local rotor tip speed. Local physical properties of the fluids were then calculated. Two types of correlation equations were derived and are described in this paper. The first correlation expresses the Nusselt number as a function of the Prandtl number, Reynolds number, and characteristic temperature ratio; the second correlation expresses the forced convection heat transfer coefficient as a function of fluid temperature, pressure and velocity.

  12. Heat control in opto-mechanical system using quantum non-classicality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sushamana; Senwar, Subash

    2016-01-01

    Cooling of matter to the quantum ground state is a primary directive of quantum control. In other words, to extract entropy from a quantum system, efficient indirect quantum measurements may be implemented. The main objective is the cooling of the oscillator either to its motional ground state or to non-classical states, such as low-number Fock states, squeezed states or entangled states. It is shown that the use of quantum control procedure is better choice for even experimental realizations because it leads to a squeezed steady state with less than one phonon on average. The steady state of system corresponds to cooling of the system.

  13. Heat removal performance of auxiliary cooling system for the high temperature engineering test reactor during scrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Takenaka, Satsuki

    2003-01-01

    The auxiliary cooling system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is employed for heat removal as an engineered safety feature when the reactor scrams in an accident when forced circulation can cool the core. The HTTR is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor in Japan with reactor outlet gas temperature of 950 degree sign C and thermal power of 30 MW. The auxiliary cooling system should cool the core continuously avoiding excessive cold shock to core graphite components and water boiling of itself. Simulation tests on manual trip from 9 MW operation and on loss of off-site electric power from 15 MW operation were carried out in the rise-to-power test up to 20 MW of the HTTR. Heat removal characteristics of the auxiliary cooling system were examined by the tests. Empirical correlations of overall heat transfer coefficients were acquired for a helium/water heat exchanger and air cooler for the auxiliary cooling system. Temperatures of fluids in the auxiliary cooling system were predicted on a scram event from 30 MW operation at 950 degree sign C of the reactor outlet coolant temperature. Under the predicted helium condition of the auxiliary cooling system, integrity of fuel blocks among the core graphite components was investigated by stress analysis. Evaluation results showed that overcooling to the core graphite components and boiling of water in the auxiliary cooling system should be prevented where open area condition of louvers in the air cooler is the full open

  14. Comparative Study of Performance and Combustion Characteristics of Conventional and Low Heat Rejection (Mullite Coated) Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patond, S. B.; Chaple, S. A.; Shrirao, P. N.; Shaikh, P. I.

    2013-06-01

    Tests were performed on a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection, diesel engine whose piston crown, cylinder head and valves were coated with a 0.5 mm thickness of 3Al2O3·2SiO2 (mullite) (Al2O3 = 60%, SiO2 = 40%) over a 150 μm thickness of NiCrAlY bond coat. The working conditions for the conventional engine (without coating) and LHR (mullite coated) engine were kept exactly same to ensure a comparison between the two configurations of the engine. This paper is intended to emphasis on performance and combustion characteristics of conventional and LHR (Mullite coated) diesel engines under identical conditions. Tests were carried out at same operational constraints i.e. air-fuel ratio and engine speed conditions for both conventional engine (without coating) and LHR (mullite coated) engines. The results showed that, there was as much as 1.8 % increasing on brake power for LHR (mullite coated) engine compared to conventional engine (without coating) at full load The average decrease in brake specific fuel consumption in the LHR engine compared with the conventional engine was 1.76 % for full engine load. However, there was increasing on cylinder gas pressure and net heat release rate for LHR engine compared to conventional engine. Also the results revealed that, there was as much as 22% increasing on exhaust gas temperature for LHR engine compared to conventional engine at full engine load.

  15. Comparative Study of Performance and Combustion Characteristics of Conventional and Low Heat Rejection (Mullite Coated) Diesel Engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patond, S B; Chaple, S A; Shrirao, P N; Shaikh, P I

    2013-01-01

    Tests were performed on a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection, diesel engine whose piston crown, cylinder head and valves were coated with a 0.5 mm thickness of 3Al 2 O 3 ·2SiO 2 (mullite) (Al 2 O 3 = 60%, SiO 2 = 40%) over a 150 μm thickness of NiCrAlY bond coat. The working conditions for the conventional engine (without coating) and LHR (mullite coated) engine were kept exactly same to ensure a comparison between the two configurations of the engine. This paper is intended to emphasis on performance and combustion characteristics of conventional and LHR (Mullite coated) diesel engines under identical conditions. Tests were carried out at same operational constraints i.e. air-fuel ratio and engine speed conditions for both conventional engine (without coating) and LHR (mullite coated) engines. The results showed that, there was as much as 1.8 % increasing on brake power for LHR (mullite coated) engine compared to conventional engine (without coating) at full load The average decrease in brake specific fuel consumption in the LHR engine compared with the conventional engine was 1.76 % for full engine load. However, there was increasing on cylinder gas pressure and net heat release rate for LHR engine compared to conventional engine. Also the results revealed that, there was as much as 22% increasing on exhaust gas temperature for LHR engine compared to conventional engine at full engine load.

  16. Combustion, performance, and emission characteristics of low heat rejection engine operating on various biodiesels and vegetable oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedin, M.J.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Sanjid, A.; Ashraful, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Combustion, performance, and emissions of low heat rejection engine are studied. • Comparative assessment is carried out for different fuels and coating materials. • Alternative coating materials are suggested for engine. • Thermal efficiency is increased and fuel consumption is decreased for all fuels. • Exhaust emissions have improved except nitrogen oxides emission. - Abstract: Internal combustion engine with its combustion chamber walls insulated by thermal barrier coating materials is referred to as low heat rejection engine or LHR engine. The main purpose of this concept is to reduce engine coolant heat losses, hence improve engine performance. Most of the researchers have reported that the thermal coating increases thermal efficiency, and reduces exhaust emissions. In contrast to the above expectations, a few researchers reported that almost there was no improvement in thermal efficiency. This manuscript investigates the contradictory results in order to find out the exact scenario. A wide range of coating materials has been studied in order to justify their feasibility of implementation in engine. The influence of coating material, thickness, and technique on engine performance and emissions has been studied critically to accelerate the LHR engine evolution. The objectives of higher thermal efficiency, improved fuel economy, and lower emissions are accomplishable but much more investigations with improved engine modification, and design are required to explore full potentiality of LHR engine

  17. Optimal piston motion for maximum net output work of Daniel cam engines with low heat rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badescu, Viorel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The piston motion of low heat rejection compression ignition engines is optimized. • A realistic model taking into account the cooling system is developed. • The optimized cam is smaller for cylinders without thermal insulation. • The optimized cam size depends on ignition moment and cooling process intensity. - Abstract: Compression ignition engines based on classical tapper-crank systems cannot provide optimal piston motion. Cam engines are more appropriate for this purpose. In this paper the piston motion of a Daniel cam engine is optimized. Piston acceleration is taken as a control. The objective is to maximize the net output work during the compression and power strokes. A major research effort has been allocated in the last two decades for the development of low heat rejection engines. A thermally insulated cylinder is considered and a realistic model taking into account the cooling system is developed. The sinusoidal approximation of piston motion in the classical tapper-crank system overestimates the engine efficiency. The exact description of the piston motion in tapper-crank system is used here as a reference. The radiation process has negligible effects during the optimization. The approach with no constraint on piston acceleration is a reasonable approximation. The net output work is much larger (by 12–13%) for the optimized system than for the classical tapper-crank system, for similar thickness of cylinder walls and thermal insulation. Low heat rejection measures are not of significant importance for optimized cam engines. The optimized cam is smaller for a cylinder without thermal insulation than for an insulated cylinder (by up to 8%, depending on the local polar radius). The auto-ignition moment is not a parameter of significant importance for optimized cam engines. However, for given cylinder wall and insulation materials there is an optimum auto-ignition moment which maximizes the net output work. The optimum auto

  18. Peracetic Acid: A Practical Agent for Sterilizing Heat-Labile Polymeric Tissue-Engineering Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganarasimha, Suyog; Trahan, William R.; Best, Al M.; Bowlin, Gary L.; Kitten, Todd O.; Moon, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced biomaterials and sophisticated processing technologies aim at fabricating tissue-engineering scaffolds that can predictably interact within a biological environment at the cellular level. Sterilization of such scaffolds is at the core of patient safety and is an important regulatory issue that needs to be addressed before clinical translation. In addition, it is crucial that meticulously engineered micro- and nano- structures are preserved after sterilization. Conventional sterilization methods involving heat, steam, and radiation are not compatible with engineered polymeric systems because of scaffold degradation and loss of architecture. Using electrospun scaffolds made from polycaprolactone, a low melting polymer, and employing spores of Bacillus atrophaeus as biological indicators, we compared ethylene oxide, autoclaving and 80% ethanol to a known chemical sterilant, peracetic acid (PAA), for their ability to sterilize as well as their effects on scaffold properties. PAA diluted in 20% ethanol to 1000 ppm or above sterilized electrospun scaffolds in 15 min at room temperature while maintaining nano-architecture and mechanical properties. Scaffolds treated with PAA at 5000 ppm were rendered hydrophilic, with contact angles reduced to 0°. Therefore, PAA can provide economical, rapid, and effective sterilization of heat-sensitive polymeric electrospun scaffolds that are used in tissue engineering. PMID:24341350

  19. Dissipated energy and entropy production for an unconventional heat engine: the stepwise `circular cycle'

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Liberto, Francesco; Pastore, Raffaele; Peruggi, Fulvio

    2011-05-01

    When some entropy is transferred, by means of a reversible engine, from a hot heat source to a colder one, the maximum efficiency occurs, i.e. the maximum available work is obtained. Similarly, a reversible heat pumps transfer entropy from a cold heat source to a hotter one with the minimum expense of energy. In contrast, if we are faced with non-reversible devices, there is some lost work for heat engines, and some extra work for heat pumps. These quantities are both related to entropy production. The lost work, i.e. ? , is also called 'degraded energy' or 'energy unavailable to do work'. The extra work, i.e. ? , is the excess of work performed on the system in the irreversible process with respect to the reversible one (or the excess of heat given to the hotter source in the irreversible process). Both quantities are analysed in detail and are evaluated for a complex process, i.e. the stepwise circular cycle, which is similar to the stepwise Carnot cycle. The stepwise circular cycle is a cycle performed by means of N small weights, dw, which are first added and then removed from the piston of the vessel containing the gas or vice versa. The work performed by the gas can be found as the increase of the potential energy of the dw's. Each single dw is identified and its increase, i.e. its increase in potential energy, evaluated. In such a way it is found how the energy output of the cycle is distributed among the dw's. The size of the dw's affects entropy production and therefore the lost and extra work. The distribution of increases depends on the chosen removal process.

  20. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project. Semiannual progress report, April-September 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with input from private industry. Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: management and coordination; materials and processing (monolithics, ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining); materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts); data base and life prediction (time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE development); and technology transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants.

  1. Origin and type of flaws in heat engine ceramic materials and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govila, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    A number of ceramic materials such as Silicon Nitrides and Carbides, Sialons, Whisker-Reinforced Ceramic Composites and Partially-Stabilized Zirconias (PSZs) have been developed for use as structural components in heat engine applications. The reliability and durability of a structural engine component is critically dependent on the size, density of distribution and location of flaws. This information is critical for the processing and design engineers in order to design structural components using suitable materials and thus minimize stress intensity. In general, the failure initiating flaws are associated or produced due to material impurity, processing methods and parameters, and fabrication techniques (machining and grinding). Examples of each type of flaws associated with material impurity, processing methods and fabrication techniques are illustrated

  2. Study on Waste Heat Utilization Device of High-Temperature Freshwater in the Modern Marine Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuaijun; Liu, Chentao; Zhou, Yao

    2018-01-01

    Based on using the waste heat recycling from high temperature freshwater in marine diesel engine to heat fuel oil tank, lubrication oil tank and settling tank and so on to achieve energy saving, improve fuel efficiency as the goal, study on waste heat utilization device of high-temperature freshwater in the modern marine diesel engine to make the combustion chamber effectively cooled by high-temperature freshwater and the inner liner freshwater temperature heat is effectively utilized and so on to improve the overall efficiency of the power plant of the ship and the diesel optimum working condition.

  3. Parametric optimization and heat transfer analysis of a dual loop ORC (organic Rankine cycle) system for CNG engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fubin; Zhang, Hongguang; Yu, Zhibin; Wang, Enhua; Meng, Fanxiao; Liu, Hongda; Wang, Jingfu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a dual loop ORC (organic Rankine cycle) system is adopted to recover exhaust energy, waste heat from the coolant system, and intercooler heat rejection of a six-cylinder CNG (compressed natural gas) engine. The thermodynamic, heat transfer, and optimization models for the dual loop ORC system are established. On the basis of the waste heat characteristics of the CNG engine over the whole operating range, a GA (genetic algorithm) is used to solve the Pareto solution for the thermodynamic and heat transfer performances to maximize net power output and minimize heat transfer area. Combined with optimization results, the optimal parameter regions of the dual loop ORC system are determined under various operating conditions. Then, the variation in the heat transfer area with the operating conditions of the CNG engine is analyzed. The results show that the optimal evaporation pressure and superheat degree of the HT (high temperature) cycle are mainly influenced by the operating conditions of the CNG engine. The optimal evaporation pressure and superheat degree of the HT cycle over the whole operating range are within 2.5–2.9 MPa and 0.43–12.35 K, respectively. The optimal condensation temperature of the HT cycle, evaporation and condensation temperatures of the LT (low temperature) cycle, and exhaust temperature at the outlet of evaporator 1 are kept nearly constant under various operating conditions of the CNG engine. The thermal efficiency of the dual loop ORC system is within the range of 8.79%–10.17%. The dual loop ORC system achieves the maximum net power output of 23.62 kW under the engine rated condition. In addition, the operating conditions of the CNG engine and the operating parameters of the dual loop ORC system significantly influence the heat transfer areas for each heat exchanger. - Highlights: • A dual loop ORC system is adopted to recover the waste heat of a CNG engine. • Parametric optimization and heat transfer analysis are

  4. Self-organized anisotropic strain engineering for lateral quantum dot ordering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nötzel, R.; Schmidt, O.G.

    2007-01-01

    Lateral ordering of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) of high quality in well-defined arrangements is essential for the realization of future quantum functional devices with applications in solid state quantum computing and quantum communication [1]. We have developed a new concept for the creation

  5. A thermodynamic analysis of waste heat recovery from reciprocating engine power plants by means of Organic Rankine Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uusitalo, Antti; Honkatukia, Juha; Turunen-Saaresti, Teemu; Larjola, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is a Rankine cycle using organic fluid as the working fluid instead of water and steam. The ORC process is a feasible choice in waste heat recovery applications producing electricity from relatively low-temperature waste heat sources or in applications having a rather low power output. Utilizing waste heat from a large high-efficiency reciprocating engine power plant with ORC processes is studied by means of computations. In addition to exhaust gas heat recovery, this study represents and discusses an idea of directly replacing the charge air cooler (CAC) of a large turbocharged engine with an ORC evaporator to utilize the charge air heat in additional power production. A thermodynamic analysis for ORCs was carried out with working fluids toluene, n-pentane, R245fa and cyclohexane. The effect of different ORC process parameters on the process performance are presented and analyzed in order to investigate the heat recovery potential from the exhaust gas and charge air. A simplified feasibility consideration is included by comparing the ratio of the theoretical heat transfer areas needed and the obtained power output from ORC processes. The greatest potential is related to the exhaust gas heat recovery, but in addition also the lower temperature waste heat streams could be utilized to boost the electrical power of the engine power plant. A case study for a large-scale gas-fired engine was carried out showing that the maximum power increase of 11.4% was obtained from the exhaust gas and 2.4% from the charge air heat. - Highlights: • Waste heat recovery potential of reciprocating engines was studied. • Thermodynamic optimization for ORCs was carried out with different fluids. • The utilization of exhaust gas and charge air heat is presented and discussed. • Simplified economic feasibility study was included in the analysis. • Power increase of 11.4% was obtained from exhaust gas and 2.4% from charge air

  6. Development of the performance of an alpha-type heat engine by using elbow-bend transposed-fluids heat exchanger as a heater and a cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Ehwany, A.A.; Hennes, G.M. [Mechanical Power Department, Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University, 11566 Cairo (Egypt); Eid, E.I. [Mechanical Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Suez Canal University, 43515 Suez (Egypt); El-Kenany, E.A. [Technological Development Department, Technological Studies Academy, Workers University, Tanta (Egypt)

    2011-02-15

    In this work, elbow-bend heat exchangers were suggested to be used as a heater and a cooler in an alpha-type Stirling engine. Elbow-bend heat exchanger is a bank of tubes arranged in a quadrant either in line or staggered with different normal and parallel pitches. Eight of such heat exchangers having different dimensions were tested experimentally for steady flow (in a previous work by the same authors). The experimental results were correlated for heat transfer and pressure drop. In the present work, an alpha-Stirling engine with twin parallel cylinders on a common crankcase was suggested to use elbow-bend heat exchangers as a heater and a cooler. In the heater, the flue gases flow inside the tubes and the working gas fluctuates about the heater tubes. In the cooler, the coolant flows inside the cooler tubes and the gas flows about the cooler tubes. A computer program in the form of a spread sheet was prepared to solve numerically the engine cycle in the vision of Schmidt theory. Upon calculations, the most suitable stroke/bore ratio, phase angle and speed were found out for nitrogen as a working gas. In a comparison among the proposed engine and practical ones by the literature, it was found that; the proposed engine delivers about 13% more power per cc per {delta}T than those by the literature at high thermal efficiency level. (author)

  7. Heat recovery from Diesel engines: A thermodynamic comparison between Kalina and ORC cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombarda, Paola; Invernizzi, Costante M.; Pietra, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    In the context of heat recovery for electric power generation, Kalina cycle (a thermodynamic cycle using as working fluid a mixture of water and ammonia) and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) represent two different eligible technologies. In this work a comparison between the thermodynamic performances of Kalina cycle and an ORC cycle, using hexamethyldisiloxane as working fluid, was conducted for the case of heat recovery from two Diesel engines, each one with an electrical power of 8900 kWe. The maximum net electric power that can be produced exploiting the heat source constituted by the exhaust gases mass flow (35 kg/s for both engines, at 346 deg. C) was calculated for the two thermodynamic cycles. Owing to the relatively low useful power, for the Kalina cycle a relatively simple plant layout was assumed. Supposing reasonable design parameters and a logarithmic mean temperature difference in the heat recovery exchanger of 50 deg. C, a net electric power of 1615 kW and of 1603 kW respectively for the Kalina and for the ORC cycle was calculated. Although the obtained useful powers are actually equal in value, the Kalina cycle requires a very high maximum pressure in order to obtain high thermodynamic performances (in our case, 100 bar against about 10 bar for the ORC cycle). So, the adoption of Kalina cycle, at least for low power level and medium-high temperature thermal sources, seems not to be justified because the gain in performance with respect to a properly optimized ORC is very small and must be obtained with a complicated plant scheme, large surface heat exchangers and particular high pressure resistant and no-corrosion materials.

  8. The Sensitivity of Precooled Air-Breathing Engine Performance to Heat Exchanger Design Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, H.; Bond, A.; Hempsell, M.

    The issues relevant to propulsion design for Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) vehicles are considered. In particular two air- breathing engine concepts involving precooling are compared; SABRE (Synergetic Air-Breathing and Rocket Engine) as designed for the Skylon SSTO launch vehicle, and a LACE (Liquid Air Cycle Engine) considered in the 1960's by the Americans for an early generation spaceplane. It is shown that through entropy minimisation the SABRE has made substantial gains in performance over the traditional LACE precooled engine concept, and has shown itself as the basis of a viable means of realising a SSTO vehicle. Further, it is demonstrated that the precooler is a major source of thermodynamic irreversibility within the engine cycle and that further reduction in entropy can be realised by increasing the heat transfer coefficient on the air side of the precooler. If this were to be achieved, it would improve the payload mass delivered to orbit by the Skylon launch vehicle by between 5 and 10%.

  9. Development of Advanced In-Cylinder Components and Tribological Systems for Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonushonis, T. M.; Wiczynski, P. D.; Myers, M. R.; Anderson, D. D.; McDonald, A. C.; Weber, H. G.; Richardson, D. E.; Stafford, R. J.; Naylor, M. G.

    1999-01-01

    In-cylinder components and tribological system concepts were designed, fabricated and tested at conditions anticipated for a 55% thermal efficiency heavy duty diesel engine for the year 2000 and beyond. A Cummins L10 single cylinder research engine was used to evaluate a spherical joint piston and connecting rod with 19.3 MPa (2800 psi) peak cylinder pressure capability, a thermal fatigue resistant insulated cylinder head, radial combustion seal cylinder liners, a highly compliant steel top compression ring, a variable geometry turbocharger, and a microwave heated particulate trap. Components successfully demonstrated in the final test included spherical joint connecting rod with a fiber reinforced piston, high conformability steel top rings with wear resistant coatings, ceramic exhaust ports with strategic oil cooling and radial combustion seal cylinder liner with cooling jacket transfer fins. A Cummins 6B diesel was used to develop the analytical methods, materials, manufacturing technology and engine components for lighter weight diesel engines without sacrificing performance or durability. A 6B diesel engine was built and tested to calibrate analytical models for the aluminum cylinder head and aluminum block.

  10. Investigation of In-Cylinder Steam Injection in a Turbocharged Diesel Engine for Waste Heat Recovery and NOx Emission Control

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongbo Zhang; Lifu Li

    2018-01-01

    In this study, an in-cylinder steam injection method is introduced and applied to a turbocharged diesel engine for waste heat recovery and NOx emission reduction. In the method, cool water was first heated into superheated steam by exhaust. Then the superheated steam was directly injected into the cylinder during the compression stroke. The potential for fuel savings and NOx emission reduction obtained by this method was investigated. First, a two-zone combustion model for the baseline engine...

  11. Heat capacity of quantum adsorbates: Hydrogen and helium on evaporated gold films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birmingham, J.T.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1996-06-01

    The author has constructed an apparatus to make specific heat measurements of quantum gases adsorbed on metallic films at temperatures between 0.3 and 4 K. He has used this apparatus to study quench-condensed hydrogen films between 4 and 923 layers thick with J = 1 concentrations between 0.28 and 0.75 deposited on an evaporated gold surface. He has observed that the orientational ordering of the J = 1 molecules depends on the substrate temperature during deposition of the hydrogen film. He has inferred that the density of the films condensed at the lowest temperatures is 25% higher than in bulk H 2 crystals and have observed that the structure of those films is affected by annealing at 3.4 K. The author has measured the J = 1 to J = 0 conversion rate to be comparable to that of the bulk for thick films; however, he found evidence that the gold surface catalyzes conversion in the first two to four layers. He has also used this apparatus to study films of 4 He less than one layer thick adsorbed on an evaporated gold surface. He shows that the phase diagram of the system is similar to that for 4 He/graphite although not as rich in structure, and the phase boundaries occur at different coverages and temperatures. At coverages below about half a layer and at sufficiently high temperatures, the 4 He behaves like a two-dimensional noninteracting Bose gas. At lower temperatures and higher coverages, liquidlike and solidlike behavior is observed. The Appendix shows measurements of the far-infrared absorptivity of the high-T c superconductor La 1.87 Sr 0.13 CuO 4

  12. Finite time thermodynamic analysis and optimization of solar-dish Stirling heat engine with regenerative losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Arjun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the performance of the solar-driven Stirling engine system to maximize the power output and thermal efficiency using the non-linearized heat loss model of the solar dish collector and the irreversible cycle model of the Stirling engine. Finite time thermodynamic analysis has been done for combined system to calculate the finite-rate heat transfer, internal heat losses in the regenerator, conductive thermal bridging losses and finite regeneration process time. The results indicate that exergy efficiency of dish system increases as the effectiveness of regenerator increases but decreases with increase in regenerative time coefficient. It is also found that optimal range of collector temperature and corresponding concentrating ratio are 1000 K~1400 K and 1100~1400, respectively in order to get maximum value of exergy efficiency. It is reported that the exergy efficiency of this dish system can reach the maximum value when operating temperature and concentrating ratio are 1150 K and 1300, respectively.

  13. Development of micro-engineered textured tungsten surfaces for high heat flux applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharafat, Shahram, E-mail: shahrams@ucla.edu [University of California Los Angeles, CA (United States); Aoyama, Aaron [University of California Los Angeles, CA (United States); Williams, Brian, E-mail: brian.williams@ultramet.com [Ultramet Inc., Pacoima, CA (United States); Ghoniem, Nasr [University of California Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Surface micro-engineering can enhance the thermo-mechanical performance of plasma facing components (PFCs). For example, castellation of a surface can reduce thermal stress due to high heat loads and thus provide higher thermo-mechanical resilience. Recently, fabrication of a variety of micro-sized refractory dendrites with reproducible geometric characteristics (e.g., density, length, height, and aspect ratio) has been demonstrated. In contrast to flat surfaces exposed to high heat loads, dendrites deform independently to minimize near-surface thermal stress, which results in improved thermo-mechanical performance. Thus, the use of dendrites offers a unique micro-engineering approach to enhance the performance of PFC structures. A brief overview of W, Re, and Mo dendritic structures is given along with micrographs that show dendrite-coated surfaces. The thermal responses of representative dendrite structures are analyzed as a function of aspect ratios and dendrite geometry. The heat-management capability of needle-like dendrites exposed to a surface energy of up to 1 MJ/m{sup 2} is analyzed and compared to a flat surface. It is concluded that dendrite structures can significantly reduce thermal stress in the substrate when compared to flat surfaces. Implications of dendritic surfaces on sputter erosion rates are also discussed briefly.

  14. Quick assessment of binary distillation efficiency using a heat engine perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahušiak, M.; Kiss, A.A.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Schuur, B.

    2016-01-01

    With emphasis on close boiling, (near-)ideal VLE mixtures, this paper links the efficiency of distillation to the binary feed composition and thermal properties of the compounds. The proposed approach, treating the process as a heat engine, allows to directly quantify distillation performance (in terms of energy intensity & efficiency) based on the components boiling points and feed composition. In addition, this approach reviews and formulates simple, approximate and essentially non-iterative calculation procedures to quickly estimate the energy efficiency of distillation. These estimations may be applied to identify opportunities to save significant amounts of energy. The results show that the reboiler duty for low relative volatility is relatively independent of the heat of vaporization and feed composition, while being reciprocally proportional to the Carnot efficiency of the distillation column. The internal efficiency for distillation of mixtures with low relative volatility has a maximum of about 70% for a symmetrical feed (equimolar ratio) and decreases to zero for unsymmetrical feed compositions approaching infinite dilution. With increasing relative volatility, the maximum efficiency is preserved, but the locus shifts towards lower light component fractions. At very high relative volatility, the internal efficiency increases with decreasing concentration of light component, as typical for evaporators. - Highlights: • A heat engine perspective was applied to estimate binary distillation efficiency. • The method was derived from first principles. • Validation on industrial cases showed the strength of the method.

  15. Laser-assisted nanoceramics reinforced polymer scaffolds for tissue engineering: additional heating and stem cells behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkovsky, Igor; Scherbakov, Vladimir; Volchkov, Vladislav; Volova, Larisa

    2018-02-01

    The conditions of selective laser melting (SLM) of tissue engineering scaffolds affect cell response and must be engineered to support cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. In the present study, the influence of additional heating during SLM process on stem cell viability near biopolymer matrix reinforced by nanoceramics additives was carried out. We used the biocompatible and bioresorbable polymers (polyetheretherketone /PEEK/ and polycaprolactone /PCL/) as a matrix and nano-oxide ceramics - TiO2, Al2O3, ZrO2, FexOy and/or hydroxyapatite as a basis of the additives. The rate of pure PEEK and PCL bio-resorption and in mixtures with nano oxides on the matrix was studied by the method of mass loss on bacteria of hydroxylase and enzyme complex. The stem cellular morphology, proliferative MMSC activity, and adhesion of the 2D and 3D nanocomposite matrices were the subjects of comparison. Medical potential of the SLS/M-fabricated nano-oxide ceramics after additional heating as the basis for tissue engineering scaffolds and cell targeting systems were discussed.

  16. Heat release and engine performance effects of soybean oil ethyl ester blending into diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, Andre Valente; Velasquez, Jose Antonio; Milanez, Luiz Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The engine performance impact of soybean oil ethyl ester blending into diesel fuel was analyzed employing heat release analysis, in-cylinder exergy balances and dynamometric tests. Blends with concentrations of up to 30% of soybean oil ethyl ester in volume were used in steady-state experiments conducted in a high speed turbocharged direct injection engine. Modifications in fuel heat value, fuel-air equivalence ratio and combustion temperature were found to govern the impact resulting from the addition of biodiesel on engine performance. For the analyzed fuels, the 20% biodiesel blend presented the best results of brake thermal efficiency, while the 10% biodiesel blend presented the best results of brake power and sfc (specific fuel consumption). In relation to mineral diesel and in full load conditions, an average increase of 4.16% was observed in brake thermal efficiency with B20 blend. In the same conditions, an average gain of 1.15% in brake power and a reduction of 1.73% in sfc was observed with B10 blend.

  17. Association of Finite-Time Thermodynamics and a Bond-Graph Approach for Modeling an Endoreversible Heat Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Feidt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the approach known as Finite-Time Thermodynamics has provided a fruitful theoretical framework for the optimization of heat engines operating between a heat source (at temperature and a heat sink (at temperature . The aim of this paper is to propose a more complete approach based on the association of Finite-Time Thermodynamics and the Bond-Graph approach for modeling endoreversible heat engines. This approach makes it possible for example to find in a simple way the characteristics of the optimal operating point at which the maximum mechanical power of the endoreversible heat engine is obtained with entropy flow rate as control variable. Furthermore it provides the analytical expressions of the optimal operating point of an irreversible heat engine where the energy conversion is accompanied by irreversibilities related to internal heat transfer and heat dissipation phenomena. This original approach, applied to an analysis of the performance of a thermoelectric generator, will be the object of a future publication.

  18. Design for micro-combined cooling, heating and power systems stirling engines and renewable power systems

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    ‘Design for Micro-Combined Cooling, Heating & Power Systems’ provides a manual for the technical and structural design of systems for supplying decentralised energy in residential buildings. It presents the micro-combined cooling, heating & power systems Stirling engines & renewable energy sources (mCCHP-SE-RES) systems in an accessible manner both for the public at large, and for professionals who conceive, design or commercialise such systems or their components.  The high performance levels of these systems are demonstrated within the final chapter by the results of an experiment in which a house is equipped with a mCCHP-SE-RES system. The reader is also familiarized with the conceptual, technical and legal aspects of modern domestic energy systems; the components that constitute these systems; and advanced algorithms for achieving the structural and technical design of such systems. In residential buildings, satisfying demands of durable development has gradually evolved from necessity to...

  19. Heat transfer from an internal combustion (Otto-cycle) engine on the surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Owen

    1992-05-01

    The cooling requirements for an average car sized engine (spark-ignition, V-6, four-stroke, naturally aspirated, about 200 kg, about 100 kW) were looked at for Mars. Several modes of cooling were considered, including forced convection, exhaust, radiation and closed loop systems. The primary goal was to determine the effect of the thinner Martian atmosphere on the cooling system. The results show that there was only a 6-percent difference in the cooling requirements. This difference was due mostly to the thinner atmosphere during forced convection and the heat capacity of the exhaust. A method using a single pass counter-flow heat exchanger is suggested to offset this difference in cooling requirements.

  20. Heat transfer from an internal combustion (Otto-cycle) engine on the surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Owen

    1992-01-01

    The cooling requirements for an average car sized engine (spark-ignition, V-6, four-stroke, naturally aspirated, about 200 kg, about 100 kW) were looked at for Mars. Several modes of cooling were considered, including forced convection, exhaust, radiation and closed loop systems. The primary goal was to determine the effect of the thinner Martian atmosphere on the cooling system. The results show that there was only a 6-percent difference in the cooling requirements. This difference was due mostly to the thinner atmosphere during forced convection and the heat capacity of the exhaust. A method using a single pass counter-flow heat exchanger is suggested to offset this difference in cooling requirements.