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Sample records for quantum cascade laser-based

  1. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Based 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LongWave Photonics proposes a terahertz quantum-cascade laser based swept-source optical coherence tomography (THz SS-OCT) system for single-sided, 3D,...

  2. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J. S., E-mail: jingsong-li@ahu.edu.cn; Yu, B. [Key Laboratory of Opto-Electronic Information Acquisition and Manipulation of Ministry of Education, Anhui University, Hefei (China); Fischer, H. [Department of Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Chen, W. [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l’Atmosphére, Université du Littoral Côte d’Opale, Dunkerque (France); Yalin, A. P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1374 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  3. Contributed review: quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J S; Yu, B; Fischer, H; Chen, W; Yalin, A P

    2015-03-01

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  4. Quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic sulfuryl fluoride sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minini, Kariza Mayra Silva; Bueno, Sâmylla Cristina Espécie; da Silva, Marcelo Gomes; Sthel, Marcelo Silva; Vargas, Helion; Angster, Judit; Miklós, András

    2017-02-01

    Although sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) is an efficient fumigant that does not react with the surface of indoor materials and does not reduce the stratospheric ozone shield, there are some concerns about its use. It is a toxic gas that attacks the central nervous system, and its global warming potential (GWP) value is 4780 for 100 years' time. Therefore, it is a clear necessity of implementing detection methods for tracing such a molecule. In this work a sensitive photoacoustic setup was built to detect SO2F2 at concentrations of parts per billion by volume (ppbv). The symmetric S-O stretching mode was excited by a continuous-wave quantum cascade laser with radiation wavenumber ranging from 1275.7 to 1269.3 cm-1. The photoacoustic signal was generated by modulating the laser wavenumber at the first longitudinal mode of the photoacoustic cell with amplitude depth of 5 × 10-3 cm-1. The detection of a minimum SO2F2 concentration of 20 ppbv was achieved.

  5. Real-time quantum cascade laser-based infrared microspectroscopy in-vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger-Lui, N.; Haase, K.; Pucci, A.; Schönhals, A.; Petrich, W.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared microscopy can be performed to observe dynamic processes on a microscopic scale. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy-based microscopes are bound to limitations regarding time resolution, which hampers their potential for imaging fast moving systems. In this manuscript we present a quantum cascade laser-based infrared microscope which overcomes these limitations and readily achieves standard video frame rates. The capabilities of our setup are demonstrated by observing dynamical processes at their specific time scales: fermentation, slow moving Amoeba Proteus and fast moving Caenorhabditis elegans. Mid-infrared sampling rates between 30 min and 20 ms are demonstrated.

  6. Quantum cascade laser-based spectrometer for high sensitive measurements of trace gases in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Tang; Wenqing Liu; Ruifeng Kan; Yujun Zhang; Dong Chen; Shuai Zhang; Jun Ruan

    2012-01-01

    A quantum cascade (QC) laser-based spectrometer is developed to measure trace gases in air.The proposed spectrometer is tested for N2O,and the results presented in this letter.This system takes advantage of recent technology in QC lasers by utilizing intra-pulse scan spectroscopy,which allows high sensitive measurement.Without calibration gases,the gas concentration can be calculated with scan integration and the corresponding values from the HITRAN04 database.By analyzing the Allan variance,a detection limit of 2 ppb is obtained.Continuous measurement of N2O sampled from ambient air shows the applicability of the proposed system for the field measurements of gases of environmental concern.

  7. Open-path, quantum cascade laser-based sensor for high resolution atmospheric ammonia measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Miller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a compact, open-path, quantum cascade laser-based atmospheric ammonia sensor operating at 9.06 μm for high sensitivity, high temporal resolution, ground-based measurements. Atmospheric ammonia (NH3 is a gas-phase precursor to fine particulate matter, with implications for air quality and climate change. Currently, NH3 sensing challenges have led to a lack of widespread in-situ measurements. Our open-path sensor configuration avoids sampling artifacts associated with NH3 surface adsorption onto inlet tubing and reduced pressure sampling cells, as well as condensed-phase partitioning ambiguities. Multi-harmonic wavelength modulation spectroscopy allows for selective and sensitive detection of atmospheric-pressure broadened absorption features. An in-line ethylene reference cell provides real-time calibration (±20% accuracy and normalization for instrument drift under rapidly changing field conditions. The sensor has a sensitivity and minimum detection limit of 0.15 ppbv NH3 at 10 Hz, a mass of ~ 5 kg and consumes ~ 50 W of electrical power. In-situ field performance of this open-path NH3 sensor is demonstrated, with 10 Hz time resolution and a large dynamic response for in-situ NH3 measurements. This sensor provides the capabilities for improved in-situ gas phase NH3 sensing relevant for emission source characterization and flux measurements.

  8. A high carrier injection terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirectly pumped scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavipour, S. G., E-mail: sgrazavi@uwaterloo.ca; Xu, C.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Ban, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, Ontario N2L3G1 (Canada); Dupont, E.; Laframboise, S. R. [National Research Council, Blg. M-50, 1200 Montreal Rd., Ottawa, Ontario K1A0R6 (Canada); Chan, C. W. I.; Hu, Q. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    A Terahertz quantum cascade laser with a rather high injection coupling strength based on an indirectly pumped scheme is designed and experimentally implemented. To effectively suppress leakage current, the chosen quantum cascade module of the device is based on a five-well GaAs/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As structure. The device lases up to 151 K with a lasing frequency of 2.67 THz. This study shows that the effect of higher energy states in carrier transport and the long-range tunnel coupling between states that belong to non-neighbouring modules have to be considered in quantum design of structures with a narrow injector barrier. Moreover, the effect of interface roughness scattering between the lasing states on threshold current is crucial.

  9. A Sulfur Hexafluoride Sensor Using Quantum Cascade and CO2 Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helion Vargas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase in greenhouse gas emissions is a serious environmental problem and has stimulated the scientific community to pay attention to the need for detection and monitoring of gases released into the atmosphere. In this regard, the development of sensitive and selective gas sensors has been the subject of several research programs. An important greenhouse gas is sulphur hexafluoride, an almost non-reactive gas widely employed in industrial processes worldwide. Indeed it is estimated that it has a radiative forcing of 0.52 W/m2. This work compares two photoacoustic spectrometers, one coupled to a CO2 laser and another one coupled to a Quantum Cascade (QC laser, for the detection of SF6. The laser photoacoustic spectrometers described in this work have been developed for gas detection at small concentrations. Detection limits of 20 ppbv for CO2 laser and 50 ppbv for quantum cascade laser were obtained.

  10. Electrically tunable terahertz quantum cascade lasers based on a two-sections interdigitated distributed feedback cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turčinková, Dana; Scalari, Giacomo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Amanti, Maria Ines [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Univ. Paris Diderot, Lab. Matererk iaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, F-75205 Paris (France)

    2015-03-30

    The continuous electrical tuning of a single-mode terahertz quantum cascade laser operating at a frequency of 3 THz is demonstrated. The devices are based on a two-section interdigitated third-order distributed feedback cavity. The lasers can be tuned of about 4 GHz at a constant optical output power of 0.7 mW with a good far-field pattern.

  11. Monitoring Hydrogen Sulfide Using a Quantum Cascade Laser Based Trace Gas Sensing System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ling-Fang; SHARPLES Thomas-Roben

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present the detection of hydrogen sulfide (HS) in a quantum cascade laser (QCL) based gas sensing system employing direct laser absorption spectroscopy.The sensitivity is obtained to be 3.61 × 10 cm Hz and the HS broadening coefficient in N is analyzed by fitting to the plot of the Lorentzian half width at the half maximum as a function of N pressure is 0.1124±0.0031 cm.atm.A simulation based on data from the HITRAN database shows broad agreement with the experimentally obtained spectrum.

  12. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Sensor for Trace Detection of Formaldehyde Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mario Lugarà

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a photoacoustic sensor for the detection of formaldehyde (CH2O using a thermoelectrically cooled distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in pulsed mode at 5.6 mm. A resonant photoacoustic cell, equipped with four electret microphones, is excited in its first longitudinal mode at 1,380 Hz. The absorption line at 1,778.9 cm-1 is selected for CH2O detection. A detection limit of 150 parts per billion in volume in nitrogen is achieved using a 10 seconds time constant and 4 mW laser power. Measurements in ambient air will require water vapour filters.

  13. Terahertz dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser based on GaN active region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, B.; Rostami, A.; Baghban, H.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper a novel terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser (QCL) based on GaN/AlGaN quantum wells has been proposed, which emits at two widely separated wavelengths 33 and 52 μm simultaneously in a single active region. The large LO-phonon energy (˜90 meV), the ultrafast resonant phonon depopulation of the lower radiative levels, suppression of the electrons that escape to the continuum states and selective carrier injection and extraction all together lead to a considerable enhancement in the operating temperature of the structure. All calculations have been done at a temperature of 265 K. Moreover, similar behavior of the output optical powers is another remarkable feature, which makes both wavelengths useful for special applications.

  14. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Trace Vapor Detection and Molecular Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almon Fisher

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS-scale photoacoustic sensor for the detection of trace gases. A mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL was used to determine detection limits for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate. The source was continuously tunable from 1015 cm-1 to 1240 cm-1, allowing for the collection of photoacoustic vibrational spectra for these gases. Exceptional agreement between the measured photoacoustic spectra and the infrared spectra for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate was observed. Partial least-squares (PLS regression was used to develop an algorithm for classification of these compounds based solely on photoacoustic spectra.

  15. Quantum cascade laser-based sensors for the detection of exhaled carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakmanesh, Nahid; Cristescu, Simona M.; Ghorbanzadeh, Atamalek; Harren, Frans J. M.; Mandon, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important biomarker as it originates in the human body from the heme (component of hemoglobin) degradation. Tunable laser absorption spectroscopy in the mid-infrared wavelength region is used for sensitive trace gas sensing of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Based on a quantum cascade laser emitting at 4.61 µm, two different spectroscopic methods are investigated: off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and wavelength modulation 2f/1f spectroscopy (WMS). The optical sensors integrate a slow feedback system to correct for wavelength drifts improving their stability over days. Both approaches demonstrate a high reproducibility and sensitivity during online measurements of exhaled human breath. Considering the detection limit to be the equal to the standard deviation of the background fluctuations, the noise-equivalent detection limit for both OA-ICOS and WMS is 7 ppbv (1-s averaging time), leading to a noise-equivalent absorption sensitivity of 3.1 × 10-7 cm-1 Hz-1/2, which is sufficient for measurements of exhaled CO (eCO). Collection and measurements of eCO samples were investigated, and different exhalation flow rates and breath-holding time were explored, to provide a reliable sampling method for future medical investigations.

  16. Quantum cascade laser-based measurement of metal alkylamide density during atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslar, James E; Kimes, William A; Sperling, Brent A

    2012-03-01

    An in situ gas-phase diagnostic for the metal alkylamide compound tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), Hf[N(C(2)H(5))(CH(3))](4), was demonstrated. This diagnostic is based on direct absorption measurement of TEMAH vapor using an external cavity quantum cascade laser emitting at 979 cm(-1), coinciding with the most intense TEMAH absorption in the mid-infrared spectral region, and employing 50 kHz amplitude modulation with synchronous detection. Measurements were performed in a single-pass configuration in a research-grade atomic layer deposition (ALD) chamber. To examine the detection limit of this technique for use as a TEMAH delivery monitor, this technique was demonstrated in the absence of any other deposition reactants or products, and to examine the selectivity of this technique in the presence of deposition products that potentially interfere with detection of TEMAH vapor, it was demonstrated during ALD of hafnium oxide using TEMAH and water. This technique successfully detected TEMAH at molecular densities present during simulated industrial ALD conditions. During hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, absorbance from gas-phase reaction products did not interfere with TEMAH measurements while absorption by reaction products deposited on the optical windows did interfere, although interfering absorption by deposited reaction products corresponded to only ≈4% of the total derived TEMAH density. With short measurement times and appropriate signal averaging, estimated TEMAH minimum detectable densities as low as ≈2 × 10(12) molecules/cm(3) could be obtained. While this technique was demonstrated specifically for TEMAH delivery and hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, it should be readily applicable to other metal alkylamide compounds and associated metal oxide and nitride deposition chemistries, assuming similar metal alkylamide molar absorptivity and molecular density in the measurement chamber.

  17. Quantum cascade laser-based multipass absorption system for hydrogen peroxide detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yingchun; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Jiang, Wenzhe; Ren, Wei; Lewicki, Rafal; Jiang, Dongfang; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a relevant molecular trace gas species, that is related to the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the production of radical species such as OH, the generation of sulfate aerosol via oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI), and the formation of acid rain. The detection of atmospheric H2O2 involves specific challenges due to its high reactivity and low concentration (ppbv to sub-ppbv level). Traditional methods for measuring atmospheric H2O2 concentration are often based on wet-chemistry methods that require a transfer from the gas- to liquid-phase for a subsequent determination by techniques such as fluorescence spectroscopy, which can lead to problems such as sampling artifacts and interference by other atmospheric constituents. A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy-based system for the measurement of atmospheric H2O2 with a detection limit of 75 ppb for 1-s integration time was previously reported. In this paper, an updated H2O2 detection system based on long-optical-path-length absorption spectroscopy by using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) will be described. A 7.73-μm CW-DFB-QCL and a thermoelectrically cooled infrared detector, optimized for a wavelength of 8 μm, are employed for theH2O2 sensor system. A commercial astigmatic Herriott multi-pass cell with an effective optical path-length of 76 m is utilized for the reported QCL multipass absorption system. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with second harmonic detection is used for enhancing the signal-to-noise-ratio. A minimum detection limit of 13.4 ppb is achieved with a 2 s sampling time. Based on an Allan-Werle deviation analysis the minimum detection limit can be improved to 1.5 ppb when using an averaging time of 300 s.

  18. Development of a Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Detector for Ammonia and Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; McManus, J. Barry; Shorter, Joanne H.; Herndon, Scott C.; Jimenez, Rodrigo

    2005-12-31

    We have developed a compact, robust, atmospheric trace gas detector based on mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using pulsed quantum cascade (QC) lasers. The spectrometer is suitable for airborne measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, formaldehyde, formic acid, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and other gases that have line-resolved absorption spectra in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC laser light source operates near room temperature with thermal electric cooling instead of liquid nitrogen which has been previously required for semiconductor lasers in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC lasers have sufficient output power so that thermal electric cooled detectors may be used in many applications with lower precision requirements. The instrument developed in this program has been used in several field campaigns from both the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory and from the NOAA WP3 aircraft. The Phase II program has resulted in more than 10 archival publications describing the technology and its applications. Over 12 instruments based on this design have been sold to research groups in Europe and the United States making the program both a commercial as well as a technological success. Anticipated Benefits The development of a sensitive, cryogen-free, mid-infrared absorption method for atmospheric trace gas detection will have wide benefits for atmospheric and environmental research and broader potential commercial applications in areas such as medical diagnostic and industrial process monitoring of gaseous compounds. Examples include air pollution monitoring, breath analysis, combustion exhaust diagnostics, and plasma diagnostics for semi-conductor fabrication. The substitution of near-room temperature QC lasers for cryogenic lead salt TDLs and the resulting simplifications in instrument design and operation will greatly expand the range of applications.

  19. High performance 40-stage and 15-stage quantum cascade lasers based on two-material active region composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, P.; Suttinger, M.; Go, R.; Todi, A.; Shu, Hong; Tsvid, E.; Patel, C. Kumar N.; Lyakh, A.

    2017-05-01

    5.6μm quantum cascade lasers based on Al0.78In0.22As/In0.69Ga0.31As active region composition with measured pulsed room temperature wall plug efficiency of 28.3% are reported. Injection efficiency for the upper laser level of 75% was measured by testing devices with variable cavity length. Threshold current density of 1.7kA/cm2 and slope efficiency of 4.9W/A were measured for uncoated 3.15mm x 9µm lasers. Threshold current density and slope efficiency dependence on temperature in the range from 288K to 348K can be described by characteristic temperatures T0 140K and T1 710K, respectively. Pulsed slope efficiency, threshold current density, and wallplug efficiency for a 2.1mm x 10.4µm 15-stage device with the same design and a high reflection-coated back facet were measured to be 1.45W/A, 3.1kA/cm2 , and 18%, respectively. Continuous wave values for the same parameters were measured to be 1.42W/A, 3.7kA/cm2 , and 12%. Continuous wave optical power levels exceeding 0.5W per millimeter of cavity length was demonstrated. When combined with the 40-stage device data, the inverse slope efficiency dependence on cavity length for 15-stage data allowed for separate evaluation of the losses originating from the active region and from the cladding layers of the laser structure. Specifically, the active region losses for the studied design were found to be 0.77cm-1, while cladding region losses - 0.33cm-1. The data demonstrate that active region losses in mid wave infrared quantum cascade lasers largely define total waveguide losses and that their reduction should be one of the main priorities in the quantum cascade laser design.

  20. Rapid identification of goblet cells in unstained colon thin sections by means of quantum cascade laser-based infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger-Lui, N; Gretz, N; Haase, K; Kränzlin, B; Neudecker, S; Pucci, A; Regenscheit, A; Schönhals, A; Petrich, W

    2015-04-07

    Changes in the volume covered by mucin-secreting goblet cell regions within colon thin sections may serve as a means to differentiate between ulcerative colitis and infectious colitis. Here we show that rapid, quantum cascade laser-based mid-infrared microspectroscopy might be able to contribute to the differential diagnosis of colitis ulcerosa, an inflammatory bowel disease. Infrared hyperspectral images of mouse colon thin sections were obtained within 7.5 minutes per section with a pixel size of 3.65 × 3.65 μm(2) and a field of view of 2.8 × 3.1 mm(2). The spectra were processed by training a random decision forest classifier on the basis of k-means clustering on one thin section. The trained algorithm was then applied to 5 further thin sections for a blinded validation and it was able to identify goblet cells in all sections. The rapid identification of goblet cells within these unstained, paraffinized thin sections of colon tissue was enabled by the high content of glycopeptides within the goblet cells as revealed by the pronounced spectral signatures in the 7.6 μm-8.6 μm and the 9.2 μm-9.7 μm wavelength ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. More so, the simple calculation of the ratio between the absorbance values at 9.29 μm and 8.47 μm provides the potential to further shorten the time for measurement and analysis of a thin section down to well below 1 minute.

  1. Single-mode surface-emitting distributed feedback quantum-cascade lasers based on hybrid waveguide structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanhong Guo; Junqi Liu; Jianyan Chen; Lu Li; Lijun Wang; Fengqi Liu; Zhanguo Wang

    2011-01-01

    Surface-emitting distributed feedback quantum-cascade lasers operating at λ≈7.8 μm are demonstrated.The metal-covered second-order grating is shallow-etched into the surface of a thin InGaAs contact and cladding layer. This forms a hybrid waveguide and used to achieve relatively low waveguide losses and high coupling strengths. The devices exhibit stable single-mode operation from 90 to 130 K with a side mode suppression ratio above 20 dB. A slope efficiency of 194 mW/A is obtained at 90 K, which is twice higher than that of the Fabry-Perot counterpart.%@@ Surface-emitting distributed feedback quantum-cascade lasers operating at λ≈7.8 μm are demonstrated.The metal-covered second-order grating is shallow-etched into the surface of a thin InGaAs contact and cladding layer.This forms a hybrid waveguide and used to achieve relatively low waveguide losses and high coupling strengths.The devices exhibit stable single-mode operation from 90 to 130 K with a side mode suppression ratio above 20 dB.A slope efficiency of 194 mW/A is obtained at 90 K, which is twice higher than that of the Fabry-Perot counterpart.

  2. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Optical Sensor for Continuous Monitoring of Environmental Methane in Dunkirk (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabih Maamary

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A room-temperature continuous-wave (CW quantum cascade laser (QCL-based methane (CH4 sensor operating in the mid-infrared near 8 μm was developed for continuous measurement of CH4 concentrations in ambient air. The well-isolated absorption line (7F2,4 ← 8F1,2 of the ν4 fundamental band of CH4 located at 1255.0004 cm−1 was used for optical measurement of CH4 concentration by direct absorption in a White-type multipass cell with an effective path-length of 175 m. A 1σ (SNR = 1 detection limit of 33.3 ppb in 218 s was achieved with a measurement precision of 1.13%. The developed sensor was deployed in a campaign of measurements of time series CH4 concentration on a site near a suburban traffic road in Dunkirk (France from 9th to 22nd January 2013. An episode of high CH4 concentration of up to ~3 ppm has been observed and analyzed with the help of meteorological parameters combined with back trajectory calculation using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model of NOAA.

  3. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Optical Sensor for Continuous Monitoring of Environmental Methane in Dunkirk (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamary, Rabih; Cui, Xiaojuan; Fertein, Eric; Augustin, Patrick; Fourmentin, Marc; Dewaele, Dorothée; Cazier, Fabrice; Guinet, Laurence; Chen, Weidong

    2016-02-08

    A room-temperature continuous-wave (CW) quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based methane (CH4) sensor operating in the mid-infrared near 8 μm was developed for continuous measurement of CH4 concentrations in ambient air. The well-isolated absorption line (7F2,4 ← 8F1,2) of the ν4 fundamental band of CH4 located at 1255.0004 cm(-1) was used for optical measurement of CH4 concentration by direct absorption in a White-type multipass cell with an effective path-length of 175 m. A 1σ (SNR = 1) detection limit of 33.3 ppb in 218 s was achieved with a measurement precision of 1.13%. The developed sensor was deployed in a campaign of measurements of time series CH4 concentration on a site near a suburban traffic road in Dunkirk (France) from 9th to 22nd January 2013. An episode of high CH4 concentration of up to ~3 ppm has been observed and analyzed with the help of meteorological parameters combined with back trajectory calculation using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model of NOAA.

  4. Quantum cascade laser based monitoring of CF2 radical concentration as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, M.; Lang, N.; Zimmermann, S.; Schulz, S. E.; Buchholtz, W.; Röpcke, J.; van Helden, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric etching plasma processes for modern interlevel dielectrics become more and more complex by the introduction of new ultra low-k dielectrics. One challenge is the minimization of sidewall damage, while etching ultra low-k porous SiCOH by fluorocarbon plasmas. The optimization of this process requires a deeper understanding of the concentration of the CF2 radical, which acts as precursor in the polymerization of the etch sample surfaces. In an industrial dielectric etching plasma reactor, the CF2 radical was measured in situ using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) around 1106.2 cm-1. We measured Doppler-resolved ro-vibrational absorption lines and determined absolute densities using transitions in the ν3 fundamental band of CF2 with the aid of an improved simulation of the line strengths. We found that the CF2 radical concentration during the etching plasma process directly correlates to the layer structure of the etched wafer. Hence, this correlation can serve as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes. Applying QCL based absorption spectroscopy opens up the way for advanced process monitoring and etching controlling in semiconductor manufacturing.

  5. Gas chromatography vs. quantum cascade laser-based N2O flux measurements using a novel chamber design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brümmer, Christian; Lyshede, Bjarne; Lempio, Dirk; Delorme, Jean-Pierre; Rüffer, Jeremy J.; Fuß, Roland; Moffat, Antje M.; Hurkuck, Miriam; Ibrom, Andreas; Ambus, Per; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in laser spectrometry offer new opportunities to investigate the soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrous oxide. During two field campaigns conducted at a grassland site and a willow field, we tested the performance of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) connected to a newly developed automated chamber system against a conventional gas chromatography (GC) approach using the same chambers plus an automated gas sampling unit with septum capped vials and subsequent laboratory GC analysis. Through its high precision and time resolution, data of the QCL system were used for quantifying the commonly observed nonlinearity in concentration changes during chamber deployment, making the calculation of exchange fluxes more accurate by the application of exponential models. As expected, the curvature values in the concentration increase was higher during long (60 min) chamber closure times and under high-flux conditions (FN2O > 150 µg N m-2 h-1) than those values that were found when chambers were closed for only 10 min and/or when fluxes were in a typical range of 2 to 50 µg N m-2 h-1. Extremely low standard errors of fluxes, i.e., from ˜ 0.2 to 1.7 % of the flux value, were observed regardless of linear or exponential flux calculation when using QCL data. Thus, we recommend reducing chamber closure times to a maximum of 10 min when a fast-response analyzer is available and this type of chamber system is used to keep soil disturbance low and conditions around the chamber plot as natural as possible. Further, applying linear regression to a 3 min data window with rejecting the first 2 min after closure and a sampling time of every 5 s proved to be sufficient for robust flux determination while ensuring that standard errors of N2O fluxes were still on a relatively low level. Despite low signal-to-noise ratios, GC was still found to be a useful method to determine the mean the soil-atmosphere exchange of N2O on longer timescales during specific campaigns. Intriguingly

  6. Atmospheric ammonia measurements in Houston, TX using an external cavity-quantum cascade laser-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, L.; Lewicki, R.; Griffin, R. J.; Flynn, J. H.; Lefer, B. L.; Tittel, F. K.

    2010-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. It has many anthropogenic (e.g., agricultural crops and mineral fertilizers) and natural sources (e.g., animals, oceans, and vegetation) in the environment. In certain areas, industrial and motor vehicle activities also can contribute to increases in atmospheric NH3 levels. From a perspective of environmental concern, NH3 is a precursor of particulate matter (PM) because it can lead to production of ammonium salts (e.g., (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3) through chemical reactions with sulfuric and nitric acid. As a result, the abundance of NH3 in the atmosphere has a great impact on aerosol nucleation and composition. Despite this, NH3 is not regulated. It is crucial, however, to improve our understanding of the dynamics of NH3 in an industrial and urban area such as Greater Houston where atmospheric NH3 data are limited. In this study, a 10.4 µm external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL)-based sensor was developed and utilized. To monitor atmospheric NH3 at trace gas concentration levels, an amplitude modulated photo-acoustic spectroscopy (AM-PAS) technique was employed. The minimum detection limit obtained from the sensor is ~1.5 ppb for a 5-second data acquisition time. After averaging data over 300 seconds a sub-ppb NH3 concentration level can be achieved. The NH3 sensor has been deployed on the roof of a ~60-meter-high building (North Moody Tower) located on the University of Houston campus since November 2009. Several episodes of high NH3 concentrations were observed. For example, the sensor recorded a significant and lasting increase in NH3 concentrations (~21 ppb) on August 14, 2010, when a major accident occurred during the same time period on the Gulf Freeway (I-45) in Houston only 2 miles from the sampling site. The elevated concentration levels are assumed to be associated with NH3 generation from a chemical fire resulting from the collision involving two 18-wheelers, one carrying fertilizer

  7. Cascade quantum teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nan-run; GONG Li-hua; LIU Ye

    2006-01-01

    In this letter a cascade quantum teleportation scheme is proposed. The proposed scheme needs less local quantum operations than those of quantum multi-teleportation. A quantum teleportation scheme based on entanglement swapping is presented and compared with the cascade quantum teleportation scheme. Those two schemes can effectively teleport quantum information and extend the distance of quantum communication.

  8. Enhancing the sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser-based cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy using RF current perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfred, Katherine M; Kirkbride, James M R; Ciaffoni, Luca; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-12-15

    The sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), often limited by cavity mode structure and diffraction losses, was enhanced by applying a broadband RF noise to the laser current. A pump-probe measurement demonstrated that the addition of bandwidth-limited white noise effectively increased the laser linewidth, thereby reducing mode structure associated with CEAS. The broadband noise source offers a more sensitive, more robust alternative to applying single-frequency noise to the laser. Analysis of CEAS measurements of a CO(2) absorption feature at 1890  cm(-1) averaged over 100 ms yielded a minimum detectable absorption of 5.5×10(-3)  Hz(-1/2) in the presence of broadband RF perturbation, nearly a tenfold improvement over the unperturbed regime. The short acquisition time makes this technique suitable for breath applications requiring breath-by-breath gas concentration information.

  9. Gas chromatography vs. quantum cascade laser-based N2O flux measurements using a novel chamber design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruemmer, Christian; Lyshede, Bjarne; Lempio, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in laser spectrometry offer new opportunities to investigate the soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrous oxide. During two field campaigns conducted at a grassland site and a willow field, we tested the performance of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) connected to a newly developed...... observed regardless of linear or exponential flux calculation when using QCL data. Thus, we recommend reducing chamber closure times to a maximum of 10 min when a fast-response analyzer is available and this type of chamber system is used to keep soil disturbance low and conditions around the chamber plot....... Despite low signal-to-noise ratios, GC was still found to be a useful method to determine the mean the soil-atmosphere exchange of N2O on longer timescales during specific campaigns. Intriguingly, the consistency between GC and QCL-based campaign averages was better under low than under high N2O efflux...

  10. Direct determination of glucose, lactate and triglycerides in blood serum by a tunable quantum cascade laser-based mid-IR sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, M.; Volgger, L.; Genner, A.; Jungbauer, C.; Lendl, B.

    2013-02-01

    This work reports on a compact sensor for fast and reagent-free point-of-care determination of glucose, lactate and triglycerides in blood serum based on a tunable (1030-1230 cm-1) external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL). For simple and robust operation a single beam set-up was designed and only thermoelectric cooling was used for the employed laser and detector. Full computer control of analysis including liquid handling and data analysis facilitated routine measurements. A high optical pathlength (>100 μm) is a prerequisite for robust measurements in clinical practice. Hence, the optimum optical pathlength for transmission measurements in aqueous solution was considered in theory and experiment. The experimentally determined maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was around 140 μm for the QCL blood sensor and around 50 μm for a standard FT-IR spectrometer employing a liquid nitrogen cooled mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detector. A single absorption spectrum was used to calculate the analyte concentrations simultaneously by using a partial-least-squares (PLS) regression analysis. Glucose was determined in blood serum with a prediction error (RMSEP) of 6.9 mg/dl and triglycerides with an error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 17.5 mg/dl in a set of 42 different patients. In spiked serum samples the lactate concentration could be determined with an RMSECV of 8.9 mg/dl.

  11. Short-lived species detection of nitrous acid by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Hongming [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l' Atmosphère, Université du Littoral Côte d' Opale, 189A, Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Laboratory of Atmospheric Physico-Chemistry, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1125, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Maamary, Rabih; Fertein, Eric; Chen, Weidong, E-mail: chen@univ-littoral.fr [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l' Atmosphère, Université du Littoral Côte d' Opale, 189A, Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Gao, Xiaoming [Laboratory of Atmospheric Physico-Chemistry, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1125, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sigrist, Markus W. [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, HPT H4.1, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-09

    Spectroscopic detection of short-lived gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) at 1254.85 cm{sup −1} was realized by off-beam coupled quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) in conjunction with an external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL). High sensitivity monitoring of HONO was performed within a very small gas-sample volume (of ∼40 mm{sup 3}) allowing a significant reduction (of about 4 orders of magnitude) of air sampling residence time which is highly desired for accurate quantification of chemically reactive short-lived species. Calibration of the developed QEPAS-based HONO sensor was carried out by means of lab-generated HONO samples whose concentrations were determined by direct absorption spectroscopy involving a ∼109.5 m multipass cell and a distributed feedback QCL. A minimum detection limit (MDL) of 66 ppbv (1 σ) HONO was achieved at 70 mbar using a laser output power of 50 mW and 1 s integration time, which corresponded to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. This MDL was down to 7 ppbv at the optimal integration time of 150 s. The corresponding 1σ minimum detected absorption coefficient is ∼1.1 × 10{sup −7 }cm{sup −1} (MDL ∼ 3 ppbv) in 1 s and ∼1.1 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1} (MDL ∼ 330 pptv) in 150 s, respectively, with 1 W laser power.

  12. Coupling simultaneous dissolved nitrate measurements with quantum cascade laser based nitrous oxide flux and isotopocule analysis to investigate the biogeochemical processes occurring in a denitrifying bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. J.; Maxwell, B.; Deshmukh, P.; Chen, H.

    2016-12-01

    Denitrifying bioreactors are used to treat nitrogen enriched water from agricultural operations. These systems may also be an important source of nitrous oxide emissions, a potent greenhouse gas. Bioreactors also provide researchers with an opportunity to investigate the biogeochemical processes occurring in soils under controlled conditions. A pilot-scale bioreactor with woodchip media was injected with KNO3 at a constant flow rate through the system. The water-filled-pore-space (WFPS) was varied in separate experiments to create differing aerobic conditions. A quantum cascade laser spectroscopy system was used to determine the flux and isotopic signature of N2O emissions from woodchip bioreactor media over time. Simultaneous nitrate concentration measurements were made using an optical method at multiple points in the bioreactor. Isotopic site-preference (SP) characterization of N2O emissions was used to estimate production sources from soil nitrification and denitrification. A dynamic gas sampling method was used to measure N2O mixing ratios, which required ambient air to equalize chamber atmospheric pressure during sampling. Precise instrument calibration using gas samples of known isotopic abundances, provided by the Swiss Federal Labs (EMPA), together with a Keeling plot method to account for variations in isotopocule composition in ambient air, produced reliable SP estimates. Initial experiments during 100% WFPS show that SP and δ15Nbulk values were varied from -6‰ to 3‰ and -23‰ to -12‰, respectively. The trend of these values indicated that the N2O source was slightly changed from partial nitrification to denitrification during the measuring period of time. The peak rate of nitrous oxide production occurred 7 hours after peak nitrate removal. These results and others to be presented show the utility of coupling real-time dissolved and gas phase measurements for studying nitrogen cycling in soils.

  13. Implementation of a quantum cascade laser-based gas sensor prototype for sub-ppmv H2S measurements in a petrochemical process gas stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Harald; Pölz, Walter; Waclawek, Johannes Paul; Ofner, Johannes; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of a sensitive and selective as well as industrial fit gas sensor prototype based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (2f-WMS) employing an 8-μm continuous-wave distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (CW-DFB-QCL) for monitoring hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at sub-ppm levels is reported. Regarding the applicability for analytical and industrial process purposes aimed at petrochemical environments, a synthetic methane (CH4) matrix of up to 1000 ppmv together with a varying H2S content was chosen as the model environment for the laboratory-based performance evaluation performed at TU Wien. A noise-equivalent absorption sensitivity (NEAS) for H2S targeting the absorption line at 1247.2 cm(-1) was found to be 8.419 × 10(-10) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2), and a limit of detection (LOD) of 150 ppbv H2S could be achieved. The sensor prototype was then deployed for on-site measurements at the petrochemical research hydrogenation platform of the industrial partner OMV AG. In order to meet the company's on-site safety regulations, the H2S sensor platform was installed in an industry rack and equipped with the required safety infrastructure for protected operation in hazardous and explosive environments. The work reports the suitability of the sensor prototype for simultaneous monitoring of H2S and CH4 content in the process streams of a research hydrodesulfurization (HDS) unit. Concentration readings were obtained every 15 s and revealed process dynamics not observed previously.

  14. Integrated Broadband Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Kamjou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A broadband, integrated quantum cascade laser is disclosed, comprising ridge waveguide quantum cascade lasers formed by applying standard semiconductor process techniques to a monolithic structure of alternating layers of claddings and active region layers. The resulting ridge waveguide quantum cascade lasers may be individually controlled by independent voltage potentials, resulting in control of the overall spectrum of the integrated quantum cascade laser source. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  15. Multicomponent gas analysis using broadband quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes Reyes, A.; Hou, Z.; Van Mastrigt, E.; Horsten, R.C.; De Jongste, J.C.; Pijnenburg, M.W.; Urbach, H.P.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system covering the region between 850 and 1250 cm−1. Its robust multipass cavity ensures a constant interaction length over the entire spectral region. The device enables the detection and identification of numerous molecules present

  16. Multicomponent gas analysis using broadband quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes Reyes, A.; Hou, Z.; Van Mastrigt, E.; Horsten, R.C.; De Jongste, J.C.; Pijnenburg, M.W.; Urbach, H.P.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system covering the region between 850 and 1250 cm−1. Its robust multipass cavity ensures a constant interaction length over the entire spectral region. The device enables the detection and identification of numerous molecules present

  17. Lens Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor); Lee, Alan Wei Min (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade (QC) devices are disclosed that can operate, e.g., in a range of about 1 THz to about 10 THz. In some embodiments, QC lasers are disclosed in which an optical element (e.g., a lens) is coupled to an output facet of the laser's active region to enhance coupling of the lasing radiation from the active region to an external environment. In other embodiments, terahertz amplifier and tunable terahertz QC lasers are disclosed.

  18. Lateral Modes in Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C. Dente

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We will examine the waveguide mode losses in ridge-guided quantum cascade lasers. Our analysis illustrates how the low-loss mode for broad-ridge quantum cascade lasers (QCLs can be a higher-order lateral waveguide mode that maximizes the feedback from the sloped ridge-wall regions. The results are in excellent agreement with the near- and far-field data taken on broad-ridge-guided quantum cascade lasers processed with sloped ridge walls.

  19. 2.9 THz束缚态向连续态跃迁量子级联激光器研制%Study of 2.9 THz quantum cascade laser based on bound-to-continuum transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万文坚; 尹嵘; 谭智勇; 王丰; 韩英军; 曹俊诚

    2013-01-01

    The material of GaAs/AlGaAs bound-to-continuum terahertz quantum-cascade laser (THz QCL) was grown by gas source molec-ular beam epitaxy. A THz QCL device was fabricated with semi-insulating surface-plasmon waveguide. Its spectrum and light intensity-current-voltage characteristics were studied. The device emits about 2.95 THz, and yields a maximum temperature of 67 K in pulse mode. In continuous-wave mode, it displays a threshold current density of 230 A/cm2 at 9 K with maximum emitted power of 1.2 mW and lases up to 30 K.%采用气源分子束外延技术生长了GaAs/AlGaAs束缚态向连续态跃迁的太赫兹量子级联激光器材料,基于半绝缘等离子体波导工艺制作了太赫兹量子级联激光器.测量了激光器的发射光谱和功率-电流-电压关系曲线,研究了器件的激光特性.器件激射频率约2.95 THz,脉冲模式下,最高工作温度为67 K.连续波模式下,阈值电流密度最低为230 A/cm2,最大光输出功率1.2 mW,最高工作温度为30 K.

  20. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Quantum Cascade Lasers for Trace Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Scamarcio

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Various applications, such as pollution monitoring, toxic-gas detection, noninvasive medical diagnostics and industrial process control, require sensitive and selectivedetection of gas traces with concentrations in the parts in 109 (ppb and sub-ppb range.The recent development of quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs has given a new aspect toinfrared laser-based trace gas sensors. In particular, single mode distributed feedback QCLsare attractive spectroscopic sources because of their excellent properties in terms of narrowlinewidth, average power and room temperature operation. In combination with these lasersources, photoacoustic spectroscopy offers the advantage of high sensitivity and selectivity,compact sensor platform, fast time-response and user friendly operation. This paper reportsrecent developments on quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for tracegas detection. In particular, different applications of a photoacoustic trace gas sensoremploying a longitudinal resonant cell with a detection limit on the order of hundred ppb ofozone and ammonia are discussed. We also report two QC laser-based photoacousticsensors for the detection of nitric oxide, for environmental pollution monitoring andmedical diagnostics, and hexamethyldisilazane, for applications in semiconductormanufacturing process.

  1. Quantum Cascade Photonic Crystal lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Federico

    2004-03-01

    QC lasers have emerged in recent years as the dominant laser technology for the mid-to far infrared spectrum in light of their room temperature operation, their tunability, ultrahigh speed operation and broad range of applications to chemical sensing, spectroscopy etc. (Ref. 1-3). After briefly reviewing the latter, I will describe a new class of mid-infrared QC lasers, Quantum Cascade Photonic Crystal Surface Emitting Lasers (QCPCSELS), that combine electronic and photonic band structure engineering to achieve vertical emission from the surface (Ref. 4). Devices operating on bandedge mode and on defect modes will be discussed. Exciting potential uses of these new devices exist in nonlinear optics, microfluidics as well as novel sensors. Finally a bird's eye view of other exciting areas of QC laser research will be given including broadband QCLs and new nonlinear optical sources based on multiwavelength QCLs. 1. F. Capasso, C. Gmachl, D. L. Sivco, and A. Y. Cho, Physics Today 55, 34 (May 2002) 2. F. Capasso, C. Gmachl, R. Paiella, A. Tredicucci, A. L. Hutchinson, D. L. Sivco, J. N. Baillargeon, A. Y. Cho and H. C. Liu, IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, 6, 931 (2000). 3. F. Capasso, R. Paiella, R. Martini, R. Colombelli, C. Gmachl, T. L. Myers, M. S. Taubman, R. M. Williams, C. G. Bethea, K. Unterrainer, H. Y. Hwang, D. L. Sivco, A. Y. Cho, A. M. Sergent, H. C. Liu, E. A. Whittaker, IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 38, 511 (2002) 4. R. Colombelli, K. Srivasan, M. Troccoli, O. Painter, C. Gmachl, D. M. Tennant, A. M. Sergent, D. L. Sivco, A. Y. Cho and F. Capasso, Science 302, 1374 (2003)

  2. Exhaled nitric oxide monitoring by quantum cascade laser: comparison with chemiluminescent and electrochemical sensors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandon, J.; Hogman, M.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Amsterdam, J. van; Harren, F.J.M.; Cristescu, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (F(E)NO) is considered an indicator in the diagnostics and management of asthma. In this study we present a laser-based sensor for measuring F(E)NO. It consists of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) combined with a multi-pass cell and wavelength modulation spectroscopy for

  3. Applications of cw quantum cascade laser near 8 μm in gas sensing research

    KAUST Repository

    Sajid, Muhammad Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Quantum cascade laser based sensors operating near 8 μm to detect H2O2, C2H2, CH4, N2O and H2O are discussed and demonstrated for applications in chemical kinetics, combustion and spectroscopic measurements.

  4. A quantum cascade phonon-polariton laser

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtani, Keita; Bosco, Lorenzo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    We report a laser that coherently emits phonon-polaritons, quasi-particles arising from the coupling between photons and transverse optical phonons. The gain is provided by an intersubband transition in a quantum cascade structure. The polaritons at h$\

  5. Quantum Cascade Laser Frequency Combs

    CERN Document Server

    Faist, Jérôme; Scalari, Giacomo; Rösch, Markus; Bonzon, Christopher; Hugi, Andreas; Beck, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that broadband quantum cascade lasers can operate as frequency combs. As such, they operate under direct electrical pumping at both mid-infrared and THz frequencies, making them very attractive for dual-comb spectroscopy. Performance levels are continuously improving, with average powers over 100 mW and frequency coverage of 100 cm$^{-1}$ in the mid-infrared. In the THz range, 10 mW of average power and 600 GHz of frequency coverage are reported. As a result of the very short upper state lifetime of the gain medium, the mode proliferation in these sources arises from four wave mixing rather than saturable absorption. As a result, their optical output is characterized by the tendency of small intensity modulation of the output power, and the relative phases of the modes to be similar to the ones of a frequency modulated laser. Recent results include the proof of comb operation down to a metrological level, the observation of a Schawlow-Townes broadened linewidth, as well as the fir...

  6. Quantum Cascade Laser Frequency Combs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faist Jérôme

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It was recently demonstrated that broadband quantum cascade lasers can operate as frequency combs. As such, they operate under direct electrical pumping at both mid-infrared and THz frequencies, making them very attractive for dual-comb spectroscopy. Performance levels are continuously improving, with average powers over 100mW and frequency coverage of 100 cm-1 in the mid-infrared region. In the THz range, 10mW of average power and 600 GHz of frequency coverage are reported. As a result of the very short upper state lifetime of the gain medium, the mode proliferation in these sources arises from four-wave mixing rather than saturable absorption. As a result, their optical output is characterized by the tendency of small intensity modulation of the output power, and the relative phases of the modes to be similar to the ones of a frequency modulated laser. Recent results include the proof of comb operation down to a metrological level, the observation of a Schawlow-Townes broadened linewidth, as well as the first dual-comb spectroscopy measurements. The capability of the structure to integrate monothically nonlinear optical elements as well as to operate as a detector shows great promise for future chip integration of dual-comb systems.

  7. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Based 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Constellation program has a need to non-destructively test (NDT) non-metallic materials (foams, Shuttle Tile, Avcoat, etc) for defects such as delaminations...

  8. MID-INFRARED QUANTUM CASCADE LASERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... diode known as the quantum cascade laser (QCL) emerged. During the last .... temperature of the chip or the laser injection current. By varying the ... mospheric transmission windows between 3 - 5 im and 8 - 12 im which ...

  9. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininger, Peter, E-mail: peter.reininger@tuwien.ac.at; Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried [Institute for Solid State Electronics and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, Vienna 1040 (Austria)

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  10. Normal Incident Long Wave Infrared Quantum Dash Quantum Cascade Photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Jiao; Ren, Fei; Liu, Shu-Man; Zhuo, Ning; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a quantum dash quantum cascade photodetector (QDash-QCD) by incorporating self-assembled InAs quantum dashes into the active region of a long wave infrared QCD. Sensitive photoresponse to normal incident light at 10 μm was observed, which is attributed to the intersubband (ISB) transitions in the quantum well/quantum dash (QW/QDash) hybrid absorption region and the following transfer of excited electrons on the extraction stair-like quantum levels separated by LO-phonon energy. The high density InAs quantum dashes were formed in the Stranski-Krastanow mode and stair-like levels were formed by a lattice matched InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice. A stable responsivity from 5 mA/W at 77 K to 3 mA/W at as high as 190 K was observed, which makes the QDash-QCD promising in high temperature operation.

  11. Towards automated design of quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirčetić, Aleksandra; Indjin, Dragan; Ikonić, Zoran; Harrison, Paul; Milanović, Vitomir; Kelsall, Robert W.

    2005-04-01

    We present an advanced technique for the design and optimization of GaAs /AlGaAs quantum cascade laser structures. It is based on the implementation of the simulated annealing algorithm with the purpose of determining a set of design parameters that satisfy predefined conditions, leading to an enhancement of the device output characteristics. Two important design aspects have been addressed: improved thermal behavior, achieved by the use of higher conduction band offset materials, and a more efficient extraction mechanism, realized via a ladder of three lower laser states, with subsequent pairs separated by the optical phonon energy. A detailed analysis of performance of the obtained structures is carried out within a full self-consistent rate equations model of the carrier dynamics. The latter uses wave functions calculated by the transfer matrix method, and evaluates all relevant carrier-phonon and carrier-carrier scattering rates from each quantized state to all others within the same and neighboring periods of the cascade. These values are then used to form a set of rate equations for the carrier density in each state, enabling further calculation of the current density and gain as a function of the applied field and temperature. This paper addresses the application of the described procedure to the design of λ ˜9μm GaAs-based mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and presents the output characteristics of some of the designed optimized structures.

  12. Quantum-engineered interband cascade photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Hinkey, Robert T.; Ye, Hao; Klem, John F.; Lei, L.; Mishima, T. D.; Keay, J. C.; Santos, M. B.; Johnson, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Quantum-engineered multiple stage photovoltaic (PV) devices are explored based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb interband cascade (IC) structures. These ICPV devices employ multiple discrete absorbers that are connected in series by widebandgap unipolar barriers using type-II heterostructure interfaces for facilitating carrier transport between cascade stages similar to IC lasers. The discrete architecture is beneficial for improving the collection efficiency and for spectral splitting by utilizing absorbers with different bandgaps. As such, the photo-voltages from each individual cascade stage in an ICPV device add together, creating a high overall open-circuit voltage, similar to conventional multi-junction tandem solar cells. Furthermore, photo-generated carriers can be collected with nearly 100% efficiency in each stage. This is because the carriers travel over only a single cascade stage, designed to be shorter than a typical diffusion length. The approach is of significant importance for operation at high temperatures where the diffusion length is reduced. Here, we will present our recent progress in the study of ICPV devices, which includes the demonstration of ICPV devices at room temperature and above with narrow bandgaps (e.g. 0.23 eV) and high open-circuit voltages.

  13. High efficiency quantum cascade laser frequency comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Quanyong; Wu, Donghai; Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-03-01

    An efficient mid-infrared frequency comb source is of great interest to high speed, high resolution spectroscopy and metrology. Here we demonstrate a mid-IR quantum cascade laser frequency comb with a high power output and narrow beatnote linewidth at room temperature. The active region was designed with a strong-coupling between the injector and the upper lasing level for high internal quantum efficiency and a broadband gain. The group velocity dispersion was engineered for efficient, broadband mode-locking via four wave mixing. The comb device exhibits a narrow intermode beatnote linewidth of 50.5 Hz and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 6.5% covering a spectral coverage of 110 cm‑1 at λ ~ 8 μm. The efficiency is improved by a factor of 6 compared with previous demonstrations. The high power efficiency and narrow beatnote linewidth will greatly expand the applications of quantum cascade laser frequency combs including high-precision remote sensing and spectroscopy.

  14. High efficiency quantum cascade laser frequency comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Quanyong; Wu, Donghai; Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-01-01

    An efficient mid-infrared frequency comb source is of great interest to high speed, high resolution spectroscopy and metrology. Here we demonstrate a mid-IR quantum cascade laser frequency comb with a high power output and narrow beatnote linewidth at room temperature. The active region was designed with a strong-coupling between the injector and the upper lasing level for high internal quantum efficiency and a broadband gain. The group velocity dispersion was engineered for efficient, broadband mode-locking via four wave mixing. The comb device exhibits a narrow intermode beatnote linewidth of 50.5 Hz and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 6.5% covering a spectral coverage of 110 cm−1 at λ ~ 8 μm. The efficiency is improved by a factor of 6 compared with previous demonstrations. The high power efficiency and narrow beatnote linewidth will greatly expand the applications of quantum cascade laser frequency combs including high-precision remote sensing and spectroscopy. PMID:28262834

  15. Beam combining of quantum cascade laser arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin G; Kansky, Jan; Goyal, Anish K; Pflügl, Christian; Diehl, Laurent; Belkin, Mikhail A; Sanchez, Antonio; Capasso, Federico A

    2009-08-31

    Wavelength beam combining was used to co-propagate beams from 28 elements in an array of distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCLs). The beam-quality product of the array, defined as the product of near-field spot size and far-field divergence for the entire array, was improved by a factor of 21 by using wavelength beam combining. To demonstrate the applicability of wavelength beam combined DFB-QCL arrays for remote sensing, we obtained the absorption spectrum of isopropanol at a distance of 6 m from the laser array.

  16. Dynamics of quantum cascade lasers: numerics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Sande, Guy; Verschaffelt, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Since the original demonstration of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs), the performance of these devices has shown rapid improvement. QCLs can now deliver milliwatts or more of continuous-wave radiation throughout the terahertz frequency range (300 GHz to 10 THz). Therefore, QCLs have become widely used in various applications such as spectroscopy, metrology or free-space telecommunications. For many of these applications there is a need for compact tuneable quantum cascade lasers. Nowadays most tuneable QCLs are based on a bulky external cavity configuration. We explore the possibility of tuning the operating wavelength through a fully integrated on-chip wavelength selective feedback applied to a dual wavelength QCL. Our numerical and analytical analyses are based on rate equation models describing the dynamics of QCLs extended to include delayed filtered optical feedback. We demonstrate the possibility to tune the operating wavelength by altering the absorption and/or amplification of the signal in the delayed feedback path. The tuning range of a laser is limited by the spectral width of its gain. For inter-band semiconductor lasers this spectral width is typically several tens of nm. Hence, the laser cavity supports the existence of multiple modes and on chip wavelength selective feedback has been demonstrated to be a promising tuning mechanism. We have selected a specific QCL gain structure with four energy levels and with two lasing transitions in the same cascade. In this scheme, the two lasing modes use a common upper level. Hence, the two modes compete in part for the same carriers to account for their optical gain. We have added delayed wavelength specific filtered optical feedback to the rate equation model describing these transitions. We have calculated the steady states and their stability in the absence of delay for the feedback field and studied numerically the case with non-zero delay. We have proven that wavelength tuning of a dual wavelength

  17. Normal Incident Long Wave Infrared Quantum Dash Quantum Cascade Photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Jiao; Ren, Fei; Liu, Shu-Man; Zhuo, Ning; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a quantum dash quantum cascade photodetector (QDash-QCD) by incorporating self-assembled InAs quantum dashes into the active region of a long wave infrared QCD. Sensitive photoresponse to normal incident light at 10 μm was observed, which is attributed to the intersubband (ISB) transitions in the quantum well/quantum dash (QW/QDash) hybrid absorption region and the following transfer of excited electrons on the extraction stair-like quantum levels separated by LO-phonon energy. The high density InAs quantum dashes were formed in the Stranski-Krastanow mode and stair-like levels were formed by a lattice matched InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice. A stable responsivity from 5 mA/W at 77 K to 3 mA/W at as high as 190 K was observed, which makes the QDash-QCD promising in high temperature operation.

  18. Electrical derivative measurement of quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dingkai; Cheng, Liwei; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen; Fan, Jenyu; Worchesky, Terry

    2011-02-01

    The electrical derivative characteristics of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are investigated to test the QCL threshold, leakage current, and possibly explore carrier transport. QCL thresholds can be identified by searching for the slope peak of the first derivative of the I-V curves and can be further confirmed with its alignment to the peak of the second derivative of the I-V curves. Leakage current in QCLs with oxide-blocked ridge waveguides and buried heterostructure (BH) waveguides are studied and compared. The oxide-blocking structures provide the lowest leakage current although the capped-mesa-BH (CMBH) QCLs provide the toughest durability under highly stressful operations. The leakage current of CMBH QCLs are also compared at different temperatures.

  19. Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy of single cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Patel, Imran

    2017-03-27

    Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy is a next generation novel imaging technique allowing high resolution spectral imaging of cells. We show after spectral pre-processing, identification of different cancer cell populations within minutes.

  20. Terahertz Difference-Frequency Quantum Cascade Laser Sources on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    Terahertz difference-frequency quantum cascade laser sources on silicon SEUNGYONG JUNG,1,3 JAE HYUN KIM,1 YIFAN JIANG,1 KARUN VIJAYRAGHAVAN,2 AND...revised 24 November 2016; accepted 30 November 2016 (Doc. ID 278379); published 22 December 2016 Terahertz quantum cascade laser sources based on intra...of microwatts of average terahertz power output and wide spectral tunability. However, terahertz radiation outcoupling in these sources is still highly

  1. Linewidth and tuning characteristics of terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, A; Tittel, F K; Mittleman, D M; Dengler, R; Siegel, P H; Scalari, G; Ajili, L; Faist, J; Beere, H E; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Ritchie, D A

    2004-03-15

    We have measured the spectral linewidths of three continuous-wave quantum cascade lasers operating at terahertz frequencies by heterodyning the free-running quantum cascade laser with two far-infrared gas lasers. Beat notes are detected with a GaAs diode mixer and a microwave spectrum analyzer, permitting very precise frequency measurements and giving instantaneous linewidths of less than -30 kHz. Characteristics are also reported for frequency tuning as the injection current is varied.

  2. Quantum cascade laser Kerr frequency comb

    CERN Document Server

    Lecaplain, Caroline; Lucas, Erwan; Jost, John D; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2015-01-01

    The mid-infrared (mid-IR) regime (typically the wavelength regime of $\\lambda \\sim 2.5-20 \\ \\mathrm{\\mu m}$) is an important spectral range for spectroscopy as many molecules have their fundamental rotational-vibrational absorption in this band. Recently optical frequency combs based on optical microresonators ("Kerr" combs) at the onset of the mid-IR region have been generated using crystalline resonators and integrated planar silicon micro-resonators. Here we extend for the first time Kerr combs deep into the mid-IR i.e. the 'molecular fingerprint' region. This is achieved by combining an ultra high quality (Q) factor mid-IR microresonator based on crystalline $\\mathrm{MgF_{2}}$ with the quantum cascade laser (QCL) technology. Using a tapered chalgogenide (ChG) fiber and a QCL continuous wave pump laser, frequency combs at $\\lambda\\sim 4.4\\ \\mathrm{\\mu m}$ (i.e. 2270cm$^{-1}$) are generated, that span over 600nm (i.e. 300cm$^{-1}$) in bandwidth, with a mode spacing of 14.3GHz (0.5cm$^{-1}$), corresponding t...

  3. Low power-consumption quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, Tsukuru; Hashimoto, Jun-ichi; Yoshinaga, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hiroki; Tsuji, Yukihiro; Murata, Makoto; Ekawa, Mitsuru; Tanahashi, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are promising light sources for real time high-sensitivity gas sensing in the mid-infrared region. For the practical use of QCLs as a compact and portable gas sensor, their power-consumption needs to be reduced. We report a successful operation of a low power-consumption distributed feedback (DFB) QCL. For the reduction of power consumption, we introduced a vertical-transition structure in a core region to improve carrier transition efficiency and reduced the core volume. DFB-QCL epitaxial structure was grown by low-pressure OMVPE. The core region consists of AlInAs/GaInAs superlattices lattice-matched to InP. A first-order Bragg-grating was formed near the core region to obtain a large coupling coefficiency. A mesa-strip was formed by reactive ion etching and a buried-heterostructure was fabricated by the regrowth of semi-insulating InP. High-reflective facet coatings were also performed to decrease the mirror loss for the reduction of the threshold current. A device (5x500μm) operated with a single mode in the wavelength region from 7.23μm to 7.27μm. The threshold current and threshold voltage under CW operation at 20 °C were 52mA and 8.4V respectively. A very low threshold power-consumption as low as 0.44 W was achieved, which is among the lowest values at room temperature to our knowledge.

  4. Sensitivity of Heterointerfaces on Emission Wavelength in Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    Strasser, "Tuning quantum -cascade lasers by postgrowth rapid thermal processing," Applied Physics Letters, vol. 84, pp. 164- 166, 2004. [7] T. Roch, C...InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells," Applied Physics Letters, vol. 61, pp. 557-559, 1992. [23] A. A. Marmalyuk, O. I. Govorkov, A. V. Petrovsky, D. B...Technology. Sensitivity of Heterointerfaces on Emission Wavelength of Quantum Cascade Lasers C.A. Wang1, B. Schwarz2,3, D.F. Siriani1, M. K.Connors1

  5. Photon Cascade from a Single Crystal Phase Nanowire Quantum Dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwes Bavinck, Maaike; Jöns, Klaus D; Zieliński, Michal

    2016-01-01

    unprecedented potential to be controlled with atomic layer accuracy without random alloying. We show for the first time that crystal phase quantum dots are a source of pure single-photons and cascaded photon-pairs from type II transitions with excellent optical properties in terms of intensity and line width...... quantum optical properties for single photon application and quantum optics.......We report the first comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the optical properties of single crystal phase quantum dots in InP nanowires. Crystal phase quantum dots are defined by a transition in the crystallographic lattice between zinc blende and wurtzite segments and therefore offer...

  6. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  7. Rate equation modelling and investigation of quantum cascade detector characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sumit; Kumar, Jitendra

    2016-10-01

    A simple precise transport model has been proposed using rate equation approach for the characterization of a quantum cascade detector. The resonant tunneling transport is incorporated in the rate equation model through a resonant tunneling current density term. All the major scattering processes are included in the rate equation model. The effect of temperature on the quantum cascade detector characteristics has been examined considering the temperature dependent band parameters and the carrier scattering processes. Incorporation of the resonant tunneling process in the rate equation model improves the detector performance appreciably and reproduces the detector characteristics within experimental accuracy.

  8. Terahertz Quantum-Cascade Transmission-Line Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Tavallaee, Amir Ali

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz quantum-cascade (QC) lasers operating at 0.6 − 5 THz (λ ∼ 60 − 500 μm) are poised to become the dominant solid-state sources of continuous-wave (cw) far-infrared radiation enabling applications in terahertz spectroscopy, imaging, and sensing. QC-lasers are the longest wavelength semiconductor laser sources in which terahertz gain is obtained from electronic intersubband radiative transitions in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure quantum wells. Since their invent...

  9. Efficient method for transport simulations in quantum cascade lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maczka Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient method for simulating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers is presented. The calculations are performed within a simple approximation inspired by Büttiker probes and based on a finite model for semiconductor superlattices. The formalism of non-equilibrium Green’s functions is applied to determine the selected transport parameters in a typical structure of a terahertz laser. Results were compared with those obtained for a infinite model as well as other methods described in literature.

  10. Efficient method for transport simulations in quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maczka, Mariusz; Pawlowski, Stanislaw

    2016-12-01

    An efficient method for simulating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers is presented. The calculations are performed within a simple approximation inspired by Büttiker probes and based on a finite model for semiconductor superlattices. The formalism of non-equilibrium Green's functions is applied to determine the selected transport parameters in a typical structure of a terahertz laser. Results were compared with those obtained for a infinite model as well as other methods described in literature.

  11. Passively mode-locked fiber laser based on polarization rotation in a multiple-quantum-well waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhotnikov, O G; Salcedo, J R

    1995-01-01

    We give experimental evidence for a new type of mode-locking mechanism for Er-doped fiber lasers based on polarization evolution in an intracavity multiple-quantum-well waveguide. Experiments indicate that anisotropic properties of waveguides can continuously start the mode-locking process.

  12. Development of GaN/AlGaN Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-19

    AFOSR-Taiwan Nanoscience Initiative Project Final Report Project Title Development of GaN /AlGaN Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser...DATES COVERED 14-06-2007 to 13-06-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of GaN -Based Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...the GaN /AlGaN active region for terahertz quantum cascade lasers using MOCVD system based on the quantum cascade structure proposed by Prof. Greg Sun

  13. Measurements of the linewidth enhancement factor of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers by different optical feedback techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jumpertz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise knowledge of the linewidth enhancement factor of a semiconductor laser under actual operating conditions is of prime importance since this parameter dictates various phenomena such as linewidth broadening or optical nonlinearities enhancement. The above-threshold linewidth enhancement factor of a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser structure operated at 10∘C is determined experimentally using two different methods based on optical feedback. Both Fabry-Perot and distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers based on the same active area design are studied, the former by following the wavelength shift as a function of the feedback strength and the latter by self-mixing interferometry. The results are consistent and unveil a clear pump current dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor, with values ranging from 0.8 to about 3.

  14. Measurements of the linewidth enhancement factor of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers by different optical feedback techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumpertz, L., E-mail: louise.jumpertz@telecom-paristech.fr [Université Paris-Saclay, Télécom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris (France); MirSense, 8 avenue de la Vauve, F-91120 Palaiseau (France); Michel, F.; Pawlus, R.; Elsässer, W. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 7, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Schires, K. [Université Paris-Saclay, Télécom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris (France); Carras, M. [MirSense, 8 avenue de la Vauve, F-91120 Palaiseau (France); Grillot, F. [Université Paris-Saclay, Télécom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris (France); also with Center for High Technology Materials, University of New-Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Precise knowledge of the linewidth enhancement factor of a semiconductor laser under actual operating conditions is of prime importance since this parameter dictates various phenomena such as linewidth broadening or optical nonlinearities enhancement. The above-threshold linewidth enhancement factor of a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser structure operated at 10{sup ∘}C is determined experimentally using two different methods based on optical feedback. Both Fabry-Perot and distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers based on the same active area design are studied, the former by following the wavelength shift as a function of the feedback strength and the latter by self-mixing interferometry. The results are consistent and unveil a clear pump current dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor, with values ranging from 0.8 to about 3.

  15. A phonon scattering assisted injection and extraction based terahertz quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, E.; Fathololoumi, S.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Aers, G.; Laframboise, S. R.; Lindskog, M.; Razavipour, S. G.; Wacker, A.; Ban, D.; Liu, H. C.

    2012-04-01

    A lasing scheme for terahertz quantum cascade lasers, based on consecutive phonon-photon-phonon emissions per module, is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The charge transport of the proposed structure is modeled using a rate equation formalism. An optimization code based on a genetic algorithm was developed to find a four-well design in the GaAs/Al0.25Ga0.75As material system that maximizes the product of population inversion and oscillator strength at 150 K. The fabricated devices using Au double-metal waveguides show lasing at 3.2 THz up to 138 K. The electrical characteristics display no sign of differential resistance drop at lasing threshold, which, in conjunction with the low optical power of the device, suggest—thanks to the rate equation model—a slow depopulation rate of the lower lasing state, a hypothesis confirmed by non-equilibrium Green's function calculations.

  16. Intrinsic linewidth of quantum cascade laser frequency combs

    CERN Document Server

    Cappelli, Francesco; Riedi, Sabine; Faist, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The frequency noise power spectral density of a free-running quantum cascade laser frequency comb is investigated. A plateau is observed at high frequencies, attributed to the quantum noise limit set by the Schawlow-Townes formula for the total laser power on all comb lines. In our experiment, a linewidth of 292 Hz is measured for a total power of 25 mW. This result proves that the four-wave mixing process, responsible for the comb operation, effectively correlates the quantum noise of the individual comb lines.

  17. Influence of the material parameters on quantum cascade devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, E.; Vasanelli, A.; Delteil, A.; Devenson, J.; Teissier, R.; Baranov, A.; Andrews, A. M.; Strasser, G.; Sagnes, I.; Sirtori, C.

    2008-09-01

    An experimental investigation on the influence of the material systems on the optical properties of quantum cascade structures is presented. Three electroluminescent quantum cascade devices have been grown using GaAs /AlGaAs, GaInAs /AlInAs, and InAs /AlSb heterostructures. The devices emit at 10μm and are based on a similar bandstructure design. Our results verify that the optical quantum efficiency has the predicted dependence on the electron effective mass. We also demonstrate that the shape of the electroluminescence spectra is independent from the particular material parameters and mainly depends on the tunnel coupling between the injector state and the upper state of the radiative transition.

  18. An indirectly pumped terahertz quantum cascade laser with low injection coupling strength operating above 150 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavipour, S. G.; Dupont, E.; Fathololoumi, S.; Chan, C. W. I.; Lindskog, M.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Aers, G.; Laframboise, S. R.; Wacker, A.; Hu, Q.; Ban, D.; Liu, H. C.

    2013-05-01

    We designed and demonstrated a terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirect pump injection to the upper lasing state and phonon scattering extraction from the lower lasing state. By employing a rate equation formalism and a genetic algorithm, an optimized active region design with four-well GaAs/Al0.25Ga0.75As cascade module was obtained and epitaxially grown. A figure of merit which is defined as the ratio of modal gain versus injection current was maximized at 150 K. A fabricated device with a Au metal-metal waveguide and a top n+ GaAs contact layer lased at 2.4 THz up to 128.5 K, while another one without the top n+ GaAs lased up to 152.5 K (1.3ℏω /kB). The experimental results have been analyzed with rate equation and nonequilibrium Green's function models. A high population inversion is achieved at high temperature using a small oscillator strength of 0.28, while its combination with the low injection coupling strength of 0.85 meV results in a low current. The carefully engineered wavefunctions enhance the quantum efficiency of the device and therefore improve the output optical power even with an unusually low injection coupling strength.

  19. Retrieval of atmospheric ozone profiles from an infrared quantum cascade laser heterodyne radiometer: results and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Damien; Reburn, William J; Smith, Kevin M

    2007-10-10

    Following the recent development of a ground-based prototype quantum cascade laser heterodyne radiometer operating in the midinfrared, atmospheric ozone profile retrievals from a solar occultation measurement campaign performed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory on 21 September 2006 are presented. Retrieval is based on the optimal estimation method. High resolution (0.0073 cm(-1)) atmospheric spectra recorded by the laser heterodyne radiometer and covering a microwindow (1033.8-1034.5 cm(-1)) optimized for atmospheric ozone measurements were used as measurement vectors. As part of the evaluation of this novel instrument, a comprehensive analysis of the retrievals is presented, demonstrating the high potential of quantum cascade laser heterodyne radiometry for atmospheric sounding. Vertical resolutions of 2 km near the ground and about 3 km in the stratosphere were obtained. The information content of the retrieval was found to be up to 48 bits, which is much higher than any other passive ground-based instrument. Frequency mismatches of several absorption peaks between the forward model and experimental spectra have been observed and significantly contribute to the retrieval noise error in the upper-troposphere lower-stratosphere region. Retrieved ozone vertical profiles were compared to ozonesonde data recorded at similar latitudes. The agreement is generally excellent except for the 20 to 25 km peak in ozone concentration, where ozonesonde data were found to be 20% lower than the amount retrieved from the laser heterodyne radiometer spectra. Quantum cascade laser based heterodyne radiometry in the midinfrared has been demonstrated to provide high spectral resolution and unprecedented vertical resolution for a passive sounder in a highly compact and mechanically simple package.

  20. THz quantum cascade lasers for standoff molecule detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Weng Wah; Wanke, Michael Clement; Lerttamrab, Maytee; Waldmueller, Ines

    2007-10-01

    Remote optical detection of molecules, agents, and energetic materials has many applications to national security interests. Currently there is significant interest in determining under what circumstances THz frequency coverage will aid in a complete sensing package. Sources of coherent THz frequency (i.e. 0.1 to 10 THz) electromagnetic radiation with requisite power levels, frequency agility, compactness and reliability represent the single greatest obstacle in establishing a THz technology base, but recent advances in semiconductor-based quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) offer huge improvements towards the ultimate THz source goals. This project advanced the development of narrow-linewidth THz quantum cascade lasers. We developed theoretical tools to guide the improvement of standard THz quantum cascade lasers, the investigation of nonlinear optics employing infrared QCLs, and the exploration of quantum coherence to improve QCL performance. The latter was aimed especially towards achieving high temperature operation. In addition we developed a computer algorithm capable of shifting the frequencies of an existing THz QCL to a different frequency and invented a new type of laser that may enable room temperature THz generation in a electrically driven solid-state source.

  1. Mid-Infrared Quantum-Dot Quantum Cascade Laser: A Theoretical Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Michael

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of a microscopic model for intersubband gain from electrically pumped quantum-dot structures we investigate electrically pumped quantum-dots as active material for a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser. Our previous calculations have indicated that these structures could operate with reduced threshold current densities while also achieving a modal gain comparable to that of quantum well active materials. Here, we study the influence of two important quantum-dot material parameters, namely inhomogeneous broadening and quantum-dot sheet density, on the performance of a proposed quantum cascade laser design. In terms of achieving a positive modal net gain, a high quantum-dot density can compensate for moderately high inhomogeneous broadening, but at a cost of increased threshold current density. However, by minimizing quantum-dot density with presently achievable inhomogeneous broadening and total losses, significantly lower threshold densities than those reported in quantum-well quantum-cascade lasers are predicted by our theory.

  2. InAs based terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandstetter, Martin, E-mail: martin.brandstetter@tuwien.ac.at; Kainz, Martin A.; Krall, Michael; Schönhuber, Sebastian; Unterrainer, Karl [Photonics Institute and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Technische Universität Wien, Gusshausstrasse 27-29, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Zederbauer, Tobias; Schrenk, Werner; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Strasser, Gottfried [Institute for Solid State Electronics and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Technische Universität Wien, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Detz, Hermann [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2, 1010 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-01-04

    We demonstrate terahertz lasing emission from a quantum cascade structure, realized with InAs/AlAs{sub 0.16}Sb{sub 0.84} heterostructures. Due to the lower effective electron mass, InAs based active regions are expected to provide a higher optical gain compared to structures consisting of GaAs or InGaAs. The growth by molecular beam epitaxy enabled the fabrication of monolayer-thick barriers, required for the active region, which is based on a 3-well resonant phonon depletion design. Devices were processed in a double-metal waveguide geometry to ensure high mode confinement and low optical losses. Lasing emission at 3.8 THz was observed at liquid helium temperatures by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the layered structure in order to suppress parasitic scattering channels. These results demonstrate the feasibility of InAs based active regions for terahertz quantum cascade lasers, potentially enabling higher operating temperatures.

  3. Delay time calculation for dual-wavelength quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamadou, A., E-mail: abd-hamado@yahoo.fr [Département des Sciences et Techniques, Faculté des Sciences et de la Technologie, Université de Bordj Bou Arreridj 34000 (Algeria); Laboratoire d’étude des surfaces et interfaces des matériaux solides (LESIMS), Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Lamari, S. [Laboratoire d’étude des surfaces et interfaces des matériaux solides (LESIMS), Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Sétif 1, 19000 (Algeria); Thobel, J.-L. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR 8520, Université Lille1, Avenue Poincaré, BP 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cédex (France)

    2013-11-28

    In this paper, we calculate the turn-on delay (t{sub th}) and buildup (Δt) times of a midinfrared quantum cascade laser operating simultaneously on two laser lines having a common upper level. The approach is based on the four-level rate equations model describing the variation of the electron number in the states and the photon number present within the cavity. We obtain simple analytical formulae for the turn-on delay and buildup times that determine the delay times and numerically apply our results to both the single and bimode states of a quantum cascade laser, in addition the effects of current injection on t{sub th} and Δt are explored.

  4. Emergence of a turbulent cascade in a quantum gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navon, Nir; Gaunt, Alexander L.; Smith, Robert P.; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2016-11-01

    A central concept in the modern understanding of turbulence is the existence of cascades of excitations from large to small length scales, or vice versa. This concept was introduced in 1941 by Kolmogorov and Obukhov, and such cascades have since been observed in various systems, including interplanetary plasmas, supernovae, ocean waves and financial markets. Despite much progress, a quantitative understanding of turbulence remains a challenge, owing to the interplay between many length scales that makes theoretical simulations of realistic experimental conditions difficult. Here we observe the emergence of a turbulent cascade in a weakly interacting homogeneous Bose gas—a quantum fluid that can be theoretically described on all relevant length scales. We prepare a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical box, drive it out of equilibrium with an oscillating force that pumps energy into the system at the largest length scale, study its nonlinear response to the periodic drive, and observe a gradual development of a cascade characterized by an isotropic power-law distribution in momentum space. We numerically model our experiments using the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and find excellent agreement with the measurements. Our experiments establish the uniform Bose gas as a promising new medium for investigating many aspects of turbulence, including the interplay between vortex and wave turbulence, and the relative importance of quantum and classical effects.

  5. Influence of nonparabolicity on electronic structure of quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuković, Nikola; Milanović, Vitomir; Radovanović, Jelena

    2014-06-01

    We analyze the influence of nonparabolicity on the bound electronic states in the conduction-band of quantum wells in external electric field. Numerical results, obtained by transfer matrix method are presented for active region of GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As quantum cascade laser. The structure was initially optimized by genetic algorithm, using Kane's model of nonparabolicity, with emission wavelength set to λ≈15.1 μm. However, our numerical results indicate the change in lasing wavelength to 14.04 μm when using a more comprehensive description of nonparabolicity.

  6. Entangled Photons from Radiative Cascades in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    CERN Document Server

    Akopian, N; Poem, E; Berlatzky, Y; Avron, J; Gershoni, D; Gerardot, B D; Petroff, P M

    2005-01-01

    We show, for the first time, that polarization-entangled photon pairs can be produced from the biexciton radiative cascade in a semiconductor quantum dot. We select an energy window that erases the ``which path'' information contained in the colors of the emitted photons, and use tomographic analysis to demonstrate that the photon pair violate Bell's inequality and satisfy Peres criterion for entanglement by more than 3 standard deviations of the experimental uncertainty. Our quantitative analysis show that semiconductor quantum dots can be used as sources for ``event-ready'' entangled photons.

  7. Hole transport simulations in SiGe cascade quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonić, Z.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2004-03-01

    Hole transport in p-Si/SiGe quantum well cascade structures has been analyzed using a rate equation method with thermal balancing (self-consistent energy balance method). The carrier and energy relaxation due to alloy disorder, acoustic and optical phonon scattering are included. The model includes the in-plane k-space anisotropy. The results are compared to those obtained from Monte Carlo simulations and from the basic particle rate equation method.

  8. Quantum steering in cascaded four-wave mixing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Lv, Shuchao; Jing, Jietai

    2017-07-24

    Quantum steering is used to describe the "spooky action-at-a-distance" nonlocality raised in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox, which is important for understanding entanglement distribution and constructing quantum networks. Here, in this paper, we study an experimentally feasible scheme for generating quantum steering based on cascaded four-wave-mixing (FWM) processes in hot rubidium (Rb) vapor. Quantum steering, including bipartite steering and genuine tripartite steering among the output light fields, is theoretically analyzed. We find the corresponding gain regions in which the bipartite and tripartite steering exist. The results of bipartite steering can be used to establish a hierarchical steering model in which one beam can steer the other two beams in the whole gain region; however, the other two beams cannot steer the first beam simultaneously. Moreover, the other two beams cannot steer with each other in the whole gain region. More importantly, we investigate the gain dependence of the existence of the genuine tripartite steering and we find that the genuine tripartite steering exists in most of the whole gain region in the ideal case. Also we discuss the effect of losses on the genuine tripartite steering. Our results pave the way to experimental demonstration of quantum steering in cascaded FWM process.

  9. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser With Efficient Coupling and Beam Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Lin, Robert H.; Williams, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are unipolar semiconductor lasers, where the wavelength of emitted radiation is determined by the engineering of quantum states within the conduction band in coupled multiple-quantum-well heterostructures to have the desired energy separation. The recent development of terahertz QCLs has provided a new generation of solid-state sources for radiation in the terahertz frequency range. Terahertz QCLs have been demonstrated from 0.84 to 5.0 THz both in pulsed mode and continuous wave mode (CW mode). The approach employs a resonant-phonon depopulation concept. The metal-metal (MM) waveguide fabrication is performed using Cu-Cu thermo-compression bonding to bond the GaAs/AlGaAs epitaxial layer to a GaAs receptor wafer.

  10. Mid-infrared interband cascade photodetectors with high quantum efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhao-Bing; Singh, Anjali; Rigg, Kevin; Krishna, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Antimony-based Interband Cascade (IC) photodetectors are emerging as viable candidates for highperformance infrared applications, especially at high operating temperatures. In our previous IC detector designs using InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattices, the quantum efficiency was relatively low as the designs were optimized for high signal to noise ratio. Here we report our recent development of low-noise mid-IR IC photodetectors with high external quantum efficiency. By adopting IC detectors with thicker absorber designs, the quantum efficiency of these mid-IR IC detectors has been increased up to 35%. These IC devices continue to have low-dark current and high temperature operations. Some further analysis on the device characteristics is also presented.

  11. New quantum cascade laser sources for sensing applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troccoli, Mariano

    2017-05-01

    In this presentation we will review our most recent results on development of Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs) for analytical and industrial applications. QCLs have demonstrated the capability to cover the entire range of Mid-IR, Far-IR, and THz wavelengths by skillful tuning of the material design and composition and by use of intrinsic material properties via a set of techniques collectively called "bandgap engineering". The use of MOCVD, pioneered on industrial scale by AdTech Optics, has enabled the deployment of QCL devices into a diverse range of environments and applications. QCLs can be tailored to the specific application requirements due to their unprecedented flexibility in design and thanks to the leveraging of well-known III-V fabrication technologies inherited from the NIR domain. Nevertheless, several applications and new frontiers in R and D need the constant support of new developments in device features, capabilities, and performances. We have developed a wide range of devices, from high power, high efficiency multi-mode sources, to narrow-band, single mode devices with low-power consumption, and from non-linear, multi-wavelength generating devices to broadband sources and multi-emitter arrays. All our devices are grown and processed using MOCVD technology and allow us to attain competitive performances across the whole mid-IR spectral range. This talk will present an overview of our current achievements. References 1. M. Troccoli, "High power emission and single mode operation of quantum cascade lasers for industrial applications", J. Sel. Topics in Quantum Electron., 21 (6), 1-7 (2015). Invited Review. 2. Seungyong Jung, Aiting Jiang, Yifan Jiang, Karun Vijayraghavan, Xiaojun Wang, Mariano Troccoli, and Mikhail A. Belkin, "Broadly Tunable Monolithic Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Sources", Nature Comm. 5, 4267 (2014).. 3. Mariano Troccoli, Arkadiy Lyakh, Jenyu Fan, Xiaojun Wang, Richard Maulini, Alexei G Tsekoun, Rowel Go, C Kumar N Patel, "Long

  12. Emergence of a Turbulent Cascade in a Quantum Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Navon, Nir; Smith, Robert P; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    In the modern understanding of turbulence, a central concept is the existence of cascades of excitations from large to small lengthscales, or vice-versa. This concept was introduced in 1941 by Kolmogorov and Obukhov, and the phenomenon has since been observed in a variety of systems, including interplanetary plasmas, supernovae, ocean waves, and financial markets. Despite a lot of progress, quantitative understanding of turbulence remains a challenge due to the interplay of many lengthscales that usually thwarts theoretical simulations of realistic experimental conditions. Here we observe the emergence of a turbulent cascade in a weakly interacting homogeneous Bose gas, a quantum fluid that is amenable to a theoretical description on all relevant lengthscales. We prepare a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in an optical box, drive it out of equilibrium with an oscillating force that pumps energy into the system at the largest lengthscale, study the BEC's nonlinear response to the periodic drive, and observe a gr...

  13. Tunable fiber laser based on a cascaded structure consisting of in-line MZI and traditional MZI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zheng-rong; Yang, He; Zhang, Wei-hua

    2016-11-01

    A tunable erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser with a cascaded structure consisting of in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) and traditional MZI is proposed. The transmission spectrum of the in-line MZI is modulated by the traditional MZI, which determines the period of the cascaded structure, while the in-line MZI's transmission spectrum is the outer envelope curve of the cascaded structure's transmission spectrum. A stable single-wavelength lasing operation is obtained at 1 527.14 nm. The linewidth is less than 0.07 nm with a side-mode suppression ratio ( SMSR) over 48 dB. Fixing the in-line MZI structure on a furnace, when the temperature changes from 30 °C to 230 °C, the central wavelength can be tuned within the range of 12.4 nm.

  14. Fully automatized quantum cascade laser design by genetic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bismuto, A.; Terazzi, R.; Hinkov, B.; Beck, M.; Faist, J.

    2012-07-01

    Using a transport model based on the density matrix formalism, a fully automatized technique to design quantum cascade structures in the mid-infrared is presented that implements a genetic algorithm where the wallplug efficiency has been used as merit factor. Starting from a reference design, the model converges after few generations on an optimized design that presents a better carrier injection in the upper lasing state. Both the designs have been fabricated using buried heterostructure process and the optimized design shows a pronounced increase in the laser operation range and higher output powers. In good agreement with the simulations, the laser efficiency increases from 5% to 12%.

  15. Optical mode control of surface-plasmon quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, V.; Bahriz, M.; Palomo, J.; Wilson, L. R.; Krysa, A. B.; Sirtori, C.; Austin, D. A.; Cockburn, J. W.; Roberts, J. S.; Colombelli, R.

    2007-04-01

    Surface-plasmon waveguides based on metallic strips can provide a two dimensional optical confinement. This concept has been successfully applied to quantum cascade lasers, processed as ridge waveguides, to demonstrate that the lateral extension of the optical mode can be influenced solely by the width of the device top contact. For devices operating at a wavelength of λ ≈7.5 μm, the room-temperature threshold current density was reduced from 6.3 kA/cm2 to 4.4 kA/cm2 with respect to larger devices with full top metallization.

  16. Plasmonic lens enhanced mid-infrared quantum cascade detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrer, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.harrer@tuwien.ac.at; Schwarz, Benedikt; Gansch, Roman; Reininger, Peter; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried [Institute for Solid State Electronics and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-27

    We demonstrate monolithic integrated quantum cascade detectors enhanced by plasmonic lenses. Surface normal incident mid-infrared radiation is coupled to surface plasmon polaritons guided to and detected by the active region of the detector. The lens extends the optical effective active area of the device up to a 5 times larger area than for standard mesa detectors or pixel devices while the electrical active region stays the same. The extended optical area increases the absorption efficiency of the presented device as well as the room temperature performance while it offers a flexible platform for various detector geometries. A photocurrent response increase at room temperature up to a factor of 6 was observed.

  17. Modelling of GaN quantum dot terahertz cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, A.; Khorrami, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper GaN based spherical quantum dot cascade lasers has been modelled, where the generation of the terahertz waves are obtained. The Schrödinger, Poisson, and the laser rate equations have been solved self-consistently including all dominant physical effects such as piezoelectric and spontaneous polarization in nitride-based QDs and the effects of the temperature. The exact value of the energy levels, the wavefunctions, the lifetimes of electron levels, and the lasing frequency are calculated. Also the laser parameters such as the optical gain, the output power and the threshold current density have been calculated at different temperatures and applied electric fields.

  18. Higher order nonlinearity and synchronization of quantum cascade lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taraprasad Chattopadhyay; Prosenjit Bhattacharyya

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a closed-form analysis of the synchronization phenomenon of the quantum cascade laser (QCL). The analysis has been made with considering higher order nonlinearity of the modal gain of the QCL. The frequency response characteristics of the synchronized QCL along with the stability of the locked state, the effect of nonlinearity on the lockband of the QCL and the amplitude limiting action of the locked QCL have been calculated. The analysis demonstrates the effect of higher order nonlinearity on the properties of the synchronized QCL.

  19. Quantum cascade laser: Applications in chemical detection and environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the structural parameter optimization of the active region of a GaAs-based quantum cascade laser in order to maximize the optical gain of the laser at the characteristic wavelengths, which are best suited for detection of pollutant gasses, such as SO2, HNO3, CH4, and NH3, in the ambient air by means of direct absorption. The procedure relies on applying elaborate tools for global optimization, such as the genetic algorithm. One of the important goals is to extend the applicability of a single active region design to the detection of several compounds absorbing at close wave-lengths, and this is achieved by introducing a strong external magnetic field perpendicularly to the epitaxial layers. The field causes two-dimensional continuous energy subbands to split into the series of discrete Landau levels. Since the arrangement of Landau levels depends strongly on the magnitude of the magnetic field, this enables one to control the population inversion in the active region, and hence the optical gain. Furthermore, strong effects of band non-parabolicity result in subtle changes of the lasing wavelength at magnetic fields which maximize the gain, thus providing a path for fine-tuning of the output radiation properties and changing the target compound for detection. The numerical results are presented for quantum cascade laser structures designed to emit at specified wavelengths in the mid-infrared part of the spectrum.

  20. Wavefront Engineering of Quantum Cascade Lasers Using Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nanfang; Capasso, Federico

    2012-12-01

    We review recent work on beam shaping of mid-infrared and far-infrared (terahertz) quantum cascade lasers using plasmonics. Essentials of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are discussed; these include the operating principle based on bandstructure engineering, and beam quality problems associated with laser waveguide design. We explain how metal and semiconductor microstructures can effectively tailor the dispersion properties of mid- and far-infrared surface plasmon polaritons, and therefore can be used as important building blocks for optical devices in these frequencies. The physical principles of three structures are discussed: plasmonic Bragg gratings, designer (spoof) surface plasmon polariton structures, and channel polariton structures. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these structures by realizing various functionalities in QCLs, ranging from beam collimation, polarization control, to multibeam emission, and spatial wavelength demultiplexing. Plasmonics offers a monolithic, compact, and low-loss solution to the problem of poor beam quality of QCLs and may have a large impact on applications such as sensing, light detection and ranging (LIDAR), free-space optical communication, and heterodyne detection of chemicals. The plasmonic designs are scalable and applicable to near-infrared active or passive optical devices.

  1. Temperature independent infrared responsivity of a quantum dot quantum cascade photodetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng-Jiao; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Shu-Man, E-mail: liusm@semi.ac.cn; Ren, Fei; Ning, Zhen-Dong; Ye, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Jun-Qi; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Liu, Feng-Qi, E-mail: fqliu@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Zhan-Guo [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Beijing Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Semiconductor Materials and Devices, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-06-20

    We demonstrate a quantum dot quantum cascade photodetector with a hybrid active region of InAs quantum dots and an InGaAs quantum well, which exhibited a temperature independent response at 4.5 μm. The normal incident responsivity reached 10.3 mA/W at 120 K and maintained a value of 9 mA/W up to 260 K. It exhibited a specific detectivity above 10{sup 11} cm Hz{sup 1/2} W{sup −1} at 77 K, which remained at 10{sup 8} cm Hz{sup 1/2} W{sup −1} at 260 K. We ascribe the device's good thermal stability of infrared response to the three-dimensional quantum confinement of the InAs quantum dots incorporated in the active region.

  2. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based CO Sensor for Fire Warning Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maxion Technologies, Inc. (Maxion) proposes to develop and field test a Carbon Monoxide (CO)-sensor prototype for post fire cleanup and CO detection. The sensor will...

  3. Mapping Atmospheric Ammonia Emissions Using a Mobile Quantum Cascade Laser-based Open-path Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Miller, D. J.; Khan, M. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor to atmospheric fine particulate matter, with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. Despite the importance of atmospheric ammonia, its spatial/temporal variation is poorly characterized, and the knowledge of its sources, sinks, and transport is severely limited. Existing measurements suggest that traffic exhaust may provide significant amounts of ammonia in urban areas, which cause greater impacts on particulate matter formation and urban air quality. To capture the spatial and temporal variation of ammonia emissions, a portable, low power sensor with high time resolution is necessary. We have developed a portable open-path ammonia sensor with a detection limit of 0.5 ppbv ammonia for 1 s measurements. The sensor has a power consumption of about 60 W and is capable of running on a car battery continuously for 24 hours. An additional laser has been coupled to the sensor to yield concurrent N2O and CO measurements as tracers for determining various sources. The overall sensor prototype fits on a 60 cm × 20 cm aluminum breadboard. Roadside measurements indicated NH3/CO emission ratios of 4.1±5.4 ppbv/ppmv from a fleet of 320 vehicles, which agree with existing on-ramp measurements. Urban measurements in the Baltimore and Washington, DC metropolitan areas have shown significant ammonia mixing ratios concurrent with carbon monoxide levels from the morning and evening rush hours. On-road measurements of our open-path sensor have also been performed continuously from the Midwest to Princeton, NJ including urban areas such as Pittsburgh, tunnels, and relatively clean conditions. The emission ratios of ammonia against CO and/or CO2 help identify the sources and amounts of both urban and agricultural ammonia emissions. Preliminary data from both spatial mapping, monitoring, and vehicle exhaust measurements suggest that urban ammonia emissions from fossil fuel combustion are significant and may provide an unrecognized source in the atmospheric ammonia budget. Ongoing efforts include spatial mapping of ammonia and other tracers in the New York City and Philadelphia metropolitan areas. Further comparison with TES satellite ammonia retrieval will help to put the measurements into a larger geographical and temporal context.

  4. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensors for Hypersonic Flows (7274-050) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ground test facilities are used by NASA to simulate the conditions present during flight at hypersonic velocities, to test thermal protection materials for existing...

  5. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Local Oscillator for Terahertz Astronomy (7275-070) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Scientists at JPL measure radiation emitted in the far-infrared (or terahertz) region of the spectrum to study the history of the universe and the Earth's...

  6. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based CO Sensor for Fire Warning Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maxion Technologies and Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) propose to jointly develop a compact, rugged, highly reliable, and autonomous sensor for in-situ monitoring of...

  7. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensors for Hypersonic Flows (7275-020) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) proposes to design, build, test, and deliver to NASA a THz wavelength absorption sensor for continuous monitoring of atomic oxygen...

  8. Terahertz Quantum-Cascade Transmission-Line Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallaee, Amir Ali

    Terahertz quantum-cascade (QC) lasers operating at 0.6 - 5 THz (λ ˜ 60 - 500 µm) are poised to become the dominant solid-state sources of continuous-wave (cw) far-infrared radiation enabling applications in terahertz spectroscopy, imaging, and sensing. QC-lasers are the longest wavelength semiconductor laser sources in which terahertz gain is obtained from electronic intersubband radiative transitions in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure quantum wells. Since their invention in 2001, rapid development has enabled demonstration of cw powers greater than 100 mW. However, challenges still remain in the areas of operating temperature, laser efficiency and power, and beam quality to name a few. The highest-temperature operation of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (200 K pulsed, 117 K cw) depends on the use of a low-loss "metal-metal" waveguide where the active gain material is sandwiched between two metal cladding layers; a technique similar, in concept, to microstrip transmission line technology at microwave frequencies. Due to the subwavelength transverse dimensions of the metal-metal waveguide, however, obtaining a directive beam pattern and efficient out-coupling of THz power is non-trivial. This thesis reports the demonstration of a one-dimensional waveguide for terahertz quantum-cascade lasers that acts as a leaky-wave antenna and tailors laser radiation in one dimension to a directional beam. This scheme adapts microwave transmission-line metamaterial concepts to a planar structure realized in terahertz metal-metal waveguide technology and is fundamentally different from distributed feedback/photonic crystal structures that work based on Bragg scattering of propagating modes. The leaky-wave metamaterial antenna operates based on a propagating mode with an effective phase index smaller than unity such that it radiates in the surface direction via a leaky-wave mechanism. Surface emission (˜ 40° from broadside) with a single directive beam (FWHM ˜ 15°) at 2.74 THz

  9. Exhaled nitric oxide monitoring by quantum cascade laser: comparison with chemiluminescent and electrochemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandon, Julien; Högman, Marieann; Merkus, Peter J. F. M.; van Amsterdam, Jan; Harren, Frans J. M.; Cristescu, Simona M.

    2012-01-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is considered an indicator in the diagnostics and management of asthma. In this study we present a laser-based sensor for measuring FENO. It consists of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) combined with a multi-pass cell and wavelength modulation spectroscopy for the detection of NO at the sub-part-per-billion by volume (ppbv, 1∶10-9) level. The characteristics and diagnostic performance of the sensor were assessed. A detection limit of 0.5 ppbv was demonstrated with a relatively simple design. The QCL-based sensor was compared with two market sensors, a chemiluminescent analyzer (NOA 280, Sievers) and a portable hand-held electrochemical analyzer (MINO®, Aerocrine AB, Sweden). FENO from 20 children diagnosed with asthma and treated with inhaled corticosteroids were measured. Data were found to be clinically acceptable within 1.1 ppbv between the QCL-based sensor and chemiluminescent sensor and within 1.7 ppbv when compared to the electrochemical sensor. The QCL-based sensor was tested on healthy subjects at various expiratory flow rates for both online and offline sampling procedures. The extended NO parameters, i.e. the alveolar region, airway wall, diffusing capacity, and flux were calculated and showed a good agreement with the previously reported values.

  10. Exhaled nitric oxide monitoring by quantum cascade laser: comparison with chemiluminescent and electrochemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandon, Julien; Högman, Marieann; Merkus, Peter J F M; van Amsterdam, Jan; Harren, Frans J M; Cristescu, Simona M

    2012-01-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (F(E)NO) is considered an indicator in the diagnostics and management of asthma. In this study we present a laser-based sensor for measuring F(E)NO. It consists of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) combined with a multi-pass cell and wavelength modulation spectroscopy for the detection of NO at the sub-part-per-billion by volume (ppbv, 110(-9)) level. The characteristics and diagnostic performance of the sensor were assessed. A detection limit of 0.5 ppbv was demonstrated with a relatively simple design. The QCL-based sensor was compared with two market sensors, a chemiluminescent analyzer (NOA 280, Sievers) and a portable hand-held electrochemical analyzer (MINO, Aerocrine AB, Sweden). F(E)NO from 20 children diagnosed with asthma and treated with inhaled corticosteroids were measured. Data were found to be clinically acceptable within 1.1 ppbv between the QCL-based sensor and chemiluminescent sensor and within 1.7 ppbv when compared to the electrochemical sensor. The QCL-based sensor was tested on healthy subjects at various expiratory flow rates for both online and offline sampling procedures. The extended NO parameters, i.e. the alveolar region, airway wall, diffusing capacity, and flux were calculated and showed a good agreement with the previously reported values.

  11. Improved terahertz quantum cascade laser with variable height barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Alpar; Chashmahcharagh, Reza; Kovacs, Istvan; Lugli, Paolo; Vijayraghavan, Karun; Belkin, Mikhail A.; Jirauschek, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Using an ensemble Monte-Carlo analysis, it is found that relaxing the constraint of identical barrier heights can result in an improved temperature performance. Exploiting this additional design degree of freedom, modified structures with non-uniform barrier heights are developed based on the current record temperature design. For an optimized structure with reduced diagonality, we predict an increase of 31 K for the maximum operating temperature. Furthermore, we develop improved designs with the same oscillator strength as for the reference design. Using a genetic algorithm for optimization, an improvement of the maximum operating temperature by 38 K is obtained. These results aim to show the potential of varying the barrier heigths for the design of high temperature performance terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

  12. Analytical expression for the second threshold in quantum cascade lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Vukovic, Nikola; Milanovic, Vitomir; Boiko, Dmitri L

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained a closed-form expression for the threshold of Risken-Nummedal-Graham-Haken (RNGH) multimode instability in a Fabry-P\\'erot (FP) cavity quantum cascade laser (QCL). This simple analytical expression is a versatile tool that can easily be applied in practical situations which require analysis of QCL dynamic behavior and estimation of its second threshold. Our model for a FP cavity laser accounts for the carrier coherence grating and carrier population grating as well as their relaxation due to carrier diffusion. In the model, the RNGH instability threshold is analyzed using a second-order bi-orthogonal perturbation theory and we confirm our analytical solution by a comparison with the numerical simulations. In particular, the model predicts a low second threshold in QCLs. This agrees very well with experimental data available in the literature.

  13. Fast terahertz imaging using a quantum cascade amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yuan, E-mail: yr235@cam.ac.uk; Wallis, Robert; Jessop, David Stephen; Degl' Innocenti, Riccardo; Klimont, Adam; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-06

    A terahertz (THz) imaging scheme based on the effect of self-mixing in a 2.9 THz quantum cascade (QC) amplifier has been demonstrated. By coupling an antireflective-coated silicon lens to the facet of a QC laser, with no external optical feedback, the laser mirror losses are enhanced to fully suppress lasing action, creating a THz QC amplifier. The addition of reflection from an external target to the amplifier creates enough optical feedback to initiate lasing action and the resulting emission enhances photon-assisted transport, which in turn reduces the voltage across the device. At the peak gain point, the maximum photon density coupled back leads to a prominent self-mixing effect in the QC amplifier, leading to a high sensitivity, with a signal to noise ratio up to 55 dB, along with a fast data acquisition speed of 20 000 points per second.

  14. Free-space communication based on quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanwei, Liu; Shenqiang, Zhai; Jinchuan, Zhang; Yuhong, Zhou; Zhiwei, Jia; Fengqi, Liu; Zhanguo, Wang

    2015-09-01

    A free-space communication based on a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) is presented. A room-temperature continuous-wave distributed-feedback (DFB) QCL combined with a mid-infrared detector comprise the basic unit of the communication system. Sinusoidal signals at a highest frequency of 40 MHz and modulated video signals with a carrier frequency of 30 MHz were successfully transmitted with this experimental setup. Our research has provided a proof-of-concept demonstration of space optical communication application with QCL. The highest operation frequency of our setup was determined by the circuit-limited modulation bandwidth. A high performance communication system can be obtained with improved modulation circuit system. Project supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Nos. 2013CB632801, 2013CB632803) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61435014, 61306058, 61274094).

  15. Temperature-dependent coherent carrier transport in quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman; Menyuk, Curtis R, E-mail: anisuzzaman@umbc.edu [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The temperature dependence of coherent carrier transport in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is studied in this paper. It was found that coherent carrier transport in QCLs decreases as the temperature increases because the coherence between the injector and active region energy levels decays at a faster rate with increasing temperature. Calculations show that the coherence time decreases by at least a factor of two as the temperature increases from 100 K to room temperature. Electron transport from the injector regions into the active regions and vice versa is a highly coherent process that becomes less efficient with decreasing coherence time and hence becomes less efficient with increasing temperature. As a consequence, when the temperature increases, the population of the upper lasing levels in active regions decreases, the population of the lower lasing levels increases and performance suffers.

  16. Spectrally resolved far-fields of terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Brandstetter, Martin; Krall, Michael; Kainz, Martin A; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron M; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a convenient and fast method to measure the spectrally resolved far-fields of multimode terahertz quantum cascade lasers by combining a microbolometer focal plane array with an FTIR spectrometer. Far-fields of fundamental TM0 and higher lateral order TM1 modes of multimode Fabry-P\\'erot type lasers have been distinguished, which very well fit to the results obtained by a 3D finite-element simulation. Furthermore, multimode random laser cavities have been investigated, analyzing the contribution of each single laser mode to the total far-field. The presented method is thus an important tool to gain in-depth knowledge of the emission properties of multimode laser cavities at terahertz frequencies, which become increasingly important for future sensing applications.

  17. Ultrafast, high repetition rate, ultraviolet, fiber-laser-based source: application towards Yb+ fast quantum-logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mahmood Irtiza; Petrasiunas, Matthew Joseph; Bentley, Christopher D B; Taylor, Richard L; Carvalho, André R R; Hope, Joseph J; Streed, Erik W; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-07-25

    Trapped ions are one of the most promising approaches for the realization of a universal quantum computer. Faster quantum logic gates could dramatically improve the performance of trapped-ion quantum computers, and require the development of suitable high repetition rate pulsed lasers. Here we report on a robust frequency upconverted fiber laser based source, able to deliver 2.5 ps ultraviolet (UV) pulses at a stabilized repetition rate of 300.00000 MHz with an average power of 190 mW. The laser wavelength is resonant with the strong transition in Ytterbium (Yb+) at 369.53 nm and its repetition rate can be scaled up using high harmonic mode locking. We show that our source can produce arbitrary pulse patterns using a programmable pulse pattern generator and fast modulating components. Finally, simulations demonstrate that our laser is capable of performing resonant, temperature-insensitive, two-qubit quantum logic gates on trapped Yb+ ions faster than the trap period and with fidelity above 99%.

  18. Efficient method for the calculation of dissipative quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greck, Peter; Birner, Stefan; Huber, Bernhard; Vogl, Peter

    2015-03-09

    We present a novel and very efficient method for calculating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). It follows the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) framework but sidesteps the calculation of lesser self-energies by replacing them by a quasi-equilibrium expression. This method generalizes the phenomenological Büttiker probe model by taking into account individual scattering mechanisms. It is orders of magnitude more efficient than a fully self-consistent NEGF calculation for realistic devices. We apply this method to a new THz QCL design which works up to 250 K - according to our calculations.

  19. New quantum cascade laser architectures: II-VI quantum cascade emitters, high k-space lasing, and short injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Kale J.

    Quantum cascade (QC) lasers are today's most capable mid-infrared light sources. With up to watt-level room temperature emission over a broad swath of mid-infrared wavelengths, these tiny semiconductor devices enable a variety of applications and technologies such as ultra-sensitive systems for detecting trace molecules in the vapor phase. The foundation of a QC structure lies in alternating hundreds of wide- and narrow-bandgap semiconductor layers to form a coupled quantum well system. In this way, the laws of quantum mechanics are used to precisely engineer electron transport and create artificial optical transitions. The result is a material with capabilities not found in nature, a truly "designer" material. As a central theme in this thesis, we stress the remarkable flexibility of the quantum cascade---the ability to highly tailor device structure for creative design concepts. The QC idea, in fact, relies on no particular material system for its implementation. While all QC lasers to date have been fabricated from III--V materials such as InGaAs/AlInAs, I detail our preliminary work on ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe---a II--VI materials system---where we have demonstrated electroluminescence. We then further discuss how the inherent QC flexibility can be exploited for new devices that extend QC performance and capabilities. In this regard, we offer the examples of excited state transitions and short injectors. Excited state transitions are an avenue to enhancing optical gain, which is especially needed for longer-wavelength devices where optical losses hinder performance. Likewise, shortening the QC injector length over a conventional QC structure has powerful implications for threshold current, output power, and wall-plug efficiency. In both cases, novel physical effects are discovered. Pumping electrons into highly excited states led to the discovery of high k-space lasing from highly non-equilibrium electron distributions. Shortening QC injector regions allowed us to

  20. Optical dynamics in low-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures. Quantum dots and quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Carsten

    2008-07-01

    This work is focused on the optical dynamics of mesoscopic semiconductor heterostructures, using as prototypes zero-dimensional quantum dots and quantum cascade lasers which consist of quasitwo- dimensional quantum wells. Within a density matrix theory, a microscopic many-particle theory is applied to study scattering effects in these structures: the coupling to external as well as local fields, electron-phonon coupling, coupling to impurities, and Coulomb coupling. For both systems, the investigated effects are compared to experimentally observed results obtained during the past years. In quantum dots, the three-dimensional spatial confinement leads to the necessity to consider a quantum kinetic description of the dynamics, resulting in non-Markovian electron-phonon effects. This can be seen in the spectral phonon sidebands due to interaction with acoustic phonons as well as a damping of nonlinear Rabi oscillations which shows a nonmonotonous intensity and pulse duration dependence. An analysis of the inclusion of the self-interaction of the quantum dot shows that no dynamical local field terms appear for the simple two-level model. Considering local fields which have their origin in many quantum dots, consequences for a two-level quantum dot such as a zero-phonon line broadening and an increasing signal in photon echo experiments are found. For the use of quantum dots in an optical spin control scheme, it is found that the dephasing due to the electron-phonon interaction can be dominant in certain regimes. Furthermore, soliton and breather solutions are studied analytically in nonlinear quantum dot ensembles. Generalizing to quasi-two-dimensional structures, the intersubband dynamics of quantum cascade laser structures is investigated. A dynamical theory is considered in which the temporal evolution of the subband populations and the current density as well as the influence of scattering effects is studied. In the nonlinear regime, the scattering dependence and

  1. Optimization of optical nonlinearities in quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jing

    Nonlinearities in quantum cascade lasers (QCL's) have wide applications in wavelength tunability and ultra-short pulse generation. In this thesis, optical nonlinearities in InGaAs/AlInAs-based mid-infrared (MIR) QCL's with quadruple resonant levels are investigated. Design optimization for the second-harmonic generation (SHG) of the device is presented. Performance characteristics associated with the third-order nonlinearities are also analyzed. The design optimization for SHG efficiency is obtained utilizing techniques from supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM) with both material-dependent effective mass and band nonparabolicity. Current flow and power output of the structure are analyzed by self-consistently solving rate equations for the carriers and photons. Nonunity pumping efficiency from one period of the QCL to the next is taken into account by including all relevant electron-electron (e-e) and longitudinal (LO) phonon scattering mechanisms between the injector/collector and active regions. Two-photon absorption processes are analyzed for the resonant cascading triple levels designed for enhancing SHG. Both sequential and simultaneous two-photon absorption processes are included in the rate-equation model. The current output characteristics for both the original and optimized structures are analyzed and compared. Stronger resonant tunneling in the optimized structure is manifested by enhanced negative differential resistance. Current-dependent linear optical output power is derived based on the steady-state photon populations in the active region. The second-harmonic (SH) power is derived from the Maxwell equations with the phase mismatch included. Due to stronger coupling between lasing levels, the optimized structure has both higher linear and nonlinear output powers. Phase mismatch effects are significant for both structures leading to a substantial reduction of the linear-to-nonlinear conversion efficiency. The optimized structure can be fabricated

  2. A Rapid and Cost-Effective Laser Based Synthesis of High Purity Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondall, M A; Qahtan, Talal F; Dastageer, M A; Yamani, Z H; Anjum, D H

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and cost effective method is developed to synthesize high purity cadmium Selenide (CdSe) quantum dots in acetone medium using second harmonic of Nd:YAG nanosecond pulsed laser of 532 nm wavelength. The thermal agglomeration due the nanosecond pulse duration of the laser was successfully eliminated by using unfocussed laser beam and thereby providing a favorable conditions for the synthesis of quantum dots having the grain size of 3 nm. The morphological and optical characterizations like XRD, HRTEM, optical absorption of the synthesized CdSe quantum dots, reveal that the material possesses the similar characteristics of the one synthesized through cumbersome wet chemical methods. Relative to the CdSe bulk material, the synthesized CdSe quantum dots showed a blue shift in the measured band gap energy from near infrared spectral region to visible region, making this material very attractive for many solar energy harvesting applications like photo-catalysis and solar cells.

  3. Analysis of Trace Gas Mixtures Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-07-01

    We measure and analyze mixtures of trace gases at ppb-ppm levels using an external cavity quantum cascade laser sensor with a 1-second response time. Accurate spectral fits are obtained in the presence of overlapping spectra.

  4. Rapid Swept-Wavelength External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser for Open Path Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-07-01

    A rapidly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser system is used for open path sensing. The system permits acquisition of transient absorption spectra over a 125 cm-1 tuning range in less than 0.01 s.

  5. GaN-based terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Wataru; Hirayama, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    III-nitride semiconductors having huge longitudinal optical phonon energies are promising as materials to solve a problem of "development of operational frequency range (5-12 THz)" on THz-QCLs. In this study, for the purpose of THz lasing from target subband levels, we designed unique quantum cascade (QC) structures whose active regions consisted of two quantum wells (QWs) for one period and the number of wave-functions contributed to lasing is limited to minimum 3 subband levels. (i.e., Pure 3-level laser system). We fabricated THz-QCLs with QC structures of a pure 3- level laser system (100-200 periods) through a radio-frequency molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE) and a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on MOCVD-growth AlGaN/AlN templates grown on c-plane sapphire substrates. Clear satellite peaks in XRD analyses could be observed, indicating that layer structures were stacked with a good periodicity. By comparing data with simulation spectra, it was found that error of film thicknesses were 1-3 %. We observed sharp lasing spectra with peaks at frequencies of ~5.5 THz and ~7.0 THz whose full width at half maximum (FWHM) values were close to those of resolution of FTIR spectrometer, when we tried pulse current injection measurements into THz-QCL devices. We successfully for the first time realized GaN-based THz-QCL devices lasing at almost the same frequencies as the target ones by designing a 2QWs-type QC structure with a pure 3-level laser system. We also successfully achieved lasing at ~5.5 and ~7.0 THz, which are highest reported to date for any kinds of THz- QCLs.

  6. Position and mode dependent coupling of terahertz quantum cascade laser fields to an integrated diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Gregory C.; Nordquist, Christopher D.; Cich, Michael J.; Ribaudo, Troy; Grine, Albert D.; Fuller, Charles T.; Reno, John L.; Wanke, Michael C.

    2013-10-01

    A Schottky diode integrated into a terahertz quantum cascade laser waveguide couples directly to the internal laser fields. In a multimode laser, the diode response is correlated with both the instantaneous power and the coupling strength to the diode of each lasing mode. Measurements of the rectified response of diodes integrated in two quantum cascade laser cavities at different locations indicate that the relative diode position strongly influences the laser-diode coupling.

  7. Position and mode dependent coupling of terahertz quantum cascade laser fields to an integrated diode

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, Gregory C; Cich, Michael J; Ribaudo, Troy; Grine, Albert D; Fuller, Charles T; Reno, John L; Wanke, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    A Schottky diode integrated into a terahertz quantum cascade laser waveguide couples directly to the internal laser fields. In a multimode laser, the diode response is correlated with both the instantaneous power and the coupling strength to the diode of each lasing mode. Measurements of the rectified response of diodes integrated in two quantum cascade laser cavities at different locations indicate that the relative diode position strongly influences the laser-diode coupling.

  8. Applying Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy in Plasma Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Röpcke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The considerably higher power and wider frequency coverage available from quantum cascade lasers (QCLs in comparison to lead salt diode lasers has led to substantial advances when QCLs are used in pure and applied infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, they can be used in both pulsed and continuous wave (cw operation, opening up new possibilities in quantitative time resolved applications in plasmas both in the laboratory and in industry as shown in this article. However, in order to determine absolute concentrations accurately using pulsed QCLs, careful attention has to be paid to features like power saturation phenomena. Hence, we begin with a discussion of the non-linear effects which must be considered when using short or long pulse mode operation. More recently, cw QCLs have been introduced which have the advantage of higher power, better spectral resolution and lower fluctuations in light intensity compared to pulsed devices. They have proved particularly useful in sensing applications in plasmas when very low concentrations have to be monitored. Finally, the use of cw external cavity QCLs (EC-QCLs for multi species detection is described, using a diagnostics study of a methane/nitrogen plasma as an example. The wide frequency coverage of this type of QCL laser, which is significantly broader than from a distributed feedback QCL (DFB-QCL, is a substantial advantage for multi species detection. Therefore, cw EC-QCLs are state of the art devices and have enormous potential for future plasma diagnostic studies.

  9. Fast automotive diesel exhaust measurement using quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, J.; Brunner, R.; Lambrecht, A.

    2013-12-01

    Step by step, US and European legislations enforce the further reduction of atmospheric pollution caused by automotive exhaust emissions. This is pushing automotive development worldwide. Fuel efficient diesel engines with SCRtechnology can impede NO2-emission by reduction with NH3 down to the ppm range. To meet the very low emission limits of the Euro6 resp. US NLEV (National Low Emission Vehicle) regulations, automotive manufacturers have to optimize continuously all phases of engine operation and corresponding catalytic converters. Especially nonstationary operation holds a high potential for optimizing gasoline consumption and further reducing of pollutant emissions. Test equipment has to cope with demanding sensitivity and speed requirements. In the past Fraunhofer IPM has developed a fast emission analyzer called DEGAS (Dynamic Exhaust Gas Analyzer System), based on cryogenically cooled lead salt lasers. These systems have been used at Volkswagen AG`s test benches for a decade. Recently, IPM has developed DEGAS-Next which is based on cw quantum cascade lasers and thermoelectrically cooled detectors. The system is capable to measure three gas components (i.e. NO, NO2, NH3) in two channels with a time resolution of 20 ms and 1 ppm detection limits. We shall present test data and a comparison with fast FTIR measurements.

  10. Low Power Consumption Substrate-Emitting DFB Quantum Cascade Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan-Wei; Zhang, Jin-Chuan; Jia, Zhi-Wei; Zhuo, Ning; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Shu-Man; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2017-09-02

    In the present work, an ultra-low power consumption substrate-emitting distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade laser (QCL) was developed. The continuous-wave (CW) threshold power dissipation is reduced to 0.43 W at 25 °C by shortening the cavity length to 0.5 mm and depositing high-reflectivity (HR) coating on both facets. As far as we know, this is the recorded threshold power dissipation of QCLs in the same conditions. Single-mode emission was achieved by employing a buried second-order grating. Mode-hop free emission can be observed within a wide temperature range from 15 to 105 °C in CW mode. The divergence angles are 22.5(o) and 1.94(o) in the ridge-width direction and cavity-length direction, respectively. The maximum optical power in CW operation was 2.4 mW at 25 °C, which is sufficient to spectroscopy applications.

  11. Simulation of Domain Formation in p-Si/SiGe Quantum Cascade Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonic, Z.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.

    Domain formation in p-doped Si/SiGe quantum cascades is considered using a carrier scattering transport framework. The hole flow along the cascade is described via scattering between quantized states belonging to neighbouring periods, caused by phonons, alloy disorder, and carrier-carrier interactions. The generation of either periodic or of nonperiodic domains is studied in uniformly or modulationally doped cascades, and criteria for their appearance are found. The domains in modulationally doped cascades have a relatively smaller effect on the energy structure than in uniformly doped ones.

  12. Criterion of applicable models for planar type Cherenkov laser based on quantum mechanical treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Minoru [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Institute of Science and Engineering Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Fares, Hesham, E-mail: fares_fares4@yahoo.com [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Institute of Science and Engineering Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt)

    2013-05-01

    A generalized theoretical analysis for amplification mechanism in the planar-type Cherenkov laser is given. An electron is represented to be a material wave having temporal and spatial varying phases with finite spreading length. Interaction between the electrons and the electromagnetic (EM) wave is analyzed by counting the quantum statistical properties. The interaction mechanism is classified into the Velocity and Density Modulation (VDM) model and the Energy Level Transition (ELT) model basing on the relation between the wavelength of the EM wave and the electron spreading length. The VDM model is applicable when the wavelength of the EM wave is longer than the electron spreading length as in the microwave region. The dynamic equation of the electron, which is popularly used in the classical Newtonian mechanics, has been derived from the quantum mechanical Schrödinger equation. The amplification of the EM wave can be explained basing on the bunching effect of the electron density in the electron beam. The amplification gain and whose dispersion relation with respect to the electron velocity is given in this paper. On the other hand, the ELT model is applicable for the case that the wavelength of the EM wave is shorter than the electron spreading length as in the optical region. The dynamics of the electron is explained to be caused by the electron transition between different energy levels. The amplification gain and whose dispersion relation with respect to the electron acceleration voltage was derived on the basis of the quantum mechanical density matrix.

  13. Experimental investigation of terahertz quantum cascade laser with variable barrier heights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Aiting; Vijayraghavan, Karun; Belkin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mbelkin@ece.utexas.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Matyas, Alpar; Jirauschek, Christian [Institute for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität München, D-80333 Munich (Germany); Wasilewski, Zbig R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G (Canada)

    2014-04-28

    We report an experimental study of terahertz quantum cascade lasers with variable barrier heights based on the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}As/GaAs material system. Two new designs are developed based on semiclassical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations using state-of-the-art Al{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As/GaAs three-quantum-well resonant phonon depopulation active region design as a reference. The new designs achieved maximum lasing temperatures of 188 K and 172 K, as compared to the maximum lasing temperature of 191 K for the reference structure. These results demonstrate that terahertz quantum cascade laser designs with variable barrier heights provide a viable alternative to the traditional active region designs with fixed barrier composition. Additional design space offered by using variable barriers may lead to future improvements in the terahertz quantum cascade laser performance.

  14. Characterization of Pairwise Correlations from Multiple Quantum Correlated Beams Generated from Cascaded Four-Wave Mixing Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Cao, Leiming; Jing, Jietai

    2017-01-10

    We theoretically characterize the performance of the pairwise correlations (PCs) from multiple quantum correlated beams based on the cascaded four-wave mixing (FWM) processes. The presence of the PCs with quantum corre- lation in these systems can be verified by calculating the degree of intensity difference squeezing for any pair of all the output fields. The quantum correlation characteristics of all the PCs under different cascaded schemes are also discussed in detail and the repulsion effect between PCs in these cascaded FWM processes is theoretically predicted. Our results open the way for the classification and application of quantum states generated from the cascaded FWM processes.

  15. Efficient Dielectric Metasurface Collimating Lenses for Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Arbabi, Amir; Horie, Yu; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Light emitted from single-mode semiconductor lasers generally has large divergence angles, and high numerical aperture lenses are required for beam collimation. Visible and near infrared lasers are collimated using aspheric glass or plastic lenses, yet collimation of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers typically requires more costly aspheric lenses made of germanium, chalcogenide compounds, or other infrared-transparent materials. Here we report mid-infrared dielectric metasurface flat lenses that efficiently collimate the output beam of single-mode quantum cascade lasers. The metasurface lenses are composed of amorphous silicon posts on a flat sapphire substrate and can be fabricated at low cost using a single step conventional UV binary lithography. Mid-infrared radiation from a 4.8 $\\mu$m distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser is collimated using a polarization insensitive metasurface lens with 0.86 numerical aperture and 79% transmission efficiency. The collimated beam has a half divergence angle of 0...

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of hole dynamics in SiGe/Si terahertz quantum-cascade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonić, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.; Harrison, P.

    2004-06-01

    A detailed analysis of hole transport in cascaded p - Si/SiGe quantum well structures is performed using ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. The hole subband structure is calculated using the 6×6 k·p model, and then used to find carrier relaxation rates due to the alloy disorder, acoustic and optical phonon scattering. The simulation accounts for the in-plane k -space anisotropy of both the hole subband structure and the scattering rates. Results are presented for prototype terahertz Si/SiGe quantum cascade structures.

  17. On the cascade approach to the quantum multiscattering problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo, L.L. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2003-01-01

    The multiscattering problem is studied in the matrix density formalism. We study how to isolate the quasi-classical degrees of freedom in order to connect them with a cascade approach. The different problems that arise, as well as their possible solutions, are discussed and exemplified with a pion-nucleus model. (orig.)

  18. Quantum Transport Simulation of High-Power 4.6-μm Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olafur Jonasson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a quantum transport simulation of a 4.6- μ m quantum cascade laser (QCL operating at high power near room temperature. The simulation is based on a rigorous density-matrix-based formalism, in which the evolution of the single-electron density matrix follows a Markovian master equation in the presence of applied electric field and relevant scattering mechanisms. We show that it is important to allow for both position-dependent effective mass and for effective lowering of very thin barriers in order to obtain the band structure and the current-field characteristics comparable to experiment. Our calculations agree well with experiments over a wide range of temperatures. We predict a room-temperature threshold field of 62 . 5 kV/cm and a characteristic temperature for threshold-current-density variation of T 0 = 199 K . We also calculate electronic in-plane distributions, which are far from thermal, and show that subband electron temperatures can be hundreds to thousands of degrees higher than the heat sink. Finally, we emphasize the role of coherent tunneling current by looking at the size of coherences, the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix. At the design lasing field, efficient injection manifests itself in a large injector/upper lasing level coherence, which underscores the insufficiency of semiclassical techniques to address injection in QCLs.

  19. Numerical Study on Quantum Walks Implemented on the Cascade Rotational Transitions in a Diatomic Molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Leo; Hashimoto, Masashi; Yokoyama, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    We propose an implementation scheme for the continuous-time quantum walk using a diatomic molecule and an optical frequency comb. We show an analogy between the quantum walk and the cascade rotational transitions induced by the optical frequency comb whose frequency peaks are tuned to the pure rotational transitions in the molecule. The strategy to compensate for the centrifugal distortion of the real molecule is also demonstrated.

  20. High-Power Growth-Robust InGaAs/InAlAs Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Christoph; Kainz, Martin Alexander; Krall, Michael; Brandstetter, Martin; Bachmann, Dominic; Schönhuber, Sebastian; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Beck, Mattias; Ohtani, Keita; Faist, Jérôme; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2017-04-19

    We report on high-power terahertz quantum cascade lasers based on low effective electron mass InGaAs/InAlAs semiconductor heterostructures with excellent reproducibility. Growth-related asymmetries in the form of interface roughness and dopant migration play a crucial role in this material system. These bias polarity dependent phenomena are studied using a nominally symmetric active region resulting in a preferential electron transport in the growth direction. A structure based on a three-well optical phonon depletion scheme was optimized for this bias direction. Depending on the sheet doping density, the performance of this structure shows a trade-off between high maximum operating temperature and high output power. While the highest operating temperature of 155 K is observed for a moderate sheet doping density of 2 × 10(10) cm(-2), the highest peak output power of 151 mW is found for 7.3 × 10(10) cm(-2). Furthermore, by abutting a hyperhemispherical GaAs lens to a device with the highest doping level a record output power of 587 mW is achieved for double-metal waveguide structures.

  1. Probing organometallic reactions by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy in solution and in the solid state using quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calladine, James A; Horvath, Raphael; Davies, Andrew J; Wriglesworth, Alisdair; Sun, Xue-Zhong; George, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    The photochemistry and photophysics of metal carbonyl compounds (W(CO)6, Cp*Rh(CO)2 (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5), and fac-[Re(CO)3(4,4'-bpy)2Br] [bpy = bipyridine]) have been examined on the nanosecond timescale using a time-resolved infrared spectrometer with an external cavity quantum cascade laser (QCL) as the infrared source. We show the photochemistry of W(CO)6 in alkane solution is easily monitored, and very sensitive measurements are possible with this approach, meaning it can monitor small transients with absorbance changes less than 10(-6) ΔOD. The C-H activation of Cp*Rh(CO)(C6H12) to form Cp*Rh(CO)(C6H11)H occurs within the first few tens of nanoseconds following photolysis, and we demonstrate that kinetics obtained following deconvolution are in excellent agreement with those measured using an ultrafast laser-based spectrometer. We also show that the high flux and tunability of QCLs makes them suited for solid-state and time-resolved measurements.

  2. Application of step-scan FTIR to the research of quantum cascade lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junqi Liu; Xiuzhen Lu; Yu Guo; Xiuqi Huang; Xiaoling Che; Wen Lei; Fengqi Liu

    2005-01-01

    The principle of step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is introduced. Double modulation step-scan FTIR technique is used to obtain the quantum cascade laser's stacked emission spectra in the time domain. Optical property and thermal accumulation of devices due to large drive current are analyzed.

  3. Frequency Stabilization of a Single Mode Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser to the Kilohertz Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-27

    Frequency stabilization of a single mode terahertz quantum cascade laser to the kilohertz level 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...primarily in a single-longitudinal mode (SLM) up to a bias voltage of 3.7 V and a multi-lodgitudinal mode ( MLM ) at higher voltages. It was mounted in a

  4. Beam and phase distributions of a terahertz quantum cascade wire laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, M.; Hovenier, J.N.; Ren, Y.; Vercruyssen, N.; Gao, J.R.; Kao, T.Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    We report on both measurements and simulations of the beam profile and wavefront of a single-mode, 3.5 THz quantum cascade wire laser, incorporating a lateral corrugated metal-metal waveguide, 3rd-order distributed feedback grating. The intrinsic wavefront was measured by using a Hartmann wavefront

  5. Electron transport in n-doped Si/SiGe quantum cascade structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazic, I.; Ikonic, Z.; Milanovic, V.; Kelsall, R.W.; Indjin, D.; Harrison, P.

    2007-01-01

    An electron transport model in n-Si/SiGe quantum cascade or superlattice structures is described. The model uses the electronic structure calculated within the effective-mass complex-energy framework, separately for perpendicular (Xz) and in-plane (Xxy) valleys, the degeneracy of which is lifted by

  6. Electron transport in n-doped Si/SiGe quantum cascade structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazic, I.; Ikonic, Z.; Milanovic, V.; Kelsall, R.W.; Indjin, D.; Harrison, P.

    2007-01-01

    An electron transport model in n-Si/SiGe quantum cascade or superlattice structures is described. The model uses the electronic structure calculated within the effective-mass complex-energy framework, separately for perpendicular (Xz) and in-plane (Xxy) valleys, the degeneracy of which is lifted by

  7. On the cascade capture of electrons at donors in GaAs quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleshkin, V. Ya., E-mail: aleshkin@ipmras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    The impact parameter for the cascade capture of electrons at a charged donor in a GaAs quantum well is calculated. A simple approximate analytical expression for the impact parameter is suggested. The temperature dependence of the impact parameter for the case of electron scattering by the piezoelectric potential of acoustic phonons is determined.

  8. Room Temperature Operation of a Buried Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Quantum Cascade Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Peretti, R; Wolf, J M; Bonzon, C; Süess, M J; Lourdudoss, S; Metaferia, W; Beck, M; Faist, J

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated room temperature operation of deep etched photonic crystal quantum cascade laser emitting around 8.5 micron. We fabricated buried heterostructure photonic crystals, resulting in single mode laser emission on a high order slow Bloch modes of the photonic crystal, between high symmetry points of the Brillouin.

  9. Phase-locking of a 2.7-THz quantum cascade laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J. R.; Khosropanah, P.; Baryshev, A.; Zhang, W.; Jellema, W.; Hovenier, J. N.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Paveliev, D. G.; Williams, B. S.; Kumar, S.; Hu, Q.; Reno, L.; Klein, B.; Hesler, J. L.; Rastogi, PK; Hack, E

    2010-01-01

    We successfully realized phase-locking of a 2.7-THz metal-metal waveguide quantum cascade laser (QCL) to a reference, which is generated from an external microwave signal by applying two stages of frequency multiplication. The reference is the 15th harmonic of a signal at 182 GHz, which is produced

  10. Phase locking of a 2.7 THz quantum cascade laser to a microwave reference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khosropanah, P.; Baryshev, A.; Zhang, W.; Jellema, W.; Hovenier, J. N.; Gao, J. R.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Paveliev, D. G.; Williams, B. S.; Kumar, S.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.; Klein, B.; Hesler, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the phase locking of a 2.7 THz metal-metal waveguide quantum cascade laser (QCL) to an external microwave signal. The reference is the 15th harmonic, generated by a semiconductor superlattice nonlinear device, of a signal at 182 GHz, which itself is generated by a multiplier chain (x1

  11. Phase locking of a 2.7 THz quantum cascade laser to a microwave reference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khosropanah, P.; Baryshev, A.; Zhang, W.; Jellema, W.; Hovenier, J.N.; Gao, J.R.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Paveliev, D.G.; Williams, B.S.; Kumar, S.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J.L.; Klein, B.; Hesler, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the phase locking of a 2.7 THz metal–metal waveguide quantum cascade laser (QCL) to an external microwave signal. The reference is the 15th harmonic, generated by a semiconductor superlattice nonlinear device, of a signal at 182 GHz, which itself is generated by a multiplier chain (x1

  12. Phase locking and spectral linewidth of a two-mode terahertz quantum cascade laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baryshev, A.; Hovenier, J.N.; Adam, A.J.L.; Kašalynas, I.; Gao, J.R.; Klaassen, T.O.; Williams, B.S.; Kumar, S.; Hu,Q.; Reno, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the phase locking and spectral linewidth of an ∼ 2.7 THz quantum cascade laser by mixing its two lateral lasing modes. The beat signal at about 8 GHz is compared with a microwave reference by applying conventional phase lock loop circuitry with feedback to the laser bias current. Pha

  13. Coupled carrier-phonon nonequilibrium dynamics in terahertz quantum cascade lasers: a Monte Carlo analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iotti, Rita C.; Rossi, Fausto

    2013-07-01

    The operation of state-of-the-art optoelectronic quantum devices may be significantly affected by the presence of a nonequilibrium quasiparticle population to which the carrier subsystem is unavoidably coupled. This situation is particularly evident in new-generation semiconductor-heterostructure-based quantum emitters, operating both in the mid-infrared as well as in the terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we present a Monte Carlo-based global kinetic approach, suitable for the investigation of a combined carrier-phonon nonequilibrium dynamics in realistic devices, and discuss its application with a prototypical resonant-phonon THz emitting quantum cascade laser design.

  14. Pulsed electron-beam-pumped laser based on AlGaN/InGaN/GaN quantum-well heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamov, N A; Zhdanova, E V; Zverev, M M; Peregudov, D V; Studenov, V B [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation); Mazalov, A V; Kureshov, V A; Sabitov, D R; Padalitsa, A A; Marmalyuk, A A [Open Joint-Stock Company M.F. Stel' makh Polyus Research Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-31

    The parameters of pulsed blue-violet (λ ≈ 430 nm at T = 300 K) lasers based on an AlGaN/InGaN/GaN structure with five InGaN quantum wells and transverse electron-beam pumping are studied. At room temperature of the active element, the minimum electron energy was 9 keV and the minimum threshold electron beam current density was 8 A cm{sup -2} at an electron energy of 18 keV. (lasers)

  15. Above room temperature continuous wave operation of a broad-area quantum-cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semtsiv, M. P.; Masselink, W. T.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a broad-area (w ≈ 30 μm) quantum-cascade laser operating in a continuous wave mode up to heat-sink temperatures beyond +100 °C. The room-temperature emission wavelength is 4.6 μm. The temperature gradient in the active region of such a wide laser stripe is essentially perpendicular to the epitaxial layers and the resulting steady-state active region temperature offset scales approximately with the square of the number of cascades. With only 10 cascades in the active region, the threshold electrical power density in the current quantum-cascade laser in the continuous-wave mode is as low as Vth × Ith = 3.8 V × 0.9 kA/cm2 = 3.4 kW/cm2 at room temperature for 2 mm-long two-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe. A 4 mm-long one-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe delivers in continuous-wave mode above 0.6 W at +20 °C and above 1.3 W at -27 °C (cooled with a single-stage Peltier element). A 2 mm-long two-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe demonstrates continuous-wave lasing up to at least +102 °C (375 K). The thermal conductance, Gth, ranges between 235 W/K cm2 and 140 W/K cm2 for temperatures between -33 °C and +102 °C. This demonstration opens the route for continuous-wave power scaling of quantum-cascade lasers via broad-area laser ridges.

  16. Porous waveguide facilitated low divergence quantum cascade laser*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Wen; Lu Quanyong; Liu Wannfeng; Zhang Jinchuan; Wang Lijun; Liu Junqi; Li Lu; Liu Fengqi; Wang Zhanguo

    2011-01-01

    A quantum cscade laser with a porous waveguide structure emitting at 4.5 μm is reported. A branchlike porous structure filled with metal material was fabricated on both sides of the laser ridge by an electrochemical etching process. In contrast to the common ridge waveguide laser, devices with a porous structure give rather better beam quality. Utilizing this porous structure as a high-order mode absorber, the device exhibited fundamental transverse mode emission with a nearly diffraction limited far-field beam divergence angle of 4.9°.

  17. Mode-resolved Photon Counting via Cascaded Quantum Frequency Conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Resources for the manipulation and measurements of high-dimensional photonic signals are crucial for implementing qu$d$it-based applications. Here we propose potentially high-performance, chip-compatible devices for such purposes by exploiting quantum-frequency conversion in nonlinear optical media. Specifically, by using sum-frequency generation in a $\\chi^{(2)}$ waveguide we show how mode-resolved photon counting can be accomplished for telecom-band photonic signals subtending multiple temporal modes. Our method is generally applicable to any nonlinear medium with arbitrary dispersion property.

  18. Beam shaping in high-power broad-area quantum cascade lasers using optical feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Simon; Jumpertz, Louise; Carras, Mathieu; Ferreira, Robson; Grillot, Frédéric

    2017-03-01

    Broad-area quantum cascade lasers with high output powers are highly desirable sources for various applications including infrared countermeasures. However, such structures suffer from strongly deteriorated beam quality due to multimode behavior, diffraction of light and self-focusing. Quantum cascade lasers presenting high performances in terms of power and heat-load dissipation are reported and their response to a nonlinear control based on optical feedback is studied. Applying optical feedback enables to efficiently tailor its near-field beam profile. The different cavity modes are sequentially excited by shifting the feedback mirror angle. Further control of the near-field profile is demonstrated using spatial filtering. The impact of an inhomogeneous gain as well as the influence of the cavity width are investigated. Compared to existing technologies, that are complex and costly, beam shaping with optical feedback is a more flexible solution to obtain high-quality mid-infrared sources.

  19. Exploring negative refraction conditions for quantum cascade semiconductor metamaterials in the terahertz spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daničić, A.; Radovanović, J.; Ramović, S.; Milanović, V.

    2016-03-01

    In order to avoid losses in metamaterial unit cells at frequencies of interest, caused by metallic inclusions, an active medium design has been proposed. As candidate structures for this active medium, we have chosen quantum cascade lasers because of their high output gain. Here we analyze and compare two quantum cascade structures that emit at 4.6 THz and 3.9 THz, respectively, placed under the influence of a strong magnetic field. We first solve the full system of rate equations for all relevant Landau levels, and obtain the necessary information about carrier distribution among the levels, after which we are able to evaluate the permittivity component along the growth direction of the structure. With these data one can determine the conditions under which negative refraction occurs, and calculate the values of the refractive index of the structure, as well as the range of frequencies at which the structure exhibits negative refraction for a predefined total electron sheet density.

  20. Beam shaping in high-power broad-area quantum cascade lasers using optical feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Simon; Jumpertz, Louise; Carras, Mathieu; Ferreira, Robson; Grillot, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Broad-area quantum cascade lasers with high output powers are highly desirable sources for various applications including infrared countermeasures. However, such structures suffer from strongly deteriorated beam quality due to multimode behavior, diffraction of light and self-focusing. Quantum cascade lasers presenting high performances in terms of power and heat-load dissipation are reported and their response to a nonlinear control based on optical feedback is studied. Applying optical feedback enables to efficiently tailor its near-field beam profile. The different cavity modes are sequentially excited by shifting the feedback mirror angle. Further control of the near-field profile is demonstrated using spatial filtering. The impact of an inhomogeneous gain as well as the influence of the cavity width are investigated. Compared to existing technologies, that are complex and costly, beam shaping with optical feedback is a more flexible solution to obtain high-quality mid-infrared sources. PMID:28287175

  1. Importance of coherence in models of mid-infrared quantum cascade laser gain spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuzhang I.; Harter, Michael P.; Dikmelik, Yamac; Hoffman, Anthony J.

    2017-09-01

    We present a three-level model based on a density matrix to examine the influence of coherence and dephasing on the gain spectrum of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. The model is used to examine a quantum cascade active region with multiple optical transitions. We show how coherence can explain the origin of additional peaks in the gain spectrum. We also analyze the spectra calculated using the three-level model with a rate equation formalism to demonstrate the importance of considering interface roughness and limitations of the rate equation formalism. Specifically, we present how interface roughness influences the broadening and oscillator strength that are recovered using a rate equation analysis. The results of this work are important when considering the design of active regions with multiple optical transitions and could lead to devices with improved performance.

  2. Si/SiGe quantum cascade superlattice designs for terahertz emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matmon, G.; Paul, D. J.; Lever, L.; Califano, M.; Ikonić, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.; Zhang, J.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G.; von Känel, H.; Müller, E.; Neels, A.

    2010-03-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are compact sources that have demonstrated high output powers at terahertz (THz) frequencies. To date, all THz QCLs have been realized in III-V materials. Results are presented from Si1-xGex quantum cascade superlattice designs emitting at around 3 THz which have been grown in two different chemical vapor deposition systems. The key to achieving successful electroluminescence at THz frequencies in a p-type system has been to strain the light-hole states to energies well above the radiative subband states. To accurately model the emission wavelengths, a 6-band k ṡp tool which includes the effects of nonabrupt heterointerfaces has been used to predict the characteristics of the emitters. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy have been used along with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to fully characterize the samples. A number of methods to improve the gain from the designs are suggested.

  3. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers operating in external ring cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Revin, D G; Wang, Y; Cockburn, J W; Belyanin, A

    2015-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode locked operation remains a challenge despite dedicated effort. Here we report the first demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents of a standard commercial laser chip.

  4. Origin of the inverse energy cascade in two-dimensional quantum turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Skaugen, Audun

    2016-01-01

    We unravel the intimate connection between fundamental characteristics of two dimensional turbulence, i.e. the large-scale coherent structures and the inverse energy cascade. We propose a driven, dissipative point vortex model that is able to capture the dynamics of two-dimensional quantum turbulence by the emergent clustering of same-sign vortices, which form a non-equilibrium analogue of Onsager vortex equilibria. The inverse energy cascade developing in a statistically neutral system originates from this clustering of co-rotating and counter-rotating vortices. The Kolmogorov energy spectrum $k^{-5/3}$ is attributed to the scale-free correlations in the vorticity field fluctuations, here measured by the weighted pair correlation function that has a power-law decay as $r^{-4/3}$ on inertial separation lengthscales $r$. This scale-invariant statistics of vorticity, attributed to a conformal symmetry of two-dimensional classical turbulence, draws further analogies between classical and quantum turbulence beyon...

  5. Far-infrared quantum cascade lasers operating in AlAs phonon Reststrahlen band

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtani, K; Süess, M J; Faist, J; Andrews, A M; Zederbauer, T; Detz, H; Schrenk, W; Strasser, G

    2016-01-01

    We report on the operation of a double metal waveguide far-infrared quantum cascade laser emitting at 28 $\\mu$m, corresponding to the AlAs-like phonon Reststrahlen band. To avoid absorption by AlAs-like optical phonons, the Al-free group-V alloy GaAs$_{0.51}$Sb$_{0.49}$ is used as a barrier layer in the bound-to-continuum based active region. Lasing occurs at a wavelength of 28.3 $\\mu$m, which is the longest wavelength among the quantum cascade lasers operating from mid-infrared to far-infrared. The threshold current density at 50 K is 5.5 kA/cm$^{2}$ and maximum operation temperature is 175 K. We also discuss the feasibility that operation wavelength cover the whole spectral range bridging between mid-infrared and terahertz by choosing suited group III-V materials.

  6. Strong coupling and stimulated emission in single parabolic quantum well microcavity for terahertz cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzimis, A.; Savvidis, P. G. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Trifonov, A. V.; Ignatiev, I. V. [Spin Optics Laboratory, State University of Saint-Petersburg, 1 Ulianovskaya, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Christmann, G.; Tsintzos, S. I. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Hatzopoulos, Z. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Kavokin, A. V. [Spin Optics Laboratory, State University of Saint-Petersburg, 1 Ulianovskaya, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-07

    We report observation of strong light-matter coupling in an AlGaAs microcavity (MC) with an embedded single parabolic quantum well. The parabolic potential is achieved by varying aluminum concentration along the growth direction providing equally spaced energy levels, as confirmed by Brewster angle reflectivity from a reference sample without MC. It acts as an active region of the structure which potentially allows cascaded emission of terahertz (THz) light. Spectrally and time resolved pump-probe spectroscopy reveals characteristic quantum beats whose frequencies range from 0.9 to 4.5 THz, corresponding to energy separation between relevant excitonic levels. The structure exhibits strong stimulated nonlinear emission with simultaneous transition to weak coupling regime. The present study highlights the potential of such devices for creating cascaded relaxation of bosons, which could be utilized for THz emission.

  7. Spectral gain profile of a multi-stack terahertz quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, D., E-mail: dominic.bachmann@tuwien.ac.at; Deutsch, C.; Krall, M.; Unterrainer, K.; Darmo, J. [Photonics Institute, Vienna University of Technology, Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Rösch, M.; Scalari, G.; Beck, M.; Faist, J. [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zürich, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-11-03

    The spectral gain of a multi-stack terahertz quantum cascade laser, composed of three active regions with emission frequencies centered at 2.3, 2.7, and 3.0 THz, is studied as a function of driving current and temperature using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The optical gain associated with the particular quantum cascade stacks clamps at different driving currents and saturates to different values. We attribute these observations to varying pumping efficiencies of the respective upper laser states and to frequency dependent optical losses. The multi-stack active region exhibits a spectral gain full width at half-maximum of 1.1 THz. Bandwidth and spectral position of the measured gain match with the broadband laser emission. As the laser action ceases with increasing operating temperature, the gain at the dominant lasing frequency of 2.65 THz degrades sharply.

  8. Narrow-band injection seeding of a terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser: Selection and suppression of longitudinal modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nong, Hanond, E-mail: Nong.Hanond@rub.de; Markmann, Sergej; Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan, E-mail: Nathan.Jukam@rub.de [Arbeitsgruppe Terahertz Spektroskopie und Technologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Pal, Shovon [Arbeitsgruppe Terahertz Spektroskopie und Technologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Mohandas, Reshma A.; Dean, Paul; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    A periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal with multiple poling periods is used to generate tunable narrow-bandwidth THz pulses for injection seeding a quantum cascade laser (QCL). We demonstrate that longitudinal modes of the quantum cascade laser close to the gain maximum can be selected or suppressed according to the seed spectrum. The QCL emission spectra obtained by electro-optic sampling from the quantum cascade laser, in the most favorable case, shows high selectivity and amplification of the longitudinal modes that overlap the frequency of the narrow-band seed. Proper selection of the narrow-band THz seed from the PPLN crystal discretely tunes the longitudinal mode emission of the quantum cascade laser. Moreover, the THz wave build-up within the laser cavity is studied as a function of the round-trip time. When the seed frequency is outside the maximum of the gain spectrum the laser emission shifts to the preferential longitudinal mode.

  9. Single-mode GaAs/AlGaAs quantum cascade microlasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yu; Liu Junqi; Liu Fengqi; Zhang Wei; Zhang Quande; Liu Wanfeng; Li Lu; Wang Lijun; Wang Zhanguo

    2009-01-01

    Single-mode edge emitting GaAs/A1GaAs quantum cascade microlasers at a wavelength of about 11.4 μm were realized by shortening the Fabry-P6rot cavity length. The spacing of the longitudinal resonator modes is inversely proportional to the cavity length. Stable single-mode emission with a side mode suppression ratio of about 19 dB at 85 K for a 150-μm-long device was demonstrated.

  10. Waveguide design for mid- and far-infrared p-Si/SiGe quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonic, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.; Harrison, P.

    2004-01-01

    Design considerations are presented for waveguides to be used in p-Si/SiGe based quantum cascade lasers operating in the mid- and far-infrared wavelength ranges. Modal losses and confinement factors are calculated for both TM and TE modes in conventional double metal clad structures, metal-highly doped semiconductor layer structures and also in novel metal-metal silicide structures. Guidelines for choosing the confinement and contact layer parameters are given.

  11. Entangled photon pairs from a quantum dot cascade decay: the effect of time-reordering

    OpenAIRE

    F. Troiani; Tejedor, C.

    2008-01-01

    Coulomb interactions between confined carriers remove degeneracies in the excitation spectra of quantum dots. This provides a which path information in the cascade decay of biexcitons, thus spoiling the energy-polarization entanglement of the emitted photon pairs. We theoretically analyze a strategy of color coincidence across generation (AG), recently proposed as an alternative to the previous, within generation (WG) approach. We simulate the system dynamics and compute the correlation funct...

  12. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging using self-mixing interferometry with a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, H S; Taimre, T; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Dean, P; Khanna, S P; Lachab, M; Valavanis, A; Indjin, D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Rakić, A D

    2014-05-01

    We propose a terahertz (THz)-frequency synthetic aperture radar imaging technique based on self-mixing (SM) interferometry, using a quantum cascade laser. A signal processing method is employed which extracts and exploits the radar-related information contained in the SM signals, enabling the creation of THz images with improved spatial resolution. We demonstrate this by imaging a standard resolution test target, achieving resolution beyond the diffraction limit.

  13. Infrared absorption nano-spectroscopy using sample photoexpansion induced by tunable quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Feng; Belkin, Mikhail A

    2011-10-10

    We report a simple technique that allows obtaining mid-infrared absorption spectra with nanoscale spatial resolution under low-power illumination from tunable quantum cascade lasers. Light absorption is detected by measuring associated sample thermal expansion with an atomic force microscope. To detect minute thermal expansion we tune the repetition frequency of laser pulses in resonance with the mechanical frequency of the atomic force microscope cantilever. Spatial resolution of better than 50 nm is experimentally demonstrated.

  14. Effects of quantum interference in spectra of cascade spontaneous emission from multilevel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, A. A.; Yudson, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    A general expression for the spectrum of cascade spontaneous emission from an arbitrary multilevel system is presented. Effects of the quantum interference of photons emitted in different transitions are analyzed. These effects are especially essential when the transition frequencies are close. Several examples are considered: (i) Three-level system; (ii) Harmonic oscillator; (iii) System with equidistant levels and equal rates of the spontaneous decay for all the transitions; (iv) Dicke superradiance model.

  15. Long-range energy transfer in self-assembled quantum dot-DNA cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Samuel M.; Siu, Albert; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-11-01

    The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient transport of energy across QD-DNA thin films.The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient

  16. Efficient exciton funneling in cascaded PbS quantum dot superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Ma, Xin; Haughn, Chelsea R; Benavides, Jamie; Doty, Matthew F; Cloutier, Sylvain G

    2011-12-27

    Benzenedithiol (BDT) and ethanedithiol (EDT) ligand-exchange treatments can be used to cross-link colloidal PbS quantum dots into nanocrystalline film structures with distinct optoelectronic properties. Such structures can provide a unique platform to study the energy transfer between layers of quantum dots with different sizes. In this report, efficient exciton funneling and recycling of surface state-bound excitons is observed in cascaded PbS quantum dot-based multilayered superstructures, where the excitons transfer from the larger band gap or donor layers to the smallest band gap or acceptor layers. In this system, both the BDT- and EDT-treated cascaded structures exhibit dramatically enhanced photoluminescence from the acceptor layers. As we show, the energy transfer mechanisms involved and their efficiencies are significantly different depending on the ligand-exchange treatment. In the future, we believe these efficient exciton recycling and funneling mechanisms could be used to improve significantly the photocurrent, charge-transport, and conversion efficiencies in low-cost nanocrystalline and hybrid solar cells and the emission efficiencies in hybrid light-emitting devices.

  17. Low-threshold terahertz molecular laser optically pumped by a quantum cascade laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pagies

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a low-threshold, compact, room temperature, and continuous-wave terahertz molecular laser optically pumped by a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser. These characteristics are obtained, thanks to large dipole transitions of the active medium: NH3 (ammonia in gas state. The low-power (<60 mW laser pumping excites the molecules, thanks to intense mid-infrared transitions around 10.3 μm. The molecules de-excite by stimulated emission on pure inversion “umbrella-mode” quantum transitions allowed by the tunnel effect. The tunability of the quantum cascade laser gives access to several pure inversion transitions with different rotation states: we demonstrate the continuous-wave generation of ten laser lines around 1 THz. At 1.07 THz, we measure a power of 34 μW with a very low-threshold of 2 mW and a high differential efficiency of 0.82 mW/W. The spectrum was measured showing that the linewidth is lower than 1 MHz. To our knowledge, this is the first THz molecular laser pumped by a solid-state source and this result opens the way for compact, simple, and efficient THz source at room temperature for imaging applications.

  18. Room-temperature operation of mid-infrared surface-plasmon quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahriz, M.; Moreau, V.; Palomo, J.; Krysa, A. B.; Austin, D.; Cockburn, J. W.; Roberts, J. S.; Wilson, L. R.; Julien, F.; Colombelli, R.

    2007-04-01

    We report the pulsed, room-temperature operation of an InGaAs/AllnAs quantum cascade laser at an operating wavelength of ≈ 7.5 μm in which the optical mode is a surface-plasmon polariton excitation. The use of a silver-based electrical contact with reduced optical losses at the laser emission wavelength allows for a reduction of the laser threshold current by a factor of two relative to samples with a gold-based contact layer.

  19. Indirect absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Marcel; Ruf, Alexander; Fischer, Peer

    2013-11-04

    We record vibrational spectra with two indirect schemes that depend on the real part of the index of refraction: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy. In the former, a quantum cascade laser (QCL) spot is imaged to determine the angles of total internal reflection, which yields the absorption line via a beam profile analysis. In the photothermal measurements, a tunable QCL excites vibrational resonances of a molecular monolayer, which heats the surrounding medium and changes its refractive index. This is observed with a probe laser in the visible. Sub-monolayer sensitivities are demonstrated.

  20. Optical feedback in dfb quantum cascade laser for mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terabayashi, Ryohei, E-mail: terabayashi.ryouhei@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Sonnenschein, Volker, E-mail: volker@nagoya-u.jp; Tomita, Hideki, E-mail: tomita@nagoya-u.jp; Hayashi, Noriyoshi, E-mail: hayashi.noriyoshi@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kato, Shusuke, E-mail: katou.shuusuke@f.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Jin, Lei, E-mail: kin@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Yamanaka, Masahito, E-mail: yamanaka@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Nishizawa, Norihiko, E-mail: nishizawa@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan); Sato, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.sato@sekisui.com; Nozawa, Kohei, E-mail: kohei.nozawa@sekisui.com; Hashizume, Kenta, E-mail: kenta.hashizume@sekisui.com; Oh-hara, Toshinari, E-mail: toshinari.ohara@sekisui.com [Sekisui Medical Co., Ltd., Drug Development Solutions Center (Japan); Iguchi, Tetsuo, E-mail: t-iguchi@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    A simple external optical feedback system has been applied to a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB QCL) for cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and a clear effect of feedback was observed. A long external feedback path length of up to 4m can decrease the QCL linewidth to around 50kHz, which is of the order of the transmission linewidth of our high finesse ring-down cavity. The power spectral density of the transmission signal from high finesse cavity reveals that the noise at frequencies above 20kHz is reduced dramatically.

  1. Low-Loss Hollow Waveguide Fibers for Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Harrington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on single mode optical transmission of hollow core glass waveguides (HWG coupled with an external cavity mid-IR quantum cascade lasers (QCLs. The QCL mode results perfectly matched to the hybrid HE11 waveguide mode and the higher losses TE-like modes have efficiently suppressed by the deposited inner dielectric coating. Optical losses down to 0.44 dB/m and output beam divergence of ~5 mrad were measured. Using a HGW fiber with internal core size of 300 µm we obtained single mode laser transmission at 10.54 µm and successful employed it in a quartz enhanced photoacoustic gas sensor setup.

  2. Mechanisms of carrier transport and temperature performance evaluation in terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indjin, D.; Ikonic, Z.; Jovanovic, V. D.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2004-04-01

    Electron transport in GaN/AlGaN and GaAs/AlGaAs terahertz quantum cascade lasers is calculated using a fully self-consistent intersubband scattering model with thermal balancing. Subband populations and carrier transition rates are calculated and all relevant intra- and inter-period electron-electron and electron-LO-phonon scattering mechanisms are included. In particular, the influence of the lattice temperature on relevant scattering rates, carrier lifetimes and the population inversion is investigated in both cases.

  3. Theory and design of quantum cascade lasers in (111) n -type Si/SiGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valavanis, A.; Lever, L.; Evans, C. A.; Ikonić, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2008-07-01

    Although most work toward the realization of group IV quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) has focused on valence-band transitions, there are many desirable properties associated with the conduction band. We show that the commonly cited shortcomings of n -type Si/SiGe heterostructures can be overcome by moving to the (111) growth direction. Specifically, a large band offset and low effective mass are achievable and subband degeneracy is preserved. We predict net gain up to lattice temperatures of 90 K in a bound-to-continuum QCL with a double-metal waveguide, and show that a Ge interdiffusion length of at least 8Å across interfaces is tolerable.

  4. High frequency modulation capabilities and quasi single-sideband emission from a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangauer, Andreas; Spinner, Georg; Nikodem, Michal; Wysocki, Gerard

    2014-09-22

    Both intensity- (IM) and frequency-modulation (FM) behavior of a directly modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL) are measured from 300 Hz to 1.7 GHz. Quantitative measurements of tuning coefficients has been performed and the transition from thermal- to electronic-tuning is clearly observed. A very specific FM behavior of QCLs has been identified which allows for optical quasi single sideband (SSB) modulation through current injection and has not been observed in directly modulated semiconductor lasers before. This predestines QCLs in applications where SSB is required, such as telecommunication or high speed spectroscopy. The experimental procedure and theoretical modeling for data extraction is discussed.

  5. High Temperature Operation of 5.5μm Strain-Compensated Quantum Cascaded Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiu-Zhen; LIU Feng-Qi; LIU Jun-Qi; JIN Peng; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2005-01-01

    @@ We develop 5.5-μm Inx Ga1-xAs/InyAl1-yAs strain-compensated quantum cascade lasers with InP and InGaAs cladding layers by using solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy. Pulse operation has been achieved up to 323K (50℃) for uncoated 20-μm-wide and 2-mm-long devices. These devices display an output power of 36mW with a duty cycle of 1% at room temperature. In continuous wave operation a record peak optical power of 10mW per facet has been measured at 83 K.

  6. Rectified diode response of a multimode quantum cascade laser integrated terahertz transceiver

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, Gregory C; Cich, Michael J; Grine, Albert D; Fuller, Charles T; Reno, John L; Wanke, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    We characterized the DC transport response of a diode embedded in a THz quantum cascade laser as the laser current was changed. The overall response is described by parallel contributions from the rectification of the laser field due to the non-linearity of the diode I-V and from thermally activated transport. Sudden jumps in the diode response when the laser changes from single mode to multi-mode operation, with no corresponding jumps in output power, suggest that the coupling between the diode and laser field depends on the spatial distribution of internal fields. The results demonstrate conclusively that the internal laser field couples directly to the integrated diode.

  7. Continuous wave operation of quantum cascade lasers with frequency-shifted feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyakh, A., E-mail: arkadiy.lyakh@ucf.edu [Pranalytica, Inc., 1101 Colorado Ave., Santa Monica, CA 90401 (United States); NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, 12424 Research Pkwy, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 304 Scorpius St, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); Barron-Jimenez, R.; Dunayevskiy, I.; Go, R.; Tsvid, G.; Patel, C. Kumar N., E-mail: patel@pranalytica.com [Pranalytica, Inc., 1101 Colorado Ave., Santa Monica, CA 90401 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Operation of continuous wave quantum cascade lasers with a frequency-shifted feedback provided by an acousto-optic modulator is reported. Measured linewidth of 1.7 cm{sup −1} for these devices, under CW operating conditions, was in a good agreement with predictions of a model based on frequency-shifted feedback seeded by spontaneous emission. Linewidth broadening was observed for short sweep times, consistent with sound wave grating period variation across the illuminated area on the acousto-optic modulator. Standoff detection capability of the AOM-based QCL setup was demonstrated for several solid materials.

  8. Low-loss hollow waveguide fibers for mid-infrared quantum cascade laser sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patimisco, Pietro; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Vitiello, Miriam S; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Bledt, Carlos M; Harrington, James A

    2013-01-21

    We report on single mode optical transmission of hollow core glass waveguides (HWG) coupled with an external cavity mid-IR quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). The QCL mode results perfectly matched to the hybrid HE(11) waveguide mode and the higher losses TE-like modes have efficiently suppressed by the deposited inner dielectric coating. Optical losses down to 0.44 dB/m and output beam divergence of ~5 mrad were measured. Using a HGW fiber with internal core size of 300 µm we obtained single mode laser transmission at 10.54 µm and successful employed it in a quartz enhanced photoacoustic gas sensor setup.

  9. Laser absorption spectroscopy based on a broadband external cavity quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Juan; Liu, Ningwu; Deng, Hao; Ding, Junya; Sun, Jiancha; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jingsong

    2017-02-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) system based on a broad band external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) near 7.78 μm was used to study volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measurements. Instead of using a standard infrared mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detector, a quartz crystal tuning fork (QCTF) as a light detector was successfully used for laser signal detection. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) was used to extract vibration intensity information of QCTF. Primary results indicate that the new developed system has a good reproducibility, and a good agreement was obtained by comparing with data taken from standard spectroscopic database.

  10. Distributed feedback terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers with dual periodicity gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, F; Li, L H; Pitanti, A; Tredicucci, A; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Vitiello, M S

    2016-01-01

    We have developed terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers that exploit a double-periodicity distributed feedback grating to control the emission frequency and the output beam direction independently. The spatial refractive index modulation of the gratings necessary to provide optical feedback at a fixed frequency and, simultaneously, a far-field emission pattern centered at controlled angles, was designed through use of an appropriate wavevector scattering model. Single mode THz emission at angles tuned by design between 0{\\deg} and 50{\\deg} was realized, leading to an original phase-matching approach, lithographically independent, for highly collimated THz QCLs.

  11. Integration of a terahertz quantum cascade laser with a hollow waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, Michael C [Albuquerque, NM; Nordquist, Christopher D [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    The present invention is directed to the integration of a quantum cascade laser with a hollow waveguide on a chip to improve both the beam pattern and manufacturability. By coupling the QCL output into a single-mode rectangular waveguide the radiation mode structure can be known and the propagation, manipulation, and broadcast of the QCL radiation can then be entirely controlled by well-established rectangular waveguide techniques. By controlling the impedance of the interface, enhanced functions, such as creating amplifiers, efficient coupling to external cavities, and increasing power output from metal-metal THz QCLs, are also enabled.

  12. Measurement of gain and losses of a midinfrared quantum cascade laser by wavelength chirping spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, E.; Laurent, S.; Vasanelli, A.; Manquest, C.; Sirtori, C.; Teulon, F.; Carras, M.; Marcadet, X.

    2009-02-01

    We present an optimized technique for the measurement of gain and losses of semiconductor lasers. We optically inject the beam of a distributed feedback laser (DFB) inside the cavity of the lasers under study. The DFB laser operates in a pulsed mode and shifts its emission wavelength as a function of time. This frequency chirp creates the Fabry-Pérot fringes of the transmitted intensity that contains all the information on the cavity losses. The setup has been validated by a quantitative study of the losses as a function of the injected current, for a quantum cascade laser emitting at 7.6 μm.

  13. On-chip focusing in the mid-infrared: Demonstrated with ring quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szedlak, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.szedlak@tuwien.ac.at; Schwarzer, Clemens; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried [Institute for Solid State Electronics and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-04-14

    We report on collimated emission beams from substrate emitting ring quantum cascade lasers with an on-chip focusing element fabricated into the bottom side of the device. It is formed by a gradient index metamaterial layer, realized by etching subwavelength holes into the substrate. The generated optical path length difference for rays emitted under different angles from the ring waveguide flattens the wavefront and focuses the light. Our far field measurements show an increased peak intensity corresponding to 617% of the initial value without the focusing element. Far field calculations, based on a Fourier transformation of the metamaterial area, are in good agreement with our experimental data.

  14. Towards a compact THz local oscillator based on a quantum cascade laser

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Heiko; Greiner-Bär, Michael; Pavlov, Sergey; Semenov, Alexei D.; Wienold, Martin; Schrottke, Lutz; Giehler, M.; Hey, R.; Grahn, H.T.; Huebers, H. -W.

    2010-01-01

    Heterodyne spectroscopy of molecular rotational lines and atomic fine-structure lines is a powerful tool in astronomy and planetary research. One example is the OI fine-structure line at 4.7 THz. This is a main target to be observed with GREAT, the German Receiver for Astronomy at Terahertz Frequencies, which will be operated on board of SOFIA. We report on the development of a compact, easy-to-use source, which combines a quantum-cascade laser (QCL) a compact, lowinput- power Stirling cooler...

  15. Widely Tunable Monolithic Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Lasers Using Super-Structure Grating Reflectors

    OpenAIRE

    Dingkai Guo; Jiun-Yun Li; Liwei Cheng; Xing Chen; Terry Worchesky; Fow-Sen Choa

    2016-01-01

    A monolithic, three-section, and widely tunable mid-infrared (mid-IR) quantum cascade laser (QCL) is demonstrated. This electrically tuned laser consists of a gain section placed between two super structure grating (SSG) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). By varying the injection currents to the two grating sections of this device, its emission wavelength can be tuned from 4.58 μm to 4.77 μm (90 cm−1) with a supermode spacing of 30 nm. This type of SSG-DBR QCLs can be a compact replacement ...

  16. Thermal Management of Quantum Cascade Lasers in an individually Addressable Array Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    quantum cascade laser (QCL) and amplifier devices are an excellent choice of emitter for those applications. To realize the power levels of interest...Anisotropic and extremely poor thermal conductivity of the gain region which can be as low as 2.0 to 4.0 W/m-°C depending upon the direction of heat...element. Figure 1 shows a micrograph image of the cross section of a realized LWIR QCL device along with its electro-optical performance. The design

  17. Extracting fundamental transverse mode operation in broad area quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, R.; Luong, S.; Yang, C.; Lu, C.; Newell, T. C.; Bate, T.

    2016-11-01

    Power scaling in broad area quantum cascade lasers results in the operation of high order transverse modes with a far-field profile consisting of two lobes propagating at large angles relative to the optical axis. We report a method of suppressing the high order transverse modes that can extract the fundamental mode and provide emission along the optical axis. By generating a lateral constriction in the waveguide in the form of short trenches defined by the focused ion beam milling technique, we report broad area devices in which most of the power is contained in a near diffraction-limited beam that provides high brightness.

  18. Real-time terahertz imaging through self-mixing in a quantum-cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wienold, M., E-mail: martin.wienold@dlr.de; Rothbart, N.; Hübers, H.-W. [Institute of Optical Sensor Systems, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hagelschuer, T. [Institute of Optical Sensor Systems, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schrottke, L.; Biermann, K.; Grahn, H. T. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Leibniz-Institut im Forschungsverbund Berlin e. V., Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-04

    We report on a fast self-mixing approach for real-time, coherent terahertz imaging based on a quantum-cascade laser and a scanning mirror. Due to a fast deflection of the terahertz beam, images with frame rates up to several Hz are obtained, eventually limited by the mechanical inertia of the employed scanning mirror. A phase modulation technique allows for the separation of the amplitude and phase information without the necessity of parameter fitting routines. We further demonstrate the potential for transmission imaging.

  19. Fast continuous tuning of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers by rear-facet illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, Martin, E-mail: hempel@pdi-berlin.de; Röben, Benjamin; Schrottke, Lutz; Grahn, Holger T. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Leibniz-Institut im Forschungsverbund Berlin e. V., Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm [Institute of Optical Sensor Systems, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-09

    GaAs-based terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) are continuously tuned in their emission frequency by illuminating the rear facet with a near-infrared, high-power diode laser. For QCLs emitting around 3.1 THz, the maximum tuning range amounts to 2.8 GHz for continuous-wave operation at a heat sink temperature of 55 K, while in pulsed mode 9.1 and 8.0 GHz are achieved at 35 and 55 K, respectively.

  20. Standoff Hyperspectral Imaging of Explosives Residues Using Broadly Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2010-05-01

    We describe experimental results on the detection of explosives residues using active hyperspectral imaging by illumination of the target surface using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) and imaging using a room temperature microbolometer camera. The active hyperspectral imaging technique forms an image hypercube by recording one image for each tuning step of the ECQCL. The resulting hyperspectral image contains the full absorption spectrum produced by the illumination laser at each pixel in the image which can then be used to identify the explosive type and relative quantity using spectral identification approaches developed initially in the remote sensing community.

  1. Modeling of dilute nitride cascaded quantum well solar cells for high efficiency photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya, G.; Alemu, A.; Freundlich, A.

    2013-03-01

    III-V Dilute Nitride multi-quantum well structures are currently promising candidates to achieve 1 sun efficiencies of cell in a 4 junction configuration could yield 1 sun efficiencies greater than 40%. However for a conventional deep well design the characteristic carrier escape times could exceed that of radiative recombination hence limiting the current output of the cell, as has been indicated by prior experiments. In order to increase the current extraction here we evaluate the performance of a cascaded quantum well design whereby a thermally assisted resonant tunneling process is used to accelerate the carrier escape process (efficiency. The quantum efficiency of a p-i-n subcell where a periodic sequence of quantum wells with well and barrier thicknesses adjusted for the sequential extraction operation is calculated using a 2D drift diffusion model and taking into account absorption properties of resulting MQWs. The calculation also accounts for the E-field induced modifications of absorption properties and quantization in quantum wells. The results are then accounted for to calculate efficiencies for the proposed 4 junction design, and indicate potential for reaching efficiencies in excess of this structure is above 42% (1 sun) and above 50% (500 sun) AM1.5.

  2. The Oscillator Strength of the Quantum Transitions in Multi-Resonant-Tunneling Structures Tours as Basic Elements of Quantum Cascade Lasers and Detectors in a Transverse Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Boyko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Using the model of a closed resonant tunneling structure developed the theory of the electron energy spectrum and oscillator strengths of the quantum electronic transitions between energy levels of this nanostructure. It is shown that by changing the intensity of the magnetic field can be in a wide range of electromagnetic waves to adjust the operating frequency of the radiation of a quantum cascade laser or detector, working on quantum transitions between the first and the third energy electronic states.

  3. Quantum cascade emission in the III-nitride material system designed with effective interface grading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Alex Y., E-mail: alexys@stanford.edu; Huang, Tzu-Yung; Zah, Chung-En; Gmachl, Claire F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Bhat, Rajaram; Wang, Jie [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States); Allerman, Andrew A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    We report the realization of quantum cascade (QC) light emission in the III-nitride material system, designed with effective interface grading (EIG). EIG induces a continuous transition between wells and barriers in the quantum confinement, which alters the eigenstate system and even delocalizes the states with higher energy. Fully transverse-magnetic spontaneous emission is observed from the fabricated III-nitride QC structure, with a center wavelength of ∼4.9 μm and a full width at half maximum of ∼110 meV, both in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. A multi-peak photo-response spectrum is also measured from the QC structure, which again agrees well with theoretical calculations and verifies the effects of EIG.

  4. Quantum cascade emission in the III-nitride material system designed with effective interface grading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Alex Y.; Bhat, Rajaram; Allerman, Andrew A.; Wang, Jie; Huang, Tzu-Yung; Zah, Chung-En; Gmachl, Claire F.

    2015-09-01

    We report the realization of quantum cascade (QC) light emission in the III-nitride material system, designed with effective interface grading (EIG). EIG induces a continuous transition between wells and barriers in the quantum confinement, which alters the eigenstate system and even delocalizes the states with higher energy. Fully transverse-magnetic spontaneous emission is observed from the fabricated III-nitride QC structure, with a center wavelength of ˜4.9 μm and a full width at half maximum of ˜110 meV, both in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. A multi-peak photo-response spectrum is also measured from the QC structure, which again agrees well with theoretical calculations and verifies the effects of EIG.

  5. Density matrix theory of transport and gain in quantum cascade lasers in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, Ivana; Vukmirović, Nenad; Ikonić, Zoran; Indjin, Dragan; Kelsall, Robert W.; Harrison, Paul; Milanović, Vitomir

    2007-10-01

    A density matrix theory of electron transport and optical gain in quantum cascade lasers in an external magnetic field is formulated. Starting from a general quantum kinetic treatment, we describe the intraperiod and interperiod electron dynamics at the non-Markovian, Markovian, and Boltzmann approximation levels. Interactions of electrons with longitudinal optical phonons and classical light fields are included in the present description. The non-Markovian calculation for a prototype structure reveals a significantly different gain spectra in terms of linewidth and additional polaronic features in comparison to the Markovian and Boltzmann ones. Despite strongly controversial interpretations of the origin of the transport processes in the non-Markovian or Markovian and the Boltzmann approaches, they yield comparable values of the current densities.

  6. Monte Carlo study of GaN versus GaAs terahertz quantum cascade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellotti, Enrico; Driscoll, Kristina; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Paiella, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    Due to their large optical phonon energies, nitride semiconductors are promising for the development of terahertz quantum cascade lasers with dramatically improved high-temperature performance relative to existing GaAs devices. Here, we present a rigorous Monte Carlo study of carrier dynamics in two structures based on the same design scheme for emission at 2THz, consisting of GaN /AlGaN or GaAs /AlGaAs quantum wells. The population inversion and hence the gain coefficient of the nitride device are found to exhibit a much weaker (by a factor of over 3) temperature dependence and to remain large enough for laser action even without cryogenic cooling.

  7. Performance of a quantum defect minimized disk laser based on cryogenically cooled Yb:CaF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Martin; Körner, Jörg; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C.

    2017-07-01

    A low quantum defect is the fundamental key to a high efficiency of any laser. To study the anticipated performance boost for a 980 nm-diode pumped cryogenically cooled Yb:CaF2 disk laser we compared its operation at output wavelengths of 991 nm, 996 nm, and 1032 nm. Despite the higher quantum defect a maximum efficiency of 74% (output versus incident power) with an output power of 15.8 W was achieved at the 1032 nm output wavelength. This observation led to a detailed analysis of remaining loss mechanisms we are reporting on in this paper.

  8. High quantum efficiency mid-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors with one and two stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Zhicheng; He, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report on mid-wavelength infrared interband cascade photodetectors grown on InAs substrates. We studied the transport properties of the photon-generated carriers in the interband cascade structures by comparing two different detectors, a single stage detector and a two-stage cascade detector. The two-stage device showed quantum efficiency around 19.8% at room temperature, and clear optical response was measured even at a temperature of 323 K. The two detectors showed similar Johnson-noise limited detectivity. The peak detectivity of the one- and two-stage devices was measured to be 2.15 × 1014 cm·Hz1/02/W and 2.19 × 1014 cm·Hz1/02/W at 80 K, 1.21 × 109 cm·Hz1/02/W and 1.23 × 109 cm·Hz1/02/W at 300 K, respectively. The 300 K background limited infrared performance (BLIP) operation temperature is estimated to be over 140 K.

  9. Trace-gas sensing using the compliance voltage of an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2013-06-04

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are increasingly being used to detect, identify, and measure levels of trace gases in the air. External cavity QCLs (ECQCLs) provide a broadly-tunable infrared source to measure absorption spectra of chemicals and provide high detection sensitivity and identification confidence. Applications include detecting chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals, monitoring building air quality, measuring greenhouse gases for atmospheric research, monitoring and controlling industrial processes, analyzing chemicals in exhaled breath for medical diagnostics, and many more. Compact, portable trace gas sensors enable in-field operation in a wide range of platforms, including handheld units for use by first responders, fixed installations for monitoring air quality, and lightweight sensors for deployment in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). We present experimental demonstration of a new chemical sensing technique based on intracavity absorption in an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL). This new technique eliminates the need for an infrared photodetector and gas cell by detecting the intracavity absorption spectrum in the compliance voltage of the laser device itself. To demonstrate and characterize the technique, we measure infrared absorption spectra of chemicals including water vapor and Freon-134a. Sub-ppm detection limits in one second are achieved, with the potential for increased sensitivity after further optimization. The technique enables development of handheld, high-sensitivity, and high-accuracy trace gas sensors for in-field use.

  10. Short pulse generation and mode control of broadband terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Bachmann, Dominic; Süess, Martin J; Beck, Mattias; Unterrainer, Karl; Darmo, Juraj; Faist, Jérôme; Scalari, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a waveguide engineering technique that enables the generation of a bandwidth up to 1 THz and record ultra-short pulse length of 2.5 ps in injection seeded terahertz quantum cascade lasers. The reported technique is able to control and fully suppress higher order lateral modes in broadband terahertz quantum cascade lasers by introducing side-absorbers to metal-metal waveguides. The side-absorbers consist of a top metalization set-back with respect to the laser ridge and an additional lossy metal layer. In continuous wave operation the side-absorbers lead to octave spanning laser emission, ranging from 1.63 to 3.37 THz, exhibiting a 725 GHz wide at top within a 10 dB intensity range as well as frequency comb operation with a bandwidth of 442 GHz. Numerical and experimental studies have been performed to optimize the impact of the side-absorbers on the emission properties and to determine the required increase of waveguide losses. Furthermore, these studies have led to a better understanding of the ...

  11. Optimizing optical nonlinearities in GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajić Aleksandra D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of the huge advances made in the design and fabrication of mid-infrared and terahertz quantum cascade lasers, success in accessing the ~3-4 mm region of the electromagnetic spectrum has remained limited. This fact has brought about the need to exploit resonant intersubband transitions as powerful nonlinear oscillators, consequently enabling the occurrence of large nonlinear optical susceptibilities as a means of reaching desired wavelengths. In this work, we present a computational model developed for the optimization of second-order optical nonlinearities in In0.53Ga0.47As/Al0.48In0.52As quantum cascade laser structures based on the implementation of the Genetic algorithm. The carrier transport and the power output of the structure were calculated by self-consistent solutions to the system of rate equations for carriers and photons. Both stimulated and simultaneous double-photon absorption processes occurring between the second harmonic generation-relevant levels are incorporated into rate equations and the material-dependent effective mass and band non-parabolicity are taken into account, as well. The developed method is quite general and can be applied to any higher order effect which requires the inclusion of the photon density equation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45010

  12. Long term reliability study and life time model of quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Nguyen, Hong-Ky; Leblanc, Herve; Hughes, Larry; Wang, Jie; Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean J.; Lascola, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present results of quantum cascade laser lifetime tests under various aging conditions including an accelerated life test. The total accumulated life time exceeds 1.5 × 106 device hours. The longest single device aging time was 46 500 hours without failure in the room temperature aging test. Four failures were found in a group of 19 devices subjected to the accelerated life test with a heat-sink temperature of 60 °C and a continuous-wave current of 1 A. Failure mode analyses revealed that thermally induced oxidation of InP in the semi-insulating layer is the cause of failure. An activation energy of 1.2 eV is derived from the dependence of the failure rate on laser core temperature. The mean time to failure of the quantum cascade lasers operating at a typical condition with the current density of 5 kA/cm2 and heat-sink temperature of 25 °C is expected to be 809 000 hours.

  13. Phase-locked array of quantum cascade lasers with an intracavity spatial filter

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lei; Jia, Zhiwei; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Chuanwei; Liu, Yinghui; Zhai, Shenqiang; Ning, Zhuo; Liu, Fengqi

    2016-01-01

    Phase-locking an array of quantum cascade lasers is an effective way to achieve higher output power and beam shaping. In this article, based on Talbot effect, we show a new-type phase-locked array of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers with an integrated spatial- filtering Talbot cavity. All the arrays show stable in-phase operation from the threshold current to full power current. The beam divergence of the array device is smaller than that of a single-ridge laser. We use the multi-slit Fraunhofer diffraction mode to interpret the far-field radiation profile and give a solution to get better beam quality. The maximum power is just about 5 times that of a single-ridge laser for eleven-laser array device and 3 times for seven-laser array device. Considering the great modal selection ability, simple fabricating process and the potential for achieving better beam quality and smaller cavity loss, this new-type phase-locked array may be a hopeful and elegant solution to get high power or beam shaping.

  14. Self-consistent energy balance simulations of hole dynamics in SiGe/Si THz quantum cascade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonić, Z.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    Analysis of hole transport in cascaded p-Si /SiGe quantum well structures is performed using self-consistent rate equations simulations. The hole subband structure is calculated using the 6×6k.p model, and then used to find carrier relaxation rates due to the alloy disorder, acoustic, and optical phonon scattering, as well as hole-hole scattering. The simulation accounts for the in-plane k-space anisotropy of both the hole subband structure and the scattering rates. Results are presented for prototype THzSi /SiGe quantum cascade structures.

  15. Realization of a Cascaded Quantum System: Heralded Absorption of a Single Photon Qubit by a Single-Electron Charged Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Aymeric; Sun, Zhe; Fält, Stefan; Imamoğlu, Atac

    2017-04-28

    Photonic losses pose a major limitation for the implementation of a quantum state transfer between nodes of a quantum network. A measurement that heralds a successful transfer without revealing any information about the qubit may alleviate this limitation. Here, we demonstrate the heralded absorption of a single photonic qubit, generated by a single neutral quantum dot, by a single-electron charged quantum dot that is located 5 m away. The transfer of quantum information to the spin degree of freedom takes place upon the emission of a photon; for a properly chosen or prepared quantum dot, the detection of this photon yields no information about the qubit. We show that this process can be combined with local operations optically performed on the destination node by measuring classical correlations between the absorbed photon color and the final state of the electron spin. Our work suggests alternative avenues for the realization of quantum information protocols based on cascaded quantum systems.

  16. Optimization of a Quantum Cascade Laser Operating in the Terahertz Frequency Range Using a Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    laser fundamentals , semiconductors, quantum wells and finally ending with a discussion of generic QC lasers. With the a priori knowledge that...quantum cascade laser structure and operation. It begins, in Chapter 2, with a discussion of the atom, continus with laser fundamentals , semiconductors...Aerospace Engineering, Arizona State University. 102 15. Chow, W. W. and Koch, S. W. Semiconductor- Laser Fundamentals . New York: Springer-Verlag

  17. Multi-species trace gas analysis with dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jágerská, Jana; Tuzson, Béla; Looser, Herbert; Jouy, Pierre; Hugi, Andreas; Mangold, Markus; Soltic, Patrik; Faist, Jérôme; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Simultaneous detection of multiple gas species using mid-IR laser spectroscopy is highly appealing for a large variety of applications ranging from air quality monitoring, medical breath analysis to industrial process control. However, state-of-the-art distributed-feedback (DFB) mid-IR lasers are usually tunable only within a narrow spectral range, which generally leads to one-laser-one-compound measurement strategy. Thus, multi-species detection involves several lasers and elaborate beam combining solutions [1]. This makes them bulky, costly, and highly sensitive to optical alignment, which limits their field deployment. In this paper, we explore an alternative measurement concept based on a dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser (DW-QCL) [2]. Such a laser can emit at two spectrally distinct wavelengths using a succession of two DFB gratings with different periodicities and a common waveguide to produce one output beam. The laser design was optimized for NOx measurements and correspondingly emits single-mode at 5.26 and 6.25 μm. Electrical separation of the respective laser sections makes it possible to address each wavelength independently. Thereby, it is possible to detect NO and NO2 species with one laser using the same optical path, without any beam combining optics, i.e. in a compact and cost-efficient single-path optical setup. Operated in a time-division multiplexed mode, the spectrometer reaches detection limits at 100 s averaging of 0.5 and 1.5 ppb for NO2 and NO, respectively. The performance of the system was validated against the well-established chemiluminescence detection while measuring the NOx emissions on an automotive test-bench, as well as monitoring the pollution at a suburban site. [1] B. Tuzson, K. Zeyer, M. Steinbacher, J. B. McManus, D. D. Nelson, M. S. Zahniser, and L. Emmenegger, 'Selective measurements of NO, NO2 and NOy in the free troposphere using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy,' Atmospheric Measurement Techniques 6, 927-936 (2013

  18. Nonequilibrium Green's functions theory for the alpha factor of quantum cascade lasers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mauro F.; Winge, David O.; Wacker, Andreas; Jumpertz, Louise; Michel, Florian; Pawlus, Robert; Elsaesser, Wolfgang E.; Schires, Kevin; Carras, Mathieu; Grillot, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The linewidth of a conventional laser is due to fluctuations in the laser field due to spontaneous emission and described by the Schalow-Townes formula. In addition to that, in a semiconductor laser there is a contribution arising from fluctuations in the refractive index induced by carrier density fluctuations. The later are quantitatively described by the linewidth enhancement or alpha factor [C. H. Henry, IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 18 (2), 259 (1982), W. W. Chow, S. W. Koch and M. Sargent III, Semiconductor-Laser Physics, Springer-Verlag (1994), M.F. Pereira Jr et al, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B10, 765 (1993). In this paper we investigate the alpha factor of quantum cascade lasers under actual operating conditions using the Nonequilibrium Greens Functions approach [A. Wacker et a, IEEE Journal of Sel. Top. in Quantum Electron.,19 1200611, (2013), T. Schmielau and M.F. Pereira, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95 231111, (2009)]. The simulations are compared with recent results obtained with different optical feedback techniques [L. Jumpertz et al, AIP ADVANCES 6, 015212 (2016)].

  19. Coagulation and ablation of biological soft tissue by quantum cascade laser with peak wavelength of 5.7 μm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Hashimura

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecules such as water, proteins and lipids that are contained in biological tissue absorb mid-infrared (MIR light, which allows such light to be used in laser surgical treatment. Esters, amides and water exhibit strong absorption bands in the 5–7 μm wavelength range, but at present there are no lasers in clinical use that can emit in this range. Therefore, the present study focused on the quantum cascade laser (QCL, which is a new type of semiconductor laser that can emit at MIR wavelengths and has recently achieved high output power. A high-power QCL with a peak wavelength of 5.7 μm was evaluated for use as a laser scalpel for ablating biological soft tissue. The interaction of the laser beam with chicken breast tissue was compared to a conventional CO2 laser, based on surface and cross-sectional images. The QCL was found to have sufficient power to ablate soft tissue, and its coagulation, carbonization and ablation effects were similar to those for the CO2 laser. The QCL also induced comparable photothermal effects because it acted as a pseudo-continuous wave laser due to its low peak power. A QCL can therefore be used as an effective laser scalpel, and also offers the possibility of less invasive treatment by targeting specific absorption bands in the MIR region.

  20. Frequency locking of single-mode 3.5-THz quantum cascade lasers using a gas cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.; Hovenier, J.N.; Cui, M.; Hayton, D.J.; Gao, J.R.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Shi, S.C.; Kao, T.Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    We report frequency locking of two 3.5-THz third-order distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) by using methanol molecular absorption lines, a proportional-integral-derivative controller, and a NbN bolometer. We show that the free-running linewidths of the QCLs are dependent on the

  1. Use of external cavity quantum cascade laser compliance voltage in real-time trace gas sensing of multiple chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-02-08

    We describe a prototype trace gas sensor designed for real-time detection of multiple chemicals. The sensor uses an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) swept over its tuning range of 940-1075 cm-1 (9.30-10.7 µm) at a 10 Hz repetition rate.

  2. Real-time imaging using a 2.8 THz quantum cascade laser and uncooled infrared microbolometer camera

    OpenAIRE

    Behnken, Barry N.; Karunasiri, Gamani; Chamberlin, Danielle R.; Robrish, Peter R.; Faist, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    Optics Letters, Volume 33, No. 5, pp. 440-442 (March 1, 2008) Real-time imaging in the terahertz (THz) spectral range was achieved using a milliwatt-scale, 2.8 THz quantum cascade laser and an uncooled, 160 120 pixel microbolometer camera modified with Picarin optics... This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  3. Absorption and wavelength modulation spectroscopy of NO2 using a tunable, external cavity continuous wave quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpf, Andreas; Rao, Gottipaty N

    2009-01-10

    The absorption spectra and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) of NO(2) using a tunable, external cavity CW quantum cascade laser operating at room temperature in the region of 1625 to 1645 cm(-1) are reported. The external cavity quantum cascade laser enabled us to record continuous absorption spectra of low concentrations of NO(2) over a broad range (approximately 16 cm(-1)), demonstrating the potential for simultaneously recording the complex spectra of multiple species. This capability allows the identification of a particular species of interest with high sensitivity and selectivity. The measured spectra are in excellent agreement with the spectra from the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption database [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 96, 139-204 (2005)]. We also conduct WMS for the first time using an external cavity quantum cascade laser, a technique that enhances the sensitivity of detection. By employing WMS, we could detect low-intensity absorption lines, which are not visible in the simple absorption spectra, and demonstrate a minimum detection limit at the 100 ppb level with a short-path absorption cell. Details of the tunable, external cavity quantum cascade laser system and its performance are discussed.

  4. Nanoscale displacement sensing based on nonlinear frequency mixing in quantum cascade lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzapesa, F P; De Risi, G; Brambilla, M; Dabbicco, M; Spagnolo, V; Scamarcio, G

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a sensor scheme for nanoscale target displacement that relies on a single Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) subject to optical feedback. The system combines the inherent sensitivity of QCLs to optical re-injection and their ultra-stability in the strong feedback regime where nonlinear frequency mixing phenomena are enhanced. An experimental proof of principle in the micrometer wavelength scale is provided. We perform real-time measurements of displacement with {\\lambda}/100 resolution by inserting a fast-shifting reference etalon in the external cavity. The resulting signal dynamics at the QCL terminals shows a stroboscopic-like effect that relates the sensor resolution with the reference etalon speed. Intrinsic limits to the measurement algorithm and to the reference speed are discussed, disclosing that nanoscale ranges are attainable.

  5. The MBE growth and optimization of high performance terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L H; Zhu, J X; Chen, L; Davies, A G; Linfield, E H

    2015-02-09

    The technique of molecular beam epitaxy has recently been used to demonstrate the growth of terahertz frequency GaAs/AlGaAs quantum cascade lasers (QCL) with Watt-level optical output powers. In this paper, we discuss the critical importance of achieving accurate layer thicknesses and alloy compositions during growth, and demonstrate that precise growth control as well as run-to-run growth reproducibility is possible. We also discuss the importance of minimizing background doping level in maximizing QCL performance. By selecting high-performance active region designs, and optimizing the injection doping level and device fabrication, we demonstrate total optical (two-facet) output powers as high as 1.56 W.

  6. Comb-assisted subkilohertz linewidth quantum cascade laser for high-precision mid-infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galli, I.; Cappelli, F.; Bartalini, S.; Mazzotti, D.; Giusfredi, G.; Cancio, P.; De Natale, P. [CNR-INO-Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Largo E. Fermi 6, 50125 Firenze, FI (Italy); LENS-European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy, Via Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Siciliani de Cumis, M. [CNR-INO-Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Largo E. Fermi 6, 50125 Firenze, FI (Italy); Borri, S. [CNR-IFN-Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari, BA (Italy); Montori, A. [LENS-European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy, Via Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Akikusa, N. [Development Bureau Laser Device R and D Group, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Shizuoka 434-8601 (Japan); Yamanishi, M. [Central Research Laboratories, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Shizuoka 434-8601 (Japan)

    2013-03-25

    We report on the linewidth narrowing of a room-temperature mid-infrared quantum cascade laser by phase-locking to a difference-frequency-generated radiation referenced to an optical frequency comb synthesizer. A locking bandwidth of 250 kHz, with a residual rms phase-noise of 0.56 rad, has been achieved. The laser linewidth is narrowed by more than 2 orders of magnitude below 1 kHz, and its frequency is stabilized with an absolute traceability of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12}. This source has allowed the measurement of the absolute frequency of a CO{sub 2} molecular transition with an uncertainty of about 1 kHz.

  7. A Polarization-Dependent Normal Incident Quantum Cascade Detector Enhanced Via Metamaterial Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Wang, Feng-Jiao; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Shu-Man; Zhuo, Ning; Zhang, Chuan-Jin; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-12-01

    The design, fabrication, and characterization of a polarization-dependent normal incident quantum cascade detector coupled via complementary split-ring metamaterial resonators in the infrared regime are presented. The metamaterial structure is designed through three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method and fabricated on the top metal contact, which forms a double-metal waveguide together with the metallic ground plane. With normal incidence, significant enhancements of photocurrent response are obtained at the metamaterial resonances compared with the 45° polished edge coupling device. The photocurrent response enhancements exhibit clearly polarization dependence, and the largest response enhancement factor of 165% is gained for the incident light polarized parallel to the split-ring gap.

  8. Terahertz quantum-cascade lasers as high-power and wideband, gapless sources for spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röben, Benjamin; Lü, Xiang; Hempel, Martin; Biermann, Klaus; Schrottke, Lutz; Grahn, Holger T

    2017-07-10

    Terahertz (THz) quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) are powerful radiation sources for high-resolution and high-sensitivity spectroscopy with a discrete spectrum between 2 and 5 THz as well as a continuous coverage of several GHz. However, for many applications, a radiation source with a continuous coverage of a substantially larger frequency range is required. We employed a multi-mode THz QCL operated with a fast ramped injection current, which leads to a collective tuning of equally-spaced Fabry-Pérot laser modes exceeding their separation. A continuous coverage over 72 GHz at about 4.7 THz was achieved. We demonstrate that the QCL is superior to conventional sources used in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio as well as the dynamic range by one to two orders of magnitude. Our results pave the way for versatile THz spectroscopic systems with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity across a wide frequency range.

  9. Quantum cascade laser photoacoustic detection of nitrous oxide released from soils for biofuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, F. M.; Sthel, M. S.; Castro, M. P. P.; da Silva, M. G.; Rocha, M. V.; Tavares, J. R.; Veiga, C. F. M.; Vargas, H.

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate the generation of greenhouse gases in sugarcane ethanol production chain, a comparative study of N2O emission in artificially fertilized soils and soils free from fertilizers was carried out. Photoacoustic spectroscopy using quantum cascade laser with an emission ranging from 7.71 to 7.88 µm and differential photoacoustic cell were applied to detect nitrous oxide (N2O), an important greenhouse gas emitted from soils cultivated with sugar cane. Owing to calibrate the experimental setup, an initial N2O concentration was diluted with pure nitrogen and detection limit of 50 ppbv was achieved. The proposed methodology was selective and sensitive enough to detect N2O from no fertilized and artificially fertilized soils. The measured N2O concentration ranged from ppmv to ppbv.

  10. III-nitride quantum cascade detector grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yu, E-mail: yusong@princeton.edu; Huang, Tzu-Yung; Badami, Pranav; Gmachl, Claire [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Bhat, Rajaram; Zah, Chung-En [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Quantum cascade (QC) detectors in the GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N material system grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition are designed, fabricated, and characterized. Only two material compositions, i.e., GaN as wells and Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N as barriers are used in the active layers. The QC detectors operates around 4 μm, with a peak responsivity of up to ∼100 μA/W and a detectivity of up to 10{sup 8} Jones at the background limited infrared performance temperature around 140 K.

  11. Electron transport in n-doped Si/SiGe quantum cascade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, I.; Ikonic, Z.; Milanovic, V.; Kelsall, R. W.; Indjin, D.; Harrison, P.

    2007-05-01

    An electron transport model in n-Si/SiGe quantum cascade or superlattice structures is described. The model uses the electronic structure calculated within the effective-mass complex-energy framework, separately for perpendicular (Xz) and in-plane (Xxy) valleys, the degeneracy of which is lifted by strain, and additionally by size quantization. The transport is then described via scattering between quantized states, using a rate equations approach and tight-binding expansion, taking the coupling with two nearest-neighbor periods. Acoustic phonon, optical phonon, alloy disorder, and interface roughness scattering are taken into account. The calculated current/voltage dependence and gain profiles are presented for two simple superlattice structures.

  12. Si/SiGe bound-to-continuum quantum cascade terahertz emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D. J.; Matmon, G.; Lever, L.; Ikonić, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G.; von Känel, H.

    2008-04-01

    A review will be presented of recent work on Si/SiGe heavy-hole to heavy-hole quantum cascade emitters showing progress towards a laser using the bound-to-continuum design for the active region. The sample was grown by low energy plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition in significantly less time than comparable structures and designs in III-V or Si/SiGe technology using molecular beam epitaxy or more standard chemical vapour deposition techniques. Clear intersubband electroluminescence is demonstrated at 4.2 K between 6.7 and 10.1 THz. This is inside the III-V restrahlung band where III-V materials cannot lase, unlike Group IV materials. A review of waveguide losses will also be presented and some ideas of how to design an active region with gain higher than the waveguide losses will be discussed.

  13. Material configurations for n-type silicon-based terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valavanis, A.; Dinh, T. V.; Lever, L. J. M.; Ikonić, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2011-05-01

    Silicon-based quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) offer the prospect of integrating coherent terahertz (THz) radiation sources with silicon microelectronics. Theoretical studies have proposed a variety of n-type SiGe-based heterostructures as design candidates; however, the optimal material configuration remains unclear. In this work, an optimization algorithm is used to design equivalent THz QCLs in three recently proposed configurations [(001) Ge/GeSi, (001) Si/SiGe, and (111) Si/SiGe], with emission frequencies of 3 and 4 THz. A systematic comparison of the electronic and optical properties is presented. A semiclassical electron transport simulation is used to model the charge carrier dynamics and calculate the peak gain, the corresponding current density, and the maximum operating temperature. It is shown that (001) Ge/GeSi structures yield the best simulated performance at both emission frequencies.

  14. The importance of electron temperature in silicon-based terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, L.; Valavanis, A.; Evans, C. A.; Ikonić, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2009-09-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are compact sources of coherent terahertz radiation. Although all existing QCLs use III-V compound semiconductors, silicon-based devices are highly desirable due to the high thermal conductivity and mature processing technology. We use a semiclassical rate-equation model to show that Ge/SiGe THz QCL active region gain is strongly enhanced by reducing the electron temperature. We present a bound-to-continuum QCL design employing L-valley intersubband transitions, using high Ge fraction barriers to reduce interface roughness scattering, and a low electric field to reduce the electron temperature. We predict a gain of ˜50 cm-1, which exceeds the calculated waveguide losses.

  15. Surface Emitting Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Laser around 8.3μm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wan-Hong; LIU Jun-Qi; LU Quan-Yong; ZHANG Wei; JIANG Yu-Chao; LI Lu; WANG Li-Jun; LIU Feng-Qi; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2010-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate surface emitting distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers emitting at wavelengths from8.1 μm at 90 K to 8.4 μm at 210K.The second-order metalized grating is carefully designed using a modified coupled-mode theory and fabricated by contact lithography.The devices show single mode behavior with a side mode suppression ratio above 18dB at all working temperatures.At 90K,the device emits an optical power of 101 mW from the surface and 199mW from the edge.In addition,a double-lobe far-field pattern with a separation of 2.2° is obtained in the direction along the waveguide.

  16. High-speed mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging using quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, David B.; Goyal, Anish K.; Zhu, Ninghui; Wood, Derek A.; Myers, Travis R.; Kotidis, Petros; Murphy, Cara; Georgan, Chelsea; Raz, Gil; Maulini, Richard; Müller, Antoine

    2017-05-01

    We report on a standoff chemical detection system using widely tunable external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (ECQCLs) to illuminate target surfaces in the mid infrared (λ = 7.4 - 10.5 μm). Hyperspectral images (hypercubes) are acquired by synchronously operating the EC-QCLs with a LN2-cooled HgCdTe camera. The use of rapidly tunable lasers and a high-frame-rate camera enables the capture of hypercubes with 128 x 128 pixels and >100 wavelengths in acetaminophen) on a variety of surfaces (e.g., aluminum, plastic, glass). Signature spectra are obtained for particulate loadings of RDX on glass of <1 μg/cm2.

  17. Proton implantation for the isolation of AlGaAs/GaAs quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szerling, A.; Kosiel, K.; Kozubal, M.; Myśliwiec, M.; Jakieła, R.; Kuc, M.; Czyszanowski, T.; Kruszka, R.; Pągowska, K.; Karbownik, P.; Barcz, A.; Kamińska, E.; Piotrowska, A.

    2016-07-01

    The novel fabrication scheme of the mid-infrared (∼9.5 μm) Al0.45Ga0.55As/GaAs plasmon-enhanced-waveguide quantum cascade laser (QCL) is reported. The electric isolation was made exclusively by 6.5 μm-deep proton implantation. The applied implantation allowed us to suppress the current spreading and at the same time enabled the laser radiation confinement without any mesa formation. A galvanic gold layer at least 3.5 μm thick covering the top ohmic contact was used as a mask for implantation. This mask was not removed after the implantation, but it served for heat spreading from the laser. A considerable reduction in the necessary technological steps was obtained with the presented novel fabrication scheme, in comparison with the standard mesa-etching-based method.

  18. Optical feedback effects on terahertz quantum cascade lasers: modelling and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakić, Aleksandar D.; Lim, Yah Leng; Taimre, Thomas; Agnew, Gary; Qi, Xiaoqiong; Bertling, Karl; Han, She; Wilson, Stephen J.; Kundu, Iman; Grier, Andrew; Ikonić, Zoran; Valavanis, Alexander; Demić, Aleksandar; Keeley, James; Li, Lianhe H.; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Harrison, Paul; Ferguson, Blake; Walker, Graeme; Prow, Tarl; Indjin, Dragan; Soyer, H. Peter

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are compact sources of radiation in the 1-5 THz range with significant potential for applications in sensing and imaging. Laser feedback interferometry (LFI) with THz QCLs is a technique utilizing the sensitivity of the QCL to the radiation reflected back into the laser cavity from an external target. We will discuss modelling techniques and explore the applications of LFI in biological tissue imaging and will show that the confocal nature of the QCL in LFI systems, with their innate capacity for depth sectioning, makes them suitable for skin diagnostics with the well-known advantages of more conventional confocal microscopes. A demonstration of discrimination of neoplasia from healthy tissue using a THz, LFI-based system in the context of melanoma is presented using a transgenic mouse model.

  19. Detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile with a pulsed room temperature quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, J.; Jäger, W.; Tulip, J.

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the use of a pulsed, distributed feedback quantum cascade laser centered at 957 cm-1 in combination with an astigmatic Herriot cell with 250 m path length for the detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile. These molecules have been identified as hazardous air-pollutants because of their adverse health effects. The spectrometer utilizes the intra-pulse method, where a linear frequency down-chirp, that is induced when a top-hat current pulse is applied to the laser, is used for sweeping across the absorption line. Up to 450 ns long pulses were used for these measurements which resulted in a spectral window of ~2.2 cm-1. A room temperature mercury-cadmium-telluride detector was used, resulting in a completely cryogen free spectrometer. We demonstrated detection limits of ~3 ppb for acrylonitrile and ~6 ppb for acrolein with ~10 s averaging time. Laser characterization and optimization of the operational parameters for sensitivity improvement are discussed.

  20. Ultrasonic photoacoustic spectroscopy of trace hazardous chemicals using quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Ghai, Devinder Pal; Soni, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    We report an ultrasonic sensor based on open-cell photoacoustic spectroscopy method for the detection of explosive agents in traces. Experimentally, we recorded photoacoustic spectra of traces of hazardous explosives and molecules. Tunable mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers in the wavelength range 7.0-8.8 μm lying in the molecular fingerprint region are used as optical source. Samples of Pentaerylthirol Tetranitrate (PETN), Tetranitro-triazacyclohexane (RDX), Dinitrotoluene, p-Nitrobenzoic acid and other chemicals like Ibuprofen having quantity 1.0 mg were detected using a custom made photoacoustic cells in both open and closed configurations. The explosive traces were swiped using paper from contaminated surface and detected. Finite element mesh based simulation of photoacoustic cell is carried out for optimization of geometry at ultrasonic frequency (40 kHz). A point sensor based on above approach will be very effective for forensic applications and suspicious material screening.

  1. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging with a quantum cascade laser transmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylov, Andriy A; Goyette, Thomas M; Waldman, Jerry; Coulombe, Michael J; Gatesman, Andrew J; Giles, Robert H; Qian, Xifeng; Chandrayan, Neelima; Vangala, Shivashankar; Termkoa, Krongtip; Goodhue, William D; Nixon, William E

    2010-07-19

    A coherent transceiver using a THz quantum cascade (TQCL) laser as the transmitter and an optically pumped molecular laser as the local oscillator has been used, with a pair of Schottky diode mixers in the receiver and reference channels, to acquire high-resolution images of fully illuminated targets, including scale models and concealed objects. Phase stability of the received signal, sufficient to allow coherent image processing of the rotating target (in azimuth and elevation), was obtained by frequency-locking the TQCL to the free-running, highly stable optically pumped molecular laser. While the range to the target was limited by the available TQCL power (several hundred microwatts) and reasonably strong indoor atmospheric attenuation at 2.408 THz, the coherence length of the TQCL transmitter will allow coherent imaging over distances up to several hundred meters. Image data obtained with the system is presented.

  2. External cavity-quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) spectroscopy for protein analysis in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowski, Julia; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Alcaráz, Mirta Raquel; Quintás, Guillermo; Mayer, Helmut; Vento, Máximo; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-04-22

    The analytical determination of bovine milk proteins is important in food and non-food industrial applications and yet, rather labour-intensive wet-chemical, low-throughput methods have been employed since decades. This work proposes the use of external cavity-quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) spectroscopy for the simultaneous quantification of the most abundant bovine milk proteins and the total protein content based on the chemical information contained in mid-infrared (IR) spectral features of the amide I band. Mid-IR spectra of protein standard mixtures were used for building partial least squares (PLS) regression models. Protein concentrations in commercial bovine milk samples were calculated after chemometric compensation of the matrix contribution employing science-based calibration (SBC) without sample pre-processing. The use of EC-QCL spectroscopy together with advanced multivariate data analysis allowed the determination of casein, α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin and total protein content within several minutes.

  3. On-chip dual-comb based on quantum cascade laser frequency combs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villares, G., E-mail: gustavo.villares@phys.ethz.ch; Wolf, J.; Kazakov, D.; Süess, M. J.; Beck, M.; Faist, J., E-mail: jfaist@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Hugi, A. [IRsweep GmbH, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-21

    Dual-comb spectroscopy is emerging as an appealing application of mid-infrared frequency combs for high-resolution molecular spectroscopy, as it leverages on the unique coherence properties of frequency combs. Here, we present an on-chip dual-comb source based on mid-infrared quantum cascade laser frequency combs. Control of the combs repetition and offset frequencies is obtained by integrating micro-heaters next to each laser. We show that a full control of the dual-comb system is possible, by measuring a multi-heterodyne beating corresponding to an optical bandwidth of 32 cm{sup −1} centered at 1330 cm{sup −1} (7.52 μm), demonstrating that this device represents a critical step towards compact dual-comb systems.

  4. Phase-locked array of quantum cascade lasers with an intracavity spatial filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhiwei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jinchuan; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Chuanwei; Zhai, Shenqiang; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, JunQi; Wang, LiJun; Liu, ShuMan; Liu, Fengqi; Wang, Zhanguo

    2017-08-01

    We show a phase-locked array of quantum cascade lasers with an intracavity spatial filter based on the Talbot effect. All the laser arrays show in-phase operation from the threshold current to full power current with a near-diffraction-limited divergence angle. The maximum power is just about 5 times that of a single-ridge laser for an eleven-laser array device and 3 times for a seven-laser array device. The structure was analyzed by using the multi-slit Fraunhofer diffraction theory, showing very good agreement with the experimental results. Considering the great modal selection ability, simple fabricating process, and potential for achieving continuous wave operation, this phase-locked array may be a hopeful solution to obtain higher coherent power.

  5. Widely Tunable Monolithic Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Lasers Using Super-Structure Grating Reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingkai Guo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A monolithic, three-section, and widely tunable mid-infrared (mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL is demonstrated. This electrically tuned laser consists of a gain section placed between two super structure grating (SSG distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs. By varying the injection currents to the two grating sections of this device, its emission wavelength can be tuned from 4.58 μm to 4.77 μm (90 cm−1 with a supermode spacing of 30 nm. This type of SSG-DBR QCLs can be a compact replacement for the external cavity QCL. It has great potential to achieve gap-free and even further tuning ranges for sensor applications.

  6. Diffraction coupled phase-locked arrays of quantum cascade lasers with monolithically integrated Talbot cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lei; Jia, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Chuan-Wei; Liu, Ying-Hui; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Feng-Qi; Xu, Xian-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Diffraction coupled arrays of quantum cascade laser are presented. The phase-locked behavior is achieved through monolithic integration of a Talbot cavity at one side of the laser array. The principle is based on fractional Talbot effect. By controlling length of Talbot cavity to be a quarter of Talbot distance (Zt/4), in-phase mode operation is selected. Measured far-field radiation patterns reflect stable in-phase mode operation under different injection currents, from threshold current to full power current. Diffraction-limited performance is shown from the lateral far-field, where three peaks can be obtained and main peak and side peak interval is 10.5{\\deg}. The phase-locked arrays with in-phase mode operation may be a feasible solution to get higher output power and maintain well beam quality meanwhile.

  7. Rate equations model and optical external efficiency of optically pumped electrically driven terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadou, A.; Thobel, J.-L.; Lamari, S.

    2016-10-01

    A four level rate equations model for a terahertz optically pumped electrically driven quantum cascade laser is here introduced and used to model the system both analytically and numerically. In the steady state, both in the presence and absence of the terahertz optical field, we solve the resulting nonlinear system of equations and obtain closed form expressions for the levels occupation, population inversion as well as the mid-infrared pump threshold intensity in terms of the device parameters. We also derive, for the first time for this system, an analytical formula for the optical external efficiency and analyze the simultaneous effects of the cavity length and pump intensity on it. At moderate to high pump intensities, we find that the optical external efficiency scales roughly as the reciprocal of the cavity length.

  8. Extended and quasi-continuous tuning of quantum cascade lasers using superstructure gratings and integrated heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidaux, Yves, E-mail: yves.bidaux@alpeslasers.ch [Alpes Lasers SA, 1-3 Passsage Max Meuron, CH-2001 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH-Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Bismuto, Alfredo, E-mail: alfredo.bismuto@alpeslasers.ch; Tardy, Camille; Terazzi, Romain; Gresch, Tobias; Blaser, Stéphane; Muller, Antoine [Alpes Lasers SA, 1-3 Passsage Max Meuron, CH-2001 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Faist, Jerome [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH-Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-11-30

    In this work, we demonstrate broad electrical tuning of quantum cascade lasers at 9.25 μm, 8.5 μm, and 4.4 μm in continuous wave operation using Vernier-effect distributed Bragg reflectors based on superstructure gratings. Integrated micro-heaters allow to switch from one Vernier channel to the other, while predictable and mode-hop free tuning can be obtained in each channel modulating the laser current with a side mode suppression ratio as high as 30 dB. The resulting device behaves effectively as a switchable multicolour tunable source. Tuning up to 6.5% of the central wavelength is observed. To prove the importance of the developed devices for high resolution molecular spectroscopy, a N{sub 2}O absorption spectrum has been measured.

  9. Nonresonant tunneling phonon depopulated GaN based terahertz quantum cascade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Will; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2013-04-01

    GaN based terahertz quantum cascade structures are theoretically studied. Since the Fröhlich interaction is ˜15 times higher in GaN than in GaAs, level broadening makes obtaining appreciable optical gain difficult even with a large population inversion. A density matrix Monte Carlo method is used to calculate the broadening of the optical gain spectra as a function of lattice temperature. We find by using a proposed method of nonresonant tunneling and electron-longitudinal-optical phonon scattering for depopulation of the lower lasing state, that it is possible to sufficiently isolate the upper lasing state and control the lower lasing state lifetime to obtain high optical gain in GaN. The results predict lasing out to 300 K which is significantly higher than for GaAs based structures.

  10. Phase Locking of a 2.7 THz Quantum Cascade Laser to a Microwave Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosropanah, P.; Baryshev, A.; Zhang, W.; Jellema, W.; Hovenier, J. N.; Gao, J. R.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Paveliev, D. G.; Williams, B. S.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.; Klein, B.; Hesler, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the phase locking of a 2.7 THz metal-metal waveguide quantum cascade laser (QCL) to an external microwave signal. The reference is the 15th harmonic, generated by a semiconductor superlattice nonlinear device, of a signal at 182 GHz, which itself is generated by a multiplier chain (x 12) from a microwave synthesizer at approx. 15 GHz. Both laser and reference radiations are coupled into a bolometer mixer, resulting in a beat signal, which is fed into a phase-lock loop. The spectral analysis of the beat signal confirms that the QCL is phase locked. This result opens the possibility to extend heterodyne interferometers into the far-infrared range.

  11. Planar integrated metasurfaces for highly-collimated terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guozhen; Dupont, Emmanuel; Fathololoumi, Saeed; Wasilewski, Zbigniew R.; Ban, Dayan; Liang, Hou Kun; Zhang, Ying; Yu, Siu Fung; Li, Lianhe H.; Davies, Alexander Giles; Linfield, Edmund H.; Liu, Hui Chun; Wang, Qi Jie

    2014-01-01

    We report planar integration of tapered terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with metasurface waveguides that are designed to be spoof surface plasmon (SSP) out-couplers by introducing periodically arranged SSP scatterers. The resulting surface-emitting THz beam profile is highly collimated with a divergence as narrow as ~4° × 10°, which indicates a good waveguiding property of the metasurface waveguide. In addition, the low background THz power implies a high coupling efficiency for the THz radiation from the laser cavity to the metasurface structure. Furthermore, since all the structures are in-plane, this scheme provides a promising platform where well-established surface plasmon/metasurface techniques can be employed to engineer the emitted beam of THz QCLs controllably and flexibly. More importantly, an integrated active THz photonic circuit for sensing and communication applications could be constructed by incorporating other optoelectronic devices such as Schottky diode THz mixers, and graphene modulators and photodetectors. PMID:25403796

  12. Electronic temperatures of terahertz quantum cascade active regions with phonon scattering assisted injection and extraction scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patimisco, Pietro; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Santacroce, Maria Vittoria; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Dupont, Emmanuel; Laframboise, Sylvain R; Fathololoumi, Saeed; Razavipour, Ghasem S; Wasilewski, Zbigniew

    2013-04-22

    We measured the lattice and subband electronic temperatures of terahertz quantum cascade devices based on the optical phonon-scattering assisted active region scheme. While the electronic temperature of the injector state (j = 4) significantly increases by ΔT = T(e)(4) - T(L) ~40 K, in analogy with the reported values in resonant phonon scheme (ΔT ~70-110 K), both the laser levels (j = 2,3) remain much colder with respect to the latter (by a factor of 3-5) and share the same electronic temperature of the ground level (j = 1). The electronic population ratio n(2)/n(1) shows that the optical phonon scattering efficiently depopulates the lower laser level (j = 2) up to an electronic temperature T(e) ~180 K.

  13. High power, low divergent, substrate emitting quantum cascade ring laser in continuous wave operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a surface grating coupled substrate emitting quantum cascade ring laser with high power room temperature continuous wave operation at 4.64 μm. A second order surface metal/semiconductor distributed-feedback grating is used for in-plane feedback and vertical out-coupling. A device with 400 μm radius ring cavity exhibits an output power of 202 mW in room temperature continuous wave operation. Single mode operation with a side mode suppression ratio of 25 dB is obtained along with a good linear tuning with temperature. The far field measurement exhibits a low divergent concentric ring beam pattern with a lobe separation of ∼0.34°, which indicates that the device operates in fundamental mode (n = 1.

  14. Mid-infrared gas absorption sensor based on a broadband external cavity quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Juan; Deng, Hao; Liu, Ningwu; Wang, Hongliang; Yu, Benli; Li, Jingsong

    2016-12-01

    We developed a laser absorption sensor based on a pulsed, broadband tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) centered at 1285 cm-1. Unlike traditional infrared spectroscopy system, a quartz crystal tuning fork (QCTF) as a light detector was used for laser signal detection. Fast Fourier transform was applied to extract vibration intensity information of QCTF. The sensor system is successfully tested on nitrous oxide (N2O) spectroscopy measurements and compared with a standard infrared detector. The wide wavelength tunability of ECQCL will allow us to access the fundamental vibrational bands of many chemical agents, which are well-suited for trace explosive, chemical warfare agent, and toxic industrial chemical detection and spectroscopic analysis.

  15. Point and standoff detection of trace explosives using quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonghwan; Lee, Dongkyu; Liu, Xunchen; Van Neste, C. W.; Thundat, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Chemical sensors based on micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (M/NEMS) offer many advantages. However, obtaining chemical selectivity in M/NEMS sensors using chemoselective interfaces has been a longstanding challenge. Despite their many advantages, M/NEMS devices relying on chemoselective interfaces do not have sufficient selectivity. Therefore, highly sensitive and selective detection and quantification of chemical molecules using real-time, miniature sensor platforms still remains as a crucial challenge. Incorporating photothermal/photoacoustic spectroscopic techniques with M/NEMS using quantum cascade lasers can provide the chemical selectivity without sacrificing the sensitivity of the miniaturized sensing system. Point sensing is defined as sensing that requires collection and delivery of the target molecules to the sensor for detection and analysis. For example, photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy, which combines the high thermomechanical sensitivity of a bimetallic microcantilever with high selectivity of the mid infrared (IR) spectroscopy, is capable of obtaining molecular signatures of extremely small quantities of adsorbed explosive molecules (tens of picogram). On the other hand, standoff sensing is defined as sensing where the sensor and the operator are at distance from the target samples. Therefore, the standoff sensing is a non-contact method of obtaining molecular signatures without sample collection and processing. The distance of detection depends on the power of IR source, the sensitivity of a detector, and the efficiency of the collecting optics. By employing broadly tunable, high power quantum cascade lasers and a boxcar averager, molecular recognition of trace explosive compounds (1 μg/cm2 of RDX) on a stainless steel surface has been achieved at a distance of five meters.

  16. Genetic algorithm applied to the optimization of quantum cascade lasers with second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajić, A.; Radovanović, J.; Milanović, V.; Indjin, D.; Ikonić, Z.

    2014-02-01

    A computational model for the optimization of the second order optical nonlinearities in GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade laser structures is presented. The set of structure parameters that lead to improved device performance was obtained through the implementation of the Genetic Algorithm. In the following step, the linear and second harmonic generation power were calculated by self-consistently solving the system of rate equations for carriers and photons. This rate equation system included both stimulated and simultaneous double photon absorption processes that occur between the levels relevant for second harmonic generation, and material-dependent effective mass, as well as band nonparabolicity, were taken into account. The developed method is general, in the sense that it can be applied to any higher order effect, which requires the photon density equation to be included. Specifically, we have addressed the optimization of the active region of a double quantum well In0.53Ga0.47As/Al0.48In0.52As structure and presented its output characteristics.

  17. High-power quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) grown by GasMBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghi, Manijeh; Slivken, Steven

    2003-10-01

    This paper is a brief summary of the technological development and state-of-the-art performance of quantum cascade lasers produced at the Centre for Quantum Devices. Laser design will be discussed, as well as experimental details of device fabrication. Recent work has focused on the development of high peak and average power QCLs emitting at room temperature and above. Scaling of the output is demonstrated by increasing the number of emitting regions in the waveguide core. At λ = 9 μm, over 7 W of peak power has been demonstrated at room temperature for a single diode, with an average power of 300 mW at 6% duty cycle. At shorter wavelengths, laser development includes the use of highly strain-balanced heterostructures in order to maintain a high conduction band offset and minimize leakage current. At λ = 6 μm, utilizing a high reflective coating and epilayer-down mounting of the laser, we have demonstrated 225 mW of average power from a single facet at room temperature. Lastly, these results are put in perspective of other reported results and possible future directions are discussed.

  18. Growth variation effects in SiGe-based quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valavanis, A.; Ikonić, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2009-05-01

    Epitaxial growth of SiGe quantum cascade (QC) lasers has thus far proved difficult, and nonabrupt Ge profiles are known to exist. We model the resulting barrier degradation by simulating annealing in pairs of quantum wells (QWs). Using a semiclassical charge transport model, we calculate the changes in scattering rates and transition energy between the lowest pair of subbands. We compare results for each of the possible material configurations for SiGe QC lasers. The effects are most severe in n-type (001) Si-rich systems due to the large effective electron mass, and in p-type systems due to the coexistence of light holes and heavy holes. The lower effective mass and conduction band offset of (111) oriented systems minimizes the transition energy variation, and a large interdiffusion length (Ld = 1.49 nm) is tolerated with respect to the scattering rate. Ge-rich systems are shown to give the best tolerance with respect to subband separation (Ld = 3.31 nm), due also to their low effective mass.

  19. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Borri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF2 microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line.

  20. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF2 microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  1. Interband cascade light emitting devices based on type-II quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Lin, C.H.; Murry, S.J. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Space Vacuum Epitaxy Center] [and others

    1997-06-01

    The authors discuss physical processes in the newly developed type-II interband cascade light emitting devices, and review their recent progress in the demonstration of the first type-II interband cascade lasers and the observation of interband cascade electroluminescence up to room temperature in a broad mid-infrared wavelength region (extended to 9 {mu}m).

  2. High-temperature operation of broadband bidirectional terahertz quantum-cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Sudeep; Gao, Liang; Zhao, Le; Reno, John L.; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-09-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with a broadband gain medium could play an important role for sensing and spectroscopy since then distributed-feedback schemes could be utilized to produce laser arrays on a single semiconductor chip with wide spectral coverage. QCLs can be designed to emit at two different frequencies when biased with opposing electrical polarities. Here, terahertz QCLs with bidirectional operation are developed to achieve broadband lasing from the same semiconductor chip. A three-well design scheme with shallow-well GaAs/Al0.10Ga0.90As superlattices is developed to achieve high-temperature operation for bidirectional QCLs. It is shown that shallow-well heterostructures lead to optimal quantum-transport in the superlattice for bidirectional operation compared to the prevalent GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As material system. Broadband lasing in the frequency range of 3.1-3.7 THz is demonstrated for one QCL design, which achieves maximum operating temperatures of 147 K and 128 K respectively in opposing polarities. Dual-color lasing with large frequency separation is demonstrated for a second QCL, that emits at ~3.7 THz and operates up to 121 K in one polarity, and at ~2.7 THz up to 105 K in the opposing polarity. These are the highest operating temperatures achieved for broadband terahertz QCLs at the respective emission frequencies, and could lead to commercial development of broadband terahertz laser arrays.

  3. Functional model for gas sensing based on quantum cascade lasers; Funktionsmuster zur Gasdetektion auf Basis von Quantenkaskadenlasern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, T.; Rohr, J. [m.u.t. GmbH, Wedel (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Quantum cascade lasers represent an almost ideal light source for infrared gas analysis. They allow sensitive and selective measurements in the mid-infrared. The detection of combustion gases for early fire detection represents an interesting field of application, where further technologic benefits are shown to advantage. The focus of this report is on the technical realization of a functional model and the electronic components. (orig.)

  4. Surface plasmon waveguides with gradually doped or NiAl intermetallic compound buried contact for terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indjin, D.; Ikonić, Z.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2003-09-01

    Improved designs of surface plasmon waveguides for use in GaAs/AlGaAs terahertz quantum cascade lasers are presented. Modal losses and confinement factors are calculated for TM modes in metal-variably doped multilayer semiconductor and metal-intermetallic compound layer clad structures and compared with those obtained in recently realized metal-highly doped semiconductor clad layer structures. Considerable improvements of the mode confinement factors are predicted, and guidelines for choosing the confinement layer parameters are given.

  5. Development of a Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm for Strain-Enhanced Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mueller

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An automated design approach using an evolutionary algorithm for the development of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs is presented. Our algorithmic approach merges computational intelligence techniques with the physics of device structures, representing a design methodology that reduces experimental effort and costs. The algorithm was developed to produce QCLs with a three-well, diagonal-transition active region and a five-well injector region. Specifically, we applied this technique to Al x Ga 1 - x As/In y Ga 1 - y As strained active region designs. The algorithmic approach is a non-dominated sorting method using four aggregate objectives: target wavelength, population inversion via longitudinal-optical (LO phonon extraction, injector level coupling, and an optical gain metric. Analysis indicates that the most plausible device candidates are a result of the optical gain metric and a total aggregate of all objectives. However, design limitations exist in many of the resulting candidates, indicating need for additional objective criteria and parameter limits to improve the application of this and other evolutionary algorithm methods.

  6. Radiocarbon Dioxide detection based on Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy and a Quantum Cascade Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Genoud, Guillaume; Phillips, Hilary; Dean, Julian; Merimaa, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of radiocarbon ($^{14}$C) in carbon dioxide is demonstrated using mid-infrared spectroscopy and a quantum cascade laser. The measurement is based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and a high sensitivity is achieved with a simple setup. The instrument was tested using a standardised sample containing elevated levels of radiocarbon. Radiocarbon dioxide could be detected from samples with an isotopic ratio $^{14}$C/C as low as 50 parts-per-trillion, corresponding to an activity of 5 kBq/m$^3$ in pure CO$_2$, or 2 Bq/m$^3$ in air after extraction of the CO$_2$ from an air sample. The instrument is simple, compact and robust, making it the ideal tool for on-site measurements. It is aimed for monitoring of radioactive gaseous emissions in nuclear power environment, during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Its high sensitivity also makes it the ideal tool for the detection of leaks in radioactive waste repositories.

  7. Heterodyne Phase-Sensitive Dispersion Spectroscopy in the Mid-Infrared with a Quantum Cascade Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Mateos, Pedro; Hayden, Jakob; Acedo, Pablo; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-06-06

    Molecular dispersion spectroscopy encompasses a group of spectroscopic techniques for gas analysis that retrieve the characteristics of the sample from the measurement of the profile of its refractive index in the vicinity of molecular resonances. This approach, which is in clear contrast to traditional methods based on the detection of absorption, provides inherent immunity to power fluctuations, calibration-free operation, and an output that is linearly dependent on gas concentration. Heterodyne phase-sensitive dispersion spectroscopy (HPSDS) is a very recently proposed technique for molecular dispersion spectroscopy based on tunable lasers that is characterized by a very simple architecture in which data processing and concentration retrieval are straightforward. Different HPSDS implementations have been experimentally validated in the near-IR. Here, we present the first demonstration of HPSDS in the mid-IR using a directly modulated quantum cascade laser for the measurement of CO. The setup is put under test to characterize its response to changing concentrations, pressures, and levels of optical intensity on the detector, and the limit of detection is estimated. Besides this, an experimental comparison with wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (2f-WMS) is performed and discussed in detail in order to offer a clear view of the benefits and drawbacks that HPSDS can provide over what we could consider the reference method for gas analysis based on tunable laser spectroscopy.

  8. Broad band tunable quantum cascade lasers for stand-off detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkov, Borislav; Fuchs, Frank; Kaster, Jan M.; Yang, Quankui; Bronner, Wolfgang; Aidam, Rolf; Köhler, Klaus

    2009-09-01

    We present experimental results on a Quantum cascade laser (QC laser) embedded in an external cavity. These results were obtained with a broadly tunable laser exceeding 80 cm-1 covering a characteristic absorption band of trinitrotoluene (TNT). By combining the laser source with a high performance IR imager a stand-off detection setup based on multi- spectral MIR backscattering spectroscopy has been realized. With this technique TNT surface-contaminations of as low as 10 μg/cm2 could be detected on surfaces such as an aluminum-sheet and standard car paint. The contrast of the detection technique depends on the reflectance of the surface. A surface leading to mirror-like reflectance of the IR laser radiation leads to absorbance-like signatures of the TNT contamination, while surfaces showing high absorbance of the laser light may induce a contrast-reversal in the resulting image of the TNT coverage. This effect can be explained by a theoretical model for thin film coated substrates taking into account differences in the reflectance. Limitations and further work needed to explore the full potential of the IR backscattering technique are also discussed.

  9. Electron-phonon interaction in three-barrier nanosystems as active elements of quantum cascade detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkach, N. V., E-mail: ktf@chnu.edu.ua; Seti, Ju. A.; Grynyshyn, Yu. B. [Chernivtsy National University (Ukraine)

    2015-04-15

    The theory of electron tunneling through an open nanostructure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector is developed, which takes into account the interaction of electrons with confined and interface phonons. Using the method of finite-temperature Green’s functions and the electron-phonon Hamiltonian in the representation of second quantization over all system variables, the temperature shifts and electron-level widths are calculated and the contributions of different electron-phonon-interaction mechanisms to renormalization of the spectral parameters are analyzed depending on the geometrical configuration of the nanosystem. Due to weak electron-phonon coupling in a GaAs/Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As-based resonant tunneling nanostructure, the temperature shift and rf field absorption peak width are not very sensitive to the electron-phonon interaction and result from a decrease in potential barrier heights caused by a difference in the temperature dependences of the well and barrier band gaps.

  10. Mechanisms of temperature performance degradation in terahertz quantum-cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indjin, D.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.; Ikonić, Z.

    2003-03-01

    Electron transport in a terahertz GaAs/AlGaAs quantum-cascade laser is calculated using a fully self-consistent intersubband scattering model. Subband populations, carrier transition rates, and current densities are calculated and all relevant intra- and interperiod electron-electron and electron-LO-phonon scattering mechanisms are included. Employing an energy balance equation that includes the influence of both electron-LO-phonon and electron-electron scattering, the method also enables evaluation of the average electron temperature of the nonequilibrium carrier distributions in the device. In particular, the influence of the lattice temperature on the degradation of population inversion and device performance is investigated. The threshold currents, electric-field-current-density characteristics, and temperature-dependent performance are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with measurement in a recent experimental realization [Köhler et al., Nature (London) 417, 156 (2002)]. Calculations indicate that an important mechanism limiting its operating temperature is the increase of leakage current from the injector to low levels in the active region, and this feature should be improved in future designs.

  11. Extended density-matrix model applied to silicon-based terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, T. V.; Valavanis, A.; Lever, L. J. M.; Ikonić, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2012-06-01

    Silicon-based terahertz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) offer potential advantages over existing III-V devices. Although coherent electron transport effects are known to be important in QCLs, they have never been considered in Si-based device designs. We describe a density-matrix transport model that is designed to be more general than those in previous studies and to require less a priori knowledge of electronic band structure, allowing its use in semiautomated design procedures. The basis of the model includes all states involved in interperiod transport, and our steady-state solution extends beyond the rotating-wave approximation by including dc and counterpropagating terms. We simulate the potential performance of bound-to-continuum Ge/SiGe QCLs and find that devices with 4-5-nm-thick barriers give the highest simulated optical gain. We also examine the effects of interdiffusion between Ge and SiGe layers; we show that if it is taken into account in the design, interdiffusion lengths of up to 1.5 nm do not significantly affect the simulated device performance.

  12. Quantum cascade laser frequency stabilisation at the sub-Hz level

    CERN Document Server

    Argence, Bérengère; Lopez, Olivier; Nicolodi, Daniele; Abgrall, Michel; Chardonnet, Christian; Daussy, Christophe; Darquié, Benoît; Coq, Yann Le; Amy-Klein, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL) are increasingly being used to probe the mid-infrared "molecular fingerprint" region. This prompted efforts towards improving their spectral performance, in order to reach ever-higher resolution and precision. Here, we report the stabilisation of a QCL onto an optical frequency comb. We demonstrate a relative stability and accuracy of 2x10-15 and 10-14, respectively. The comb is stabilised to a remote near-infrared ultra-stable laser referenced to frequency primary standards, whose signal is transferred via an optical fibre link. The stability and frequency traceability of our QCL exceed those demonstrated so far by two orders of magnitude. As a demonstration of its capability, we then use it to perform high-resolution molecular spectroscopy. We measure absorption frequencies with an 8x10-13 relative uncertainty. This confirms the potential of this setup for ultra-high precision measurements with molecules, such as our ongoing effort towards testing the parity symmetry by probing ...

  13. Operation of a Wideband Terahertz Superconducting Bolometer Responding to Quantum Cascade Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibella, S.; Beck, M.; Carelli, P.; Castellano, M. G.; Chiarello, F.; Faist, J.; Leoni, R.; Ortolani, M.; Sabbatini, L.; Scalari, G.; Torrioli, G.; Turcinkova, D.

    2012-06-01

    We make use of a niobium film to produce a micrometric vacuum-bridge superconducting bolometer responding to THz frequency. The bolometer works anywhere in the temperature range 2-7 K, which can be easily reached in helium bath cryostats or closed-cycle cryocoolers. In this work the bolometer is mounted on a pulse tube refrigerator and operated to measure the equivalent noise power (NEP) and the response to fast (μs) terahertz pulses. The NEP above 100 Hz equals that measured in a liquid helium cryostat showing that potential drawbacks related to the use of a pulse tube refrigerator (like mechanical and thermal oscillations, electromagnetic interference, noise) are irrelevant. At low frequency, instead, the pulse tube expansion-compression cycles originate lines at 1 Hz and harmonics in the noise spectrum. The bolometer was illuminated with THz single pulses coming either from a Quantum Cascade Laser operating at liquid nitrogen temperature or from a frequency-multiplied electronic oscillator. The response of the bolometer to the single pulses show that the device can track signals with a rise time as fast as about 450 ns.

  14. External cavity tunable quantum cascade lasers and their applications to trace gas monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gottipaty N; Karpf, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Since the first quantum cascade laser (QCL) was demonstrated approximately 16 years ago, we have witnessed an explosion of interesting developments in QCL technology and QCL-based trace gas sensors. QCLs operate in the mid-IR region (3-24 μm) and can directly access the rotational vibrational bands of most molecular species and, therefore, are ideally suited for trace gas detection with high specificity and sensitivity. These sensors have applications in a wide range of fields, including environmental monitoring, atmospheric chemistry, medical diagnostics, homeland security, detection of explosive compounds, and industrial process control, to name a few. Tunable external cavity (EC)-QCLs in particular offer narrow linewidths, wide ranges of tunability, and stable power outputs, which open up new possibilities for sensor development. These features allow for the simultaneous detection of multiple species and the study of large molecules, free radicals, ions, and reaction kinetics. In this article, we review the current status of EC-QCLs and sensor developments based on them and speculate on possible future developments.

  15. Sensitive detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile with a pulsed quantum-cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, J.; Lim, A.; Tulip, J.; Jäger, W.

    2012-05-01

    We report on spectroscopic measurements of acrolein and acrylonitrile at atmospheric pressure using a pulsed distributed feedback quantum-cascade laser in combination with intra- and inter-pulse techniques and compare the results. The measurements were done in the frequency region around 957 cm-1. In the inter-pulse technique, the laser is excited with short current pulses (5-10 ns), and the pulse amplitude is modulated with an external current ramp resulting in a ˜2.3 cm-1 frequency scan. In the intra-pulse technique, a linear frequency down-chirp during the pulse is used for sweeping across the absorption line. Long current pulses up to 500 ns were used for these measurements which resulted in a spectral window of ˜2.2 cm-1 during the down-chirp. These comparatively wide spectral windows facilitated the measurements of the relatively broad absorption lines (˜1 cm-1) of acrolein and acrylonitrile. The use of a room-temperature mercury-cadmium-telluride detector resulted in a completely cryogen-free spectrometer. We demonstrate ppb level detection limits within a data acquisition time of ˜10 s with these methodologies.

  16. Real-time terahertz digital holography with a quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Massimiliano; Ravaro, Marco; Bartalini, Saverio; Consolino, Luigi; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Cicchi, Riccardo; Pavone, Francesco; de Natale, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Coherent imaging in the THz range promises to exploit the peculiar capabilities of these wavelengths to penetrate common materials like plastics, ceramics, paper or clothes with potential breakthroughs in non-destructive inspection and quality control, homeland security and biomedical applications. Up to now, however, THz coherent imaging has been limited by time-consuming raster scanning, point-like detection schemes and by the lack of adequate coherent sources. Here, we demonstrate real-time digital holography (DH) at THz frequencies exploiting the high spectral purity and the mW output power of a quantum cascade laser combined with the high sensitivity and resolution of a microbolometric array. We show that, in a one-shot exposure, phase and amplitude information of whole samples, either in reflection or in transmission, can be recorded. Furthermore, a 200 times reduced sensitivity to mechanical vibrations and a significantly enlarged field of view are observed, as compared to DH in the visible range. These properties of THz DH enable unprecedented holographic recording of real world dynamic scenes.

  17. Detection of highly energetic materials on non-reflective substrates using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Suarez, John R; Hidalgo-Santiago, Migdalia; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P

    2015-09-01

    A quantum cascade laser spectrometer was used to obtain the reflection spectra of highly energetic materials (HEMs) deposited on nonideal, low-reflectivity substrates, such as travel-bag fabric (polyester), cardboard, and wood. Various deposition methods were used to prepare the standards and samples in the study. The HEMs used were the nitroaromatic explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), the aliphatic nitrate ester pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and the aliphatic nitramine 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Chemometrics algorithms were applied to analyze the recorded spectra. Partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis was used to find the best correlation between the infrared signals and the surface concentrations of the samples, and PLS combined with discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to discriminate, classify, and identity similarities in the spectral datasets. Several preprocessing steps were applied to prepare the mid-infrared spectra of HEMs deposited on the target substrates. The results demonstrate that the infrared vibrational method described in this study is well suited for the rapid screening analysis of HEMs on low-reflectivity substrates when a supervised model has been previously constructed or when a reference spectrum of the clean substrate can be acquired to be subtracted from the HEM-substrate spectrum.

  18. Terahertz quantum cascade laser with an X-valley-based injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mithun; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman

    2017-04-01

    We present a novel terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser (QCL) design where Γ-valley states are used for lasing transition and X-valley states—in particular, Xz-states—are used as injector subbands. Since the lasing states in our proposed structure are populated and depopulated mainly through the interface roughness assisted Γ-Xz electron scattering, we present a model to describe this intervalley carrier transport. In the injector region of the proposed THz QCL, we use a quaternary AlGaAsP material to introduce tensile strain, which plays a crucial role in increasing the gain. To compensate the strain per period, we propose to grow the periodic heterostructure on a GaAs 0.94 P 0.06 virtual substrate. To simulate the carrier transport and hence calculate the gain and lasing performance of the proposed THz QCL, we use a simplified density matrix formalism that considers resonant tunneling, dephasing, and the important intersubband scattering mechanisms. Since electron temperature significantly varies from lattice temperature for QCLs, we take their difference into account using the kinetic energy balance method. We show that the proposed structure is capable of lasing up to a maximum lattice temperature of ˜119 K at 4.8 THz. For future improvements of the device, we identify major performance-degrading factors of the proposed design.

  19. Near-infrared induced optical quenching effects on mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Dingkai, E-mail: dingk1@umbc.edu; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman; Chen, Xing [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Cai, Hong [Center of Advanced Studies in Photonics Research (CASPR), University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Johnson, Anthony M.; Choa, Fow-Sen [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Center of Advanced Studies in Photonics Research (CASPR), University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-06-23

    In space communications, atmospheric absorption and Rayleigh scattering are the dominant channel impairments. Transmission using mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths offers the benefits of lower loss and less scintillation effects. In this work, we report the telecom wavelengths (1.55 μm and 1.3 μm) induced optical quenching effects on MIR quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), when QCLs are operated well above their thresholds. The QCL output power can be near 100% quenched using 20 mW of near-infrared (NIR) power, and the quenching effect depends on the input NIR intensity as well as wavelength. Time resolved measurement was conducted to explore the quenching mechanism. The measured recovery time is around 14 ns, which indicates that NIR generated electron-hole pairs may play a key role in the quenching process. The photocarrier created local field and band bending can effectively deteriorate the dipole transition matrix element and quench the QCL. As a result, MIR QCLs can be used as an optical modulator and switch controlled by NIR lasers. They can also be used as “converters” to convert telecom optical signals into MIR optical signals.

  20. Multi-modal, ultrasensitive detection of trace explosives using MEMS devices with quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandieh, Omid; Kim, Seonghwan

    2016-05-01

    Multi-modal chemical sensors based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been developed with an electrical readout. Opto-calorimetric infrared (IR) spectroscopy, capable of obtaining molecular signatures of extremely small quantities of adsorbed explosive molecules, has been realized with a microthermometer/microheater device using a widely tunable quantum cascade laser. A microthermometer/microheater device responds to the heat generated by nonradiative decay process when the adsorbed explosive molecules are resonantly excited with IR light. Monitoring the variation in microthermometer signal as a function of illuminating IR wavelength corresponds to the conventional IR absorption spectrum of the adsorbed molecules. Moreover, the mass of the adsorbed molecules is determined by measuring the resonance frequency shift of the cantilever shape microthermometer for the quantitative opto-calorimetric IR spectroscopy. In addition, micro-differential thermal analysis, which can be used to differentiate exothermic or endothermic reaction of heated molecules, has been performed with the same device to provide additional orthogonal signal for trace explosive detection and sensor surface regeneration. In summary, we have designed, fabricated and tested microcantilever shape devices integrated with a microthermometer/microheater which can provide electrical responses used to acquire both opto-calorimetric IR spectra and microcalorimetric thermal responses. We have demonstrated the successful detection, differentiation, and quantification of trace amounts of explosive molecules and their mixtures (cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using three orthogonal sensing signals which improve chemical selectivity.

  1. Toward a compact THz local oscillator based on a quantum-cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, H.; Greiner-Baer, M.; Pavlov, S. G.; Semenov, A. D.; Wienold, M.; Schrottke, L.; Giehler, M.; Hey, R.; Grahn, H. T.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2010-07-01

    Heterodyne spectroscopy of molecular rotational lines and atomic fine-structure lines is a powerful tool in astronomy and planetary research. One example is the OI fine structure line at 4.7 THz. This is a main target for the observation with GREAT, the German Receiver for Astronomy at Terahertz Frequencies, which will be operated on board of SOFIA. We report on the development of a compact, easy-to-use source, which combines a quantum-cascade laser (QCL) with a compact, low-input-power Stirling cooler. This work is part of the local-oscillator development for GREAT/SOFIA. The QCL, which is based on a two-miniband design, has been developed for high output power and low electrical pump power. Efficient carrier injection is achieved by resonant longitudinal optical phonon scattering. The amount of generated heat complies with the cooling capacity of the Stirling cooler. The whole system weighs less than 15 kg including cooler, power supplies etc. The output power is above 1 mW. With an appropriate optical beam shaping, the emission profile of the laser becomes a fundamental Gaussian one. Sub-MHz frequency accuracy can be achieved by locking the emission of the QCL to a molecular resonance.

  2. Efficient Detection of 3 THz Radiation from Quantum Cascade Laser Using Silicon CMOS Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikamas, Kęstutis; Lisauskas, Alvydas; Boppel, Sebastian; Hu, Qing; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we report on efficient detection of the radiation emitted by a THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) using an antenna-coupled field effect transistor (TeraFET). In the limiting case when all radiated power would be collected, the investigated TeraFET can show up to 230 V/W responsivity with the noise equivalent power being as low as 85 pW/√ { {Hz}} at 3.1 THz, which is several times lower than that of the typical Golay cell. A combination of the QCL and a set of off-axis parabolic mirrors with 3-inch and 2-inch focal lengths was used to measure the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the TeraFET. The practically achieved SNR was five times lower than that of the Golay cell and two orders of magnitude lower than a bolometer's. However, TeraFETs are much faster and do not need a signal modulation, thus can be used both in a continuous mode for power monitoring or for investigation of transient processes on a sub-microsecond time scale.

  3. Standoff detection of turbulent chemical mixture plumes using a swept external cavity quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Brumfield, Brian E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    2017-08-21

    We demonstrate standoff detection of turbulent mixed-chemical plumes using a broadly-tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL). The ECQCL was directed through plumes of mixed methanol/ethanol vapor to a partially-reflective surface located 10 m away. The reflected power was measured as the ECQCL was swept over its tuning range of 930-1065 cm-1 (9.4-10.8 µm) at rates up to 200 Hz. Analysis of the transmission spectra though the plume was performed to determine chemical concentrations with time resolution of 0.005 s. Comparison of multiple spectral sweep rates of 2 Hz, 20 Hz, and 200 Hz shows that higher sweep rates reduce effects of atmospheric and source turbulence, resulting in lower detection noise and more accurate measurement of the rapidly-changing chemical concentrations. Detection sensitivities of 0.13 ppm*m for MeOH and 1.2 ppm*m for EtOH are demonstrated for a 200 Hz spectral sweep rate, normalized to 1 s detection time.

  4. Efficient Detection of 3 THz Radiation from Quantum Cascade Laser Using Silicon CMOS Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikamas, Kęstutis; Lisauskas, Alvydas; Boppel, Sebastian; Hu, Qing; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we report on efficient detection of the radiation emitted by a THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) using an antenna-coupled field effect transistor (TeraFET). In the limiting case when all radiated power would be collected, the investigated TeraFET can show up to 230 V/W responsivity with the noise equivalent power being as low as 85 pW/ √ {Hz} at 3.1 THz, which is several times lower than that of the typical Golay cell. A combination of the QCL and a set of off-axis parabolic mirrors with 3-inch and 2-inch focal lengths was used to measure the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the TeraFET. The practically achieved SNR was five times lower than that of the Golay cell and two orders of magnitude lower than a bolometer's. However, TeraFETs are much faster and do not need a signal modulation, thus can be used both in a continuous mode for power monitoring or for investigation of transient processes on a sub-microsecond time scale.

  5. High Efficiency, Low Power-Consumption DFB Quantum Cascade Lasers Without Lateral Regrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Jin-Chuan; Liu, Feng-Qi; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Wang, Dong-Bo; Jia, Xue-Feng; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Jun-Qi; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2017-12-01

    Very low power-consumption distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) at the wavelength around 4.9 μm were fabricated by conventional process without lateral regrowth of InP:Fe or using sidewall grating. Benefitted from the optimized materials and low waveguide loss, very low threshold current density of 0.5 kA/cm(2) was obtained for a device with cavity length of 2 mm. Combined with the partial-high-reflection coating, the 1-mm-long DFB QCL achieved low power-consumption continuous wave (CW) operation up to 105 °C. The CW threshold power-consumptions were 0.72 and 0.78 W at 15 and 25 °C, respectively. The maximum CW output power was over 110 mW at 15 °C and still more than 35 mW at 105 °C. At 15 °C, wall-plug efficiency of 5.5% and slope efficiency of 1.8 W/A were deduced, which were very high for low power-consumption DFB QCLs.

  6. Biomolecular dynamics studied with IR-spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers combined with nanosecond perturbation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Alexander; Scheerer, David; Heck, Benjamin; Hauser, Karin

    2017-06-01

    Early events of protein folding can be studied with fast perturbation techniques triggering non-equilibrium relaxation dynamics. A nanosecond laser-excited pH-jump or temperature-jump (T-jump) was applied to initiate helix folding or unfolding of poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA). PGA is a homopolypeptide with titratable carboxyl side-chains whose protonation degree determines the PGA conformation. A pH-jump was realized by the photochemical release of protons and induces PGA folding due to protonation of the side-chains. Otherwise, the helical conformation can be unfolded by a T-jump. We operated under conditions where PGA does not aggregate and temperature and pH are the regulatory properties of its conformation. The experiments were performed in such a manner that the folding/unfolding jump proceeded to the same PGA conformation. We quantified the increase/decrease in helicity induced by the pH-/T-jump and demonstrated that the T-jump results in a relatively small change in helical content in contrast to the pH-jump. This is caused by the strong pH-dependence of the PGA conformation. The conformational changes were detected by time-resolved single wavelength IR-spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers (QCL). We could independently observe the kinetics for α-helix folding and unfolding in PGA by using different perturbation techniques and demonstrate the high sensitivity of time-resolved IR-spectroscopy to study protein folding mechanisms.

  7. Measuring intensity correlations of a THz quantum cascade laser around its threshold at sub-cycle timescales

    CERN Document Server

    Chelmus, Ileana Cristina Benea; Maissen, Curdin; Scalari, Giacomo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    The quantum nature of photonic systems is reflected in the photon statistics of the light they emit. Therefore, the development of quantum optics tools with single photon sensitivity and excellent temporal resolution is paramount to the development of exotic sources, and is particularly challenging in the THz range where photon energies approach kbT at T=300 K. Here, we report on the first room temperature measurement of field g1({\\tau}) and intensity correlations g2({\\tau}) in the THz range with sub-cycle temporal resolution (146 fs) over the bandwidth 0.3-3 THz, based on electro-optic sampling. With this system, we are able to measure the photon statistics at threshold of a THz Quantum Cascade Laser.

  8. Widely tunable Sampled Grating Distributed Bragg Reflector Quantum Cascade laser for gas spectroscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diba, Abdou Salam

    Since the advent of semiconductor lasers, the development of tunable laser sources has been subject of many efforts in industry and academia arenas. This interest towards broadly tunable lasers is mainly due to the great promise they have in many applications ranging from telecommunication, to environmental science and homeland security, just to name a few. After the first demonstration of quantum cascade laser (QCL) in the early nineties, QCL has experienced a rapid development, so much so that QCLs are now the most reliable and efficient laser source in the Mid-IR range covering between 3 microm to 30 microm region of the electromagnetic spectrum. QCLs have almost all the desirable characteristics of a laser for spectroscopy applications such as narrow spectral linewidth ideal for high selectivity measurement, high power enabling high sensitivity sensing and more importantly they emit in the finger-print region of most of the trace gases and large molecules. The need for widely tunable QCLs is now more pressing than ever before. A single mode quantum cascade laser (QCL) such as a distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, is an ideal light source for gas sensing in the MIR wavelength range. Despite their performance and reliability, DFB QCLs are limited by their relatively narrow wavelength tuning range determined by the thermal rollover of the laser. An external cavity (EC) QCL, on the other hand, is a widely tunable laser source, and so far is the choice mid-infrared single frequency light sources for detecting multiple species/large molecules. However, EC QCLs can be complex, bulky and expensive. In the quest for finding alternative broadly wavelength tunable sources in the mid-infrared, many monolithic tunable QCLs are recently proposed and fabricated, including SG-DBR, DFB-Arrays, Slot-hole etc. and they are all of potentially of interest as a candidate for multi-gas sensing and monitoring applications, due to their large tuning range (>50 cm-1), and potentially low

  9. Improvements in quantum cascade laser performance through comprehensive modeling and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Scott Sheridan

    Prior to the invention of the quantum cascade (QC) laser, many applications based on mid-infrared (mid-IR) laser absorption spectroscopy were not be explored. Development of the QC laser provided an inherently compact, semiconductor based, and tunable mid-IR source that could be used for laser absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, QC lasers can be designed to emit at a specific wavelength within a very wide wavelength range from between 3 and 30 mum and can be fabricated to operate single-mode to clearly scan mid-IR absorption "fingerprints" [1]. This allows lasers to be tailored to the exact wavelength of an absorption feature. Two examples of absorption spectroscopy experiments were carried out as part of this dissertation and described herein: C60 in space and dissolved gasses in living tissue. Although QC lasers allow for application development in the mid-IR, they are inefficient and heat dissipation is problematic. First generation QC lasers relied on either bulky cryogenic cooling systems for continuous wave operation or large, expensive pulse generators [2]. Later, advances in QC laser design, growth, and fabrication led to room-temperature continuous wave operation [3]. These advances promoted additional applications of QC lasers where cryogenic cooling was impossible or highly inconvenient. This dissertation presents comprehensive self-consistent models permitting the optimization of high operating temperature QC lasers. These models employ strategies counter to those used in designing low temperature devices and were used to design, fabricate, and demonstrate high-performance QC lasers. By self-consistently solving the temperature dependent threshold current density and heat equations, including temperature dependent thermal conductivities, phonon lifetimes, thermal "backfilling," thermionic emission, and energy level broadening, we calculated the effects of doping level, material choice, and waveguide layer thickness on the laser threshold performance

  10. Multiplexed Chirped Pulse Quantum Cascade Laser Measurements of Ammonia and Other Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picken, Craig; Langford, Nigel; Duxbury, Geoffrey

    2014-06-01

    Spectrometers based on Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers can be run in either continuous or pulsed operation. Although the instrumentation based upon the most recent versions of continuously operating QC lasers can have higher resolution than chirped lasers, using chirped pulse QC lasers can give an advantage when rapid changes in gas composition occur. For example, when jet engines are being tested, a variety of temperature dependent effects on the trace gas concentrations of the plume may be observed. Most pulsed QC lasers are operated in the down chirped mode, in which the chirp rate slows during the pulse. In our spectrometer the changes in frequency are recorded using two Ge etalons, one with a free spectral range of 0.0495 cm-1, and the other with a fringe spacing of 0.0195 cm-1.They can also be deployed in multiplex schemes in which two or more down-chirped lasers are used. In this paper we wish to show examples of the use of multiplexed chirped pulse lasers to allow overlapping spectra to be recorded. The examples of multiplex methods used are taken partly from measurements of 14NH3 and 15NH3 in the region from 1630 to 1622 cm-1, and partly from the use of other chirped pulse lasers operating in the 8 μm region. Among the effects seen are rapid passage effects caused by the rapid down-chirp, and the use of gases such as nitrogen to cause variation in the shape of the collisional broadened absorption lines.

  11. Applications of a Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Laser in Gas Sensing Research

    KAUST Repository

    Sajid, Muhammad Bilal

    2015-05-01

    Laser absorption based sensors are extensively used in a variety of gas sensing areas such as combustion, atmospheric research, human breath analysis, and high resolution infrared spectroscopy. Quantum cascade lasers have recently emerged as high resolution, high power laser sources operating in mid infrared region and can have wide tunability range. These devices provide an opportunity to access stronger fundamental and combination vibrational bands located in mid infrared region than previously accessible weaker overtone vibrational bands located in near infrared region. Spectroscopic region near 8 µm contains strong vibrational bands of methane, acetylene, hydrogen peroxide, water vapor and nitrous oxide. These molecules have important applications in a wide range of applications. This thesis presents studies pertaining to spectroscopy and combustion applications. Advancements in combustion research are imperative to achieve lower emissions and higher efficiency in practical combustion devices such as gas turbines and engines. Accurate chemical kinetic models are critical to achieve predictive models which contain several thousand reactions and hundreds of species. These models need highly reliable experimental data for validation and improvements. Shock tubes are ideal devices to obtain such information. A shock tube is a homogenous, nearly constant volume, constant pressure, adiabatic and 0-D reactor. In combination with laser absorption sensors, shock tubes can be used to measure reaction rates and species time histories of several intermediates and products formed during pyrolysis and oxidation of fuels. This work describes measurement of the decomposition rate of hydrogen peroxide which is an important intermediate species controlling reactivity of combustion system in the intermediate temperature range. Spectroscopic parameters (linestrengths, broadening coefficients and temperature dependent coefficients) are determined for various transitions of

  12. Mid-infrared quantum cascade laser integrated with distributed Bragg reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Jun-ichi; Mori, Hiroki; Tsuji, Yukihiro; Murata, Makoto; Ekawa, Mitsuru; Katsuyama, Tsukuru

    2016-02-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are promising as compact light sources in the mid-infrared region. In order to put them into a practical use, their relatively high threshold currents should be reduced. Facet reflectivity increase by distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) is effective for this purpose, but there have been few reports on DBR-integrated QCLs (DBRQCLs). In this paper, we report a successful operation of a DBR-QCL in 7 μm wavelength region. With the fabrication, an n-InP buffer layer, a core region consisting of AlInAs/GaInAs superlattices, an n-InP cladding layer, and an n-GaInAs contact layer were successively grown on an n-InP substrate using OMVPE in the first growth. Then, the wafer was processed into a mesa-stripe, and it was buried by an Fe-doped InP current-blocking layer to form a buriedheterostructure (BH) waveguide. After that, a DBR in which semiconductor-walls and air-gaps were alternately arranged was formed at the front or end of the cavity by dry-etching the epitaxial layers of the air-gap regions, and thus a DBRQCL was fabricated. A DBR-QCL chip (Mesa-width:10 μm, Cavity-legth:2 mm) which had a DBR-structure consisting of 1 pair of a 3λ/4-thick semiconductor-wall/3λ/4-thick air-gap at the front end and a high reflective facet at the rear end oscillated successfully under continuous-wave condition at 15°C. This is the first report on the InP-based DBR-QCL to our knowledge. The facet reflectivity at the DBR was 66%, which was about two times larger than that of the cleaved facet. This result clearly shows that the DBR-structure is effective for threshold current reduction of QCL.

  13. Hollow fiber based quantum cascade laser spectrometer for fast and sensitive drug identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, J.; Scherer, B.; Ruf, A.; Erb, J.; Lambrecht, A.

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive and fast identification of drugs or drug precursors is important and necessary in scenarios like baggage or container check by customs or police. Fraunhofer IPM is developing a laser spectrometer using external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) to obtain mid-infrared (IR) absorption spectra in the wavelength range of the specific vibrational bands of amphetamines and their precursors. The commercial EC-QCL covers a tuning range of about 225 cm-1 within 1.4 s. The system could be used for different sample types like bulk samples or liquid solutions. A sampling unit evaporates the sample. Because of small sample amounts a 3 m long hollow fiber with an inner volume smaller than 1ml is used as gas cell and wave guide for the laser beam. This setup is suitable as a detector of a gas chromatograph instead of a standard detector (TCD or FID). The advantage is the selective identification of drugs by their IR spectra in addition to the retention time in the gas chromatographic column. In comparison to Fourier Transform IR systems the EC-QCL setup shows a good mechanical robustness and has the advantage of a point light source. Because of the good fiber incoupling performance of the EC-QCL it is possible to use hollow fibers. So, a good absorption signal is achieved because of the long optical path in the small cell volume without significant dilution. In first laboratory experiments a detection limit in the microgram range for pseudo ephedrine is achieved.

  14. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for atmospheric sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.; Suter, Jonathan D.

    2016-07-01

    The application of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in atmospheric science for trace detection of gases has been demonstrated using sensors in point or remote sensing configurations. Many of these systems utilize single narrowly-tunable (~10 cm-1) distributed feedback (DFB-) QCLs that limit simultaneous detection to a restricted number of small chemical species like H2O or N2O. The narrow wavelength range of DFB-QCLs precludes accurate quantification of large chemical species with broad rotationally-unresolved vibrational spectra, such as volatile organic compounds, that play an important role in the chemistry of the atmosphere. External-cavity (EC-) QCL systems are available that offer tuning ranges >100 cm-1, making them excellent IR sources for measuring multiple small and large chemical species in the atmosphere. While the broad wavelength coverage afforded by an EC system enables measurements of large chemical species, most commercial systems can only be swept over their entire wavelength range at less than 10 Hz. This prohibits broadband simultaneous measurements of multiple chemicals in plumes from natural or industrial sources where turbulence and/or chemical reactivity are resulting in rapid changes in chemical composition on sub-1s timescales. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory we have developed rapidly-swept EC-QCL technology that acquires broadband absorption spectra (~100 cm-1) on ms timescales. The spectral resolution of this system has enabled simultaneous measurement of narrow rotationally-resolved atmospherically-broadened lines from small chemical species, while offering the broad tuning range needed to measure broadband spectral features from multiple large chemical species. In this talk the application of this technology for open-path atmospheric measurements will be discussed based on results from laboratory measurements with simulated plumes of chemicals. The performance offered by the system for simultaneous detection of multiple chemical

  15. Broadband spectroscopy with external cavity quantum cascade lasers beyond conventional absorption measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Armin; Pfeifer, Marcel; Konz, Werner; Herbst, Johannes; Axtmann, Felix

    2014-05-07

    Laser spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analyzing small molecules, i.e. in the gas phase. In the mid-infrared spectral region quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have been established as the most frequently used laser radiation source. Spectroscopy of larger molecules in the gas phase, of complex mixtures, and analysis in the liquid phase requires a broader tuning range and is thus still the domain of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. However, the development of tunable external cavity (EC) QCLs is starting to change this situation. The main advantage of QCLs is their high spectral emission power that is enhanced by a factor of 10(4) compared with thermal light sources. Obviously, transmission measurements with EC-QCLs in strongly absorbing samples are feasible, which can hardly be measured by FTIR due to detector noise limitations. We show that the high power of EC-QCLs facilitates spectroscopy beyond simple absorption measurements. Starting from QCL experiments with liquid samples, we show results of fiber evanescent field analysis (FEFA) to detect pesticides in drinking water. FEFA is a special case of attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. Furthermore, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable fast vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy of chiral molecules in the liquid phase - a technique which is very time consuming with standard FTIR equipment. We present results obtained for the chiral compound 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (BINOL). Finally, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable the application of laser photothermal emission spectroscopy (LPTES). We demonstrate this for a narrowband and broadband absorber in the gas phase. All three techniques have great potential for MIR process analytical applications.

  16. High-power, surface-emitting quantum cascade laser operating in a symmetric grating mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, C.; Sigler, C.; Kirch, J. D.; Botez, D.; Mawst, L. J., E-mail: mawst@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Lindberg, D. F.; Earles, T. [Intraband, LLC, Madison, Wisconsin 53726 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Grating-coupled surface-emitting (GCSE) lasers generally operate with a double-lobed far-field beam pattern along the cavity-length direction, which is a result of lasing being favored in the antisymmetric grating mode. We experimentally demonstrate a GCSE quantum-cascade laser design allowing high-power, nearly single-lobed surface emission parallel to the longitudinal cavity. A 2nd-order Au-semiconductor distributed-feedback (DFB)/distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) grating is used for feedback and out-coupling. The DFB and DBR grating regions are 2.55 mm- and 1.28 mm-long, respectively, for a total grating length of 5.1 mm. The lasers are designed to operate in a symmetric (longitudinal) grating mode by causing resonant coupling of the guided optical mode to the antisymmetric surface-plasmon modes of the 2nd-order metal/semiconductor grating. Then, the antisymmetric modes are strongly absorbed by the metal in the grating, causing the symmetric mode to be favored to lase, which, in turn, produces a single-lobed beam over a range of grating duty-cycle values of 36%–41%. Simulations indicate that the symmetric mode is always favored to lase, independent of the random phase of reflections from the device's cleaved ends. Peak pulsed output powers of ∼0.4 W were measured with nearly single-lobe beam-pattern (in the longitudinal direction), single-spatial-mode operation near 4.75 μm wavelength. Far-field measurements confirm a diffraction-limited beam pattern, in agreement with simulations, for a source-to-detector separation of 2 m.

  17. Eddy covariance carbonyl sulfide flux measurements with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdel, Katharina; Spielmann, Felix M.; Hammerle, Albin; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur containing trace gas present in the troposphere at concentrations of around 500 ppt. Recent interest in COS by the ecosystem-physiological community has been sparked by the fact that COS co-diffuses into plant leaves pretty much the same way as carbon dioxide (CO2) does, but in contrast to CO2, COS is not known to be emitted by plants. Thus uptake of COS by vegetation has the potential to be used as a tracer for canopy gross photosynthesis, which cannot be measured directly, however represents a key term in the global carbon cycle. Since a few years, quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometers (QCLAS) are commercially available with the precision, sensitivity and time response suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. While there exist a handful of published reports on EC flux measurements in the recent literature, no rigorous investigation of the applicability of QCLAS for EC COS flux measurements has been carried out so far, nor have been EC processing and QA/QC steps developed for carbon dioxide and water vapor flux measurements within FLUXNET been assessed for COS. The aim of this study is to close this knowledge gap, to discuss critical steps in the post-processing chain of COS EC flux measurements and to devise best-practice guidelines for COS EC flux data processing. To this end we collected EC COS (and CO2, H2O and CO) flux measurements above a temperate mountain grassland in Austria over the vegetation period 2015 with a commercially available QCLAS. We discuss various aspects of EC data post-processing, in particular issues with the time-lag estimation between sonic anemometer and QCLAS signals and QCLAS time series detrending, as well as QA/QC, in particular flux detection limits, random flux uncertainty, the interaction of various processing steps with common EC QA/QC filters (e.g. detrending and stationarity tests), u*-filtering, etc.

  18. The detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors using cascaded-systems analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanguay, Jesse [Robarts Research Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Yun, Seungman [Biomedical Engineering Program, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Kyung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Cunningham, Ian A. [Robarts Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, and Biomedical Engineering Program, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Single-photon counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable new advanced energy-dependent methods. The purpose of this study is to extend cascaded-systems analyses (CSA) to the description of image quality and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of SPC systems. Methods: Point-process theory is used to develop a method of propagating the mean signal and Wiener noise-power spectrum through a thresholding stage (required to identify x-ray interaction events). The new transfer relationships are used to describe the zero-frequency DQE of a hypothetical SPC detector including the effects of stochastic conversion of incident photons to secondary quanta, secondary quantum sinks, additive noise, and threshold level. Theoretical results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations assuming the same detector model. Results: Under certain conditions, the CSA approach can be applied to SPC systems with the additional requirement of propagating the probability density function describing the total number of image-forming quanta through each stage of a cascaded model. Theoretical results including DQE show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo calculations under all conditions considered. Conclusions: Application of the CSA method shows that false counts due to additive electronic noise results in both a nonlinear image signal and increased image noise. There is a window of allowable threshold values to achieve a high DQE that depends on conversion gain, secondary quantum sinks, and additive noise.

  19. The detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors using cascaded-systems analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A

    2013-04-01

    Single-photon counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable new advanced energy-dependent methods. The purpose of this study is to extend cascaded-systems analyses (CSA) to the description of image quality and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of SPC systems. Point-process theory is used to develop a method of propagating the mean signal and Wiener noise-power spectrum through a thresholding stage (required to identify x-ray interaction events). The new transfer relationships are used to describe the zero-frequency DQE of a hypothetical SPC detector including the effects of stochastic conversion of incident photons to secondary quanta, secondary quantum sinks, additive noise, and threshold level. Theoretical results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations assuming the same detector model. Under certain conditions, the CSA approach can be applied to SPC systems with the additional requirement of propagating the probability density function describing the total number of image-forming quanta through each stage of a cascaded model. Theoretical results including DQE show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo calculations under all conditions considered. Application of the CSA method shows that false counts due to additive electronic noise results in both a nonlinear image signal and increased image noise. There is a window of allowable threshold values to achieve a high DQE that depends on conversion gain, secondary quantum sinks, and additive noise.

  20. 4-wave mixing for phase-matching free nonlinear optics in quantum cascade structures : LDRD 08-0346 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Weng Wah; Wanke, Michael Clement; Allen, Dan G.; Yang, Zhenshan; Waldmueller, Ines

    2010-10-01

    Optical nonlinearities and quantum coherences have the potential to enable efficient, high-temperature generation of coherent THz radiation. This LDRD proposal involves the exploration of the underlying physics using intersubband transitions in a quantum cascade structure. Success in the device physics aspect will give Sandia the state-of-the-art technology for high-temperature THz quantum cascade lasers. These lasers are useful for imaging and spectroscopy in medicine and national defense. Success may have other far-reaching consequences. Results from the in-depth study of coherences, dephasing and dynamics will eventually impact the fields of quantum computing, optical communication and cryptology, especially if we are successful in demonstrating entangled photons or slow light. An even farther reaching development is if we can show that the QC nanostructure, with its discrete atom-like intersubband resonances, can replace the atom in quantum optics experiments. Having such an 'artificial atom' will greatly improve flexibility and preciseness in experiments, thereby enhancing the discovery of new physics. This is because we will no longer be constrained by what natural can provide. Rather, one will be able to tailor transition energies and optical matrix elements to enhance the physics of interest. This report summarizes a 3-year LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories exploring optical nonlinearities in intersubband devices. Experimental and theoretical investigations were made to develop a fundamental understanding of light-matter interaction in a semiconductor system and to explore how this understanding can be used to develop mid-IR to THz emitters and nonclassical light sources.

  1. Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Lasers (EC-QCL): an application field for MOEMS based scanning gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahmann, Jan; Merten, André; Ostendorf, Ralf; Fontenot, Michael; Bleh, Daniela; Schenk, Harald; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2014-03-01

    In situ process information in the chemical, pharmaceutical or food industry as well as emission monitoring, sensitive trace detection and biological sensing applications would increasingly rely on MIR-spectroscopic anal­ysis in the 3 μm - 12 μm wavelength range. However, cost effective, portable, low power consuming and fast spectrometers with a wide tuning range are not available so far. To provide these MIR-spectrometer properties, the combination of quantum cascade lasers with a MOEMS scanning grating as wavelength selective element in the external cavity is addressed to provide a very compact and fast tunable laser source for spectroscopic analysis.

  2. Generation of Kerr combs centered at 4.5{\\mu}m in crystalline microresonators pumped by quantum cascade lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Di Teodoro, Fabio; Belden, Paul M; Lotshaw, William T; Matsko, Andrey B; Maleki, Lute

    2015-01-01

    We report on the generation of mid-infrared Kerr frequency combs in high-finesse CaF$_2$ and MgF$_2$ whispering-gallery mode resonators pumped with continuous wave room temperature quantum cascade lasers. The combs were centered at 4.5$\\mu$m, the longest wavelength to date. A frequency comb wider than a half of an octave was demonstrated when approximately 20mW of pump power was coupled to an MgF2 resonator characterized with quality factor exceeding 10$^8$.

  3. Recent Advances in Room Temperature, High-Power Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Sources Based on Difference-Frequency Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Quanyong Lu; Manijeh Razeghi

    2016-01-01

    We present the current status of high-performance, compact, THz sources based on intracavity nonlinear frequency generation in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. Significant performance improvements of our THz sources in the power and wall plug efficiency are achieved by systematic optimizing the device’s active region, waveguide, and chip bonding strategy. High THz power up to 1.9 mW and 0.014 mW for pulsed mode and continuous wave operations at room temperature are demonstrated, respectiv...

  4. Real-time diagnostics of a jet engine exhaust using an intra-pulse quantum cascade laser spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Hay, Kenneth G.; Langford, Nigel; Johnson, Mark P.; Black, John D.

    2011-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that an intra-pulse scanned quantum cascade laser spectrometer may be used to obtain real-time diagnostics of the amounts of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water, in the exhaust of an aero gas turbine (turbojet) engine operated in a sea level test cell. Measurements have been made of the rapid changes in composition following ignition, the composition under steady state operating conditions, and the composition changes across the exhaust plume. The minimum detection limit for CO in a double pass through a typical gas turbine plume of 50 cm in diameter, with 0.4 seconds integration time, is approximately 2 ppm.

  5. A compact, continuous-wave terahertz source based on a quantum-cascade laser and a miniature cryocooler

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Heiko; Greiner-Bär, Michael; Pavlov, Sergey; Semenov, Alexei D.; Wienold, Martin; Schrottke, Lutz; Giehler, M.; Hey, R.; Grahn, H.T.; Huebers, H. -W.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact, easy-to-use terahertz radiation source, which combines a quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating at 3.1 THz with a compact, low input-power Stirling cooler. The QCL, which is based on a two miniband design, has been developed for high output and low electrical pump power. The amount of generated heat complies with the nominal cooling capacity of the Stirling cooler of 7 W at 65 K with 240 W of electrical input power. Special care has been taken to achi...

  6. Non-equilibrium Green's function calculation for GaN-based terahertz-quantum cascade laser structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, H.; Kubis, T.; Hosako, I.; Hirakawa, K.

    2012-04-01

    We theoretically investigated GaN-based resonant phonon terahertz-quantum cascade laser (QCL) structures for possible high-temperature operation by using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It was found that the GaN-based THz-QCL structures do not necessarily have a gain sufficient for lasing, even though the thermal backfilling and the thermally activated phonon scattering are effectively suppressed. The main reason for this is the broadening of the subband levels caused by a very strong interaction between electrons and longitudinal optical (LO) phonons in GaN.

  7. Multiple lobes in the far-field distribution of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers due to self-interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Röben, B., E-mail: roeben@pdi-berlin.de; Wienold, M.; Schrottke, L.; Grahn, H. T. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Leibniz-Institut im Forschungsverbund Berlin e. V., Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The far-field distribution of the emission intensity of terahertz (THz) quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) frequently exhibits multiple lobes instead of a single-lobed Gaussian distribution. We show that such multiple lobes can result from self-interference related to the typically large beam divergence of THz QCLs and the presence of an inevitable cryogenic operation environment including optical windows. We develop a quantitative model to reproduce the multiple lobes. We also demonstrate how a single-lobed far-field distribution can be achieved.

  8. Quantum cascade lasers operating from 1.4 to 4 THz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sushil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The development of teranertz (THz) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) has progressed considerably since their advent almost a decade ago. THz QCLs operating in a frequency range from 1.4 to 4 THz with electron-phonon scattering mediated depopulation schemes are described. Several different types of GaAs/AlGaAs superlattice designs are reviewed. Some of the best temperature performances are obtained by the so-called resonant-phonon designs that are described. Operation above a temperature of 160 K has been obtained across the spectrum for THz QCLs operating at v > 1.8 THz. The maximum operating temperature of previously reported THz QCLs has empirically been limited to a value of ~ hω/kB- A new design scheme for THz QCLs with scattering-assisted injection is shown to surpass this empirical temperature barrier, and is promising to improve the maximum operating temperatures of THz QCLs even further.%1.IntroductionHigh-power sources of terahertz (THz) radiation are required for a multitude of applications in sensing,imaging,and spectroscopy in fields as diverse as astronomy,medicine,security,pharmaceuticals and so-forth.THz science and technology has advanced significantly in the recent years[1,2] especially toward the realization of novel THz radiation sources.In comparison to narrow-band sources such as lasers,broadband sources of terahertz radiation are more widely available;however,such sources are inherently low power (average power is of the order of few micro-Watts).They are useful nevertheless because of room temperature operation and for their ability to be detected coherently.Techniques such as generation of THz bandwidth time-domain pulses in high resistivity semiconductors[3],non-linear generation by electrooptical-rectification in crystals such as ZnTe[4],or nonlinear generation by optical parametric conversion in materials such as LiNbO3[5] or by difference-frequency generation in semiconductors[6],have been used for various raster-scanned imaging and

  9. Pulse delay measurements in cascaded quantum well gain and absorber media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Poel, Mike van der; Yvind, Kresten

    2010-01-01

    A tunable delay of ultrashort laser pulses in semiconductor waveguide structures are demonstrated in cascaded amplifying and absorbing semiconductor waveguides and compared with a single sectioned waveguide. The single sectioned waveguide shows a low transmission at the maximum delay. This is eff......A tunable delay of ultrashort laser pulses in semiconductor waveguide structures are demonstrated in cascaded amplifying and absorbing semiconductor waveguides and compared with a single sectioned waveguide. The single sectioned waveguide shows a low transmission at the maximum delay...

  10. Hot electron bolometer heterodyne receiver with a 4.7-THz quantum cascade laser as a local oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Kloosterman, Jenna L; Ren, Yuan; Kao, Tsung-Yu; Hovenier, Neils; Gao, Jian-Rong; Klapwijk, Teun M; Hu, Qing; Walker, Christopher K; Reno, John L

    2012-01-01

    We report on a heterodyne receiver designed to observe the astrophysically important neutral atomic oxygen [OI] line at 4.7448 THz. The local oscillator is a third-order distributed feedback Quantum Cascade Laser operating in continuous wave mode at 4.756 THz. A quasi-optical, superconducting NbN hot electron bolometer is used as the mixer. We recorded a double sideband receiver noise temperature (T^DSB_rec) of 815 +/- 12 K, which is ~7 times the quantum noise limit (hf/2kB) and an Allan variance time of 15 s at an effective noise fluctuation bandwidth of 18 MHz. Heterodyne performance was confirmed by measuring a methanol line spectrum.

  11. Highly entangled photon pairs generated from the biexciton cascade transition in a quantum-dot-metal-nanoparticle hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, T.; Harouni, M. Bagheri; Naderi, M. H.

    2017-08-01

    The entanglement between photon pairs generated from the biexciton cascade transition in a semiconductor quantum dot located in the vicinity of a metal nanoparticle is theoretically investigated. In the model scheme, the biexciton-exciton and exciton-ground-state transitions are assumed to be coupled to two principal plasmon modes of orthogonal polarizations. For a broad spectral window, because the horizontal and vertical spectra overlap, the biexciton and exciton photons are degenerate in energy. This allows us to overcome the natural splitting between the intermediate exciton states. Moreover, the degree of entanglement depends on the geometrical parameters of the system, i.e., the radius of the metal nanoparticle and the distance between the quantum dot and the nanoparticle. The results reveal that such a hybrid system profoundly modifies the photon entanglement even in the absence of strong coupling between the emitter and the metal nanosphere.

  12. Inter-subbandspectroscopy on silicon-germanium quantum cascade structures; Intersubband Spektroskopie an Silizium-Germanium-Quantenkaskadenstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bormann, I.

    2006-02-15

    This work refers to the design, the fabrication and the structural, electrical and optical characterization of light emitters based on SiGe quantum cascade structures (QCS). In a first step two Si/SiGe quantum cascade structures without waveguides were designed using a 6-band k x p calculation of the subband structure including Si/Ge segregation effects during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth. After growth on (001) Si substrates they were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although the structures are strongly strained due to the average Ge content of 18%, they show no signs of strain relaxation. The interface roughness amounts to three monolayers in good agreement with the segregation model. Both structures show well resolved intersubband electroluminescence (EL) at 146 meV and 159 meV respectively in excellent agreement with the band structure calculations. The line width is 30 meV. The transversal magnetic polarization and photocurrent measurements prove that the intersubband transition is the source of the emitted luminescence. Numerical calculations of the upper state nonradiative hole lifetime determined by the deformation potential scattering of holes with optical phonons reveal a lifetime of about 400 fs for both structures. The feasibility to enhance the upper state lifetime in 'diagonal' transitions between heavy hole states in neighboring quantum wells is investigated. Therefore the Si barrier thickness between the quantum wells was varied and accordingly the wave function overlap using a second sample series. From EL measurements the lifetime of the 35 A barrier sample was found to be 17 times longer than for a 15 A barrier. It is possible to reduce the strong strain in Si/SiGe structures by using a virtual Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} substrate. For this purpose a thin Si{sub 0.72}Ge{sub 0.28} relaxed buffer with a threading dislocation density of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2} and a RMS surface roughness of 13 A was developed and

  13. High-precision molecular interrogation by direct referencing of a quantum-cascade-laser to a near-infrared frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, D; Gambetta, A; Castrillo, A; Galzerano, G; Laporta, P; Gianfrani, L; Marangoni, M

    2011-08-29

    This work presents a very simple yet effective way to obtain direct referencing of a quantum-cascade-laser at 4.3 μm to a near-IR frequency-comb. Precise tuning of the comb repetition-rate allows the quantum-cascade-laser to be scanned across absorption lines of a CO2 gaseous sample and line profiles to be acquired with extreme reproducibility and accuracy. By averaging over 50 acquisitions, line-centre frequencies are retrieved with an uncertainty of 30 kHz in a linear interaction regime. The extension of this methodology to other lines and molecules, by the use of widely tunable extended-cavity quantum-cascade-lasers, paves the way to a wide availability of high-quality and traceable spectroscopic data in the most crucial region for molecular detection and interrogation.

  14. GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade laser design based on optimized second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajić, A.; Radovanović, J.; Milanović, V.; Indjin, D.; Ikonić, Z.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we present an innovative procedure for the design and optimization of GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade laser (QCL) structures based on the use of the genetic algorithm. The purpose of the algorithm is to determine the set of design parameters that would enable the maximization of the second order nonlinear susceptibility, thus facilitating significant optical nonlinearities to take place. In our optimization model, we start from the existing design in which the active region consists of two coupled InGaAs quantum wells separated by an AlInAs barrier, and the active region levels form double resonant nonlinear cascades. Upon obtaining the optimized structure and evaluating its energies and wave functions, the output characteristics are calculated by applying the full self-consistent rate equation modeling of the electron transport in a periodic QCL structure. The results of the calculations predict a noticeable improvement of targeted properties of the optimized design, while at the same time the original design calculations show excellent agreement with experimental results. The described procedure is applicable to various active region designs and can be used for other wavelength ranges.

  15. Lasing of multiperiod quantum-cascade lasers in the spectral range of (5.6–5.8)-μm under current pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, A. Yu., E-mail: anton@beam.ioffe.ru; Babichev, A. V.; Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Novikov, I. I. [Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation); Nikitina, E. V. [St. Petersburg Academic University (Russian Federation); Tchernycheva, M. [University Paris Sud XI, Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale (France); Sofronov, A. N.; Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Pikhtin, N. A.; Tarasov, I. S. [Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The lasing of multiperiod quantum-cascade lasers in the spectral range of (5.6–5.8)-μm under current pumping are demonstrated. The quantum-cascade laser heterostructure is grown by molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Despite the relatively short laser cavity length and high level of external loss the laser shows the lasing in the temperature range of 80–220 K. The threshold current density below 4 kA/cm{sup 2} at 220 K with the characteristic temperature T{sub 0} = 123 K was demonstrated.

  16. Performance of a quantum-dot external-cavity laser based on digital micro-mirror device%基于DMD的外腔量子点激光器性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成若海; 王海龙; 龚谦; 严进一; 汪洋; 柳庆博; 曹春芳; 岳丽

    2013-01-01

    In order to obtain more complete test data of quantum-dot external-cavity lasers,the InAs/InP quantum-dot external-cavity lasers using digital micro-mirror device (DMD) are successfully built up and their spectrum characteristics and the tuning range are measured.We also measure its tuning range and the corresponding change in the mode based on DMD quantum external cavity laser dots.The spectrum characteristics of InAs/InP quantum-dot external-cavity laser based on the grating and the DMD are compared theoretically and experimentally,and the differences between the reflection spectrum and angular dispersion are obtained.And a new method based on DMD will be applied to the external-cavity quantum-dot lasers.%为了取得更加完善的外腔量子点激光器(QDL)测试数据,构建了基于数字微镜器件(DMD,digital micro-mirror device)的InAs/InP量子点外腔QDL.测量了其光谱特性以及调谐范围,得到了基于DMD的外腔QDL调谐范围和相应的模式变化.在理论和实验上与基于光栅的外腔QDL性能进行了比较,得到了在角色散和反射光谱中与光栅的区别,实现了将DMD应用于外腔QDL中而获得的一种新方法.

  17. Frequency Locking and Monitoring Based on Bi-directional Terahertz Radiation of a 3rd-Order Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Marrewijk, N.; Mirzaei, B.; Hayton, D.; Gao, J.R.; Kao, T.Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed frequency locking of a dual, forward reverse emitting third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 3.5 THz. By using both directions of THz emission in combination with two gas cells and two power detectors, we can for the first time perform frequency stabilizati

  18. Design and characterisation of far- and mid-infrared quantum cascade detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Graf, Marcel; Hofstetter, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Cette thèse traite un type nouveau de photodétecteurs infrarouges, basés sur les transitions inter-sous-bande dans les matériaux semi-conducteurs III-V (AlAs/GaAs sur GaAs et InAlAs/InGaAs sur InP). S'adressant à une des sources bruyantes principales de photodétecteurs photoconducteurs, le bruit de courant d'obscurité, ce design comprend un gradient potentiel intérieur en forme de cascade quantique, donc le nom détecteur à cascade quantique (QCD). Cette approche permet l'opération sans mise s...

  19. Silver halide fiber-based evanescent-wave liquid droplet sensing with room temperature mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. Z.; Liu, Z.; Gmachl, C. F.; Sivco, D. L.

    2005-08-01

    Quantum cascade lasers and unclad silver halide fibers were used to assemble mid-infrared fiber-optics evanescent-wave sensors suitable to measure the chemical composition of liquid droplets. The laser wavelengths were chosen to be in the regions which offer the largest absorption contrast between constituents inside the mixture droplets. A pseudo-Beer-Lambert law fits well with the experimental data. Using a 300μm diameter fiber with a 25 mm immersion length, the signal to noise ratios correspond to 1 vol.% for α-tocophenol in squalane and 2 vol.% for acetone in aqueous solution for laser wavenumbers of 1208 cm-1 and 1363 cm-1, respectively.

  20. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic detection of ethylene using a 10.5 μm quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Li, Zhili; Ren, Wei

    2016-02-22

    A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor has been developed for the sensitive detection of ethylene (C2H4) at 10.5 µm using a continuous-wave distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser. At this long-wavelength infrared, the key acoustic elements of quartz tuning fork and micro-resonators were optimized to improve the detection signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of >4. The sensor calibration demonstrated an excellent linear response (R2>0.999) to C2H4 concentration at the selected operating pressure of 500 and 760 Torr. With a minimum detection limit of 50 parts per billion (ppb) achieved at an averaging time of 70 s, the sensor has been deployed for measuring the C2H4 efflux during the respiration of biological samples in an agronomic environment.

  1. V/III ratio effects on high quality InAlAs for quantum cascade laser structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ilkay; Elagoz, Sezai

    2017-04-01

    In this study we report the V/III ratio effects on growth, structural, optical and doping characteristics of low growth rate (∼1 Å/s) heteroepitaxial Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) grown InxAl1-xAs layers, a part of Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) structures, on InP substrate. Especially photoluminescence (PL) properties of InAlAs-InP interface show strong dependence on AsH3 overpressure. We have shown that the V/III ratio with fixed metalorganic precursor flow is a crucial parameter on InxAl1-xAs layers to have a good material quality in terms of crystallinity, optical and electrical characteristics with and without doping.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide detection with quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy using a distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wei, E-mail: wr5@rice.edu; Jiang, Wenzhe; Tittel, Frank K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Sanchez, Nancy P.; Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Patimisco, Pietro [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università e Politecnico di Bari, Via Amendola 173, Bari 70126 (Italy); Spagnolo, Vincenzo [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università e Politecnico di Bari, Via Amendola 173, Bari 70126 (Italy); Zah, Chung-en; Xie, Feng; Hughes, Lawrence C. [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor system was developed for the sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) using its absorption transitions in the v{sub 6} fundamental band at ∼7.73 μm. The recent availability of distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers provides convenient access to a strong H{sub 2}O{sub 2} absorption line located at 1295.55 cm{sup −1}. Sensor calibration was performed by means of a water bubbler that generated titrated average H{sub 2}O{sub 2} vapor concentrations. A minimum detection limit of 12 parts per billion (ppb) corresponding to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 4.6 × 10{sup −9} cm{sup −1}W/Hz{sup 1/2} was achieved with an averaging time of 100 s.

  3. Digitally graded GaAs/Al 0.44Ga 0.56As quantum-cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indjin, D.; Tomić, S.; Ikonić, Z.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.; Milanović, V.; Kočinac, S.

    2003-04-01

    A method for the optimal design and realization of a GaAs/Al 0.44Ga 0.56As quantum-cascade laser (QCL) is presented. Firstly, an optimal, smooth active region profile is derived, using inverse spectral theory. A digitally graded laser structure is then designed, having an approximately equivalent potential profile. The gain and threshold current of the optimized device are calculated using a 15-level self-consistent rate equation model, and are shown to represent substantial improvements over the figures obtained, using the same calculation method, for the recently reported room temperature GaAs/Al 0.44Ga 0.56As QCL of Page et al. (Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 (2001) 3529).

  4. Recent Advances in Room Temperature, High-Power Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Sources Based on Difference-Frequency Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanyong Lu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the current status of high-performance, compact, THz sources based on intracavity nonlinear frequency generation in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. Significant performance improvements of our THz sources in the power and wall plug efficiency are achieved by systematic optimizing the device’s active region, waveguide, and chip bonding strategy. High THz power up to 1.9 mW and 0.014 mW for pulsed mode and continuous wave operations at room temperature are demonstrated, respectively. Even higher power and efficiency are envisioned based on enhancements in outcoupling efficiency and mid-IR performance. Our compact THz device with high power and wide tuning range is highly suitable for imaging, sensing, spectroscopy, medical diagnosis, and many other applications.

  5. A calibration-free ammonia breath sensor using a quantum cascade laser with WMS 2f/1f

    KAUST Repository

    Owen, Kyle

    2013-12-22

    The amount of ammonia in exhaled breath has been linked to a variety of adverse medical conditions, including chronic kidney disease (CKD). The development of accurate, reliable breath sensors has the potential to improve medical care. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic normalized by the first harmonic (WMS 2f/1f) is a sensitive technique used in the development of calibration-free sensors. An ammonia gas sensor is designed and developed that uses a quantum cascade laser operating near 1,103.44 cm -1 and a multi-pass cell with an effective path length of 76.45 m. The sensor has a 7 ppbv detection limit and 5 % total uncertainty for breath measurements. The sensor was successfully used to detect ammonia in exhaled breath and compare healthy patients to patients diagnosed with CKD. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  6. Saturated absorption in a rotational molecular transition at 2.5 THz using a quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consolino, L., E-mail: luigi.consolino@ino.it; Campa, A.; Ravaro, M.; Mazzotti, D.; Bartalini, S.; De Natale, P. [INO, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica-CNR, Largo E. Fermi 6, Firenze I-50125 (Italy); LENS, European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, Sesto Fiorentino, I-50019 (Italy); Vitiello, M. S. [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza San Silvestro 12, Pisa I-56127 (Italy)

    2015-01-12

    We report on the evidence of saturation effects in a rotational transition of CH{sub 3}OH around 2.5 THz, induced by a free-running continuous-wave quantum cascade laser (QCL). The QCL emission is used for direct-absorption spectroscopy experiments, allowing to study the dependence of the absorption coefficient on gas pressure and laser intensity. A saturation intensity of 25 μW/mm{sup 2}, for a gas pressure of 17 μbar, is measured. This result represents the initial step towards the implementation of a QCL-based high-resolution sub-Doppler THz spectroscopy, which is expected to improve by orders of magnitude the precision of THz spectrometers.

  7. Low-threshold room-temperature continuous-wave operation of a terahertz difference-frequency quantum cascade laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kazuue; Ito, Akio; Hitaka, Masahiro; Dougakiuchi, Tatsuo; Edamura, Tadataka

    2017-08-01

    The performance of a room-temperature continuous-wave (CW) terahertz source based on intracavity difference-frequency generation in a mid-infrared (λ ∼ 6.8 µm) quantum cascade laser with a dual-upper-state active region is reported. The fabricated buried heterostructure device, with a two-section buried distributed feedback grating, operates at two mid-infrared wavelengths and demonstrates a terahertz output of 2.92 THz with a very low threshold current density of 0.89 kA/cm2 in pulsed operation. Consequently, despite an epitaxial-side-up mounting configuration, the device achieves CW operation at room temperature in which a low CW threshold current density of 1.3 kA/cm2 is obtained.

  8. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for rapid and sensitive quantification of chemical mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-13

    A rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system for fast open-path quantification of multiple chemicals and mixtures is presented. The ECQCL system is swept over its entire tuning range (>100 cm-1) at frequencies up to 200 Hz. At 200 Hz the wavelength tuning rate and spectral resolution are 2x104 cm-1/sec and < 0.2 cm-1, respectively. The capability of the current system to quantify changes in chemical concentrations on millesecond timescales is demonstrated at atmospheric pressure using an open-path multi-pass cell. The detection limits for chemicals ranged from ppb to ppm levels depending on the absorption cross-section.

  9. Distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers operating in continuous-wave mode at λ ≈ 7.6 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinchuan, Zhang; Lijun, Wang; Wanfeng, Liu; Fengqi, Liu; Lihua, Zhao; Shenqiang, Zhai; Junqi, Liu; Zhanguo, Wang

    2012-02-01

    Distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in continuous-wave (CW) mode emitting at λ ≈ 7.6 μm are presented. Holographic lithography was used to fabricate the first-order distributed feedback grating. For a high-reflectivity-coated QCL with 14.5-μm-wide and 3-mm-long cavity, CW output powers of 300 mW at 85 K and still 10 mW at 270 K are obtained. Single-mode emission with a side-mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of about 30 dB and a wide tuning range of ~300 nm in the temperature range from 85 to 280 K is observed.

  10. Frequency-locking and threshold current-lowering effects of quantum cascade laser and an application in gas detection field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟根; 万福; 邹经鑫; 顾朝亮; 周渠

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the frequency-locking and threshold current-lowering effects of quantum cascade laser are studied and achieved. Combined with cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy, the noninvasive detection of H2 with a pre-pared concentration of 500 ppm in multiple dissolved gases is performed and evaluated. The high frequency selectivity of 0.0051 cm−1 at an acquisition time of 1 s allows the sensitive detection of the (1-0) S(1) band of H2 with a high ac-curacy of (96.53±0.29)%and shows that the detection limit to an absorption line of 4712.9046 cm−1 is approximately (17.26±0.63) ppm at an atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 20◦C.

  11. Apertureless near-field terahertz imaging using the self-mixing effect in a quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Paul, E-mail: p.dean@leeds.ac.uk; Keeley, James; Kundu, Iman; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mitrofanov, Oleg [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-29

    We report two-dimensional apertureless near-field terahertz (THz) imaging using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) source and a scattering probe. A near-field enhancement of the scattered field amplitude is observed for small tip-sample separations, allowing image resolutions of ∼1 μm (∼λ/100) and ∼7 μm to be achieved along orthogonal directions on the sample surface. This represents the highest resolution demonstrated to date with a THz QCL. By employing a detection scheme based on self-mixing interferometry, our approach offers experimental simplicity by removing the need for an external detector and also provides sensitivity to the phase of the reinjected field.

  12. Surface-emitting terahertz quantum cascade lasers with continuous-wave power in the tens of milliwatt range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Gangyi, E-mail: gangyi.xu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris Sud, UMR8622 CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France); Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Li, Lianhe; Giles Davies, A.; Linfield, Edmund H. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 2JT (United Kingdom); Isac, Nathalie; Halioua, Yacine; Colombelli, Raffaele, E-mail: raffaele.colombelli@u-psud.fr [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris Sud, UMR8622 CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2014-03-03

    We demonstrate efficient surface-emitting terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers with continuous wave output powers of 20–25 mW at 15 K and maximum operating temperatures of 80–85 K. The devices employ a resonant-phonon depopulation active region design with injector, and surface emission is realized using resonators based on graded photonic heterostructures (GPHs). GPHs can be regarded as energy wells for photons and have recently been implemented through grading the period of the photonic structure. In this paper, we show that it is possible to keep the period constant and grade instead the lateral metal coverage across the GPH. This strategy ensures spectrally single-mode operation across the whole laser dynamic range and represents an additional degree of freedom in the design of confining potentials for photons.

  13. Spectral research on an AlGaAs epitaxial material for a terahertz quantum-cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Zhi-Yong; Cao, Jun-Cheng [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2012-04-15

    The spectral properties of a series of AlGaAs epitaxial films were studied by using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer with an 80-degree grazing incidence reflection unit. The AlAs like transversal optical phonon was obviously observed in the spectra, but the longitudinal optical phonon was obscured in the transmission spectra. The variation curves for the transversal optical phonon energy were acquired from the two kinds of spectra and were compared with each other and with the early results. A comparison of the results show that the grazing incidence reflection spectrum is better in reflecting the AlAs-like phonon energy of an AlGaAs epitaxial film and could be a supplementary means in the characterization of the material for a terahertz quantum-cascade laser.

  14. On statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics. Detection chambers and cascade measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzecri, J.-P.

    1986-01-01

    Using analysis of a concrete experimental system, and using a formal schema, we interpret this dictum due to Heisenberg: In quantum mechanics, the frontier between object and observer, can be arbitrarily moved in the direction of the latter.

  15. Fabrication and Operation of Integrated Distributed Bragg Reflector Thermally Tunable Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liwei

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) that emit in the mid-infrared (IR) range between 3 and 10 µm of the electromagnetic spectrum play an important role in optical gas sensing and molecular spectroscopic applications because several important environmental molecules such as CO, CO2, CH 4, and NH3 are known to exhibit strong absorption lines in this mid-IR range. To differentiate such fine absorption features as narrow as a few angstroms, a single-mode QCL with an extremely narrow spectral linewidth, broadly tunable over the molecular absorption fingerprints and operating at sufficient optical power at room temperature, is highly desirable. We present, in this dissertation, two major studies on mid-IR QCLs, one being an improvement in device performance through a buried-heterostructure (BH) regrowth study, and the other being a realization of single-mode, tunable QCLs integrated with a distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) grating and thermal tuning mechanism. Efficient heat dissipation in the QCL active region, which is crucial for high optical-power operation, can be effectively achieved using BH waveguides laterally embedded with InP grown by metal-organic chemical vapor disposition (MOCVD). We have experimentally examined the effects of the structural features of mesas, such as the mesa orientation, geometry, sidewall-etched profile, and the length of oxide overhang, on the BH regrowth. We find that the mesa oriented in the [011¯] direction with smoothly etched sidewalls produces a satisfactory planar growth profile and uniform lateral growth coverage and that a mesa-height-to-overhang-length ratio between 2.5 and 3.0 is effective in reducing anomalous growth in the vicinity of oxide edges. As a result, high-power QCLs capable of producing multi-hundred milliwatts at room temperature at ˜4.6 µm and ˜7.9 µm through reproducible BH regrowth results have been demonstrated. We have also demonstrated single-mode tunable QCLs operating at ˜7.9 µm with an internal DBR

  16. A comprehensive model of gain recovery due to unipolar electron transport after a short optical pulse in quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali Mahabadi, S. E.; Hu, Yue; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman; Carruthers, Thomas F.; Menyuk, Curtis R.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a comprehensive model of gain recovery due to unipolar electron transport after a short optical pulse in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) that takes into account all the participating energy levels, including the continuum, in a device. This work takes into account the incoherent scattering of electrons from one energy level to another and quantum coherent tunneling from an injector level to an active region level or vice versa. In contrast to the prior work that only considered transitions to and from a limited number of bound levels, this work include transitions between all bound levels and between the bound energy levels and the continuum. We simulated an experiment of S. Liu et al., in which 438-pJ femtosecond optical pulses at the device's lasing wavelength were injected into an I n0.653 Ga0.348 As/In0.310 Al0.690 As QCL structure; we found that approximately 1% of the electrons in the bound energy levels will be excited into the continuum by a pulse and that the probability that these electrons will be scattered back into bound energy levels is negligible, ˜10-4 . The gain recovery that is predicted is not consistent with the experiments, indicating that one or more phenomena besides unipolar electron transport in response to a short optical pulse play an important role in the observed gain recovery.

  17. Intersubband spectroscopy of ZnO/ZnMgO quantum wells grown on m-plane ZnO substrates for quantum cascade device applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Patrick; Jollivet, Arnaud; Isac, Nathalie; Bousseksou, Adel; Ariel, Frédéric; Tchernycheva, Maria; Julien, François H.; Montes Bajo, Miguel; Tamayo-Arriola, Julen; Hierro, Adrián.; Le Biavan, Nolwenn; Hugues, Maxime; Chauveau, Jean-Michel

    2017-03-01

    Quantum cascade (QC) lasers opens new prospects for powerful sources operating at THz frequencies. Up to now the best THz QC lasers are based on intersubband emission in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well (QW) heterostructures. The maximum operating temperature is 200 K, which is too low for wide-spread applications. This is due to the rather low LO-phonon energy (36 meV) of GaAs-based materials. Indeed, thermal activation allows non-radiative path through electron-phonon interaction which destroys the population inversion. Wide band gap materials such as ZnO have been predicted to provide much higher operating temperatures because of the high value of their LO-phonon energy. However, despite some observations of intersubband absorption in c-plane ZnO/ZnMgO quantum wells, little is known on the fundamental parameters such as the conduction band offset in such heterostructures. In addition the internal field inherent to c-plane grown heterostuctures is an handicap for the design of QC lasers and detectors. In this talk, we will review a systematic investigation of ZnO/ZnMgO QW heterostructures with various Mg content and QW thicknesses grown by plasma molecular beam epitaxy on low-defect m-plane ZnO substrates. We will show that most samples exhibit TM-polarized intersubband absorption at room temperature linked either to bound-to-quasi bound inter-miniband absorption or to bound-to bound intersubband absorption depending on the Mg content of the barrier material. This systematic study allows for the first time to estimate the conduction band offset of ZnO/ZnMgO heterostructures, opening prospects for the design of QC devices operating at THz frequencies. This was supported by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement #665107.

  18. 40 GHz AlGaInAs Multiple-Quantum-Well Integrated Electroabsorption Modulator/Distributed Feedback Laser Based on Identical Epitaxial Layer Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Jian; Cai, Pengfei; Sun, Changzheng

    2006-10-01

    An AlGaInAs multiple-quantum-well (MQW) distributed feedback (DFB) laser is monolithically integrated with a lumped-electrode electroabsorption (EA) modulator based on an identical epitaxial layer integration scheme. The device exhibits a threshold current of 12 mA and an extinction ratio of higher than 13 dB under a 3 V reverse bias. By adopting a dry-etched high-mesa ridge waveguide and planar electrode structures, the capacitance of the modulator is reduced to about 0.11 pF and a 3 dBe modulation bandwidth of over 40 GHz has been demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a 40 GHz operation of AlGaInAs integrated light sources.

  19. Step-taper active-region quantum cascade lasers for carrier-leakage suppression and high internal differential efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, J. D.; Chang, C.-C.; Boyle, C.; Mawst, L. J.; Lindberg, D.; Earles, T.; Botez, D.

    2016-03-01

    By stepwise tapering both the barrier heights and quantum-well depths in the active regions of 8.7 μm- and 8.4 μm-emitting quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) virtually complete carrier-leakage suppression is achieved, as evidenced by high values for both the threshold-current characteristic temperature coefficient T0 (283 K and 242 K) and the slope-efficiency characteristic temperature coefficient T1 (561 K and 279 K), over the 20-60 °C heatsink-temperature range, for low- and high-doped devices, respectively. Such high values are obtained while the threshold-current density is kept relatively low for 35-period, low- and high-doped devices: 1.58 kA/cm2 and 1.88 kA/cm2, respectively. In addition, due to resonant extraction from the lower laser level, high differential-transition-efficiency values (89-90%) are obtained. In turn, the slope-efficiency for 3 mm-long, 35-period high-reflectivity (HR)-coated devices are: 1.15-1.23 W/A; that is, 30- 40 % higher than for same-geometry and similar-doping conventional 8-9 μm-emitting QCLs. As a result of both efficient carrier-leakage suppression as well as fast and efficient carrier extraction, the values for the internal differential efficiency are found to be ≍ 86%, by comparison to typical values in the 58-67 % range for conventional QCLs emitting in the 7-11 μm wavelength range.

  20. Modeling of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers: The role of temperature and operating field strength on the laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefvand, Hossein Reza

    2017-07-01

    In this paper a self-consistent numerical approach to study the temperature and bias dependent characteristics of mid-infrared (mid-IR) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is presented which integrates a number of quantum mechanical models. The field-dependent laser parameters including the nonradiative scattering times, the detuning and energy levels, the escape activation energy, the backfilling excitation energy and dipole moment of the optical transition are calculated for a wide range of applied electric fields by a self-consistent solution of Schrodinger-Poisson equations. A detailed analysis of performance of the obtained structure is carried out within a self-consistent solution of the subband population rate equations coupled with carrier coherent transport equations through the sequential resonant tunneling, by taking into account the temperature and bias dependency of the relevant parameters. Furthermore, the heat transfer equation is included in order to calculate the carrier temperature inside the active region levels. This leads to a compact predictive model to analyze the temperature and electric field dependent characteristics of the mid-IR QCLs such as the light-current (L-I), electric field-current (F-I) and core temperature-electric field (T-F) curves. For a typical mid-IR QCL, a good agreement was found between the simulated temperature-dependent L-I characteristic and experimental data, which confirms validity of the model. It is found that the main characteristics of the device such as output power and turn-on delay time are degraded by interplay between the temperature and Stark effects.

  1. Experimental generation of quadruple quantum-correlated beams from hot rubidium vapor by cascaded four-wave mixing using spatial multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Leiming; Qi, Jian; Du, Jinjian; Jing, Jietai

    2017-02-01

    Multimode quantum states, such as multipartite quantum entanglement or quantum correlations, are important for both fundamental science and the future development of quantum technologies. Here we theoretically propose and experimentally realize a scheme that can fully exploit the multi-spatial-mode nature of the four-wave-mixing (FWM) process, i.e., spatial multiplexing, and thus integrates multiple FWM processes into a single cell at each stage of the cascaded process. The number of generated quantum-correlated beams 2n is exponentially dependent on the number of vapor cells n . In addition, the quantum correlations between the multiple beams also increase as the number of vapor cell increases. For the case of n =2 , we experimentally show that the degree of intensity-difference squeezing between the four quantum-correlated beams in our scheme is enhanced to -8.2 ±0.2 dB from -5.6 ±0.3 and -6.5 ±0.2 dB of squeezing obtained with a single FWM process. Our system may find applications in quantum information and precision measurement.

  2. Thermal Analysis of InAs/A1Sb Short Wavelength Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Lin; LI Ai-Zhen; XU Gang-Yi

    2009-01-01

    We present the effects of hereto-interfaces and major key parameters on the thermal behaviors and performance of short wavelength mid-IR InAs/AlSb quantum cascade lasers (QCLs).We use a finite element method (FEM) with commercial software,ANSYS,to simulate the heat dissipation in QCLs in cw operation mode with an epilayer-down mounting package.The thermal performance is characterized by the temperature increase △T (self-heating effect) between the active region of QCLs and the heatsink.Results show that (1) the self-heating effects of InAs/AlSb QCLs are much less than those in AllnAs/GaInAs QCLs,(2) narrower ridges lead to significantly cooler active regions of InAs/AlSb QCLs due to poor heat transport in the cross-plane direction (across interfaces) and that most of the heat flows out of the active region in the lateral direction,and (3) the cavity length of the laser has little influence on the self-heating effect of the device,but the long cavity reduces mirror loss and threshold current density.

  3. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2016-07-16

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm were operated in pulsed mode, causing a frequency "down-chirp" across two ro-vibrational transitions of carbon monoxide. The down-chirp phenomenon resulted in large spectral tuning (δν ∼2.8cm-1) within a single pulse of each laser at a high pulse repetition frequency (100kHz). The wide tuning range allowed the application of the two-line thermometry technique, thus making the sensor quantitative and calibration-free. The sensor was first tested in non-reactive CO-N2 gas mixtures in the RCM and then applied to cases of n-pentane oxidation. Experiments were carried out for end of compression (EOC) pressures and temperatures ranging 9.21-15.32bar and 745-827K, respectively. Measured EOC temperatures agreed with isentropic calculations within 5%. Temperature rise measured during the first-stage ignition of n-pentane is over-predicted by zero-dimensional kinetic simulations. This work presents, for the first time, highly time-resolved temperature measurements in reactive and non-reactive rapid compression machine experiments. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Continuous wave operation of distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers with low threshold voltage and low power consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Caneau, Catherine; LeBlanc, Herve P.; Coleman, Sean; Hughes, Lawrence C.; Zah, Chung-en

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrated the room temperature continuous wave (CW) operation of mid-infrared distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) made of strain balanced GaInAs/AlInAs material on InP substrates for sensing CO2 isotope and N2O gas for potential applications that need battery powered portable devices in a sensor network. For the former device at 4.35 μm wavelength, we demonstrated a low threshold voltage of less than 8 V for battery operation and a near circular far field pattern with small divergent angles of 33 by 28 degrees full width at half maximum (FWHM) in vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, for easy collimation. For the latter device at 4.5 μm wavelength, we demonstrated a low CW threshold power consumption of 0.7 W at 20 °C. A side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 30 dB was achieved within the whole operating current and temperature ranges for both lasers.

  5. External cavity-quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy for secondary structure analysis of proteins at low concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Alcaráz, Mirta R.; Araman, Can; Goicoechea, Héctor; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy are analytical techniques employed for the analysis of protein secondary structure. The use of CD spectroscopy is limited to low protein concentrations (5 mg ml-1). Here we introduce a quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based IR transmission setup for analysis of protein and polypeptide secondary structure at concentrations as low as 0.25 mg ml-1 in deuterated buffer solution. We present dynamic QCL-IR spectra of the temperature-induced α-helix to β-sheet transition of poly-L-lysine. The concentration dependence of the α-β transition temperature between 0.25 and 10 mg ml-1 was investigated by QCL-IR, FTIR and CD spectroscopy. By using QCL-IR spectroscopy it is possible to perform IR spectroscopic analysis in the same concentration range as CD spectroscopy, thus enabling a combined analysis of biomolecules secondary structure by CD and IR spectroscopy.

  6. Propene concentration sensing for combustion gases using quantum-cascade laser absorption near 11 μm

    KAUST Repository

    Chrystie, Robin

    2015-05-29

    We report on a strategy to measure, in situ, the concentration of propene (C3H6) in combustion gases using laser absorption spectroscopy. Pyrolysis of n-butane was conducted in a shock tube, in which the resultant gases were probed using an extended cavity quantum-cascade laser. A differential absorption approach using online and offline wavelengths near λ = 10.9 μm enabled discrimination of propene, cancelling the effects of spectral interference from the simultaneous presence of intermediate hydrocarbon species during combustion. Such interference-free measurements were facilitated by exploiting the =C–H bending mode characteristic to alkenes (olefins). It was confirmed, for intermediate species present during pyrolysis of n-butane, that their absorption cross sections were the same magnitude for both online and offline wavelengths. Hence, this allowed time profiles of propene concentration to be measured during pyrolysis of n-butane in a shock tube. Time profiles of propene subsequent to a passing shock wave exhibit trends similar to that predicted by the well-established JetSurF 1.0 chemical kinetic mechanism, albeit lower by a factor of two. Such a laser diagnostic is a first step to experimentally determining propene in real time with sufficient time resolution, thus aiding the refinement and development of chemical kinetic models for combustion. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  7. Rapid and Sensitive Quantification of Isotopic Mixtures Using a Rapidly-Swept External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-05-23

    A rapidly-swept external-cavity quantum cascade laser with an open-path Herriott cell is used to quantify gas-phase chemical mixtures of D2O and HDO at an update rate of 40 Hz (25 ms measurement time). The chemical mixtures were generated by evaporating D2O liquid near the open-path Herriott cell, allowing the H/D exchange reaction with ambient H2O to produce HDO. Fluctuations in the ratio of D2O and HDO on timescales of < 1 s due to the combined effects of plume transport and the H/D exchange chemical reaction are observed. Noise equivalent concentrations (1σ) (NEC) of 147.0 ppbv and 151.6 ppbv in a 25 ms measurement time are estimated for D2O and HDO respectively with a 127 m optical path. These NECs are reduced to 23.0 and 24.0 ppbv with a 1 s averaging time for D2O and HDO respectively. NECs < 200 ppbv are also estimated for N2O, F134A, CH4, Acetone, and SO2 for a 25 ms measurement time. Based on the NECs obtained for D2O and HDO, the isotopic precision for measurement of the [D2O]/[HDO] concentration ratio was studied. An isotopic precision of 33‰ and 5‰ was calculated for the current experimental conditions for measurement times of 25 ms and 1 s, respectively.

  8. Role of interface roughness scattering, temperature, and structural parameters on the performance characteristics of III-nitride quantum cascade detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S.; Kumar, J.

    2017-02-01

    A III-nitride quantum cascade detector (QCD) for the fiber optic communication wavelength (˜1.5 μm) has been designed, and the effect of intersubband scattering processes such as longitudinal-optical phonon scattering, ionized impurity scattering, and more importantly interface roughness scattering on responsivity performance has been analyzed. Carrier transport in the detector is modeled using a simplified rate equation approach. It is observed that inclusion of interface roughness scattering in the carrier transport model significantly enhances the responsivity performance of the detector. The effects of roughness conditions for instance mean roughness height and correlation length on responsivity have been examined. The responsivity of the designed detector drops by 2.16 mA/W at 400 K compared to its low temperature value at 50 K and the detection wavelength change with temperature is insignificant, which are very helpful for the stable detection of the radiation for a wide range of operating temperatures and show the thermal stability of III-nitride QCDs. The effects of active well widths, extractor barrier widths, and extractor well widths have been further investigated. A higher responsivity performance is observed for narrower barrier widths. It is noticed that change in the active well width significantly modifies the responsivity of the detector and the wavelength gets red shifted for larger active well widths.

  9. Mid-infrared multimode fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser for off-beam quartz-enhanced photoacoustic detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhili; Shi, Chao; Ren, Wei

    2016-09-01

    A mid-infrared quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor was developed using a multimode fiber (MMF)-coupled quantum cascade laser (QCL) and demonstrated for sensitive nitric oxide (NO) detection at a wavelength near 5.26 μm. The QCL radiation was readily coupled into a solid-core InF3 MMF (100 μm core) with 97% coupling efficiency using an aspheric lens. Despite the 25.5% transmission loss for the 1 m long MMF, the Gaussian beam-like fiber output of 5.72° divergence was almost completely focused through the microresonator tube (length, 8.0 mm; ID, 600 μm) designed for off-beam quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy. The sensor exploiting the R6.5 (Π21/2) doublet of NO at 1900.08  cm-1 demonstrated a minimum detection limit of 24 parts per billion by volume at an averaging time of 130 s. The sensor was found to be insensitive to the fiber bending noise for a bending radius >5  cm.

  10. Quad quantum cascade laser spectrometer with dual gas cells for the simultaneous analysis of mainstream and sidestream cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baren, Randall E; Parrish, Milton E; Shafer, Kenneth H; Harward, Charles N; Shi, Quan; Nelson, David D; McManus, J Barry; Zahniser, Mark S

    2004-12-01

    A compact, fast response, infrared spectrometer using four pulsed quantum cascade (QC) lasers has been applied to the analysis of gases in mainstream (MS) and sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke. QC lasers have many advantages over the traditional lead-salt tunable diode lasers, including near room temperature operation with thermoelectric cooling and single mode operation with improved long-term stability. The new instrument uses two 36 m, 0.3 l multiple pass absorption gas cells to obtain a time response of 0.1s for the MS smoke system and 0.4s for the SS smoke system. The concentrations of ammonia, ethylene, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide for three different reference cigarettes were measured simultaneously in MS and SS smoke. A data rate of 20Hz provides sufficient resolution to determine the concentration profiles during each 2s puff in the MS smoke. Concentration profiles before, during and after the puffs also have been observed for these smoke constituents in SS smoke. Also, simultaneous measurements of CO(2) from a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer are obtained for both MS and SS smoke. In addition, during this work, nitrous oxide was detected in both the MS and SS smoke for all reference cigarettes studied.

  11. [A trace methane gas sensor using mid-infrared quantum cascaded laser at 7.5 microm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Dang, Jing-Min; Huang, Jian-Qiang; Yang, Yue; Wang, Yi-Ding

    2012-11-01

    Presented is a compact instrument developed for in situ high-stable and sensitive continuous measurement of trace gases in air, with results shown for ambient methane (CH4) concentration accurate, real-time and in-situ. This instrument takes advantage of recent technology in thermoelectrically cooling (TEC) pulsed Fabry-Perot (FP) quantum cascaded laser (QCL) driving in a pulse mode operating at 7.5 microm ambient temperature to cover a fundamental spectral absorption band near v4 of CH4. A high quality Liquid Nitrogen (LN) cooled Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe) mid-infrared (MIR) detector is used along with a total reflection coated gold ellipsoid mirror offering 20 cm single pass optical absorption in an open-path cell to achieve stability of 5.2 x 10(-3) under experimental condition of 200 micromol x mol(-1) measured ambient CH4. The instrument integrated software via time discriminating electronics technology to control QCL provides continuous quantitative trace gas measurements without calibration. The results show that the instrument can be applied to field measurements of gases of environmental concern. Additional, operator could substitute a QCL operating at a different wavelength to measure other gases.

  12. A compact, continuous-wave terahertz source based on a quantum-cascade laser and a miniature cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, H; Greiner-Bär, M; Pavlov, S G; Semenov, A D; Wienold, M; Schrottke, L; Giehler, M; Hey, R; Grahn, H T; Hübers, H-W

    2010-05-10

    We report on the development of a compact, easy-to-use terahertz radiation source, which combines a quantum-cascade laser (QCL) operating at 3.1 THz with a compact, low-input-power Stirling cooler. The QCL, which is based on a two-miniband design, has been developed for high output and low electrical pump power. The amount of generated heat complies with the nominal cooling capacity of the Stirling cooler of 7 W at 65 K with 240 W of electrical input power. Special care has been taken to achieve a good thermal coupling between the QCL and the cold finger of the cooler. The whole system weighs less than 15 kg including the cooler and power supplies. The maximum output power is 8 mW at 3.1 THz. With an appropriate optical beam shaping, the emission profile of the laser is fundamental Gaussian. The applicability of the system is demonstrated by imaging and molecular-spectroscopy experiments.

  13. Suitability of quantum cascade laser spectroscopy for CH4 and N2O eddy covariance flux measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Vermeulen

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A quantum cascade laser spectrometer was evaluated for eddy covariance flux measurements of CH4 and N2O using three months of continuous measurements at a field site. The required criteria for eddy covariance flux measurements including continuity, sampling frequency, precision and stationarity were examined. The system operated continuously at a dairy farm on peat grassland in the Netherlands from 17 August to 6 November 2006. An automatic liquid nitrogen filling system for the infrared detector was employed to provide unattended operation of the system. The electronic sampling frequency was 10 Hz, however, the flow response time was 0.08 s, which corresponds to a bandwidth of 2 Hz. A precision of 2.9 and 0.5 ppb Hz−1/2 was obtained for CH4 and N2O, respectively. Accuracy was assured by frequent calibrations using low and high standard additions. Drifts in the system were compensated by using a 120 s running mean filter. The average CH4 and N2O exchange was 512 ngC m−2 s−1 (2.46 mg m−2 hr−1 and 52 ngN m−2 s−1 (0.29 mg m−2 hr−1. Given that 40% of the total N2O emission was due to a fertilizing event.

  14. Methodical study of nitrous oxide eddy covariance measurements using quantum cascade laser spectrometery over a Swiss forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Eugster

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured at the Lägeren CarboEurope IP flux site over the multi-species mixed forest dominated by European beech and Norway spruce. Measurements were carried out during a four-week period in October–November 2005 during leaf senescence. Fluxes were measured with a standard ultrasonic anemometer in combination with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer that measured N2O, CO2, and H2O mixing ratios simultaneously at 5 Hz time resolution. To distinguish insignificant fluxes from significant ones it is proposed to use a new approach based on the significance of the correlation coefficient between vertical wind speed and mixing ratio fluctuations. This procedure eliminated roughly 56% of our half-hourly fluxes. Based on the remaining, quality checked N2O fluxes we quantified the mean efflux at 0.8±0.4 μmol m−2 h−1 (mean ± standard error. Most of the contribution to the N2O flux occurred during a 6.5-h period starting 4.5 h before each precipitation event. No relation with precipitation amount could be found. Visibility data representing fog density and duration at the site indicate that wetting of the canopy may have as strong an effect on N2O effluxes as does below-ground microbial activity. It is speculated that above-ground N2O production from the senescing leaves at high moisture (fog, drizzle, onset of precipitation event may be responsible for part of the measured flux.

  15. Methane and nitrous oxide measurements onboard the UK Atmospheric Research Aircraft using quantum cascade laser spectrometry (QCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. B.; O'Shea, S.; Dorsey, J.; Bauguitte, S.; Cain, M.; Allen, G.; Percival, C. J.; Gallagher, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    A Aerodyne Research© Mini-Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) spectrometer was installed on the UK Facility of Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft and employed during summer 2012. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations were measured within the Arctic Circle as part of the MAMM project (Methane and other greenhouse gases in the Arctic - Measurements, process studies and Modelling) as well as around the UK as part of the ClearfLo project (Clean Air for London). A range of missions were flown, including deep vertical profiles up to the stratosphere, providing concentration profiles of CH4 and N2O, as well as low altitude level runs exploring near surface diffuse emission sources such as the wetlands in Arctic Lapland and point emissions sources such as gas platforms off the UK coast. Significant pollution plumes were observed both in the Arctic and around the UK with elevated CH4 concentrations, as well as enhanced CO, O3 and aerosol levels. The NAME Lagrangian particle dispersion model will be used to investigate the origins of these CH4 plumes to identify the locations of the emissions sources. The first set of flights using QCL on the FAAM research aircraft have been successful and regular in-flight calibrations (high/low span) and target concentrations were used to determine instrument accuracy and precision. Additional data quality control checks could be made by comparison with an onboard Los Gatos Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA) for CO2 and CH4 and provide the basis for further instrument development and implementation for future Arctic MAMM flights during spring and summer 2013.

  16. High performance liquid chromatography with on-line dual quantum cascade laser detection for the determination of carbohydrates, alcohols and organic acids in wine and grape juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowski, J.; Quintás, G.; Lendl, B.

    2010-06-01

    In the present study the simultaneous use of two quantum cascade lasers (QC-lasers) was investigated for the on-line detection in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). An optical set-up based on three gold mirrors and a ZnSe beam splitter was used to direct the emitted laser light trough a liquid flow cell with an optical path length of 52 μm onto a mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) detector. Using the separation of eight components of wine and grape juice as an example, on-line dual QC-laser detection in HPLC could be shown successfully for the first time.

  17. Pulse Wavelength Scan of Room-Temperature Mid-Infrared Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Lasers for N2O Gas Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong-Gang; XU Gang-Yi; LI Ai-Zhen; LI Yao-Yao; GU Yi; LIU Sheng; WEI Lin

    2006-01-01

    @@ The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy under a pulse wavelength scan scheme is adapted to home-made room-temperature mid-infrared distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers; and identification of N2 O spectral fingerprint is demonstrated experimentally. By driving the laser at 800ns pulse duration, a wave number tuning of about 1.6 cm- 1 is produced, which make both 1289.04 cm- 1 and 1289.86 cm- 1 absorption fingerprints of N2 O gas to be definitely assigned. The measured relative absorption intensity is consistent with the HITRAN data precisely.

  18. Spectral modification of the laser emission of a terahertz quantum cascade laser induced by broad-band double pulse injection seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markmann, Sergej, E-mail: sergej.markmann@ruhr-uni-bochum.de; Nong, Hanond, E-mail: nong.hanond@ruhr-uni-bochum.de; Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan [AG Terahertz Spektroskopie und Technologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Pal, Shovon [AG Terahertz Spektroskopie und Technologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Scholz, Sven; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Dhillon, Sukhdeep; Tignon, Jérôme [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Supérieure, UMR 8551 CNRS, UPMC, Univ. Paris 6, 75005 Paris (France); Marcadet, Xavier [Alcatel-Thales III-V Lab, Route Départementale 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bock, Claudia; Kunze, Ulrich [Lehrstuhl für Werkstoffe und Nanoelektronik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-09-14

    We demonstrate by injection seeding that the spectral emission of a terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser (QCL) can be modified with broad-band THz pulses whose bandwidths are greater than the QCL bandwidth. Two broad-band THz pulses delayed in time imprint a modulation on the single THz pulse spectrum. The resulting spectrum is used to injection seed the THz QCL. By varying the time delay between the THz pulses, the amplitude distribution of the QCL longitudinal modes is modified. By applying this approach, the QCL emission is reversibly switched from multi-mode to single mode emission.

  19. The Utility of Droplet Elimination by Thermal Annealing Technique for Fabrication of GaN/AlGaN Terahertz Quantum Cascade Structure by Radio Frequency Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Wataru; Hirayama, Hideki

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the utility of a droplet elimination by thermal annealing (DETA) technique during the radio-frequency molecular beam epitaxy growth of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) structure. DETA is a method in which droplets deposited on the surface are eliminated by temporarily increasing the substrate temperature. DETA is a useful method which makes it possible not only to increase the number of periods in the QC structure, but also to improve the surface and structural properties of the QC structure. We could successfully increase the radiant intensity from a QCL sample by increasing the number of periods in the stacked QC structure with the DETA method.

  20. A widely tunable 10-$\\mu$m quantum cascade laser phase-locked to a state-of-the-art mid-infrared reference for precision molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sow, Papa Lat Tabara; Tokunaga, Sean K; Lopez, Olivier; Goncharov, Andrey; Argence, Bérengère; Chardonnet, Christian; Amy-Klein, Anne; Daussy, Christophe; Darquié, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    We report the coherent phase-locking of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 10-$\\mu$m to the secondary frequency standard of this spectral region, a CO2 laser stabilized on a saturated absorption line of OsO4. The stability and accuracy of the standard are transferred to the QCL resulting in a line width of the order of 10 Hz, and leading to our knowledge to the narrowest QCL to date. The locked QCL is then used to perform absorption spectroscopy spanning 6 GHz of NH3 and methyltrioxorhenium, two species of interest for applications in precision measurements.

  1. Characterizing a Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS for measurements of atmospheric ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ellis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A compact, fast-response Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS for measurements of ammonia has been evaluated under both laboratory and field conditions. Absorption of radiation from a pulsed, thermoelectrically cooled QC laser occurs at reduced pressure in a 0.5 L multiple pass absorption cell with an effective path length of 76 m. Detection is achieved using a thermoelectrically cooled Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe infrared detector. A novel sampling inlet was used, consisting of a short, heated, quartz tube with a hydrophobic coating to minimize the adsorption of ammonia to surfaces. The inlet contains a critical orifice that reduces the pressure, a virtual impactor for separation of particles, and additional ports for delivering ammonia-free background air and calibration gas standards. This instrument has been found to have a detection limit of 0.23 ppb at 1 Hz. The sampling technique has been compared to the results of a conventional lead salt Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer (TDLAS during a laboratory intercomparison. The effect of humidity and heat on the surface interaction of ammonia with sample tubing was investigated at mixing ratios ranging from 30–1000 ppb. Humidity was seen to worsen the ammonia time response and considerable improvement was observed when using a heated sampling line. A field intercomparison of the QC-TILDAS with a modified Thermo 42CTL chemiluminescence based analyzer was also performed at Environment Canada's Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE in the rural town of Egbert, ON between May–July 2008. Background tests and calibrations using two different permeation tube sources and an ammonia gas cylinder were regularly carried out throughout the study. Results indicate a very good correlation with 1 min time resolution (R2=0.93 between the two instruments at the beginning of the study, when regular background

  2. Characterizing a Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS for measurements of atmospheric ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ellis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A compact, fast-response Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS for measurements of ammonia (NH3 has been evaluated under both laboratory and field conditions. Absorption of radiation from a pulsed, thermoelectrically cooled QC laser occurs at reduced pressure in a 0.5 L multiple pass absorption cell with an effective path length of 76 m. Detection is achieved using a thermoelectrically-cooled Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe infrared detector. A novel sampling inlet was used, consisting of a short, heated, quartz tube with a hydrophobic coating to minimize the adsorption of NH3 to surfaces. The inlet contains a critical orifice that reduces the pressure, a virtual impactor for separation of particles, and additional ports for delivering NH3-free background air and calibration gas standards. The level of noise in this instrument has been found to be 0.23 ppb at 1 Hz. The sampling technique has been compared to the results of a conventional lead salt Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer (TDLAS during a laboratory intercomparison. The effect of humidity and heat on the surface interaction of NH3 with sample tubing was investigated at mixing ratios ranging from 30–1000 ppb. Humidity was seen to worsen the NH3 time response and considerable improvement was observed when using a heated sampling line. A field intercomparison of the QC-TILDAS with a modified Thermo 42CTL chemiluminescence-based analyzer was also performed at Environment Canada's Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE in the rural town of Egbert, ON between May–July 2008. Background tests and calibrations using two different permeation tube sources and an NH3 gas cylinder were regularly carried out throughout the study. Results indicate a very good correlation at 1 min time resolution (R2 = 0.93 between the two instruments at the

  3. Nitrous oxide net exchange in a beech dominated mixed forest in Switzerland measured with a quantum cascade laser spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Eugster

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured at the Lägeren CarboEurope IP flux site over the multi-species mixed forest dominated by European beech and Norway spruce. Measurements were carried out during a four-week period in October–November 2005 during leaf senescence. Fluxes were measured with a standard ultrasonic anemometer in combination with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer that measured N2O, CO2, and H2O mixing ratios simultaneously at 5 Hz time resolution. To distinguish insignificant fluxes from significant ones it is proposed to use a new approach based on the significance of the correlation coefficient between vertical wind speed and mixing ratio fluctuations. This procedure eliminated roughly 56% of our half-hourly fluxes. Based on the remaining, quality checked N2O fluxes we quantified the mean efflux at 0.8 ± 0.4 μmol m−2 h−1 (mean ± standard error. Most of the contribution to the N2O flux occurred during a 6.5-h period starting 4.5 h before each precipitation event. No relation with precipitation amount could be found. Visibility data representing fog density and duration at the site indicate that wetting of the canopy may have as strong an effect on N2O effluxes as does below-ground microbial activity. It is speculated that above-ground N2O production from the senescing leaves at high moisture (fog, drizzle, onset of precipitation event may be responsible for part of the measured flux. In comparison with the annual CO2 budget of –342 g C m−2 yr−1 it is estimated that concurrent N2O fluxes offset at least 5% of the greenhouse forcing reduction via net CO2 uptake.

  4. Experimental observation of pulse delay and speed-up in cascaded quantum well gain and absorber media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Poel, Mike van der; Yvind, Kresten;

    2008-01-01

    Slow-down and speed-up of 180 fs pulses in semiconductor waveguides beyond the existing models is obseved. Cascaded gain and absorbing sections is shown to provide significant temporal pulse shifting at near constant output pulse energy.......Slow-down and speed-up of 180 fs pulses in semiconductor waveguides beyond the existing models is obseved. Cascaded gain and absorbing sections is shown to provide significant temporal pulse shifting at near constant output pulse energy....

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaN/AlGaN quantum cascade structure using droplet elimination by thermal annealing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Wataru; Hirayama, Hideki [Terahertz Quantum Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 519-1399 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    We studied on the radio-frequency molecular beam epitaxial (RF-MBE) growth of GaN/AlGaN quantum cascade (QC) structure grown on a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-GaN template by employing the droplet elimination by thermal annealing (DETA) technique, in order to realize the successful fabrication of a QC structure with a large number of periods and to increase the radiant intensity from terahertz-quantum cascade lasers (THz-QCL) sample. DETA is a technique in which the metal droplets that form on the surface are evaporated and eliminated by temporarily increasing the substrate temperature, utilizing the property whereby the equilibrium vapor pressures of the metal components (Ga, Al) are larger than those of the resulting nitrides (GaN, AlN). DETA is a useful method which not only makes it possible to increase the number of periods in the QC structure, but also to improve the surface and structural properties of the QC structure. We could successfully increase the radiant intensity from a THz-QCL sample by increasing the number of periods in the stacked QC structure by using the DETA technique. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. An off Axis Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer and a Rapid Scan Spectrometer with a Room-Temperature External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xunchen; Kang, Cheolhwa; Xu, Yunjie

    2009-06-01

    Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is a new type of mid-infrared tunable diode lasers with superior output power and mode quality. Recent developments, such as room temperature operation, wide frequency tunability, and narrow line width, make QCLs an ideal light source for high resolution spectroscopy. Two slit jet infrared spectrometers, namely an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption (CEA) spectrometer and a rapid scan spectrometer with an astigmatic multi-pass cell assembly, have been coupled with a newly purchased room temperature tunable mod-hop-free QCL with a frequency coverage from 1592 cm^{-1} to 1698 cm^{-1} and a scan rate of 0.1 cm^{-1}/ms. Our aim is to utilize these two sensitive spectrometers, that are equipped with a molecular jet expansion, to investigate the chiral molecules-(water)_n clusters. To demonstrate the resolution and sensitivity achieved, the rovibrational transitions of the static N_2O gas and the bending rovibrational transitions of the Ar-water complex, a test system, at 1634 cm^{-1} have been measured. D. Hofstetter and J. Faist in High performance quantum cascade lasers and their applications, Vol.89 Springer-Verlag Berlin & Heidelberg, 2003, pp. 61-98. Y. Xu, X. Liu, Z. Su, R. M. Kulkarni, W. S. Tam, C. Kang, I. Leonov and L. D'Agostino, Proc. Spie, 2009, 722208 (1-11). M. J. Weida and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 1997, 106, 3078-3089.

  7. Active standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using hard-target backscattered light using an open-path quantum cascade laser sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-05-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentrations. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using a quantum cascade laser open-path system that retrieves path-averaged concentrations by collecting the backscattered light from a remote hard target. It is a true standoff system and differs from other open-path systems that are deployed as point samplers or long-path transmission systems that use retroreflectors. The measured absorption spectra are obtained using a thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB quantum cascade laser at ~7.7 µm wavelength range with ~200 ns pulse width. Making fast time resolved observations, the system simultaneously realizes high spectral resolution and range to the target, resulting in path-averaged concentration retrieval. The system performs measurements at high speed ~15 Hz and sufficient range (up to 45 m, ~148 feet) achieving an uncertainty of 3.1 % and normalized sensitivity of 3.3 ppm m Hz-1/2 for N2O and 9.3 % and normalized sensitivity of 30 ppm m Hz-1/2 for CH4 with a 0.31 mW average power QCL. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile or multidirectional search and remote detection of gas leaks.

  8. Laser-based additive manufacturing of metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available For making metallic products through Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes, laser-based systems play very significant roles. Laser-based processes such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) are dominating processes...

  9. Silver halide fiber-based evanescent-wave liquid droplet sensing with thermoelectrically cooled room temperature mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian Z.; Liu, Zhijun; Gmachl, Claire F.; Sivco, Deborah L.

    2005-11-01

    Quantum cascade lasers coupled directly to unclad silver halide fibers were used to assemble mid-infrared fiber-optics evanescent-wave sensors suitable to measure the chemical composition of simple liquid droplets. Quantum cascade lasers can be designed to emit across a wide range of mid-infrared wavelengths by tailoring the quantum-well structure, and the wavelength can be fine tuned by a thermoelectric cooler. Here, laser wavelengths were chosen which offer the largest absorption contrast between two constituents of a droplet. The laser was coupled to an unclad silver halide fiber, which penetrates through the droplet resting on a hydrophobic surface. For the same liquid composition and droplet size, the transmitted intensity is weaker for a droplet on a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluoro-octyltrichlorosilane coated glass slide than for one on a hexadecanethiol (HDT) coated Au-covered glass slide because of the high reflectivity of the HDT/Au surface at mid-infrared wavelengths. The absorption coefficients of water, glycerol, α-tocophenol acetate, and squalane were measured by varying the immersion length of the fiber; i.e. the droplet size. A pseudo-Beer-Lambert law fits well with the experimental data. We tested both aqueous liquid mixtures (acetone/water and ethanol/water) and oil-base solutions (n-dodecane/squalane and α-tocophenol acetate/squalane); α-tocophenol acetate and squalane are common ingredients of cosmetics, either as active ingredients or for chemical stabilization. Using a 300μm diameter silver halide fiber with a 25mm immersion length, the detection limits are 1 vol.% for α-tocophenol in squalane and 2 vol.% for acetone in water for laser wavenumbers of 1208 cm -1 and 1363 cm -1, respectively. This work was previously been reported in J. Z. Chen et al. Optics Express 13, 5953 (2005).

  10. Measurements of linestrengths, N2-, Ar-, He- and self-broadening coefficients of acetylene in the ν4+ν5 combination band using a cw quantum cascade laser

    KAUST Repository

    Sajid, Muhammad Bilal

    2014-11-01

    Linestrengths, N2-, Ar-, He- and self-broadening coefficients of acetylene have been measured at 296K in the P branch of the ν4+ν5 combination band for 25 rotational transitions. The effect of gas temperature is studied over 296-683K for five transitions to allow the determination of the temperature dependent exponent n for N2- and Ar-broadening coefficients. These measurements were performed using a continuous-wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) operating over 1253-1310cm-1. Spectroscopic parameters were obtained by fitting absorption spectra using Voigt, Galatry and Rautian profiles. Linestrength and broadening results are compared with previous studies available in literature for the ν4+ν5 combination band and other vibrational bands of acetylene. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Stable single-mode distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers at λ ∼ 4.25 μm with low power consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhiwei; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Jinchuan; Liu, Fengqi; Zhuo, Ning; Zhai, Shenqiang; Liu, Junqi; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-10-01

    Short-wavelength (4.25 μm) distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in continuous wave (cw) mode at room temperature with low power consumption was presented. Stable single-mode operation with a side-mode-suppression-ratio above 25 dB was maintained for the whole measured current and temperature range by enlarging gain difference and strong grating coupling. Because of the strong coupling, very low threshold current and power consumption were achieved. For a device of 9-μm-wide and 2-mm-long, the cw threshold current and power consumption at 293 K were as low as 126 mA and 1.45 W, respectively. All results above were from the device without using buried heterostructure geometry.

  12. Optimization of the configuration of a symmetric three-barrier resonant-tunneling structure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkach, N. V., E-mail: ktf@chnu.edu.ua; Seti, Ju. A. [Fedkovich Chernivtsy National University (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15

    On the basis of a model of rectangular potentials and different electron effective masses in wells and barriers of an open resonant-tunneling structure with identical outer barriers, a theory has been developed and the dynamic conductance caused by the interaction of the electromagnetic field with electrons passing through the structure has been calculated. Using the example of the three-barrier resonant-tunneling structure with In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As wells and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As barriers, it is shown that, independently of the geometrical sizes of potential wells and barriers, there exist three geometrical configurations (positions of the inner barrier with respect to outer ones) at which the nanosystem, as an active element, provides optimum operating conditions of the quantum cascade detector.

  13. Influence of the active region design on output characteristics of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum cascade lasers in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, J.; Mircetic, A.; Milanovic, V.; Ikonic, Z.; Indjin, D.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2006-03-01

    We describe the application of our computational model, developed for finding the optical gain in a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser subjected to a strong magnetic field, to two distinct λ ~ 9 µm GaAs-based structures. The additional carrier confinement induced by the field alters the transition rates for the optical- and acoustic-phonon scattering processes from the upper laser level, thus affecting the laser output properties, in particular the optical gain. Within this model, the gain is found by solving the system of rate equations, from which the carrier densities in each level are calculated. Numerical results are presented for magnetic fields between 10 and 60 T, and the band nonparabolicity is taken into account.

  14. Broad area quantum cascade lasers operating in pulsed mode above 100 °C λ ∼4.7 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Yan, Fangliang; Zhang, Jinchuan; Liu, Fengqi; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Junqi; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Zhanguo

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a broad area (400 μm) high power quantum cascade laser (QCL). A total peak power of 62 W operating at room temperature is achieved at λ ∼4.7 μm. The temperature dependence of the peak power characteristic is given in the experiment, and also the temperature of the active zone is simulated by a finite-element-method (FEM). We find that the interface roughness of the active core has a great effect on the temperature of the active zone and can be enormously improved using the solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2013CB632801), the National Key Research and Development Program (No. 2016YFB0402303), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61435014, 61627822, 61574136, 61306058, 61404131), the Key Projects of Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. ZDRW-XH-20164), and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (No. 4162060).

  15. Pitchfork Bifurcation and Zharov Splitting in Nonlinear Mid-infrared Photothermal Spectroscopy in a liquid crystal using a Quantum Cascade Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Mertiri, Alket; Hong, M K; Mehta, P; Mertz, J; Ziegler, L D; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2013-01-01

    We report on the mid-infrared nonlinear photothermal spectrum of the neat liquid crystal 4-Octyl-4'-Cyanobiphenyl (8CB) using a tunable Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL). The nonequilibrium steady state characterized by the nonlinear photothermal infrared response undergoes a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. The bifurcation, observed in heterodyne two-color pump-probe detection, leads to ultrasharp nonlinear infrared spectra similar to those reported in the visible region. A systematic study of the peak splitting as function of absorbed infrared power shows the bifurcation has a critical exponent of 0.5. The surprising observation of an apparently universal critical exponent in a nonequilibrium state is explained using a simple model reminiscent of mean field theory. Apart from the intrinsic interest for nonequilibrium studies, nonlinear photothermal methods lead to a dramatic narrowing of spectral lines, giving rise to a potential new contrast mechanism for the rapidly emerging new field of mid-infrared micros...

  16. Active stand-off detection of gas leaks using an open-path quantum cascade laser sensor in a backscatter configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2005-05-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS). The system retrieves the path-averaged concentration of N2O by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms) and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet) with a detection limit of 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks.

  17. High power, widely tunable, mode-hop free, continuous wave external cavity quantum cascade laser for multi-species trace gas detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centeno, R.; Marchenko, D.; Mandon, J.; Cristescu, S. M.; Harren, F. J. M., E-mail: F.Harren@science.ru.nl [Life Science Trace Gas Facility, Molecular and Laser Physics, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Wulterkens, G. [TechnoCentrum, Radboud University, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-12-29

    We present a high power, widely tunable, continuous wave external cavity quantum cascade laser designed for infrared vibrational spectroscopy of molecules exhibiting broadband and single line absorption features. The laser source exhibits single mode operation with a tunability up to 303 cm{sup −1} (∼24% of the center wavelength) at 8 μm, with a maximum optical output power of 200 mW. In combination with off-axis integrated output spectroscopy, trace-gas detection of broadband absorption gases such as acetone was performed and a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 3.7 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1 }Hz{sup −1/2} was obtained.

  18. Label-free and ratiometric detection of nuclei acids based on graphene quantum dots utilizing cascade amplification by nicking endonuclease and catalytic G-quadruplex DNAzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-Li; Fang, Xin; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Hu, Xue-Lian; Li, Zai-Jun

    2016-07-15

    Herein, we report a ratiometric fluorescence assay based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) for the ultrasensitive DNA detection by coupling the nicking endonuclease assisted target recycling and the G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme biocatalysis for cascade signal amplifications. With o-phenylenediamine acted as the substrate of G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme, whose oxidization product (that is, 2,3-diaminophenazine, DAP) quenched the fluorescence intensity of GQDs (at 460nm) obviously, accompanied with the emergence of a new emission of DAP (at 564nm). The ratiometric signal variations at the emission wavelengths of 564 and 460nm (I564/I460) were utilized for label-free, sensitive, and selective detection of target DNA. Utilizing the nicking endonuclease assisted target recycling and the G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme biocatalysis for amplified cascade generation of DAP, the proposed bioassay exhibited high sensitivity toward target DNA with a detection limit of 30fM. The method also had additional advantages such as facile preparation and easy operation.

  19. Cascaded-systems analyses and the detective quantum efficiency of single-Z x-ray detectors including photoelectric, coherent and incoherent interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Seungman [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Tanguay, Jesse; Cunningham, Ian A. [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Kim, Ho Kyung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Theoretical models of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of x-ray detectors are an important step in new detector development by providing an understanding of performance limitations and benchmarks. Previous cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) models accounted for photoelectric interactions only. This paper describes an extension of the CSA approach to incorporate coherent and incoherent interactions, important for low-Z detectors such as silicon and selenium. Methods: A parallel-cascade approach is used to describe the three types of x-ray interactions. The description of incoherent scatter required developing expressions for signal and noise transfer through an 'energy-labeled reabsorption' process where the parameters describing reabsorption are random functions of the scatter photon energy. The description of coherent scatter requires the use of scatter form factors that may not be accurate for some crystalline detector materials. The model includes the effects of scatter reabsorption and escape, charge collection, secondary quantum sinks, noise aliasing, and additive noise. Model results are validated by Monte Carlo calculations for Si and Se detectors assuming free-atom atomic form factors. Results: The new signal and noise transfer expressions were validated by showing agreement with Monte Carlo results. Coherent and incoherent scatter can degrade the DQE of Si and sometimes Se detectors depending on detector thickness and incident-photon energy. Incoherent scatter can produce a substantial low-frequency drop in the modulation transfer function and DQE. Conclusions: A generally useful CSA model of the DQE is described that is believed valid for any single-Z material up to 10 cycles/mm at both mammographic and radiographic energies within the limitations of Fourier-based linear-systems models and the use of coherent-scatter form factors. The model describes a substantial low-frequency drop in the DQE of Si systems due to incoherent scatter

  20. Cascaded-systems analyses and the detective quantum efficiency of single-Z x-ray detectors including photoelectric, coherent and incoherent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seungman; Tanguay, Jesse; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A

    2013-04-01

    Theoretical models of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of x-ray detectors are an important step in new detector development by providing an understanding of performance limitations and benchmarks. Previous cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) models accounted for photoelectric interactions only. This paper describes an extension of the CSA approach to incorporate coherent and incoherent interactions, important for low-Z detectors such as silicon and selenium. A parallel-cascade approach is used to describe the three types of x-ray interactions. The description of incoherent scatter required developing expressions for signal and noise transfer through an "energy-labeled reabsorption" process where the parameters describing reabsorption are random functions of the scatter photon energy. The description of coherent scatter requires the use of scatter form factors that may not be accurate for some crystalline detector materials. The model includes the effects of scatter reabsorption and escape, charge collection, secondary quantum sinks, noise aliasing, and additive noise. Model results are validated by Monte Carlo calculations for Si and Se detectors assuming free-atom atomic form factors. The new signal and noise transfer expressions were validated by showing agreement with Monte Carlo results. Coherent and incoherent scatter can degrade the DQE of Si and sometimes Se detectors depending on detector thickness and incident-photon energy. Incoherent scatter can produce a substantial low-frequency drop in the modulation transfer function and DQE. A generally useful CSA model of the DQE is described that is believed valid for any single-Z material up to 10 cycles/mm at both mammographic and radiographic energies within the limitations of Fourier-based linear-systems models and the use of coherent-scatter form factors. The model describes a substantial low-frequency drop in the DQE of Si systems due to incoherent scatter above 20-40 keV.

  1. Critical Mandelbrot Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Julien; Kupiainen, Antti; Nikula, Miika; Saksman, Eero; Webb, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We study Mandelbrot's multiplicative cascade measures at the critical temperature. As has been recently shown by Barral et al. (C R Acad Sci Paris Ser I 350:535-538, 2012), an appropriately normalized sequence of cascade measures converges weakly in probability to a nontrivial limit measure. We prove that these limit measures have no atoms and give bounds for the modulus of continuity of the cumulative distribution function of the measure. Using the earlier work of Barral and Seuret (Adv Math 214:437-468, 2007), we compute the multifractal spectrum of the measures. We also extend the result of Benjamini and Schramm (Commun Math Phys 289:653-662, 2009), in which the KPZ formula from quantum gravity is validated for the high temperature cascade measures, to the critical and low temperature cases.

  2. Watt-Level Continuous-Wave Emission from a Bi-Functional Quantum Cascade Laser/Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-18

    materials, which makes their integration on Si particularly dicult. Heterogeneous integration using transfer techniques allows both single device and wafer...mixing process and low dispersion in this device. At higher currents the spectrum widens to about 80 cm−1. The spectra at the bias of highest WPE is...Elliott, S. N.; Sobiesierski, A.; Seeds , A. J.; Ross, I.; Smowton, P. M.; Liu, H. Electrically pumped continuous-wave IIIV quantum dot lasers on silicon

  3. Robust, frequency-stable and accurate mid-IR laser spectrometer based on frequency comb metrology of quantum cascade lasers up-converted in orientation-patterned GaAs

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Michael G; Vasilyev, Sergey V; Grisard, Arnaud; Lallier, Eric; Gérard, Bruno; Schiller, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a robust and simple method for measurement, stabilization and tuning of the frequency of cw mid-infrared (MIR) lasers, in particular of quantum cascade lasers. The proof of principle is performed with a quantum cascade laser at 5.4 \\mu m, which is upconverted to 1.2 \\mu m by sum-frequency generation in orientation-patterned GaAs with the output of a standard high-power cw 1.5 \\mu m fiber laser. Both the 1.2 \\mu m and the 1.5 \\mu m waves are measured by a standard Er:fiber frequency comb. Frequency measurement at the 100 kHz-level, stabilization to sub-10 kHz level, controlled frequency tuning and long-term stability are demonstrated.

  4. Time-resolved spectral characterization of ring cavity surface emitting and ridge-type distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers by step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Markus; Genner, Andreas; Schwarzer, Clemens; Mujagic, Elvis; Strasser, Gottfried; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-02-10

    We present the time-resolved comparison of pulsed 2nd order ring cavity surface emitting (RCSE) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) and pulsed 1st order ridge-type distributed feedback (DFB) QCLs using a step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Laser devices were part of QCL arrays and fabricated from the same laser material. Required grating periods were adjusted to account for the grating order. The step-scan technique provided a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm(-1) and a time resolution of 2 ns. As a result, it was possible to gain information about the tuning behavior and potential mode-hops of the investigated lasers. Different cavity-lengths were compared, including 0.9 mm and 3.2 mm long ridge-type and 0.97 mm (circumference) ring-type cavities. RCSE QCLs were found to have improved emission properties in terms of line-stability, tuning rate and maximum emission time compared to ridge-type lasers.

  5. Selective ablation of WHHLMI rabbit atherosclerotic plaque by quantum cascade laser in the 5.7 μm wavelength range for less-invasive laser angioplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimura, Keisuke; Ishii, Katsunori; Akikusa, Naota; Edamura, Tadataka; Yoshida, Harumasa; Awazu, Kunio

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the potential of a compact and high-power quantum cascade laser (QCL) in the 5.7 μm wavelength range for less-invasive laser angioplasty. Atherosclerotic plaques consist mainly of cholesteryl esters. Radiation at a wavelength of 5.75 μm is strongly absorbed in C=O stretching vibration mode of cholesteryl esters. Our previous study achieved to make cutting differences between a normal artery and an atherosclerotic lesions using nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation (DFG laser) at the wavelength of 5.75 μm. For applying this technique to clinical treatment, a compact laser device is required. In this study, QCL irradiation effects to a porcine normal aorta were compared with DFG laser. Subsequently, QCL irradiation effects on an atherosclerotic aorta of myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit (WHHLMI rabbit) and a normal rabbit aorta were observed. As a result, the QCL could make cutting differences between the rabbit atherosclerotic and normal aortas. On the other hand, the QCL induced more thermal damage to porcine normal aorta than the DFG laser at the irradiation condition of comparable ablation depths. In conclusion, the possibility of less-invasive and selective treatment of atherosclerotic plaques using the QCL in the 5.7 μm wavelength range was revealed, although improvement of QCL was required to prevent the thermal damage of a normal artery.

  6. High resolution quantum cascade laser spectroscopy of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, between 1273 cm-1 and 1290 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Pin; Merer, Anthony J.; Chang, Hsun-Hui; Jhang, Li-Ji; Chao, Wen; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2017-06-01

    The region 1273-1290 cm-1 of the ν4 fundamental of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, has been measured using a quantum cascade laser transient absorption spectrometer, which offers greater sensitivity and spectral resolution (works based on thermal light sources. Gas phase CH2OO was generated from the reaction of CH2I + O2 at 298 K and 4 Torr. The analysis of the absorption spectrum has provided precise values for the vibrational frequency and the rotational constants, with fitting errors of a few MHz. The determined ratios of the rotational constants, A'/A″ = 0.9986, B'/B″ = 0.9974, and C'/C″ = 1.0010, and the relative intensities of the a- and b-type transitions, 90:10, are in good agreement with literature values from a theoretical calculation using the MULTIMODE approach, based on a high-level ab initio potential energy surface. The low-K (=Ka) lines can be fitted extremely well, but rotational perturbations by other vibrational modes disrupt the structure for K = 4 and K ≥ 6. Not only the spectral resolution but also the detection sensitivity of CH2OO IR transitions has been greatly improved in this work, allowing for unambiguous monitoring of CH2OO in kinetic studies at low concentrations.

  7. CO concentration and temperature sensor for combustion gases using quantum-cascade laser absorption near 4.7 μm

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Wei

    2012-05-25

    A sensor for sensitive in situ measurements of carbon monoxide and temperature in combustion gases has been developed using absorption transitions in the (v′ = 1 ← v″ = 0) and (v′ = 2 ← v″ = 1) fundamental bands of CO. Recent availability of mid-infrared quantum-cascade (QC) lasers provides convenient access to the CO fundamental band near 4.7 μm, having approximately 104 and 102 times stronger absorption line-strengths compared to the overtone bands near 1.55 μm and 2.3 μm used previously to sense CO in combustion gases. Spectroscopic parameters of the selected transitions were determined via laboratory measurements in a shock tube over the 1100-2000 K range and also at room temperature. A single-laser absorption sensor was developed for accurate CO measurements in shock-heated gases by scanning the line pair v″ = 0, R(12) and v″ = 1, R(21) at 2.5 kHz. To capture the rapidly varying CO time-histories in chemical reactions, two different QC lasers were then used to probe the line-center absorbance of transitions v″ = 0, P(20) and v″ = 1, R(21) with a bandwidth of 1 MHz using fixed-wavelength direct absorption. The sensor was applied in successful shock tube measurements of temperature and CO time-histories during the pyrolysis and oxidation of methyl formate, illustrating the capability of this sensor for chemical kinetic studies. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Broadband superluminescence, 5.9 μm to 7.2 μm, of a quantum cascade gain device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedi, Sabine; Cappelli, Francesco; Blaser, Stéphane; Baroni, Pierre-Yves; Müller, Antoine; Faist, Jérôme

    2015-03-23

    The broadband electroluminescence of a quantum cascade device based on a multi-color active region covering the wavelengths 5.9 μm - 7.2 μm was measured. Anti-reflection coatings were applied on both cleaved facets to remove the Fabry-Pérot cavity and prevent the device from lasing. This allows the latter to be studied either as a superluminescent diode or a single-pass amplifier in order to determine its suitability as a source for low speckle imaging applications. At 243 K, the amplified spontaneous emission has a peak power of 38 μW that agrees well with a simple model of spontaneous emission intensity. The light of a similar structure could be modulated up to 1 GHz, limited by the RC constant of the device. The peak gain was measured from high-resolution luminescence spectra and determined to be 6.3 cm⁻¹, corresponding to a single-pass gain of 1.89.

  9. Active Stand-off Detection of Gas Leaks Using a Short Range Hard-target Backscatter Differential Optical Absorption System Based on a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS). The system retrieves the pathaveraged concentration of N2O and CH4 by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms) and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet) with a detection limit of 2.6 ppm CH4 and 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks. The instrument is monostatic with a tunable QCL emitting at ~ 7.7 μm wavelength range. The backscattered radiation is collected by a Newtonian telescope and focused on an infrared light detector. Puffs of N2O and CH4 are released along the optical path to simulate a gas leak. The measured absorption spectrum is obtained using the thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB QCL and is analyzed to obtain path averaged gas concentrations.

  10. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Pitt

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements large Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We present details of the mid-IR Aerodyne Research Inc. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS employed, including its configuration for airborne sampling, and evaluate its performance over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. A new in-flight calibration procedure to account for the observed sensitivity of the instrument to ambient pressure changes is described, and its impact on instrument performance is assessed. Test flight data linking this sensitivity to changes in cabin pressure is presented. Total 1σ uncertainties of 1.81 ppb for CH4 and 0.35 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Los Gatos Research Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA. Finally, a potential case study for the estimation of a regional N2O flux using a mass balance technique is identified, and the method for calculating such an estimate is outlined.

  11. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Joseph; Le Breton, Michael; Allen, Grant; Percival, Carl; Gallagher, Martin; Bauguitte, Stephane; O'Shea, Sebastian; Muller, Jennifer; Zahniser, Mark; Pyle, John; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We evaluate the performance of the mid-IR continuous wave Aerodyne Research Inc. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS) employed over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. Test flight data demonstrating the sensitivity of the instrument to changes in cabin pressure is presented, and a new in-flight calibration procedure to account for this issue is described and assessed. Total 1σ uncertainties of 1.81 ppb for CH4 and 0.35 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Los Gatos Research Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA).

  12. Development of Miniaturized Difference Frequency Generation, Fiber Optic, and Quantum Cascade Laser Systems in Conjunction With Integrated Electronics for Global Studies of Atmospheric Tracers Using UAVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witinski, M. F.; Lapson, L. B.; Anderson, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    In order to harness the power of UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) for in situ atmospheric monitoring of tracers such as CO2, N2O, CH4, and H2O, we have developed small, lightweight, single mode laser systems with co- developed integrated electronics. The laser sources are of various types including newly developed cavity- enhanced difference frequency generation (CE DFG), distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB QCLs), and new types of commercially available DFB diode lasers. All are continuous wave (cw) and thermo-electrically cooled, ensuring a high instrument duty cycle in a compact, low maintenance package. The light sources are collimated with miniature aspherical lenses and coupled into a home-built astigmatic Herriott cell for detection of the various targets using direct absorption. In parallel with the optical components, we have developed integrated electrical systems for laser control, data processing, and acquisition. A prototype instrument suite is described that illustrates the importance of parallel development of optical and electrical components in achieving an apparatus that is compact, fully automated, and highly capable scientifically. Although the emphasis here is on atmospheric tracers, this technology could be applied to spectroscopic measurements of other atmospheric species such as isotopes, free radicals, and reactive intermediates.

  13. Wavefront measurement of single-mode quantum cascade laser beam for seed application in laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Ohta, Takeshi; Suganuma, Takashi; Yokotsuka, Toshio; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2012-12-01

    Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is a very attractive seed source for a multikilowatt pulsed CO2 lasers applied for driving extreme ultraviolet emitting plasmas. In this Letter, we investigate output beam properties of a QCL designed to address P18 and P20 lines of 10.6 micron band of CO2 molecule. In particular, output beam quality and stability are investigated for the first time. A well-defined linear polarization and a single-mode operation enabled a use of phase retrieval method for full description of QCL output beam. A direct, multi-image numerical phase retrieval technique was developed and successfully applied to the measured intensity patterns of a QCL beam. Very good agreement between the measured and reconstructed beam profiles was observed at distances ranging from QCL aperture to infinity, proving a good understanding of the beam propagation. The results also confirm a high spatial coherence and high stability of the beam parameters, the features expected from an excellent seed source.

  14. Design and Implementation of a Laser-Based Ammonia Breath Sensor for Medical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Owen, Kyle

    2012-06-01

    Laser-based sensors can be used as non-invasive monitoring tools to measure parts per billion (ppb) levels of trace gases. Ammonia sensors are useful for applications in environmental pollutant monitoring, atmospheric and combustion kinetic studies, and medical diagnostics. This sensor was specifically designed to measure ammonia in exhaled breath to be used as a medical diagnostic and monitoring tool, however, it can also be extended for use in other applications. Although ammonia is a naturally occurring species in exhaled breath, abnormally elevated levels can be an indication of adverse medical conditions. Laser-based breath diagnostics have many benefits since they are cost effective, non-invasive, painless, real time monitors. They have the potential to improve the quality of medical care by replacing currently used blood tests and providing immediate feedback to physicians. This sensor utilizes a Quantum Cascade Laser and Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with second harmonic normalized by first harmonic detection in a 76 m multi-pass absorption cell to measure ppb levels of ammonia with improved sensitivity over previous sensors. Initial measurements to determine the ammonia absorption line parameters were performed using direct absorption spectroscopy. This is the first experimental study of the ammonia absorption line transitions near 1103.46 cm1 with absorption spectroscopy. The linestrengths were measured with uncertainties less than 10%. The collisional broadening coefficients for each of the ammonia lines with nitrogen, oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide were also measured, many of which had uncertainties less than 5%. The sensor was characterized to show a detectability limit of 10 ppb with an uncertainty of less than 5% at typical breath ammonia levels. Initial breath test results showed that some of the patients with chronic kidney disease had elevated ammonia levels while others had ammonia levels in the same range as expected for healthy

  15. Pump and Probe Spectroscopy of CH_3F-({ortho}-H_2){n} Clusters in Solid Parahydrogen by Using Two Cw-Ir Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Asao; Kanamori, Hideto

    2016-06-01

    The absorption spectrum of the ν3 (C-F stretching) mode of CH_3F in solid {para}-H_2 by FTIR showed a series of equal interval peaks Their interpretation was that the {n}-th peak of this series was due to CH_3F-({ortho}-H_2){n} clusters which were formed CH_3F and {n}'s {ortho}-H_2 in first nearest neighbor sites of the {para}-H_2 crystal with {hcp} structure. In order to understand this system in more detail, we have studied these peaks, especially {n} = 0 - 3 corresponding to 1037 - 1041 wn, by using high-resolution and high-sensitive infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. Before now, we have observed photochromic phenomena of these peaks by taking an advantage of the high brightness of the laser. However, it has not been revealed what kind of mechanism is undergoing in these processes. In order to solve this problem we introduced two cw-IR QCLs for pump and prove experiment. While the pumping laser is breaching a certain peak with high power, the probing laser is monitoring the increase of other peaks by rapid scan method. The time resolution of this spectroscopy is 5 msec. The new precise kinetic information will help us to understand the molecular interaction in solid {para}-H_2. K. Yoshioka and D. T. Anderson, J. Chem. Phys. 119 (2003) 4731-4742 A. R. W. McKellar, A. Mizoguchi, and H. Kanamori, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13 (2011) 11587-11589

  16. Relationship between carrier dynamics and temperature in terahertz quantum cascade structures: simulation of GaAs/AlGaAs, SiGe/Si and GaN/AlGaN devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indjin, D.; Ikonic, Z.; Jovanovic, V. D.; Vukmirovic, N.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2005-07-01

    Analysis of carrier transport in cascaded GaAs/AlGaAs, p-Si/SiGe and GaN/AlGaN terahertz structures is performed using self-consistent rate equations with kinetic energy-balance simulations. The electron transport in n-type structures is simulated using standard envelope function and nonparabolic effective mass approximations with all relevant electron-electron and electron-optical phonon scattering. In the case of GaAs-based structures the model is extended to include ionized impurity and interface roughness scattering as well. The hole subband structure in the p-type device is calculated using the 6 × 6 k sdot p model, and then used to find carrier relaxation rates due to the alloy disorder, acoustic and optical phonon scattering, as well as hole-hole scattering. The simulation accounts for the in-plane k-space anisotropy of both the hole subband structure and the scattering rates. Results are presented for the original GaAs/AlGaAs THz quantum cascade laser and prototypes of GaN/AlGaN and Si/SiGe THz quantum cascade structures.

  17. Single-mode interband cascade laser sources for mid-infrared spectroscopic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, J.; von Edlinger, M.; Weih, R.; Becker, S.; Nähle, L.; Fischer, M.; Koeth, J.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2016-05-01

    Compared to the near infrared, many technologically and industrially relevant gas species have more than an order of magnitude higher absorption features in the mid-infrared (MIR) wavelength range. These species include for example important hydrocarbons (methane, acetylene), nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. Tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) has proven to be a versatile tool for gas sensing applications with significant advantages compared to other techniques. These advantages include real time measurement, standoff detection and ruggedness of the sensor. We present interband cascade lasers (ICLs), which have evolved into important laser sources for the MIR spectral range from 3 to 7 μm. ICLs achieve high efficiency by cascading optically active zones whilst using interband transitions, so they combine common diode laser as well as quantum cascade laser based technologies. Our application grade singlemode distributed feedback devices operate continuous wave at room temperature and are offering several features especially useful for high performance TLAS applications like: side mode suppression ratio of > 30 dB, continuous tuning ranges up to 30 nm, low threshold power densities and low overall power consumption. The devices are typically integrated in a thermoelectrically cooled TO-style package, hermetically sealed using a cap with anti-reflection coated window. This low power consumption as well as the compact size and ruggedness of the fabricated laser sources makes them perfectly suited for battery powered portable solutions for in field spectroscopy applications.

  18. Learning Cascading

    CERN Document Server

    Covert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for software developers, system architects and analysts, big data project managers, and data scientists who wish to deploy big data solutions using the Cascading framework. You must have a basic understanding of the big data paradigm and should be familiar with Java development techniques.

  19. Laser-based displays: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappan, Kishore V; Erden, Erdem; Urey, Hakan

    2010-09-01

    After the invention of lasers, in the past 50 years progress made in laser-based display technology has been very promising, with commercial products awaiting release to the mass market. Compact laser systems, such as edge-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and optically pumped semiconductor lasers, are suitable candidates for laser-based displays. Laser speckle is an important concern, as it degrades image quality. Typically, one or multiple speckle reduction techniques are employed in laser displays to reduce speckle contrast. Likewise, laser safety issues need to be carefully evaluated in designing laser displays under different usage scenarios. Laser beam shaping using refractive and diffractive components is an integral part of laser displays, and the requirements depend on the source specifications, modulation technique, and the scanning method being employed in the display. A variety of laser-based displays have been reported, and many products such as pico projectors and laser televisions are commercially available already.

  20. Comparative study of SiOsub>2sub>, Sisub>3sub>Nsub>4sub> and TiOsub>2sub> thin films as passivation layers for quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Simon; Peinado, Alba; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Trinité, Virginie; Carras, Mathieu; Ferreira, Robson

    2016-10-17

    The aim of this article is to determine the best dielectric between SiOsub>2sub>, Sisub>3sub>Nsub>4sub> and TiOsub>2sub> for quantum cascade laser (QCL) passivation layers depending on the operation wavelength. It relies on both Mueller ellipsometry measurement to accurately determine the optical constants (the refractive index n and the extinction coefficient k) of the three dielectrics, and optical simulations to determine the mode overlap with the dielectric and furthermore the modal losses in the passivation layer. The impact of dielectric thermal conductivities are taken into account and shown to be not critical on the laser performances.

  1. Modelling, Design, Growth and Characterization of Strain Balanced Quantum Cascade Lasers (3-11mum), grown by Gas Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Neelanjan

    Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) is a compact room temperature (RT) source of mid-infrared radiation, which can be used for spectroscopic detection of trace amount of chemicals. The mid-infrared spectral range between (3-11 microm), has a dense array of absorption lines of numerous molecules, due to the presence of fundamental vibrational modes. The goal of this thesis can be subdivided into two parts. Firstly, short wavelength QCLs, emitting below 4microm, perform poorly at RT, due to inter-valley Gamma --- L carrier scattering, carrier escape to the continuum, heat removal from the core region at high power density corresponding to short wavelength operation, and large interface scattering due to highly strained materials. Secondly, it is desirable to have a single QCL based source emitting between 6-10microm, which be used to detect multiple molecules having their peak absorptions far apart, inside this spectral range. However, gain bandwidth of a single core QCL is relatively small, so laser emission cannot be tuned over a wide spectral range. This thesis describes the working principle of a QCL based on superlattice transport, rate equations, scattering mechanism, and waveguide design. The choice of the material system for this work and the fundamentals of band structure engineering has been derived. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy - growth optimization and characterization is one of the most important features of this work, especially for short wavelength QCLs, and has been explained in depth. Different strategies for design of active region design of short wavelength QCL and heterogeneous broadband QCL has been explored. The major milestones, of this research was the world's first watt level continuous wave (CW), RT demonstration at 3.76 microm, which was followed by another milestone of the first CW, RT demonstration at 3.39microm and 3.55microm, and finally the elusive result of QCL emitting at CW, RT at a wavelength as short as lambda ~3microm, a record. In

  2. Continuous and high-precision atmospheric concentration measurements of COS, CO2, CO and H2O using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer (QCLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijmans, Linda M. J.; Uitslag, Nelly A. M.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; Montzka, Stephen A.; Chen, Huilin

    2016-11-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has been suggested as a useful tracer for gross primary production as it is taken up by plants in a similar way as CO2. To explore and verify the application of this novel tracer, it is highly desired to develop the ability to perform continuous and high-precision in situ atmospheric measurements of COS and CO2. In this study we have tested a quantum cascade laser spectrometer (QCLS) for its suitability to obtain accurate and high-precision measurements of COS and CO2. The instrument is capable of simultaneously measuring COS, CO2, CO and H2O after including a weak CO absorption line in the extended wavelength range. An optimal background and calibration strategy was developed based on laboratory tests to ensure accurate field measurements. We have derived water vapor correction factors based on a set of laboratory experiments and found that for COS the interference associated with a water absorption line can dominate over the effect of dilution. This interference can be solved mathematically by fitting the COS spectral line separately from the H2O spectral line. Furthermore, we improved the temperature stability of the QCLS by isolating it in an enclosed box and actively cooling its electronics with the same thermoelectric chiller used to cool the laser. The QCLS was deployed at the Lutjewad atmospheric monitoring station (60 m; 6°21' E, 53°24' N; 1 m a.s.l.) in the Netherlands from July 2014 to April 2015. The QCLS measurements of independent working standards while deployed in the field showed a mean difference with the assigned cylinder value within 3.3 ppt COS, 0.05 ppm for CO2 and 1.7 ppb for CO over a period of 35 days. The different contributions to uncertainty in measurements of COS, CO2 and CO were summarized and the overall uncertainty was determined to be 7.5 ppt for COS, 0.23 ppm for CO2 and 3.3 ppb for CO for 1-minute data. A comparison of in situ QCLS measurements with those from concurrently filled flasks that were

  3. Cascading Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Nishant; Khoury, Justin; Trodden, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We develop a fully covariant, well-posed 5D effective action for the 6D cascading gravity brane-world model, and use this to study cosmological solutions. We obtain this effective action through the 6D decoupling limit, in which an additional scalar degree mode, \\pi, called the brane-bending mode, determines the bulk-brane gravitational interaction. The 5D action obtained this way inherits from the sixth dimension an extra \\pi self-interaction kinetic term. We compute appropriate boundary terms, to supplement the 5D action, and hence derive fully covariant junction conditions and the 5D Einstein field equations. Using these, we derive the cosmological evolution induced on a 3-brane moving in a static bulk. We study the strong- and weak-coupling regimes analytically in this static ansatz, and perform a complete numerical analysis of our solution. Although the cascading model can generate an accelerating solution in which the \\pi field comes to dominate at late times, the presence of a critical singularity prev...

  4. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  5. Synchronously pumped picosecond all-fibre Raman laser based on phosphorus-doped silica fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtsev, Sergey; Kukarin, Sergey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey

    2015-07-13

    Reported for the first time is picosecond-range pulse generation in an all-fibre Raman laser based on P₂O₅-doped silica fibre. Employment of phosphor-silicate fibre made possible single-cascade spectral transformation of pumping pulses at 1084 nm into 270-ps long Raman laser pulses at 1270 nm. The highest observed fraction of the Stokes component radiation at 1270 nm in the total output of the Raman laser amounted to 30%. The identified optimal duration of the input pulses at which the amount of Stokes component radiation in a ~16-m long phosphorus-based Raman fibre converter reaches its maximum was 140-180 ps.

  6. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  7. Constraining atmospheric ammonia emissions through new observations with an open-path, laser-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kang

    As the third most abundant nitrogen species in the atmosphere, ammonia (NH3) is a key component of the global nitrogen cycle. Since the industrial revolution, humans have more than doubled the emissions of NH3 to the atmosphere by industrial nitrogen fixation, revolutionizing agricultural practices, and burning fossil fuels. NH3 is a major precursor to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which has adverse impacts on air quality and human health. The direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcings currently constitute the largest uncertainties for future climate change predictions. Gas and particle phase NH3 eventually deposits back to the Earth's surface as reactive nitrogen, leading to the exceedance of ecosystem critical loads and perturbation of ecosystem productivity. Large uncertainties still remain in estimating the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of NH3 emissions from all sources and over a range of scales. These uncertainties in emissions also propagate to the deposition of reactive nitrogen. To improve our understanding of NH3 emissions, observational constraints are needed from local to global scales. The first part of this thesis is to provide quality-controlled, reliable NH3 measurements in the field using an open-path, quantum cascade laser-based NH3 sensor. As the second and third part of my research, NH3 emissions were quantified from a cattle feedlot using eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements, and the similarities between NH3 turbulent fluxes and those of other scalars (temperature, water vapor, and CO2) were investigated. The fourth part involves applying a mobile laboratory equipped with the open-path NH3 sensor and other important chemical/meteorological measurements to quantify fleet-integrated NH3 emissions from on-road vehicles. In the fifth part, the on-road measurements were extended to multiple major urban areas in both the US and China in the context of five observation campaigns. The results significantly improved current urban NH3

  8. How High Local Charge Carrier Mobility and an Energy Cascade in a Three-Phase Bulk Heterojunction Enable >90% Quantum Efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Burke, Timothy M.

    2013-12-27

    Charge generation in champion organic solar cells is highly efficient in spite of low bulk charge-carrier mobilities and short geminate-pair lifetimes. In this work, kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are used to understand efficient charge generation in terms of experimentally measured high local charge-carrier mobilities and energy cascades due to molecular mixing. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ``document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.`` This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2`s commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2`s organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2`s strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed.

  10. Time-resolved in situ detection of CO in a shock tube using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a quantum-cascade laser near 4.6 µm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Shengkai; Sur, Ritobrata; Chao, Xing; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-10-06

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using a mid-infrared DFB quantum-cascade laser is reported for sensitive time-resolved (10 μs) in situ CO measurements in a shock tube. Off-axis alignment and fast scanning of the laser wavelength were used to minimize coupling noise in a low-finesse cavity. An absorption gain factor of 91 was demonstrated, which enabled sub-ppm detection sensitivity for gas temperatures of 1000-2100K in a 15 cm diameter shock tube. This substantial improvement in detection sensitivity compared to conventional single-pass absorption measurements, shows great potential for the study of reaction pathways of high-temperature combustion kinetics mechanisms in shock tubes.

  11. Nanoscale Lasers Based on Carbon Peapods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shao-Long; SHEN Jian-Qi

    2006-01-01

    A scheme of nanoscale lasers based on the so-called carbon peapods is examined in detail.Since there is considerable cylindrical empty space in the middle of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT),it can serve as a laser resonant cavity that consists of two highly reflecting alignment "mirrors" separated by a distance.These mirrors refer to ordered arrays of C60 inside SWCNTs,which have photonic bandgap structures.Meanwhile,ideally single-mode lasers are supposed to be produced in the nanoscale resonant cavity.

  12. Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui Q. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Santos, Michael B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Johnson, Matthew B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-24

    In this project, we are performing basic and applied research to systematically investigate our newly proposed interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) cells [1]. These cells follow from the great success of infrared IC lasers [2-3] that pioneered the use of quantum-engineered IC structures. This quantum-engineered approach will enable PV cells to efficiently convert infrared radiation from the sun or other heat source, to electricity. Such cells will have important applications for more efficient use of solar energy, waste-heat recovery, and power beaming in combination with mid-infrared lasers. The objectives of our investigations are to: achieve extensive understanding of the fundamental aspects of the proposed PV structures, develop the necessary knowledge for making such IC PV cells, and demonstrate prototype working PV cells. This research will focus on IC PV structures and their segments for utilizing infrared radiation with wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, a range well suited for emission by heat sources (1,000-2,000 K) that are widely available from combustion systems. The long-term goal of this project is to push PV technology to longer wavelengths, allowing for relatively low-temperature thermal sources. Our investigations address material quality, electrical and optical properties, and their interplay for the different regions of an IC PV structure. The tasks involve: design, modeling and optimization of IC PV structures, molecular beam epitaxial growth of PV structures and relevant segments, material characterization, prototype device fabrication and testing. At the end of this program, we expect to generate new cutting-edge knowledge in the design and understanding of quantum-engineered semiconductor structures, and demonstrate the concepts for IC PV devices with high conversion efficiencies.

  13. 中红外量子级联激光器输运特性的仿真%Simulation of transport properties in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李营营; 茹国平; 李湛明

    2012-01-01

    基于一种非局域化的输运模型,对不同结构不同温度下的中红外量子级联激光器的输运特性进行了仿真.在这个模型中,利用量子隧穿、微带隧穿以及热载流子输运等长程载流子输运模型,对传统的扩散-漂移方程进行了矫正.并将基于上述集成模型的计算结果和实验结果进行了比较,通过拟合参数的合理设置,计算结果和实验结果得到了很好的吻合.%Simulation of transport properties in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with different structures at different temperatures bas.ed on non-local transport model is reported.With this model,drift-diffusion equations were solved with modification of current density by accounting for long-range carrier transport including quantum tunneling,mini-band tunneling and hot carrier transport in the device.The simulation with the above model was compared with experimental data and reasonable agreements with experiments have been obtained with some reasonable fitting parameters.

  14. Interband cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurgaftman, I.; Weih, R.; Kamp, M.; Meyer, J. R.; Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Bewley, W. W.; Merritt, C. D.; Abell, J.; Höfling, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review the current status of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the midwave infrared (IR). The ICL may be considered the hybrid of a conventional diode laser that generates photons via electron-hole recombination, and an intersubband-based quantum cascade laser (QCL) that stacks multiple stages for enhanced current efficiency. Following a brief historical overview, we discuss theoretical aspects of the active region and core designs, growth by molecular beam epitaxy, and the processing of broad-area, narrow-ridge, and distributed feedback (DFB) devices. We then review the experimental performance of pulsed broad area ICLs, as well as the continuous-wave (cw) characteristics of narrow ridges having good beam quality and DFBs producing output in a single spectral mode. Because the threshold drive powers are far lower than those of QCLs throughout the λ = 3-6 µm spectral band, ICLs are increasingly viewed as the laser of choice for mid-IR laser spectroscopy applications that do not require high output power but need to be hand-portable and/or battery operated. Demonstrated ICL performance characteristics to date include threshold current densities as low as 106 A cm-2 at room temperature (RT), cw threshold drive powers as low as 29 mW at RT, maximum cw operating temperatures as high as 118 °C, maximum cw output powers exceeding 400 mW at RT, maximum cw wallplug efficiencies as high as 18% at RT, maximum cw single-mode output powers as high as 55 mW at RT, and single-mode output at λ = 5.2 µm with a cw drive power of only 138 mW at RT.

  15. Regimes of turbulence without an energy cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Barenghi, C F; Baggaley, A W

    2016-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations of turbulent $^4$He and $^3$He-B have established that, at hydrodynamic length scales larger than the average distance between quantum vortices, the energy spectrum obeys the same 5/3 Kolmogorov law which is observed in the homogeneous isotropic turbulence of ordinary fluids. The importance of the 5/3 law is that it points to the existence of a Richardson energy cascade from large eddies to small eddies. However, there is also evidence of quantum turbulent regimes without Kolmogorov scaling. This raises the important questions of why, in such regimes, the Kolmogorov spectrum fails to form, what is the physical nature of turbulence without energy cascade, and whether hydrodynamical models can account for the unusual behaviour of turbulent superfluid helium. In this work we describe simple physical mechanisms which prevent the formation of Kolmogorov scaling in the thermal counterflow, and analyze the conditions necessary for emergence of quasiclassical regime in quantum tu...

  16. Quantum Cascade Laser Measurements of Line Intensities, N2-, O2- and Ar- Collisional Broadening Coefficients of N2O in the  3 Band Near 4.5  m

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, E.-t.

    2016-04-19

    This study deals with precise measurements of absolute line intensities, N2-, O2- and Ar- collisional broadening coefficients of N2O in the P-branch of the ν3 vibrational band near 4.5 μm. Collisional broadening coefficients of N2O-air are derived from the N2- and O2- broadening contributions by considering an ideal atmospheric composition. Studies are performed at room temperature for 10 rotational transitions over 2190-2202 cm-1 spectral range using a distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser. To retrieve spectroscopic parameters for each individual transition, measured absorption line shape is simulated within Voigt and Galatry profiles. The obtained results compare well with previous experimental data available in the literature: the discrepancies being less than 4% for most of the probed transitions. The spectroscopic data reported here are very useful for the design of sensors used to monitor the abundance of N2O in earth\\'s atmosphere. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Laser based combustion laboratory at NTH/SINTEF applied thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, F.; Bjoerge, T.

    1993-12-01

    During the SPUNG-program, a laser based laboratory has been built up at NTH/SINTEF Applied Thermodynamics by the funding from that program. The laser based laboratory consists of a Nd:YAG laser and an image intensifier electronic camera system. There are numerous different laser based techniques that can be used, using the laser based laboratory, but we have concentrated on laser induced fluorescence (LIF). By shaping the laser beam into a flat plane, 2D imaging of combustion radicals (OH, CH) and emission species (NO) are possible. This can give valuable information about flame structure, flame stabilization, turbulence scales and so on, but at the time being not quantitative concentrations.

  18. Performance of laser based optical imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhrupesh S.; Banerjee, Arup; Vora, Anup; Biswas, Amiya; Patel, Naimesh; Kurulkar, Amit; Dutt, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    rate (more than 100fps). Taking advantage of these, laser based camera system configuration was worked out and presented in this paper using scientific grade CMOS sensor and NIR Laser. Camera can image target range from 4km to 5km with resolution of 5cm. Camera can have instantaneous coverage of 100mx100m (at 5km). Scientific grade CMOS sensor could also be used for clear sky day time imaging conditions with Laser off condition. To reduce the laser energy requirement, FPA required to be operated in multi-integration mode where multiple low energy pulses could be thrown within given integration time and detector and its associated electronics will collect and accumulate only those photons which are reflected back from the target of interest using appropriate gating control mechanism. Paper will bring out system engineering aspects for finalization of imaging spectrum, optical parameters in terms of aperture & focal length, required laser energy, highlighting advantage of pulse mode operation of laser compared to continuous mode operation in terms of laser energy & back-scattered light, silicon based optical detector performance results and post processing aspects for target detection. Paper will also discuss achieved performance of proto-model camera.

  19. Self-Pulsation Dynamics in GaAs/AlGaAs Quantum Cascade Lasers%GaAs/AlGaAs量子级联激光器自脉动动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊岐; 刘峰奇; 李路; 邵烨; 郭瑜; 王占国

    2007-01-01

    Quasi-continuous wave lasing spectra of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum cascade lasers emitting at 9.76μm are characterized by step-scan time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Pronounced self-pulsation in stacked emission spectra is observed in the driving current duration. Self-heating accumulation in the active region affects the electron relaxation and transport greatly. Thermally-induced carrier occupation of the higher sublevels in an injector can leak out through a resonant condition with the continuum states above the next injector,which will be facilitated by the fourth sublevel of the coupled quantum wells active region. The leaking process arising from the periodic breaking and recovering of resonant tunneling accounts for the physical mechanism of the selfpulsed effect in stacked emission spectra.%利用步进扫描时间分辨傅里叶变换红外光谱,研究了波长9.76μm GaAs/AlGaAs量子级联激光器的准连续波激射谱.在驱动电流周期内,时间上堆叠的发射谱能够观察到明显的光强自脉动现象.有源区中的自加热积累大大影响了电子的驰豫和输运性质.热引起的在注入区较高子能级中占据的载流子由于这些子能级与下一注入区的连续态形成共振条件而泄露,而耦合阱有源区中第四子能级的存在加快了这个过程.周期性破坏和恢复的共振条件所引起的载流子泄露在很大程度上导致了时域堆叠光谱的自脉动.

  20. Selective ablation of rabbit atherosclerotic plaque with less thermal effect by the control of pulse structure of a quantum cascade laser in the 5.7 μm wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimura, Keisuke; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-03-01

    Cholesteryl esters are main components of atherosclerotic plaques and have an absorption peak at the wavelength of 5.75 μm originated from C=O stretching vibration mode of ester bond. Our group achieved the selective ablation of atherosclerotic lesions using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) in the 5.7 μm wavelength range. QCLs are relatively new types of semiconductor lasers that can emit mid-infrared range. They are sufficiently compact and considered to be useful for clinical application. However, large thermal effects were observed because the QCL worked as quasicontinuous wave (CW) lasers due to its short pulse interval. Then we tried macro pulse irradiation (irradiation of pulses at intervals) of the QCL and achieved effective ablation with less-thermal effects than conventional quasi-CW irradiation. However, lesion selectivity might be changed by changing pulse structure. Therefore, in this study, irradiation effects of the macro pulse irradiation to rabbit atherosclerotic plaque and normal vessel were compared. The macro pulse width and the macro pulse interval were set to 0.5 and 12 ms, respectively, because the thermal relaxation time of rabbit normal and atherosclerotic aortas in the oscillation wavelength of the QCL was 0.5-12 ms. As a result, cutting difference was achieved between rabbit atherosclerotic and normal aortas by the macro pulse irradiation. Therefore, macro pulse irradiation of a QCL in the 5.7 μm wavelength range is effective for reducing thermal effects and selective ablation of the atherosclerotic plaque. QCLs have the potential of realizing less-invasive laser angioplasty.

  1. High-brightness electron beam evolution following laser-based cleaning of a photocathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser-based techniques have been widely used for cleaning metal photocathodes to increase quantum efficiency (QE. However, the impact of laser cleaning on cathode uniformity and thereby on electron beam quality are less understood. We are evaluating whether this technique can be applied to revive photocathodes used for high-brightness electron sources in advanced x-ray free-electron laser (FEL facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The laser-based cleaning was applied to two separate areas of the current LCLS photocathode on July 4 and July 26, 2011, respectively. The QE was increased by 8–10 times upon the laser cleaning. Since the cleaning, routine operation has exhibited a slow evolution of the QE improvement and comparatively rapid improvement of transverse emittance, with a factor of 3 QE enhancement over five months, and a significant emittance improvement over the initial 2–3 weeks following the cleaning. Currently, the QE of the LCLS photocathode is holding constant at about 1.2×10^{-4}, with a normalized injector emittance of about 0.3  μm for a 150-pC bunch charge. With the proper procedures, the laser-cleaning technique appears to be a viable tool to revive the LCLS photocathode. We present observations and analyses for the QE and emittance evolution in time following the laser-based cleaning of the LCLS photocathode, and comparison to the previous studies, the measured thermal emittance versus the QE and comparison to the theoretical model.

  2. Synchronization of active atomic clocks via quantum and classical channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Alexander; Hammerer, Klemens

    2016-10-01

    Superradiant lasers based on atomic ensembles exhibiting ultranarrow optical transitions can emit light of unprecedented spectral purity and may serve as active atomic clocks. We consider two frequency-detuned active atomic clocks, which are coupled in a cascaded setup, i.e., as master and slave lasers, and study the synchronization of the slave to the master clock. In a setup where both atomic ensembles are coupled to a common cavity mode, such synchronization phenomena have been predicted by Xu et al. [M. Xu, D. A. Tieri, E. C. Fine, J. K. Thompson, and M. J. Holland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 154101 (2014)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.154101] and experimentally observed by Weiner et al. (J. M. Weiner et al., arXiv:1503.06464). Here we demonstrate that synchronization still occurs in cascaded setups but exhibits distinctly different phase diagrams. We study the characteristics of synchronization in comparison to the case of coupling through a common cavity. We also consider synchronization through a classical channel where light of the master laser is measured phase sensitively and the slave laser is injection locked by feedback and compare to the results achievable by coupling through quantum channels.

  3. Femtosecond Fiber Lasers Based on Dissipative Processes for Nonlinear Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of femtosecond-pulse fiber lasers with parameters appropriate for nonlinear microscopy is reviewed. Pulse-shaping in lasers with only normal-dispersion components is briefly described, and the performance of the resulting lasers is summarized. Fiber lasers based on the formation of dissipative solitons now offer performance competitive with that of solid-state lasers, but with the benefits of the fiber medium. Lasers based on self-similar pulse evolution in the gain section of a laser also offer a combination of short pulse duration and high pulse energy that will be attractive for applications in nonlinear bioimaging. PMID:23869163

  4. The Design of Nano-second Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser Driver%纳秒级红外量子级联激光器驱动电源的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李健; 陈晨; 薛顶柱; 王一丁

    2014-01-01

    In order to make the quantum cascade laser (QCL) applied in infrared gas detection, a nano-second pulsed QCL driver is designed. The proposed system, based on the theory of voltage controlled current source, uses S3C2410A chip as core processor to achieve a driving current which period, duty cycle and amplitude are adjust-able. The hardware circuit mainly consists of controller, pulse generator and constant current source circuit. Mean-while, to guarantee the QCL works securely in long term,the system even includes a soft delay start circuit, over-cur-rent protection circuit, over-voltage protection circuit and the electro static discharge (ESD) protection circuit. The driving experiment is implemented using the proposed driver to excite a QCL with centre wavelength at 7.71µm. The results show that the rise time of driving pulse is less than 8 ns, the fall time is less than 12 ns and the maximum am-plitude can goes up to 3.3A, all which guarantee the QCL can be applied in infrared gas detection.%为了使量子级联激光器(QCL)应用于中红外气体检测,设计了一种纳秒级脉冲型的QCL驱动电源。本系统基于压控恒流源的原理,以S3C2410A芯片为主处理器,实现周期、占空比、幅值均可调的驱动电流。硬件电路主要包括控制电路、脉冲调节电路和恒流源电路。同时具备延时软启动电路、过流保护电路、过压保护电路、静电防护电路等,以确保激光器的长期稳定工作。利用该驱动电源对中心波长为7.71µm的QCL进行驱动实验。结果表明,脉冲上升时间小于8ns,脉冲下降时间小于12ns,最大电流幅值3.3A,为QCL在红外气体检测应用中提供保证。

  5. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T; Huang, Yong; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2010-09-01

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location (+/-5 microm) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing.

  6. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T [Biomedical Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Huang Yong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie Yubing [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY (United States); Chrisey, Douglas B, E-mail: schien@rpi.ed, E-mail: chrisd@rpi.ed [Material Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location ({+-}5 {mu}m) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing. (topical review)

  7. Advanced and automated laser-based technique to evaluate aggregates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) is undertaking a research project to investigate the use of laser-based scanning technology to quantify the morphological/shape properties (i.e., form - flatness, elongation and sphericity...

  8. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Warren W.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-01-30

    Spectroscopic chemical sensing research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing advanced sensors for detecting the production of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons; use of chemical weapons; or the presence of explosives, firearms, narcotics, or other contraband of significance to homeland security in airports, cargo terminals, public buildings, or other sensitive locations. For most of these missions, the signature chemicals are expected to occur in very low concentrations, and in mixture with ambient air or airborne waste streams that contain large numbers of other species that may interfere with spectroscopic detection, or be mistaken for signatures of illicit activity. PNNL’s emphasis is therefore on developing remote and sampling sensors with extreme sensitivity, and resistance to interferents, or selectivity. PNNL’s research activities include: 1. Identification of signature chemicals and quantification of their spectral characteristics, 2. Identification and development of laser and other technologies that enable breakthroughs in sensitivity and selectivity, 3. Development of promising sensing techniques through experimentation and modeling the physical phenomenology and practical engineering limitations affecting their performance, and 4. Development and testing of data collection methods and analysis algorithms. Close coordination of all aspects of the research is important to ensure that all parts are focused on productive avenues of investigation. Close coordination of experimental development and numerical modeling is particularly important because the theoretical component provides understanding and predictive capability, while the experiments validate calculations and ensure that all phenomena and engineering limitations are considered.

  9. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Local Oscillator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has a need for airborne or space-based observatories and remote sensors in order to penetrate the opaque atmosphere between 1 and 10 THz. For observations >2...

  10. Central-wavelength-tunable multi-wavelength fiber laser based on micro-air gap cavity and tapered fiber structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiao; Tong, Zhengrong; Yang, He; Zhang, Weihua; Xue, Lifang; Pan, Honggang

    2017-08-01

    A multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on a micro-air gap cavity filter and the tapered fiber structure is proposed and demonstrated. The micro-air gap cavity filter is constructed by aligning two polished single mode fiber facets carefully through a capillary. Then a tapered fiber structure is applied to compose a cascaded filter with the micro-air gap cavity filter. According to the experiment, the transmission spectrum of the tapered fiber structure acts as the outer envelope of the cascaded structure, which is used as a tunable filter. Moreover, the periodically localized peaks of the tapered fiber structure are modulated by sinusoidal spectral response of the micro-air gap cavity filter. And the micro-air gap cavity filter acts as a comb filter, which determines the channel space of the cascaded filter structure. By using the above superimposed filter, four wavelengths with a wavelength spacing of about 1.20 nm are generated under the pump power of 270 mW. The side-mode suppression ratio of all lasing wavelengths is about 35 dB. The tapered fiber structure is fixed on a furnace, when the temperature varies from 30 °C to 120 °C, the first wavelength can be tuned within the range of 5.31 nm.

  11. Cascade Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.

    2011-09-27

    We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C 60/bathocuproine/Al. Using a tetracene layer grown in a descending energy cascade on 5,6-diphenyl-tetracene and capped with 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyl- tetracene, where the accessibility of the π-system in each material is expected to influence the rate of parasitic carrier leakage and charge recombination at the donor/acceptor interface, we observe an increase in open circuit voltage (Voc) of approximately 40% (corresponding to a change of +200 mV) compared to that of a single tetracene donor. Little change is observed in other parameters such as fill factor and short circuit current density (FF = 0.50 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.55 ± 0.23 mA/cm2) compared to those of the control tetracene-C60 solar cells (FF = 0.54 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.86 ± 0.23 mA/cm2). We demonstrate that this cascade architecture is effective in reducing losses due to polaron pair recombination at donor-acceptor interfaces, while enhancing spectral coverage, resulting in a substantial increase in the power conversion efficiency for cascade organic photovoltaic cells compared to tetracene and pentacene based devices with a single donor layer. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. THz laser based on quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, K V [N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-30

    The use of quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices as an active element of a quantum cascade laser of terahertz range is proposed and theoretically investigated. A multi-colour emission, having from three to six peaks of optical gain, is found in Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and figurate superlattices in electric fields of intensity F = 11 - 13 kV cm{sup -1} in the frequency range f = 2 - 4 THz. The peaks depend linearly on the electric field, retain the height of 20 cm{sup -1}, and strongly depend on the thickness of the AlGaAs-layers. (lasers)

  13. Short distance properties of cascading gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Aharony, O; Yarom, A; Aharony, Ofer; Buchel, Alex; Yarom, Amos

    2006-01-01

    We study the short distance (large momentum) properties of correlation functions of cascading gauge theories by performing a tree-level computation in their dual gravitational background. We prove that these theories are holographically renormalizable; the correlators have only analytic ultraviolet divergences, which may be removed by appropriate local counterterms. We find that n-point correlation functions of properly normalized operators have the expected scaling in the semi-classical gravity (large N) limit: they scale as N_{eff}^{2-n} with N_{eff} proportional to ln(k/Lambda) where k is a typical momentum. Our analysis thus confirms the interpretation of the cascading gauge theories as renormalizable four-dimensional quantum field theories with an effective number of degrees of freedom which logarithmically increases with the energy.

  14. Advances in laser-based isotope ratio measurements: selected applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kerstel, E; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-01-01

    Small molecules exhibit characteristic ro-vibrational transitions in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions, which are strongly influenced by isotopic substitution. This gift of nature has made it possible to use laser spectroscopy for the accurate analysis of the isotopic composition of gaseous samples. Nowadays, laser spectroscopy is clearly recognized as a valid alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Laser-based instruments are leaving the research laboratory stage and are be...

  15. Resource Letter: LBOT-1: Laser-based optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Matthew J.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on optical tweezers, also known as laser-based, gradient-force optical traps. Journal articles and books are cited for the following main topics: general papers on optical tweezers, trapping instrument design, optical detection methods, optical trapping theory, mechanical measurements, single molecule studies, and sections on biological motors, cellular measurements and additional applications of optical tweezers. PMID:16971965

  16. Resource Letter: LBOT-1: Laser-based optical tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Matthew J.; Block, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on optical tweezers, also known as laser-based, gradient-force optical traps. Journal articles and books are cited for the following main topics: general papers on optical tweezers, trapping instrument design, optical detection methods, optical trapping theory, mechanical measurements, single molecule studies, and sections on biological motors, cellular measurements and additional applications of optical tweezers.

  17. Cascaded Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kuniaki; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin Carl

    1982-12-01

    We investigate the counting statistics for stationary and nonstationary cascaded Poisson processes. A simple equation is obtained for the variance-to-mean ratio in the limit of long counting times. Explicit expressions for the forward-recurrence and inter-event-time probability density functions are also obtained. The results are expected to be of use in a number of areas of physics.

  18. A new cascadic multigrid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI; Zhongci

    2001-01-01

    [1]Bornemann, F., Deuflhard, P., The cascadic multigrid method for elliptic problems, Numer. Math., 996, 75: 35.[2]Bornemann, F., Deuflhard, P., The cascadic multigrid method, The Eighth International Conference on Domain Decomposition Methods for Partial Differential Equations (eds. Glowinski, R., Periaux, J., Shi, Z. et al.), New York: John Wiley and Sons, 997.[3]Bornemann, F., Krause, R., Classical and cascadic multigrid-methodogical comparison, Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Domain Decomposition (eds. Bjorstad, P., Espedal, M., Keyes, D.), New York: John Wiley and Sons, 998.[4]Shaidurov, V., Some estimates of the rate of convergence for the cascadic conjugate gradient method, Comp. Math. Applic., 996, 3: 6.[5]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid method for the second order elliptic problem, East-West J. Numer. Math., 998, 6: 309.[6]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid for elliptic problems, East-West J. Numer. Math., 999, 7: 99.[7]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid method for the plate bending problem, East-West J. Numer. Math., 998, 6: 37.[8]Braess, D., Dahmen, W., A cascade multigrid algorithm for the Stokes equations, Number. Math., 999, 82: 79.[9]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid for parabolic problems, J. Comput. Math., 2000, 8: 450.[10]Ciarlet, P.,The Finite Element Method for Elliptic Problems, Amsterdam: North-Holland, 978.[11]Zienkiewicz, O. C., The Finite Element Method, 3rd. ed., London: McGraw-Hill, 977.[12]Powell, M. J. D., Sabin, M. A., Piecewise quadratic approximations on triangles, ACM Trans. Mat. Software, 977, 3: 36.[13]Xu, J., The auxiliary space method and optimal multigrid precondition techniques for unstructured grids, Computing, 996, 56: 25.[14]Bank, R., Dupont, T., An optimal order process for solving finite element equations, Math. Comput., 980, 36: 35.[15]Brenner, S., Convergence of nonconforming multigrid methods without full elliptic regularity, Math

  19. Information cascade on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisakado, Masato; Mori, Shintaro

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model by considering three different kinds of networks: a random graph, the Barabási-Albert (BA) model, and a fitness model. A voting model represents the way in which public perceptions are conveyed to voters. Our voting model is constructed by using two types of voters-herders and independents-and two candidates. Independents conduct voting based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, herders base their voting on the number of previous votes. Hence, herders vote for the majority candidates and obtain information relating to previous votes from their networks. We discuss the difference between the phases on which the networks depend. Two kinds of phase transitions, an information cascade transition and a super-normal transition, were identified. The first of these is a transition between a state in which most voters make the correct choices and a state in which most of them are wrong. The second is a transition of convergence speed. The information cascade transition prevails when herder effects are stronger than the super-normal transition. In the BA and fitness models, the critical point of the information cascade transition is the same as that of the random network model. However, the critical point of the super-normal transition disappears when these two models are used. In conclusion, the influence of networks is shown to only affect the convergence speed and not the information cascade transition. We are therefore able to conclude that the influence of hubs on voters' perceptions is limited.

  20. Cascade laser applications: trends and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Humières, B.; Margoto, Éric; Fazilleau, Yves

    2016-03-01

    When analyses need rapid measurements, cost effective monitoring and miniaturization, tunable semiconductor lasers can be very good sources. Indeed, applications like on-field environmental gas analysis or in-line industrial process control are becoming available thanks to the advantage of tunable semiconductor lasers. Advances in cascade lasers (CL) are revolutionizing Mid-IR spectroscopy with two alternatives: interband cascade lasers (ICL) in the 3-6μm spectrum and quantum cascade lasers (QCL), with more power from 3 to 300μm. The market is getting mature with strong players for driving applications like industry, environment, life science or transports. CL are not the only Mid-IR laser source. In fact, a strong competition is now taking place with other technologies like: OPO, VCSEL, Solid State lasers, Gas, SC Infrared or fiber lasers. In other words, CL have to conquer a share of the Mid-IR application market. Our study is a market analysis of CL technologies and their applications. It shows that improvements of components performance, along with the progress of infrared laser spectroscopy will drive the CL market growth. We compare CL technologies with other Mid-IR sources and estimate their share in each application market.

  1. N2O fluxes over a corn field from an open-path, laser-based eddy covariance system and static chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, L.; Pan, D.; Gelfand, I.; Abraha, M.; Moyer, R.; Poe, A.; Sun, K.; Robertson, P.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gase. Although many efforts have been paid to N2O emissions, the spatial and temporal variability of N2O emissions still subject to large uncertainty. Application of the eddy covariance method for N2O emissions research would allow continuous ecosystem level flux measurements. The caveat, however, is need for high precision and high frequency measurements in field. In this study, an open-path, quantum cascade-laser-based eddy covariance N2O sensor has been deployed nearly continuously since May 2015 over a corn field at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station site in SW Michigan. The field precision of the N2O sensor was assessed to be 0.1 ppbv at 10 Hz, and the total consumption was ~ 40 W, allowing the system to be powered solely by solar panels. The stability of the sensor under different temperature and humidity was tested within an environmental chamber. Spectroscopic experiments and cospectra analyses were carried out to study specific corrections associated with the sensor for eddy covariance techniques, including the line broadening effect due to water vapor and high frequency flux attenuation owning to sample path averaging. Ogive analyses indicated that the high-frequency N2O flux loss due to various damping effects was comparable to those of the CO2 flux. The detection limit of flux was estimated to be 0.3 ng N s-1 m-2 with a flux averaging interval of 30 minutes. The results from the EC system were also compared with ground measurements by standard static chambers (SC). Overall, more than 150 individual chamber measurements were taken within the footprint of the EC system. We found good correlation between the EC and SC methods given the spatiotemporal differences between the two techniques (R2 = 0.75). Both methods detected increased emissions during afternoon as compared to morning and night hours. Differences between EC and SC were also studied by investigating spatial variability with a

  2. Axion Search by Laser-based Experiment OSQAR

    OpenAIRE

    Sulc, Miroslav; Pugnat, Pierre; Ballou, Rafik; Deferne, Guy; Duvillaret, Lionel; Flekova, Lucie; Finger, Michael; Finger Jr, Michael; Hošek, Jan; Husek, Thomas; Jost, Rémy; Kral, Miroslav; Kunc, Štěpán; Macuchova, Karolina; Meissner, Krzysztof,

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Laser-based experimentOSQAR in CERN is aimed to the search of the axions by twomethods. The photon regeneration experiment is using two LHC dipole magnets of the length 14.3 m and magnetic field 9.5 T equipped with an optical barrier at the end of the first magnet. It looks as light shining through the wall. No excess of events above the background was detected at this arrangement. Nevertheless, this result extends the exclusion region for the axion mass. The second me...

  3. Semiconductor defect metrology using laser-based quantitative phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Edwards, Chris; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford

    2015-03-01

    A highly sensitive laser-based quantitative phase imaging tool, using an epi-illumination diffraction phase microscope, has been developed for silicon wafer defect inspection. The first system used a 532 nm solid-state laser and detected 20 nm by 100 nm by 110 nm defects in a 22 nm node patterned silicon wafer. The second system, using a 405 nm diode laser, is more sensitive and has enabled detection of 15 nm by 90 nm by 35 nm defects in a 9 nm node densely patterned silicon wafer. In addition to imaging, wafer scanning and image-post processing are also crucial for defect detection.

  4. A laser based reusable microjet injector for transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-hee; Yoh, Jack J.

    2010-05-01

    A laser based needle-free liquid drug injection device has been developed. A laser beam is focused inside the liquid contained in the rubber chamber of microscale. The focused laser beam causes explosive bubble growth, and the sudden volume increase in a sealed chamber drives a microjet of liquid drug through the micronozzle. The exit diameter of a nozzle is 125 μm and the injected microjet reaches an average velocity of 264 m/s. This device adds the time-varying feature of microjet to the current state of liquid injection for drug delivery.

  5. Fabrication and evaluation of In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/InP quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, C.D

    2000-09-01

    InP-based quantum cascade (QC) lasers were fabricated following the design reported by Faist et al. with the initial aim of applying them in gas sensing applications. The lasers were characterised by our collaborators, Cockburn et al. Unfortunately, the performance of our QC lasers (QCLs) did not live up to expectations, and the gas sensing objectives became replaced with resolving the issues of their poor performance. This was achieved through a mixture of laser fabrication, characterisation, and optical and thermal waveguide modelling. The devices fabricated included mesa-etched QCLs, shallow-etched QCLs, and novel native-oxide defined QCLs. 2D thermal modelling using a commercial finite element modelling package was carried out to solve the 2D non-linear thermal diffusion equation for all of the structures listed above, as well as for InP-clad and buried heterostructure configurations. The temperature elevations, distributions and heat flow vectors were calculated under high, but not unrealistic thermal power generation in the active waveguide core. The relative effectiveness at dissipating heat was judged using these results. The modelling indicated the presence of high temperatures and thermal gradients across the active waveguide core under continuous wave (CW) operation. The thermal resistance derived through the use of the thermal modelling agreed very well with that calculated by Faist et al. from experimental data. The optical modelling, which was instrumental in resolving the anomalous behaviour of our QC lasers, comprised of two parts. First, modelling of the dielectric permittivity gave values of n and a for InP, In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}AS and In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As as a function of the free-carrier density and wavelength. The calculations were made using single and multiple-oscillator models with a free-carrier contribution in the form of a classical Drude expression. The dependencies of the electron mass and electron mobility on the free electron

  6. Medical diagnostics by laser-based analysis of exhaled breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco

    2002-08-01

    IMany trace gases can be found in the exhaled breath, some of them giving the possibility of a non invasive diagnosis of related diseases or allowing the monitoring of the disease in the course of its therapy. In the present lecture the principle of medical diagnosis based on the breath analysis will be introduced and the detection of trace gases in exhaled breath by high- resolution molecular spectroscopy in the IR spectral region will be discussed. A number of substrates and the optical systems for their laser detection will be reported. The following laser based experimental systems has been realised in the Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory in ENEA in Frascati for the analysis of specific substances in the exhaled breath. A tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) appartus for the measurement of 13C/12C isotopic ratio in carbon dioxide, a TDLAS apparatus for the detection of CH4 and a CO2 laser based photoacoustic system to detect trace ethylene at atmospheric pressure. The experimental set-up for each one of the a.m. optical systems will be shown and the related medical applications will be illustrated. The concluding remarks will be focuses on chemical species that are of major interest for medical people today and their diagnostic ability.

  7. Laser -Based Joining of Metallic and Non-metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabham, G.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    Laser as a high intensity heat source can be effectively used for joining of materials by fusion welding and brazing in autogenous or in hybrid modes. In autogenous mode, welding is done in conduction , deep penetration , and keyhole mode. However, due to inherently high energy density available from a laser source, autogenous keyhole welding is the most popular laser welding mode. But, it has certain limitations like need for extremely good joint fit-up, formation of very hard welds in steel , keyhole instability, loss of alloying elements, etc. To overcome these limitations, innovative variants such as laser-arc hybrid welding , induction-assisted welding , dual beam welding , etc., have been developed. Using laser heat, brazing can be performed by melting a filler to fill the joints, without melting the base materials. Accomplishing laser-based joining as mentioned above requires appropriate choice of laser source, beam delivery system, processing head with appropriate optics and accessories. Basic principles of various laser-based joining processes, laser system technology, process parameters, metallurgical effects on different base materials, joint performance, and applications are explained in this chapter.

  8. Period-doubling cascades galore

    OpenAIRE

    Sander, Evelyn; Yorke, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The appearance of numerous period-doubling cascades is among the most prominent features of {\\bf parametrized maps}, that is, smooth one-parameter families of maps $F:R \\times {\\mathfrak M} \\to {\\mathfrak M}$, where ${\\mathfrak M}$ is a smooth locally compact manifold without boundary, typically $R^N$. Each cascade has infinitely many period-doubling bifurcations, and it is typical to observe -- such as in all the examples we investigate here -- that whenever there are any cascades, there are...

  9. The Neurometabolic Cascade of Concussion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giza, Christopher C; Hovda, David A

    2001-01-01

    Data Synthesis: The primary elements of the pathophysiologic cascade following concussive brain injury include abrupt neuronal depolarization, release of excitatory neurotransmitters, ionic shifts, changes...

  10. Inferring Network Structure from Cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Ghonge, Sushrut

    2016-01-01

    Many physical, biological and social phenomena can be described by cascades taking place on a network. Often, the activity can be empirically observed, but not the underlying network of interactions. In this paper we solve the dynamics of general cascade processes. We then offer three topological inversion methods to infer the structure of any directed network given a set of cascade arrival times. Our forward and inverse formulas hold for a very general class of models where the activation probability of a node is a generic function of its degree and the number of its active neighbors. We report high success rates for synthetic and real networks, for 5 different cascade models.

  11. Energy Cascades in MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Most astrophysical and planetary systems e.g., solar convection and stellar winds, are in a turbulent state and coupled to magnetic fields. Understanding and quantifying the statistical properties of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) turbulence is crucial to explain the involved physical processes. Although the phenomenological theory of hydro-dynamic (HD) turbulence has been verified up to small corrections, a similar statement cannot be made for MHD turbulence. Since the phenomenological description of Hydrodynamic turbulence by Kolmogorov in 1941 there have been many attempts to derive a similar description for turbulence in conducting fluids (i.e Magneto-Hydrodynamic turbulence). However such a description is going to be based inevitably on strong assumptions (typically borrowed from hydrodynamics) that do not however necessarily apply to the MHD case. In this talk I will discuss some of the properties and differences of the energy and helicity cascades in turbulent MHD and HD flows. The investigation is going to be based on the analysis of direct numerical simulations. The cascades in MHD turbulence appear to be a more non-local process (in scale space) than in Hydrodynamics. Some implications of these results to turbulent modeling will be discussed

  12. Information cascade on networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hisakado, Masato

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model by considering three different kinds of networks: a random graph, the Barab\\'{a}si-Albert(BA) model, and a fitness model. A voting model represents the way in which public perceptions are conveyed to voters. Our voting model is constructed by using two types of voters--herders and independents--and two candidates. Independents conduct voting based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, herders base their voting on the number of previous votes. Hence, herders vote for the majority candidates and obtain information relating to previous votes from their networks. We discussed the difference between the phases on which the networks depend. Two kinds of phase transitions, an information cascade transition and a super-normal transition, were identified. The first of these is a transition between a state in which most voters make the correct choices and a state in which most of them are wrong. The second is a transition of convergence speed. The information cascade t...

  13. Tunable multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on an in-line Mach Zehnder interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Young-Geun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    A tunable multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on an in-line Mach Zehnder interferometer is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The in-line Mach Zehnder interferometer is realized by using cascaded long-period fiber gratings. The long-period fiber gratings can couple the guided core mode to several cladding modes. If two identical long-period fiber gratings are concatenated, an interference pattern can be generated, which results from an interaction of the core and the cladding modes in the second long-period fiber grating. Therefore, a simple multichannel filter based on an in-line Mach Zehnder interferometer can be realized. The wavelength spacing of the proposed multichannel filter is controlled by the number of long-period fiber gratings. We apply the proposed multichannel fiber to the generation of a multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber laser with a tunability on the order of the wavelength spacing. An erbium-doped fiber amplifier is implemented as a gain medium. The gain competition of erbium ions is suppressed by soaking the erbium-doped fiber in liquid nitrogen. The power fluctuation of the proposed multiwavelength fiber laser is measured to be less than 0.5 dB. A high-quality multiwavelength output with a high extinction ratio of more than 40 dB is achieved. The wavelength spacing of the proposed multiwavelength fiber laser is controlled by increasing the number of long-period fiber gratings. The wavelength spacing is changed from 0.8 nm to 1.6 nm discretely.

  14. Cascaded Parametric Amplification for Highly Efficient Terahertz Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Ravi, Koustuban; Cirmi, Giovanni; Reichert, Fabian; Schimpf, Damian N; Muecke, Oliver D; Kaertner, Franz X

    2016-01-01

    A highly efficient, practical approach to high-energy terahertz (THz) generation based on spectrally cascaded optical parametric amplification (THz-COPA) is introduced. The THz wave initially generated by difference frequency generation between a strong narrowband optical pump and optical seed (0.1-10% of pump energy) kick-starts a repeated or cascaded energy down-conversion of pump photons. This helps to greatly surpass the quantum-defect efficiency and results in exponential growth of THz energy over crystal length. In cryogenically cooled periodically poled lithium niobate, energy conversion efficiencies >8% for 100 ps pulses are predicted. The calculations account for cascading effects, absorption, dispersion and laser-induced damage. Due to the coupled nonlinear interaction of multiple triplets of waves, THz-COPA exhibits physics distinct from conventional three-wave mixing parametric amplifiers. This in turn governs optimal phase-matching conditions, evolution of optical spectra as well as limitations o...

  15. A Laser-Based Vision System for Weld Quality Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2011-01-01

    Welding is a very complex process in which the final weld quality can be affected by many process parameters. In order to inspect the weld quality and detect the presence of various weld defects, different methods and systems are studied and developed. In this paper, a laser-based vision system is developed for non-destructive weld quality inspection. The vision sensor is designed based on the principle of laser triangulation. By processing the images acquired from the vision sensor, the geometrical features of the weld can be obtained. Through the visual analysis of the acquired 3D profiles of the weld, the presences as well as the positions and sizes of the weld defects can be accurately identified and therefore, the non-destructive weld quality inspection can be achieved. PMID:22344308

  16. Axion search by laser-based experiment OSQAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulc, M.; Pugnat, P.; Ballou, R.; Deferne, G.; Duvillaret, L.; Flekova, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Hosek, J.; Husek, T.; Jost, R.; Kral, M.; Kunc, S.; Macuchova, K.; Meissner, K. A.; Morville, J.; Romanini, D.; Schott, M.; Siemko, A.; Slunecka, M.; Vitrant, G.; Zicha, J.

    2013-08-01

    Laser-based experiment OSQAR in CERN is aimed to the search of the axions by two methods. The photon regeneration experiment is using two LHC dipole magnets of the length 14.3 m and magnetic field 9.5 T equipped with an optical barrier at the end of the first magnet. It looks as light shining through the wall. No excess of events above the background was detected at this arrangement. Nevertheless, this result extends the exclusion region for the axion mass. The second method wants to measure the ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence for the first time. An optical scheme with electro-optical modulator has been proposed, validated and subsequently improved. Cotton-Mouton constant for air was determined in this experiment setup.

  17. Axion search by laser-based experiment OSQAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulc, M., E-mail: miroslav.sulc@tul.cz [Technical University of Liberec (Czech Republic); Pugnat, P. [LNCMI-G, CNRS-UJF-UPS-INSA, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex-9 (France); Ballou, R. [Institut Néel, CNRS and Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex-9 (France); Deferne, G. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva-23 (Switzerland); Duvillaret, L. [IMEP-LAHC, UMR CNRS 5130, Minatec-INPG, 3 parvis Louis Néel, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble Cedex-1 (France); Flekova, L. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Finger, M.; Finger, M. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Hosek, J. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Husek, T. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Jost, R. [LSP, UMR CNRS 5588, Université Joseph Fourier, BP 87, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Hères (France); Kral, M. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Kunc, S. [Technical University of Liberec (Czech Republic); Macuchova, K. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Meissner, K.A. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw (Poland); Morville, J. [LASIM, UMR CNRS 5579, Université Claude Bernard Lyon-1, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Romanini, D. [LSP, UMR CNRS 5588, Université Joseph Fourier, BP 87, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Hères (France); Schott, M.; Siemko, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva-23 (Switzerland); Slunecka, M. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); and others

    2013-08-01

    Laser-based experiment OSQAR in CERN is aimed to the search of the axions by two methods. The photon regeneration experiment is using two LHC dipole magnets of the length 14.3 m and magnetic field 9.5 T equipped with an optical barrier at the end of the first magnet. It looks as light shining through the wall. No excess of events above the background was detected at this arrangement. Nevertheless, this result extends the exclusion region for the axion mass. The second method wants to measure the ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence for the first time. An optical scheme with electro-optical modulator has been proposed, validated and subsequently improved. Cotton–Mouton constant for air was determined in this experiment setup.

  18. Multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xia; Tong, Zhengrong; Zhao, Junfa; Cao, Ye; Li, Lan

    2014-07-10

    A multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser based on graphene oxide (GO) has been proposed, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, to generate an output of stable wavelengths. The structure mainly comprises a few layers of GO between two single-mode fibers incorporated into a capillary device and a Lyot comb filter. GO can show a good nonlinear optical effect, which is beneficial to suppress the mode competition caused by the EDF and stabilize the multiwavelength output. With assistance from the GO device, 11 stable simultaneous lasing signals with a power nonuniformity of about 1.5 dB are obtained. Wavelength spacing is about 0.42 nm and the linewidth of each wavelength is less than 0.07 nm.

  19. Applications of laser based measurements to combustion related fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingmann, J.

    1998-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with laser based techniques for the measurement of fluid dynamical properties and their application to combusting flow fields or flow fields related to combustion. As an introduction, the theory of turbulent flow and combustion is shortly presented. An overview of laser based measuring techniques is given. Next, seven papers are included. The main topic of papers 1 and 2 is the measurements of swirling pipe flows with sudden axi-symmetric expansions. These flow fields are related to the flow fields of gas turbine combustors. Measurements and computations using commercial software are compared. Papers 3 and 7 deal with a laser Doppler anemometry based method for the measurement of the turbulent dissipation rate and its application to an axi-symmetric free jet, respectively. The measurements rely on two-point measurements with high spatial resolution. Also three-component one-point measurements are used to obtain the triple velocity correlations. Together these measurements are sufficient to present the energy balance, if pressure effects are neglected. Papers 4, 5 and 6 are concerned with the turbulent flame speed under premixed conditions. Papers 4 and 5 present flame speed measurements from a stationary burner using methane and Danish natural gas. Particle image velocimetry and one- and two-point Laser Doppler anemometry is used to measure flame speed and turbulent quantities, including integral length scales. Paper 7 presents measurements of flame speed and turbulence parameters in a spark ignition engine. Here heat release analyses from pressure measurements are combined with one- and two-point laser Doppler anemometry to analyze influence of turbulence on flame propagation 50 refs, 25 figs

  20. Laser-based sensors for oil spill remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carl E.; Fingas, Mervin F.; Mullin, Joseph V.

    1997-07-01

    Remote sensing is becoming an increasingly important tool for the effective direction of oil spill countermeasures. Cleanup personnel have recognized that remote sensing can increase spill cleanup efficiency. It has long been recognized that there is no one sensor which is capable of detecting oil and related petroleum products in all environments and spill scenarios. There are sensors which possess a wide field-of- view and can therefore be used to map the overall extent of the spill. These sensors, however lack the capability to positively identify oil and related products, especially along complicated beach and shoreline environments where several substrates are present. The laser-based sensors under development by the Emergencies Science Division of Environment Canada are designed to fill specific roles in oil spill response. The scanning laser environmental airborne fluorosensor (SLEAF) is being developed to detect and map oil and related petroleum products in complex marine and shoreline environments where other non-specific sensors experience difficulty. The role of the SLEAF would be to confirm or reject suspected oil contamination sites that have been targeted by the non-specific sensors. This confirmation will release response crews from the time-consuming task of physically inspecting each site, and direct crews to sites that require remediation. The laser ultrasonic remote sensing of oil thickness (LURSOT) sensor will provide an absolute measurement of oil thickness from an airborne platform. There are presently no sensors available, either airborne or in the laboratory which can provide an absolute measurement of oil thickness. This information is necessary for the effective direction of spill countermeasures such as dispersant application and in-situ burning. This paper describes the development of laser-based airborne oil spill remote sensing instrumentation at Environment Canada and identifies the anticipated benefits of the use of this technology

  1. Cascaded forward Brillouin scattering to all Stokes orders

    CERN Document Server

    Wolff, Christian; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Steel, Michael J; Poulton, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    Inelastic scattering processes such as Brillouin scattering can often function in cascaded regimes and this is likely to occur in certain integrated opto-acoustic devices. We develop a Hamiltonian formalism for cascaded Brillouin scattering valid for both quantum and classical regimes. By regarding Brillouin scattering as the interaction of a single acoustic envelope and a single optical envelope that covers all Stokes and anti-Stokes orders, we obtain a compact model that is well suited for numerical implementation, extension to include other optical nonlinearities or short pulses, and application in the quantum-optics domain. We then theoretically analyze intra-mode forward Brillouin scattering (FBS) for arbitrary waveguides with and without optical dispersion. In the absence of optical dispersion, we find an exact analytical solution. With a perturbative approach, we furthermore solve the case of weak optical dispersion. Our work leads to several key results on intra-mode FBS. For negligible dispersion, we...

  2. Cascade Distillation System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargushingh, Miriam; Shull, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support System (LSS) Project is chartered with de-veloping advanced life support systems that will ena-ble NASA human exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The goal of AES is to increase the affordabil-ity of long-duration life support missions, and to re-duce the risk associated with integrating and infusing new enabling technologies required to ensure mission success. Because of the robust nature of distillation systems, the AES LSS Project is pursuing develop-ment of the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) as part of its technology portfolio. Currently, the system is being developed into a flight forward Generation 2.0 design.

  3. Unsteady turbulence cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5 /3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935), 10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  4. Atomic-cascade experiment with detection of the recoil atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huelga, S.F. (Dept. de Fisica, Univ. de Oviedo (Spain)); Ferrero, M. (Dept. de Fisica, Univ. de Oviedo (Spain)); Santos, E. (Dept. de Fisica Moderna, Univ. de Cantabria (Spain))

    1994-07-20

    Bell's inequalities cannot be violated in atomic-cascade experiments, even with ideal apparatus, due to the three-body character of the atomic decay. Here we propose a new experiment that would block this loophole by means of a suitable selection of an ensemble of photon pairs. A threshold value for the quantum efficiency is found which may allow the discrimination between quantum mechanics and local-hidden-variables theories. Experimental requirements for performing such a test are discussed. (orig.).

  5. Unconditional preparation of entanglement between atoms in cascaded optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, S; Gu, M; Parkins, S; Clark, Stephen; Peng, Amy; Gu, Mile; Parkins, Scott

    2003-01-01

    We propose a scheme to unconditionally entangle the internal states of atoms trapped in separate high finesse optical cavities. The scheme uses the technique of quantum reservoir engineering in a cascaded cavity QED setting, and for ideal (lossless) coupling between the cavities generates an entangled pure state. Highly entangled states are also shown to be possible for realizable cavity QED parameters and with nonideal coupling.

  6. Unconditional preparation of entanglement between atoms in cascaded optical cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen; Peng, Amy; Gu, Mile; Parkins, Scott

    2003-10-24

    We propose a scheme to unconditionally entangle the internal states of atoms trapped in separate high-finesse optical cavities. The scheme uses the technique of quantum reservoir engineering in a cascaded cavity-QED setting, and for ideal (lossless) coupling between the cavities generates an entangled pure state. Highly entangled states are also shown to be possible for realizable cavity-QED parameters and with nonideal coupling.

  7. Cascaded forward Brillouin scattering to all Stokes orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, C.; Stiller, B.; Eggleton, B. J.; Steel, M. J.; Poulton, C. G.

    2017-02-01

    Inelastic scattering processes such as Brillouin scattering can often function in cascaded regimes and this is likely to occur in certain integrated opto-acoustic devices. We develop a Hamiltonian formalism for cascaded Brillouin scattering valid for both quantum and classical regimes. By regarding Brillouin scattering as the interaction of a single acoustic envelope and a single optical envelope that covers all Stokes and anti-Stokes orders, we obtain a compact model that is well suited for numerical implementation, extension to include other optical nonlinearities or short pulses, and application in the quantum-optics domain. We then theoretically analyze intra-mode forward Brillouin scattering (FBS) for arbitrary waveguides with and without optical dispersion. In the absence of optical dispersion, we find an exact analytical solution. With a perturbative approach, we furthermore solve the case of weak optical dispersion. Our work leads to several key results on intra-mode FBS. For negligible dispersion, we show that cascaded intra-mode FBS results in a pure phase modulation and discuss how this necessitates specific experimental methods for the observation of fiber-based and integrated FBS. Further, we discuss how the descriptions that have been established in these two classes of waveguides connect to each other and to the broader context of cavity opto-mechanics and Raman scattering. Finally, we draw an unexpected striking similarity between FBS and discrete diffraction phenomena in waveguide arrays, which makes FBS an interesting candidate for future research in quantum-optics.

  8. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges. 

  9. The simulation of laser-based guided weapon engagements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jaberi, Mubarak; Richardson, Mark; Coath, John; Jenkin, Robin

    2006-05-01

    The laser is an integrated part of many weapon systems, such as laser guided bombs, laser guided missiles and laser beam-riding missiles. These systems pose a significant threat to military assets on the modern battlefield. The lasers used in beam-riding missiles are particularly hard to detect as they typically use relatively low power lasers. Beamriders are also particularly difficult to defeat as current countermeasure systems have not been optimized against this threat. Some recent field trails conducted in the United Arab Emirates desert have demonstrated poor performance of both laser beam-riding systems and the LWRs designed to detect them. The aim of this research is to build a complete evaluation tool capable of assessing all the phases of an engagement of a main battle tank or armoured fighting vehicle with a laser based guided weapon. To this end a software model has been produced using Matlab & Simulink. This complete model has been verified using lab based experimentation and by comparison to the result of the mentioned field trials. This project will enable both the evaluation and design of any generic laser warning receiver or missile seeker and specific systems if various parameters are known. Moreover, this model will be used as a guide to the development of reliable countermeasures for laser beam-riding missiles.

  10. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A LASER BASED LOCAL POSITIONING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Lubbe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: There is no cheap, accurate device available with which the position of a slow moving object , such as a lawnmower cutting lawn, can be determined. If such a positioning system were available it would be possible to develop numerous programmable moving machines that can be taught computer-wise to perform daily chores. In this paper a prototype local positioning system, which could possibly be applied to determine the absolute position in relation to a fixed point for slow moving objects, is discussed. Accuracy, shortcomings and possible improvements of a laser based prototype are discussed.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Daar is geen goedkoop, akkurate wyse beskikbaar om die posisie van 'n stadigbewegende voorwerp soos 'n grassnyer oor 'n grasperk te bepaal nie. Indien so 'n posisioneringstelsel wei beskikbaar sou wees, sou dit moontlik wees om 'n groot verskeidenheid programmeerbare bewegende masjiene te ontwikkel wat rekenaargewys geleer kan word om alledaagse take te verrig. In hierdie artikel word 'n prototipe 10kale posisioneringstelsel bespreek wat moontlik aangewend kan word om die absolute posisie, ten opsigte van 'n vaste punt, van stadigbewegende voorwerpe te bepaal. Akkuraatheid, tekortkomings en moontlike verbeterings van 'n lasergebaseerde prototipestelsel word bespreek.

  11. Residual Stress Determination from a Laser-Based Curvature Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swank, William David; Gavalya, Rick Allen; Wright, Julie Knibloe; Wright, Richard Neil

    2000-05-01

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  12. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Daehak-ro 291, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701) (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  13. Dental hard tissue characterization using laser-based ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, David W.; Massey, Ward L.

    2003-07-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. One critical need is the detection of tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated to help re-mineralize the tooth. Currently employed x-ray imaging is limited in its ability to visualize interfaces and incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration. To this end, non-destructive and non-contact in vitro measurements on extracted human molars using laser-based ultrasonics are presented. Broadband ultrasonic waves are excited in the extracted sections by using a pulsed carbon-dioxide (CO2) laser operating in a region of high optical absorption in the dental hard tissues. Optical interferometric detection of the ultrasonic wave surface displacements in accomplished with a path-stabilized Michelson-type interferometer. Results for bulk and surface in-vitro characterization of caries are presented on extracted molars with pre-existing caries.

  14. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, Tse-Ming [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  15. Are longer cascades more stable?

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Yes, they are. We consider data from experimental cascade games that were run in different laboratories, and find uniformly that subjects are more willing to follow the crowd, the bigger the crowd is �although the decision makers who are added to the crowd should in theory simply follow suit and hence reveal no information. This correlation of length and strength of cascades appears consistently across games with different parameters and different choice sets for the subjects. ...

  16. Cascading Gravity is Ghost Free

    CERN Document Server

    de Rham, Claudia; Tolley, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    We perform a full perturbative stability analysis of the 6D cascading gravity model in the presence of 3-brane tension. We demonstrate that for sufficiently large tension on the (flat) 3-brane, there are no ghosts at the perturbative level, consistent with results that had previously only been obtained in a specific 5D decoupling limit. These results establish the cascading gravity framework as a consistent infrared modification of gravity.

  17. Aeroelasticity in Turbomachine-Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-10

    STABLE -180 UNSTABLE -360 ’ - ’ - -180 0. 󈧖O DIAGRAM 3 AERODYNAMIC LIFT (OENT)COEFFICIENTI AND PHASE LEADS IN DEPENDANCE OF FLOM GUANTATIES AND CASCADE...ABL -0.8 0.0 -5 0. -5 DIAGRAM ’. AERODYNAMIC NORK AND DAMPING COEFFICIENTS (FOR A RIGID NOTION) IN DEPENDANCE OF FLOW OURNTATIES AND CASCADE GEOMETRY...coefficients on blades + blade vibration + vizualization in the transonic flow domain (Schlieren) + instability dependance on flow conditions, blade

  18. Low Noise Interband Cascade Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    National Laboratories, Zhaobing Tian, Zhihua Cai, R. T. Hinkey, L. Li, Tetsuya D. Mishima , Michael B. Santos, and Matthew B. Johnson at the...Phys. 107, No. 5, 054514 (2010). 2. R. Q. Yang, Z. Tian, J. F. Klem, T. D. Mishima , M. B. Santos, and M. B. Johnson, “Interband cascade photovoltaic...2012). 4. Z. Tian, Z. Cai, R. Q. Yang, T. D. Mishima , M. B. Santos, M. B. Johnson, and J. F. Klem, “Interband Cascade Infrared Photodetectors

  19. Cascade Product of Permutation Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Egri-Nagy, Attila; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L.

    2013-01-01

    We define the cascade product of permutation groups as an external product, an explicit construction of substructures of the iterated wreath product that are much smaller than the full wreath product. This construction is essential for computational implementations of algebraic hierarchical decompositions of finite automata. We show how direct, semidirect, and wreath products and group extensions can all be expressed as cascade products, and analyse examples of groups that can be constructed ...

  20. Interband cascade detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shun Lien (Inventor); Li, Jian (Inventor); Yang, Rui Q. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A device for detecting radiation, typically in the infrared. Photons are absorbed in an active region of a semiconductor device such that the absorption induces an interband electronic transition and generates photo-excited charge carriers. The charge carriers are coupled into a carrier transport region having multiple quantum wells and characterized by intersubband relaxation that provides rapid charge carrier collection. The photo-excited carriers are collected from the carrier transport region at a conducting contact region. Another carrier transport region characterized by interband tunneling for multiple stages draws charge carriers from another conducting contact and replenishes the charge carriers to the active region for photo-excitation. A photocurrent is generated between the conducting contacts through the active region of the device.

  1. Communication Scheme via Cascade Chaotic Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Chang-Chun; GUAN Xin-Ping

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new chaotic communication scheme is constructed. Different from the existing literature, cascade chaotic systems are employed. Two cascade modes are considered. First, we investigate the input to state cascade mode;cascade systems between different kinds of chaotic systems are considered. Then the parameter cascade case of chaotic system is studied. Under the different cases, the corresponding receivers are designed, which can succeed in recovering the former emitted signal. Simulations are performed to verify the validity of the proposed main results.

  2. Laser-based analytical monitoring in nuclear-fuel processing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1978-09-01

    The use of laser-based analytical methods in nuclear-fuel processing plants is considered. The species and locations for accountability, process control, and effluent control measurements in the Coprocessing, Thorex, and reference Purex fuel processing operations are identified and the conventional analytical methods used for these measurements are summarized. The laser analytical methods based upon Raman, absorption, fluorescence, and nonlinear spectroscopy are reviewed and evaluated for their use in fuel processing plants. After a comparison of the capabilities of the laser-based and conventional analytical methods, the promising areas of application of the laser-based methods in fuel processing plants are identified.

  3. Three qubit quantum phase gate based on cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juntao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2004-10-01

    We describe a three qubit quantum phase gate in which the three qubits are represented by the photons in a three-modes optical cavity. This gate is implemented by passing a four-level atom in a cascade configuration through the cavity. We shall discuss the application of such a quantum phase gate to quantum searching.

  4. Laser-based gluing of diamond-tipped saw blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennigs, Christian; Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Hustedt, Michael; Brand, Helmut; Wloka, Richard; Zobel, Frank; Dültgen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    To process natural stone such as marble or granite, saw blades equipped with wear-resistant diamond grinding segments are used, typically joined to the blade by brazing. In case of damage or wear, they must be exchanged. Due to the large energy input during thermal loosening and subsequent brazing, the repair causes extended heat-affected zones with serious microstructure changes, resulting in shape distortions and disadvantageous stress distributions. Consequently, axial run-out deviations and cutting losses increase. In this work, a new near-infrared laser-based process chain is presented to overcome the deficits of conventional brazing-based repair of diamond-tipped steel saw blades. Thus, additional tensioning and straightening steps can be avoided. The process chain starts with thermal debonding of the worn grinding segments, using a continuous-wave laser to heat the segments gently and to exceed the adhesive's decomposition temperature. Afterwards, short-pulsed laser radiation removes remaining adhesive from the blade in order to achieve clean joining surfaces. The third step is roughening and activation of the joining surfaces, again using short-pulsed laser radiation. Finally, the grinding segments are glued onto the blade with a defined adhesive layer, using continuous-wave laser radiation. Here, the adhesive is heated to its curing temperature by irradiating the respective grinding segment, ensuring minimal thermal influence on the blade. For demonstration, a prototype unit was constructed to perform the different steps of the process chain on-site at the saw-blade user's facilities. This unit was used to re-equip a saw blade with a complete set of grinding segments. This saw blade was used successfully to cut different materials, amongst others granite.

  5. Enhancement of entanglement using cascaded four-wave mixing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jun; Qi, Jian; Jing, Jietai

    2017-01-15

    A maximal joint quadrature squeezing of -6.8±0.4  dB is experimentally obtained by a scheme of cascaded four-wave mixing (FWM) processes, which gives strong proof about the inseparability or entanglement between output of the twin beams from the system. Here joint quadrature is the difference between the two quadratures of the twin beam output from the cascaded FWM processes. This result is enhanced by about 3.1 dB, compared with the one of the single FWM process. We also study the gain dependence of the entanglement enhancement in this cascaded system. Theoretical predictions with the considerations of the losses in the experiment are also studied, and a similar trend in the low-gain regime can be found between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions. The scheme of cascaded FWM processes, which can be used to improve or even manipulate the degree of the entanglement between the output fields from the single FWM process, may find its applications in the continuous-variable quantum communication protocols.

  6. Cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huawei; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The conversion efficiency of double-clad Raman fiber laser is limited by the cladding-to-core area ratio. To get high conversion efficiency, the inner-cladding-to-core area ratio has to be less than about 8, which limits the brightness enhancement. To overcome the problem, a cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber laser with multiple-clad fiber as the Raman gain medium is proposed. A theoretical model of Raman fiber amplifier with multiple-clad fiber is developed, and numerical simulation proves that the proposed scheme can improve the conversion efficiency and brightness enhancement of cladding pumped Raman fiber laser.

  7. A Laser-Based Diagnostic Suite for Hypersonic Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a suite of laser-based diagnostics for the study of reactive and non-reactive hypersonic flows....

  8. Tunable Erbium-Doped Fiber Laser Based on Random Distributed Feedback

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lulu Wang; Xinyong Dong; Shum, Perry Ping; Haibin Su

    2014-01-01

    A tunable erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser based on random distributed feedback through backward Rayleigh scattering in a 20-km-long single-mode fiber and a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer filter is demonstrated...

  9. A Laser-Based Diagnostic Suite for Hypersonic Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a suite of laser-based diagnostics for the study of reactive and non-reactive hypersonic flows....

  10. Autoregressive cascades on random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Srikanth K.; Vaze, Rahul; Narasimha, Dheeraj

    2016-04-01

    A network cascade model that captures many real-life correlated node failures in large networks via load redistribution is studied. The considered model is well suited for networks where physical quantities are transmitted, e.g., studying large scale outages in electrical power grids, gridlocks in road networks, and connectivity breakdown in communication networks, etc. For this model, a phase transition is established, i.e., existence of critical thresholds above or below which a small number of node failures lead to a global cascade of network failures or not. Theoretical bounds are obtained for the phase transition on the critical capacity parameter that determines the threshold above and below which cascade appears or disappears, respectively, that are shown to closely follow numerical simulation results.

  11. Infectious Agents Trigger Trophic Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Julia C; Ripple, William J

    2017-09-01

    Most demonstrated trophic cascades originate with predators, but infectious agents can also cause top-down indirect effects in ecosystems. Here we synthesize the literature on trophic cascades initiated by infectious agents including parasitoids, pathogens, parasitic castrators, macroparasites, and trophically transmitted parasites. Like predators, infectious agents can cause density-mediated and trait-mediated indirect effects through their direct consumptive and nonconsumptive effects respectively. Unlike most predators, however, infectious agents are not fully and immediately lethal to their victims, so their consumptive effects can also trigger trait-mediated indirect effects. We find that the frequency of trophic cascades reported for different consumer types scales with consumer lethality. Furthermore, we emphasize the value of uniting predator-prey and parasite-host theory under a general consumer-resource framework. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimized multibeam configuration for observation of QED cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfer, E G; Fedotov, A M; Bashmakov, V F; Nerush, E N; Kostyukov, I Y; Narozhny, N B

    2015-01-01

    QED cascades in intense electromagnetic field can occur if the dynamical quantum parameter $\\chi$ of a seed electron, which in Compton units coincides with the electron proper acceleration, attains the order of unity. We derive general expression for $\\chi$ of an initially slow electron in an arbitrary electromagnetic field for a time range $t\\ll 1/\\omega$, where $\\omega$ is the field carrier frequency. Using this formula, we consider a special field configuration of multiple colliding focused laser beams and optimize it to provide cascade development at laser power below $10$ PW and intensity of the order of $10^{23}$W/cm$^2$. Such parameters of the beams will be obtained with a new generation of laser facilities, particularly the ELI Beamlines, in the coming years.

  13. Multi-flux warped throats and cascading gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, S; Uranga, Angel M; Franco, Sebastian; Hanany, Amihay; Uranga, Angel M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe duality cascades and their infrared behavior for systems of D3-branes at singularities given by complex cones over del Pezzo surfaces (and related examples), in the presence of fractional branes. From the gauge field theory viewpoint, we show that D3-branes probing the infrared theory have a quantum deformed moduli space, given by a complex deformation of the initial geometry to a simpler one. This implies that for the dual supergravity viewpoint, the gauge theory strong infrared dynamics smoothes out the naked singularities of the recently constructed warped throat solutions with 3-form fluxes, describing the cascading RG flow of the gauge theory. This behavior thus generalizes the Klebanov-Strassler deformation of the conifold. We describe several explicit examples, including models with several scales of strong gauge dynamics. In the regime of widely separated scales, the dual supergravity solutions should correspond to throats with several radial regions with different exponential warp factors...

  14. CASCADE: Introducing AI into CBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendley, R. J.; Jurascheck, N.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses changes in training requirements of commerce and industry in the United Kingdom and describes a project, CASCADE, that was developed to investigate and implement the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques into computer-based training (CBT). An overview of pilot projects in higher education settings is provided. (eight…

  15. Unsteady transonic flow in cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, S. P.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    There is a need for methods to predict the unsteady air loads associated with flutter of turbomachinery blading at transonic speeds. The results of such an analysis in which the steady relative flow approaching a cascade of thin airfoils is assumed to be transonic, irrotational, and isentropic is presented. The blades in the cascade are allowed to undergo a small amplitude harmonic oscillation which generates a small unsteady flow superimposed on the existing steady flow. The blades are assumed to oscillate with a prescribed motion of constant amplitude and interblade phase angle. The equations of motion are obtained by linearizing about a uniform flow the inviscid nonheat conducting continuity and momentum equations. The resulting equations are solved by employing the Weiner Hopf technique. The solution yields the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on the cascade at Mach number equal to 1. Making use of an unsteady transonic similarity law, these results are compared with the results obtained from linear unsteady subsonic and supersonic cascade theories. A parametric study is conducted to find the effects of reduced frequency, solidity, stagger angle, and position of pitching axis on the flutter.

  16. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.;

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene...

  17. Applications of cascade multilevel inverters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭方正; 钱照明

    2003-01-01

    Cascade multilevel inverters have been developed for electric utility applications. A cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 H-bridges in which each bridge's dc voltage is supported by its own dc capacitor. The new inverter can: (1) generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage while only switching one time per fundamental cycle; (2) dispense with multi-pulse inverters' transformers used in conventional utility interfaces and static var compensators; (3) enables direct parallel or series transformer-less connection to medium- and high-voltage power systems. In short, the cascade inverter is much more efficient and suitable for utility applications than traditional multi-pulse and pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters. The authors have experimentally demonstrated the superiority of the new inverter for power supply, (hybrid) electric vehicle (EV) motor drive, reactive power (var) and harmonic compensation. This paper summarizes the features, feasibility, and control schemes of the cascade inverter for utility applications including utility interface of renewable energy, voltage regulation, var compensation, and harmonic filtering in power systems. Analytical, simulated, and experimental results demonstrated the superiority of the new inverters.

  18. Applications of cascade multilevel inverters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭方正; 钱照明

    2003-01-01

    Cascade multilevel inverters have been developed for electric utility applications. A cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 H-bridges in which each bridge's dc voltage is supported by its own de ca-pacitor. The new inverter can : ( 1 ) generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage while only switching one timeper fundamental cycle ; (2) dispense with multi-pulse inverters' transformers used in conventional utility in-terfaces and static var compensators; (3) enables direct parallel or series transformer-less connection to medium- and high-voltage power systems. In short, the cascade inverter is much more efficient and suitable for utility applications than traditional multi-pulse and pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters. The authors have experimentally demonstrated the superiority of the new inverter for power supply, (hybrid) electric vehicle (EV) motor drive, reactive power (var) and harmonic compensation. This paper summarizes the features,feasibility, and control schemes of the cascade inverter for utility applications including utility interface of renewable energy, voltage regulation, var compensation, and harmonic filtering in power systems. Analytical,simulated, and experimental results demonstrated the superiority of the new inverters.

  19. Cascade Support Vector Machines with Dimensionality Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kramer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cascade support vector machines have been introduced as extension of classic support vector machines that allow a fast training on large data sets. In this work, we combine cascade support vector machines with dimensionality reduction based preprocessing. The cascade principle allows fast learning based on the division of the training set into subsets and the union of cascade learning results based on support vectors in each cascade level. The combination with dimensionality reduction as preprocessing results in a significant speedup, often without loss of classifier accuracies, while considering the high-dimensional pendants of the low-dimensional support vectors in each new cascade level. We analyze and compare various instantiations of dimensionality reduction preprocessing and cascade SVMs with principal component analysis, locally linear embedding, and isometric mapping. The experimental analysis on various artificial and real-world benchmark problems includes various cascade specific parameters like intermediate training set sizes and dimensionalities.

  20. Phase-sensitive cascaded four-wave mixing processes for generating continuous-variable entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Jing, Jietai

    2017-03-20

    Quantum entanglement shared by different parties enhances their capabilities to communicate, which is the core content of continuous-variable quantum optics and quantum information science. Here, we study an experimentally feasible scheme for generating quantum entanglement of bipartite and tripartite cases based on phase-sensitive cascaded four-wave mixing processes in rubidium vapor. Quantum entanglement of bipartite and tripartite cases in our system, which can be manipulated by the phases and the intensity gains of the input beams, is predicted. We also find a sufficient optimal single-condition criterion to give a valid description for genuine tripartite quantum entanglement in our system. The sufficient optimal single-condition criterion is convenient and can be extended to genuine multipartite entanglement.