WorldWideScience

Sample records for quantitative membrane proteomics

  1. Study of monocyte membrane proteome perturbation during lipopolysaccharide-induced tolerance using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2010-07-02

    Human monocytes\\' exposure to low-level lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces temporary monocytic insensitivity to subsequent LPS challenge. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon could have important clinical utilities in preventing and/or treating severe infections. In this study, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to comprehensively characterize the membrane proteomes of monocytes before and after LPS exposure. We identified a total of 1651 proteins, of which 53.6% were membrane proteins. Ninety-four percent of the proteins were quantified and 255 proteins were shown to be tightly regulated by LPS. Subcellular location analysis revealed organelle-specific response to LPS exposure: more than 90% of identified mitochondrial membrane proteins were significant downregulated, whereas the majority of proteins from other organelles such as ER, Golgi and ribosome were upregulated. Moreover, we found that the expression of most receptors potentially involved in LPS signal pathway (CD14, toll-like receptor 4, CD11/CD18 complex) were substantially decreased, while the expression of molecules involved in LPS neutralization were enhanced after LPS challenge. Together, these findings could be of significance in understanding the mechanism of LPS tolerance and provide values for designing new approaches for regulating monocytic responses in sepsis patients.

  2. Quantitative proteomics reveals distinct differences in the protein content of outer membrane vesicle vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Mommen, Geert P M; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Eppink, Michel H; Wijffels, René H; van der Pol, Leo A; de Jong, Ad P J M

    2013-04-05

    At present, only vaccines containing outer membrane vesicles (OMV) have successfully stopped Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B epidemics. These vaccines however require detergent-extraction to remove endotoxin, which changes immunogenicity and causes production difficulties. To investigate this in more detail, the protein content of detergent-extracted OMV is compared with two detergent-free alternatives. A novel proteomics strategy has been developed that allows quantitative analysis of many biological replicates despite inherent multiplex restrictions of dimethyl labeling. This enables robust statistical analysis of relative protein abundance. The comparison with detergent-extracted OMV reveales that detergent-free OMV are enriched with membrane (lipo)proteins and contain less cytoplasmic proteins due to a milder purification process. These distinct protein profiles are substantiated with serum blot proteomics, confirming enrichment with immunogenic proteins in both detergent-free alternatives. Therefore, the immunogenic protein content of OMV vaccines depends at least partially on the purification process. This study demonstrates that detergent-free OMV have a preferred composition.

  3. Analysis of membrane proteome and secretome in cells over-expressing ADAM17 using quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, R.; Simabuco, F.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Yokoo, S.; Paes Leme, A.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Sherman, N. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) protease is involved in proteolytic ectodomain shedding of several membrane-associated proteins and modulation of key cell signaling pathways in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examined the effect of over-expressing the full length human ADAM17 in membrane and secreted proteins. To this end, we constructed a stable Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cells expressing ADAM17 by tetracycline induction. These cells were grown in Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium containing light lysine, arginine or heavy, L-Arg-13C615N4 and L-Lys -13C615N2 (SILAC: stable isotope labeling with amino acid in cell culture) media and they were treated with an ADAM17 activator, phorbolester (PMA). Controls such as Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cell without PMA treatment and without ADAM17 cloned were cultivated in light medium. The ADAM17 overexpression was induced with tetracycline 500 ng/ml for 24 hours. Cells in a heavy condition were treated with PMA 50 ng/ml for 1 hour and vehicle DMSO was used as control in a light cell condition. The extracellular media were collected, concentrated and used to evaluate the secretome and a cell surface biotinylation-based approach was used to capture cell surface-associated proteins. The biotinylated proteins were eluted with dithiothreitol, alkylated with iodoacetamide and then digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis on an ETD enabled Orbitrap Velos instrument. The results showed different proteins up or down regulated in membrane and secretome analysis which might represent potential molecules involved in signaling or ADAM17 regulation events. (author)

  4. Quantitative proteomic profiling of membrane proteins from the mouse brain cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum using the HysTag reagent: mapping of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper V; Nielsen, Peter Aa; Andersen, Jens R

    2007-01-01

    of recently developed methods for isolation of membrane proteins from 10-20 mg brain tissue [Nielsen, P.Aa., Olsen, J.V., Podtelejnokov, A.V., Andersen, J.R., Mann, M., Wisniewski, J.R., 2005. Proteomic mapping of brain plasma membrane proteins. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 4, 402--408] and the Hys......Analysis of the brain proteome and studying brain diseases through clinical biopsies and animal disease models require methods of quantitative proteomics that are sensitive and allow identification and quantification of low abundant membrane proteins from minute amount of tissue. Taking advantage......Tag-quantification method [Olsen, J.V., Andersen, J.R., Nielsen, P.Aa., Nielsen, M.L., Figeys, D., Mann, M., Wisniewski, J.R., 2004. HysTag---A novel proteomic qualification tool applied to differential analysis of membrane proteins from distinct areas of mouse brain. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 3, 82--92] we performed...

  5. A label-free proteome analysis strategy for identifying quantitative changes in erythrocyte membranes induced by red cell disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Sriswasdi, Sira; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Speicher, David W

    2012-12-05

    Red blood cells have been extensively studied but many questions regarding membrane properties and pathophysiology remain unanswered. Proteome analysis of red cell membranes is complicated by a very wide dynamic range of protein concentrations as well as the presence of proteins that are very large, very hydrophobic, or heterogeneously glycosylated. This study investigated the removal of other blood cell types, red cell membrane extraction, differing degrees of fractionation using 1-D SDS gels, and label-free quantitative methods to determine optimized conditions for proteomic comparisons of clinical blood samples. The results showed that fractionation of red cell membranes on 1-D SDS gels was more efficient than low-ionic-strength extractions followed by 1-D gel fractionation. When gel lanes were sliced into 30 uniform slices, a good depth of analysis that included the identification of most well-characterized, low-abundance red cell membrane proteins including those present at 500 to 10,000 copies per cell was obtained. Furthermore, the size separation enabled detection of changes due to proteolysis or in vivo protein crosslinking. A combination of Rosetta Elucidator quantitation and subsequent statistical analysis enabled the robust detection of protein differences that could be used to address unresolved questions in red cell disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  6. Comprehensive quantitative comparison of the membrane proteome, phosphoproteome, and sialiome of human embryonic and neural stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melo-Braga, Marcella Nunes; Schulz, Melanie; Liu, Qiuyue;

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can differentiate into neural stem cells (NSCs), which can further be differentiated into neurons and glia cells. Therefore, these cells have huge potential as source for treatment of neurological diseases. Membrane-associated proteins are very important......ESCs and NSCs as well as to investigate potential new markers for these two cell stages, we performed large-scale quantitative membrane-proteomic of hESCs and NSCs. This approach employed membrane purification followed by peptide dimethyl labeling and peptide enrichment to study the membrane subproteome as well...... in which 78% of phosphopeptides were identified with ≥99% confidence in site assignment and 1810 unique formerly sialylated N-linked glycopeptides. Several proteins were identified as significantly regulated in hESCs and NSC, including proteins involved in the early embryonic and neural development...

  7. Quantitative Membrane Proteomics in a Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Line Undergoing Osteogenic Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Helle

    . Mesenchymal stem cells are generally isolated based on physical-chemical characteristics such as adherence to plastic, isolating the monocyte fraction. The resultant cultures are often heterogeneous and can contain other cell types, providing a currently poorly defined basis for future clinical use....... We have validated a subset of these markers by antibody-based flourescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), to confirm their presence at the cell surface. In this study, we have obtained a high-resolution profile of the membrane proteome of hMSCs. Furthermore, we have monitored the quantitative changes...

  8. Comprehensive quantitative comparison of the membrane proteome and PTM-ome of human embryonic stem cells and neural stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braga, Marcella Nunes de Melo; Schulz, Melanie; Jakobsen, Lene

    Introduction: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can differentiate into all three germ layers and self-renew. Due to its ability to differentiate in vitro into human neural stem cells (hNSCs), which can further be differentiated into motor neurons and dopaminergic neurons, these cells are potential...... source for treatment of neurological diseases such as Parkinson´s disease. Membrane proteins are very important in cellular signaling and they are regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and glycosylation. In order to obtain more information about important membrane proteins...... and modification sites involved in the differentiation of hESCs to hNSCs and also investigate potential new markers for two stages, we have performed a comprehensive mass-spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics and PTMomics study. Methods: The hESC and hNSC were subject to Na2CO3 and ultracentrifugation...

  9. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and quantitative comparison of the membrane proteomes of self-renewing and differentiating human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Johansen, Pia T;

    2009-01-01

    : Glypican-4, Neuroligin-4, ErbB2, receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase zeta (PTPRZ), and Glycoprotein M6B. Our study also revealed 17 potential markers of hESC differentiation as their corresponding protein expression levels displayed a dramatic increase in differentiated embryonic stem cell......-labeled hESCs appear to be perfectly suitable for functional studies, and we exploited a SILAC-based proteomics strategy for discovery of hESC-specific surface markers. We determined and quantitatively compared the membrane proteomes of the self-renewing versus differentiating cells of two distinct human...

  10. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Distinct Differences in the Protein Content of Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterbeemd, van de B.; Mommen, G.P.M.; Pennings, J.L.A.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Pol, van der L.A.; Jong, de A.P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    At present, only vaccines containing outer membrane vesicles (OMV) have successfully stopped Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B epidemics. These vaccines however require detergent-extraction to remove endotoxin, which changes immunogenicity and causes production difficulties. To investigate this in

  11. Rapid label-free quantitative analysis of the E. coli BL21(DE3) inner membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Malvina; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Kountourakis, Nikos; Koukaki, Marina; Sardis, Marios Frantzeskos; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Tsolis, Konstantinos C; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Economou, Anastassios

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes define cells and cellular compartments and are essential in regulating bidirectional flow of chemicals and signals. Characterizing their protein content therefore is required to determine their function, nevertheless, the comprehensive determination of membrane-embedded sub-proteomes remains challenging. Here, we experimentally characterized the inner membrane proteome (IMP) of the model organism E. coli BL21(DE3). We took advantage of the recent extensive re-annotation of the theoretical E. coli IMP regarding the sub-cellular localization of all its proteins. Using surface proteolysis of IMVs with variable chemical treatments followed by nanoLC-MS/MS analysis, we experimentally identified ∼45% of the expressed IMP in wild type E. coli BL21(DE3) with 242 proteins reported here for the first time. Using modified label-free approaches we quantified 220 IM proteins. Finally, we compared protein levels between wild type cells and those over-synthesizing the membrane-embedded translocation channel SecYEG proteins. We propose that this proteomics pipeline will be generally applicable to the determination of IMP from other bacteria.

  12. Quantitative Proteome Mapping of Nitrotyrosines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Qian, Weijun

    2008-02-10

    An essential first step in the understanding disease and environmental perturbations is the early and quantitative detection of the increased levels of the inflammatory marker nitrotyrosine, as compared with its endogenous levels within the tissue or cellular proteome. Thus, methods that successfully address a proteome-wide quantitation of nitrotyrosine and related oxidative modifications can provide early biomarkers of risk and progression of disease as well as effective strategies for therapy. Multidimensional separations LC coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has, in recent years, significantly expanded our knowledge of human (and mammalian model system) proteomes including some nascent work in identification of post-translational modifications. In the following review, we discuss the application of LC-MS/MS for quantitation and identification of nitrotyrosine-modified proteins within the context of complex protein mixtures presented in mammalian proteomes.

  13. Quantitative proteomics of fractionated membrane and lumen exosome proteins from isogenic metastatic and nonmetastatic bladder cancer cells reveal differential expression of EMT factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Jensen, Steffen Grann; Thorsen, Kasper; Whitehead, Bradley; Howard, Kenneth A; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Larsen, Martin R; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe

    2014-03-01

    Cancer cells secrete soluble factors and various extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, into their tissue microenvironment. The secretion of exosomes is speculated to facilitate local invasion and metastatic spread. Here, we used an in vivo metastasis model of human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 without metastatic capacity and its two isogenic derivate cell lines SLT4 and FL3, which form metastases in the lungs and liver of mice, respectively. Cultivation in CLAD1000 bioreactors rather than conventional culture flasks resulted in a 13- to 16-fold increased exosome yield and facilitated quantitative proteomics of fractionated exosomes. Exosomes from T24, SLT4, and FL3 cells were partitioned into membrane and luminal fractions and changes in protein abundance related to the gain of metastatic capacity were identified by quantitative iTRAQ proteomics. We identified several proteins linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including increased abundance of vimentin and hepatoma-derived growth factor in the membrane, and casein kinase II α and annexin A2 in the lumen of exosomes, respectively, from metastatic cells. The change in exosome protein abundance correlated little, although significant for FL3 versus T24, with changes in cellular mRNA expression. Our proteomic approach may help identification of proteins in the membrane and lumen of exosomes potentially involved in the metastatic process.

  14. Differential expression profiling of membrane proteins by quantitative proteomics in a human mesenchymal stem cell line undergoing osteoblast differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Leonard J; Zeemann, Patricia A; Li, Chen;

    2005-01-01

    One of the major limitations for understanding the biology of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is the absence of prospective markers needed for distinguishing them from other cells and for monitoring lineage-specific differentiation. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has proven extremely...... in a cell model of hMSCs established by overexpression of human telomerase reverse-transcriptase gene. We identified 463 unique proteins with extremely high confidence, including all known markers of hMSCs (e.g., SH3 [CD71], SH2 [CD105], CD166, CD44, Thy1, CD29, and HOP26 [CD63]) among 148 integral membrane...... or membrane-anchored proteins and 159 membrane-associated proteins. Twenty-nine integrins and cell adhesion molecules, 20 receptors, and 18 Ras-related small GTPases were also identified. Upon OB differentiation, the expression levels of 83 proteins increased by at least twofold whereas the levels of another...

  15. Selective Proteomic Proximity Labeling Assay Using Tyramide (SPPLAT): A Quantitative Method for the Proteomic Analysis of Localized Membrane-Bound Protein Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Johanna Susan; Li, Xue-Wen; Perrett, Sarah; Lilley, Kathryn Susan; Jackson, Antony Philip

    2017-04-03

    This manuscript describes a new and general method to identify proteins localized into spatially restricted membrane microenvironments. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is brought into contact with a target protein by being covalently linked to a primary or secondary antibody, an antigen or substrate, a drug, or a toxin. A biotinylated tyramide-based reagent is then added. In the presence of HRP and hydrogen peroxide, the reagent is converted into a free radical that only diffuses a short distance before covalently labeling proteins within a few tens to hundreds of nanometers from the target. The biotinylated proteins can then be isolated by standard affinity chromatography and identified by liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS). The assay can be made quantitative by using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) or isobaric tagging at the peptide level. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Efficient Isolation and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Cancer Cell Plasma Membrane Proteins for Identification of Metastasis-Associated Cell Surface Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Jensen, Ole N

    2009-01-01

    Cell surface membrane proteins are involved in central processes such as cell signaling, cell-cell interactions, ion and solute transport, and they seem to play a pivotal role in several steps of the metastatic process of cancer cells. The low abundance and hydrophobic nature of cell surface...... membrane proteins complicate their purification and identification by MS. We used two isogenic cell lines with opposite metastatic capabilities in nude mice to optimize cell surface membrane protein purification and to identify potential novel markers of metastatic cancer. The cell surface membrane...... proteins were isolated by centrifugation/ultracentrifugation steps, followed by membrane separation using a Percoll/sucrose density gradient. The gradient fractions containing the cell surface membrane proteins were identified by enzymatic assays. Stable isotope labeling of the proteome of the metastatic...

  17. Comprehensive quantitative comparison of the membrane proteome and PTM-ome of human embryonic stem cells and neural stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braga, Marcella Nunes de Melo; Schulz, Melanie; Jakobsen, Lene

    Introduction: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can differentiate into all three germ layers and self-renew. Due to its ability to differentiate in vitro into human neural stem cells (hNSCs), which can further be differentiated into motor neurons and dopaminergic neurons, these cells are potential...... source for treatment of neurological diseases such as Parkinson´s disease. Membrane proteins are very important in cellular signaling and they are regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and glycosylation. In order to obtain more information about important membrane proteins...... development and has been implicated in cell growth control. Neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NRCAM) is a sialylated glycoprotein upregulated in hNSCs. This protein is involved in several aspects of nervous system development, such as synaptogenesis. In addition, components of neural specific canonical...

  18. Proteome-Wide Quantitation by SILAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2010-01-01

    isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) has emerged as a powerful and versatile approach for proteome-wide quantitation by mass spectrometry. SILAC utilizes the cells' own metabolism to incorporate isotopically labeled amino acids into its proteome which can be mixed with the proteome...... detailed procedure for performing SILAC-based experiment for proteome-wide quantitation, including a protocol for optimizing SILAC labeling. We also provide an update on the most recent developments of this technique....... of unlabeled cells and differences in protein expression can easily be read out by comparing the abundance of the labeled versus unlabeled proteins. SILAC has been applied to numerous different cell lines and the technique has been adapted for a wide range of experimental procedures. In this chapter we provide...

  19. Proteomics and the dynamic plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    plasma membrane is of particular interest, by not only serving as a barrier between the "cell interior" and the external environment, but moreover by organizing and clustering essential components to enable dynamic responses to internal and external stimuli. Defining and characterizing the dynamic plasma...... membrane proteome is crucial for understanding fundamental biological processes, disease mechanisms and for finding drug targets. Protein identification, characterization of dynamic PTMs and protein-ligand interactions, and determination of transient changes in protein expression and composition are among...... the challenges in functional proteomic studies of the plasma membrane. We review the recent progress in MS-based plasma membrane proteomics by presenting key examples from eukaryotic systems, including mammals, yeast and plants. We highlight the importance of enrichment and quantification technologies required...

  20. [Progress in stable isotope labeled quantitative proteomics methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Shan, Yichu; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative proteomics is an important research field in post-genomics era. There are two strategies for proteome quantification: label-free methods and stable isotope labeling methods which have become the most important strategy for quantitative proteomics at present. In the past few years, a number of quantitative methods have been developed, which support the fast development in biology research. In this work, we discuss the progress in the stable isotope labeling methods for quantitative proteomics including relative and absolute quantitative proteomics, and then give our opinions on the outlook of proteome quantification methods.

  1. Mapping the membrane proteome of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluesener, Daniela; Fischer, Frank; Kruip, Jochen; Rögner, Matthias; Poetsch, Ansgar

    2005-04-01

    In order to avoid the specific problems with intrinsic membrane proteins in proteome analysis, a new procedure was developed which is superior to the classical two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) method in terms of intrinsic membrane proteins. For analysis of the membrane proteome from Corynebacterium glutamicum, we replaced the first separation dimension, i.e., the isoelectric focusing step, by anion-exchange chromatography, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE in the second separation dimension. Enrichment of the membrane intrinsic subproteome was achieved by washing with 2.5 M NaBr which removed more than 35% of the membrane-associated soluble proteins. For the extraction and solubilization of membrane proteins, the detergent amidosulfobetaine 14 (ASB-14) was most efficient in a detailed screening procedure and proved also suitable for chromatography. 356 gel bands were spotted, and out of 170 different identified proteins, 50 were membrane-integral. Membrane proteins with one up to 13 transmembrane helices were found. Careful analysis revealed that this new procedure covers proteins from a wide pI range (3.7-10.6) and a wide mass range of 10-120 kDa. About 50% of the identified membrane proteins belong to various functional categories like energy metabolism, transport, signal transduction, protein translocation, and proteolysis while for the others a function is not yet known, indicating the potential of the developed method for elucidation of membrane proteomes in general.

  2. Inspection, visualisation and analysis of quantitative proteomics data

    OpenAIRE

    Gatto, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Material Quantitative Proteomics and Data Analysis Course. 4 - 5 April 2016, Queen Hotel, Chester, UK Table D - Inspection, visualisation and analysis of quantitative proteomics data, Laurent Gatto (University of Cambridge)

  3. Organellar proteomics: analysis of pancreatic zymogen granule membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuequn; Walker, Angela K; Strahler, John R; Simon, Eric S; Tomanicek-Volk, Sarah L; Nelson, Bradley B; Hurley, Mary C; Ernst, Stephen A; Williams, John A; Andrews, Philip C

    2006-02-01

    The zymogen granule (ZG) is the specialized organelle in pancreatic acinar cells for digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion and has been a model for studying secretory granule functions. In an initial effort to comprehensively understand the functions of this organelle, we conducted a proteomic study to identify proteins from highly purified ZG membranes. By combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional LC with tandem mass spectrometry, 101 proteins were identified from purified ZG membranes including 28 known ZG proteins and 73 previously unknown proteins, including SNAP29, Rab27B, Rab11A, Rab6, Rap1, and myosin Vc. Moreover several hypothetical proteins were identified that represent potential novel proteins. The ZG localization of nine of these proteins was further confirmed by immunocytochemistry. To distinguish intrinsic membrane proteins from soluble and peripheral membrane proteins, a quantitative proteomic strategy was used to measure the enrichment of intrinsic membrane proteins through the purification process. The iTRAQ ratios correlated well with known or Transmembrane Hidden Markov Model-predicted soluble or membrane proteins. By combining subcellular fractionation with high resolution separation and comprehensive identification of proteins, we have begun to elucidate zymogen granule functions through proteomic and subsequent functional analysis of its membrane components.

  4. Integrated and Quantitative Proteomics of Human Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakkioui, Y; Temel, Y; Chevet, E; Negroni, L

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics represents a powerful approach for the comprehensive analysis of proteins expressed under defined conditions. These properties have been used to investigate the proteome of disease states, including cancer. It has become a major subject of studies to apply proteomics for biomarker and therapeutic target identification. In the last decades, technical advances in mass spectrometry have increased the capacity of protein identification and quantification. Moreover, the analysis of posttranslational modification (PTM), especially phosphorylation, has allowed large-scale identification of biological mechanisms. Even so, increasing evidence indicates that global protein quantification is often insufficient for the explanation of biology and has shown to pose challenges in identifying new and robust biomarkers. As a consequence, to improve the accuracy of the discoveries made using proteomics in human tumors, it is necessary to combine (i) robust and reproducible methods for sample preparation allowing statistical comparison, (ii) PTM analyses in addition to global proteomics for additional levels of knowledge, and (iii) use of bioinformatics for decrypting protein list. Herein, we present technical specificities for samples preparation involving isobaric tag labeling, TiO2-based phosphopeptides enrichment and hydrazyde-based glycopeptides purification as well as the key points for the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the protein lists. The method is based on our experience with tumors analysis derived from hepatocellular carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, human embryonic intervertebral disk, and chordoma experiments.

  5. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  6. Quantitative proteomics of Chlorobaculum tepidum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenby, Lasse Gaarde; Szymanska, Monika; Holkenbrink, Carina;

    2011-01-01

    two different growth conditions. Wild-type cells growing on thiosulfate had an increased abundance of periplasmic cytochrome c-555 and proteins of the periplasmic thiosulfate-oxidizing SOX enzyme system when compared with cells growing on sulfide. A dsrM mutant of Cba. tepidum, which lacks......Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum is a green sulfur bacterium that oxidizes sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate for photosynthetic growth. To gain insight into the sulfur metabolism, the proteome of Cba. tepidum cells sampled under different growth conditions has been quantified using a rapid gel......-free, filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) protocol with an in-solution isotopic labeling strategy. Among the 2245 proteins predicted from the Cba. tepidum genome, approximately 970 proteins were detected in unlabeled samples, whereas approximately 630-640 proteins were detected in labeled samples comparing...

  7. Interpretation of Quantitative Shotgun Proteomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasebø, Elise; Berven, Frode S; Selheim, Frode; Barsnes, Harald; Vaudel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In quantitative proteomics, large lists of identified and quantified proteins are used to answer biological questions in a systemic approach. However, working with such extensive datasets can be challenging, especially when complex experimental designs are involved. Here, we demonstrate how to post-process large quantitative datasets, detect proteins of interest, and annotate the data with biological knowledge. The protocol presented can be achieved without advanced computational knowledge thanks to the user-friendly Perseus interface (available from the MaxQuant website, www.maxquant.org ). Various visualization techniques facilitating the interpretation of quantitative results in complex biological systems are also highlighted.

  8. Quantitative proteomics reveals cellular targets of celastrol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Hansen

    Full Text Available Celastrol, a natural substance isolated from plant extracts used in traditional Chinese medicine, has been extensively investigated as a possible drug for treatment of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and protein misfolding disorders. Although studies focusing on celastrol's effects in specific cellular pathways have revealed a considerable number of targets in a diverse array of in vitro models there is an essential need for investigations that can provide a global view of its effects. To assess cellular effects of celastrol and to identify target proteins as biomarkers for monitoring treatment regimes, we performed large-scale quantitative proteomics in cultured human lymphoblastoid cells, a cell type that can be readily prepared from human blood samples. Celastrol substantially modified the proteome composition and 158 of the close to 1800 proteins with robust quantitation showed at least a 1.5 fold change in protein levels. Up-regulated proteins play key roles in cytoprotection with a prominent group involved in quality control and processing of proteins traversing the endoplasmic reticulum. Increased levels of proteins essential for the cellular protection against oxidative stress including heme oxygenase 1, several peroxiredoxins and thioredoxins as well as proteins involved in the control of iron homeostasis were also observed. Specific analysis of the mitochondrial proteome strongly indicated that the mitochondrial association of certain antioxidant defense and apoptosis-regulating proteins increased in cells exposed to celastrol. Analysis of selected mRNA transcripts showed that celastrol activated several different stress response pathways and dose response studies furthermore showed that continuous exposure to sub-micromolar concentrations of celastrol is associated with reduced cellular viability and proliferation. The extensive catalog of regulated proteins presented here identifies numerous cellular effects of celastrol and constitutes

  9. Quantitative proteomic analysis of amphotericin B resistance in Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Marie-Christine; Bourassa, Sylvie; Légaré, Danielle; Poirier, Guy G; Droit, Arnaud; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) in its liposomal form is now considered as either first- or second-line treatment against Leishmania infections in different part of the world. Few cases of AmB resistance have been reported and resistance mechanisms toward AmB are still poorly understood. This paper reports a large-scale comparative proteomic study in the context of AmB resistance. Quantitative proteomics using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was used to better characterize cytoplasmic and membrane-enriched (ME) proteomes of the in vitro generated Leishmania infantum AmB resistant mutant AmB1000.1. In total, 97 individual proteins were found as differentially expressed between the mutant and its parental sensitive strain (WT). More than half of these proteins were either metabolic enzymes or involved in transcription or translation processes. Key energetic pathways such as glycolysis and TCA cycle were up-regulated in the mutant. Interestingly, many proteins involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and heat-shock proteins were also up-regulated in the resistant mutant. This work provides a basis for further investigations to understand the roles of proteins differentially expressed in relation with AmB resistance.

  10. Quantitative proteome and transcriptome analysis of the archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Pan, Cuiping; Nickell, Stephan; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nagy, István

    2010-09-03

    A comparative proteome and transcriptome analysis of Thermoplasma acidophilum cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions has been performed. One-thousand twenty-five proteins were identified covering 88% of the cytosolic proteome. Using a label-free quantitation method, we found that approximately one-quarter of the identified proteome (263 proteins) were significantly induced (>2 fold) under anaerobic conditions. Thirty-nine macromolecular complexes were identified, of which 28 were quantified and 15 were regulated under anaerobiosis. In parallel, a whole genome cDNA microarray analysis was performed showing that the expression levels of 445 genes were influenced by the absence of oxygen. Interestingly, more than 40% of the membrane protein-encoding genes (145 out of 335 ORFs) were up- or down-regulated at the mRNA level. Many of these proteins are functionally associated with extracellular protein or peptide degradation or ion and amino acid transport. Comparison of the transcriptome and proteome showed only a weak positive correlation between mRNA and protein expression changes, which is indicative of extensive post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in T. acidophilum. Integration of transcriptomics and proteomics data generated hypotheses for physiological adaptations of the cells to anaerobiosis, and the quantitative proteomics data together with quantitative analysis of protein complexes provide a platform for correlation of MS-based proteomics studies with cryo-electron tomography-based visual proteomics approaches.

  11. [Pharmacoproteomic approach by quantitative targeted proteomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2012-01-01

    Omics analyses provided many candidates for drug targets and biomarkers. However, these analyses have not contributed to drug development efficiently because of top-down omics analyses. To solve this problem, we have recently developed quantitative targeted proteomics with multiplexed-multiple reaction monitoring (multiplexed-MRM) method, which enables us to perform bottom-up proteomics. In this method, the target proteins for quantification are selected prior to analysis based on the knowledge related to interesting phenomena. Target peptides for quantification are selected only from sequence information, so time-consuming procedures such as antibody preparation and protein purification are unnecessary. In this review, we introduce the technical features of multiplexed-MRM method as novel protein quantification method, and summarize its advantages with reference to recently reported results, including species differences, in vitro-to-in vivo reconstruction and personalized chemotherapy. This novel simultaneous protein quantification method overcomes problems of antibody-based quantification and would open new drug research based of protein as "Pharmacoproteomics".

  12. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kieselbach

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT and leukotoxin (LtxA into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  13. Quantitative proteomic assessment of very early cellular signaling events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Olsen, Jesper V

    2007-01-01

    Technical limitations have prevented proteomic analyses of events occurring less than 30 s after signal initiation. We developed an automated, continuous quench-flow system allowing quantitative proteomic assessment of very early cellular signaling events (qPACE) with a time resolution of 1 s...

  14. [Bibliometric analysis of bacterial quantitative proteomics in English literatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; She, Danyang; Liu, Youning; Wang, Rui; Di, Xiuzhen; Liang, Beibei; Wang, Yue

    2014-07-01

    To analyze the worldwide advances on bacterial quantitative proteomics over the past fifteen years with bibliometric approach. Literature retrieval was conducted throughout the databases of Pubmed, Embase and Science citation index (SCI), using "bacterium" and "quantitative proteomics" as the key words. The deadline is July 2013. We sorted and analyzed these articles with Endnote X6 from the aspects of published year, the first author, name of journal, published institution, cited frequency and publication type. 932 English articles were included in our research after deleting the duplicates. The first article on bacterial quantitative proteomics was reported in 1999. The maximal publications were 163 related articles in 2012. Up till July 2013, authors from more than 23 countries and regions have published articles in this field. China ranks the fourth. The main publication type is original articles. The most frequently cited article is entitled with "Absolute quantification of proteins by LCMSE: a virtue of parallel MS acquisition" by Silva JC, Gorenstein MV, Li GZ, et al in Mol Cell Proteomics 2006. The most productive author is Smith RD from Biological Sciences Division, Pac. Northwest National Laboratory. The top journal publishing bacterial quantitative proteomics is Proteomics. More and more researchers pay attention to quantitative proteomics which will be widely used in bacteriology.

  15. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Studying Phosphotyrosine Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism for controlling many aspects of cellular processes, as well as aspects of human health and diseases. Compared to phosphoserine (pSer) and phosphothreonine (pThr), phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signaling is more tightly regulated, but often more challenging to characterize due to significantly lower level of tyrosine phosphorylation (a relative abundance of 1800:200:1 was estimated for pSer/pThr/pTyr in vertebrate cells[1]). In this review, we outline the recent advances in analytical methodologies for enrichment, identification, and accurate quantitation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and peptides using antibody-based technologies, capillary liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), and various stable isotope labeling strategies, as well as non-MS-based methods such as protein or peptide array methods. These proteomic technological advances provide powerful tools for potentially understanding signal transduction at the system level and provide a basis for discovering novel drug targets for human diseases. [1] Hunter, T. (1998) The Croonian Lecture 1997. The phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine: its role in cell growth and disease. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 353, 583–605

  16. Proteomics characterization of abundant Golgi membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A W; Ward, M A; Blackstock, W P; Freeman, H N; Choudhary, J S; Lewis, A P; Chotai, D; Fazel, A; Gushue, J N; Paiement, J; Palcy, S; Chevet, E; Lafrenière-Roula, M; Solari, R; Thomas, D Y; Rowley, A; Bergeron, J J

    2001-02-16

    A mass spectrometric analysis of proteins partitioning into Triton X-114 from purified hepatic Golgi apparatus (84% purity by morphometry, 122-fold enrichment over the homogenate for the Golgi marker galactosyl transferase) led to the unambiguous identification of 81 proteins including a novel Golgi-associated protein of 34 kDa (GPP34). The membrane protein complement was resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to a hierarchical approach using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry characterization by peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry to generate sequence tags, and Edman sequencing of proteins. Major membrane proteins corresponded to known Golgi residents, a Golgi lectin, anterograde cargo, and an abundance of trafficking proteins including KDEL receptors, p24 family members, SNAREs, Rabs, a single ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor, and two SCAMPs. Analytical fractionation and gold immunolabeling of proteins in the purified Golgi fraction were used to assess the intra-Golgi and total cellular distribution of GPP34, two SNAREs, SCAMPs, and the trafficking proteins GBF1, BAP31, and alpha(2)P24 identified by the proteomics approach as well as the endoplasmic reticulum contaminant calnexin. Although GPP34 has never previously been identified as a protein, the localization of GPP34 to the Golgi complex, the conservation of GPP34 from yeast to humans, and the cytosolically exposed location of GPP34 predict a role for a novel coat protein in Golgi trafficking.

  17. Quantitative transporter proteomics by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry: addressing methodologic issues of plasma membrane isolation and expression-activity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vineet; Prasad, Bhagwat; Patilea, Gabriela; Gupta, Anshul; Salphati, Laurent; Evers, Raymond; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2015-02-01

    To predict transporter-mediated drug disposition using physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, one approach is to measure transport activity and relate it to protein expression levels in cell lines (overexpressing the transporter) and then scale these to via in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). This approach makes two major assumptions. First, that the expression of the transporter is predominantly in the plasma membrane. Second, that there is a linear correlation between expression level and activity of the transporter protein. The present study was conducted to test these two assumptions. We evaluated two commercially available kits that claimed to separate plasma membrane from other cell membranes. The Qiagen Qproteome kit yielded very little protein in the fraction purported to be the plasma membrane. The Abcam Phase Separation kit enriched the plasma membrane but did not separate it from other intracellular membranes. For the Abcam method, the expression level of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1/2B1 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) proteins in all subcellular fractions isolated from cells or human liver tissue tracked that of Na⁺-K⁺ ATPase. Assuming that Na⁺-K⁺ ATPase is predominantly located in the plasma membrane, these data suggest that the transporters measured are also primarily located in the plasma membrane. Using short hairpin RNA, we created clones of cell lines with varying degrees of OATP1B1 or BCRP expression level. In these clones, transport activity of OATP1B1 or BCRP was highly correlated with protein expression level (r² > 0.9). These data support the use of transporter expression level data and activity data from transporter overexpressing cell lines for IVIVE of transporter-mediated disposition of drugs.

  18. Quantitative proteomics to study carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vishvanath; Tiwari, Monalisa

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen causing pneumonia, respiratory infections and urinary tract infections. The prevalence of this lethal pathogen increases gradually in the clinical setup where it can grow on artificial surfaces, utilize ethanol as a carbon source. Moreover it resists desiccation. Carbapenems, a β-lactam, are the most commonly prescribed drugs against A. baumannii. Resistance against carbapenem has emerged in Acinetobacter baumannii which can create significant health problems and is responsible for high morbidity and mortality. With the development of quantitative proteomics, a considerable progress has been made in the study of carbapenem resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii. Recent updates showed that quantitative proteomics has now emerged as an important tool to understand the carbapenem resistance mechanism in Acinetobacter baumannii. Present review also highlights the complementary nature of different quantitative proteomic methods used to study carbapenem resistance and suggests to combine multiple proteomic methods for understanding the response to antibiotics by Acinetobacter baumannii.

  19. Quantitative Proteomics to study Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishvanath eTiwari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen causing pneumonia, respiratory infections and urinary tract infections. The prevalence of this lethal pathogen increases gradually in the clinical setup where it can grow on artificial surfaces, utilize ethanol as a carbon source. Moreover it resists desiccation. Carbapenems, a β-lactam, are the most commonly prescribed drugs against A. baumannii. Resistance against carbapenem has emerged in Acinetobacter baumannii which can create significant health problems and is responsible for high morbidity & mortality. With the development of quantitative proteomics, a considerable progress has been made in the study of carbapenem resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii. Recent updates showed that quantitative proteomics has now emerged as an important tool to understand the carbapenem resistance mechanism in Acinetobacter baumannii. Present review also highlights the complementary nature of different quantitative proteomic methods used to study carbapenem resistance and suggests to combine multiple proteomic methods for understanding the response to antibiotics by Acinetobacter baumannii.

  20. A Biologist's Field Guide to Multiplexed Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalarski, Corey E; Kirkpatrick, Donald S

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput genomic and proteomic studies have generated near-comprehensive catalogs of biological constituents within many model systems. Nevertheless, static catalogs are often insufficient to fully describe the dynamic processes that drive biology. Quantitative proteomic techniques address this need by providing insight into closely related biological states such as the stages of a therapeutic response or cellular differentiation. The maturation of quantitative proteomics in recent years has brought about a variety of technologies, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. It can be difficult for those unfamiliar with this evolving landscape to match the experiment at hand with the best tool for the job. Here, we outline quantitative methods for proteomic mass spectrometry and discuss their benefits and weaknesses from the perspective of the biologist aiming to generate meaningful data and address mechanistic questions. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Quantitative Proteome Analysis Reveals Increased Content of Basement Membrane Proteins in Arteries from Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Lower Levels among Metformin Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørdam Preil, Simone; Kristensen, Lars P; Beck, Hans C

    2015-01-01

    analysis was done by iTRAQ-labelling and LC-MS/MS analysis on individual arterial samples. The amounts of the basement membrane (BM) components, alpha-1- and alpha-2- type IV collagen, gamma-1- and beta-2-laminin were significantly increased in patients with diabetes. Moreover, the expressions of basement...

  2. Quantitative proteomics by amino acid labeling in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredens, Julius; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Giessing, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate labeling of Caenorhabditis elegans with heavy isotope-labeled lysine by feeding them with heavy isotope-labeled Escherichia coli. Using heavy isotope-labeled worms and quantitative proteomics methods, we identified several proteins that are regulated in response to loss or RNAi-med......-mediated knockdown of the nuclear hormone receptor 49 in C. elegans. The combined use of quantitative proteomics and selective gene knockdown is a powerful tool for C. elegans biology.......We demonstrate labeling of Caenorhabditis elegans with heavy isotope-labeled lysine by feeding them with heavy isotope-labeled Escherichia coli. Using heavy isotope-labeled worms and quantitative proteomics methods, we identified several proteins that are regulated in response to loss or RNAi...

  3. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M.; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2016-04-07

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highly differentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified in these membrane systems, and a comprehensive catalog of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared to the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared to a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Overall, the protein composition of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane is quite similar to the E.coli plasma membrane and Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a gram-negative bacterium that has an additional internal membrane system that fulfils the energetic requirements of the cell.

  4. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M; Nguyen, Amelia Y; Gritsenko, Marina A; Smith, Richard D; Koppenaal, David W; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-06-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highly differentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems in cyanobacteria, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified, and a comprehensive catalogue of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 differentially localized proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared with the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared with a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Thus, our data clearly define the two membrane systems with distinct functions. Overall, the protein compositions of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane are quite similar to that of the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli and thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis chloroplasts, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a Gram

  5. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M.; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2016-04-07

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highlydifferentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems in cyanobacteria, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified, and a comprehensive catalogue of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 differentially localized proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared with the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared with a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Thus, our data clearly define the two membrane systems with distinct functions. Overall, the protein compositions of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane are quite similar to that of the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli and thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis chloroplasts, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a Gram

  6. Quantitative proteomic analyses of the response of acidophilic microbial communities to different pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, Christopher P; Pan, Chongle; Denef, Vincent J; Samatova, Nagiza F; Hettich, Robert L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2011-07-01

    Extensive genomic characterization of multi-species acid mine drainage microbial consortia combined with laboratory cultivation has enabled the application of quantitative proteomic analyses at the community level. In this study, quantitative proteomic comparisons were used to functionally characterize laboratory-cultivated acidophilic communities sustained in pH 1.45 or 0.85 conditions. The distributions of all proteins identified for individual organisms indicated biases for either high or low pH, and suggests pH-specific niche partitioning for low abundance bacteria and archaea. Although the proteome of the dominant bacterium, Leptospirillum group II, was largely unaffected by pH treatments, analysis of functional categories indicated proteins involved in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, as well as cell membrane/envelope biogenesis were overrepresented at high pH. Comparison of specific protein abundances indicates higher pH conditions favor Leptospirillum group III, whereas low pH conditions promote the growth of certain archaea. Thus, quantitative proteomic comparisons revealed distinct differences in community composition and metabolic function of individual organisms during different pH treatments. Proteomic analysis revealed other aspects of community function. Different numbers of phage proteins were identified across biological replicates, indicating stochastic spatial heterogeneity of phage outbreaks. Additionally, proteomic data were used to identify a previously unknown genotypic variant of Leptospirillum group II, an indication of selection for a specific Leptospirillum group II population in laboratory communities. Our results confirm the importance of pH and related geochemical factors in fine-tuning acidophilic microbial community structure and function at the species and strain level, and demonstrate the broad utility of proteomics in laboratory community studies.

  7. Purification and proteomics of pathogen-modified vacuoles and membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Ana eHerweg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain pathogenic bacteria adopt an intracellular lifestyle and proliferate in eukaryotic host cells. The intracellular niche protects the bacteria from cellular and humoral components of the mammalian immune system, and at the same time, allows the bacteria to gain access to otherwise restricted nutrient sources. Yet, intracellular protection and access to nutrients comes with a price, i.e. the bacteria need to overcome cell-autonomous defense mechanisms, such as the bactericidal endocytic pathway. While a few bacteria rupture the early phagosome and escape into the host cytoplasm, most intracellular pathogens form a distinct, degradation-resistant and replication-permissive membranous compartment. Intracellular bacteria that form unique pathogen vacuoles include Legionella, Mycobacterium, Chlamydia, Simkania and Salmonella species. In order to understand the formation of these pathogen niches on a global scale and in a comprehensive and quantitative manner, an inventory of compartment-associated host factors is required. To this end, the intact pathogen compartments need to be isolated, purified and biochemically characterized. Here, we review recent progress on the isolation and purification of pathogen-modified vacuoles and membranes, as well as their proteomic characterization by mass spectrometry and different validation approaches. These studies provide the basis for further investigations on the specific mechanisms of pathogen-driven compartment formation.

  8. PIQMIe: A web server for semi-quantitative proteomics data management and analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kuzniar (Arnold); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe present the Proteomics Identifications and Quantitations Data Management and Integration Service or PIQMIe that aids in reliable and scalable data management, analysis and visualization of semi-quantitative mass spectrometry based proteomics experiments. PIQMIe readily integrates pept

  9. Mapping Protein-Protein Interactions by Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2010-01-01

    spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics in combination with affinity purification protocols has become the method of choice to map and track the dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions, including the ones occurring during cellular signaling events. Different quantitative MS strategies have been used...

  10. Towards a quantitative prediction of the fluxome from the proteome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossell, S.L.; Solem, C.; Jensen, P.R.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The promise of proteomics and fluxomics is limited by our current inability to integrate these two levels of cellular organization. Here we present the derivation, experimental parameterization, and appraisal of flux functions that enable the quantitative prediction of changes in metabolic fluxes fr

  11. Differential membrane proteomics using 18O-labeling to identify biomarkers for cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias; Harsha, H C; Grønborg, Mads

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative proteomic methodologies allow profiling of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a high-throughput fashion. This approach is increasingly applied to cancer biomarker discovery to identify proteins that are differentially regulated in cancers. Fractionation of protein samples based...... on enrichment of cellular subproteomes prior to mass spectrometric analysis can provide increased coverage of certain classes of molecules. We used a membrane protein enrichment strategy coupled with 18O labeling based quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that are highly expressed in cholangiocarcinomas....... In addition to identifying several proteins previously known to be overexpressed in cholangiocarcinoma, we discovered a number of molecules that were previously not associated with cholangiocarcinoma. Using immunoblotting and immunohistochemical labeling of tissue microarrays, we validated Golgi membrane...

  12. Quantitative and qualitative proteome characteristics extracted from in-depth integrated genomics and proteomics analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, T.Y.; van Heesch, S.; van den Toorn, H.; Giansanti, P.; Cristobal, A.; Toonen, P.; Schafer, S.; Hubner, N.; van Breukelen, B.; Mohammed, S.; Cuppen, E.; Heck, A.J.R.; Guryev, V.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative protein characteristics are regulated at genomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptional levels. Here, we integrated in-depth transcriptome and proteome analyses of liver tissues from two rat strains to unravel the interactions within and between these layers. We obtain

  13. Quantitative proteomic approaches to studying histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Barry M; Young, Nicolas L; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2011-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) positively and negatively regulate gene expression, and are consequently a vital influence on the genomic profile of all eukaryotic species. The study of histone PTMs using classical methods in molecular biology, such as immunofluorescence and Western blotting, is challenging given the technical issues of the approaches, and chemical diversity and combinatorial patterns of the modifications. In light of these many technical limitations, mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as the most unbiased and rigorous experimental platform to identify and quantify histone PTMs in a high-throughput manner. This review covers the latest developments in mass spectrometry for the analysis of histone PTMs, with the hope of inspiring the continued integration of proteomic, genomic and epigenetic research.

  14. Red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteomics--Part II: Comparative proteomics and RBC patho-physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, Erica M; Lutz, Hans U; Mann, Matthias; Thomas, Alan W

    2010-01-03

    Membrane proteomics offers unprecedented possibilities to compare protein expression in health and disease leading potentially to the identification of markers, of targets for therapeutics and to a better understanding of disease mechanisms. From transfusion medicine to infectious diseases, from cardiovascular affections to diabetes, comparative proteomics has made a contribution to the identification of proteins unique to RBCs of patients with specific illnesses shedding light on possible RBC markers for systemic diseases. In this review we will provide a short overview of some of the main achievements obtained by comparative proteomics in the field of RBC-related local and systemic diseases and suggest some additional areas of RBCs research to which comparative proteomics approaches could be fruitfully applied or extended in combination with biochemical techniques.

  15. Statistical design of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Ann L; Vitek, Olga

    2009-05-01

    We review the fundamental principles of statistical experimental design, and their application to quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We focus on class comparison using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and discuss how randomization, replication and blocking help avoid systematic biases due to the experimental procedure, and help optimize our ability to detect true quantitative changes between groups. We also discuss the issues of pooling multiple biological specimens for a single mass analysis, and calculation of the number of replicates in a future study. When applicable, we emphasize the parallels between designing quantitative proteomic experiments and experiments with gene expression microarrays, and give examples from that area of research. We illustrate the discussion using theoretical considerations, and using real-data examples of profiling of disease.

  16. Assessing the Phagosome Proteome by Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Julien; Härtlova, Anetta; Trost, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Phagocytosis is the process that engulfs particles in vesicles called phagosomes that are trafficked through a series of maturation steps, culminating in the destruction of the internalized cargo. Because phagosomes are in direct contact with the particle and undergo constant fusion and fission events with other organelles, characterization of the phagosomal proteome is a powerful tool to understand mechanisms controlling innate immunity as well as vesicle trafficking. The ability to isolate highly pure phagosomes through the use of latex beads led to an extensive use of proteomics to study phagosomes under different stimuli. Thousands of different proteins have been identified and quantified, revealing new properties and shedding new light on the dynamics and composition of maturing phagosomes and innate immunity mechanisms. In this chapter, we describe how quantitative-based proteomic methods such as label-free, dimethyl labeling or Tandem Mass Tag (TMT) labeling can be applied for the characterization of protein composition and translocation during maturation of phagosomes in macrophages.

  17. Optimization of Statistical Methods Impact on Quantitative Proteomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursiheimo, Anna; Vehmas, Anni P; Afzal, Saira; Suomi, Tomi; Chand, Thaman; Strauss, Leena; Poutanen, Matti; Rokka, Anne; Corthals, Garry L; Elo, Laura L

    2015-10-02

    As tools for quantitative label-free mass spectrometry (MS) rapidly develop, a consensus about the best practices is not apparent. In the work described here we compared popular statistical methods for detecting differential protein expression from quantitative MS data using both controlled experiments with known quantitative differences for specific proteins used as standards as well as "real" experiments where differences in protein abundance are not known a priori. Our results suggest that data-driven reproducibility-optimization can consistently produce reliable differential expression rankings for label-free proteome tools and are straightforward in their application.

  18. Red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteomics--Part I: Proteomics and RBC physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, Erica M; Lutz, Hans U; Mann, Matthias; Thomas, Alan W

    2010-01-03

    Membrane proteomics is concerned with accurately and sensitively identifying molecules involved in cell compartmentalisation, including those controlling the interface between the cell and the outside world. The high lipid content of the environment in which these proteins are found often causes a particular set of problems that must be overcome when isolating the required material before effective HPLC-MS approaches can be performed. The membrane is an unusually dynamic cellular structure since it interacts with an ever changing environment. A full understanding of this critical cell component will ultimately require, in addition to proteomics, lipidomics, glycomics, interactomics and study of post-translational modifications. Devoid of nucleus and organelles in mammalian species other than camelids, and constantly in motion in the blood stream, red blood cells (RBCs) are the sole mammalian oxygen transporter. The fact that mature mammalian RBCs have no internal membrane-bound organelles, somewhat simplifies proteomics analysis of the plasma membrane and the fact that it has no nucleus disqualifies microarray based methods. Proteomics has the potential to provide a better understanding of this critical interface, and thereby assist in identifying new approaches to diseases.

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Analysis of Protein S-Nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhe; Greenlief, C Michael; Gu, Zezong

    2016-01-01

    S-Nitrosylation is a redox-based post-translational modification of a protein in response to nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and it participates in a variety of processes in diverse biological systems. The significance of this type of protein modification in health and diseases is increasingly recognized. In the central nervous system, aberrant S-nitrosylation, due to excessive NO production, is known to cause protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, transcriptional dysregulation, and neuronal death. This leads to an altered physiological state and consequently contributes to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, much effort has been made to understand the mechanisms underlying protein S-nitrosylation, and several approaches have been developed to unveil S-nitrosylated proteins from different organisms. Interest in determining the dynamic changes of protein S-nitrosylation under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions has underscored the need for the development of quantitative proteomic approaches. Currently, both gel-based and gel-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative methods are widely used, and they each have advantages and disadvantages but may also be used together to produce complementary data. This review evaluates current available quantitative proteomic techniques for the analysis of protein S-nitrosylation and highlights recent advances, with emphasis on applications in neurodegenerative diseases. An important goal is to provide a comprehensive guide of feasible quantitative proteomic methodologies for examining protein S-nitrosylation in research to yield insights into disease mechanisms, diagnostic biomarkers, and drug discovery.

  20. Quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung tumor xenografts treated with the ectopic ATP synthase inhibitor citreoviridin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available ATP synthase is present on the plasma membrane of several types of cancer cells. Citreoviridin, an ATP synthase inhibitor, selectively suppresses the proliferation and growth of lung cancer without affecting normal cells. However, the global effects of targeting ectopic ATP synthase in vivo have not been well defined. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and provided a comprehensive insight into the complicated regulation by citreoviridin in a lung cancer xenograft model. With high reproducibility of the quantitation, we obtained quantitative proteomic profiling with 2,659 proteins identified. Bioinformatics analysis of the 141 differentially expressed proteins selected by their relative abundance revealed that citreoviridin induces alterations in the expression of glucose metabolism-related enzymes in lung cancer. The up-regulation of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis and storage of glucose indicated that citreoviridin may reduce the glycolytic intermediates for macromolecule synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation. Using comprehensive proteomics, the results identify metabolic aspects that help explain the antitumorigenic effect of citreoviridin in lung cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the links between metabolism and tumorigenesis in cancer therapy.

  1. Data from quantitative label free proteomics analysis of rat spleen

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    Khadar Dudekula

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dataset presented in this work has been obtained using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of rat spleen. A robust method for extraction of proteins from rat spleen tissue and LC-MS-MS analysis was developed using a urea and SDS-based buffer. Different fractionation methods were compared. A total of 3484 different proteins were identified from the pool of all experiments run in this study (a total of 2460 proteins with at least two peptides. A total of 1822 proteins were identified from nine non-fractionated pulse gels, 2288 proteins and 2864 proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE fractionation into three and five fractions respectively. The proteomics data are deposited in ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE PXD003520, Progenesis and Maxquant output are presented in the supported information. The generated list of proteins under different regimes of fractionation allow assessing the nature of the identified proteins; variability in the quantitative analysis associated with the different sampling strategy and allow defining a proper number of replicates for future quantitative analysis.

  2. Data from quantitative label free proteomics analysis of rat spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudekula, Khadar; Le Bihan, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    The dataset presented in this work has been obtained using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of rat spleen. A robust method for extraction of proteins from rat spleen tissue and LC-MS-MS analysis was developed using a urea and SDS-based buffer. Different fractionation methods were compared. A total of 3484 different proteins were identified from the pool of all experiments run in this study (a total of 2460 proteins with at least two peptides). A total of 1822 proteins were identified from nine non-fractionated pulse gels, 2288 proteins and 2864 proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE fractionation into three and five fractions respectively. The proteomics data are deposited in ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE PXD003520, Progenesis and Maxquant output are presented in the supported information. The generated list of proteins under different regimes of fractionation allow assessing the nature of the identified proteins; variability in the quantitative analysis associated with the different sampling strategy and allow defining a proper number of replicates for future quantitative analysis.

  3. Quantitative proteome profiling of normal human circulating microparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer T; Iversen, Line V;

    2012-01-01

    proteome using nano-LC-MS/MS on an LTQ-Orbitrap with optimized sample collection, preparation, and analysis of 12 different normal samples. Analytical and procedural variation were estimated in triply processed samples analyzed in triplicate from two different donors. Label-free quantitation was validated...... by the correlation of cytoskeletal protein intensities with MP numbers obtained by flow cytometry. Finally, the validity of using pooled samples was evaluated using overlap protein identification numbers and multivariate data analysis. Using conservative parameters, 536 different unique proteins were quantitated...

  4. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granstrom, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and

  5. The plasma membrane proteome of germinating barley embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hynek, Radovan; Svensson, Birte; Jensen, O.N.

    2009-01-01

    was used to reduce soluble protein contamination and enrich for hydrophobic proteins. Sixty-one proteins in 14 SDS-PAGE bands were identified by LC-MS/MS and database searches. The identifications provide new insight into the plasma membrane functions in seed germination.......Cereal seed germination involves a complex coordination between different seed tissues. Plasma membranes must play crucial roles in coordination and execution of germination; however, very little is known about seed plasma membrane proteomes due to limited tissue amounts combined...... with amphiphilicity and low abundance of membrane proteins. A fraction enriched in plasma membranes was prepared from embryos dissected from 18 h germinated barley seeds using aqueous two-phase partitioning. Reversed-phase chromatography on C-4 resin performed in micro-spin columns with stepwise elution by 2-propanol...

  6. Proteomic analysis of the shistosome tegument and its surface membranes

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    Simon Braschi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The tegument surface of the adult schistosome, bounded by a normal plasma membrane overlain by a secreted membranocalyx, holds the key to understanding how schistosomes evade host immune responses. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS, and the sequencing of the Schistosoma mansoni transcriptome/genome, have facilitated schistosome proteomics. We detached the tegument from the worm body and enriched its surface membranes by differential extraction, before subjecting the preparation to liquid chromatography-based proteomics to identify its constituents. The most exposed proteins on live worms were labelled with impearmeant biotinylation reagents, and we also developed methods to isolate the membranocalyx for analysis. We identified transporters for sugars, amino acids, inorganic ions and water, which confirm the importance of the tegument plasma membrane in nutrient acquisition and solute balance. Enzymes, including phosphohydrolases, esterases and carbonic anhydrase were located with their catalytic domains external to the plasma membrane, while five tetraspanins, annexin and dysferlin were implicated in membrane architecture. In contrast, few parasite proteins could be assigned to the membranocalyx but mouse immune response proteins, including three immunoglobulins and two complement factors, were detected, plus host membrane proteins such as CD44, integrin and a complement regulatory protein, testifying to the acquisitive properties of the secreted bilayer.

  7. Dissecting Escherichia coli outer membrane biogenesis using differential proteomics.

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    Alessandra M Martorana

    Full Text Available The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria is a complex multi-layered structure comprising an inner cytoplasmic membrane and an additional asymmetric lipid bilayer, the outer membrane, which functions as a selective permeability barrier and is essential for viability. Lipopolysaccharide, an essential glycolipid located in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane, greatly contributes to the peculiar properties exhibited by the outer membrane. This complex molecule is transported to the cell surface by a molecular machine composed of seven essential proteins LptABCDEFG that form a transenvelope complex and function as a single device. While advances in understanding the mechanisms that govern the biogenesis of the cell envelope have been recently made, only few studies are available on how bacterial cells respond to severe envelope biogenesis defects on a global scale. Here we report the use of differential proteomics based on Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT to investigate how Escherichia coli cells respond to a block of lipopolysaccharide transport to the outer membrane. We analysed the envelope proteome of a lptC conditional mutant grown under permissive and non permissive conditions and identified 123 proteins whose level is modulated upon LptC depletion. Most such proteins belong to pathways implicated in cell envelope biogenesis, peptidoglycan remodelling, cell division and protein folding. Overall these data contribute to our understanding on how E. coli cells respond to LPS transport defects to restore outer membrane functionality.

  8. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-04-29

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, 8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment.

  9. A Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of In Vitro Assembled Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker-Albert, Moritz Carl; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Fedisch, Andreas; Schilcher, Pierre; Schmidt, Andreas; Imhof, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The structure of chromatin is critical for many aspects of cellular physiology and is considered to be the primary medium to store epigenetic information. It is defined by the histone molecules that constitute the nucleosome, the positioning of the nucleosomes along the DNA and the non-histone proteins that associate with it. These factors help to establish and maintain a largely DNA sequence-independent but surprisingly stable structure. Chromatin is extensively disassembled and reassembled during DNA replication, repair, recombination or transcription in order to allow the necessary factors to gain access to their substrate. Despite such constant interference with chromatin structure, the epigenetic information is generally well maintained. Surprisingly, the mechanisms that coordinate chromatin assembly and ensure proper assembly are not particularly well understood. Here, we use label free quantitative mass spectrometry to describe the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin supported by an embryo extract prepared from preblastoderm Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The use of a data independent acquisition method for proteome wide quantitation allows a time resolved comparison of in vitro chromatin assembly. A comparison of our in vitro data with proteomic studies of replicative chromatin assembly in vivo reveals an extensive overlap showing that the in vitro system can be used for investigating the kinetics of chromatin assembly in a proteome-wide manner. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Enhanced detergent extraction for analysis of membrane proteomes by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

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    Hsu Kimberly K

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of hydrophobic membrane proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has long been hampered by the concept of inherent difficulty due to solubility issues. We have optimized extraction protocols by varying the detergent composition of the solubilization buffer with a variety of commercially available non-ionic and zwitterionic detergents and detergent-like phospholipids. Results After initial analyses by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE, quantitative two-dimensional analyses of human erythrocyte membranes, mouse liver membranes, and mouse brain membranes, extracted with buffers that included the zwitterionic detergent MEGA 10 (decanoyl-N-methylglucamide and the zwitterionic lipid LPC (1-lauroyl lysophosphatidylcholine, showed selective improvement over extraction with the common 2-DE detergent CHAPS (3 [(3-cholamidopropyldimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. Mixtures of the three detergents showed additive improvements in spot number, density, and resolution. Substantial improvements in the analysis of a brain membrane proteome were observed. Conclusion This study demonstrates that an optimized detergent mix, coupled with rigorous sample handling and electrophoretic protocols, enables simple and effective analysis of membrane proteomes using two-dimensional electrophoresis.

  11. Performance of isobaric and isotopic labeling in quantitative plant proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogueira, Fábio C S; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Schwämmle, Veit

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become indispensable for peptide and protein quantification in proteomics studies. When proteomics technologies are applied to understand the biology of plants, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is still the prevalent method for protein fractionation, identification......, and quantitation. In the present work, we have used LC-MS to compare an isotopic (ICPL) and isobaric (iTRAQ) chemical labeling technique to quantify proteins in the endosperm of Ricinus communis seeds at three developmental stages (IV, VI, and X). Endosperm proteins of each stage were trypsin-digested in...... the efficiency of the iTRAQ and ICPL in protein quantification depends on several parameters, both labeling methods were able to successfully quantify proteins present in the endosperm of castor bean during seed development and, when combined, increase the number of quantified proteins....

  12. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the fall armyworm saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Flor E; Stanley, Bruce A; Stanley, Anne; Peiffer, Michelle; Luthe, Dawn S; Felton, Gary W

    2017-07-01

    Lepidopteran larvae secrete saliva on plant tissues during feeding. Components in the saliva may aid in food digestion, whereas other components are recognized by plants as cues to elicit defense responses. Despite the ecological and economical importance of these plant-feeding insects, knowledge of their saliva composition is limited to a few species. In this study, we identified the salivary proteins of larvae of the fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda; determined qualitative and quantitative differences in the salivary proteome of the two host races-corn and rice strains-of this insect; and identified changes in total protein concentration and relative protein abundance in the saliva of FAW larvae associated with different host plants. Quantitative proteomic analyses were performed using labeling with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In total, 98 proteins were identified (>99% confidence) in the FAW saliva. These proteins were further categorized into five functional groups: proteins potentially involved in (1) plant defense regulation, (2) herbivore offense, (3) insect immunity, (4) detoxification, (5) digestion, and (6) other functions. Moreover, there were differences in the salivary proteome between the FAW strains that were identified by label-free proteomic analyses. Thirteen differentially identified proteins were present in each strain. There were also differences in the relative abundance of eleven salivary proteins between the two FAW host strains as well as differences within each strain associated with different diets. The total salivary protein concentration was also different for the two strains reared on different host plants. Based on these results, we conclude that the FAW saliva contains a complex mixture of proteins involved in different functions that are specific for each strain and its composition can change plastically in response to diet type

  13. Proteomic analysis of GPI-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Hye Ryung; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    Glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) represent a subset of post-translationally modified proteins that are tethered to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane via a C-terminal GPI anchor. GPI-APs are found in a variety of eukaryote species, from pathogenic microorganisms...... to humans. GPI-APs confer important cellular functions as receptors, enzymes and scaffolding molecules. Specific enzymes and detergent extraction methods combined with separation technologies and mass spectrometry permit proteomic analysis of GPI-APs from plasma membrane preparations to reveal cell...

  14. Proteomic analysis of GPI-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Hye Ryung; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    to humans. GPI-APs confer important cellular functions as receptors, enzymes and scaffolding molecules. Specific enzymes and detergent extraction methods combined with separation technologies and mass spectrometry permit proteomic analysis of GPI-APs from plasma membrane preparations to reveal cell......Glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) represent a subset of post-translationally modified proteins that are tethered to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane via a C-terminal GPI anchor. GPI-APs are found in a variety of eukaryote species, from pathogenic microorganisms...

  15. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Weijun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-05-03

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and environmental electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 79% membrane proteins among all proteins identified from the enriched sample. To illustrate the quantification of membrane proteome changes, enriched membrane protein samples from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) were further labeled with 16O and 18O at the peptide level prior to LC-MS analysis. A chemical-probe-labeled pure protein has also been used as an internal standard for normalization purpose. The quantitative data revealed reduced abundances of many outer membrane proteins such as OmcA and MtrC in ΔgspD mutant cells, which agreed well with previously published studies.

  16. Redefining the Breast Cancer Exosome Proteome by Tandem Mass Tag Quantitative Proteomics and Multivariate Cluster Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David J; Fondrie, William E; Liao, Zhongping; Hanson, Phyllis I; Fulton, Amy; Mao, Li; Yang, Austin J

    2015-10-20

    Exosomes are microvesicles of endocytic origin constitutively released by multiple cell types into the extracellular environment. With evidence that exosomes can be detected in the blood of patients with various malignancies, the development of a platform that uses exosomes as a diagnostic tool has been proposed. However, it has been difficult to truly define the exosome proteome due to the challenge of discerning contaminant proteins that may be identified via mass spectrometry using various exosome enrichment strategies. To better define the exosome proteome in breast cancer, we incorporated a combination of Tandem-Mass-Tag (TMT) quantitative proteomics approach and Support Vector Machine (SVM) cluster analysis of three conditioned media derived fractions corresponding to a 10 000g cellular debris pellet, a 100 000g crude exosome pellet, and an Optiprep enriched exosome pellet. The quantitative analysis identified 2 179 proteins in all three fractions, with known exosomal cargo proteins displaying at least a 2-fold enrichment in the exosome fraction based on the TMT protein ratios. Employing SVM cluster analysis allowed for the classification 251 proteins as "true" exosomal cargo proteins. This study provides a robust and vigorous framework for the future development of using exosomes as a potential multiprotein marker phenotyping tool that could be useful in breast cancer diagnosis and monitoring disease progression.

  17. Quantitative Map of Proteome Dynamics during Neuronal Differentiation

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    Christian K. Frese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal differentiation is a multistep process that shapes and re-shapes neurons by progressing through several typical stages, including axon outgrowth, dendritogenesis, and synapse formation. To systematically profile proteome dynamics throughout neuronal differentiation, we took cultured rat hippocampal neurons at different developmental stages and monitored changes in protein abundance using a combination of stable isotope labeling and high-resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Almost one third of all 4,500 proteins quantified underwent a more than 2-fold expression change during neuronal differentiation, indicating extensive remodeling of the neuron proteome. To highlight the strength of our resource, we studied the neural-cell-adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1 and found that it stimulates dendritic arbor development by promoting actin filament growth at the dendritic growth cone. We anticipate that our quantitative map of neuronal proteome dynamics is a rich resource for further analyses of the many identified proteins in various neurodevelopmental processes.

  18. Quantitative Proteomics of Intracellular Campylobacter jejuni Reveals Metabolic Reprogramming.

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    Xiaoyun Liu

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in the USA and Europe. An important virulence attribute of this bacterial pathogen is its ability to enter and survive within host cells. Here we show through a quantitative proteomic analysis that upon entry into host cells, C. jejuni undergoes a significant metabolic downshift. Furthermore, our results indicate that intracellular C. jejuni reprograms its respiration, favoring the respiration of fumarate. These results explain the poor ability of C. jejuni obtained from infected cells to grow under standard laboratory conditions and provide the bases for the development of novel anti microbial strategies that would target relevant metabolic pathways.

  19. Mitochondrial outer membrane proteome of Trypanosoma brucei reveals novel factors required to maintain mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Moritz; Wiese, Sebastian; Mani, Jan; Chanfon, Astrid; Jackson, Christopher; Meisinger, Chris; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2013-02-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a unicellular parasite that causes devastating diseases in humans and animals. It diverged from most other eukaryotes very early in evolution and, as a consequence, has an unusual mitochondrial biology. Moreover, mitochondrial functions and morphology are highly regulated throughout the life cycle of the parasite. The outer mitochondrial membrane defines the boundary of the organelle. Its properties are therefore key for understanding how the cytosol and mitochondria communicate and how the organelle is integrated into the metabolism of the whole cell. We have purified the mitochondrial outer membrane of T. brucei and characterized its proteome using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for protein abundance profiling in combination with statistical analysis. Our results show that the trypanosomal outer membrane proteome consists of 82 proteins, two-thirds of which have never been associated with mitochondria before. 40 proteins share homology with proteins of known functions. The function of 42 proteins, 33 of which are specific to trypanosomatids, remains unknown. 11 proteins are essential for the disease-causing bloodstream form of T. brucei and therefore may be exploited as novel drug targets. A comparison with the outer membrane proteome of yeast defines a set of 17 common proteins that are likely present in the mitochondrial outer membrane of all eukaryotes. Known factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology are virtually absent in T. brucei. Interestingly, RNAi-mediated ablation of three outer membrane proteins of unknown function resulted in a collapse of the network-like mitochondrion of procyclic cells and for the first time identified factors that control mitochondrial shape in T. brucei.

  20. Recent advances in yeast organelle and membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premsler, Thomas; Zahedi, René Peiman; Lewandrowski, Urs; Sickmann, Albert

    2009-10-01

    Yeast proteome research comprises two different aspects: with respect to systemic fungal infections (fungemias), invasive candidiasis, for instance by Candida albicans, is among the most common causes of morbidity and mortality particularly in the expanding population of immunocompromised patients, which rises a high medical and pharmaceutical interest in this facultative pathogenic organism. Apart from its clinical relevance, yeast research moreover provides an indispensable source of knowledge regarding fundamental biochemical processes of eukaryotic cells. In this context, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is, in addition to its multiple industrial applications, one of the most extensively used microorganisms and serves as the best understood eukaryotic model system so far. Consequently, numerous studies have focused on gaining insight into the yeast proteome, with protein MS providing a very efficient technology to cope with this task since it enables both protein identification and differential quantification of cellular material. In this review we present an overview of recent advances in yeast organelle and membrane proteomics focusing on the cell wall, plasma membrane, mitochondria and vacuole.

  1. Shotgun proteomics and network analysis between plasma membrane and extracellular matrix proteins from rat olfactory ensheathing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yisong; Teng, Xiaohua; Yang, Xiaoxu; Song, Qing; Lu, Rong; Xiong, Jixian; Liu, Bo; Zeng, Nianju; Zeng, Yu; Long, Jia; Cao, Rui; Lin, Yong; He, Quanze; Chen, Ping; Lu, Ming; Liang, Songping

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a special type of glial cells that have characteristics of both astrocytes and Schwann cells. Evidence suggests that the regenerative capacity of OECs is induced by soluble, secreted factors that influence their microenvironment. These factors may regulate OECs self-renewal and/or induce their capacity to augment spinal cord regeneration. Profiling of plasma membrane and extracellular matrix through a high-throughput expression proteomics approach was undertaken to identify plasma membrane and extracellular matrix proteins of OECs under serum-free conditions. 1D-shotgun proteomics followed with gene ontology (GO) analysis was used to screen proteins from primary culture rat OECs. Four hundred and seventy nonredundant plasma membrane proteins and 168 extracellular matrix proteins were identified, the majority of which were never before reported to be produced by OECs. Furthermore, plasma membrane and extracellular proteins were classified based on their protein-protein interaction predicted by STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data. The proteomic profiling of the OECs plasma membrane proteins and their connection with the secretome in serum-free culture conditions provides new insights into the nature of their in vivo microenvironmental niche. Proteomic analysis for the discovery of clinical biomarkers of OECs mechanism warrants further study.

  2. Proteomic Substrate Identification for Membrane Proteases in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan A.; Scilabra, Simone D.; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell communication in the brain is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including proteolysis. Membrane-bound proteases generate signaling molecules from membrane-bound precursor proteins and control the length and function of cell surface membrane proteins. These proteases belong to different families, including members of the “a disintegrin and metalloprotease” (ADAM), the beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzymes (BACE), membrane-type matrix metalloproteases (MT-MMP) and rhomboids. Some of these proteases, in particular ADAM10 and BACE1 have been shown to be essential not only for the correct development of the mammalian brain, but also for myelination and maintaining neuronal connections in the adult nervous system. Additionally, these proteases are considered as drug targets for brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), schizophrenia and cancer. Despite their biomedical relevance, the molecular functions of these proteases in the brain have not been explored in much detail, as little was known about their substrates. This has changed with the recent development of novel proteomic methods which allow to identify substrates of membrane-bound proteases from cultured cells, primary neurons and other primary brain cells and even in vivo from minute amounts of mouse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This review summarizes the recent advances and highlights the strengths of the individual proteomic methods. Finally, using the example of the Alzheimer-related proteases BACE1, ADAM10 and γ-secretase, as well as ADAM17 and signal peptide peptidase like 3 (SPPL3), we illustrate how substrate identification with novel methods is instrumental in elucidating broad physiological functions of these proteases in the brain and other organs.

  3. Proteomic Substrate Identification for Membrane Proteases in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan A Müller

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell-cell communication in the brain is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including proteolysis. Membrane-bound proteases generate signaling molecules from membrane-bound precursor proteins and control the length and function of cell surface membrane proteins. These proteases belong to different families, including members of the a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM, the beta-site APP cleaving enzymes (BACE, membrane-type matrix metalloproteases (MT-MMP and rhomboids. Some of these proteases, in particular ADAM10 and BACE1 have been shown to be essential for the correct development of the mammalian brain, but also for myelination and maintaining neuronal connections in the adult nervous system. Additionally, these proteases are considered as drug targets for brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and cancer. Despite their biomedical relevance, the molecular functions of these proteases in the brain have not been explored in much detail as little was known about their substrates. This has changed with the recent development of novel proteomic methods which allow to identify substrates of membrane-bound proteases from cultured cells, primary neurons and other primary brain cells and even in vivo from minute amounts of mouse cerebrospinal fluid. This review summarizes the recent advances and highlights the strengths of the individual proteomic methods. Finally, using the example of the Alzheimer-related proteases BACE1, ADAM10, and γ-secretase, as well as ADAM17 and SPPL3, we illustrate how substrate identification with novel methods is instrumental in elucidating broad physiological functions of these proteases in the brain and other organs.

  4. Quantitative and qualitative proteome characteristics extracted from in-depth integrated genomics and proteomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Teck Yew; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; van den Toorn, Henk; Giansanti, Piero; Cristobal, Alba; Toonen, Pim; Schafer, Sebastian; Hübner, Norbert; van Breukelen, Bas; Mohammed, Shabaz; Cuppen, Edwin; Heck, Albert J R; Guryev, Victor

    2013-12-12

    Quantitative and qualitative protein characteristics are regulated at genomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptional levels. Here, we integrated in-depth transcriptome and proteome analyses of liver tissues from two rat strains to unravel the interactions within and between these layers. We obtained peptide evidence for 26,463 rat liver proteins. We validated 1,195 gene predictions, 83 splice events, 126 proteins with nonsynonymous variants, and 20 isoforms with nonsynonymous RNA editing. Quantitative RNA sequencing and proteomics data correlate highly between strains but poorly among each other, indicating extensive nongenetic regulation. Our multilevel analysis identified a genomic variant in the promoter of the most differentially expressed gene Cyp17a1, a previously reported top hit in genome-wide association studies for human hypertension, as a potential contributor to the hypertension phenotype in SHR rats. These results demonstrate the power of and need for integrative analysis for understanding genetic control of molecular dynamics and phenotypic diversity in a system-wide manner. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative and Qualitative Proteome Characteristics Extracted from In-Depth Integrated Genomics and Proteomics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teck Yew Low

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative and qualitative protein characteristics are regulated at genomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptional levels. Here, we integrated in-depth transcriptome and proteome analyses of liver tissues from two rat strains to unravel the interactions within and between these layers. We obtained peptide evidence for 26,463 rat liver proteins. We validated 1,195 gene predictions, 83 splice events, 126 proteins with nonsynonymous variants, and 20 isoforms with nonsynonymous RNA editing. Quantitative RNA sequencing and proteomics data correlate highly between strains but poorly among each other, indicating extensive nongenetic regulation. Our multilevel analysis identified a genomic variant in the promoter of the most differentially expressed gene Cyp17a1, a previously reported top hit in genome-wide association studies for human hypertension, as a potential contributor to the hypertension phenotype in SHR rats. These results demonstrate the power of and need for integrative analysis for understanding genetic control of molecular dynamics and phenotypic diversity in a system-wide manner.

  6. Improved Recovery and Identification of Membrane Proteins from Rat Hepatic Cells using a Centrifugal Proteomic Reactor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hu; Wang, Fangjun; Wang, Yuwei; Ning, Zhibin; Hou, Weimin; Wright, Theodore G.; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Zhong, Shumei; Yao, Zemin; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance in many biological processes, membrane proteins are underrepresented in proteomic analysis because of their poor solubility (hydrophobicity) and often low abundance. We describe a novel approach for the identification of plasma membrane proteins and intracellular microsomal proteins that combines membrane fractionation, a centrifugal proteomic reactor for streamlined protein extraction, protein digestion and fractionation by centrifugation, and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem MS. The performance of this approach was illustrated for the study of the proteome of ER and Golgi microsomal membranes in rat hepatic cells. The centrifugal proteomic reactor identified 945 plasma membrane proteins and 955 microsomal membrane proteins, of which 63 and 47% were predicted as bona fide membrane proteins, respectively. Among these proteins, >800 proteins were undetectable by the conventional in-gel digestion approach. The majority of the membrane proteins only identified by the centrifugal proteomic reactor were proteins with ≥2 transmembrane segments or proteins with high molecular mass (e.g. >150 kDa) and hydrophobicity. The improved proteomic reactor allowed the detection of a group of endocytic and/or signaling receptor proteins on the plasma membrane, as well as apolipoproteins and glycerolipid synthesis enzymes that play a role in the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins. Thus, the centrifugal proteomic reactor offers a new analytical tool for structure and function studies of membrane proteins involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:21749988

  7. Improved recovery and identification of membrane proteins from rat hepatic cells using a centrifugal proteomic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hu; Wang, Fangjun; Wang, Yuwei; Ning, Zhibin; Hou, Weimin; Wright, Theodore G; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Zhong, Shumei; Yao, Zemin; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    Despite their importance in many biological processes, membrane proteins are underrepresented in proteomic analysis because of their poor solubility (hydrophobicity) and often low abundance. We describe a novel approach for the identification of plasma membrane proteins and intracellular microsomal proteins that combines membrane fractionation, a centrifugal proteomic reactor for streamlined protein extraction, protein digestion and fractionation by centrifugation, and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem MS. The performance of this approach was illustrated for the study of the proteome of ER and Golgi microsomal membranes in rat hepatic cells. The centrifugal proteomic reactor identified 945 plasma membrane proteins and 955 microsomal membrane proteins, of which 63 and 47% were predicted as bona fide membrane proteins, respectively. Among these proteins, >800 proteins were undetectable by the conventional in-gel digestion approach. The majority of the membrane proteins only identified by the centrifugal proteomic reactor were proteins with ≥ 2 transmembrane segments or proteins with high molecular mass (e.g. >150 kDa) and hydrophobicity. The improved proteomic reactor allowed the detection of a group of endocytic and/or signaling receptor proteins on the plasma membrane, as well as apolipoproteins and glycerolipid synthesis enzymes that play a role in the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins. Thus, the centrifugal proteomic reactor offers a new analytical tool for structure and function studies of membrane proteins involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism.

  8. Investigation of male infertility using quantitative comparative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, Christine; Droit, Arnaud; Fournier, Frédéric; Bourassa, Sylvie; Force, André; Cloutier, Francine; Tremblay, Roland; Sullivan, Robert

    2014-12-05

    Male factors account for 40% of infertility cases. The identification of differentially expressed proteins on spermatozoa from fertile and infertile men can help in the elucidation of the molecular basis of male infertility. The aim of this study was to compare sperm proteomes from 3 different groups: fertile men, normozoospermic men consulting for infertility, and normozoospermic men with an impaired capacity for fertilization (IVF-failure). We used differential proteomics with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling, and LC-MS analysis to identify proteins that are differentially expressed. A total of 348 unique proteins were identified and quantified. The analysis identified 33 proteins that were differentially expressed in the IVF-failure group vs the fertile group. Comparison of the infertile and fertile groups revealed that 18 proteins appeared to be differentially expressed. Four proteins were similarly altered in the IVF-failure and infertile groups: semenogelin 1 (SEMG1), prolactin-induced protein (PIP), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS), and phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2). These protein markers were selected for validation using multiple reactions monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) and further confirmed by Western blot analysis. Overall, these results suggest that a panel of proteins may be used as biomarkers for future studies of infertility.

  9. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E; Purvine, Samuel O; Moore, Ronald J; Gritsenko, Marina A; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2010-05-07

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope (18)O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a Gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level (16)O and (18)O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in Delta gspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-type cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with a previous report that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system.

  10. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level 16O and 18O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in ΔgspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-cype cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with previously investigation demonstrating that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system. PMID:20380418

  11. Cassava root membrane proteome reveals activities during storage root maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naconsie, Maliwan; Lertpanyasampatha, Manassawe; Viboonjun, Unchera; Netrphan, Supatcharee; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Naotake; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crops of Thailand. Its storage roots are used as food, feed, starch production, and be the important source for biofuel and biodegradable plastic production. Despite the importance of cassava storage roots, little is known about the mechanisms involved in their formation. This present study has focused on comparison of the expression profiles of cassava root proteome at various developmental stages using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Based on an anatomical study using Toluidine Blue, the secondary growth was confirmed to be essential during the development of cassava storage root. To investigate biochemical processes occurring during storage root maturation, soluble and membrane proteins were isolated from storage roots harvested from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old cassava plants. The proteins with differential expression pattern were analysed and identified to be associated with 8 functional groups: protein folding and degradation, energy, metabolism, secondary metabolism, stress response, transport facilitation, cytoskeleton, and unclassified function. The expression profiling of membrane proteins revealed the proteins involved in protein folding and degradation, energy, and cell structure were highly expressed during early stages of development. Integration of these data along with the information available in genome and transcriptome databases is critical to expand knowledge obtained solely from the field of proteomics. Possible role of identified proteins were discussed in relation with the activities during storage root maturation in cassava.

  12. Quantitative proteomics suggests metabolic reprogramming during ETHE1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahebekhtiari, Navid; Thomsen, Michelle M.; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase (ETHE1) causes the severe metabolic disorder ethylmalonic encephalopathy, which is characterized by early-onset encephalopathy and defective cytochrome C oxidase because of hydrogen sulfide accumulation. Although the severe systemic consequences...... of the disorder are becoming clear, the molecular effects are not well defined. Therefore, for further elucidating the effects of ETHE1-deficiency, we performed a large scale quantitative proteomics study on liver tissue from ETHE1-deficient mice. Our results demonstrated a clear link between ETHE1-deficiency...... and redox active proteins, as reflected by down-regulation of several proteins related to oxidation-reduction, such as different dehydrogenases and cytochrome P450 (CYP450) members. Furthermore, the protein data indicated impact of the ETHE1-deficiency on metabolic reprogramming through up...

  13. Quantitative Proteomics of Sleep-Deprived Mouse Brains Reveals Global Changes in Mitochondrial Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tie-Mei; Zhang, Ju-en; Lin, Rui; Chen, She; Luo, Minmin; Dong, Meng-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a ubiquitous, tightly regulated, and evolutionarily conserved behavior observed in almost all animals. Prolonged sleep deprivation can be fatal, indicating that sleep is a physiological necessity. However, little is known about its core function. To gain insight into this mystery, we used advanced quantitative proteomics technology to survey the global changes in brain protein abundance. Aiming to gain a comprehensive profile, our proteomics workflow included filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), which increased the coverage of membrane proteins; tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, for relative quantitation; and high resolution, high mass accuracy, high throughput mass spectrometry (MS). In total, we obtained the relative abundance ratios of 9888 proteins encoded by 6070 genes. Interestingly, we observed significant enrichment for mitochondrial proteins among the differentially expressed proteins. This finding suggests that sleep deprivation strongly affects signaling pathways that govern either energy metabolism or responses to mitochondrial stress. Additionally, the differentially-expressed proteins are enriched in pathways implicated in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Alzheimer’s, hinting at possible connections between sleep loss, mitochondrial stress, and neurodegeneration. PMID:27684481

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveal proteins enriched in tubular endoplasmic reticulum of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinbo; Li, Shanshan; Wang, Haicheng; Shui, Wenqing; Hu, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    The tubular network is a critical part of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The network is shaped by the reticulons and REEPs/Yop1p that generate tubules by inducing high membrane curvature, and the dynamin-like GTPases atlastin and Sey1p/RHD3 that connect tubules via membrane fusion. However, the specific functions of this ER domain are not clear. Here, we isolated tubule-based microsomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae via classical cell fractionation and detergent-free immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged Yop1p, which specifically localizes to ER tubules. In quantitative comparisons of tubule-derived and total microsomes, we identified a total of 79 proteins that were enriched in the ER tubules, including known proteins that organize the tubular ER network. Functional categorization of the list of proteins revealed that the tubular ER network may be involved in membrane trafficking, lipid metabolism, organelle contact, and stress sensing. We propose that affinity isolation coupled with quantitative proteomics is a useful tool for investigating ER functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23816.001 PMID:28287394

  15. Development and standardization of multiplexed antibody microarrays for use in quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlee, Lt; Christiansen, J; Dondero, R; Grimwade, B; Lejnine, S; Mullenix, M; Shao, W; Sorette, M; Tchernev, Vt; Patel, Dd; Kingsmore, Sf

    2004-12-15

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative proteomics is an emerging field that encompasses multiplexed measurement of many known proteins in groups of experimental samples in order to identify differences between groups. Antibody arrays are a novel technology that is increasingly being used for quantitative proteomics studies due to highly multiplexed content, scalability, matrix flexibility and economy of sample consumption. Key applications of antibody arrays in quantitative proteomics studies are identification of novel diagnostic assays, biomarker discovery in trials of new drugs, and validation of qualitative proteomics discoveries. These applications require performance benchmarking, standardization and specification. RESULTS: Six dual-antibody, sandwich immunoassay arrays that measure 170 serum or plasma proteins were developed and experimental procedures refined in more than thirty quantitative proteomics studies. This report provides detailed information and specification for manufacture, qualification, assay automation, performance, assay validation and data processing for antibody arrays in large scale quantitative proteomics studies. CONCLUSION: The present report describes development of first generation standards for antibody arrays in quantitative proteomics. Specifically, it describes the requirements of a comprehensive validation program to identify and minimize antibody cross reaction under highly multiplexed conditions; provides the rationale for the application of standardized statistical approaches to manage the data output of highly replicated assays; defines design requirements for controls to normalize sample replicate measurements; emphasizes the importance of stringent quality control testing of reagents and antibody microarrays; recommends the use of real-time monitors to evaluate sensitivity, dynamic range and platform precision; and presents survey procedures to reveal the significance of biomarker findings.

  16. Development and standardization of multiplexed antibody microarrays for use in quantitative proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorette M

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative proteomics is an emerging field that encompasses multiplexed measurement of many known proteins in groups of experimental samples in order to identify differences between groups. Antibody arrays are a novel technology that is increasingly being used for quantitative proteomics studies due to highly multiplexed content, scalability, matrix flexibility and economy of sample consumption. Key applications of antibody arrays in quantitative proteomics studies are identification of novel diagnostic assays, biomarker discovery in trials of new drugs, and validation of qualitative proteomics discoveries. These applications require performance benchmarking, standardization and specification. Results Six dual-antibody, sandwich immunoassay arrays that measure 170 serum or plasma proteins were developed and experimental procedures refined in more than thirty quantitative proteomics studies. This report provides detailed information and specification for manufacture, qualification, assay automation, performance, assay validation and data processing for antibody arrays in large scale quantitative proteomics studies. Conclusion The present report describes development of first generation standards for antibody arrays in quantitative proteomics. Specifically, it describes the requirements of a comprehensive validation program to identify and minimize antibody cross reaction under highly multiplexed conditions; provides the rationale for the application of standardized statistical approaches to manage the data output of highly replicated assays; defines design requirements for controls to normalize sample replicate measurements; emphasizes the importance of stringent quality control testing of reagents and antibody microarrays; recommends the use of real-time monitors to evaluate sensitivity, dynamic range and platform precision; and presents survey procedures to reveal the significance of biomarker findings.

  17. Proteomic analysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elortza, Felix; Nühse, Thomas S; Foster, Leonard J; Stensballe, Allan; Peck, Scott C; Jensen, Ole N

    2003-12-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are a functionally and structurally diverse family of post-translationally modified membrane proteins found mostly in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane in a variety of eukaryotic cells. Although the general role of GPI-APs remains unclear, they have attracted attention because they act as enzymes and receptors in cell adhesion, differentiation, and host-pathogen interactions. GPI-APs may represent potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in humans and are interesting in plant biotechnology because of their key role in root development. We here present a general mass spectrometry-based proteomic "shave-and-conquer" strategy that specifically targets GPI-APs. Using a combination of biochemical methods, mass spectrometry, and computational sequence analysis we identified six GPI-APs in a Homo sapiens lipid raft-enriched fraction and 44 GPI-APs in an Arabidopsis thaliana membrane preparation, representing the largest experimental dataset of GPI-anchored proteins to date.

  18. Membrane proteomics of phagosomes suggests a connection to autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Wenqing; Sheu, Leslie; Liu, Jun; Smart, Brian; Petzold, Christopher J.; Hsieh, Tsung-yen; Pitcher, Austin; Keasling*, Jay D.; Bertozzi*, Carolyn R.

    2008-11-25

    Phagocytosis is the central process by which macrophage cellsinternalize and eliminate infectious microbes as well as apoptoticcells. During maturation, phagosomes containing engulfed particlesfuse with various endosomal compartments through theaction of regulatory molecules on the phagosomal membrane. Inthis study, we performed a proteomic analysis of the membranefraction from latex bead-containing (LBC) phagosomes isolatedfrom macrophages. The profile, which comprised 546 proteins,suggests diverse functions of the phagosome and potential connectionsto secretory processes, toll-like receptor signaling, andautophagy. Many identified proteins were not previously knownto reside in the phagosome. We characterized several proteins inLBC phagosomes that change in abundance on induction of autophagy,a process that has been previously implicated in the hostdefense against microbial pathogens. These observations suggestcrosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis that may be relevantto the innate immune response of macrophages.

  19. A quantitative proteomic analysis of long-term memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenegger David

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Memory is the ability to store, retain, and later retrieve learned information. Long-term memory (LTM formation requires: DNA transcription, RNA translation, and the trafficking of newly synthesized proteins. Several components of these processes have already been identified. However, due to the complexity of the memory formation process, there likely remain many yet to be identified proteins involved in memory formation and persistence. Results Here we use a quantitative proteomic method to identify novel memory-associated proteins in neural tissue taken from animals that were trained in vivo to form a long-term memory. We identified 8 proteins that were significantly up-regulated, and 13 that were significantly down-regulated in the LTM trained animals as compared to two different control groups. In addition we found 19 proteins unique to the trained animals, and 12 unique proteins found only in the control animals. Conclusions These results both confirm the involvement of previously identified memory proteins such as: protein kinase C (PKC, adenylate cyclase (AC, and proteins in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway. In addition these results provide novel protein candidates (e.g. UHRF1 binding protein on which to base future studies.

  20. Quantitative bottom-up proteomics depends on digestion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Mark S; Liang, Yuxue; Phinney, Karen W; Stein, Stephen E

    2014-01-07

    Accurate quantification is a fundamental requirement in the fields of proteomics and biomarker discovery, and for clinical diagnostic assays. To demonstrate the extent of quantitative variability in measurable peptide concentrations due to differences among "typical" protein digestion protocols, the model protein, human serum albumin (HSA), was subjected to enzymatic digestion using 12 different sample preparation methods, and separately, was examined through a comprehensive timecourse of trypsinolysis. A variety of digestion conditions were explored including differences in digestion time, denaturant, source of enzyme, sample cleanup, and denaturation temperature, among others. Timecourse experiments compared differences in relative peptide concentrations for tryptic digestions ranging from 15 min to 48 h. A predigested stable isotope-labeled ((15)N) form of the full-length (HSA) protein, expressed in yeast was spiked into all samples prior to LC-MS analysis to compare yields of numerous varieties of tryptic peptides. Relative quantification was achieved by normalization of integrated extracted ion chromatograms (XICs) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) by multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) on a triple quadrupole (QQQ) MS. Related peptide fragmentation transitions, and multiple peptide charge states, were monitored for validation of quantitative results. Results demonstrate that protein concentration was shown to be unequal to tryptic peptide concentrations for most peptides, including so-called "proteotypic" peptides. Peptide release during digestion displayed complex kinetics dependent on digestion conditions and, by inference, from denatured protein structure. Hydrolysis rates at tryptic cleavage sites were also shown to be affected by differences in nearest and next-nearest amino acid residues. The data suggesting nonstoichiometry of enzymatic protein digestions emphasizes the often overlooked difficulties for routine absolute

  1. Data in support of quantitative proteomics to identify potential virulence regulators in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Keiji Tashima

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides genus are the etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, a systemic mycosis endemic in Latin America. Few virulence factors have been identified in these fungi. This paper describes support data from the quantitative proteomics of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis attenuated and virulent isolates [1]. The protein compositions of two isolates of the Pb18 strain showing distinct infection profiles were quantitatively assessed by stable isotopic dimethyl labeling and proteomic analysis. The mass spectrometry and the analysis dataset have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with identifier PXD000804.

  2. Proteomic Profiling of Detergent Resistant Membranes (Lipid Rafts) of Prostasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Louise; Ronquist, Karl K Göran; Ek, Bo; Ronquist, Gunnar; Larsson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Prostasomes are exosomes derived from prostate epithelial cells through exocytosis by multivesicular bodies. Prostasomes have a bilayered membrane and readily interact with sperm. The membrane lipid composition is unusual with a high contribution of sphingomyelin at the expense of phosphatidylcholine and saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids are dominant. Lipid rafts are liquid-ordered domains that are more tightly packed than the surrounding nonraft phase of the bilayer. Lipid rafts are proposed to be highly dynamic, submicroscopic assemblies that float freely within the liquid disordered membrane bilayer and some proteins preferentially partition into the ordered raft domains. We asked the question whether lipid rafts do exist in prostasomes and, if so, which proteins might be associated with them. Prostasomes of density range 1.13-1.19g/ml were subjected to density gradient ultracentrifugation in sucrose fabricated by phosphate buffered saline (PBS) containing 1% Triton X-100 with capacity for banding at 1.10 g/ml, i.e. the classical density of lipid rafts. Prepared prostasomal lipid rafts (by gradient ultracentrifugation) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The clearly visible band on top of 1.10g/ml sucrose in the Triton X-100 containing gradient was subjected to liquid chromatography-tandem MS and more than 370 lipid raft associated proteins were identified. Several of them were involved in intraluminal vesicle formation, e.g. tetraspanins, ESCRTs, and Ras-related proteins. This is the first comprehensive liquid chromatography-tandem MS profiling of proteins in lipid rafts derived from exosomes. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002163.

  3. Peptide-Centric Approaches Provide an Alternative Perspective To Re-Examine Quantitative Proteomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Zhibin; Zhang, Xu; Mayne, Janice; Figeys, Daniel

    2016-02-16

    Quantitative proteomics can provide rich information on changes in biological functions and processes. However, its accuracy is affected by the inherent information degeneration found in bottom-up proteomics. Therefore, the precise protein inference from identified peptides can be mistaken since an ad hoc rule is used for generating a list of protein groups that depends on both the sample type and the sampling depth. Herein, we propose an alternative approach for examining quantitative proteomic data which is peptide-centric instead of protein-centric. We discuss the feasibility of the peptide-centric approach which was tested on several quantitative proteomic data sets. We show that peptide-centric quantification has several advantages over protein level analysis: (1) it is more sensitive for sample segregation, (2) it avoids the issues associated with protein inference, and (3) it can retrieve significant peptides lost in protein-centric quantification for further downstream analysis.

  4. Comparative proteomics of milk fat globule membrane in different species reveals variations in lactation and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Weiqing; Liu, Lu; Pang, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Shuwen; Lv, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    In present study, 312, 554, 175 and 143 proteins were identified and quantified by label-free quantitative proteomics in human, cow, goat and yak milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), respectively. Fifty proteins involved in vesicle mediate transport and milk fat globule secretion were conserved among species. Moreover, proteins involved in lipid synthesis and secretion (xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase, stomatin and CD36), showed different expression pattern and the host defense proteins exhibited various profiles within species. Notably, the content and activity of lipid catabolic enzymes were significantly higher in human MFGM, which could be indicative of the superior fat utilization in breast fed infants. Our findings unraveled the significant differences in protein composition of human milk and conventionally used substitutes of it. The in-depth study of lipid metabolic enzymes in human MFGM will probably contribute to the improvement of the fat utilization through modulation of lipid catabolic enzymes in infant formula.

  5. Quantitative Map of Proteome Dynamics during Neuronal Differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, Christian K; Mikhaylova, Marina; Stucchi, Riccardo; Gautier, Violette; Liu, Qingyang; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal differentiation is a multistep process that shapes and re-shapes neurons by progressing through several typical stages, including axon outgrowth, dendritogenesis, and synapse formation. To systematically profile proteome dynamics throughout neuronal differentiation, we took cultured rat hip

  6. Simple preparation of plant epidermal tissue for laser microdissection and downstream quantitative proteome and carbohydrate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falter, Christian; Ellinger, Dorothea; von Hülsen, Behrend; Heim, René; Voigt, Christian A

    2015-01-01

    The outwardly directed cell wall and associated plasma membrane of epidermal cells represent the first layers of plant defense against intruding pathogens. Cell wall modifications and the formation of defense structures at sites of attempted pathogen penetration are decisive for plant defense. A precise isolation of these stress-induced structures would allow a specific analysis of regulatory mechanism and cell wall adaption. However, methods for large-scale epidermal tissue preparation from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which would allow proteome and cell wall analysis of complete, laser-microdissected epidermal defense structures, have not been provided. We developed the adhesive tape - liquid cover glass technique (ACT) for simple leaf epidermis preparation from A. thaliana, which is also applicable on grass leaves. This method is compatible with subsequent staining techniques to visualize stress-related cell wall structures, which were precisely isolated from the epidermal tissue layer by laser microdissection (LM) coupled to laser pressure catapulting. We successfully demonstrated that these specific epidermal tissue samples could be used for quantitative downstream proteome and cell wall analysis. The development of the ACT for simple leaf epidermis preparation and the compatibility to LM and downstream quantitative analysis opens new possibilities in the precise examination of stress- and pathogen-related cell wall structures in epidermal cells. Because the developed tissue processing is also applicable on A. thaliana, well-established, model pathosystems that include the interaction with powdery mildews can be studied to determine principal regulatory mechanisms in plant-microbe interaction with their potential outreach into crop breeding.

  7. Simple preparation of plant epidermal tissue for laser microdissection and downstream quantitative proteome and carbohydrate analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eFalter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The outwardly directed cell wall and associated plasma membrane of epidermal cells represent the first layers of plant defense against intruding pathogens. Cell wall modifications and the formation of defense structures at sites of attempted pathogen penetration are decisive for plant defense. A precise isolation of these stress-induced structures would allow a specific analysis of regulatory mechanism and cell wall adaption. However, methods for large-scale epidermal tissue preparation from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which would allow proteome and cell wall analysis of complete, laser-microdissected epidermal defense structures, have not been provided. We developed the adhesive tape – liquid cover glass technique for simple leaf epidermis preparation from A. thaliana, which is also applicable on grass leaves. This method is compatible with subsequent staining techniques to visualize stress-related cell wall structures, which were precisely isolated from the epidermal tissue layer by laser microdissection coupled to laser pressure catapulting. We successfully demonstrated that these specific epidermal tissue samples could be used for quantitative downstream proteome and cell wall analysis. The development of the adhesive tape – liquid cover glass technique for simple leaf epidermis preparation and the compatibility to laser microdissection and downstream quantitative analysis opens new possibilities in the precise examination of stress- and pathogen-related cell wall structures in epidermal cells. Because the developed tissue processing is also applicable on A. thaliana, well-established, model pathosystems that include the interaction with powdery mildews can be studied to determine principal regulatory mechanisms in plant-microbe interaction with their potential outreach into crop breeding.

  8. Comparative membrane proteomics analyses of breast cancer cell lines to understand the molecular mechanism of breast cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenjing; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Rui; Mechref, Yehia

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer in women. Breast cancer brain metastasis is currently considered an issue of concern among breast cancer patients. Membrane proteins play important roles in breast cancer brain metastasis, involving cell adhesion and penetration of blood-brain barrier. To understand the mechanism of breast cancer brain metastasis, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed in conjunction with enrichment of membrane proteins to analyze the proteomes from five different breast cancer and a brain cancer cell lines. Quantitative proteomic data of all cell lines were compared with MDA-MB-231BR which is a brain seeking breast cancer cell line, thus representing brain metastasis characteristics. Label-free proteomics of the six cell lines facilitates the identification of 1238 proteins and the quantification of 899 proteins of which more than 70% were membrane proteins. Unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) of the label-free proteomics data resulted in a distinct clustering of cell lines, suggesting quantitative differences in the expression of several proteins among the different cell lines. Unique protein expressions in 231BR were observed for 28 proteins. The up-regulation of STAU1, AT1B3, NPM1, hnRNP Q, and hnRNP K and the down-regulation of TUBB4B and TUBB5 were noted in 231BR relative to 231 (precursor cell lines from which 231BR is derived). These proteins might contribute to the breast cancer brain metastasis. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) supported the great brain metastatic propensity of 231BR and suggested the importance of the up-regulation of integrin proteins and down-regulation of EPHA2 in brain metastasis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from Shigella flexneri under different culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Liguo; Fu, Hua; Wei, Candong; Jin, Qi

    2014-10-31

    The production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a common and regulated process of gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, the processes of Shigella flexneri OMV production still remain unclear. S. flexneri is the causative agent of endemic shigellosis in developing countries. The Congo red binding of strains is associated with increased infectivity of S. flexneri. Therefore, understanding the modulation pattern of OMV protein expression induced by Congo red will help to elucidate the bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the proteomic composition of OMVs and the change in OMV protein expression induced by Congo red using mTRAQ-based quantitative comparative proteomics. mTRAQ labelling increased the confidence in protein identification, and 148 total proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. These include a variety of important virulence factors, including Ipa proteins, TolC family, murein hydrolases, and members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Among the identified proteins, 28 and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the Congo red-induced OMV, respectively. Additionally, by comprehensive comparison with previous studies focused on DH5a-derived OMV, we identified some key node proteins in the protein-protein interaction network that may be involved in OMV biogenesis and are common to all gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human Spermatozoa Quantitative Proteomic Signature Classifies Normo- and Asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Mayank; Joenväärä, Sakari; Jain, Tushar; Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sinha, Ashima; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita; Renkonen, Risto

    2017-01-01

    Scarcely understood defects lead to asthenozoospermia, which results in poor fertility outcomes. Incomplete knowledge of these defects hinders the development of new therapies and reliance on interventional therapies, such as in vitro fertilization, increases. Sperm cells, being transcriptionally and translationally silent, necessitate the proteomic approach to study the sperm function. We have performed a differential proteomics analysis of human sperm and seminal plasma and identified and quantified 667 proteins in sperm and 429 proteins in seminal plasma data set, which were used for further analysis. Statistical and mathematical analysis combined with pathway analysis and self-organizing maps clustering and correlation was performed on the data set.It was found that sperm proteomic signature combined with statistical analysis as opposed to the seminal plasma proteomic signature can differentiate the normozoospermic versus the asthenozoospermic sperm samples. This is despite the results that some of the seminal plasma proteins have big fold changes among classes but they fall short of statistical significance. S-Plot of the sperm proteomic data set generated some high confidence targets, which might be implicated in sperm motility pathways. These proteins also had the area under the curve value of 0.9 or 1 in ROC curve analysis.Various pathways were either enriched in these proteomic data sets by pathway analysis or they were searched by their constituent proteins. Some of these pathways were axoneme activation and focal adhesion assembly, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, cellular response to stress and nucleosome assembly among others. The mass spectrometric data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004098.

  11. Quantitative body fluid proteomics in medicine - A focus on minimal invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csősz, Éva; Kalló, Gergő; Márkus, Bernadett; Deák, Eszter; Csutak, Adrienne; Tőzsér, József

    2017-02-05

    Identification of new biomarkers specific for various pathological conditions is an important field in medical sciences. Body fluids have emerging potential in biomarker studies especially those which are continuously available and can be collected by non-invasive means. Changes in the protein composition of body fluids such as tears, saliva, sweat, etc. may provide information on both local and systemic conditions of medical relevance. In this review, our aim is to discuss the quantitative proteomics techniques used in biomarker studies, and to present advances in quantitative body fluid proteomics of non-invasively collectable body fluids with relevance to biomarker identification. The advantages and limitations of the widely used quantitative proteomics techniques are also presented. Based on the reviewed literature, we suggest an ideal pipeline for body fluid analyses aiming at biomarkers discoveries: starting from identification of biomarker candidates by shotgun quantitative proteomics or protein arrays, through verification of potential biomarkers by targeted mass spectrometry, to the antibody-based validation of biomarkers. The importance of body fluids as a rich source of biomarkers is discussed. Quantitative proteomics is a challenging part of proteomics applications. The body fluids collected by non-invasive means have high relevance in medicine; they are good sources for biomarkers used in establishing the diagnosis, follow up of disease progression and predicting high risk groups. The review presents the most widely used quantitative proteomics techniques in body fluid analysis and lists the potential biomarkers identified in tears, saliva, sweat, nasal mucus and urine for local and systemic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative proteomic analyses of crop seedlings subjected to stress conditions; a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjo, Yohei; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative proteomics is one of the analytical approaches used to clarify crop responses to stress conditions. Recent remarkable advances in proteomics technologies allow for the identification of a wider range of proteins than was previously possible. Current proteomic methods fall into roughly two categories: gel-based quantification methods, including conventional two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis, and MS-based quantification methods consists of label-based and label-free protein quantification approaches. Although MS-based quantification methods have become mainstream in recent years, gel-based quantification methods are still useful for proteomic analyses. Previous studies examining crop responses to stress conditions reveal that each method has both advantages and disadvantages in regard to protein quantification in comparative proteomic analyses. Furthermore, one proteomics approach cannot be fully substituted by another technique. In this review, we discuss and highlight the basis and applications of quantitative proteomic analysis approaches in crop seedlings in response to flooding and osmotic stress as two environmental stresses.

  13. Characterization of the rat liver membrane proteome using peptide immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, J M; Haynes, P A; Molloy, M P; Bjellqvist, B; Baker, M S; Len, A C L

    2008-03-01

    Membrane proteins are of particular interest in proteomics because of their potential therapeutic utility. Past proteomic approaches used to investigate membrane proteins have only been partially successful at providing a comprehensive analysis due to the inherently hydrophobic nature and low abundance for some of these proteins. Recently, these difficulties have been improved by analyzing membrane protein enriched samples using shotgun proteomics. In addition, the recent application of methanol-assisted trypsin digestion of membrane proteins has been shown to be a method to improve membrane protein identifications. In this study, a comparison of different concentrations of methanol was assessed for assisting membrane protein digestion with trypsin prior to analysis using a gel-based shotgun proteomics approach called peptide immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing (IPG-IEF). We demonstrate the use of peptide IEF on pH 3-10 IPG strips as the first dimension of two-dimensional shotgun proteomics for protein identifications from the membrane fraction of rat liver. Tryptic digestion of proteins was carried out in varying concentrations of methanol in 10 mM ammonium bicarbonate: 0% (v/v), 40% (v/v), and 60% (v/v). A total of 800 proteins were identified from 60% (v/v) methanol, which increased the protein identifications by 17% and 14% compared to 0% (v/v) methanol and 40% (v/v) methanol assisted digestion, respectively. In total, 1549 nonredundant proteins were identified from all three concentrations of methanol including 690 (42%) integral membrane proteins of which 626 of these proteins contained at least one transmembrane domain. Peptide IPG-IEF separation of peptides was successful as the peptides were separated into discrete pI regions with high resolution. The results from this study prove utility of 60% (v/v) methanol assisted digestion in conjunction with peptide IPG-IEF as an optimal shotgun proteomics technique for the separation and identification of

  14. UNiquant, a Program for Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Using Stable Isotope Labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xin; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Shen, Yulei; Liu, Miao; Huang, Lin; Zhang, Zhixin; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Chan, Wing C.; Hinrichs, Steven; Fu, Kai; Ding, Shi-Jian

    2011-03-04

    We present UNiquant, a new software program for analyzing stable isotope labeling (SIL) based quantitative proteomics data. UNiquant surpassed the performance of two other platforms, MaxQuant and Mascot Distiller, using complex proteome mixtures having either known or unknown heavy/light ratios. UNiquant is compatible with a broad spectrum of search engines and SIL methods, providing outstanding peptide pair identification and accurate measurement of the relative peptide/protein abundance.

  15. Towards a membrane proteome in Drosophila: a method for the isolation of plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Graham H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plasma membrane (PM is a compartment of significant interest because cell surface proteins influence the way in which a cell interacts with its neighbours and its extracellular environment. However, PM is hard to isolate because of its low abundance. Aqueous two-phase affinity purification (2PAP, based on PEG/Dextran two-phase fractionation and lectin affinity for PM-derived microsomes, is an emerging method for the isolation of high purity plasma membranes from several vertebrate sources. In contrast, PM isolation techniques in important invertebrate genetic model systems, such as Drosophila melanogaster, have relied upon enrichment by density gradient centrifugation. To facilitate genetic investigation of activities contributing to the content of the PM sub-proteome, we sought to adapt 2PAP to this invertebrate model to provide a robust PM isolation technique for Drosophila. Results We show that 2PAP alone does not completely remove contaminating endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial membrane. However, a novel combination of density gradient centrifugation plus 2PAP results in a robust PM preparation. To demonstrate the utility of this technique we isolated PM from fly heads and successfully identified 432 proteins using MudPIT, of which 37% are integral membrane proteins from all compartments. Of the 432 proteins, 22% have been previously assigned to the PM compartment, and a further 34% are currently unassigned to any compartment and represent candidates for assignment to the PM. The remainder have previous assignments to other compartments. Conclusion A combination of density gradient centrifugation and 2PAP results in a robust, high purity PM preparation from Drosophila, something neither technique can achieve on its own. This novel preparation should lay the groundwork for the proteomic investigation of the PM in different genetic backgrounds in Drosophila. Our results also identify two key steps in this

  16. Quantitative proteomics and bioinformatic analysis provide new insight into protein function during avian eggshell biomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Pauline; Labas, Valérie; Brionne, Aurélien; Harichaux, Grégoire; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joël

    2015-01-15

    Gallus gallus eggshell is a bioceramic composed of 95% calcium carbonate in calcitic form and 3.5% extracellular organic matrix. The calcification process occurs in the uterine fluid where biomineralization follows a temporal sequence corresponding to the initiation, growth and termination stages of crystal growth. Eggshell texture and its ultrastructure are regulated by organic matrix proteins, which control mineralization process and influence the eggshell biomechanical properties. We performed proteomic qualitative analyses and identified 308 uterine fluid proteins. Quantitative analysis showed differential abundances at the three stages of shell biomineralization for 64 of them. Cluster analysis revealed a first group of proteins related to mineralization and mainly present at the onset of calcification including OVOT, OVAL, OC-17, and two novel calcium binding proteins (EDIL3, MFGE8). A second group of proteins mainly present at the initiation and termination of shell formation was potentially involved in the regulation of the activity of the uterine fluid proteins (e.g. molecular chaperones, folding proteins, proteases and protease inhibitors). OCX21, a protein highly concentrated in the fluid and the shell, belongs to this group. A third group equally represented at all stages of shell mineralization corresponded to antibacterial proteins that could protect the forming egg against microbial invasion. The calcitic avian eggshell protects the developing embryo and, moreover, ensures that the nutritious table egg remains free of pathogens. The eggshell is formed by nucleation upon a fibrous scaffold (the eggshell membranes) followed by an interaction between the growing mineral crystals and the shell organic matrix. This interaction leads to a highly ordered shell microstructure and texture which contribute to its exceptional mechanical properties. Shell mineralization occurs in three distinct phases of calcification (initiation, growth and termination), which

  17. Quantitative Tracking of Isotope Flows in Proteomes of Microbial Communities*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chongle; Fischer, Curt R.; Hyatt, Doug; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Hettich, Robert L.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2011-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) has been used to track nutrient flows in microbial communities, but existing protein-based SIP methods capable of quantifying the degree of label incorporation into peptides and proteins have been demonstrated only by targeting usually less than 100 proteins per sample. Our method automatically (i) identifies the sequence of and (ii) quantifies the degree of heavy atom enrichment for thousands of proteins from microbial community proteome samples. These features make our method suitable for comparing isotopic differences between closely related protein sequences, and for detecting labeling patterns in low-abundance proteins or proteins derived from rare community members. The proteomic SIP method was validated using proteome samples of known stable isotope incorporation levels at 0.4%, ∼50%, and ∼98%. The method was then used to monitor incorporation of 15N into established and regrowing microbial biofilms. The results indicate organism-specific migration patterns from established communities into regrowing communities and provide insights into metabolism during biofilm formation. The proteomic SIP method can be extended to many systems to track fluxes of 13C or 15N in microbial communities. PMID:21285414

  18. Streamlined Membrane Proteome Preparation for Shotgun Proteomics Analysis with Triton X-100 Cloud Point Extraction and Nanodiamond Solid Phase Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Minh D.; Ting-Chun Wen; Hung-Cheng Li; Pei-Hsuan Hsieh; Yet-Ran Chen; Huan-Cheng Chang; Chau-Chung Han

    2016-01-01

    While mass spectrometry (MS) plays a key role in proteomics research, characterization of membrane proteins (MP) by MS has been a challenging task because of the presence of a host of interfering chemicals in the hydrophobic protein extraction process, and the low protease digestion efficiency. We report a sample preparation protocol, two-phase separation with Triton X-100, induced by NaCl, with coomassie blue added for visualizing the detergent-rich phase, which streamlines MP preparation fo...

  19. Sources of technical variability in quantitative LC-MS proteomics: human brain tissue sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehowski, Paul D; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Orton, Daniel J; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J; Ramirez-Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P; Albin, Roger L; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Myers, Amanda J

    2013-05-03

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE cleanup (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) > instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  20. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  1. Large-Scale and Deep Quantitative Proteome Profiling Using Isobaric Labeling Coupled with Two-Dimensional LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Marina A; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive, quantitative information on abundances of proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs) can potentially provide novel biological insights into diseases pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Herein, we introduce a quantitative strategy utilizing isobaric stable isotope-labeling techniques combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) for large-scale, deep quantitative proteome profiling of biological samples or clinical specimens such as tumor tissues. The workflow includes isobaric labeling of tryptic peptides for multiplexed and accurate quantitative analysis, basic reversed-phase LC fractionation and concatenation for reduced sample complexity, and nano-LC coupled to high resolution and high mass accuracy MS analysis for high confidence identification and quantification of proteins. This proteomic analysis strategy has been successfully applied for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of tumor samples and can also be used for integrated proteome and PTM characterization, as well as comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis across samples from large clinical cohorts.

  2. Quantitative Clinical Chemistry Proteomics (qCCP) using mass spectrometry: general characteristics and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Sylvain; Hoofnagle, Andrew; Hochstrasser, Denis; Brede, Cato; Glueckmann, Matthias; Cocho, José A; Ceglarek, Uta; Lenz, Christof; Vialaret, Jérôme; Scherl, Alexander; Hirtz, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Proteomics studies typically aim to exhaustively detect peptides/proteins in a given biological sample. Over the past decade, the number of publications using proteomics methodologies has exploded. This was made possible due to the availability of high-quality genomic data and many technological advances in the fields of microfluidics and mass spectrometry. Proteomics in biomedical research was initially used in 'functional' studies for the identification of proteins involved in pathophysiological processes, complexes and networks. Improved sensitivity of instrumentation facilitated the analysis of even more complex sample types, including human biological fluids. It is at that point the field of clinical proteomics was born, and its fundamental aim was the discovery and (ideally) validation of biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis, or therapeutic monitoring of disease. Eventually, it was recognized that the technologies used in clinical proteomics studies [particularly liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)] could represent an alternative to classical immunochemical assays. Prior to deploying MS in the measurement of peptides/proteins in the clinical laboratory, it seems likely that traditional proteomics workflows and data management systems will need to adapt to the clinical environment and meet in vitro diagnostic (IVD) regulatory constraints. This defines a new field, as reviewed in this article, that we have termed quantitative Clinical Chemistry Proteomics (qCCP).

  3. Quantitative Performance Evaluator for Proteomics (QPEP): Web-based Application for Reproducible Evaluation of Proteomics Preprocessing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbenac, Dario; Zhong, Ling; Raftery, Mark J; Wang, Penghao; Wilson, Susan R; Armstrong, Nicola J; Yang, Jean Y H

    2017-07-07

    Tandem mass spectrometry is one of the most popular techniques for quantitation of proteomes. There exists a large variety of options in each stage of data preprocessing that impact the bias and variance of the summarized protein-level values. Using a newly released data set satisfying a replicated Latin squares design, a diverse set of performance metrics has been developed and implemented in a web-based application, Quantitative Performance Evaluator for Proteomics (QPEP). QPEP has the flexibility to allow users to apply their own method to preprocess this data set and share the results, allowing direct and straightforward comparison of new methodologies. Application of these new metrics to three case studies highlights that (i) the summarization of peptides to proteins is robust to the choice of peptide summary used, (ii) the differences between iTRAQ labels are stronger than the differences between experimental runs, and (iii) the commercial software ProteinPilot performs equivalently well at between-sample normalization to more complicated methods developed by academics. Importantly, finding (ii) underscores the benefits of using the principles of randomization and blocking to avoid the experimental measurements being confounded by technical factors. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003608.

  4. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2015-06-30

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  5. Quantitative proteome analysis using isotope-coded affinity tags and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiio, Yuzuru; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2006-01-01

    A main objective of proteomics research is to systematically identify and quantify proteins in a given proteome (cells, subcellular fractions, protein complexes, tissues or body fluids). Protein labeling with isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT) followed by tandem mass spectrometry allows sequence identification and accurate quantification of proteins in complex mixtures, and has been applied to the analysis of global protein expression changes, protein changes in subcellular fractions, components of protein complexes, protein secretion and body fluids. This protocol describes protein-sample labeling with ICAT reagents, chromatographic fractionation of the ICAT-labeled tryptic peptides, and protein identification and quantification using tandem mass spectrometry. The method is suitable for both large-scale analysis of complex samples including whole proteomes and small-scale analysis of subproteomes, and allows quantitative analysis of proteins, including those that are difficult to analyze by gel-based proteomics technology.

  6. Novel small protein identification and quantitative proteomic analysis in Pseudomonas putida KT-­2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen

    .This thesis investigated an industrial bacterium, Pseudomonas putida KT-2440, in two aspects. First, the research focused on discovering novel small proteins (s-proteins) in the bacterium. With large-scale approaches for gene identification, groups of novel s-proteins were identified and validated from...... the genome, transcriptome and proteome of the bacterium. The application of new research approach, ribosome profiling, enabled us to analysis novel open reading frames (ORFs) from different standpoint. Second, by quantitative proteomic approach, the differential expressions of genes were analyzed at proteome...... level under different environmental conditions. The results yield insights intothe adaptation of P. putida KT-2440 in different environments.Based on bioinformatic, proteomic and transcriptomic approaches, global gene expression was analyzed on both transcriptional and translational levels. Our research...

  7. Integral membrane proteins in proteomics. How to break open the black box?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vit, O; Petrak, J

    2017-02-05

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) are coded by 20-30% of human genes and execute important functions - transmembrane transport, signal transduction, cell-cell communication, cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and many other processes. Due to their hydrophobicity, low expression and lack of trypsin cleavage sites in their transmembrane segments, IMPs have been generally under-represented in routine proteomic analyses. However, the field of membrane proteomics has changed markedly in the past decade, namely due to the introduction of filter assisted sample preparation (FASP), the establishment of cell surface capture (CSC) protocols, and the development of methods that enable analysis of the hydrophobic transmembrane segments. This review will summarize the recent developments in the field and outline the most successful strategies for the analysis of integral membrane proteins. Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) are attractive therapeutic targets mostly due to their many important functions. However, our knowledge of the membrane proteome is severely limited to effectively exploit their potential. This is mostly due to the lack of appropriate techniques or methods compatible with the typical features of IMPs, namely hydrophobicity, low expression and lack of trypsin cleavage sites. This review summarizes the most recent development in membrane proteomics and outlines the most successful strategies for their large-scale analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An Automated High Throughput Proteolysis and Desalting Platform for Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert-Baskar Arul

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics for biomarker validation needs high throughput instrumentation to analyze huge set of clinical samples for quantitative and reproducible analysis at a minimum time without manual experimental errors. Sample preparation, a vital step in proteomics plays a major role in identification and quantification of proteins from biological samples. Tryptic digestion a major check point in sample preparation for mass spectrometry based proteomics needs to be more accurate with rapid processing time. The present study focuses on establishing a high throughput automated online system for proteolytic digestion and desalting of proteins from biological samples quantitatively and qualitatively in a reproducible manner. The present study compares online protein digestion and desalting of BSA with conventional off-line (in-solution method and validated for real time sample for reproducibility. Proteins were identified using SEQUEST data base search engine and the data were quantified using IDEALQ software. The present study shows that the online system capable of handling high throughput samples in 96 well formats carries out protein digestion and peptide desalting efficiently in a reproducible and quantitative manner. Label free quantification showed clear increase of peptide quantities with increase in concentration with much linearity compared to off line method. Hence we would like to suggest that inclusion of this online system in proteomic pipeline will be effective in quantification of proteins in comparative proteomics were the quantification is really very crucial.

  9. Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants and high-performance mass spectrometry for quantitative plant proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Mills, Davinia J S; Cramer, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants (HILEP) combines hydroponic plant cultivation and metabolic labeling with stable isotopes using (15)N-containing inorganic salts to label whole and mature plants. Employing (15)N salts as the sole nitrogen source for HILEP leads to the production of healthy-looking plants which contain (15)N proteins labeled to nearly 100%. Therefore, HILEP is suitable for quantitative plant proteomic analysis, where plants are grown in either (14)N- or (15)N-hydroponic media and pooled when the biological samples are collected for relative proteome quantitation. The pooled (14)N-/(15)N-protein extracts can be fractionated in any suitable way and digested with a protease for shotgun proteomics, using typically reverse phase liquid chromatography nanoelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (RPLC-nESI-MS/MS). Best results were obtained with a hybrid ion trap/FT-MS mass spectrometer, combining high mass accuracy and sensitivity for the MS data acquisition with speed and high-throughput MS/MS data acquisition, increasing the number of proteins identified and quantified and improving protein quantitation. Peak processing and picking from raw MS data files, protein identification, and quantitation were performed in a highly automated way using integrated MS data analysis software with minimum manual intervention, thus easing the analytical workflow. In this methodology paper, we describe how to grow Arabidopsis plants hydroponically for isotope labeling using (15)N salts and how to quantitate the resulting proteomes using a convenient workflow that does not require extensive bioinformatics skills.

  10. Proteomic analysis of astrocytic secretion that regulates neurogenesis using quantitative amine-specific isobaric tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Hu; Zhou, Wenhao [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, 399 Wanyuan Road, Shanghai 201102 (China); Wei, Liming; Zhong, Fan [Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, 138 Yixueyuan Roda, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yang, Yi, E-mail: yyang@shmu.edu.cn [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, 399 Wanyuan Road, Shanghai 201102 (China)

    2010-01-08

    Astrocytes are essential components of neurogenic niches that affect neurogenesis through membrane association and/or the release of soluble factors. To identify factors released from astrocytes that could regulate neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation, we used mild oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to inhibit the secretory capacity of astrocytes. Using the Transwell co-culture system, we found that OGD-treated astrocytes could not promote neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation. Next, isobaric tagging for the relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomics techniques was performed to identify the proteins in the supernatants of astrocytes (with or without OGD). Through a multi-step analysis and gene ontology classification, 130 extracellular proteins were identified, most of which were involved in neuronal development, the inflammatory response, extracellular matrix composition and supportive functions. Of these proteins, 44 had never been reported to be produced by astrocytes. Using ProteinPilot software analysis, we found that 60 extracellular proteins were significantly altered (27 upregulated and 33 downregulated) in the supernatant of OGD-treated astrocytes. Among these proteins, 7 have been reported to be able to regulate neurogenesis, while others may have the potential to regulate neurogenesis. This study profiles the major proteins released by astrocytes, which play important roles in the modulation of neurogenesis.

  11. Quantitative proteomics reveals dynamic responses of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to next-generation biofuel butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoxu; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiangxin; Qiao, Jianjun; Zhang, Weiwen

    2013-01-14

    Butanol is a promising biofuel, and recent metabolic engineering efforts have demonstrated the use of photosynthetic cyanobacterial hosts for its production. However, cyanobacteria have very low tolerance to butanol, limiting the economic viability of butanol production from these renewable producing systems. The existing knowledge of molecular mechanism involved in butanol tolerance in cyanobacteria is very limited. To build a foundation necessary to engineer robust butanol-producing cyanobacterial hosts, in this study, the responses of Synechocystis PCC 6803 to butanol were investigated using a quantitative proteomics approach with iTRAQ - LC-MS/MS technologies. The resulting high-quality dataset consisted of 25,347 peptides corresponding to 1452 unique proteins, a coverage of approximately 40% of the predicted proteins in Synechocystis. Comparative quantification of protein abundances led to the identification of 303 differentially regulated proteins by butanol. Annotation and GO term enrichment analysis showed that multiple biological processes were regulated, suggesting that Synechocystis probably employed multiple and synergistic resistance mechanisms in dealing with butanol stress. Notably, the analysis revealed the induction of heat-shock protein and transporters, along with modification of cell membrane and envelope were the major protection mechanisms against butanol. A conceptual cellular model of Synechocystis PCC 6803 responses to butanol stress was constructed to illustrate the putative molecular mechanisms employed to defend against butanol stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative proteomics using the high resolution accurate mass capabilities of the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallien, Sebastien; Domon, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    High resolution/accurate mass hybrid mass spectrometers have considerably advanced shotgun proteomics and the recent introduction of fast sequencing capabilities has expanded its use for targeted approaches. More specifically, the quadrupole-orbitrap instrument has a unique configuration and its new features enable a wide range of experiments. An overview of the analytical capabilities of this instrument is presented, with a focus on its application to quantitative analyses. The high resolution, the trapping capability and the versatility of the instrument have allowed quantitative proteomic workflows to be redefined and new data acquisition schemes to be developed. The initial proteomic applications have shown an improvement of the analytical performance. However, as quantification relies on ion trapping, instead of ion beam, further refinement of the technique can be expected.

  13. Identification of Hypoxia-Regulated Proteins Using MALDI-Mass Spectrometry Imaging Combined with Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djidja, Marie-Claude; Chang, Joan; Hadjiprocopis, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    quantitative proteomics combined with MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Here we present a comprehensive hypoxic proteome study and are the first to investigate changes in situ using tumor samples. In vitro quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of the hypoxic proteome was performed on breast cancer...... cells using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). MS analyses were performed on laser-capture microdissected samples isolated from normoxic and hypoxic regions from tumors derived from the same cells used in vitro. MALDI-MSI was used in combination to investigate hypoxia......-regulated protein localization within tumor sections. Here we identified more than 100 proteins, both novel and previously reported, that were associated with hypoxia. Several proteins were localized in hypoxic regions, as identified by MALDI-MSI. Visualization and data extrapolation methods for the in vitro SILAC...

  14. Maximum entropy reconstructions of dynamic signaling networks from quantitative proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locasale, Jason W; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2009-08-26

    Advances in mass spectrometry among other technologies have allowed for quantitative, reproducible, proteome-wide measurements of levels of phosphorylation as signals propagate through complex networks in response to external stimuli under different conditions. However, computational approaches to infer elements of the signaling network strictly from the quantitative aspects of proteomics data are not well established. We considered a method using the principle of maximum entropy to infer a network of interacting phosphotyrosine sites from pairwise correlations in a mass spectrometry data set and derive a phosphorylation-dependent interaction network solely from quantitative proteomics data. We first investigated the applicability of this approach by using a simulation of a model biochemical signaling network whose dynamics are governed by a large set of coupled differential equations. We found that in a simulated signaling system, the method detects interactions with significant accuracy. We then analyzed a growth factor mediated signaling network in a human mammary epithelial cell line that we inferred from mass spectrometry data and observe a biologically interpretable, small-world structure of signaling nodes, as well as a catalog of predictions regarding the interactions among previously uncharacterized phosphotyrosine sites. For example, the calculation places a recently identified tumor suppressor pathway through ARHGEF7 and Scribble, in the context of growth factor signaling. Our findings suggest that maximum entropy derived network models are an important tool for interpreting quantitative proteomics data.

  15. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.; Acha, Moshe Ray; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Lyneh, Stacey N.; Olesen, Soren-Peter; Brunak, Soren; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Spiering, Wilko; Daly, Mark J.; Asselbergs, Ikea W.; van der Harst, Pim; Milan, David J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Lage, Kasper; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from Shigella flexneri under different culture conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Liguo; Fu, Hua; Wei, Candong, E-mail: weicando@ipbcams.ac.cn; Jin, Qi, E-mail: zdsys@vip.sina.com

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • We utilized mTRAQ-based quantification to study protein changes in Congo red-induced OMVs. • A total of 148 proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. • Twenty-eight and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the CR-induced OMV, respectively. • The result implied that a special sorting mechanism of particular proteins into OMVs may exist. • Key node proteins in the protein interaction network might be important for pathogenicity. - Abstract: The production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a common and regulated process of gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, the processes of Shigella flexneri OMV production still remain unclear. S. flexneri is the causative agent of endemic shigellosis in developing countries. The Congo red binding of strains is associated with increased infectivity of S. flexneri. Therefore, understanding the modulation pattern of OMV protein expression induced by Congo red will help to elucidate the bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the proteomic composition of OMVs and the change in OMV protein expression induced by Congo red using mTRAQ-based quantitative comparative proteomics. mTRAQ labelling increased the confidence in protein identification, and 148 total proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. These include a variety of important virulence factors, including Ipa proteins, TolC family, murein hydrolases, and members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Among the identified proteins, 28 and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the Congo red-induced OMV, respectively. Additionally, by comprehensive comparison with previous studies focused on DH5a-derived OMV, we identified some key node proteins in the protein–protein interaction network that may be involved in OMV biogenesis and are common to all gram-negative bacteria.

  17. Identification of redox-sensitive cysteines in the arabidopsis proteome using OxiTRAQ, a quantitative redox proteomics method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Pei

    2014-01-28

    Cellular redox status plays a key role in mediating various physiological and developmental processes often through modulating activities of redox-sensitive proteins. Various stresses trigger over-production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species which lead to oxidative modifications of redox-sensitive proteins. Identification and characterization of redox-sensitive proteins are important steps toward understanding molecular mechanisms of stress responses. Here, we report a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach termed OxiTRAQ for identifying proteins whose thiols undergo reversible oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells subjected to oxidative stress. In this approach, a biotinylated thiol-reactive reagent is used for differential labeling of reduced and oxidized thiols. The biotin-tagged peptides are affinity purified, labeled with iTRAQ reagents, and analyzed using a paralleled HCD-CID fragmentation mode in an LTQ-Orbitrap. With this approach, we identified 195 cysteine-containing peptides from 179 proteins whose thiols underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells following the treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A majority of those redox-sensitive proteins, including several transcription factors, were not identified by previous redox proteomics studies. This approach allows identification of the specific redox-regulated cysteine residues, and offers an effective tool for elucidation of redox proteomes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. A workflow for peptide-based proteomics in a poorly sequenced plant: A case study on the plasma membrane proteome of banana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertommen, A.; Laurell Blom Møller, Anders; Cordewener, J. H. G.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are an interesting class of proteins because of their functional importance. Unfortunately their analysis is hampered by low abundance and poor solubility in aqueous media. Since shotgun methods are high-throughput and partly overcome these problems, they are preferred......, integral plasma membrane proteins from banana leaves were successfully identified....... for membrane proteomics. However, their application in non-model plants demands special precautions to prevent false positive identification of proteins.In the current paper, a workflow for membrane proteomics in banana, a poorly sequenced plant, is proposed. The main steps of this workflow are (i...

  19. A review on mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics: Targeted and data independent acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidova, Veronika; Spacil, Zdenek

    2017-04-29

    Mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics have achieved a near-complete proteome coverage in humans and in several other organisms, producing a wealth of information stored in databases and bioinformatics resources. Recent implementation of selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) technology in targeted proteomics introduced the possibility of quantitatively follow-up specific protein targets in a hypothesis-driven experiment. In contrast to immunoaffinity-based workflows typically used in biological and clinical research for protein quantification, SRM/MRM is characterized by high selectivity, large capacity for multiplexing (approx. 200 proteins per analysis) and rapid, cost-effective transition from assay development to deployment. The concept of SRM/MRM utilizes triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer to provide inherent reproducibility, unparalleled sensitivity and selectivity to efficiently differentiate isoforms, post-translational modifications and mutated forms of proteins. SRM-like targeted acquisitions such as parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) are pioneered on high resolution/accurate mass (HR/AM) platforms based on the quadrupole-orbitrap (Q-orbitrap) mass spectrometer. The expansion of HR/AM also caused development in data independent acquisition (DIA). This review presents a step-by-step tutorial on development of SRM/MRM protein assay intended for researchers without prior experience in proteomics. We discus practical aspects of SRM-based quantitative proteomics workflow, summarize milestones in basic biological and medical research as well as recent trends and emerging techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of DHA in aging-related changes in mouse brain synaptic plasma membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Vishaldeep K; Huang, Bill X; Desai, Abhishek; Kevala, Karl; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Aging has been related to diminished cognitive function, which could be a result of ineffective synaptic function. We have previously shown that synaptic plasma membrane proteins supporting synaptic integrity and neurotransmission were downregulated in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-deprived brains, suggesting an important role of DHA in synaptic function. In this study, we demonstrate aging-induced synaptic proteome changes and DHA-dependent mitigation of such changes using mass spectrometry-based protein quantitation combined with western blot or messenger RNA analysis. We found significant reduction of 15 synaptic plasma membrane proteins in aging brains including fodrin-α, synaptopodin, postsynaptic density protein 95, synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B, synaptosomal-associated protein 25, synaptosomal-associated protein-α, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit epsilon-2 precursor, AMPA2, AP2, VGluT1, munc18-1, dynamin-1, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, rab3A, and EAAT1, most of which are involved in synaptic transmission. Notably, the first 9 proteins were further reduced when brain DHA was depleted by diet, indicating that DHA plays an important role in sustaining these synaptic proteins downregulated during aging. Reduction of 2 of these proteins was reversed by raising the brain DHA level by supplementing aged animals with an omega-3 fatty acid sufficient diet for 2 months. The recognition memory compromised in DHA-depleted animals was also improved. Our results suggest a potential role of DHA in alleviating aging-associated cognitive decline by offsetting the loss of neurotransmission-regulating synaptic proteins involved in synaptic function.

  1. Spatially-Resolved Proteomics: Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Alveolar Tissue Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clair, Geremy; Piehowski, Paul D.; Nicola, Teodora; Kitzmiller, Joseph A.; Huang, Eric L.; Zink, Erika M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Carson, James P.; Smith, Richard D.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Corley, Richard A.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Ansong, Charles

    2016-12-22

    Global proteomics approaches allow characterization of whole tissue lysates to an impressive depth. However, it is now increasingly recognized that to better understand the complexity of multicellular organisms, global protein profiling of specific spatially defined regions/substructures of tissues (i.e. spatially-resolved proteomics) is essential. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) enables microscopic isolation of defined regions of tissues preserving crucial spatial information. However, current proteomics workflows entail several manual sample preparation steps and are challenged by the microscopic mass-limited samples generated by LCM, and that impact measurement robustness, quantification, and throughput. Here, we coupled LCM with a fully automated sample preparation workflow that with a single manual step allows: protein extraction, tryptic digestion, peptide cleanup and LC-MS/MS analysis of proteomes from microdissected tissues. Benchmarking against the current state of the art in ultrasensitive global proteomic analysis, our approach demonstrated significant improvements in quantification and throughput. Using our LCM-SNaPP proteomics approach, we characterized to a depth of more than 3,400 proteins, the ontogeny of protein changes during normal lung development in laser capture microdissected alveolar tissue containing ~4,000 cells per sample. Importantly, the data revealed quantitative changes for 350 low abundance transcription factors and signaling molecules, confirming earlier transcript-level observations and defining seven modules of coordinated transcription factor/signaling molecule expression patterns, suggesting that a complex network of temporal regulatory control directs normal lung development with epigenetic regulation fine-tuning pre-natal developmental processes. Our LCM-proteomics approach facilitates efficient, spatially-resolved, ultrasensitive global proteomics analyses in high-throughput that will be enabling for several clinical and

  2. Plasma membrane proteomics and its application in clinical cancer biomarker discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2010-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins that are exposed on the cell surface have important biological functions, such as signaling into and out of the cells, ion transport, and cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The expression level of many of the plasma membrane proteins involved in these key functions...... targeted by protein drugs, such as human antibodies, that have enhanced survival of several groups of cancer patients. The combination of novel analytical approaches and subcellular fractionation procedures has made it possible to study the plasma membrane proteome in more detail, which will elucidate...... cancer biology, particularly metastasis, and guide future development of novel drug targets. The technical advances in plasma membrane proteomics and the consequent biological revelations will be discussed herein. Many of the advances have been made using cancer cell lines, but because the main goal...

  3. Optimization of statistical methods impact on quantitative proteomics data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pursiheimo, A.; Vehmas, A.P.; Afzal, S.; Suomi, T.; Chand, T.; Strauss, L.; Poutanen, M.; Rokka, A.; Corthals, G.L.; Elo, L.L.

    2015-01-01

    As tools for quantitative label-free mass spectrometry (MS) rapidly develop, a consensus about the best practices is not apparent. In the work described here we compared popular statistical methods for detecting differential protein expression from quantitative MS data using both controlled

  4. Putative Alginate Assimilation Process of the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Based on Quantitative Proteomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Toshiyuki; Morisaka, Hironobu; Aburaya, Shunsuke; Tatsukami, Yohei; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted to assess the assimilation processes of Saccharophagus degradans cultured with glucose, pectin, and alginate as carbon sources. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach was used, employing our unique, long monolithic silica capillary column. In an attempt to select candidate proteins that correlated to alginate assimilation, the production of 23 alginate-specific proteins was identified by statistical analyses of the quantitative proteomic data. Based on the analysis, we propose that S. degradans has an alginate-specific gene cluster for efficient alginate utilization. The alginate-specific proteins of S. degradans were comprised of alginate lyases, enzymes related to carbohydrate metabolism, membrane transporters, and transcription factors. Among them, the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase Sde_3281 annotated in the alginate-specific cluster showed 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid reductase (DehR) activity. Furthermore, we found two different genes (Sde_3280 and Sde_0939) encoding 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconic acid (KDG) kinases (KdgK) that metabolize the KDG derived from alginate and pectin in S. degradans. S. degradans used Sde_3280 to phosphorylate the KDG derived from alginate and Sde_0939 to phosphorylate the KDG derived from pectin. The distinct selection of KdgKs provides an important clue toward the elucidation of how S. degradans recognizes and processes polysaccharides.

  5. Dissecting the C. elegans response during infection using quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karina Trankjær; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kristensen, Anders Riis;

    the infection process is followed using GFP-expressing bacteria and persistence assays. A quantitative proteomic approach was used to follow the C. elegans host response during the infection process. C. elegans were metabolic labeled with the stable isotope 15N and samples from three different time points...... process. By analyzing the changes in the C. elegans proteome throughout infection we will be able to identify and follow pathways and effector proteins in the early, mid and late phase of the innate immune response towards this pathogenic E. coli.  ...

  6. Proteomic analysis of liver plasma membrane from hepatitis B surface antigen transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾小芳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the differential liver plasma membrane( PM) proteins that may be related to the occurrence,development and reversal process of hepatitis and to understand the pathogenesis of hepatitis and the new drug targets by performing a comparative proteomics research of liver PM between

  7. Insights into physiological traits of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 through membrane proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir; Hjernø, Karin; Østerlund, Eva Christina

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 is a widely used probiotic strain associated with a variety of health-promoting traits. There is, however, only limited knowledge available regarding the membrane proteome and the proteins involved in oligosaccharide transport in BB-12. We applied two...

  8. New proteomic approaches to study the organization of yeast mitochondrial membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbens, J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite their importance, membrane proteins have traditionally been underrepresented in proteomics studies due to their incompatibility with common methods used in this field. Therefore, new methods have to be developed for studying this class of proteins. In this thesis, new approaches are describe

  9. A Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Clinical Research with Non-Traditional Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licier, Rígel; Miranda, Eric; Serrano, Horacio

    2016-10-17

    The proper handling of samples to be analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) can guarantee excellent results and a greater depth of analysis when working in quantitative proteomics. This is critical when trying to assess non-traditional sources such as ear wax, saliva, vitreous humor, aqueous humor, tears, nipple aspirate fluid, breast milk/colostrum, cervical-vaginal fluid, nasal secretions, bronco-alveolar lavage fluid, and stools. We intend to provide the investigator with relevant aspects of quantitative proteomics and to recognize the most recent clinical research work conducted with atypical samples and analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Having as reference the most recent and different approaches used with non-traditional sources allows us to compare new strategies in the development of novel experimental models. On the other hand, these references help us to contribute significantly to the understanding of the proportions of proteins in different proteomes of clinical interest and may lead to potential advances in the emerging field of precision medicine.

  10. A Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Clinical Research with Non-Traditional Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rígel Licier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The proper handling of samples to be analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS can guarantee excellent results and a greater depth of analysis when working in quantitative proteomics. This is critical when trying to assess non-traditional sources such as ear wax, saliva, vitreous humor, aqueous humor, tears, nipple aspirate fluid, breast milk/colostrum, cervical-vaginal fluid, nasal secretions, bronco-alveolar lavage fluid, and stools. We intend to provide the investigator with relevant aspects of quantitative proteomics and to recognize the most recent clinical research work conducted with atypical samples and analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Having as reference the most recent and different approaches used with non-traditional sources allows us to compare new strategies in the development of novel experimental models. On the other hand, these references help us to contribute significantly to the understanding of the proportions of proteins in different proteomes of clinical interest and may lead to potential advances in the emerging field of precision medicine.

  11. Data for chicken semen proteome and label free quantitative analyses displaying sperm quality biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labas, Valérie; Grasseau, Isabelle; Cahier, Karine; Gargaros, Audrey; Harichaux, Grégoire; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Alves, Sabine; Bourin, Marie; Gérard, Nadine; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Understanding of biology of the avian male gamete is essential to improve the conservation of genetic resources and performances in farming. In this study, the semen proteome of the main domestic avian species (Gallus gallus) and evaluation of the molecular phenotype related to sperm quality were investigated using GeLC-MS/MS approach and label-free quantitative proteomic based on Spectral Counting (SC) and extracted ion chromatograms (XIC) methods. Here we describe in details the peptide/protein inventory of chicken ejaculated spermatozoa (SPZ) and seminal plasma (SP). We also show differential analyses of chicken semen (SPZ and corresponding SP) from 11 males demonstrating different levels of fertilizing capacity and sperm motility. The interpretation and description of these data can be found in a research article published by Labas and colleagues in the Journal of Proteomics in 2014 [1]. This is a new resource for exploring the molecular mechanisms involved in fertilizing capacity and to reveal new sets of fertility biomarkers.

  12. Ultra-deep and quantitative saliva proteome reveals dynamics of the oral microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassl, Niklas; Kulak, Nils Alexander; Pichler, Garwin

    2016-01-01

    , disruptions in saliva secretion and changes in the oral microbiome contribute to conditions such as tooth decay and respiratory tract infections. Here we set out to quantitatively map the saliva proteome in great depth with a rapid and in-depth mass spectrometry-based proteomics workflow. METHODS: We used...... with next-generation sequencing data from the Human Microbiome Project as well as a comparison to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry on microbial cultures revealed strong agreement. The oral microbiome differs between individuals and changes drastically upon eating and tooth brushing. CONCLUSION: Rapid shotgun...... and robust technology can now simultaneously characterize the human and microbiome contributions to the proteome of a body fluid and is therefore a valuable complement to genomic studies. This opens new frontiers for the study of host-pathogen interactions and clinical saliva diagnostics....

  13. Strigolactone-Regulated Proteins Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhou [ORNL; Czarnecki, Olaf [ORNL; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Yang, Jun [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a new class of plant hormones. In addition to acting as a key inhibitor of shoot branching, SLs stimulate seed germination of root parasitic plants and promote hyphal branching and root colonization of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. They also regulate many other aspects of plant growth and development. At the transcription level, SL-regulated genes have been reported. However, nothing is known about the proteome regulated by this new class of plant hormones. Here, a quantitative proteomics approach using an isobaric chemical labeling reagent, iTRAQ, to identify the proteome regulated by SLs in Arabidopsis seedlings is presented. It was found SLs regulate the expression of about three dozens of proteins that have not been previously assigned to SL pathways. These findings provide a new tool to investigate the molecular mechanism of action of SLs.

  14. Data set for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of chicken uterine fluid during eggshell biomineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Marie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chicken eggshell is the protective barrier of the egg. It is a biomineral composed of 95% calcium carbonate on calcitic form and 3.5% organic matrix proteins. Mineralization process occurs in uterus into the uterine fluid. This acellular fluid contains ions and organic matrix proteins precursors which are interacting with the mineral phase and control crystal growth, eggshell structure and mechanical properties. We performed a proteomic approach and identified 308 uterine fluid proteins. Gene Ontology terms enrichments were determined to investigate their potential functions. Mass spectrometry analyses were also combined to label free quantitative analysis to determine the relative abundance of 96 proteins at initiation, rapid growth phase and termination of shell calcification. Sixty four showed differential abundance according to the mineralization stage. Their potential functions have been annotated. The complete proteomic, bioinformatic and functional analyses are reported in Marie et al., J. Proteomics (2015 [1].

  15. A tutorial for software development in quantitative proteomics using PSI standard formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel F; Qi, Da; Fan, Jun; Bessant, Conrad; Jones, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    The Human Proteome Organisation - Proteomics Standards Initiative (HUPO-PSI) has been working for ten years on the development of standardised formats that facilitate data sharing and public database deposition. In this article, we review three HUPO-PSI data standards - mzML, mzIdentML and mzQuantML, which can be used to design a complete quantitative analysis pipeline in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. In this tutorial, we briefly describe the content of each data model, sufficient for bioinformaticians to devise proteomics software. We also provide guidance on the use of recently released application programming interfaces (APIs) developed in Java for each of these standards, which makes it straightforward to read and write files of any size. We have produced a set of example Java classes and a basic graphical user interface to demonstrate how to use the most important parts of the PSI standards, available from http://code.google.com/p/psi-standard-formats-tutorial. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A tutorial for software development in quantitative proteomics using PSI standard formats☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel F.; Qi, Da; Fan, Jun; Bessant, Conrad; Jones, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Proteome Organisation — Proteomics Standards Initiative (HUPO-PSI) has been working for ten years on the development of standardised formats that facilitate data sharing and public database deposition. In this article, we review three HUPO-PSI data standards — mzML, mzIdentML and mzQuantML, which can be used to design a complete quantitative analysis pipeline in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. In this tutorial, we briefly describe the content of each data model, sufficient for bioinformaticians to devise proteomics software. We also provide guidance on the use of recently released application programming interfaces (APIs) developed in Java for each of these standards, which makes it straightforward to read and write files of any size. We have produced a set of example Java classes and a basic graphical user interface to demonstrate how to use the most important parts of the PSI standards, available from http://code.google.com/p/psi-standard-formats-tutorial. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23584085

  17. Proteomic analysis of cow, yak, buffalo, goat and camel milk whey proteins: quantitative differential expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongxin; Bu, Dengpan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Peng; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhou, Lingyun

    2013-04-05

    To aid in unraveling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach was used to analyze the whey proteome in cow, yak, buffalo, goat, and camel milk based on the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) techniques. This analysis is the first to produce proteomic data for the milk from the above-mentioned animal species: 211 proteins have been identified and 113 proteins have been categorized according to molecular function, cellular components, and biological processes based on gene ontology annotation. The results of principal component analysis showed significant differences in proteomic patterns among goat, camel, cow, buffalo, and yak milk. Furthermore, 177 differentially expressed proteins were submitted to advanced hierarchical clustering. The resulting clustering pattern included three major sample clusters: (1) cow, buffalo, and yak milk; (2) goat, cow, buffalo, and yak milk; and (3) camel milk. Certain proteins were chosen as characterization traits for a given species: whey acidic protein and quinone oxidoreductase for camel milk, biglycan for goat milk, uncharacterized protein (Accession Number: F1MK50 ) for yak milk, clusterin for buffalo milk, and primary amine oxidase for cow milk. These results help reveal the quantitative milk whey proteome pattern for analyzed species. This provides information for evaluating adulteration of specific specie milk and may provide potential directions for application of specific milk protein production based on physiological differences among animal species.

  18. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Richard J; Wurch, Louie L; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L

    2015-08-04

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. As this interaction is thought to be membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins, proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitans proteins. Using this method, we show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. These gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  19. Proteomic characterization of golgi membranes enriched from Arabidopsis suspension cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Fasmer; Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The plant Golgi apparatus has a central role in the secretory pathway and is the principal site within the cell for the assembly and processing of macromolecules. The stacked membrane structure of the Golgi apparatus along with its interactions with the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum has...... from an Arabidopsis cell suspension culture that can be used to investigate the proteome of this organelle. We also provide a useful workflow for the examination of proteomic data as the result of multiple analyses. Finally, we highlight a simple technique to validate the subcellular localization...

  20. Relationship between sample loading amount and peptide identification and its effects on quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kehui; Zhang, Jiyang; Wang, Jinglan; Zhao, Liyan; Peng, Xu; Jia, Wei; Ying, Wantao; Zhu, Yunping; Xie, Hongwei; He, Fuchu; Qian, Xiaohong

    2009-02-15

    The relationship between sample loading amount and peptide identification is crucial for the optimization of proteomics experiments, but few studies have addressed this matter. Herein, we present a systematic study using a replicate run strategy to probe the inherent influence of both peptide physicochemical properties and matrix effects on the relationship between peptide identification and sample loading amounts, as well as its applications in protein quantification. Ten replicate runs for a series of laddered loading amounts (ranging between 0.01 approximately 10 microg) of total digested proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were performed with nanoscale liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (nanoLC-LTQ-FT) to obtain a nearly saturated peptide identification. This permitted us to differentiate the linear correlativity of peptide identification by the commonly used peptide quantitative index, the area of constructed ion chromatograms (XIC) (SA, from MS and tandem MS data) in the given experiments. The absolute loading amount of a given complex sample affected the final qualitative identification result; thus, optimization of the sample loading amount before every proteomics study was essential. Peptide physicochemical properties had little effect on the linear correlativity between SA-based peptide quantification and loading amount. The matrix effects, rather than the static physicochemical properties of individual peptides, affect peptide measurability. We also quantified the target protein by selecting peptides with good parallel linear correlativity based upon SA as signature peptides and revised the data by multiplying by the reciprocal of the slope coefficient. We found that this optimized the linear protein abundance relativity at every amount range and thus extended the linear dynamic range of label-free quantification. This empirical rule for linear peptide selection (ERLPS) can be adopted to

  1. The quantitative nuclear matrix proteome as a biochemical snapshot of nuclear organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Rudolf; Riede, Julia; Hegermann, Jan; Wuerch, Andreas; Eimer, Stefan; Dengjel, Joern; Mittler, Gerhard

    2014-09-05

    The nuclear matrix (NM) is an operationally defined structure of the mammalian cell nucleus that resists stringent biochemical extraction procedures applied subsequent to nuclease-mediated chromatin digestion of intact nuclei. This comprises removal of soluble biomolecules and chromatin by means of either detergent (LIS: lithium diiodosalicylate) or high salt (AS: ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride) treatment. So far, progress toward defining bona fide NM proteins has been hindered by the problem of distinguishing them from copurifying abundant contaminants and extraction-method-intrinsic precipitation artifacts. Here, we present a highly improved NM purification strategy, adding a FACS sorting step for efficient isolation of morphologically homogeneous lamin B positive NM specimens. SILAC-based quantitative proteome profiling of LIS-, AS-, or NaCl-extracted matrices versus the nuclear proteome together with rigorous statistical filtering enables the compilation of a high-quality catalogue of NM proteins commonly enriched among the three different extraction methods. We refer to this set of 272 proteins as the NM central proteome. Quantitative NM retention profiles for 2381 proteins highlight elementary features of nuclear organization and correlate well with immunofluorescence staining patterns reported in the Human Protein Atlas, demonstrating that the NM central proteome is significantly enriched in proteins exhibiting a nuclear body as well as nuclear speckle-like morphology.

  2. Streamlined Membrane Proteome Preparation for Shotgun Proteomics Analysis with Triton X-100 Cloud Point Extraction and Nanodiamond Solid Phase Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh D. Pham

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available While mass spectrometry (MS plays a key role in proteomics research, characterization of membrane proteins (MP by MS has been a challenging task because of the presence of a host of interfering chemicals in the hydrophobic protein extraction process, and the low protease digestion efficiency. We report a sample preparation protocol, two-phase separation with Triton X-100, induced by NaCl, with coomassie blue added for visualizing the detergent-rich phase, which streamlines MP preparation for SDS-PAGE analysis of intact MP and shot-gun proteomic analyses. MP solubilized in the detergent-rich milieu were then sequentially extracted and fractionated by surface-oxidized nanodiamond (ND at three pHs. The high MP affinity of ND enabled extensive washes for removal of salts, detergents, lipids, and other impurities to ensure uncompromised ensuing purposes, notably enhanced proteolytic digestion and down-stream mass spectrometric (MS analyses. Starting with a typical membranous cellular lysate fraction harvested with centrifugation/ultracentrifugation, MP purities of 70%, based on number (not weight of proteins identified by MS, was achieved; the weight-based purity can be expected to be much higher.

  3. Proteomic analysis of urinary exosomes from patients of early IgA nephropathy and thin basement membrane nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Pyong-Gon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; You, Sungyong; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Kim, In-San; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Chan-Duck; Park, Sun-Hee; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Yong-Lim; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2011-06-01

    To identify biomarker candidates associated with early IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and thin basement membrane nephropathy (TBMN), the most common causes presenting isolated hematuria in childhood, a proteomic approach of urinary exosomes from early IgAN and TBMN patients was introduced. The proteomic results from the patients were compared with a normal group to understand the pathophysiological processes associated with these diseases at the protein level. The urinary exosomes, which reflect pathophysiological processes, collected from three groups of young adults (early IgAN, TBMN, and normal) were trypsin-digested using a gel-assisted protocol, and quantified by label-free LC-MS/MS, using an MS(E) mode. A total of 1877 urinary exosome proteins, including cytoplasmic, membrane, and vesicle trafficking proteins, were identified. Among the differentially expressed proteins, four proteins (aminopeptidase N, vasorin precursor, α-1-antitrypsin, and ceruloplasmin) were selected as biomarker candidates to differentiate early IgAN from TBMN. We confirmed the protein levels of the four biomarker candidates by semi-quantitative immunoblot analysis in urinary exosomes independently prepared from other patients, including older adult groups. Further clinical studies are needed to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic value of these urinary markers for early IgAN and TBMN. Taken together, this study showed the possibility of identifying biomarker candidates for human urinary diseases using urinary exosomes and might help to understand the pathophysiology of early IgAN and TBMN at the protein level.

  4. The quantitative and condition-dependent Escherichia coli proteome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Alexander; Kochanowski, Karl; Vedelaar, Silke; Ahrné, Erik; Volkmer, Benjamin; Callipo, Luciano; Knoops, Kèvin; Bauer, Manuel; Aebersold, Ruedi; Heinemann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Measuring precise concentrations of proteins can provide insights into biological processes. Here we use efficient protein extraction and sample fractionation, as well as state-of-the-art quantitative mass spectrometry techniques to generate a comprehensive, condition-dependent protein-abundance map

  5. Proteomic analysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elortza, Felix; Nühse, Thomas S; Foster, Leonard J

    2003-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are a functionally and structurally diverse family of post-translationally modified membrane proteins found mostly in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane in a variety of eukaryotic cells. Although the general role of GPI-APs remains un...

  6. Clinical applications of quantitative proteomics using targeted and untargeted data-independent acquisition techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jesse G; Schilling, Birgit

    2017-05-01

    While selected/multiple-reaction monitoring (SRM or MRM) is considered the gold standard for quantitative protein measurement, emerging data-independent acquisition (DIA) using high-resolution scans have opened a new dimension of high-throughput, comprehensive quantitative proteomics. These newer methodologies are particularly well suited for discovery of biomarker candidates from human disease samples, and for investigating and understanding human disease pathways. Areas covered: This article reviews the current state of targeted and untargeted DIA mass spectrometry-based proteomic workflows, including SRM, parallel-reaction monitoring (PRM) and untargeted DIA (e.g., SWATH). Corresponding bioinformatics strategies, as well as application in biological and clinical studies are presented. Expert commentary: Nascent application of highly-multiplexed untargeted DIA, such as SWATH, for accurate protein quantification from clinically relevant and disease-related samples shows great potential to comprehensively investigate biomarker candidates and understand disease.

  7. Quantitative proteomic analysis of post-translational modifications of human histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Nielsen, Eva C; Matthiesen, Rune

    2006-01-01

    software for qualitative and quantitative proteomic analysis of histones extracted from human small cell lung cancer cells. A total of 32 acetylations, methylations, and ubiquitinations were located in the human histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4, including seven novel modifications. An LC-MSMS-based method....... Deciphering of the histone code is hampered by the lack of analytical methods for monitoring the combinatorial complexity of reversible multisite modifications of histones, including acetylation and methylation. To address this problem, we used LC-MSMS technology and Virtual Expert Mass Spectrometrist...... was applied in a quantitative proteomic study of the dose-response effect of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) PXD101 on histone acetylation in human cell cultures. Triplicate LC-MSMS runs at six different HDACi concentrations demonstrated that PXD101 affects acetylation of histones H2A, H2B, H3...

  8. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.;

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes...... involved in the Mendelian disorder long QT syndrome (LOTS). We integrated the LOTS network with GWAS loci from the corresponding common complex trait, QT-interval variation, to identify candidate genes that were subsequently confirmed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and zebrafish. We used the LOTS protein...... to propose candidates in GWAS loci for functional studies and to systematically filter subtle association signals using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics....

  9. A statistical framework for protein quantitation in bottom-up MS-based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpievitch, Yuliya; Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Taverner, Thomas; Huang, Jianhua; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Weijun; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2009-08-15

    ABSTRACT Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics requires protein-level estimates and confidence measures. Challenges include the presence of low-quality or incorrectly identified peptides and widespread, informative, missing data. Furthermore, models are required for rolling peptide-level information up to the protein level. Results: We present a statistical model for protein abundance in terms of peptide peak intensities, applicable to both label-based and label-free quantitation experiments. The model allows for both random and censoring missingness mechanisms and provides naturally for protein-level estimates and confidence measures. The model is also used to derive automated filtering and imputation routines. Three LC-MS datasets are used to illustrate the methods. Availability: The software has been made available in the open-source proteomics platform DAnTE (Polpitiya et al. (2008)) (http://omics.pnl.gov/software/). Contact: adabney@stat.tamu.edu

  10. A guideline to proteome-wide α-helical membrane protein topology predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigos, Konstantinos D; Hennerdal, Aron; Käll, Lukas; Elofsson, Arne

    2012-08-01

    For current state-of-the-art methods, the prediction of correct topology of membrane proteins has been reported to be above 80%. However, this performance has only been observed in small and possibly biased data sets obtained from protein structures or biochemical assays. Here, we test a number of topology predictors on an "unseen" set of proteins of known structure and also on four "genome-scale" data sets, including one recent large set of experimentally validated human membrane proteins with glycosylated sites. The set of glycosylated proteins is also used to examine the ability of prediction methods to separate membrane from nonmembrane proteins. The results show that methods utilizing multiple sequence alignments are overall superior to methods that do not. The best performance is obtained by TOPCONS, a consensus method that combines several of the other prediction methods. The best methods to distinguish membrane from nonmembrane proteins belong to the "Phobius" group of predictors. We further observe that the reported high accuracies in the smaller benchmark sets are not quite maintained in larger scale benchmarks. Instead, we estimate the performance of the best prediction methods for eukaryotic membrane proteins to be between 60% and 70%. The low agreement between predictions from different methods questions earlier estimates about the global properties of the membrane proteome. Finally, we suggest a pipeline to estimate these properties using a combination of the best predictors that could be applied in large-scale proteomics studies of membrane proteins.

  11. Comparative proteome analysis of saccular intracranial aneurysms with iTRAQ quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Yu, Lanbing; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-01-01

    To screen differentially expressed proteins of saccular intracranial aneurysms and superficial temporal artery by the proteomics analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) combined with reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Collecting 17 samples from intracranial aneurysm patients undergoing aneurysmectomy as experiment group and 17 matched STA as control group. After quantification and enzymolysis of the protein, the iTRAQ were used to label the peptides of the 2 groups respectively. Then, the mixture of the peptides was fractioned by RP-HPLC and analyzed by LC-MS/MS to identify the differential expression proteins. A total of 1699 proteins were identified from the ProteinPilot 4.5 software (AB SCIEX) using the Paragon database search algorithm. Comparing with STA, 54 proteins were significantly up-regulated (115:1142.0-fold). Furthermore, Integrin β3, Secreted frizzled-related protein 2 were significantly up-regulated (2.3 fold and 2.1 fold, respectively), whereas MyosinIIb, Alpha-actinin-1, Laminin β2, and Carboxypeptidase A3 were down-regulated (3.01 fold, 2.1 fold, 2.07 fold, and 2.01 fold, respectively) in sIAs. GO Ontology analysis showed that most differential proteins expressed in cytoskeletal; up-regulated proteins in sIAs play an important role in inflammatory reaction, enzymatic hydrolysis, cell adhesion and invasion, and cellular immune reaction; down-regulated proteins in sIAs involved in cytoskeletal protein, enzyme, and structural protein. ITGB3, ACTN1 and MYL2 play a role in aneurysm formation via focal adhesion pathway. The results of Western-blot assay were consistent with the proteomic changes of those 6 proteins. The differentially expressed proteins in sIAs that showed aneurysm formation are related to cytoskeleton abnormal and extracellular matrix changes. The iTRAQ technology provides scientific foundation for the further study to explore the pathogenic mechanism of sIAs. Copyright © 2015

  12. High Throughput Quantitative Glycomics and Glycoform-focused Proteomics of Murine Dermis and Epidermis

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of the significance of the protein glycosylation, the throughput of protein glycosylation analysis is still too low to be applied to the exhaustive glycoproteomic analysis. Aiming to elucidate the N-glycosylation of murine epidermis and dermis glycoproteins, here we used a novel approach for focused proteomics. A gross N-glycan profiling (glycomics) of epidermis and dermis was first elucidated both qualitatively and quantitatively upon N-glycan der...

  13. Combining Amine Metabolomics and Quantitative Proteomics of Cancer Cells Using Derivatization with Isobaric Tags

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy,J. Patrick; Everley, Robert A.; Coloff, Jonathan L.; Steven P. Gygi

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative metabolomics and proteomics technologies are powerful approaches to explore cellular metabolic regulation. Unfortunately, combining the two technologies typically requires different LC-MS setups for sensitive measurement of metabolites and peptides. One approach to enhance the analysis of certain classes of metabolites is by derivatization with various types of tags to increase ionization and chromatographic efficiency. We demonstrate here that derivatization of amine metabolites...

  14. Hydroponics on a chip: analysis of the Fe deficient Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Gómez, Stephen M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Nishio, John N

    2009-04-13

    The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was used to evaluate the thylakoid membrane proteome under Fe-deficient conditions. Plants were cultivated using a novel hydroponic system, called "hydroponics on a chip", which yields highly reproducible plant tissue samples for physiological analyses, and can be easily used for in vivo stable isotope labeling. The thylakoid membrane proteome, from intact chloroplasts isolated from Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient plants grown with hydroponics on a chip, was analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Intact masses of thylakoid membrane proteins were measured, many for the first time, and several proteins were identified with post-translational modifications that were altered by Fe deficiency; for example, the doubly phosphorylated form of the photosystem II oxygen evolving complex, PSBH, increased under Fe-deficiency. Increased levels of photosystem II protein subunit PSBS were detected in the Fe-deficient samples. Antioxidant enzymes, including ascorbate peroxidase and peroxiredoxin Q, were only detected in the Fe-deficient samples. We present the first biochemical evidence that the two major LHC IIb proteins (LHCB1 and LHCB2) may have significantly different functions in the thylakoid membrane. The study illustrates the utility of intact mass proteomics as an indispensable tool for functional genomics. "Hydroponics on a chip" provides the ability to grow A. thaliana under defined conditions that will be useful for systems biology.

  15. PeptideDepot: flexible relational database for visual analysis of quantitative proteomic data and integration of existing protein information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kebing; Salomon, Arthur R

    2009-12-01

    Recently, dramatic progress has been achieved in expanding the sensitivity, resolution, mass accuracy, and scan rate of mass spectrometers able to fragment and identify peptides through MS/MS. Unfortunately, this enhanced ability to acquire proteomic data has not been accompanied by a concomitant increase in the availability of flexible tools allowing users to rapidly assimilate, explore, and analyze this data and adapt to various experimental workflows with minimal user intervention. Here we fill this critical gap by providing a flexible relational database called PeptideDepot for organization of expansive proteomic data sets, collation of proteomic data with available protein information resources, and visual comparison of multiple quantitative proteomic experiments. Our software design, built upon the synergistic combination of a MySQL database for safe warehousing of proteomic data with a FileMaker-driven graphical user interface for flexible adaptation to diverse workflows, enables proteomic end-users to directly tailor the presentation of proteomic data to the unique analysis requirements of the individual proteomics lab. PeptideDepot may be deployed as an independent software tool or integrated directly with our high throughput autonomous proteomic pipeline used in the automated acquisition and post-acquisition analysis of proteomic data.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of a membrane-enriched fraction from flag leaves reveals responses to chemical hybridization agent SQ-1 in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilu eSong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The induction of wheat male fertile lines by using the chemical hybridizing agent SQ-1 (CHA-SQ-1 is an effective approach in the utilization of heterosis; however, the molecular basis of male fertility remains unknown. Wheat flag leaves are the initial receptors of CHA-SQ-1 and their membrane structure plays a vital role in response to CHA-SQ-1 stress. To investigate the response of wheat flag leaves to CHA-SQ-1 stress, we compared their quantitative proteomic profiles in the absence and presence of CHA-SQ-1. Our results indicated that wheat flag leaves suffered oxidative stress during CHA-SQ-1 treatments. Leaf O2-, H2O2, and malonaldehyde levels were significantly increased within 10 h after CHA-SQ-1 treatment, while the activities of major antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase were significantly reduced. Proteome profiles of membrane-enriched fraction showed a change in the abundance of a battery of membrane proteins involved in multiple biological processes. These variable proteins mainly impaired photosynthesis, ATP synthesis protein mechanisms and were involved in the response to stress. These results provide an explanation of the relationships between membrane proteomes and anther abortion and the practical application of CHA for hybrid breeding.

  17. Pipeline to assess the greatest source of technical variance in quantitative proteomics using metabolic labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Matthew R; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2012-12-21

    The biological variance in protein expression of interest to biologists can only be accessed if the technical variance of the protein quantification method is low compared with the biological variance. Technical variance is dependent on the protocol employed within a quantitative proteomics experiment and accumulated with every additional step. The magnitude of additional variance incurred by each step of a protocol should be determined to enable design of experiments maximally sensitive to differential protein expression. Metabolic labelling techniques for MS based quantitative proteomics enable labelled and unlabelled samples to be combined at the tissue level. It has been widely assumed, although not yet empirically verified, that early combination of samples minimises technical variance in relative quantification. This study presents a pipeline to determine the variance incurred at each stage of a common quantitative proteomics protocol involving metabolic labelling. We apply this pipeline to determine whether early combination of samples in a protocol leads to significant reduction in experimental variance. We also identify which stage within the protocol is associated with maximum variance. This provides a blueprint by which the variance associated with each stage of any protocol can be dissected and utilised to influence optimal experimental design.

  18. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Hfq-Regulon in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrero, Patricio; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Lanner, Ulrike; Schlosser, Andreas; Becker, Anke; Valverde, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Riboregulation stands for RNA-based control of gene expression. In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are a major class of riboregulatory elements, most of which act at the post-transcriptional level by base-pairing target mRNA genes. The RNA chaperone Hfq facilitates antisense interactions between target mRNAs and regulatory sRNAs, thus influencing mRNA stability and/or translation rate. In the α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 2011, the identification and detection of multiple sRNAs genes and the broadly pleitropic phenotype associated to the absence of a functional Hfq protein both support the existence of riboregulatory circuits controlling gene expression to ensure the fitness of this bacterium in both free living and symbiotic conditions. In order to identify target mRNAs subject to Hfq-dependent riboregulation, we have compared the proteome of an hfq mutant and the wild type S. meliloti by quantitative proteomics following protein labelling with 15N. Among 2139 univocally identified proteins, a total of 195 proteins showed a differential abundance between the Hfq mutant and the wild type strain; 65 proteins accumulated ≥2-fold whereas 130 were downregulated (≤0.5-fold) in the absence of Hfq. This profound proteomic impact implies a major role for Hfq on regulation of diverse physiological processes in S. meliloti, from transport of small molecules to homeostasis of iron and nitrogen. Changes in the cellular levels of proteins involved in transport of nucleotides, peptides and amino acids, and in iron homeostasis, were confirmed with phenotypic assays. These results represent the first quantitative proteomic analysis in S. meliloti. The comparative analysis of the hfq mutant proteome allowed identification of novel strongly Hfq-regulated genes in S. meliloti. PMID:23119037

  19. Nano Random Forests to mine protein complexes and their relationships in quantitative proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño-Gutierrez, Luis F; Ohta, Shinya; Kustatscher, Georg; Earnshaw, William C; Rappsilber, Juri

    2017-03-01

    Ever-increasing numbers of quantitative proteomics data sets constitute an underexploited resource for investigating protein function. Multiprotein complexes often follow consistent trends in these experiments, which could provide insights about their biology. Yet, as more experiments are considered, a complex's signature may become conditional and less identifiable. Previously we successfully distinguished the general proteomic signature of genuine chromosomal proteins from hitchhikers using the Random Forests (RF) machine learning algorithm. Here we test whether small protein complexes can define distinguishable signatures of their own, despite the assumption that machine learning needs large training sets. We show, with simulated and real proteomics data, that RF can detect small protein complexes and relationships between them. We identify several complexes in quantitative proteomics results of wild-type and knockout mitotic chromosomes. Other proteins covary strongly with these complexes, suggesting novel functional links for later study. Integrating the RF analysis for several complexes reveals known interdependences among kinetochore subunits and a novel dependence between the inner kinetochore and condensin. Ribosomal proteins, although identified, remained independent of kinetochore subcomplexes. Together these results show that this complex-oriented RF (NanoRF) approach can integrate proteomics data to uncover subtle protein relationships. Our NanoRF pipeline is available online. © 2017 Montaño-Gutierrez et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the Hfq-regulon in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Sobrero

    Full Text Available Riboregulation stands for RNA-based control of gene expression. In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs are a major class of riboregulatory elements, most of which act at the post-transcriptional level by base-pairing target mRNA genes. The RNA chaperone Hfq facilitates antisense interactions between target mRNAs and regulatory sRNAs, thus influencing mRNA stability and/or translation rate. In the α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 2011, the identification and detection of multiple sRNAs genes and the broadly pleitropic phenotype associated to the absence of a functional Hfq protein both support the existence of riboregulatory circuits controlling gene expression to ensure the fitness of this bacterium in both free living and symbiotic conditions. In order to identify target mRNAs subject to Hfq-dependent riboregulation, we have compared the proteome of an hfq mutant and the wild type S. meliloti by quantitative proteomics following protein labelling with (15N. Among 2139 univocally identified proteins, a total of 195 proteins showed a differential abundance between the Hfq mutant and the wild type strain; 65 proteins accumulated ≥2-fold whereas 130 were downregulated (≤0.5-fold in the absence of Hfq. This profound proteomic impact implies a major role for Hfq on regulation of diverse physiological processes in S. meliloti, from transport of small molecules to homeostasis of iron and nitrogen. Changes in the cellular levels of proteins involved in transport of nucleotides, peptides and amino acids, and in iron homeostasis, were confirmed with phenotypic assays. These results represent the first quantitative proteomic analysis in S. meliloti. The comparative analysis of the hfq mutant proteome allowed identification of novel strongly Hfq-regulated genes in S. meliloti.

  1. Use of sequential chemical extractions to purify nuclear membrane proteins for proteomics identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfali, Nadia; Fairley, Elizabeth A L; Swanson, Selene K; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) is a double membrane system that is both a part of the endoplasmic reticulum and part of the nucleus. As its constituent proteins tend to be highly complexed with nuclear and cytoplasmic components, it is notoriously difficult to purify. Two methods can reduce this difficulty for the identification of nuclear membrane proteins: comparison to contaminating membranes and chemical extractions to enrich for certain groups of proteins. The purification of nuclear envelopes and contaminating microsomal membranes is described here along with procedures for chemical extraction using salt and detergent, chaotropes, or alkaline solutions. Each extraction method enriches for different combinations of nuclear envelope proteins. Finally, we describe the analysis of these fractions with MudPIT, a proteomics methodology that avoids gel extraction of bands to facilitate identification of minor proteins and membrane proteins that do not resolve well on gels. Together these three approaches can significantly increase the output of proteomics studies aimed at identifying the protein complement of subcellular membrane systems.

  2. Identification of cypermethrin induced protein changes in green algae by iTRAQ quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-04-29

    Cypermethrin (CYP) is one of the most widely used pesticides in large scale for agricultural and domestic purpose and the residue often seriously affects aquatic system. Environmental pollutant-induced protein changes in organisms could be detected by proteomics, leading to discovery of potential biomarkers and understanding of mode of action. While proteomics investigations of CYP stress in some animal models have been well studied, few reports about the effects of exposure to CYP on algae proteome were published. To determine CYP effect in algae, the impact of various dosages (0.001μg/L, 0.01μg/L and 1μg/L) of CYP on green algae Chlorella vulgaris for 24h and 96h was investigated by using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics technique. A total of 162 and 198 proteins were significantly altered after CYP exposure for 24h and 96h, respectively. Overview of iTRAQ results indicated that the influence of CYP on algae protein might be dosage-dependent. Functional analysis of differentially expressed proteins showed that CYP could induce protein alterations related to photosynthesis, stress responses and carbohydrate metabolism. This study provides a comprehensive view of complex mode of action of algae under CYP stress and highlights several potential biomarkers for further investigation of pesticide-exposed plant and algae.

  3. Quantitative proteomics identifies unanticipated regulators of nitrogen- and glucose starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødkær, Steven V; Pultz, Dennis; Brusch, Michelle;

    2014-01-01

    starvation. We identify nearly 1400 phosphorylation sites of which more than 500 are regulated in a temporal manner in response to glucose- or nitrogen starvation. By bioinformatics and network analyses, we have identified the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Sic1, the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37......, and the Hsp90 isoform Hsp82 to putatively mediate some of the starvation responses. Consistently, quantitative expression analyses showed that Sic1, Cdc37, and Hsp82 are required for normal expression of nutrient-responsive genes. Collectively, we therefore propose that Sic1, Cdc37, and Hsp82 may orchestrate...... parts of the cellular starvation response by regulating transcription factor- and kinase activities....

  4. Method and platform standardization in MRM-based quantitative plasma proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Andrew J; Chambers, Andrew G; Yang, Juncong; Jackson, Angela M; Domanski, Dominik; Burkhart, Julia; Sickmann, Albert; Borchers, Christoph H

    2013-12-16

    There exists a growing demand in the proteomics community to standardize experimental methods and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) platforms in order to enable the acquisition of more precise and accurate quantitative data. This necessity is heightened by the evolving trend of verifying and validating candidate disease biomarkers in complex biofluids, such as blood plasma, through targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based approaches with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS). Considering the lack of performance standards for quantitative plasma proteomics, we previously developed two reference kits to evaluate the MRM with SIS peptide approach using undepleted and non-enriched human plasma. The first kit tests the effectiveness of the LC/MRM-MS platform (kit #1), while the second evaluates the performance of an entire analytical workflow (kit #2). Here, these kits have been refined for practical use and then evaluated through intra- and inter-laboratory testing on 6 common LC/MS platforms. For an identical panel of 22 plasma proteins, similar concentrations were determined, regardless of the kit, instrument platform, and laboratory of analysis. These results demonstrate the value of the kit and reinforce the utility of standardized methods and protocols. The proteomics community needs standardized experimental protocols and quality control methods in order to improve the reproducibility of MS-based quantitative data. This need is heightened by the evolving trend for MRM-based validation of proposed disease biomarkers in complex biofluids such as blood plasma. We have developed two kits to assist in the inter- and intra-laboratory quality control of MRM experiments: the first kit tests the effectiveness of the LC/MRM-MS platform (kit #1), while the second evaluates the performance of an entire analytical workflow (kit #2). In this paper, we report the use of these kits in intra- and inter-laboratory testing on 6 common LC/MS platforms. This

  5. Proteomics of the milk fat globule membrane from Camelus dromedarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadaoui, Besma; Henry, Céline; Khorchani, Touhami; Mars, Mohamed; Martin, Patrice; Cebo, Christelle

    2013-04-01

    Camel milk has been widely characterized with regards to casein and whey proteins. However, in camelids, almost nothing is known about the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), the membrane surrounding fat globules in milk. The purpose of this study was thus to identify MFGM proteins from Camelus dromedarius milk. Major MFGM proteins (namely, fatty acid synthase, xanthine oxidase, butyrophilin, lactadherin, and adipophilin) already evidenced in cow milk were identified in camel milk using MS. In addition, a 1D-LC-MS/MS approach led us to identify 322 functional groups of proteins associated with the camel MFGM. Dromedary MFGM proteins were then classified into functional categories using DAVID (the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery) bioinformatics resources. More than 50% of MFGM proteins from camel milk were found to be integral membrane proteins (mostly belonging to the plasma membrane), or proteins associated to the membrane. Enriched GO terms associated with MFGM proteins from camel milk were protein transport (p-value = 1.73 × 10(-14)), translation (p-value = 1.08 × 10(-11)), lipid biosynthetic process (p-value = 6.72 × 10(-10)), hexose metabolic process (p-value = 1.89 × 10(-04)), and actin cytoskeleton organization (p-value = 2.72 × 10(-04)). These findings will help to contribute to a better characterization of camel milk. Identified MFGM proteins from camel milk may also provide new insight into lipid droplet formation in the mammary epithelial cell.

  6. GProX, a user-friendly platform for bioinformatics analysis and visualization of quantitative proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Vanselow, Jens T; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2011-08-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to identify and quantify thousands of proteins in a single proteomics experiment. As a result of these developments, the analysis of data has become the bottleneck of proteomics experiment. To provide the proteomics community with a user-friendly platform for comprehensive analysis, inspection and visualization of quantitative proteomics data we developed the Graphical Proteomics Data Explorer (GProX)(1). The program requires no special bioinformatics training, as all functions of GProX are accessible within its graphical user-friendly interface which will be intuitive to most users. Basic features facilitate the uncomplicated management and organization of large data sets and complex experimental setups as well as the inspection and graphical plotting of quantitative data. These are complemented by readily available high-level analysis options such as database querying, clustering based on abundance ratios, feature enrichment tests for e.g. GO terms and pathway analysis tools. A number of plotting options for visualization of quantitative proteomics data is available and most analysis functions in GProX create customizable high quality graphical displays in both vector and bitmap formats. The generic import requirements allow data originating from essentially all mass spectrometry platforms, quantitation strategies and software to be analyzed in the program. GProX represents a powerful approach to proteomics data analysis providing proteomics experimenters with a toolbox for bioinformatics analysis of quantitative proteomics data. The program is released as open-source and can be freely downloaded from the project webpage at http://gprox.sourceforge.net.

  7. RNAi-mediated downregulation of poplar plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) changes plasma membrane proteome composition and affects leaf physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhen; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Uehlein, Norbert; Zimmer, Ina; Mühlhans, Stefanie; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Palme, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Block, Katja

    2015-10-14

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are one subfamily of aquaporins that mediate the transmembrane transport of water. To reveal their function in poplar, we generated transgenic poplar plants in which the translation of PIP genes was downregulated by RNA interference investigated these plants with a comprehensive leaf plasma membrane proteome and physiome analysis. First, inhibition of PIP synthesis strongly altered the leaf plasma membrane protein composition. Strikingly, several signaling components and transporters involved in the regulation of stomatal movement were differentially regulated in transgenic poplars. Furthermore, hormonal crosstalk related to abscisic acid, auxin and brassinosteroids was altered, in addition to cell wall biosynthesis/cutinization, the organization of cellular structures and membrane trafficking. A physiological analysis confirmed the proteomic results. The leaves had wider opened stomata and higher net CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates as well as greater mesophyll conductance for CO2 (gm) and leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). Based on these results, we conclude that PIP proteins not only play essential roles in whole leaf water and CO2 flux but have important roles in the regulation of stomatal movement.

  8. Quantitative proteomics analysis by iTRAQ revealed underlying changes in thermotolerance of Arthrospira platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Rong; Lv, Bingxin; Li, Bosheng

    2017-08-08

    Growth temperature is a critical factor that affects cultivation of Arthrospira platensis which is a type of cyanobacterium widely known as Spirulina that has significant commercial value. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the thermotolerance of Spirulina, differential protein expression profiling was carried out using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. This study only analyzed changes in thylakoids. Among the 2085 proteins quantified, 43 differentially expressed proteins were selected based on the fold change cutoff scores of ≥2 or ≤0.5 for up-regulation or down-regulation, respectively. An analysis of these 43 proteins found that 23% of them are photosynthetic system proteins which include photosynthetic enzymes and pigment proteins. The dynamic change of these proteins indicates that photosynthetic system functions were profoundly affected under heat stress and the light-dependent reactions were probably the most sensitive to temperature changes. Meanwhile, to cope with the low energy production due to impaired photosynthesis there was a considerable down-shift in protein synthesis which is a very energy demanding process. The impaired photosynthesis led to low energy generation that was compensated by a down-shift in translation (the most energy-demanding process) and an up-shift of glycolysis. The reduction of many ribosome proteins may lead to a loss in translation efficiency; therefore, Spirulina may adopted a different mechanism to increase translational elongation under heat stress to compensate for this loss, such as elevate L7/L12 proteins. Changes were also found in the classical heat shock proteins, the ROS scavenging system, DNA-binding proteins, and some membrane proteins. In conclusion, this research demonstrate that heat stress induces profound changes in cellular physiology and shed light on the mechanism of the heat stress response and thermotolerance of Arthrospira platensis. Arthrospira platensis, widely known as

  9. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend; Stougaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    proteomics data. Two characteristics of legumes are the high seed protein level and the nitrogen fixing symbiosis. Thus, the majority of the proteomics studies in Lotus have been performed on seed/pod and nodule/root tissues in order to create proteome reference maps and to enable comparative analyses within...... Lotus tissues or toward similar tissues from other legume species. More recently, N-glycan structures and compositions have been determined from mature Lotus seeds using glycomics and glycoproteomics, and finally, phosphoproteomics has been employed...... and annotated Lotus japonicus (Lotus) genome has been essential for obtaining high-quality protein identifications from proteomics studies. Furthermore, additional genomics and transcriptomics studies from several Lotus species/ecotypes support putative gene structures and these can be further supported using...

  10. Quantitative proteomics using reductive dimethylation for stable isotope labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Haas, Wilhelm

    2014-07-01

    Stable isotope labeling of peptides by reductive dimethylation (ReDi labeling) is a method to accurately quantify protein expression differences between samples using mass spectrometry. ReDi labeling is performed using either regular (light) or deuterated (heavy) forms of formaldehyde and sodium cyanoborohydride to add two methyl groups to each free amine. Here we demonstrate a robust protocol for ReDi labeling and quantitative comparison of complex protein mixtures. Protein samples for comparison are digested into peptides, labeled to carry either light or heavy methyl tags, mixed, and co-analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Relative protein abundances are quantified by comparing the ion chromatogram peak areas of heavy and light labeled versions of the constituent peptide extracted from the full MS spectra. The method described here includes sample preparation by reversed-phase solid phase extraction, on-column ReDi labeling of peptides, peptide fractionation by basic pH reversed-phase (BPRP) chromatography, and StageTip peptide purification. We discuss advantages and limitations of ReDi labeling with respect to other methods for stable isotope incorporation. We highlight novel applications using ReDi labeling as a fast, inexpensive, and accurate method to compare protein abundances in nearly any type of sample.

  11. Identification of hypoxia-regulated proteins using MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging combined with quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djidja, Marie-Claude; Chang, Joan; Hadjiprocopis, Andreas; Schmich, Fabian; Sinclair, John; Mršnik, Martina; Schoof, Erwin M; Barker, Holly E; Linding, Rune; Jørgensen, Claus; Erler, Janine T

    2014-05-02

    Hypoxia is present in most solid tumors and is clinically correlated with increased metastasis and poor patient survival. While studies have demonstrated the role of hypoxia and hypoxia-regulated proteins in cancer progression, no attempts have been made to identify hypoxia-regulated proteins using quantitative proteomics combined with MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Here we present a comprehensive hypoxic proteome study and are the first to investigate changes in situ using tumor samples. In vitro quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of the hypoxic proteome was performed on breast cancer cells using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). MS analyses were performed on laser-capture microdissected samples isolated from normoxic and hypoxic regions from tumors derived from the same cells used in vitro. MALDI-MSI was used in combination to investigate hypoxia-regulated protein localization within tumor sections. Here we identified more than 100 proteins, both novel and previously reported, that were associated with hypoxia. Several proteins were localized in hypoxic regions, as identified by MALDI-MSI. Visualization and data extrapolation methods for the in vitro SILAC data were also developed, and computational mapping of MALDI-MSI data to IHC results was applied for data validation. The results and limitations of the methodologies described are discussed.

  12. Quantitative proteomic characterization of redox-dependent post-translational modifications on protein cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jicheng; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols play a crucial role in redox signaling, regulation of enzymatic activity and protein function, and maintaining redox homeostasis in living systems. The unique chemical reactivity of thiol groups makes cysteine susceptible to oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to form a broad array of reversible and irreversible protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). The reversible modifications in particular are one of the major components of redox signaling and are involved in regulation of various cellular processes under physiological and pathological conditions. The biological significance of these redox PTMs in health and diseases has been increasingly recognized. Herein, we review the recent advances of quantitative proteomic approaches for investigating redox PTMs in complex biological systems, including the general considerations of sample processing, various chemical or affinity enrichment strategies, and quantitative approaches. We also highlight a number of redox proteomic approaches that enable effective profiling of redox PTMs for addressing specific biological questions. Although some technological limitations remain, redox proteomics is paving the way towards a better understanding of redox signaling and regulation in human health and diseases.

  13. Quantitative proteomic profiling of breast cancers using a multiplexed microfluidic platform for immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minseok S; Kwon, Seyong; Kim, Taemin; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, Je-Kyun

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes a multiplexed microfluidic immunohistochemistry (IHC)/immunocytochemistry (ICC) platform for quantitative proteomic profiling in breast cancer samples. Proteomic profiling via ICC was examined for four breast cancer cell lines (AU-565, HCC70, MCF-7, and SK-BR-3). The microfluidic device enabled 20 ICC assays on a biological specimen at the same time and a 16-fold decrease in time consumption, and could be used to quantitatively compare the expression level of each biomarker. The immunohistochemical staining from the microfluidic system showed an accurate localization of protein and comparable quality to that of the conventional IHC method. Although AU-565 and SK-BR-3 cell lines were classified by luminal subtype and adenocarcinomas and were derived from the same patient, weak p63 expression was seen only in SK-BR-3. The HCC70 cell line showed a triple-negative (estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative) phenotype and showed only cytokeratin 5 expression, a representative basal/myoepithelial cell marker. To demonstrate the applicability of the system to clinical samples for proteomic profiling, we were also able to apply this platform to human breast cancer tissue. This result indicates that the microfluidic IHC/ICC platform is useful for accurate histopathological diagnoses using numerous specific biomarkers simultaneously, facilitating the individualization of cancer therapy.

  14. Quantitative proteomic analysis of mice corneal tissues reveals angiogenesis-related proteins involved in corneal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Minqian; Tao, Yimin; Feng, Yifan; Liu, Xing; Yuan, Fei; Zhou, Hu

    2016-07-01

    Corneal neovascularization (CNV) was induced in Balb/c mice by alkali burns in the central area of the cornea with a diameter of 2.5mm. After fourteen days, the cornea from one eye was collected for histological staining for CNV examination, while the cornea from the other eye of the same mouse was harvested for proteomic analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic approach was applied to analyze five normal corneal tissues (normal group mice n=5) and five corresponding neovascularized corneal tissues (model group mice n=5). A total of 2124 proteins were identified, and 1682 proteins were quantified from these corneal tissues. Among these quantified proteins, 290 proteins were significantly changed between normal and alkali burned corneal tissues. Of these significantly changed proteins, 35 were reported or predicted as angiogenesis-related proteins. Then, these 35 proteins were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Software, resulting in 26 proteins enriched and connected to each other in the protein-protein interaction network, such as Lcn-2, αB-crystallin and Serpinf1 (PEDF). These three significantly changed proteins were selected for further Western blotting validation. Consistent with the quantitative proteomic results, Western blotting showed that Lcn-2 and αB-crystallin were significantly up-regulated in CNV model, while PEDF was down-regulated. This study provided increased understanding of angiogenesis-related proteins involved in corneal vascular development, which will be useful in the ophthalmic clinic of specifically target angiogenesis.

  15. Spiked proteomic standard dataset for testing label-free quantitative software and statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Claire; Hovasse, Agnès; Marcellin, Marlène; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Mouton-Barbosa, Emmanuelle; Bouyssié, David; Vaca, Sebastian; Carapito, Christine; Chaoui, Karima; Bruley, Christophe; Garin, Jérôme; Cianférani, Sarah; Ferro, Myriam; Dorssaeler, Alain Van; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Schaeffer, Christine; Couté, Yohann; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne

    2016-03-01

    This data article describes a controlled, spiked proteomic dataset for which the "ground truth" of variant proteins is known. It is based on the LC-MS analysis of samples composed of a fixed background of yeast lysate and different spiked amounts of the UPS1 mixture of 48 recombinant proteins. It can be used to objectively evaluate bioinformatic pipelines for label-free quantitative analysis, and their ability to detect variant proteins with good sensitivity and low false discovery rate in large-scale proteomic studies. More specifically, it can be useful for tuning software tools parameters, but also testing new algorithms for label-free quantitative analysis, or for evaluation of downstream statistical methods. The raw MS files can be downloaded from ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001819. Starting from some raw files of this dataset, we also provide here some processed data obtained through various bioinformatics tools (including MaxQuant, Skyline, MFPaQ, IRMa-hEIDI and Scaffold) in different workflows, to exemplify the use of such data in the context of software benchmarking, as discussed in details in the accompanying manuscript [1]. The experimental design used here for data processing takes advantage of the different spike levels introduced in the samples composing the dataset, and processed data are merged in a single file to facilitate the evaluation and illustration of software tools results for the detection of variant proteins with different absolute expression levels and fold change values.

  16. Quantitative proteomic determination of diethylstilbestrol action on prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pierre Bigot; Kevin Mouzat; Souhil Lebdai; Muriel Bahut; Nora Benhabiles; Géraldine Cancel Tassin; Abdel-Rahmène Azzouzi

    2013-01-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) has a direct cellular mechanism inhibition on prostate cancer.Its action is independent from the oestrogen receptors and is preserved after a first-line hormonal therapy.We aimed to identify proteins involved in the direct cellular inhibition effects of DES on prostate cancer.We used a clonogenic assay to establish the median lethal concentration of DES on 22RV1 cells.22RV1 cells were exposed to standard and DES-enriched medium.After extraction,protein expression levels were obtained by two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and isotope labelling tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ).Proteins of interest were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting.The differentially regulated proteins (P<0.01) were interrogated against a global molecular network based on the ingenuity knowledge base.The 2D-DIGE analyses revealed DES-induced expression changes for 14 proteins (> 1.3 fold; P<0.05).The iTRAQ analyses allowed the identification of 895proteins.Among these proteins,65 had a modified expression due to DES exposure (i.e.,23 overexpressed and 42 underexpressed).Most of these proteins were implicated in apoptosis and redox processes and had a predicted mitochondrial expression.Additionally,ingenuity pathway analysis placed the OAT and HSBP1 genes at the centre of a highly significant network.RT-PCR confirmed the overexpression of OAT (P=0.006) and HSPB1 (P=0.046).

  17. The proteome of human liver peroxisomes: identification of five new peroxisomal constituents by a label-free quantitative proteomics survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gronemeyer

    Full Text Available The peroxisome is a key organelle of low abundance that fulfils various functions essential for human cell metabolism. Severe genetic diseases in humans are caused by defects in peroxisome biogenesis or deficiencies in the function of single peroxisomal proteins. To improve our knowledge of this important cellular structure, we studied for the first time human liver peroxisomes by quantitative proteomics. Peroxisomes were isolated by differential and Nycodenz density gradient centrifugation. A label-free quantitative study of 314 proteins across the density gradient was accomplished using high resolution mass spectrometry. By pairing statistical data evaluation, cDNA cloning and in vivo colocalization studies, we report the association of five new proteins with human liver peroxisomes. Among these, isochorismatase domain containing 1 protein points to the existence of a new metabolic pathway and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase like 2 protein is likely involved in the transport or β-oxidation of fatty acids in human peroxisomes. The detection of alcohol dehydrogenase 1A suggests the presence of an alternative alcohol-oxidizing system in hepatic peroxisomes. In addition, lactate dehydrogenase A and malate dehydrogenase 1 partially associate with human liver peroxisomes and enzyme activity profiles support the idea that NAD(+ becomes regenerated during fatty acid β-oxidation by alternative shuttling processes in human peroxisomes involving lactate dehydrogenase and/or malate dehydrogenase. Taken together, our data represent a valuable resource for future studies of peroxisome biochemistry that will advance research of human peroxisomes in health and disease.

  18. Quantitative proteomics of Spodoptera frugiperda cells during growth and baculovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinhas, Nuno; Robitaille, Aaron Mark; Moes, Suzette; Carrondo, Manuel José Teixeira; Jenoe, Paul; Oliveira, Rui; Alves, Paula Marques

    2011-01-01

    Baculovirus infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells is a system of choice to produce a range of recombinant proteins, vaccines and, potentially, gene therapy vectors. While baculovirus genomes are well characterized, the genome of S. frugiperda is not sequenced and the virus-host molecular interplay is sparsely known. Herein, we describe the application of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to obtain the first comparative proteome quantitation of S. frugiperda cells during growth and early baculovirus infection. The proteome coverage was maximized by compiling a search database with protein annotations from insect species. Of interest were differentially proteins related to energy metabolism, endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress, yet not investigated in the scope of baculovirus infection. Further, the reduced expression of key viral-encoded proteins early in the infection cycle is suggested to be related with decreased viral replication at high cell density culture. These findings have implications for virological research and improvement of baculovirus-based bioprocesses.

  19. Click-MS: Tagless Protein Enrichment Using Bioorthogonal Chemistry for Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Arne H; Borrmann, Annika; Roosjen, Mark; van Hest, Jan C M; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2016-12-16

    Epitope-tagging is an effective tool to facilitate protein enrichment from crude cell extracts. Traditionally, N- or C-terminal fused tags are employed, which, however, can perturb protein function. Unnatural amino acids (UAAs) harboring small reactive handles can be site-specifically incorporated into proteins, thus serving as a potential alternative for conventional protein tags. Here, we introduce Click-MS, which combines the power of site-specific UAA incorporation, bioorthogonal chemistry, and quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to specifically enrich a single protein of interest from crude mammalian cell extracts. By genetic encoding of p-azido-l-phenylalanine, the protein of interest can be selectively captured using copper-free click chemistry. We use Click-MS to enrich proteins that function in different cellular compartments, and we identify protein-protein interactions, showing the great potential of Click-MS for interaction proteomics workflows.

  20. Plasma proteome response to severe burn injury revealed by 18O-labeled "universal" reference-based quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Monroe, Matthew E; Moore, Ronald J; Schepmoes, Athena A; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David N; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2010-09-01

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the 12 most abundant plasma proteins with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation prior to LC-MS analyses of individual patient samples. Incorporation of an 18O-labeled "universal" reference among the sample sets enabled precise relative quantification across samples. In total, 313 plasma proteins confidently identified with two or more unique peptides were quantified. Following statistical analysis, 110 proteins exhibited significant abundance changes in response to the burn injury. The observed changes in protein concentrations suggest significant inflammatory and hypermetabolic response to the injury, which is supported by the fact that many of the identified proteins are associated with acute phase response signaling, the complement system, and coagulation system pathways. The regulation of approximately 35 proteins observed in this study is in agreement with previous results reported for inflammatory or burn response, but approximately 50 potentially novel proteins previously not known to be associated with burn response or inflammation are also found. Elucidating proteins involved in the response to severe burn injury may reveal novel targets for therapeutic interventions as well as potential predictive biomarkers for patient outcomes such as multiple organ failure.

  1. Label-free quantitative proteomics of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Sheng-Ta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells, which are characterized by their resistance to conventional chemotherapy and their tumor initiation ability at limited dilutions, have been recognized as a critical target in liver cancer therapeutics. In the current work, we developed a label-free quantitative method to investigate the proteome of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells for the purpose of identifying unique biomarkers that can be utilized for targeting liver cancer stem cells. Label-free quantitation was performed in combination with ID-based Elution time Alignment by Linear regression Quantitation (IDEAL-Q and MaxQuant. Results Initially, IDEAL-Q analysis revealed that 151 proteins were differentially expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells when compared with CD133-negative cells. We then analyzed these 151 differentially expressed proteins by MaxQuant software and identified 10 significantly up-regulated proteins. The results were further validated by RT-PCR, western blot, flow cytometry or immunofluorescent staining which revealed that prominin-1, annexin A1, annexin A3, transgelin, creatine kinase B, vimentin, and EpCAM were indeed highly expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells. Conclusions These findings confirmed that mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics can be used to gain insights into liver cancer stem cells.

  2. Probing Advantages of Different Selectivity Strategies for Targeted Quantitative Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriman, M.; Hunter, C.; Mollah, Sahana

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There has been an exponential increase in the number of ‘potential’ protein biomarkers discovered; thus requiring the need for better quantification strategies to confirm or refute their ultimate utility. Also required is increased throughput which means reduced sample preparation and/or accelerated chromatography which increases the chance of interferences that could confound robust quantification. The purpose of this study is to explore a range of new MS analysis methodologies that enable higher selectivity quantification. The different techniques rely on different properties of the molecule for specificity so their utility will depend to a large degree on the target molecules. But an exploration to determine some general guidelines will be helpful when choosing the best strategy. In this study, we compare the quantification of tryptic peptides in complex biological matrices using various strategies including combinations of sample preparation and mass spectrometric methodologies on different mass spectrometric platforms. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: The intact or digested BNP was spiked into the crashed plasma to create calibration curves. An AB SCIEX QTRAP® 5500 system equipped with Turbo V™ source was used. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions and MRM3 experiments for intact and digested BNP were developed and used to measure the calibration curves. For the differential mobility separations, a QTRAP 5500 system equipped with SelexION™ Technology was used. RESULTS: Three quantitative methodologies were used with the QTRAP® 5500 System: MRM provides selectivity based on the fragmentation of the peptide and monitoring of a specific product ion. When matrix interference is a problem with MRM, further selectivity can be performed using MRM3, which provides a second level of selectivity based on monitoring a secondary product ion. Alternatively, the differential mobility separation (DMS) system which provides selectivity based on the

  3. Large-Scale and Deep Quantitative Proteome Profiling Using Isobaric Labeling Coupled with Two-Dimensional LC-MS/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-02-12

    Comprehensive, quantitative information on abundances of proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) can potentially provide novel biological insights into diseases pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Herein, we introduce a quantitative strategy utilizing isobaric stable isotope-labelling techniques combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) for large-scale, deep quantitative proteome profiling of biological samples or clinical specimens such as tumor tissues. The workflow includes isobaric labeling of tryptic peptides for multiplexed and accurate quantitative analysis, basic reversed-phase LC fractionation and concatenation for reduced sample complexity, and nano-LC coupled to high resolution and high mass accuracy MS analysis for high confidence identification and quantification of proteins. This proteomic analysis strategy has been successfully applied for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of tumor samples, and can also be used for integrated proteome and PTM characterization, as well as comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis across samples from large clinical cohorts.

  4. Proteomic characterization of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 photosynthetic membrane: Identification of New Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Xiaohua; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Callister, Stephen J.; Tavano, Christine; Donohue, Timothy; Lipton, Mary S.; Kaplan, Samuel

    2007-10-01

    The intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) system develops, upon induction, as a structure dedicated to the major events of bacterial photosynthesis, including harvesting light energy, primary charge separation, and electron transport. In this study, multi-chromatographic methods coupled with fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer, combined with subcellular fractionation, was applied to an investigation of the supramolecular composition of the native photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. A complete proteomic profile of the intracytoplasmic membranes was obtained and the results showed that the intracytoplasmic membranes are mainly composed of four photosynthetic membrane protein complexes, including light harvesting complexes I and II, the reaction center and cytochrome bc1, as well as two new membrane protein components, an unknown protein (RSP1760) and a possible alkane hydroxylase. Proteins necessary for various cellular functions, such as ATP synthesis, respiratory components, ABC transporters, protein translocation, and other proteins with unknown functions were also identified in association with the intracytoplasmic membranes. This study opens a new perspective on the characterization and understanding of the photosynthetic supramolecular complexes of R. sphaeroides, and their internal interactions as well as interactions with other proteins inside or outside the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  5. Outer membrane proteome and antigens of Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Paul D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Tan, Yan; Djatmiko, Deasy C; Dashper, Stuart G; Reynolds, Eric C

    2009-09-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative, anaerobic, fusiform bacterium implicated as a periodontal pathogen. With use of 2D PAGE, SDS PAGE, and LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, 221 proteins of T. forsythia outer membrane preparations were identified, of which 197 were predicted to be localized to the cell envelope. Fifty-six proteins were reproducibly mapped by 2D PAGE and included several highly abundant proteins in the MW range 140-250 kDa that exhibited C-terminal sequence similarity to the CTD family of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Two-dimensional Western blot analyses revealed that these CTD family proteins together with several other outer membrane proteins were antigenic. The CTD family proteins exhibited a higher than expected MW, and were strongly reactive with the fluorescent glycoprotein stain, ProQ Emerald. This group included BspA and surface layer proteins A and B. TonB-dependent receptors (TDRs) (46) were identified together with 28 putative lipoproteins whose genes are immediately downstream of a TDR gene. The major OmpA-like protein was found to be TF1331. Uniquely, it was found to exist as a homodimer held together by up to three disulfide bridges as demonstrated by MS/MS of a tryptic peptide derived from unreduced TF1331.

  6. Membrane Proteomic Insights into the Physiology and Taxonomy of an Oleaginous Green Microalga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibay-Hernández, Adriana; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Martinez, Alfredo; Pantoja, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Ettlia oleoabundans is a nonsequenced oleaginous green microalga. Despite the significant biotechnological interest in producing value-added compounds from the acyl lipids of this microalga, a basic understanding of the physiology and biochemistry of oleaginous microalgae is lacking, especially under nitrogen deprivation conditions known to trigger lipid accumulation. Using an RNA sequencing-based proteomics approach together with manual annotation, we are able to provide, to our knowledge, the first membrane proteome of an oleaginous microalga. This approach allowed the identification of novel proteins in E. oleoabundans, including two photoprotection-related proteins, Photosystem II Subunit S and Maintenance of Photosystem II under High Light1, which were considered exclusive to higher photosynthetic organisms, as well as Retinitis Pigmentosa Type 2-Clathrin Light Chain, a membrane protein with a novel domain architecture. Free-flow zonal electrophoresis of microalgal membranes coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proved to be a useful technique for determining the intracellular location of proteins of interest. Carbon-flow compartmentalization in E. oleoabundans was modeled using this information. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of protein markers and 18S ribosomal DNA support the reclassification of E. oleoabundans within the trebouxiophycean microalgae, rather than with the Chlorophyceae class, in which it is currently classified, indicating that it may not be closely related to the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii A detailed survey of biological processes taking place in the membranes of nitrogen-deprived E. oleoabundans, including lipid metabolism, provides insights into the basic biology of this nonmodel organism.

  7. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Kevin P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli.

  8. Identification of membrane-associated proteins from Campylobacter jejuni strains using complementary proteomics technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordwell, Stuart J; Len, Alice C L; Touma, Rachel G; Scott, Nichollas E; Falconer, Linda; Jones, David; Connolly, Angela; Crossett, Ben; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2008-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of food- and water-borne illness world-wide. The membrane-associated proteome of a recent C. jejuni gastrointestinal isolate (JHH1) was generated by sodium carbonate precipitation and ultracentrifugation followed by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF MS as well as 2-DLC (strong cation exchange followed by RP chromatography) of trypsin digests coupled to MS/MS (2-DLC/MS/MS). 2-DE/MS identified 77 proteins, 44 of which were predicted membrane proteins, while 2-DLC/MS/MS identified 432 proteins, of which 206 were predicted to be membrane associated. A total of 453 unique proteins (27.4% of the C. jejuni theoretical proteome), including 187 bona fide membrane proteins were identified in this study. Membrane proteins were also compared between C. jejuni JHH1 and ATCC 700297 to identify factors potentially associated with increased gastrointestinal virulence. We identified 28 proteins that were significantly (>two-fold) more abundant in, or unique to, JHH1, including eight proteins involved in chemotaxis signal transduction and flagellar motility, the amino acid-binding surface antigens CjaA and CjaC, and four outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of unknown function (Cj0129c, Cj1031, Cj1279c, and Cj1721c). Immunoblotting using convalescent patient sera generated post-gastrointestinal infection revealed 13 (JHH1) and 12 (ATCC 700297) immunoreactive proteins. These included flagellin (FlaA) and CadF as well as Omp18, Omp50, Cj1721c, PEB1A, PEB2, and PEB4A. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of membrane-associated proteins from C. jejuni.

  9. The mzQuantML data standard for mass spectrometry-based quantitative studies in proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Mathias; Qi, Da; Mayer, Gerhard; Uszkoreit, Julian; Eisenacher, Martin; Sachsenberg, Timo; Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel F; Fan, Jun; Bessant, Conrad; Deutsch, Eric W; Reisinger, Florian; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Jones, Andrew R

    2013-08-01

    The range of heterogeneous approaches available for quantifying protein abundance via mass spectrometry (MS)(1) leads to considerable challenges in modeling, archiving, exchanging, or submitting experimental data sets as supplemental material to journals. To date, there has been no widely accepted format for capturing the evidence trail of how quantitative analysis has been performed by software, for transferring data between software packages, or for submitting to public databases. In the context of the Proteomics Standards Initiative, we have developed the mzQuantML data standard. The standard can represent quantitative data about regions in two-dimensional retention time versus mass/charge space (called features), peptides, and proteins and protein groups (where there is ambiguity regarding peptide-to-protein inference), and it offers limited support for small molecule (metabolomic) data. The format has structures for representing replicate MS runs, grouping of replicates (for example, as study variables), and capturing the parameters used by software packages to arrive at these values. The format has the capability to reference other standards such as mzML and mzIdentML, and thus the evidence trail for the MS workflow as a whole can now be described. Several software implementations are available, and we encourage other bioinformatics groups to use mzQuantML as an input, internal, or output format for quantitative software and for structuring local repositories. All project resources are available in the public domain from the HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative http://www.psidev.info/mzquantml.

  10. Plant SILAC: stable-isotope labelling with amino acids of arabidopsis seedlings for quantitative proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Lewandowska

    Full Text Available Stable Isotope Labelling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC is a powerful technique for comparative quantitative proteomics, which has recently been applied to a number of different eukaryotic organisms. Inefficient incorporation of labelled amino acids in cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana has led to very limited use of SILAC in plant systems. We present a method allowing, for the first time, efficient labelling with stable isotope-containing arginine and lysine of whole Arabidopsis seedlings. To illustrate the utility of this method, we have combined the high labelling efficiency (>95% with quantitative proteomics analyses of seedlings exposed to increased salt concentration. In plants treated for 7 days with 80 mM NaCl, a relatively mild salt stress, 215 proteins were identified whose expression levels changed significantly compared to untreated seedling controls. The 92 up-regulated proteins included proteins involved in abiotic stress responses and photosynthesis, while the 123 down-regulated proteins were enriched in proteins involved in reduction of oxidative stress and other stress responses, respectively. Efficient labelling of whole Arabidopsis seedlings by this modified SILAC method opens new opportunities to exploit the genetic resources of Arabidopsis and analyse the impact of mutations on quantitative protein dynamics in vivo.

  11. Data for chicken semen proteome and label free quantitative analyses displaying sperm quality biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Labas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of biology of the avian male gamete is essential to improve the conservation of genetic resources and performances in farming. In this study, the semen proteome of the main domestic avian species (Gallus gallus and evaluation of the molecular phenotype related to sperm quality were investigated using GeLC–MS/MS approach and label-free quantitative proteomic based on Spectral Counting (SC and extracted ion chromatograms (XIC methods. Here we describe in details the peptide/protein inventory of chicken ejaculated spermatozoa (SPZ and seminal plasma (SP. We also show differential analyses of chicken semen (SPZ and corresponding SP from 11 males demonstrating different levels of fertilizing capacity and sperm motility. The interpretation and description of these data can be found in a research article published by Labas and colleagues in the Journal of Proteomics in 2014 [1]. This is a new resource for exploring the molecular mechanisms involved in fertilizing capacity and to reveal new sets of fertility biomarkers.

  12. Quantitative Proteomics of Zea mays Hybrids Exhibiting Different Levels of Heterosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Diwakar; Newton, Kathleen J; Mooney, Brian P

    2016-08-01

    Maize hybrids exhibiting heterosis (hybrid vigor) were generated from inbred parents with increasing genetic distance. B73 was used as the common female parent in crosses with N192 (low heterosis), MO17 (high-heterosis 1), and NC350 (high-heterosis 2). Total and mitochondria-enriched proteomes were analyzed from ear shoots of field-grown hybrids and their inbred parents. GeLCMS (1D SDS-PAGE fractionation, trypsin digestion, LTQ Orbitrap nano-RP-LC MS/MS) was used to analyze proteins, and spectral counting was used for quantitation. In total, 3,568 proteins were identified and quantified in hybrids including 2,489 in the mitochondria-enriched fraction and 2,162 in the total protein fraction. Sixty-one proteins were differentially abundant (p hybrids compared with the low-heterosis hybrid. For the total proteome, eight of these showed similar trends in abundance in both of the higher-heterosis hybrids. Nine proteins showed this heterosis-correlated pattern in the mitochondrial proteome, including a mitochondria-associated target of rapamycin (TOR) protein. Although differentially abundant proteins belong to various pathways, protein, and RNA metabolism, and stress responsive proteins were the major classes changed in response to increasing heterosis.

  13. Quantitative and integrated proteome and microRNA analysis of endothelial replicative senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yentrapalli, Ramesh; Azimzadeh, Omid; Kraemer, Anne; Malinowsky, Katharina; Sarioglu, Hakan; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Atkinson, Michael J; Moertl, Simone; Tapio, Soile

    2015-08-01

    Age-related changes in vascular functioning are a harbinger of cardiovascular disease but the biological mechanisms during the progression of endothelial senescence have not been studied. We investigated alterations in the proteome and miRNA profiles in the course of replicative senescence using primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells as an in vitro vascular model. Quantitative proteomic profiling from early growth stage to senescence was performed by isotope-coded protein label coupled to LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. Some proteins consistently changed their expression during the senescence whereas others appeared as deregulated only during the late senescence. The latter was accompanied by alterations in morphology of senescent endothelial cells. MicroRNA expression profiling revealed transient changes in the level of miR-16-5p, miR-28-3p and miR-886-5p in the early senescence, decrease in the level of miR-106b-3p at the late stage, and continuous changes in the expression of miR-181a-5p and miR-376a-3p during the whole senescence process. Integrating data on proteomic and microRNA changes indicated potential crosstalk between specific proteins and non-coding RNAs in the regulation of metabolism, cell cycle progression and cytoskeletal organization in the endothelial senescence. The knowledge of molecular targets that change during the senescence can ultimately contribute to a better understanding and prevention of age-related vascular diseases.

  14. Integrative Quantitative Proteomics Unveils Proteostasis Imbalance in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Developed on Nonfibrotic Livers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Luc; Taouji, Said; Arma, Daniela; Pallares-Lupon, Nestor; Leong, Kristen; Beausang, Lee Anne; Latterich, Martin; Bossé, Roger; Balabaud, Charles; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Rosenbaum, Jean; Chevet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics-based clinical studies represent promising resources for the discovery of novel biomarkers or for unraveling molecular mechanisms underlying particular diseases. Here, we present a discovery study of hepatocellular carcinoma developed on nonfibrotic liver (nfHCC) that combines complementary quantitative iTRAQ-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics approaches. Using both approaches, we compared a set of 24 samples (18 nfHCC versus six nontumor liver tissue). We identified 43 proteins (67 peptides) differentially expressed and 32 peptides differentially phosphorylated between the experimental groups. The functional analysis of the two data sets pointed toward the deregulation of a protein homeostasis (proteostasis) network including the up-regulation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) resident HSPA5, HSP90B1, PDIA6, and P4HB and of the cytosolic HSPA1B, HSP90AA1, HSPA9, UBC, CNDP2, TXN, and VCP as well as the increased phosphorylation of the ER resident calnexin at Ser583. Antibody-based validation approaches (immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, Alphascreen®, and AMMP®) on independent nfHCC tumor sets (up to 77 samples) confirmed these observations, thereby indicating a common mechanism occurring in nfHCC tumors. Based on these results we propose that adaptation to proteostasis imbalance in nfHCC tumors might confer selective advantages to those tumors. As such, this model could provide an additional therapeutic opportunity for those tumors arising on normal liver by targeting the tumor proteostasis network. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001253. PMID:25225353

  15. Integrative quantitative proteomics unveils proteostasis imbalance in human hepatocellular carcinoma developed on nonfibrotic livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Luc; Taouji, Said; Arma, Daniela; Pallares-Lupon, Nestor; Leong, Kristen; Beausang, Lee Anne; Latterich, Martin; Bossé, Roger; Balabaud, Charles; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Rosenbaum, Jean; Chevet, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Proteomics-based clinical studies represent promising resources for the discovery of novel biomarkers or for unraveling molecular mechanisms underlying particular diseases. Here, we present a discovery study of hepatocellular carcinoma developed on nonfibrotic liver (nfHCC) that combines complementary quantitative iTRAQ-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics approaches. Using both approaches, we compared a set of 24 samples (18 nfHCC versus six nontumor liver tissue). We identified 43 proteins (67 peptides) differentially expressed and 32 peptides differentially phosphorylated between the experimental groups. The functional analysis of the two data sets pointed toward the deregulation of a protein homeostasis (proteostasis) network including the up-regulation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) resident HSPA5, HSP90B1, PDIA6, and P4HB and of the cytosolic HSPA1B, HSP90AA1, HSPA9, UBC, CNDP2, TXN, and VCP as well as the increased phosphorylation of the ER resident calnexin at Ser583. Antibody-based validation approaches (immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, Alphascreen(®), and AMMP(®)) on independent nfHCC tumor sets (up to 77 samples) confirmed these observations, thereby indicating a common mechanism occurring in nfHCC tumors. Based on these results we propose that adaptation to proteostasis imbalance in nfHCC tumors might confer selective advantages to those tumors. As such, this model could provide an additional therapeutic opportunity for those tumors arising on normal liver by targeting the tumor proteostasis network. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001253.

  16. Quantitative proteomics of nutrient limitation in the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrickson Erik L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methanogenic Archaea play key metabolic roles in anaerobic ecosystems, where they use H2 and other substrates to produce methane. Methanococcus maripaludis is a model for studies of the global response to nutrient limitations. Results We used high-coverage quantitative proteomics to determine the response of M. maripaludis to growth-limiting levels of H2, nitrogen, and phosphate. Six to ten percent of the proteome changed significantly with each nutrient limitation. H2 limitation increased the abundance of a wide variety of proteins involved in methanogenesis. However, one protein involved in methanogenesis decreased: a low-affinity [Fe] hydrogenase, which may dominate over a higher-affinity mechanism when H2 is abundant. Nitrogen limitation increased known nitrogen assimilation proteins. In addition, the increased abundance of molybdate transport proteins suggested they function for nitrogen fixation. An apparent regulon governed by the euryarchaeal nitrogen regulator NrpR is discussed. Phosphate limitation increased the abundance of three different sets of proteins, suggesting that all three function in phosphate transport. Conclusion The global proteomic response of M. maripaludis to each nutrient limitation suggests a wider response than previously appreciated. The results give new insight into the function of several proteins, as well as providing information that should contribute to the formulation of a regulatory network model.

  17. Quantitative proteomic profiling reveals photosynthesis responsible for inoculum size dependent variation in Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Wang, Jiangxin; Lu, Shuhuan; Lv, Yajin; Yuan, Yingjin

    2013-03-01

    High density cultivation is essential to industrial production of biodiesel from microalgae, which involves in variations of micro-environment around individual cells, including light intensity, nutrition distribution, other abiotic stress and so on. To figure out the main limit factor in high inoculum cultivation, a quantitative proteomic analysis (iTRAQ-on-line 2-D nano-LC/MS) in a non-model green microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana, under different inoculum sizes was conducted. The resulting high-quality proteomic dataset consisted of 695 proteins. Using a cutoff of P photosynthesis (light reaction) and Calvin cycle (carbon reaction pathway) had highest expression levels under inoculum size of 1 × 10(6) cells mL(-1), and lowest levels under 1 × 10(7) cells mL(-1). Canonical correlation analysis of the photosynthesis related proteins and metabolites biomarkers showed that a good correlation existed between them (canonical coefficient was 0.987), suggesting photosynthesis process greatly affected microalgae biodiesel productivity and quality. Proteomic study of C. sorokiniana under different illuminations was also conducted to confirm light intensity as a potential limit factor of high inoculum size. Nearly two thirds of proteins showed up-regulation under the illumination of 70-110 µmol m(-2) s(-1), compared to those of 40 µmol m(-2) s(-1). This result suggested that by elegantly adjusting light conditions, high cell density cultivation and high biodiesel production might be achieved. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Quantitative Differences in the Urinary Proteome of Siblings Discordant for Type 1 Diabetes Include Lysosomal Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Moo-Jin; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Thovarai, Vishal; Rolfe, Melanie A; Torralba, Manolito G; Wang, Junmin; Adkins, Joshua N; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Osborne, Whitney; Cogen, Fran R; Kaplowitz, Paul B; Metz, Thomas O; Nelson, Karen E; Madupu, Ramana; Pieper, Rembert

    2015-08-01

    Individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) often have higher than normal blood glucose levels, causing advanced glycation end product formation and inflammation and increasing the risk of vascular complications years or decades later. To examine the urinary proteome in juveniles with T1D for signatures indicative of inflammatory consequences of hyperglycemia, we profiled the proteome of 40 T1D patients with an average of 6.3 years after disease onset and normal or elevated HbA1C levels, in comparison with a cohort of 41 healthy siblings. Using shotgun proteomics, 1036 proteins were identified, on average, per experiment, and 50 proteins showed significant abundance differences using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (FDR q-value ≤ 0.05). Thirteen lysosomal proteins were increased in abundance in the T1D versus control cohort. Fifteen proteins with functional roles in vascular permeability and adhesion were quantitatively changed, including CD166 antigen and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. α-N-Acetyl-galactosaminidase and α-fucosidase 2, two differentially abundant lysosomal enzymes, were detected in western blots with often elevated quantities in the T1D versus control cohort. Increased release of proteins derived from lysosomes and vascular epithelium into urine may result from hyperglycemia-associated inflammation in the kidney vasculature.

  19. Qualitative and quantitative peptidomic and proteomic approaches to phenotyping chicken semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labas, Valérie; Grasseau, Isabelle; Cahier, Karine; Gargaros, Audrey; Harichaux, Grégoire; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Alves, Sabine; Bourin, Marie; Gérard, Nadine; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the avian male gamete biology is essential to improve the conservation of genetic resources and performance in farming. In this study, the chicken semen peptidome/proteome and the molecular phenotype related to sperm quality were investigated. Spermatozoa (SPZ) and corresponding seminal plasma (SP) from 11 males with different fertilizing capacity were analyzed using three quantitative strategies (fluid and intact cells MALDI-MS, SDS-PAGE combined to LC-MS/MS with spectral counting and XIC methods). Individual MALDI profiling in combination with top-down MS allowed to characterize specific profiles per male and to identify 16 biomolecules (e.g.VMO1, AvBD10 and AvBD9 including polymorphism). Qualitative analysis identified 1165 proteins mainly involved in oxidoreduction mechanisms, energy processes, proteolysis and protein localization. Comparative analyses between the most and the least fertile males were performed. The enzymes involved in energy metabolism, respiratory chain or oxido-reduction activity were over-represented in SPZ of the most fertile males. The SP of the most and the least fertile males differed also on many proteins (e.g. ACE, AvBD10 and AvBD9, NEL precursor, acrosin). Thus proteomic is a "phenomic molecular tool" that may help to discriminate avian males on their reproductive capacity. The data have been deposited with ProteomeXchange (identifiers PXD000287 and PXD001254). This peptidomic and proteomic study i) characterized for the first time the semen protein composition of the main domestic avian species (Gallus gallus) by analysis of ejaculated spermatozoa and corresponding seminal plasma; ii) established a characteristic molecular phenotype distinguishing semen and males at an individual level; and iii) proposedthe first evidence of biomarkers related to fertility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Elucidation of Zymomonas mobilis physiology and stress responses by quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihui eYANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Zymomonas mobilis is an excellent ethanologenic bacterium. Biomass pretreatment and saccharification provides access to simple sugars, but also produces inhibitors such as acetate and furfural. Our previous work has identified and confirmed the genetic change of a 1.5-kb deletion in the sodium acetate tolerant Z. mobilis mutant (AcR leading to constitutively elevated expression of a sodium proton antiporter encoding gene nhaA, which contributes to the sodium acetate tolerance of AcR mutant. In this study, we further investigated the responses of AcR and wild-type ZM4 to sodium acetate stress in minimum media using both transcriptomics and a metabolic labeling approach for quantitative proteomics the first time. Proteomic measurements at two time points identified about eight hundreds proteins, or about half of the predicted proteome. Extracellular metabolite analysis indicated AcR overcame the acetate stress quicker than ZM4 with a concomitant earlier ethanol production in AcR mutant, although the final ethanol yields and cell densities were similar between two strains. Transcriptomic samples were analyzed for four time points and revealed that the response of Z. mobilis to sodium acetate stress is dynamic, complex and involved about one-fifth of the total predicted genes from all different functional categories. The modest correlations between proteomic and transcriptomic data may suggest the involvement of posttranscriptional control. In addition, the transcriptomic data of forty-four microarrays from four experiments for ZM4 and AcR under different conditions were combined to identify strain-specific, media-responsive, growth phase-dependent, and treatment-responsive gene expression profiles. Together this study indicates that minimal medium has the most dramatic effect on gene expression compared to rich medium followed by growth phase, inhibitor, and strain background. Genes involved in protein biosynthesis, glycolysis and fermentation as

  1. Elucidation of Zymomonas mobilis physiology and stress responses by quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shihui; Pan, Chongle; Hurst, Gregory B.; Dice, Lezlee; Davison, Brian H.; Brown, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is an excellent ethanologenic bacterium. Biomass pretreatment and saccharification provides access to simple sugars, but also produces inhibitors such as acetate and furfural. Our previous work has identified and confirmed the genetic change of a 1.5-kb deletion in the sodium acetate tolerant Z. mobilis mutant (AcR) leading to constitutively elevated expression of a sodium proton antiporter encoding gene nhaA, which contributes to the sodium acetate tolerance of AcR mutant. In this study, we further investigated the responses of AcR and wild-type ZM4 to sodium acetate stress in minimum media using both transcriptomics and a metabolic labeling approach for quantitative proteomics the first time. Proteomic measurements at two time points identified about eight hundreds proteins, or about half of the predicted proteome. Extracellular metabolite analysis indicated AcR overcame the acetate stress quicker than ZM4 with a concomitant earlier ethanol production in AcR mutant, although the final ethanol yields and cell densities were similar between two strains. Transcriptomic samples were analyzed for four time points and revealed that the response of Z. mobilis to sodium acetate stress is dynamic, complex, and involved about one-fifth of the total predicted genes from all different functional categories. The modest correlations between proteomic and transcriptomic data may suggest the involvement of posttranscriptional control. In addition, the transcriptomic data of forty-four microarrays from four experiments for ZM4 and AcR under different conditions were combined to identify strain-specific, media-responsive, growth phase-dependent, and treatment-responsive gene expression profiles. Together this study indicates that minimal medium has the most dramatic effect on gene expression compared to rich medium followed by growth phase, inhibitor, and strain background. Genes involved in protein biosynthesis, glycolysis and fermentation as well as ATP

  2. Finding Biomass Degrading Enzymes Through an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongyan; Delafield, Daniel G.; Wang, Zhe; You, Jianlan; Wu, Si

    2017-04-01

    The microbial secretome, known as a pool of biomass (i.e., plant-based materials) degrading enzymes, can be utilized to discover industrial enzyme candidates for biofuel production. Proteomics approaches have been applied to discover novel enzyme candidates through comparing protein expression profiles with enzyme activity of the whole secretome under different growth conditions. However, the activity measurement of each enzyme candidate is needed for confident "active" enzyme assignments, which remains to be elucidated. To address this challenge, we have developed an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP) that systematically correlates protein-level enzymatic activity patterns and protein elution profiles using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach. The ACPP optimized a high performance anion exchange separation for efficiently fractionating complex protein samples while preserving enzymatic activities. The detected enzymatic activity patterns in sequential fractions using microplate-based assays were cross-correlated with protein elution profiles using a customized pattern-matching algorithm with a correlation R-score. The ACPP has been successfully applied to the identification of two types of "active" biomass-degrading enzymes (i.e., starch hydrolysis enzymes and cellulose hydrolysis enzymes) from Aspergillus niger secretome in a multiplexed fashion. By determining protein elution profiles of 156 proteins in A. niger secretome, we confidently identified the 1,4-α-glucosidase as the major "active" starch hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.96) and the endoglucanase as the major "active" cellulose hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.97). The results demonstrated that the ACPP facilitated the discovery of bioactive enzymes from complex protein samples in a high-throughput, multiplexing, and untargeted fashion.

  3. Finding Biomass Degrading Enzymes Through an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongyan; Delafield, Daniel G.; Wang, Zhe; You, Jianlan; Wu, Si

    2017-01-01

    The microbial secretome, known as a pool of biomass (i.e., plant-based materials) degrading enzymes, can be utilized to discover industrial enzyme candidates for biofuel production. Proteomics approaches have been applied to discover novel enzyme candidates through comparing protein expression profiles with enzyme activity of the whole secretome under different growth conditions. However, the activity measurement of each enzyme candidate is needed for confident "active" enzyme assignments, which remains to be elucidated. To address this challenge, we have developed an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP) that systematically correlates protein-level enzymatic activity patterns and protein elution profiles using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach. The ACPP optimized a high performance anion exchange separation for efficiently fractionating complex protein samples while preserving enzymatic activities. The detected enzymatic activity patterns in sequential fractions using microplate-based assays were cross-correlated with protein elution profiles using a customized pattern-matching algorithm with a correlation R-score. The ACPP has been successfully applied to the identification of two types of "active" biomass-degrading enzymes (i.e., starch hydrolysis enzymes and cellulose hydrolysis enzymes) from Aspergillus niger secretome in a multiplexed fashion. By determining protein elution profiles of 156 proteins in A. niger secretome, we confidently identified the 1,4-α-glucosidase as the major "active" starch hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.96) and the endoglucanase as the major "active" cellulose hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.97). The results demonstrated that the ACPP facilitated the discovery of bioactive enzymes from complex protein samples in a high-throughput, multiplexing, and untargeted fashion.

  4. A knowledge-based T2-statistic to perform pathway analysis for quantitative proteomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, En-Yu; Chen, Yi-Hau; Wu, Kun-Pin

    2017-06-01

    Approaches to identify significant pathways from high-throughput quantitative data have been developed in recent years. Still, the analysis of proteomic data stays difficult because of limited sample size. This limitation also leads to the practice of using a competitive null as common approach; which fundamentally implies genes or proteins as independent units. The independent assumption ignores the associations among biomolecules with similar functions or cellular localization, as well as the interactions among them manifested as changes in expression ratios. Consequently, these methods often underestimate the associations among biomolecules and cause false positives in practice. Some studies incorporate the sample covariance matrix into the calculation to address this issue. However, sample covariance may not be a precise estimation if the sample size is very limited, which is usually the case for the data produced by mass spectrometry. In this study, we introduce a multivariate test under a self-contained null to perform pathway analysis for quantitative proteomic data. The covariance matrix used in the test statistic is constructed by the confidence scores retrieved from the STRING database or the HitPredict database. We also design an integrating procedure to retain pathways of sufficient evidence as a pathway group. The performance of the proposed T2-statistic is demonstrated using five published experimental datasets: the T-cell activation, the cAMP/PKA signaling, the myoblast differentiation, and the effect of dasatinib on the BCR-ABL pathway are proteomic datasets produced by mass spectrometry; and the protective effect of myocilin via the MAPK signaling pathway is a gene expression dataset of limited sample size. Compared with other popular statistics, the proposed T2-statistic yields more accurate descriptions in agreement with the discussion of the original publication. We implemented the T2-statistic into an R package T2GA, which is available at https

  5. Classical Galactosemia: Insight into Molecular Pathomechanisms by Differential Membrane Proteomics of Fibroblasts under Galactose Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staubach, Simon; Müller, Stefan; Pekmez, Murat; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2017-02-03

    Classical galactosemia, a hereditary metabolic disease caused by the deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT; EC 2.7.712), results in an impaired galactose metabolism and serious long-term developmental affection of the CNS and ovaries, potentially related in part to endogenous galactose-induced protein dysglycosylation. In search for galactose-induced changes in membrane raft proteomes of GALT-deficient cells, we performed differential analyses of lipid rafts from patient-derived (Q) and sex- and age-matched control fibroblasts (H) in the presence or absence of the stressor. Label-based proteomics revealed of the total 454 (female) or 678 (male) proteins a proportion of ∼12% in at least one of four relevant ratios as fold-changed. GALT(-) cell-specific effects in the absence of stressor revealed cell-model-dependent affection of biological processes related to protein targeting to the plasma membrane (female) or to cellular migration (male). However, a series of common galactose-induced effects were observed, among them the strongly increased ER-stress marker GRP78 and calreticulin involved in N-glycoprotein quality control. The membrane-anchored N-glycoprotein receptor CD109 was concertedly decreased under galactose-stress together with cadherin-13, GLIPR1, glypican-1, and semaphorin-7A. A series of proteins showed opposite fold-changes in the two cell models, whereas others fluctuated in only one of the two models.

  6. GProX, a User-Friendly Platform for Bioinformatics Analysis and Visualization of Quantitative Proteomics Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Vanselow, Jens T; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2011-01-01

    -friendly platform for comprehensive analysis, inspection and visualization of quantitative proteomics data we developed the Graphical Proteomics Data Explorer (GProX)(1). The program requires no special bioinformatics training, as all functions of GProX are accessible within its graphical user-friendly interface...... which will be intuitive to most users. Basic features facilitate the uncomplicated management and organization of large data sets and complex experimental setups as well as the inspection and graphical plotting of quantitative data. These are complemented by readily available high-level analysis options...... such as database querying, clustering based on abundance ratios, feature enrichment tests for e.g. GO terms and pathway analysis tools. A number of plotting options for visualization of quantitative proteomics data is available and most analysis functions in GProX create customizable high quality graphical...

  7. Quantitative proteomics and terminomics to elucidate the role of ubiquitination and proteolysis in adaptive immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Theo; Viner, Rosa I.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is the specialized defence mechanism in vertebrates that evolved to eliminate pathogens. Specialized lymphocytes recognize specific protein epitopes through antigen receptors to mount potent immune responses, many of which are initiated by nuclear factor-kappa B activation and gene transcription. Most, if not all, pathways in adaptive immunity are further regulated by post-translational modification (PTM) of signalling proteins, e.g. phosphorylation, citrullination, ubiquitination and proteolytic processing. The importance of PTMs is reflected by genetic or acquired defects in these pathways that lead to a dysfunctional immune response. Here we discuss the state of the art in targeted proteomics and systems biology approaches to dissect the PTM landscape specifically regarding ubiquitination and proteolysis in B- and T-cell activation. Recent advances have occurred in methods for specific enrichment and targeted quantitation. Together with improved instrument sensitivity, these advances enable the accurate analysis of often rare PTM events that are opaque to conventional proteomics approaches, now rendering in-depth analysis and pathway dissection possible. We discuss published approaches, including as a case study the profiling of the N-terminome of lymphocytes of a rare patient with a genetic defect in the paracaspase protease MALT1, a key regulator protease in antigen-driven signalling, which was manifested by elevated linear ubiquitination. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644975

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganglong Yang

    Full Text Available The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia, KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC, and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer.

  9. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Spirulina platensis in Response to Low Temperature Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingye; Chang, Rong; Sun, Yijun; Li, Bosheng

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most important abiotic stresses that can significantly reduce crop yield. To gain insight into how Spirulina responds to LT stress, comprehensive physiological and proteomic analyses were conducted in this study. Significant decreases in growth and pigment levels as well as excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes were observed in response to LT stress. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics approach was used to identify changes in protein abundance in Spirulina under LT. A total of 3,782 proteins were identified, of which 1,062 showed differential expression. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that differentially expressed proteins that were enriched in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and translation are important for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and metabolic balance in Spirulina when subjected to LT stress. The up-regulation of proteins involved in gluconeogenesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and amino acid biosynthesis served as coping mechanisms of Spirulina in response to LT stress. Moreover, the down-regulated expression of proteins involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, photosynthesis, and translation were associated with reduced energy consumption. The findings of the present study allow a better understanding of the response of Spirulina to LT stress and may facilitate in the elucidation of mechanisms underlying LT tolerance.

  10. A Statistical Framework for Protein Quantitation in Bottom-Up MS-Based Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpievitch, Yuliya; Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Taverner, Thomas; Huang, Jianhua; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Weijun; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2009-08-15

    Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics requires protein-level estimates and associated confidence measures. Challenges include the presence of low quality or incorrectly identified peptides and informative missingness. Furthermore, models are required for rolling peptide-level information up to the protein level. Results: We present a statistical model that carefully accounts for informative missingness in peak intensities and allows unbiased, model-based, protein-level estimation and inference. The model is applicable to both label-based and label-free quantitation experiments. We also provide automated, model-based, algorithms for filtering of proteins and peptides as well as imputation of missing values. Two LC/MS datasets are used to illustrate the methods. In simulation studies, our methods are shown to achieve substantially more discoveries than standard alternatives. Availability: The software has been made available in the opensource proteomics platform DAnTE (http://omics.pnl.gov/software/). Contact: adabney@stat.tamu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. A proteomic approach for quantitation of phosphorylation using stable isotope labeling in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarrola, Nieves; Kalume, Dario E; Gronborg, Mads; Iwahori, Akiko; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2003-11-15

    Posttranslational modifications are major mechanisms of regulating protein activity and function in vertebrate cells. It is essential to obtain qualitative information about posttranslational modification patterns of proteins to understand signal transduction mechanisms in greater detail. However, it is equally important to measure the dynamics of posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation to approach signaling networks from a systems biology perspective. Despite a number of advances, methods to quantitate posttranslational modifications remain difficult to implement due to a number of factors including lack of a generic method, elaborate chemical steps, and requirement for large amounts of sample. We have previously shown that stable isotope-containing amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) can be used to differentially label growing cell populations for quantitation of protein levels. In this report, we extend the use of SILAC as a novel proteomic approach for the relative quantitation of posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation. We have used SILAC to quantitate the extent of known phosphorylation sites as well as to identify and quantitate novel phosphorylation sites.

  12. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  13. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes.

  14. WaveletQuant, an improved quantification software based on wavelet signal threshold de-noising for labeled quantitative proteomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Song

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative proteomics technologies have been developed to comprehensively identify and quantify proteins in two or more complex samples. Quantitative proteomics based on differential stable isotope labeling is one of the proteomics quantification technologies. Mass spectrometric data generated for peptide quantification are often noisy, and peak detection and definition require various smoothing filters to remove noise in order to achieve accurate peptide quantification. Many traditional smoothing filters, such as the moving average filter, Savitzky-Golay filter and Gaussian filter, have been used to reduce noise in MS peaks. However, limitations of these filtering approaches often result in inaccurate peptide quantification. Here we present the WaveletQuant program, based on wavelet theory, for better or alternative MS-based proteomic quantification. Results We developed a novel discrete wavelet transform (DWT and a 'Spatial Adaptive Algorithm' to remove noise and to identify true peaks. We programmed and compiled WaveletQuant using Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition. We then incorporated the WaveletQuant program in the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP, a commonly used open source proteomics analysis pipeline. Conclusions We showed that WaveletQuant was able to quantify more proteins and to quantify them more accurately than the ASAPRatio, a program that performs quantification in the TPP pipeline, first using known mixed ratios of yeast extracts and then using a data set from ovarian cancer cell lysates. The program and its documentation can be downloaded from our website at http://systemsbiozju.org/data/WaveletQuant.

  15. Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) Applied to Quantitative Proteomics of Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soufi, Boumediene; Kumar, C.; Gnad, F.

    2010-01-01

    We applied stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to large-scale quantitative proteomics analyses of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis in two physiological conditions: growth on succinate and growth under phosphate starvation. Using a B. subtilis strain auxotrophic...... of the most comprehensive quantitative proteomics studies in bacteria, covering more than 75% of the B. subtilis genes expressed in the log phase of growth. Furthermore, we detect and quantify dynamics of 35 Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation sites under growth on succinate, and 10 phosphorylation sites under...

  16. Experimental Null Method to Guide the Development of Technical Procedures and to Control False-Positive Discovery in Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaomeng; Hu, Qiang; Li, Jun; Wang, Jianmin; Qu, Jun

    2015-10-02

    Comprehensive and accurate evaluation of data quality and false-positive biomarker discovery is critical to direct the method development/optimization for quantitative proteomics, which nonetheless remains challenging largely due to the high complexity and unique features of proteomic data. Here we describe an experimental null (EN) method to address this need. Because the method experimentally measures the null distribution (either technical or biological replicates) using the same proteomic samples, the same procedures and the same batch as the case-vs-contol experiment, it correctly reflects the collective effects of technical variability (e.g., variation/bias in sample preparation, LC-MS analysis, and data processing) and project-specific features (e.g., characteristics of the proteome and biological variation) on the performances of quantitative analysis. To show a proof of concept, we employed the EN method to assess the quantitative accuracy and precision and the ability to quantify subtle ratio changes between groups using different experimental and data-processing approaches and in various cellular and tissue proteomes. It was found that choices of quantitative features, sample size, experimental design, data-processing strategies, and quality of chromatographic separation can profoundly affect quantitative precision and accuracy of label-free quantification. The EN method was also demonstrated as a practical tool to determine the optimal experimental parameters and rational ratio cutoff for reliable protein quantification in specific proteomic experiments, for example, to identify the necessary number of technical/biological replicates per group that affords sufficient power for discovery. Furthermore, we assessed the ability of EN method to estimate levels of false-positives in the discovery of altered proteins, using two concocted sample sets mimicking proteomic profiling using technical and biological replicates, respectively, where the true

  17. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Fukao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex, respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  18. Proteomic characterization of the outer membrane vesicle of the halophilic marine bacterium Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Hayoung; Ro, Hyun-Joo; Jun, Sangmi; Kwon, Yong Min; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Kim, Sang-Jin; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Kim, Seung Il

    2017-01-01

    Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a Gram-negative halophilic marine bacterium able to utilize several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene. In this study, using transmission electron microscopy, we confirmed that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). N. pentaromativorans OMVs (hereafter OMVNovo) are spherical in shape, and the average diameter of OMVNovo is 25-70 nm. Proteomic analysis revealed that outer membrane proteins and periplasmic proteins of N. pentaromativorans are the major protein components of OMVNovo. Comparative proteomic analysis with the membrane-associated protein fraction and correlation analysis demonstrated that the outer membrane proteins of OMVNovo originated from the membrane- associated protein fraction. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize OMV purified from halophilic marine bacteria.

  19. A quantitative proteomic analysis of biofilm adaptation by the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Trong Khoa; Roy, Sumita; Noirel, Josselin; Douglas, Ian; Wright, Phillip C; Stafford, Graham P

    2010-09-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative anaerobe that is one of the most prominent inhabitants of the sub-gingival plaque biofilm, which is crucial for causing periodontitis. We have used iTRAQ proteomics to identify and quantify alterations in global protein expression of T. forsythia during growth in a biofilm. This is the first proteomic study concentrating on biofilm growth in this key periodontal pathogen, and this study has identified several changes in protein expression. Moreover, we introduce a rigorous statistical method utilising peptide-level intensities of iTRAQ reporters to determine which proteins are significantly regulated. In total, 348 proteins were identified and quantified with the expression of 44 proteins being significantly altered between biofilm and planktonic cells. We identified proteins from all cell compartments, and highlighted a marked upregulation in the relative abundances of predicted outer membrane proteins in biofilm cells. These included putative transport systems and the T. forsythia S-layer proteins. These data and our finding that the butyrate production pathway is markedly downregulated in biofilms indicate possible alterations in host interaction capability. We also identified upregulation of putative oxidative stress response proteins, and showed that biofilm cells are 10 to 20 fold more resistant to oxidative stress. This may represent an important adaptation of this organism to prolonged persistence and immune evasion in the oral cavity.

  20. Proteomic Profiling of Nonenzymatically Glycated Proteins in Human Plasma and Erythrocyte Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. In this report, a thorough proteomic profiling of glycated proteins was attempted by using phenylboronate affinity chromatography to enrich glycated proteins and glycated, tryptic peptides from human plasma and erythrocyte membranes. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, and 76 and 31 proteins were confidently identified as glycated from human plasma and erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It was observed that most of the glycated proteins can be identified in samples from individuals with normal glucose tolerance, although samples from individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus have slightly higher numbers of glycated proteins and more glycation sites identified.

  1. Differential proteomic analysis of outer membrane enriched extracts of Bacteroides fragilis grown under bile salts stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boente, Renata F; Pauer, Heidi; Silva, Deborah N S; Filho, Joaquim Santos; Sandim, Vanessa; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Ferreira, Rosana Barreto Rocha; Zingali, Russolina B; Domingues, Regina M C P; Lobo, Leandro A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated anaerobic bacteria from infectious processes. Several virulence traits contribute to the pathogenic nature of this bacterium, including the ability to tolerate the high concentrations of bile found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The activity of bile salts is similar to detergents and may lead to membrane permeabilization and cell death. Modulation of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is considered a crucial event to bile salts resistance. The primary objective of the current work was to identify B. fragilis proteins associated with the stress induced by high concentration of bile salts. The outer membrane of B. fragilis strain 638R was isolated after growth either in the presence of 2% conjugated bile salts or without bile salts. The membrane fractions were separated on SDS-PAGE and analyzed by ESI-Q/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 37 proteins were identified; among them nine were found to be expressed exclusively in the absence of bile salts whereas eight proteins were expressed only in the presence of bile salts. These proteins are related to cellular functions such as transport through membrane, nutrient uptake, and protein-protein interactions. This study demonstrates the alteration of OMPs composition in B. fragilis during bile salts stress resistance and adaptation to environmental changes. Proteomics of OMPs was also shown to be a useful approach in the identification of new targets for functional analyses.

  2. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølbøll, Trine Højgaard; Danscher, Anne Mette; Andersen, Pia Haubro;

    2012-01-01

    different proteins were identified, with 146 proteins available for identification in C, 279 proteins in D and 269 proteins in L. A functional annotation of the identified proteins was obtained using the on-line Blast2GO tool. Three hundred and sixteen of the identified proteins could be subsequently...... grouped manually to one or more of five major functional groups related to metabolism, cell structure, immunity, apoptosis and angiogenesis. These were chosen to represent basic cell functions and biological processes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of CHD. The LC–MS/MS-based proteomic analysis...

  3. Characterization of global yeast quantitative proteome data generated from the wild-type and glucose repression Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: The comparison of two quantitative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Wohlschlegel, James; Venable, John D.;

    2008-01-01

    The quantitative proteomic analysis of complex protein mixtures is emerging as a technically challenging but viable systems-level approach for studying cellular function. This study presents a large-scale comparative analysis of protein abundances from yeast protein lysates derived from both wild...

  4. Quantitative proteomic analysis of bacterial enzymes released in cheese during ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Julien; Mollé, Daniel; Piot, Michel; Lortal, Sylvie; Gagnaire, Valérie

    2012-04-02

    Due to increasingly available bacterial genomes in databases, proteomic tools have recently been used to screen proteins expressed by micro-organisms in food in order to better understand their metabolism in situ. While the main objective is the systematic identification of proteins, the next step will be to bridge the gap between identification and quantification of these proteins. For that purpose, a new mass spectrometry-based approach was applied, using isobaric tagging reagent for quantitative proteomic analysis (iTRAQ), which are amine specific and yield labelled peptides identical in mass. Experimental Swiss-type cheeses were manufactured from microfiltered milk using Streptococcus thermophilus ITG ST20 and Lactobacillus helveticus ITG LH1 as lactic acid starters. At three ripening times (7, 20 and 69 days), cheese aqueous phases were extracted and enriched in bacterial proteins by fractionation. Each sample, standardised in protein amount prior to proteomic analyses, was: i) analysed by 2D-electrophoresis for qualitative analysis and ii) submitted to trypsinolysis, and labelled with specific iTRAQ tag, one per ripening time. The three labelled samples were mixed together and analysed by nano-LC coupled on-line with ESI-QTOF mass spectrometer. Thirty proteins, both from bacterial or bovine origin, were identified and efficiently quantified. The free bacterial proteins detected were enzymes from the central carbon metabolism as well as stress proteins. Depending on the protein considered, the quantity of these proteins in the cheese aqueous extract increased from 2.5 to 20 fold in concentration from day 7 to day 69 of ripening. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Proteomic and Lipidomic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens Membranes Under Microaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tookmanian, E. M.; Neubauer, C.; Newman, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Hopanoids are a class of sterol-like molecules found in modern bacterial membranes. Remarkably, they can leave behind carbon skeletons (hopanes) that persist for millions of years. Previously, hopanes were thought to be biomarkers of cyanobacteria, and thus, indirectly, the evolution of oxygen. As our understanding of the biosynthetic pathway of hopanoids has improved, we have learned that oxygen is not required for hopanoid biosynthesis and that many different bacteria have the genetic potential to synthesize hopanoids. These facts motivate a deeper understanding of the distribution and role(s) of hopanoids in bacteria. Bioinformatic approaches revealed that a subgroup of bacteria that synthesize hopanoids have symbiotic relationships with plants. These symbioses often take the form of root nodules, which have a unique microenvironment including microaerobic conditions to promote nitrogen fixation. We utilized the legume symbiont Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens to investigate the molecular composition of membranes through lipidomic and proteomic studies. A B. diazoefficiens mutant lacking the C-2 hopanoid methylase (ΔhpnP) was previously shown to have a growth defect compared to wildtype under microaerobic conditions, whereas a mutant unable to synthesize C35 hopanoids (ΔhpnH) failed to grow entirely. Because these different hopanoid classes impact the fitness of this organism under nodule-like growth conditions, we sought to determine how these classes affect the rest of the membrane. Here, we present how the presence or absence of specific hopanoid classes alters the membrane proteome and lipidome of B. diazoefficiens; this information provides clues regarding their cellular function. By constraining the roles hopanoids play in modern niches, we hope to identify conserved biochemical functions that will advance our interpretations of the hopane rock record.

  6. Proteomic characterization of the outer membrane vesicle of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chi-Won; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Lee, Yeol Gyun; Hong, Yeonhee; Park, Kyeong Ryang; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Kim, Seung Il

    2014-10-03

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced by various pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In this study, we isolated OMVs from a representative soil bacterium, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which has a biodegradative activity toward various aromatic compounds. Proteomic analysis identified the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) OprC, OprD, OprE, OprF, OprH, OprG, and OprW as major components of the OMV of P. putida KT2440. The production of OMVs was dependent on the nutrient availability in the culture media, and the up- or down-regulation of specific OMPs was observed according to the culture conditions. In particular, porins (e.g., benzoate-specific porin, BenF-like porin) and enzymes (e.g., catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, benzoate dioxygenase) for benzoate degradation were uniquely found in OMVs prepared from P. putida KT2440 that were cultured in media containing benzoate as the energy source. OMVs of P. putida KT2440 showed low pathological activity toward cultured cells that originated from human lung cells, which suggests their potential as adjuvants or OMV vaccine carriers. Our results suggest that the protein composition of the OMVs of P. putida KT2440 reflects the characteristics of the total proteome of P. putida KT2440.

  7. The plasma membrane proteome of maize roots grown under low and high iron conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopff, David; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Lüthje, Sabine

    2013-10-08

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is essential for life and has been intensively investigated for dicots, while our knowledge for species in the Poaceae is fragmentary. This study presents the first proteome analysis (LC-MS/MS) of plasma membranes isolated from roots of 18-day old maize (Zea mays L.). Plants were grown under low and high Fe conditions in hydroponic culture. In total, 227 proteins were identified in control plants, whereas 204 proteins were identified in Fe deficient plants and 251 proteins in plants grown under high Fe conditions. Proteins were sorted by functional classes, and most of the identified proteins were classified as signaling proteins. A significant number of PM-bound redox proteins could be identified including quinone reductases, heme and copper-containing proteins. Most of these components were constitutive, and others could hint at an involvement of redox signaling and redox homeostasis by change in abundance. Energy metabolism and translation seem to be crucial in Fe homeostasis. The response to Fe deficiency includes proteins involved in development, whereas membrane remodeling and assembly and/or repair of Fe-S clusters is discussed for Fe toxicity. The general stress response appears to involve proteins related to oxidative stress, growth regulation, an increased rigidity and synthesis of cell walls and adaption of nutrient uptake and/or translocation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics in Europe.

  8. A Simplified Workflow for Protein Quantitation of Rat Brain Tissues Using Label-Free Proteomics and Spectral Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutté, Angela M; Grant, Shonnette F; Dave, Jitendra R

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is an increasingly valuable tool for determining relative or quantitative protein abundance in brain tissues. A plethora of technical and analytical methods are available, but straightforward and practical approaches are often needed to facilitate reproducibility. This aspect is particularly important as an increasing number of studies focus on models of traumatic brain injury or brain trauma, for which brain tissue proteomes have not yet been fully described. This text provides suggested techniques for robust identification and quantitation of brain proteins by using molecular weight fractionation prior to mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Detailed sample preparation and generalized protocols for chromatography, mass spectrometry, spectral counting, and normalization are described. The rat cerebral cortex isolated from a model of blast-overpressure was used as an exemplary source of brain tissue. However, these techniques may be adapted for lysates generated from several types of cells or tissues and adapted by the end user.

  9. Structural and Functional Proteomic Analysis of a Developing Energy Transducing Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niederman, Robert A

    2012-06-04

    While much is known about the light reactions of photosynthesis in purple bacteria, comparatively little information is available on how the requisite integral membrane proteins are assembled, their patterns of cellular localization are established or their apoproteins cooperate with numerous assembly factors in their insertion into the growing intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM). This problem was approached through a detailed structural and functional proteomic analysis of ICM assembly process in the well-characterized purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Proteomic approaches have focused upon identification of membrane proteins temporally expressed during ICM development and spatially localized in both membrane growth initiation sites and in mature ICM vesicles. Protocols were established for ICM induction under reduced aeration and ICM remodeling in cells adapting to low intensity illumination, which permitted isolation, in sucrose density gradients, of ICM growth initiation sites as an upper pigmented band (UPB) and mature ICM vesicles as the main (chromatophore) band. Non-denaturing clear native gel electrophoresis (CNE) of these isolated membrane fractions gave rise to pigmented bands containing the peripheral light-harvesting 2 (LH2) antenna and the reaction center-light-harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) core complex, together with a full array of other ICM proteins, which were subjected to proteomic analysis. Proteomic analysis of the gel bands from chromatophores revealed developmental changes including increasing levels of the LH2 complex as ICM development proceeded, as well as a large array of other associated proteins including high spectral counts for the F1FO ATP synthase subunits, given the inability to detect this coupling factor, as well as the more abundant cytochrome bc1 complex by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Significant levels of general membrane assembly factors were encountered, as well as high counts for RSP6124, a protein of unknown function

  10. Quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper

    into such novel therapeutics. However, limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying microbicidal activity of antimicrobial peptides has slowed down this development. A central step toward understanding the microbicidal mechanisms of action of antimicrobial peptides is to understand the mechanisms by which......The increasing occurrence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria poses a serious threat to modern society. Therefore, novel types of anti-infective therapeutics are highly warranted. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of naturally occurring host-defense molecules that potentially might be developed...... antimicrobial peptides interact with phospholipid membranes. Motivated by that fact, the scope of this thesis is to study these antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions. In particular, we attempt to study these interactions with a quantitative approach. For that purpose, we consider the three...

  11. Quantitative mapping of intracellular cations in the human amniotic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Ph.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.; Razafindrabe, L.; Bara, M.; Guiet-Bara, A.

    1993-05-01

    The effect of magnesium and taurine on the permeability of cell membranes to monovalent cations has been investigated using the Bordeaux nuclear microprobe. PIXE and RBS techniques have been used to provide quantitative measurements and ion distributions in the isolated amniotic membrane. This physiological model for cellular exchanges allowed us to reveal the distribution of most elements involved in cellular pathways and the modifications under different experimental conditions of incubation in physiological fluids. The PIXE microanalysis provided an original viewpoint on these mechanisms. Following this first study, the amnion compact lamina was found to play a role which was not, up to now, taken into account in the interpretation of electrophysiological experimentations. The release of some ionic species, such as K +, from the epithelial cells, during immersion in isotonic fluids, could have been hitherto underestimated.

  12. Application of survival analysis methodology to the quantitative analysis of LC-MS proteomics data

    KAUST Repository

    Tekwe, C. D.

    2012-05-24

    MOTIVATION: Protein abundance in quantitative proteomics is often based on observed spectral features derived from liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) or LC-MS/MS experiments. Peak intensities are largely non-normal in distribution. Furthermore, LC-MS-based proteomics data frequently have large proportions of missing peak intensities due to censoring mechanisms on low-abundance spectral features. Recognizing that the observed peak intensities detected with the LC-MS method are all positive, skewed and often left-censored, we propose using survival methodology to carry out differential expression analysis of proteins. Various standard statistical techniques including non-parametric tests such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney rank sum tests, and the parametric survival model and accelerated failure time-model with log-normal, log-logistic and Weibull distributions were used to detect any differentially expressed proteins. The statistical operating characteristics of each method are explored using both real and simulated datasets. RESULTS: Survival methods generally have greater statistical power than standard differential expression methods when the proportion of missing protein level data is 5% or more. In particular, the AFT models we consider consistently achieve greater statistical power than standard testing procedures, with the discrepancy widening with increasing missingness in the proportions. AVAILABILITY: The testing procedures discussed in this article can all be performed using readily available software such as R. The R codes are provided as supplemental materials. CONTACT: ctekwe@stat.tamu.edu.

  13. A quantitative proteomics analysis of MCF7 breast cancer stem and progenitor cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Song; McDermott, Sean P; Deol, Yadwinder; Tan, Zhijing; Wicha, Max S; Lubman, David M

    2015-11-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that breast cancers are initiated and develop from a small population of stem-like cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). These cells are hypothesized to mediate tumor metastasis and contribute to therapeutic resistance. However, the molecular regulatory networks responsible for maintaining CSCs in an undifferentiated state have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we used CSC markers to isolate pure breast CSCs fractions (ALDH+ and CD44+CD24- cell populations) and the mature luminal cells (CD49f-EpCAM+) from the MCF7 cell line. Proteomic analysis was performed on these samples and a total of 3304 proteins were identified. A label-free quantitative method was applied to analyze differentially expressed proteins. Using the criteria of greater than twofold changes and p value analysis of differentially expressed proteins by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) revealed potential molecular regulatory networks that may regulate CSCs. Selected differential proteins were validated by Western blot assay and immunohistochemical staining. The use of proteomics analysis may increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of breast CSCs. This may be of importance in the future development of anti-CSC therapeutics.

  14. Workflow for quantitative proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 using iTRAQ tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shuyu; Jones, Shawn W; Choe, Leila H; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T; Lee, Kelvin H

    2013-06-15

    Clostridium acetobutylicum (Cac) is an anaerobic, endospore-forming, Gram-positive bacterium with tremendous promise for use as a biocatalyst for the production of fuels and solvents. Cac proteomic sample preparation for shotgun analysis typically involves a multitude of reagents for harsh lysis conditions and to maintain protein solubility. We describe a protein extraction and preparation method for Cac that is compatible with proteomic shotgun analysis using isobaric labeling approaches. The method is applied to the analysis of Cac grown under butanol stress and labeled using iTRAQ 4-plex reagents. This method relies on the use of calcium carbonate to facilitate lysis by sonication and a commercially available kit to remove detergents prior to labeling. This workflow resulted in the identification and quantitation of 566 unique proteins using ProteinPilot software with a false discovery rate of 0.01% for peptide matches and 0.70% for protein matches. Ninety-five proteins were found to have statistically higher expression levels in butanol-stressed Cac as compared to non-stressed Cac. Sixty-one proteins were found to have statistically lower expression levels in stressed versus non-stressed cells. This method may be applicable to other Gram-positive organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative proteomics study of larval settlement in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2014-02-13

    Barnacles are major sessile components of the intertidal areas worldwide, and also one of the most dominant fouling organisms in fouling communities. Larval settlement has a crucial ecological effect not only on the distribution of the barnacle population but also intertidal community structures. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the transition process from the larval to the juvenile stage remain largely unclear. In this study, we carried out comparative proteomic profiles of stage II nauplii, stage VI nauplii, cyprids, and juveniles of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite using label-free quantitative proteomics, followed by the measurement of the gene expression levels of candidate proteins. More than 700 proteins were identified at each stage; 80 were significantly up-regulated in cyprids and 95 in juveniles vs other stages. Specifically, proteins involved in energy and metabolism, the nervous system and signal transduction were significantly up-regulated in cyprids, whereas proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling, transcription and translation, cell proliferation and differentiation, and biomineralization were up-regulated in juveniles, consistent with changes associated with larval metamorphosis and tissue remodeling in juveniles. These findings provided molecular evidence for the morphological, physiological and biological changes that occur during the transition process from the larval to the juvenile stages in B. amphitrite. © 2014 Chen et al.

  16. Uncovering stem cell differentiation factors for salivary gland regeneration by quantitative analysis of differential proteomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun-Jong; Koh, Jin; Kwon, Jin Teak; Park, Yong-Seok; Yang, Lijun; Cha, Seunghee

    2017-01-01

    Severe xerostomia (dry mouth) compromises the quality of life in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome or radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. A clinical management of xerostomia is often unsatisfactory as most interventions are palliative with limited efficacy. Following up our previous study demonstrating that mouse BM-MSCs are capable of differentiating into salivary epithelial cells in a co-culture system, we further explored the molecular basis that governs the MSC reprogramming by utilizing high-throughput iTRAQ-2D-LC-MS/MS-based proteomics. Our data revealed the novel induction of pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (PTF1α), muscle, intestine and stomach expression-1 (MIST-1), and achaete-scute complex homolog 3 (ASCL3) in 7 day co-cultured MSCs but not in control MSCs. More importantly, a common notion of pancreatic-specific expression of PTF1 α was challenged for the first time by our verification of PTF1 α expression in the mouse salivary glands. Furthermore, a molecular network simulation of our selected putative MSC reprogramming factors demonstrated evidence for their perspective roles in salivary gland development. In conclusion, quantitative proteomics with extensive data analyses narrowed down a set of MSC reprograming factors potentially contributing to salivary gland regeneration. Identification of their differential/synergistic impact on MSC conversion warrants further investigation. PMID:28158262

  17. Quantitative proteomics of Spodoptera frugiperda cells during growth and baculovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Carinhas

    Full Text Available Baculovirus infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells is a system of choice to produce a range of recombinant proteins, vaccines and, potentially, gene therapy vectors. While baculovirus genomes are well characterized, the genome of S. frugiperda is not sequenced and the virus-host molecular interplay is sparsely known. Herein, we describe the application of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC to obtain the first comparative proteome quantitation of S. frugiperda cells during growth and early baculovirus infection. The proteome coverage was maximized by compiling a search database with protein annotations from insect species. Of interest were differentially proteins related to energy metabolism, endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress, yet not investigated in the scope of baculovirus infection. Further, the reduced expression of key viral-encoded proteins early in the infection cycle is suggested to be related with decreased viral replication at high cell density culture. These findings have implications for virological research and improvement of baculovirus-based bioprocesses.

  18. Quantitative Proteomics of Synaptic and Nonsynaptic Mitochondria: Insights for Synaptic Mitochondrial Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic mitochondria are essential for maintaining calcium homeostasis and producing ATP, processes vital for neuronal integrity and synaptic transmission. Synaptic mitochondria exhibit increased oxidative damage during aging and are more vulnerable to calcium insult than nonsynaptic mitochondria. Why synaptic mitochondria are specifically more susceptible to cumulative damage remains to be determined. In this study, the generation of a super-SILAC mix that served as an appropriate internal standard for mouse brain mitochondria mass spectrometry based analysis allowed for the quantification of the proteomic differences between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria isolated from 10-month-old mice. We identified a total of 2260 common proteins between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria of which 1629 were annotated as mitochondrial. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the proteins common between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria revealed significant differential expression of 522 proteins involved in several pathways including oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial fission/fusion, calcium transport, and mitochondrial DNA replication and maintenance. In comparison to nonsynaptic mitochondria, synaptic mitochondria exhibited increased age-associated mitochondrial DNA deletions and decreased bioenergetic function. These findings provide insights into synaptic mitochondrial susceptibility to damage. PMID:24708184

  19. Proteomic analysis identifies interleukin 11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton Peter G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the peri-implantation period, the embryo adheres to an adequately prepared or receptive endometrial surface epithelium. Abnormal embryo adhesion to the endometrium results in embryo implantation failure and infertility. Endometrial epithelial cell plasma membrane proteins critical in regulating adhesion may potentially be infertility biomarkers or targets for treating infertility. Interleukin (IL 11 regulates human endometrial epithelial cells (hEEC adhesion. Its production is abnormal in women with infertility. The objective of the study was to identify IL11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in hEEC in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Using a 2D-differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE electrophoresis combined with LCMS/MS mass spectrometry approach, we identified 20 unique plasma membrane proteins differentially regulated by IL11 in ECC-1 cells, a hEEC derived cell line. Two IL11 regulated proteins with known roles in cell adhesion, annexin A2 (ANXA2 and flotillin-1 (FLOT1, were validated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry in hEEC lines (ECC-1 and an additional cell line, Ishikawa and primary hEEC. Flotilin-1 was further validated by immunohistochemistry in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle (n = 6-8/cycle. Results 2D-DIGE analysis identified 4 spots that were significantly different between control and IL11 treated group. Of these 4 spots, there were 20 proteins that were identified with LCMS/MS. Two proteins; ANXA2 and FLOT1 were chosen for further analyses and have found to be significantly up-regulated following IL11 treatment. Western blot analysis showed a 2-fold and a 2.5-fold increase of ANXA2 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. Similarly, a 1.8-fold and a 2.3/2.4-fold increase was also observed for FLOT1 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. In vitro, IL11 induced stronger ANXA2 expression on cell surface of primary h

  20. Plasma membrane proteome analysis of the early effect of alcohol on liver:implications for alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Zhang; Ye Zheng; Pengyuan Yang; Zhenghong Yuan; Xiaofang Jia; Yanling Feng; Xia Peng; Zhiyong Zhang; Wenjiang Zhou; Zhanqing Zhang; Fang Ma; Xiaohui Liu

    2011-01-01

    In humans, the over-consumption of alcohol can lead to serious liver disease. To examine the early effects of alcohol on liver disease, rats were given sufficient ethanol to develop liver cirrhosis. Rats before the onset of fibrosis were studied in this work. Plasma membranes (PM) of liver were extracted by twice sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The proteome profiles of PM from ethanol-treated rats and the controls were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) tech-nology. Ethanol treatment altered the amount of 15 differ-ent liver proteins: 10 of them were detected by 2-DE and 5 by iTRAQ. Keratin 8 was detected by both methods.Gene ontology analysis of these differentially detected proteins indicated that most of them were involved in important cell functions such as binding activity (includ-ing ion, DNA, ATP binding, etc.), cell structure, or enzyme activity. Among these, annexin A2, keratin 8, and keratin 18 were further verified using western blot analy-sis and annexin A2 was verified by immunohistochemis-try. Our results suggested that alcohol has the potential to affect cell structure, adhesion and enzyme activity by altering expression levels of several relevant proteins in the PM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to study the effect of alcohol on the liver PM pro-teome and it might be helpful for understanding the poss-ible mechanisms of alcohol-induced liver disease.

  1. Discovery of colorectal cancer biomarker candidates by membrane proteomic analysis and subsequent verification using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and tissue microarray (TMA) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Hideaki; Muraoka, Satoshi; Kuga, Takahisa; Adachi, Jun; Narumi, Ryohei; Watanabe, Shio; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Kodera, Yoshio; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Fukuoka, Junya; Masuda, Takeshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Nomura, Fumio; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in quantitative proteomic technology have enabled the large-scale validation of biomarkers. We here performed a quantitative proteomic analysis of membrane fractions from colorectal cancer tissue to discover biomarker candidates, and then extensively validated the candidate proteins identified. A total of 5566 proteins were identified in six tissue samples, each of which was obtained from polyps and cancer with and without metastasis. GO cellular component analysis predicted that 3087 of these proteins were membrane proteins, whereas TMHMM algorithm predicted that 1567 proteins had a transmembrane domain. Differences were observed in the expression of 159 membrane proteins and 55 extracellular proteins between polyps and cancer without metastasis, while the expression of 32 membrane proteins and 17 extracellular proteins differed between cancer with and without metastasis. A total of 105 of these biomarker candidates were quantitated using selected (or multiple) reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) with stable synthetic isotope-labeled peptides as an internal control. The results obtained revealed differences in the expression of 69 of these proteins, and this was subsequently verified in an independent set of patient samples (polyps (n = 10), cancer without metastasis (n = 10), cancer with metastasis (n = 10)). Significant differences were observed in the expression of 44 of these proteins, including ITGA5, GPRC5A, PDGFRB, and TFRC, which have already been shown to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer, as well as proteins with unknown function, such as C8orf55. The expression of C8orf55 was also shown to be high not only in colorectal cancer, but also in several cancer tissues using a multicancer tissue microarray, which included 1150 cores from 14 cancer tissues. This is the largest verification study of biomarker candidate membrane proteins to date; our methods for biomarker discovery and subsequent validation using SRM/MRM will contribute to the

  2. Deep Proteomics of Mouse Skeletal Muscle Enables Quantitation of Protein Isoforms, Metabolic Pathways, and Transcription Factors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T.; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. PMID:25616865

  3. Deep proteomics of mouse skeletal muscle enables quantitation of protein isoforms, metabolic pathways and transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraja, Nagarjuna

    2015-01-01

    expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compare to tissue. This revealed unexpectedly...... complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms.......Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging due to highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art mass...

  4. iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis reveals the pathways for methanation of propionate facilitated by magnetite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Yuhang; Wan, Jingjing; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    by around 44% in batch experiments, and both direct interspecies electron transfer and interspecies H2 transfer were thermodynamically feasible with the addition of magnetite. The methanation of propionate facilitated by magnetite was also demonstrated in a long-term operated continuous reactor. The methane...... enriched with the addition of magnetite. iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis, which was used in mixed culture for the first time, showed that magnetite induced the changes of protein expression levels involved in various pathways during the methanation of propionate. The up-regulation of proteins...... electron transfer considering its up-regulation with the addition of magnetite and origination from Thauera. Most of the up-regulated proteins in methane metabolism were originated from Methanosaeta, while most of the enzymes with down-regulated proteins were originated from Methanosarcina. However, the up-regulated...

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Human Pluripotency and Neural Specification by In-Depth (PhosphoProteomic Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyas Singec

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs can be utilized for precise analysis of cell type identities during early development. We established a highly efficient neural induction strategy and an improved analytical platform, and determined proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of hESCs and their specified multipotent neural stem cell derivatives (hNSCs. This quantitative dataset (nearly 13,000 proteins and 60,000 phosphorylation sites provides unique molecular insights into pluripotency and neural lineage entry. Systems-level comparative analysis of proteins (e.g., transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, kinase families, phosphorylation sites, and numerous biological pathways allowed the identification of distinct signatures in pluripotent and multipotent cells. Furthermore, as predicted by the dataset, we functionally validated an autocrine/paracrine mechanism by demonstrating that the secreted protein midkine is a regulator of neural specification. This resource is freely available to the scientific community, including a searchable website, PluriProt.

  6. Metastasis-related plasma membrane proteins of human breast cancer cells identified by comparative quantitative mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Hansen, Helle V

    2009-01-01

    The spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to form metastasis at distant sites is a complex multi-step process. The cancer cell proteins, and plasma membrane proteins in particular, involved in this process are poorly defined and a study of the very early events of the metastatic process using...... clinical samples or in vitro assays is not feasible. We have used a unique model system consisting of two isogenic human breast cancer cell lines that are equally tumorigenic in mice, but while one gives rise to metastasis, the other disseminates single cells that remain dormant at distant organs. Membrane...... by the two cell lines. The study demonstrates a quantitative and comparative proteomic strategy to identify clinically-relevant key molecules in the early events of metastasis, some of which may prove to be potential targets for cancer therapy....

  7. Milk Fat Globule Membrane Proteomics: A 'Snapshot' of Mammary Epithelial Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Cebo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are released in milk as fat globules, which are droplets of apolar lipids surrounded by a complex membrane deriving from the mammary epithelial cell (MEC and called the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM. The structure of the MFGM is highly complex and closely related to the mechanisms of milk fat globule secretion in the mammary epithelial cell. Indeed, MFGM is composed of two biological membranes, a phospholipid monolayer, deriving from the endoplasmic reticulum, and a phospholipid bilayer, which originates from the apical plasma membrane of the MEC, with variable amounts of cytoplasm trapped between. Biochemical techniques (i.e. sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by different staining procedures have been employed historically to characterize major MFGM proteins, namely MUC-1, fatty acid synthase, xanthine oxidase, butyrophilin, lactadherin, and adipophilin. However, recent advances in the field of proteomics (mostly development of one-dimensional gel electrophoresis approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry have led to the identification of hundreds of proteins associated with the MFGM. Surprisingly, newly identified MFGM proteins were not only involved in lipid metabolic or exocytosis-related biological processes, but also in cell signalling, translation, or host defense-related mechanisms. Therefore, the milk fat globule should no longer be viewed as an inert structure only devoted to the delivery of lipids to the newborn, but rather as a dynamic and informative compartment which can contribute to the improvement of our comprehension of the mammary gland biology.

  8. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Chicken Eggshell Brownness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guiqin; Shi, Fengying; Liu, Aiqiao; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Brown eggs are popular in many countries and consumers regard eggshell brownness as an important indicator of egg quality. However, the potential regulatory proteins and detailed molecular mechanisms regulating eggshell brownness have yet to be clearly defined. In the present study, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ technology in the shell gland epithelium of hens laying dark and light brown eggs to investigate the candidate proteins and molecular mechanisms underlying variation in chicken eggshell brownness. The results indicated 147 differentially expressed proteins between these two groups, among which 65 and 82 proteins were significantly up-regulated in the light and dark groups, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that in the light group, the down-regulated iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (Iba57) would decrease the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX; furthermore, the up-regulated protein solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine nucleotide translocator), member 5 (SLC25A5) and down-regulated translocator protein (TSPO) would lead to increased amounts of protoporphyrin IX transported into the mitochondria matrix to form heme with iron, which is supplied by ovotransferrin protein (TF). In other words, chickens from the light group produce less protoporphyrin IX, which is mainly used for heme synthesis. Therefore, the exported protoporphyrin IX available for eggshell deposition and brownness is reduced in the light group. The current study provides valuable information to elucidate variation of chicken eggshell brownness, and demonstrates the feasibility and sensitivity of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis in providing useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying brown eggshell pigmentation. PMID:28006025

  9. Quantitative proteomic analysis provides novel insights into cold stress responses in petunia seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eZhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature is a major adverse environmental factor that impairs petunia growth and development. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of cold stress adaptation of petunia plants, a quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology was performed to detect the effects of cold stress on protein expression profiles in petunia seedlings which had been subjected to 2°C for 5d. Of the 2,430 proteins whose levels were quantitated, a total of 117 proteins were discovered to be differentially expressed under low temperature stress in comparison to unstressed controls. As an initial study, 44 proteins including well known and novel cold-responsive proteins were successfully annotated. By integrating the results of two independent Gene Ontology (GO enrichment analyses, seven common GO terms were found of which oxidation-reduction process was the most notable for the cold-responsive proteins. By using the subcellular localization tool Plant-mPLoc predictor, as much as 40.2% of the cold-responsive protein group was found to be located within chloroplasts, suggesting that the chloroplast proteome is particularly affected by cold stress. Gene expression analyses of 11 cold-responsive proteins by real time PCR demonstrated that the mRNA levels were not strongly correlated with the respective protein levels. Further activity assay of anti-oxidative enzymes showed different alterations in cold treated petunia seedlings. Our investigation has highlighted the role of antioxidation mechanisms and also epigenetic factors in the regulation of cold stress responses. Our work has provided novel insights into the plant response to cold stress and should facilitate further studies regarding the molecular mechanisms which determine how plant cells cope with environmental perturbation.

  10. QPROT: Statistical method for testing differential expression using protein-level intensity data in label-free quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungwon; Kim, Sinae; Fermin, Damian; Tsou, Chih-Chiang; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2015-11-03

    We introduce QPROT, a statistical framework and computational tool for differential protein expression analysis using protein intensity data. QPROT is an extension of the QSPEC suite, originally developed for spectral count data, adapted for the analysis using continuously measured protein-level intensity data. QPROT offers a new intensity normalization procedure and model-based differential expression analysis, both of which account for missing data. Determination of differential expression of each protein is based on the standardized Z-statistic based on the posterior distribution of the log fold change parameter, guided by the false discovery rate estimated by a well-known Empirical Bayes method. We evaluated the classification performance of QPROT using the quantification calibration data from the clinical proteomic technology assessment for cancer (CPTAC) study and a recently published Escherichia coli benchmark dataset, with evaluation of FDR accuracy in the latter. QPROT is a statistical framework with computational software tool for comparative quantitative proteomics analysis. It features various extensions of QSPEC method originally built for spectral count data analysis, including probabilistic treatment of missing values in protein intensity data. With the increasing popularity of label-free quantitative proteomics data, the proposed method and accompanying software suite will be immediately useful for many proteomics laboratories. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Time-course investigation of Phytophthora infestans infection of potato leaf from three cultivars by quantitative proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Kruse Guldstrand Larsen

    2016-03-01

    We used label-free quantitative proteomics to investigate the infection with P. infestans in a time-course study over 258 h. Several key issues limits proteome analysis of potato leaf tissue [5–7]. Firstly, the immense complexity of the plant proteome, which is further complicated by the presence of highly abundant proteins, such as ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. Secondly, plant leaf and potato, in particular, contain abundant levels amounts of phenols and polyphenols, which hinder or completely prevent a successful protein extraction. Hitherto, protein profiling of potato leaf tissues have been limited to few proteome studies and only 1484 proteins have been extracted and comprehensively described [5,8,9]. We here present the detailed methods and raw data by optimized gel-enhanced label free quantitative approach. The methodology enabled us to detect and quantify between 3248 and 3529 unique proteins from each cultivar, and up to 758 P. infestans derived proteins. The complete dataset is available via ProteomeXchange, with the identifier PXD002767.

  12. Quantitative proteome analysis in cardiovascular physiology and pathology. I. Data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grussenmeyer, Thomas; Meili-Butz, Silvia; Dieterle, Thomas; Traunecker, Emmanuel; Carrel, Thierry P; Lefkovits, Ivan

    2008-12-01

    Methodological evaluation of the proteomic analysis of cardiovascular-tissue material has been performed with a special emphasis on establishing examinations that allow reliable quantitative analysis of silver-stained readouts. Reliability, reproducibility, robustness and linearity were addressed and clarified. In addition, several types of normalization procedures were evaluated and new approaches are proposed. It has been found that the silver-stained readout offers a convenient approach for quantitation if a linear range for gel loading is defined. In addition, a broad range of a 10-fold input (loading 20-200 microg per gel) fulfills the linearity criteria, although at the lowest input (20 microg) a portion of protein species will remain undetected. The method is reliable and reproducible within a range of 65-200 microg input. The normalization procedure using the sum of all spot intensities from a silver-stained 2D pattern has been shown to be less reliable than other approaches, namely, normalization through median or through involvement of interquartile range. A special refinement of the normalization through virtual segmentation of pattern, and calculation of normalization factor for each stratum provides highly satisfactory results. The presented results not only provide evidence for the usefulness of silver-stained gels for quantitative evaluation, but they are directly applicable to the research endeavor of monitoring alterations in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

  13. Quantitative proteomic analysis for high-throughput screening of differential glycoproteins in hepatocellular carcinoma serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Jun Gao; Ya-Jing Chen; Duo Zuo; Ming-Ming Xiao; Ying Li; Hua Guo; Ning Zhang; Rui-Bing Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Novel serum biomarkers are required to increase the sensitivity and specificity of serum screening for early HCC diagnosis. This study employed a quantitative proteomic strategy to analyze the differential expression of serum glycoproteins between HCC and normal control serum samples. Methods:Lectin affnity chromatography (LAC) was used to enrich glycoproteins from the serum samples. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis combined with stable isotope dimethyl labeling and 2D liquid chromatography (LC) separations were performed to examine the differential levels of the detected proteins between HCC and control serum samples. Western blot was used to analyze the differential expression levels of the three serum proteins. Results:A total of 2,280 protein groups were identiifed in the serum samples from HCC patients by using the 2D LC-MS/MS method. Up to 36 proteins were up-regulated in the HCC serum, whereas 19 proteins were down-regulated. Three differential glycoproteins, namely, fibrinogen gamma chain (FGG), FOS-like antigen 2 (FOSL2), and α-1, 6-mannosylglycoprotein 6-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase B (MGAT5B) were validated by Western blot. All these three proteins were up-regulated in the HCC serum samples. Conclusion:A quantitative glycoproteomic method was established and proven useful to determine potential novel biomarkers for HCC.

  14. Quantitative proteomic analysis for high-throughput screening of differential glycoproteins in hepatocellular carcinoma serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hua-Jun; Chen, Ya-Jing; Zuo, Duo; Xiao, Ming-Ming; Li, Ying; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Rui-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Novel serum biomarkers are required to increase the sensitivity and specificity of serum screening for early HCC diagnosis. This study employed a quantitative proteomic strategy to analyze the differential expression of serum glycoproteins between HCC and normal control serum samples. Methods Lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) was used to enrich glycoproteins from the serum samples. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis combined with stable isotope dimethyl labeling and 2D liquid chromatography (LC) separations were performed to examine the differential levels of the detected proteins between HCC and control serum samples. Western blot was used to analyze the differential expression levels of the three serum proteins. Results A total of 2,280 protein groups were identified in the serum samples from HCC patients by using the 2D LC-MS/MS method. Up to 36 proteins were up-regulated in the HCC serum, whereas 19 proteins were down-regulated. Three differential glycoproteins, namely, fibrinogen gamma chain (FGG), FOS-like antigen 2 (FOSL2), and α-1,6-mannosylglycoprotein 6-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase B (MGAT5B) were validated by Western blot. All these three proteins were up-regulated in the HCC serum samples. Conclusion A quantitative glycoproteomic method was established and proven useful to determine potential novel biomarkers for HCC. PMID:26487969

  15. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Germination of Nosema bombycis Spores under Extremely Alkaline Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Chen, Bosheng; Hu, Sirui; Liang, Xili; Lu, Xingmeng; Shao, Yongqi

    2016-01-01

    The microsporidian Nosema bombycis is an obligate intracellular pathogen of the silkworm Bombyx mori, causing the epidemic disease Pebrine and extensive economic losses in sericulture. Although N. bombycis forms spores with rigid spore walls that protect against various environmental pressures, ingested spores germinate immediately under the extremely alkaline host gut condition (Lepidoptera gut pH > 10.5), which is a key developmental turning point from dormant state to infected state. However, to date this process remains poorly understood due to the complexity of the animal digestive tract and the lack of genetic tools for microsporidia. Here we show, using an in vitro spore germination model, how the proteome of N. bombycis changes during germination, analyse specific metabolic pathways employed in detail, and validate key functional proteins in vivo in silkworms. By a label-free quantitative proteomics approach that is directly based on high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) data, a total of 1136 proteins were identified with high confidence, with 127 proteins being significantly changed in comparison to non-germinated spores. Among them, structural proteins including polar tube protein 1 and 3 and spore wall protein (SWP) 4 and 30 were found to be significantly down-regulated, but SWP9 significantly up-regulated. Some nucleases like polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase and flap endonucleases 1, together with a panel of hydrolases involved in protein degradation and RNA cleavage were overrepresented too upon germination, which implied that they might play important roles during spore germination. The differentially regulated trends of these genes were validated, respectively, by quantitative RT-PCR and 3 proteins of interest were confirmed by Western blotting analyses in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the pathway analysis showed that abundant up- and down-regulations appear involved in the glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, purine, and pyrimidine metabolism

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Germination of Nosema bombycis Spores under Extremely Alkaline Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Chen, Bosheng; Hu, Sirui; Liang, Xili; Lu, Xingmeng; Shao, Yongqi

    2016-01-01

    The microsporidian Nosema bombycis is an obligate intracellular pathogen of the silkworm Bombyx mori, causing the epidemic disease Pebrine and extensive economic losses in sericulture. Although N. bombycis forms spores with rigid spore walls that protect against various environmental pressures, ingested spores germinate immediately under the extremely alkaline host gut condition (Lepidoptera gut pH > 10.5), which is a key developmental turning point from dormant state to infected state. However, to date this process remains poorly understood due to the complexity of the animal digestive tract and the lack of genetic tools for microsporidia. Here we show, using an in vitro spore germination model, how the proteome of N. bombycis changes during germination, analyse specific metabolic pathways employed in detail, and validate key functional proteins in vivo in silkworms. By a label-free quantitative proteomics approach that is directly based on high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) data, a total of 1136 proteins were identified with high confidence, with 127 proteins being significantly changed in comparison to non-germinated spores. Among them, structural proteins including polar tube protein 1 and 3 and spore wall protein (SWP) 4 and 30 were found to be significantly down-regulated, but SWP9 significantly up-regulated. Some nucleases like polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase and flap endonucleases 1, together with a panel of hydrolases involved in protein degradation and RNA cleavage were overrepresented too upon germination, which implied that they might play important roles during spore germination. The differentially regulated trends of these genes were validated, respectively, by quantitative RT-PCR and 3 proteins of interest were confirmed by Western blotting analyses in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the pathway analysis showed that abundant up- and down-regulations appear involved in the glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, purine, and pyrimidine metabolism

  17. Improving data quality and preserving HCD-generated reporter ions with EThcD for isobaric tag-based quantitative proteomics and proteome-wide PTM studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Shi, Xudong; Feng, Yu; Kent, K Craig; Li, Lingjun

    2017-05-22

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based isobaric labeling has undergone rapid development in recent years due to its capability for high throughput quantitation. Apart from its originally designed use with collision-induced dissociation (CID) and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD), isobaric tagging technique could also work with electron-transfer dissociation (ETD), which provides complementarity to CID and is preferred in sequencing peptides with post-translational modifications (PTMs). However, ETD suffers from long reaction time, reduced duty cycle and bias against peptides with lower charge states. In addition, common fragmentation mechanism in ETD results in altered reporter ion production, decreased multiplexing capability, and even loss of quantitation capability for some of the isobaric tags, including custom-designed dimethyl leucine (DiLeu) tags. Here, we demonstrate a novel electron-transfer/higher-energy collision dissociation (EThcD) approach that preserves original reporter ion channels, mitigates bias against lower charge states, improves sensitivity, and significantly improves data quality for quantitative proteomics and proteome-wide PTM studies. Systematic optimization was performed to achieve a balance between data quality and sensitivity. We provide direct comparison of EThcD with ETD and HCD for DiLeu- and TMT-labeled HEK cell lysate and IMAC enriched phosphopeptides. Results demonstrate improved data quality and phosphorylation localization accuracy while preserving sufficient reporter ion production. Biological studies were performed to investigate phosphorylation changes in a mouse vascular smooth muscle cell line treated with four different conditions. Overall, EThcD exhibits superior performance compared to conventional ETD and offers distinct advantages compared to HCD in isobaric labeling based quantitative proteomics and quantitative PTM studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteome analysis. Novel proteins identified at the peribacteroid membrane from ¤Lotus japonicus¤ root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienkoop, S.; Saalbach, G.

    2003-01-01

    The peribacteroid membrane (PBM) forms the structural and functional interface between the legume plant and the rhizobia. The model legume Lotus japonicus was chosen to study the proteins present at the PBM by proteome analysis. PBM was purified from root nodules by an aqueous polymer two...... physiological processes and localized proteins known from nodule-specific expressed sequence tag databases to the PBM....

  19. Proteomics of Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy support that the extracellular matrix of Descemet's membrane is disordered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Dyrlund, Thomas F; Runager, Kasper;

    2014-01-01

    the protein profiles of diseased and control tissues using two relative quantitation MS methods. The first quantitation method based on the areas of the extracted ion chromatograms, quantified the 51 and 48 most abundant proteins of the Descemet's membrane/endothelial layer in patient and control tissues......, respectively, of which 10 were significantly regulated. The results indicated that the level of type VIII collagen was unaltered even though the protein previously has been implicated in familial early onset forms of the disease. Using the second relative quantitation method iTRAQ we identified 22...

  20. Membrane glucocorticoid receptor activation induces proteomic changes aligning with classical glucocorticoid effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernocchi, Sara; Battello, Nadia; Schmitz, Stephanie; Revets, Dominique; Billing, Anja M; Turner, Jonathan D; Muller, Claude P

    2013-07-01

    Glucocorticoids exert rapid nongenomic effects by several mechanisms including the activation of a membrane-bound glucocorticoid receptor (mGR). Here, we report the first proteomic study on the effects of mGR activation by BSA-conjugated cortisol (Cort-BSA). A subset of target proteins in the proteomic data set was validated by Western blot and we found them responding to mGR activation by BSA-conjugated cortisol in three additional cell lines, indicating a conserved effect in cells originating from different tissues. Changes in the proteome of BSA-conjugated cortisol treated CCRF-CEM leukemia cells were associated with early and rapid pro-apoptotic, immune-modulatory and metabolic effects aligning with and possibly "priming" classical activities of the cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor (cGR). PCR arrays investigating target genes of the major signaling pathways indicated that the mGR does not exert its effects through the transcriptional activity of any of the most common kinases in these leukemic cells, but RhoA signaling emerged from our pathway analysis. All cell lines tested displayed very low levels of mGR on their surface. Highly sensitive and specific in situ proximity ligation assay visualized low numbers of mGR even in cells previously thought to be mGR negative. We obtained similar results when using three distinct anti-GR monoclonal antibodies directed against the N-terminal half of the cGR. This strongly suggests that the mGR and the cGR have a high sequence homology and most probably originate from the same gene. Furthermore, the mGR appears to reside in caveolae and its association with caveolin-1 (Cav-1) was clearly detected in two of the four cell lines investigated using double recognition proximity ligation assay. Our results indicate however that Cav-1 is not necessary for membrane localization of the GR since CCRF-CEM and Jurkat cells have a functional mGR, but did not express this caveolar protein. However, if expressed, this membrane protein

  1. Quantitative Proteomics of an Amphibian Pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, following Exposure to Thyroid Hormone.

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    Jose Thekkiniath

    Full Text Available Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, a chytrid fungus, has increasingly been implicated as a major factor in the worldwide decline of amphibian populations. The fungus causes chytridiomycosis in susceptible species leading to massive die-offs of adult amphibians. Although Bd infects the keratinized mouthparts of tadpoles and negatively affects foraging behavior, these infections are non-lethal. An important morphogen controlling amphibian metamorphosis is thyroid hormone (T3. Tadpoles may be infected with Bd and the fungus may be exposed to T3 during metamorphosis. We hypothesize that exposure of Bd to T3 may induce the expression of factors associated with host colonization and pathogenicity. We utilized a proteomics approach to better understand the dynamics of the Bd-T3 interaction. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, we generated a data set of a large number of cytoplasmic and membrane proteins following exposure of Bd to T3. From these data, we identified a total of 263 proteins whose expression was significantly changed following T3 exposure. We provide evidence for expression of an array of proteins that may play key roles in both genomic and non-genomic actions of T3 in Bd. Additionally, our proteomics study shows an increase in several proteins including proteases and a class of uncommon crinkler and crinkler-like effector proteins suggesting their importance in Bd pathogenicity as well as those involved in metabolism and energy transfer, protein fate, transport and stress responses. This approach provides insights into the mechanistic basis of the Bd-amphibian interaction following T3 exposure.

  2. Dataset of the proteome of purified outer membrane vesicles from the human pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomintans

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    Thomas Kieselbach

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen, which is linked to aggressive forms of periodontitis and can be associated with endocarditis. The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs of this species contain effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT and leukotoxin (LtxA, which they can deliver into human host cells. The OMVs can also activate innate immunity through NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns. This dataset provides a proteome of highly purified OMVs from A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e strain 173. The experimental data do not only include the raw data of the LC-MS/MS analysis of four independent preparations of purified OMVs but also the mass lists of the processed data and the Mascot.dat files from the database searches. In total 501 proteins are identified, of which 151 are detected in at least three of four independent preparations. In addition, this dataset contains the COG definitions and the predicted subcellular locations (PSORTb 3.0 for the entire genome of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e strain SC1083, which is used for the evaluation of the LC-MS/MS data. These data are deposited in ProteomeXchange in the public dataset PXD002509. In addition, a scientific interpretation of this dataset by Kieselbach et al. (2015 [2] is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138591.

  3. Dataset for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of the breast cancer hypoxic secretome associated with osteotropism

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    Thomas R. Cox

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cancer secretome includes all of the macromolecules secreted by cells into their microenvironment. Cancer cell secretomes are significantly different to that of normal cells reflecting the changes that normal cells have undergone during their transition to malignancy. More importantly, cancer secretomes are known to be active mediators of both local and distant host cells and play an important role in the progression and dissemination of cancer. Here we have quantitatively profiled both the composition of breast cancer secretomes associated with osteotropism, and their modulation under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We detect and quantify 162 secretome proteins across all conditions which show differential hypoxic induction and association with osteotropism. Mass Spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD000397 and the complete proteomic, bioinformatic and biological analyses are reported in Cox et al. (2015 [1].

  4. Dataset for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of the breast cancer hypoxic secretome associated with osteotropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas R.; Schoof, Erwin M.; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T.; Linding, Rune

    2015-01-01

    The cancer secretome includes all of the macromolecules secreted by cells into their microenvironment. Cancer cell secretomes are significantly different to that of normal cells reflecting the changes that normal cells have undergone during their transition to malignancy. More importantly, cancer secretomes are known to be active mediators of both local and distant host cells and play an important role in the progression and dissemination of cancer. Here we have quantitatively profiled both the composition of breast cancer secretomes associated with osteotropism, and their modulation under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We detect and quantify 162 secretome proteins across all conditions which show differential hypoxic induction and association with osteotropism. Mass Spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD000397 and the complete proteomic, bioinformatic and biological analyses are reported in Cox et al. (2015) [1]. PMID:26649326

  5. Biomedical applications of ion mobility-enhanced data-independent acquisition-based label-free quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distler, Ute; Kuharev, Jörg; Tenzer, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics greatly benefited from recent improvements in instrument performance and the development of bioinformatics solutions facilitating the high-throughput quantification of proteins in complex biological samples. In addition to quantification approaches using stable isotope labeling, label-free quantification has emerged as the method of choice for many laboratories. Over the last years, data-independent acquisition approaches have gained increasing popularity. The integration of ion mobility separation into commercial instruments enabled researchers to achieve deep proteome coverage from limiting sample amounts. Additionally, ion mobility provides a new dimension of separation for the quantitative assessment of complex proteomes, facilitating precise label-free quantification even of highly complex samples. The present work provides a thorough overview of the combination of ion mobility and data-independent acquisition-based label-free quantification LC-MS and its applications in biomedical research.

  6. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Herbaceous Peony in Response to Paclobutrazol Inhibition of Lateral Branching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqiu Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall. is an emerging high-grade cut flower worldwide, which is usually used in wedding bouquets and known as the “wedding flower”. However, abundant lateral branches appear frequently in some excellent cultivars, and a lack of a method to remove Paeonia lactiflora lateral branches other than inefficient artificial methods is an obstacle for improving the quality of its cut flowers. In this study, paclobutrazol (PBZ application was found to inhibit the growth of lateral branches in Paeonia lactiflora for the first time, including 96.82% decreased lateral bud number per branch, 77.79% and 42.31% decreased length and diameter of lateral branches, respectively, declined cell wall materials and changed microstructures. Subsequently, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ technology was used for quantitative proteomics analysis of lateral branches under PBZ application and control. The results indicated that 178 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs successfully obtained, 98 DEPs were up-regulated and 80 DEPs were down-regulated. Thereafter, 34 candidate DEPs associated with the inhibited growth of lateral branches were screened according to their function and classification. These PBZ-stress responsive candidate DEPs were involved in eight biological processes, which played a very important role in the growth and development of lateral branches together with the response to PBZ stress. These results provide a better understanding of the molecular theoretical basis for removing Paeonia lactiflora lateral branches using PBZ application.

  7. Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics on serial tumor biopsies from a sorafenib-treated HCC patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazert, Eva; Colombi, Marco; Boldanova, Tujana; Moes, Suzette; Adametz, David; Quagliata, Luca; Roth, Volker; Terracciano, Luigi; Heim, Markus H.; Jenoe, Paul; Hall, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Compensatory signaling pathways in tumors confer resistance to targeted therapy, but the pathways and their mechanisms of activation remain largely unknown. We describe a procedure for quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics on snap-frozen biopsies of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and matched nontumor liver tissue. We applied this procedure to monitor signaling pathways in serial biopsies taken from an HCC patient before and during treatment with the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. At diagnosis, the patient had an advanced HCC. At the time of the second biopsy, abdominal imaging revealed progressive disease despite sorafenib treatment. Sorafenib was confirmed to inhibit MAPK signaling in the tumor, as measured by reduced ribosomal protein S6 kinase phosphorylation. Hierarchical clustering and enrichment analysis revealed pathways broadly implicated in tumor progression and resistance, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell adhesion pathways. Thus, we describe a protocol for quantitative analysis of oncogenic pathways in HCC biopsies and obtained first insights into the effect of sorafenib in vivo. This protocol will allow elucidation of mechanisms of resistance and enable precision medicine. PMID:26787912

  8. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the rice (Oryza sativa L. salt response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen Xu

    Full Text Available Salt stress is one of most serious limiting factors for crop growth and production. An isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ approach was used to analyze proteomic changes in rice shoots under salt stress in this study. A total of 56 proteins were significantly altered and 16 of them were enriched in the pathways of photosynthesis, antioxidant and oxidative phosphorylation. Among these 16 proteins, peroxiredoxin Q and photosystem I subunit D were up-regulated, while thioredoxin M-like, thioredoxin x, thioredoxin peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase F3, PSI subunit H, light-harvesting antenna complex I subunits, chloroplast chaperonin, vacuolar ATP synthase subunit H, and ATP synthase delta chain were down-regulated. Moreover, physiological data including total antioxidant capacity, peroxiredoxin activity, chlorophyll a/b content, glutathione S-transferase activity, reduced glutathione content and ATPase activity were consistent with changes in the levels of these proteins. The levels of the mRNAs encoding these proteins were also analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, and approximately 86% of the results were consistent with the iTRAQ data. Importantly, our data suggest the important role of PSI in balancing energy supply and ROS generation under salt stress. This study provides information for an improved understanding of the function of photosynthesis and PSI in the salt-stress response of rice.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of the mitochondrial proteomes of Drosophila melanogaster adapted to extreme oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Songyue; Xue, Jin; Sun, Haidan; Wen, Bo; Wang, Quanhui; Perkins, Guy; Zhao, Huiwen W; Ellisman, Mark H; Hsiao, Yu-hsin; Yin, Liang; Xie, Yingying; Hou, Guixue; Zi, Jin; Lin, Liang; Haddad, Gabriel G; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Siqi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are the primary organelles that consume oxygen and provide energy for cellular activities. To investigate the mitochondrial mechanisms underlying adaptation to extreme oxygen conditions, we generated Drosophila strains that could survive in low- or high-oxygen environments (LOF or HOF, respectively), examined their mitochondria at the ultrastructural level via transmission electron microscopy, studied the activity of their respiratory chain complexes, and quantitatively analyzed the protein abundance responses of the mitochondrial proteomes using Isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). A total of 718 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 55 and 75 mitochondrial proteins displayed significant differences in abundance in LOF and HOF, respectively, compared with the control flies. Importantly, these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins are primarily involved in respiration, calcium regulation, the oxidative response, and mitochondrial protein translation. A correlation analysis of the changes in the levels of the mRNAs corresponding to differentially regulated mitochondrial proteins revealed two sets of proteins with different modes of regulation (transcriptional vs. post-transcriptional) in both LOF and HOF. We believe that these findings will not only enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying adaptation to extreme oxygen conditions in Drosophila but also provide a clue in studying human disease induced by altered oxygen tension in tissues and cells.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of the mitochondrial proteomes of Drosophila melanogaster adapted to extreme oxygen conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyue Yin

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the primary organelles that consume oxygen and provide energy for cellular activities. To investigate the mitochondrial mechanisms underlying adaptation to extreme oxygen conditions, we generated Drosophila strains that could survive in low- or high-oxygen environments (LOF or HOF, respectively, examined their mitochondria at the ultrastructural level via transmission electron microscopy, studied the activity of their respiratory chain complexes, and quantitatively analyzed the protein abundance responses of the mitochondrial proteomes using Isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ. A total of 718 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 55 and 75 mitochondrial proteins displayed significant differences in abundance in LOF and HOF, respectively, compared with the control flies. Importantly, these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins are primarily involved in respiration, calcium regulation, the oxidative response, and mitochondrial protein translation. A correlation analysis of the changes in the levels of the mRNAs corresponding to differentially regulated mitochondrial proteins revealed two sets of proteins with different modes of regulation (transcriptional vs. post-transcriptional in both LOF and HOF. We believe that these findings will not only enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying adaptation to extreme oxygen conditions in Drosophila but also provide a clue in studying human disease induced by altered oxygen tension in tissues and cells.

  11. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) Applications in Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahrour, Osama; Malone, John

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) hyphenated to different separation techniques have promoted it as a valuable tool in protein/peptide quantification. These emerging ICP-MS applications allow absolute quantification by measuring specific elemental responses. One approach quantifies elements already present in the structure of the target peptide (e.g. phosphorus and sulphur) as natural tags. Quantification of these natural tags allows the elucidation of the degree of protein phosphorylation in addition to absolute protein quantification. A separate approach is based on utilising bi-functional labelling substances (those containing ICP-MS detectable elements), that form a covalent chemical bond with the protein thus creating analogs which are detectable by ICP-MS. Based on the previously established stoichiometries of the labelling reagents, quantification can be achieved. This technique is very useful for the design of precise multiplexed quantitation schemes to address the challenges of biomarker screening and discovery. This review discusses the capabilities and different strategies to implement ICP-MS in the field of quantitative proteomics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Quantitative Proteomic Analyses of Molecular Mechanisms Associated with Cytoplasmic Incompatibility in Drosophila melanogaster Induced by Wolbachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lin-Ling; Chen, Xiulan; Zong, Qiong; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Jia-Lin; Zheng, Ya; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Zailong; Brownlie, Jeremy C; Yang, Fuquan; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2015-09-04

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) induced by Wolbachia bacteria in Drosophila melanogaster, we applied an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomic assay to identify differentially expressed proteins extracted from spermathecae and seminal receptacles (SSR) of uninfected females mated with either 1-day-old Wolbachia-uninfected (1T) or infected males (1W) or 5-day-old infected males (5W). In total, 1317 proteins were quantified; 83 proteins were identified as having at least a 1.5-fold change in expression when 1W was compared with 1T. Differentially expressed proteins were related to metabolism, immunity, and reproduction. Wolbachia changed the expression of seminal fluid proteins (Sfps). Wolbachia may disrupt the abundance of proteins in SSR by affecting ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated proteolysis. Knocking down two Sfp genes (CG9334 and CG2668) in Wolbachia-free males resulted in significantly lower embryonic hatch rates with a phenotype of chromatin bridges. Wolbachia-infected females may rescue the hatch rates. This suggests that the changed expression of some Sfps may be one of the mechanisms of CI induced by Wolbachia. This study provides a panel of candidate proteins that may be involved in the interaction between Wolbachia and their insect hosts and, through future functional studies, may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of Wolbachia-induced CI.

  13. Outer Membrane Proteome of Veillonella parvula: A Diderm Firmicute of the Human Microbiome

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    Daniel I. Poppleton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Veillonella parvula is a biofilm-forming commensal found in the lungs, vagina, mouth, and gastro-intestinal tract of humans, yet it may develop into an opportunistic pathogen. Furthermore, the presence of Veillonella has been associated with the development of a healthy immune system in infants. Veillonella belongs to the Negativicutes, a diverse clade of bacteria that represent an evolutionary enigma: they phylogenetically belong to Gram-positive (monoderm Firmicutes yet maintain an outer membrane (OM with lipopolysaccharide similar to classic Gram-negative (diderm bacteria. The OMs of Negativicutes have unique characteristics including the replacement of Braun's lipoprotein by OmpM for tethering the OM to the peptidoglycan. Through phylogenomic analysis, we have recently provided bioinformatic annotation of the Negativicutes diderm cell envelope. We showed that it is a unique type of envelope that was present in the ancestor of present-day Firmicutes and lost multiple times independently in this phylum, giving rise to the monoderm architecture; however, little experimental data is presently available for any Negativicutes cell envelope. Here, we performed the first experimental proteomic characterization of the cell envelope of a diderm Firmicute, producing an OM proteome of V. parvula. We initially conducted a thorough bioinformatics analysis of all 1,844 predicted proteins from V. parvula DSM 2008's genome using 12 different localization prediction programs. These results were complemented by protein extraction with surface exposed (SE protein tags and by subcellular fractionation, both of which were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The merging of proteomics and bioinformatics results allowed identification of 78 OM proteins. These include a number of receptors for TonB-dependent transport, the main component of the BAM system for OM protein biogenesis (BamA, the Lpt system component LptD, which is responsible for

  14. Enrichment and proteomic analysis of plasma membrane from rat dorsal root ganglions

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    Lin Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons are primary sensory neurons that conduct neuronal impulses related to pain, touch and temperature senses. Plasma membrane (PM of DRG cells plays important roles in their functions. PM proteins are main performers of the functions. However, mainly due to the very low amount of DRG that leads to the difficulties in PM sample collection, few proteomic analyses on the PM have been reported and it is a subject that demands further investigation. Results By using aqueous polymer two-phase partition in combination with high salt and high pH washing, PMs were efficiently enriched, demonstrated by western blot analysis. A total of 954 non-redundant proteins were identified from the plasma membrane-enriched preparation with CapLC-MS/MS analysis subsequent to protein separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE or shotgun digestion. 205 (21.5% of the identified proteins were unambiguously assigned as PM proteins, including a large number of signal proteins, receptors, ion channel and transporters. Conclusion The aqueous polymer two-phase partition is a simple, rapid and relatively inexpensive method. It is well suitable for the purification of PMs from small amount of tissues. Therefore, it is reasonable for the DRG PM to be enriched by using aqueous two-phase partition as a preferred method. Proteomic analysis showed that DRG PM was rich in proteins involved in the fundamental biological processes including material exchange, energy transformation and information transmission, etc. These data would help to our further understanding of the fundamental DRG functions.

  15. High throughput quantitative glycomics and glycoform-focused proteomics of murine dermis and epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Rie; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Shinohara, Yasuro; Deguchi, Kisaburo; Monde, Kenji; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2005-12-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of the significance of the protein glycosylation, the throughput of protein glycosylation analysis is still too low to be applied to the exhaustive glycoproteomic analysis. Aiming to elucidate the N-glycosylation of murine epidermis and dermis glycoproteins, here we used a novel approach for focused proteomics. A gross N-glycan profiling (glycomics) of epidermis and dermis was first elucidated both qualitatively and quantitatively upon N-glycan derivatization with novel, stable isotope-coded derivatization reagents followed by MALDI-TOF(/TOF) analysis. This analysis revealed distinct features of the N-glycosylation profile of epidermis and dermis for the first time. A high abundance of high mannose type oligosaccharides was found to be characteristic of murine epidermis glycoproteins. Based on this observation, we performed high mannose type glycoform-focused proteomics by direct tryptic digestion of protein mixtures and affinity enrichment. We identified 15 glycoproteins with 19 N-glycosylation sites that carry high mannose type glycans by off-line LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Moreover the relative quantity of microheterogeneity of different glycoforms present at each N-glycan binding site was determined. Glycoproteins identified were often contained in lysosomes (e.g. cathepsin L and gamma-glutamyl hydrolase), lamellar granules (e.g. glucosylceramidase and cathepsin D), and desmosomes (e.g. desmocollin 1, desmocollin 3, and desmoglein). Lamellar granules are organelles found in the terminally differentiating cells of keratinizing epithelia, and desmosomes are intercellular junctions in vertebrate epithelial cells, thus indicating that N-glycosylation of tissue-specific glycoproteins may contribute to increase the relative proportion of high mannose glycans. The striking roles of lysosomal enzymes in epidermis during lipid remodeling and desquamation may also reflect the observed high abundance of high mannose

  16. The Arabidopsis thaliana Cyclic-Nucleotide-Dependent Response – a Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Alqurashi, May M.

    2013-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation governs many regulatory pathways and an increasing number of kinases, proteins that transfer phosphate groups, are in turn activated by cyclic nucleotides. One of the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), has been shown to be a second messenger in abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, little is known about the precise role of cAMP in plants and in the down-stream activation of kinases, and hence cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. To increase our understanding of the role of cAMP, proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension culture cells were analyzed before and after treatment of cells with two different concentrations of 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 µM and 100 nM) and over a time-course of one hour. A comparative quantitative analysis was undertaken using two- dimensional gel electrophoresis and the Delta 2D software (DECODON) followed by protein spot identification by tandem mass spectrometry combined with Mascot and Scaffold. Differentially expressed proteins and regulated phosphoproteins were categorized according to their biological function using bioinformatics tools. The results revealed that the treatment with 1 µM and 100 nM 8-Bromo-cAMP was sufficient to induce specific concentration- and time-dependent changes at the proteome and phosphoproteome levels. In particular, different phosphorylation patterns were observed overtime preferentially affecting proteins in a number of functional categories, notably phosphatases, proteins that remove phosphate groups. This suggests that cAMP both transiently activates and deactivates proteins through specific phosphorylation events and provides new insight into biological mechanisms and functions at the systems level.

  17. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the influence of lignin on biofuel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Mahendra P; Couto, Narciso; Pham, Trong K; Evans, Caroline; Noirel, Josselin; Wright, Phillip C

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum has been a focus of research because of its ability to produce high-value compounds that can be used as biofuels. Lignocellulose is a promising feedstock, but the lignin-cellulose-hemicellulose biomass complex requires chemical pre-treatment to yield fermentable saccharides, including cellulose-derived cellobiose, prior to bioproduction of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) and hydrogen. Fermentation capability is limited by lignin and thus process optimization requires knowledge of lignin inhibition. The effects of lignin on cellular metabolism were evaluated for C. acetobutylicum grown on medium containing either cellobiose only or cellobiose plus lignin. Microscopy, gas chromatography and 8-plex iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic technologies were applied to interrogate the effect of lignin on cellular morphology, fermentation and the proteome. Our results demonstrate that C. acetobutylicum has reduced performance for solvent production when lignin is present in the medium. Medium supplemented with 1 g L(-1) of lignin led to delay and decreased solvents production (ethanol; 0.47 g L(-1) for cellobiose and 0.27 g L(-1) for cellobiose plus lignin and butanol; 0.13 g L(-1) for cellobiose and 0.04 g L(-1) for cellobiose plus lignin) at 20 and 48 h, respectively, resulting in the accumulation of acetic acid and butyric acid. Of 583 identified proteins (FDR acetobutylicum to lignin at metabolic and physiological levels. These data will enable targeted metabolic engineering strategies to optimize biofuel production from biomass by overcoming limitations imposed by the presence of lignin.

  18. Quantitative analysis of proteome extracted from barley crowns grown under different drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítámvás, Pavel; Urban, Milan O; Škodáček, Zbynek; Kosová, Klára; Pitelková, Iva; Vítámvás, Jan; Renaut, Jenny; Prášil, Ilja T

    2015-01-01

    Barley cultivar Amulet was used to study the quantitative proteome changes through different drought conditions utilizing two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Plants were cultivated for 10 days under different drought conditions. To obtain control and differentially drought-treated plants, the soil water content was kept at 65, 35, and 30% of soil water capacity (SWC), respectively. Osmotic potential, water saturation deficit, (13)C discrimination, and dehydrin accumulation were monitored during sampling of the crowns for proteome analysis. Analysis of the 2D-DIGE gels revealed 105 differentially abundant spots; most were differentially abundant between the controls and drought-treated plants, and 25 spots displayed changes between both drought conditions. Seventy-six protein spots were successfully identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The most frequent functional categories of the identified proteins can be put into the groups of: stress-associated proteins, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, as well as DNA and RNA regulation and processing. Their possible role in the response of barley to drought stress is discussed. Our study has shown that under drought conditions barley cv. Amulet decreased its growth and developmental rates, displayed a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, and exhibited increased levels of several protective proteins. Comparison of the two drought treatments revealed plant acclimation to milder drought (35% SWC); but plant damage under more severe drought treatment (30% SWC). The results obtained revealed that cv. Amulet is sensitive to drought stress. Additionally, four spots revealing a continuous and significant increase with decreasing SWC (UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, glutathione peroxidase, and two non-identified) could be good candidates for testing of their protein phenotyping capacity together with proteins that were significantly distinguished in both drought treatments.

  19. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF PROTEOME EXTRACTED FROM BARLEY CROWNS GROWN UNDER DIFFERENT DROUGHT CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel eVítámvás

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Barley cv. Amulet was used to study the quantitative proteome changes through different drought conditions utilizing two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. Plants were cultivated for ten days under different drought conditions. To obtain control and differentially drought-treated plants, the soil water content was kept at 65%, 35%, and 30% of soil water capacity (SWC, respectively. Osmotic potential, water saturation deficit, 13C discrimination, and dehydrin accumulation were monitored during sampling of the crowns for proteome analysis. Analysis of the 2D-DIGE gels revealed 105 differentially abundant spots; most were differentially abundant between the controls and drought-treated plants, and 25 spots displayed changes between both drought conditions. Seventy-six protein spots were successfully identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The most frequent functional categories of the identified proteins can be put into the groups of: stress-associated proteins, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, as well as DNA & RNA regulation and processing. Their possible role in the response of barley to drought stress is discussed. Our study has shown that under drought conditions barley cultivar Amulet decreased its growth and developmental rates, displayed a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, and exhibited increased levels of several protective proteins. Comparison of the two drought treatments revealed plant acclimation to milder drought (35% SWC; but plant damage under more severe drought treatment (30% SWC. The results obtained revealed that cv. Amulet is sensitive to drought stress. Additionally, four spots revealing a continuous and significant increase with decreasing SWC (UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, glutathione peroxidase, and two non-identified could be good candidates for testing of their protein phenotyping capacity together with proteins that were significantly distinguished in both drought treatments.

  20. A quantitative proteomic analysis of cellular responses to high glucose media in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenke; Dai, Shujia; Bones, Jonathan; Ray, Somak; Cha, Sangwon; Karger, Barry L; Li, Jingyi Jessica; Wilson, Lee; Hinckle, Greg; Rossomando, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    A goal in recombinant protein production using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is to achieve both high specific productivity and high cell density. Addition of glucose to the culture media is necessary to maintain both cell growth and viability. We varied the glucose concentration in the media from 5 to 16 g/L and found that although specific productivity of CHO-DG44 cells increased with the glucose level, the integrated viable cell density decreased. To examine the biological basis of these results, we conducted a discovery proteomic study of CHO-DG44 cells grown under batch conditions in normal (5 g/L) or high (15 g/L) glucose over 3, 6, and 9 days. Approximately 5,000 proteins were confidently identified against an mRNA-based CHO-DG44 specific proteome database, with 2,800 proteins quantified with at least two peptides. A self-organizing map algorithm was used to deconvolute temporal expression profiles of quantitated proteins. Functional analysis of altered proteins suggested that differences in growth between the two glucose levels resulted from changes in crosstalk between glucose metabolism, recombinant protein expression, and cell death, providing an overall picture of the responses to high glucose environment. The high glucose environment may enhance recombinant dihydrofolate reductase in CHO cells by up-regulating NCK1 and down-regulating PRKRA, and may lower integrated viable cell density by activating mitochondrial- and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated cell death pathways by up-regulating HtrA2 and calpains. These proteins are suggested as potential targets for bioengineering to enhance recombinant protein production.

  1. Rapid preparation of nuclei-depleted detergent-resistant membrane fractions suitable for proteomics analysis

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    Mukhopadhyay Nishit K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been implicated in diverse physiologic processes including lipid transport and signal transduction. Lipid rafts were originally defined as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs due to their relative insolubility in cold non-ionic detergents. Recent findings suggest that, although DRMs are not equivalent to lipid rafts, the presence of a given protein within DRMs strongly suggests its potential for raft association in vivo. Therefore, isolation of DRMs represents a useful starting point for biochemical analysis of lipid rafts. The physicochemical properties of DRMs present unique challenges to analysis of their protein composition. Existing methods of isolating DRM-enriched fractions involve flotation of cell extracts in a sucrose density gradient, which, although successful, can be labor intensive, time consuming and results in dilute sucrose-containing fractions with limited utility for direct proteomic analysis. In addition, several studies describing the proteomic characterization of DRMs using this and other approaches have reported the presence of nuclear proteins in such fractions. It is unclear whether these results reflect trafficking of nuclear proteins to DRMs or whether they arise from nuclear contamination during isolation. To address these issues, we have modified a published differential detergent extraction method to enable rapid DRM isolation that minimizes nuclear contamination and yields fractions compatible with mass spectrometry. Results DRM-enriched fractions isolated using the conventional or modified extraction methods displayed comparable profiles of known DRM-associated proteins, including flotillins, GPI-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G-protein subunits. Thus, the modified procedure yielded fractions consistent with those isolated by existing methods. However, we observed a marked reduction in the percentage of nuclear proteins

  2. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pururawa Mayank Chaubey

    Full Text Available Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes.

  3. Quantitative shotgun proteomics reveals extensive changes to the proteome of the orbitofrontal cortex in rats that are hyperactive following withdrawal from a high sugar diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Jane L; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Wearne, Travis A; Sauer, Melanie K; Homewood, Judi; Goodchild, Ann K; Haynes, Paul A; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    In most Westernized societies, there has been an alarming increase in the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks. For many adults these drinks represent a substantial proportion of their total daily caloric intake. Here we investigated whether extended exposure to sugar changes behavior and protein expression in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 per group) were treated for 26 days with either water or a 10% sucrose solution. Locomotor behavior was measured on the first and last day of treatment, then 1 week after treatment. Following the 1-week period free from treatment, sucrose treated rats were significantly more active than the control. Two hours following final behavioral testing, brains were rapidly removed and prepared for proteomic analysis of the OFC. Label free quantitative shotgun proteomic analyses of three rats from each group found 290 proteins were differentially expressed in the sucrose treated group when compared to the control group. Major changes in the proteome were seen in proteins related to energy metabolism, mitochondrial function and the cellular response to stress. This research does not seek to suggest that sugar will cause specific neurological disorders, however similar changes in proteins have been seen in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia.

  4. Measuring dynamic membrane fluctuations in cell membrane using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2017-02-01

    There is a strong correlation between the dynamic membrane fluctuations and the biomechanical properties of living cells. The dynamic membrane fluctuation consists of submicron displacements, and can be altered by changing the cells' pathophysiological conditions. These results have significant relevance to the understanding of RBC biophysics and pathology, as follows. RBCs must withstand large mechanical deformations during repeated passages through the microvasculature and the fenestrated walls of the splenic sinusoids. This essential ability is diminished with senescence, resulting in physiological destruction of the aging RBCs. Pathological destruction of the red cells, however, occurs in cells affected by a host of diseases such as spherocytosis, malaria, and Sickle cell disease, as RBCs depart from their normal discoid shape and lose their deformability. Therefore, quantifying the RBC deformability insight into a variety of problems regarding the interplay of cell structure, dynamics, and function. Furthermore, the ability to monitor mechanical properties of RBCs is of vital interest in monitoring disease progression or response to treatment as molecular and pharmaceutical approaches for treatment of chronic diseases. Here, we present the measurements of dynamic membrane fluctuations in live cells using quantitative phase imaging techniques. Measuring both the 3-D refractive index maps and the dynamic phase images of live cells are simultaneously measured, from which dynamic membrane fluctuation and deformability of cells are precisely calculated. We also present its applications to various diseases ranging from sickle cell diseases, babesiosis, and to diabetes.

  5. A gel-free quantitative proteomics approach to investigate temperature adaptation of the food-borne pathogen Cronobacter turicensis 3032.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Paula; Grunau, Alexander; Schneider, Thomas; Hartmann, Isabel; Lehner, Angelika; Stephan, Roger; Gehrig, Peter; Grossmann, Jonas; Groebel, Katrin; Hoelzle, Ludwig E; Eberl, Leo; Riedel, Kathrin

    2010-09-01

    The opportunistic food-borne pathogen Cronobacter sp. causes rare but significant illness in neonates and is capable to grow at a remarkably wide range of temperatures from 5.5 to 47 degrees C. A gel-free quantitative proteomics approach was employed to investigate the molecular basis of the Cronobacter sp. adaptation to heat and cold-stress. To this end the model strain Cronobacter turicensis 3032 was grown at 25, 37, 44, and 47 degrees C, and whole-cell and secreted proteins were iTRAQ-labelled and identified/quantified by 2-D-LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. While 44 degrees C caused only minor changes in C. turicensis growth rate and protein profile, 47 degrees C affected the expression of about 20% of all 891 identified proteins and resulted in a reduced growth rate and rendered the strain non-motile and filamentous. Among the heat-induced proteins were heat shock factors, transcriptional and translational proteins, whereas proteins affecting cellular morphology, proteins involved in motility, central metabolism and energy production were down-regulated. Notably, numerous potential virulence factors were found to be up-regulated at higher temperatures, suggesting an elevated pathogenic potential of Cronobacter sp. under these growth conditions. Significant alterations in the protein expression profile and growth rate of C. turicensis exposed to 25 degrees C indicate that at this temperature the organism is cold-stressed. Up-regulated gene products comprised cold-shock, DNA-binding and ribosomal proteins, factors that support protein folding and proteins opposing cold-induced decrease in membrane fluidity, whereas down-regulated proteins were mainly involved in central metabolism.

  6. Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis outer membrane complex proteins by differential proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Afrane, Mary; Clemmer, David E; Zhong, Guangming; Nelson, David E

    2010-06-01

    The extracellular chlamydial infectious particle, or elementary body (EB), is enveloped by an intra- and intermolecular cysteine cross-linked protein shell called the chlamydial outer membrane complex (COMC). A few abundant proteins, including the major outer membrane protein and cysteine-rich proteins (OmcA and OmcB), constitute the overwhelming majority of COMC proteins. The identification of less-abundant COMC proteins has been complicated by limitations of proteomic methodologies and the contamination of COMC fractions with abundant EB proteins. Here, we used parallel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 434/Bu EB, COMC, and Sarkosyl-soluble EB fractions to identify proteins enriched or depleted from COMC. All well-described COMC proteins were specifically enriched in the COMC fraction. In contrast, multiple COMC-associated proteins found in previous studies were strongly enriched in the Sarkosyl-soluble fraction, suggesting that these proteins are not COMC components or are not stably associated with COMC. Importantly, we also identified novel proteins enriched in COMC. The list of COMC proteins identified in this study has provided reliable information for further understanding chlamydial protein secretion systems and modeling COMC and EB structures.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Rice Plasma Membrane-associated Proteins in Response to Chitooligosaccharide Elicitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Chen; Qun Li; Zuhua He

    2007-01-01

    Chitooligomers or chitooligosaccharides (COS) are elicitors that bind to the plasma membrane (PM) and elicit various defense responses. However, the PM-bound proteins involved in elicitor-mediated plant defense responses still remain widely unknown. In order to get more information about PM proteins involved in rice defense responses, we conducted PM proteomic analysis of the rice suspension cells elicited by COS. A total of 14 up- or down-regulated protein spots were observed on 2-D gels of PM fractions at 12 h and 24 h after COS incubation. Of them, eight protein spots were successfully identified by MS (mass spectrography) and predicted to be associated to the PM and function in plant defense, including a putative PKN/PRK1 protein kinase, a putative pyruvate kinase isozyme G, a putative zinc finger protein, a putative MAR-binding protein MFP1, and a putative calcium-dependent protein kinase. Interestingly, a COS-induced pM5-like protein was identified for the first time in plants, which is a trans-membrane nodal modulator in transforming growth factor-β(TGFβ) signaling in vertebrates. We also identified two members of a rice polyprotein family, which were up-regulated by COS. Our study would provide a starting point for functionality of PM proteins in the rice basal defense.

  8. The Proteome of the Red Blood Cell: An Auspicious Source of New Insights into Membrane-Centered Regulation of Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Giel J C G M

    2016-11-25

    During the past decade, the hand-in-hand development of biotechnology and bioinformatics has enabled a view of the function of the red blood cell that surpasses the supply of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide. Comparative proteomic inventories have yielded new clues to the processes that regulate membrane-cytoskeleton interactions in health and disease, and to the ways by which red blood cells communicate with their environment. In addition, proteomic data have revealed the possibility that many, hitherto unsuspected, metabolic processes are active in the red blood cell cytoplasm. Recent metabolomic studies have confirmed and expanded this notion. Taken together, the presently available data point towards the red blood cell membrane as the hub at which all regulatory processes come together. Thus, alterations in the association of regulatory proteins with the cell membrane may be a sine qua non for the functional relevance of any postulated molecular mechanism. From this perspective, comparative proteomics centered on the red blood cell membrane constitute a powerful tool for the identification and elucidation of the physiologically and pathologically relevant pathways that regulate red blood cell homeostasis. Additionally, this perspective provides a focus for the interpretation of metabolomic studies, especially in the development of biomarkers in the blood.

  9. Enhanced detergent extraction for analysis of membrane proteomes by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu Kimberly K; Lang John C; Butt R Hussain; Churchward Matthew A; Coorssen Jens R

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The analysis of hydrophobic membrane proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has long been hampered by the concept of inherent difficulty due to solubility issues. We have optimized extraction protocols by varying the detergent composition of the solubilization buffer with a variety of commercially available non-ionic and zwitterionic detergents and detergent-like phospholipids. Results After initial analyses by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE, quantitative two-dimensiona...

  10. A qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the peptide characteristics of microwave- and ultrasound-assisted digestion in discovery and targeted proteomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhengguang; Cheng, Jie; Sun, Haidan; Sun, Wei

    2017-08-30

    Fast digestion methods can dramatically accelerate enzyme digestion and increase the throughput of proteomic analysis. However, the peptide characteristics of fast digestion methods and their performance in discovery and targeted proteomic analysis must be systematically evaluated. Three digestion methods, including overnight digestion, microwave-assisted protein enzymatic digestion (MAPED), and high-intensity focused ultrasonic-assisted enzymatic digestion (HIFUSAED), in trypsin or in trypsin/Lys-C were comprehensively compared in both discovery and targeted proteomics analysis using the HeLa cell proteome. In discovery proteomic analysis, the highest numbers of peptides and proteins were identified when the sample was digested via the MAPED method with trypsin/Lys-C. The fast digestion methods showed a higher mis-cleavage rate and a lower semi-tryptic rate than the overnight digestion method. In both label-free quantitative analysis and targeted proteomic analysis, both fully cleaved peptides (FCPs) and mis-cleaved peptides (MCPs) from the fast digestion methods and the overnight digestion method showed good reproducibility if they showed good abundance. When both the FCPs and MCPs were included in the analysis, the MAPED with trypsin/Lys-C method showed the best results for both discovery proteomic analysis and relative quantitative targeted proteomic analysis. These results will be beneficial for the application of fast digestion methods to proteomics. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative proteomic profiling of cripto(-/-) embryonic stem cells by means of accurate mass LC-MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambery, Angela; Vissers, Johannes P C; Langridge, James I; Lonardo, Enza; Minchiotti, Gabriella; Ruvo, Menotti; Parente, Augusto

    2009-02-01

    Cripto is one of the key regulators of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiation into cardiomyocites vs neuronal fate. Cripto(-/-) murine ESCs have been utilized to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying early events of mammalian lineage differentiation. 2D/LC-MS/MS and a label-free LC-MS approaches were used to qualitatively and quantitatively profile the cripto(-/-) ESC proteome, providing an integral view of the alterations induced in stem cell functions by deleting the cripto gene.

  12. Towards cracking the epigenetic code using a combination of high-throughput epigenomics and quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2011-07-01

    High-throughput genomic sequencing and quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics technology have recently emerged as powerful tools, increasing our understanding of chromatin structure and function. Both of these approaches require substantial investments and expertise in terms of instrumentation, experimental methodology, bioinformatics, and data interpretation and are, therefore, usually applied independently from each other by dedicated research groups. However, when applied reiteratively in the context of epigenetics research these approaches are strongly synergistic in nature.

  13. Identification of transporters associated with Etoposide sensitivity of stomach cancer cell lines and methotrexate sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines by quantitative targeted absolute proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, Wataru; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohmine, Ken; Yamori, Takao; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2013-02-01

    Membrane transporter proteins may influence the sensitivity of cancer cells to anticancer drugs that can be recognized as substrates. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins that play a key role in the drug sensitivity of stomach and breast cancer cell lines by measuring the absolute protein expression levels of multiple transporters and other membrane proteins and examining their correlation to drug sensitivity. Absolute protein expression levels of 90 membrane proteins were examined by quantitative targeted absolute proteomics using liquid chromatography-linked tandem mass spectrometry. Among them, 11 and 14 membrane proteins, including transporters, were present in quantifiable amounts in membrane fraction of stomach cancer and breast cancer cell lines, respectively. In stomach cancer cell lines, the protein expression level of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was inversely correlated with etoposide sensitivity. MK571, an MRP inhibitor, increased both the cell-to-medium ratio of etoposide and the etoposide sensitivity of MRP1-expressing stomach cancer cell lines. In breast cancer cell lines, the protein expression level of reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) was directly correlated with methotrexate (MTX) sensitivity. Initial uptake rate and steady-state cell-to-medium ratio of [(3)H]MTX were correlated with both RFC1 expression level and MTX sensitivity. These results suggest that MRP1 modulates the etoposide sensitivity of stomach cancer cell lines and RFC1 modulates the MTX sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines. Our results indicate that absolute quantification of multiple membrane proteins could be a useful strategy for identification of candidate proteins involved in drug sensitivity.

  14. Deep proteomics of mouse skeletal muscle enables quantitation of protein isoforms, metabolic pathways, and transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling the Molecular Signatures of Annexin A5 in Lung Squamous Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gong, Linlin; Qi, Xiaoyu; Li, Huizhen; Wang, Faming; Chi, Xinming; Jiang, Yulin; Shao, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer around the world. It’s crucial to identify newer mechanism-based targets to effectively manage lung cancer. Annexin A5 (ANXA5) is a protein kinase C inhibitory protein and calcium dependent phospholipid-binding protein, which may act as an endogenous regulator of various pathophysiological processes. However, its molecular mechanism in lung cancer remains poorly understood. This study was designed to determine the mechanism of ANXA5 in lung cancer with a hope to obtain useful information to provide a new therapeutic target. We used a stable isotope dimethyl labeling based quantitative proteomic method to identify differentially expressed proteins in NSCLC cell lines after ANXA5 transfection. Out of 314 proteins, we identified 26 and 44 proteins that were down- and up-regulated upon ANXA5 modulation, respectively. The IPA analysis revealed that glycolysis and gluconeogenesis were the predominant pathways modulated by ANXA5. Multiple central nodes, namely HSPA5, FN1, PDIA6, ENO1, ALDOA, JUP and KRT6A appeared to occupy regulatory nodes in the protein-protein networks upon ANXA5 modulation. Taken together, ANXA5 appears to have pleotropic effects, as it modulates multiple key signaling pathways, supporting the potential usefulness of ANXA5 as a potential target in lung cancer. This study might provide a new insight into the mechanism of ANXA5 in lung cancer. PMID:27684953

  16. Protein turnover analysis in Salmonella Typhimurium during infection by dynamic SILAC, Topograph, and quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Han, Qiang-Qiang; Zhou, Mao-Tian; Chen, Xi; Guo, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Protein turnover affects protein abundance and phenotypes. Comprehensive investigation of protein turnover dynamics has the potential to provide substantial information about gene expression. Here we report a large-scale protein turnover study in Salmonella Typhimurium during infection by quantitative proteomics. Murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells were infected with SILAC labeled Salmonella. Bacterial cells were extracted after 0, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min. Mass spectrometry analyses yielded information about Salmonella protein turnover dynamics and a software program named Topograph was used for the calculation of protein half lives. The half lives of 311 proteins from intracellular Salmonella were obtained. For bacteria cultured in control medium (DMEM), the half lives for 870 proteins were obtained. The calculated median of protein half lives was 69.13 and 99.30 min for the infection group and the DMEM group, respectively, indicating an elevated protein turnover at the initial stage of infection. Gene ontology analyses revealed that a number of protein functional groups were significantly regulated by infection, including proteins involved in ribosome, periplasmic space, cellular amino acid metabolic process, ion binding, and catalytic activity. The half lives of proteins involved in purine metabolism pathway were found to be significantly shortened during infection.

  17. Quantitative proteomics identify molecular targets that are crucial in larval settlement and metamorphosis of bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2011-01-07

    The marine invertebrate Bugula neritina has a biphasic life cycle that consists of a swimming larval stage and a sessile juvenile and adult stage. The attachment of larvae to the substratum and their subsequent metamorphosis have crucial ecological consequences. Despite many studies on this species, little is known about the molecular mechanism of these processes. Here, we report a comparative study of swimming larvae and metamorphosing individuals at 4 and 24 h postattachment using label-free quantitative proteomics. We identified more than 1100 proteins at each stage, 61 of which were differentially expressed. Specifically, proteins involved in energy metabolism and structural molecules were generally down-regulated, whereas proteins involved in transcription and translation, the extracellular matrix, and calcification were strongly up-regulated during metamorphosis. Many tightly regulated novel proteins were also identified. Subsequent analysis of the temporal and spatial expressions of some of the proteins and an assay of their functions indicated that they may have key roles in metamorphosis of B. neritina. These findings not only provide molecular evidence with which to elucidate the substantial changes in morphology and physiology that occur during larval attachment and metamorphosis but also identify potential targets for antifouling treatment. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Investigation of ovarian cancer associated sialylation changes in N-linked glycopeptides by quantitative proteomics

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    Shetty Vivekananda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In approximately 80% of patients, ovarian cancer is diagnosed when the patient is already in the advanced stages of the disease. CA125 is currently used as the marker for ovarian cancer; however, it lacks specificity and sensitivity for detecting early stage disease. There is a critical unmet need for sensitive and specific routine screening tests for early diagnosis that can reduce ovarian cancer lethality by reliably detecting the disease at its earliest and treatable stages. Results In this study, we investigated the N-linked sialylated glycopeptides in serum samples from healthy and ovarian cancer patients using Lectin-directed Tandem Labeling (LTL and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics methods. We identified 45 N-linked sialylated glycopeptides containing 46 glycosylation sites. Among those, ten sialylated glycopeptides were significantly up-regulated in ovarian cancer patients’ serum samples. LC-MS/MS analysis of the non-glycosylated peptides from the same samples, western blot data using lectin enriched glycoproteins of various ovarian cancer type samples, and PNGase F (+/− treatment confirmed the sialylation changes in the ovarian cancer samples. Conclusion Herein, we demonstrated that several proteins are aberrantly sialylated in N-linked glycopeptides in ovarian cancer and detection of glycopeptides with abnormal sialylation changes may have the potential to serve as biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

  19. Quantitative Lipid Droplet Proteome Analysis Identifies Annexin A3 as a Cofactor for HCV Particle Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Rösch

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipid droplets are vital to hepatitis C virus (HCV infection as the putative sites of virion assembly, but morphogenesis and egress of virions remain ill defined. We performed quantitative lipid droplet proteome analysis of HCV-infected cells to identify co-factors of that process. Our results demonstrate that HCV disconnects lipid droplets from their metabolic function. Annexin A3 (ANXA3, a protein enriched in lipid droplet fractions, strongly impacted HCV replication and was characterized further: ANXA3 is recruited to lipid-rich fractions in HCV-infected cells by the viral core and NS5A proteins. ANXA3 knockdown does not affect HCV RNA replication but severely impairs virion production with lower specific infectivity and higher density of secreted virions. ANXA3 is essential for the interaction of viral envelope E2 with apolipoprotein E (ApoE and for trafficking, but not lipidation, of ApoE in HCV-infected cells. Thus, we identified ANXA3 as a regulator of HCV maturation and egress.

  20. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Approaches for Deciphering the Signaling Pathway for Tension Wood Formation in Poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Claverol, Stéphane; Bartholomé, Jérôme; Negroni, Luc; Richet, Nicolas; Lalanne, Céline; Bonneu, Marc; Coutand, Catherine; Plomion, Christophe

    2015-08-07

    Trees adjust their growth following forced changes in orientation to re-establish a vertical position. In angiosperms, this adjustment involves the differential regulation of vascular cambial activity between the lower (opposite wood) and upper (tension wood) sides of the leaning stem. We investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to the formation of differential wood types through a quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis on poplar subjected to a gravitropic stimulus. We identified and quantified 675 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 468 phosphoproteins, and 3 763 nonphosphorylated peptides, corresponding to 1 155 proteins, in the differentiating xylem of straight-growing trees (control) and trees subjected to a gravitational stimulus during 8 weeks. About 1% of the peptides were specific to a wood type (straight, opposite, or tension wood). Proteins quantified in more than one type of wood were more numerous: a mixed linear model showed 389 phosphopeptides and 556 proteins to differ in abundance between tension wood and opposite wood. Twenty-one percent of the phosphoproteins identified here were described in their phosphorylated form for the first time. Our analyses revealed remarkable developmental molecular plasticity, with wood type-specific phosphorylation events, and highlighted the involvement of different proteins in the biosynthesis of cell wall components during the formation of the three types of wood.

  1. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-13

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy.

  2. Comprehensive tissue processing strategy for quantitative proteomics of formalin-fixed multiple sclerosis lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Linda; Barnett, Michael H; Zheng, Yuan Z; Gulati, Twishi; Prineas, John W; Crossett, Ben

    2011-10-07

    Formalin-fixed (FF) autopsy tissue comprises the bulk of existing Multiple Sclerosis (MSc) pathology archives, providing a rich pool of material for biomarker discovery and disease characterization. Here, we present the development of a heat-induced extraction protocol for the proteomic analysis of FF brain tissue, its application to the study of lesion remyelination and its failure in MSc. A 4-round extraction strategy was optimized using FF tissue leading to a 35% increase in the number of proteins identified compared to a single extraction; and a 65% increase in proteins identified with ≥4 peptides. Histological staining of sections with oil red O and luxol fast blue-periodic acid Schiff, required to characterize MSc lesions was found to have minimal effect on LC-MS/MS. The application of the optimized protocol to chronic demyelinated and remyelinated FF MSc lesions and the adjacent periplaque white matter, isolated through laser guided manual dissection from 3 patients, identified 428 unique proteins (0.2% FDR) using LC-MS/MS. Comparison of the lesion types using iTRAQ and 2-D LC-MS/MS revealed 82 differentially expressed proteins. Protein quantitation by iTRAQ and spectral counting was well-correlated (r(s)= 0.7653; p < 10(-30)). The data generated from this work illustrates the scope of the methodology and provides insights into the pathogenesis of MSc and remyelination.

  3. Quantitative transcriptome, proteome, and sulfur metabolite profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae response to arsenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Michael; Lagniel, Gilles; Kristiansson, Erik; Junot, Christophe; Nerman, Olle; Labarre, Jean; Tamás, Markus J

    2007-06-19

    Arsenic is ubiquitously present in nature, and various mechanisms have evolved enabling cells to evade toxicity and acquire tolerance. Herein, we explored how Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) respond to trivalent arsenic (arsenite) by quantitative transcriptome, proteome, and sulfur metabolite profiling. Arsenite exposure affected transcription of genes encoding functions related to protein biosynthesis, arsenic detoxification, oxidative stress defense, redox maintenance, and proteolytic activity. Importantly, we observed that nearly all components of the sulfate assimilation and glutathione biosynthesis pathways were induced at both gene and protein levels. Kinetic metabolic profiling evidenced a significant increase in the pools of sulfur metabolites as well as elevated cellular glutathione levels. Moreover, the flux in the sulfur assimilation pathway as well as the glutathione synthesis rate strongly increased with a concomitant reduction of sulfur incorporation into proteins. By combining comparative genomics and molecular analyses, we pinpointed transcription factors that mediate the core of the transcriptional response to arsenite. Taken together, our data reveal that arsenite-exposed cells channel a large part of assimilated sulfur into glutathione biosynthesis, and we provide evidence that the transcriptional regulators Yap1p and Met4p control this response in concert.

  4. Quantitative proteomics analysis reveals the tolerance of Mirabilis jalapa L. to petroleum contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuisen; Ma, Hui; Guo, Zhifu; Feng, Yaping; Lin, Jingwei; Zhang, Menghua; Zhong, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Petroleum is not only an important energy resource but is also a major soil pollutant. To gain better insight into the adaptability mechanism of Mirabilis jalapa to petroleum-contaminated soil, the protein profiles of M. jalapa root were investigated using label-free quantitative proteomics technique. After exposing to petroleum-contaminated soil for 24 h, 34 proteins significantly changed their protein abundance and most of the proteins increased in protein abundance (91.18%). Combined with gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses as well as data from previous studies, our results revealed that M. jalapa enhanced tolerance to petroleum by changing antioxidation and detoxification, cell wall organization, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism, transportation and protein process, and so on. These metabolism alterations could result in the production and secretion of low molecular carbohydrate, amino acid, and functional protein, which enhanced the bioavailability of petroleum and reducing the toxicity of the petroleum. Taken together, these results provided novel information for better understanding of the tolerance of M. jalapa to petroleum stress.

  5. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential regulation of protein expression in recipient myocardium after trilineage cardiovascular cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Ye, Lei; Cai, Wenxuan; Lee, Yoonkyu; Guner, Huseyin; Lee, Youngsook; Kamp, Timothy J; Zhang, Jianyi; Ge, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Intramyocardial transplantation of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has beneficial effects on the post-infarction heart. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional improvements remain undefined. We employed large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that were differentially regulated following cellular transplantation in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 22 proteins that were significantly up-regulated after trilineage cell transplantation compared to both MI and Sham groups. Among them, 12 proteins, including adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and tropomodulin-1, are associated with positive regulation of muscular contraction whereas 11 proteins, such as desmoplakin and zyxin, are involved in embryonic and muscular development and regeneration. Moreover, we identified 21 proteins up-regulated and another 21 down-regulated in MI, but reversed after trilineage cell transplantation. Proteins up-regulated after MI but reversed by transplantation are related to fibrosis and apoptosis. Conversely, proteins down-regulated in MI but restored after cell therapy are regulators of protein nitrosylation. Our results show that the functionally beneficial effects of trilineage cell therapy are accompanied by differential regulation of protein expression in the recipient myocardium, which may contribute to the improved cardiac function.

  6. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Harmless and Pathogenic Strains of Infectious Microalgae, Prototheca spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae of the genus Prototheca (P.) spp are associated with rare algal infections of invertebrates termed protothecosis. Among the seven generally accepted species, P. zopfii genotype 2 (GT2) is associated with a severe form of bovine mastitis while P. blaschkeae causes the mild and sub-clinical form of mastitis. The reason behind the infectious nature of P. zopfii GT2, while genotype 1 (GT1) remains non-infectious, is not known. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the protein expression level difference between the genotypes of P. zopfii and P. blaschkeae. Cells were cultured to the mid-exponential phase, harvested, and processed for LC-MS analysis. Peptide data was acquired on an LTQ Orbitrap Velos, raw spectra were quantitatively analyzed with MaxQuant software and matching with the reference database of Chlorella variabilis and Auxenochlorella protothecoides resulted in the identification of 226 proteins. Comparison of an environmental strain with infectious strains resulted in the identification of 51 differentially expressed proteins related to carbohydrate metabolism, energy production and protein translation. The expression level of Hsp70 proteins and their role in the infectious process is worth further investigation. All mass spectrometry data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005305. PMID:28036087

  7. SuperSILAC Quantitative Proteome Profiling of Murine Middle Ear Epithelial Cell Remodeling with NTHi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Val

    Full Text Available Chronic Otitis Media with effusion (COME develops after sustained inflammation and is characterized by secretory middle ear epithelial metaplasia and effusion, most frequently mucoid. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi, the most common acute Otitis Media (OM pathogen, is postulated to promote middle ear epithelial remodeling in the progression of OM from acute to chronic. The goals of this study were to examine histopathological and quantitative proteomic epithelial effects of NTHi challenge in a murine middle ear epithelial cell line.NTHi lysates were generated and used to stimulate murine epithelial cells (mMEEC cultured at air-liquid interface over 48 hours- 1 week. Conditional quantitative Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC of cell lysates was performed to interrogate the global protein production in the cells, using the SuperSILAC technique. Histology of the epithelium over time was done to measure bacterial dependent remodeling.Mass spectrometry analysis identified 2,565 proteins across samples, of which 74 exhibited differential enrichment or depletion in cell lysates (+/-2.0 fold-change; p value<0.05. The key molecular functions regulated by NTHi lysates exposure were related to cell proliferation, death, migration, adhesion and inflammation. Finally, chronic exposure induced significant epithelial thickening of cells grown at air liquid interface.NTHi lysates drive pathways responsible of cell remodeling in murine middle ear epithelium which likely contributes to observed epithelial hyperplasia in vitro. Further elucidation of these mediators will be critical in understanding the progression of OM from acute to chronic at the molecular level.

  8. Potential protein biomarkers for burning mouth syndrome discovered by quantitative proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Eoon Hye; Diep, Cynthia; Liu, Tong; Li, Hong; Merrill, Robert; Messadi, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by severe burning sensation in normal looking oral mucosa. Diagnosis of BMS remains to be a challenge to oral healthcare professionals because the method for definite diagnosis is still uncertain. In this study, a quantitative saliva proteomic analysis was performed in order to identify target proteins in BMS patients’ saliva that may be used as biomarkers for simple, non-invasive detection of the disease. By using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to quantify 1130 saliva proteins between BMS patients and healthy control subjects, we found that 50 proteins were significantly changed in the BMS patients when compared to the healthy control subjects (p ≤ 0.05, 39 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated). Four candidates, alpha-enolase, interleukin-18 (IL-18), kallikrein-13 (KLK13), and cathepsin G, were selected for further validation. Based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements, three potential biomarkers, alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13, were successfully validated. The fold changes for alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13 were determined as 3.6, 2.9, and 2.2 (burning mouth syndrome vs. control), and corresponding receiver operating characteristic values were determined as 0.78, 0.83, and 0.68, respectively. Our findings indicate that testing of the identified protein biomarkers in saliva might be a valuable clinical tool for BMS detection. Further validation studies of the identified biomarkers or additional candidate biomarkers are needed to achieve a multi-marker prediction model for improved detection of BMS with high sensitivity and specificity.

  9. Proteome Differences between Hepatitis B Virus Genotype-B- and Genotype-C-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dahai; Zeng, Yongyi; Xing, Xiaohua; Liu, Hongzhi; Lin, Minjie; Han, Xiao; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-02-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the main cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in southeast Asia where HBV genotype B and genotype C are the most prevalent. Viral genotypes have been reported to significantly affect the clinical outcomes of HCC. However, the underlying molecular differences among different genotypes of HBV virus infected HCC have not been revealed. Here, we applied isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology integrated with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis to identify the proteome differences between the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. In brief, a total of 83 proteins in the surrounding noncancerous tissues and 136 proteins in the cancerous tissues between HBV genotype-B- and genotype-C-induced HCC were identified, respectively. This information revealed that there might be different molecular mechanisms of the tumorigenesis and development of HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. Furthermore, our results indicate that the two proteins ARFIP2 and ANXA1 might be potential biomarkers for distinguishing the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. Thus, the quantitative proteomic analysis revealed molecular differences between the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC, and might provide fundamental information for further deep study.

  10. Accounting for the Multiple Natures of Missing Values in Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics Data Sets to Compare Imputation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cosmin; Gatto, Laurent; Ferro, Myriam; Bruley, Christophe; Burger, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Missing values are a genuine issue in label-free quantitative proteomics. Recent works have surveyed the different statistical methods to conduct imputation and have compared them on real or simulated data sets and recommended a list of missing value imputation methods for proteomics application. Although insightful, these comparisons do not account for two important facts: (i) depending on the proteomics data set, the missingness mechanism may be of different natures and (ii) each imputation method is devoted to a specific type of missingness mechanism. As a result, we believe that the question at stake is not to find the most accurate imputation method in general but instead the most appropriate one. We describe a series of comparisons that support our views: For instance, we show that a supposedly "under-performing" method (i.e., giving baseline average results), if applied at the "appropriate" time in the data-processing pipeline (before or after peptide aggregation) on a data set with the "appropriate" nature of missing values, can outperform a blindly applied, supposedly "better-performing" method (i.e., the reference method from the state-of-the-art). This leads us to formulate few practical guidelines regarding the choice and the application of an imputation method in a proteomics context.

  11. Transcriptome and quantitative proteome analysis reveals molecular processes associated with larval metamorphosis in the polychaete pseudopolydora vexillosa

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2013-03-01

    Larval growth of the polychaete worm Pseudopolydora vexillosa involves the formation of segment-specific structures. When larvae attain competency to settle, they discard swimming chaetae and secrete mucus. The larvae build tubes around themselves and metamorphose into benthic juveniles. Understanding the molecular processes, which regulate this complex and unique transition, remains a major challenge because of the limited molecular information available. To improve this situation, we conducted high-throughput RNA sequencing and quantitative proteome analysis of the larval stages of P. vexillosa. Based on gene ontology (GO) analysis, transcripts related to cellular and metabolic processes, binding, and catalytic activities were highly represented during larval-adult transition. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), calcium-signaling, Wnt/β-catenin, and notch signaling metabolic pathways were enriched in transcriptome data. Quantitative proteomics identified 107 differentially expressed proteins in three distinct larval stages. Fourteen and 53 proteins exhibited specific differential expression during competency and metamorphosis, respectively. Dramatic up-regulation of proteins involved in signaling, metabolism, and cytoskeleton functions were found during the larval-juvenile transition. Several proteins involved in cell signaling, cytoskeleton and metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins related to transcription and oxidative phosphorylation were down-regulated during competency. The integration of high-throughput RNA sequencing and quantitative proteomics allowed a global scale analysis of larval transcripts/proteins associated molecular processes in the metamorphosis of polychaete worms. Further, transcriptomic and proteomic insights provide a new direction to understand the fundamental mechanisms that regulate larval metamorphosis in polychaetes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  12. Involvement of GABA transporters in atropine-treated myopic retina as revealed by iTRAQ quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barathi, Veluchamy A; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Poidinger, Michael; Koh, Siew Kwan; Tian, Dechao; Ho, Candice; Iuvone, P Michael; Beuerman, Roger W; Zhou, Lei

    2014-11-07

    Atropine, a muscarinic antagonist, is known to inhibit myopia progression in several animal models and humans. However, the mode of action is not established yet. In this study, we compared quantitative iTRAQ proteomic analysis in the retinas collected from control and lens-induced myopic (LIM) mouse eyes treated with atropine. The myopic group received a (-15D) spectacle lens over the right eye on postnatal day 10 with or without atropine eye drops starting on postnatal day 24. Axial length was measured by optical low coherence interferometry (OLCI), AC-Master, and refraction was measured by automated infrared photorefractor at postnatal 24, 38, and 52 days. Retinal tissue samples were pooled from six eyes for each group. The experiments were repeated twice, and technical replicates were also performed for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. MetaCore was used to perform protein profiling for pathway analysis. We identified a total of 3882 unique proteins with retina proteome reported to date. Thirty proteins were found to be up-regulated (ratio for myopia/control > global mean ratio + 1 standard deviation), and 28 proteins were down-regulated (ratio for myopia/control retinas. Pathway analysis using MetaCore revealed regulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the myopic eyes. Detailed analysis of the quantitative proteomics data showed that the levels of GABA transporter 1 (GAT-1) were elevated in myopic retina and significantly reduced after atropine treatment. These results were further validated with immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. In conclusion, this study provides a comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis of atropine-treated mouse retina and suggests the involvement of GABAergic signaling in the antimyopic effects of atropine in mouse eyes. The GABAergic transmission in the neural retina plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of axial eye growth in mammals.

  13. Transcriptome- Assisted Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel Insights into Piper nigrum-Phytophthora capsici Phytopathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Chidambareswaren; Krishnan, Anu; Saraswathy, Gayathri G; Surendran, Arun; Jaleel, Abdul; Sakuntala, Manjula

    2016-01-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), a tropical spice crop of global acclaim, is susceptible to Phytophthora capsici, an oomycete pathogen which causes the highly destructive foot rot disease. A systematic understanding of this phytopathosystem has not been possible owing to lack of genome or proteome information. In this study, we explain an integrated transcriptome-assisted label-free quantitative proteomics pipeline to study the basal immune components of black pepper when challenged with P. capsici. We report a global identification of 532 novel leaf proteins from black pepper, of which 518 proteins were functionally annotated using BLAST2GO tool. A label-free quantitation of the protein datasets revealed 194 proteins common to diseased and control protein datasets of which 22 proteins showed significant up-regulation and 134 showed significant down-regulation. Ninety-three proteins were identified exclusively on P. capsici infected leaf tissues and 245 were expressed only in mock (control) infected samples. In-depth analysis of our data gives novel insights into the regulatory pathways of black pepper which are compromised during the infection. Differential down-regulation was observed in a number of critical pathways like carbon fixation in photosynthetic organism, cyano-amino acid metabolism, fructose, and mannose metabolism, glutathione metabolism, and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. The proteomics results were validated with real-time qRT-PCR analysis. We were also able to identify the complete coding sequences for all the proteins of which few selected genes were cloned and sequence characterized for further confirmation. Our study is the first report of a quantitative proteomics dataset in black pepper which provides convincing evidence on the effectiveness of a transcriptome-based label-free proteomics approach for elucidating the host response to biotic stress in a non-model spice crop like P. nigrum, for which genome information is unavailable. Our dataset

  14. Transcriptome- Assisted Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel Insights into Piper nigrum—Phytophthora capsici Phytopathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Chidambareswaren; Krishnan, Anu; Saraswathy, Gayathri G.; Surendran, Arun; Jaleel, Abdul; Sakuntala, Manjula

    2016-01-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), a tropical spice crop of global acclaim, is susceptible to Phytophthora capsici, an oomycete pathogen which causes the highly destructive foot rot disease. A systematic understanding of this phytopathosystem has not been possible owing to lack of genome or proteome information. In this study, we explain an integrated transcriptome-assisted label-free quantitative proteomics pipeline to study the basal immune components of black pepper when challenged with P. capsici. We report a global identification of 532 novel leaf proteins from black pepper, of which 518 proteins were functionally annotated using BLAST2GO tool. A label-free quantitation of the protein datasets revealed 194 proteins common to diseased and control protein datasets of which 22 proteins showed significant up-regulation and 134 showed significant down-regulation. Ninety-three proteins were identified exclusively on P. capsici infected leaf tissues and 245 were expressed only in mock (control) infected samples. In-depth analysis of our data gives novel insights into the regulatory pathways of black pepper which are compromised during the infection. Differential down-regulation was observed in a number of critical pathways like carbon fixation in photosynthetic organism, cyano-amino acid metabolism, fructose, and mannose metabolism, glutathione metabolism, and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. The proteomics results were validated with real-time qRT-PCR analysis. We were also able to identify the complete coding sequences for all the proteins of which few selected genes were cloned and sequence characterized for further confirmation. Our study is the first report of a quantitative proteomics dataset in black pepper which provides convincing evidence on the effectiveness of a transcriptome-based label-free proteomics approach for elucidating the host response to biotic stress in a non-model spice crop like P. nigrum, for which genome information is unavailable. Our dataset

  15. Quantitative Gingival Crevicular Fluid Proteome in Health and Periodontal Disease Using Stable-Isotope Chemistries and Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Leandro G.; Nouh, Hesham; Salih, Erdjan

    2014-01-01

    Aim Application of quantitative stable-isotope-labeling chemistries and mass spectrometry (MS) to determine alterations in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) proteome in periodontal disease. Materials and Methods Quantitative proteome of GCF from 40 healthy individuals versus 40 patients with periodontal disease was established using 320 GCF samples and stable-isotope-labeling reagents, ICAT and mTRAQ, with MS technology and validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent methods. Results We have identified 238 distinct proteins of which 180 were quantified in GCF of both healthy and periodontal patients with additional 26 and 32 distinct proteins that were found only in GCF of healthy or periodontal patients. In addition, 42 pathogenic bacterial proteins and 11 yeast proteins were quantified. The data highlighted a series of proteins not quantified previously by large-scale MS approaches in GCF with relevance to periodontal disease, such as host derived Ig alpha-2 chain C, Kallikrein-4, S100-A9, transmembrane proteinase 13, peptidase S1 domain, several collagen types and pathogenic bacterial proteins e.g., formamidase, leucine amidopeptidase and virulence factor OMP85. Conclusions The innovative analytical approaches provided detailed novel changes in both host and microbial derived GCF proteomes of periodontal patients. The study defined 50 host and 16 pathogenic bacterial proteins significantly elevated in periodontal disease most of which were novel with significant potential for application in the clinical arena of periodontal disease. PMID:24738839

  16. Quantitative proteomic view associated with resistance to clinically important antibiotics in Gram-positive bacteria: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Ro eLee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The increase of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE poses a worldwide and serious health threat. Although new antibiotics, such as daptomycin and linezolid, have been developed for the treatment of infections of Gram-positive pathogens, the emergence of daptomycin-resistant and linezolid-resistant strains during therapy has now increased clinical treatment failures. In the past few years, studies using quantitative proteomic methods have provided a considerable progress in understanding antibiotic resistance mechanisms. In this review, to understand the resistance mechanisms to four clinically important antibiotics (methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin used in the treatment of Gram-positive pathogens, we summarize recent advances in studies on resistance mechanisms using quantitative proteomic methods, and also examine proteins playing an important role in the bacterial mechanisms of resistance to the four antibiotics. Proteomic researches can identify proteins whose expression levels are changed in the resistance mechanism to only one antibiotic, such as LiaH in daptomycin resistance and PrsA in vancomycin resistance, and many proteins simultaneously involved in resistance mechanisms to various antibiotics. Most of resistance-related proteins, which are simultaneously associated with resistance mechanisms to several antibiotics, play important roles in regulating bacterial envelope biogenesis or compensating for the fitness cost of antibiotic resistance. Therefore,

  17. Time-resolved quantitative proteome analysis of in vivo intestinal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Jenny; Panchaud, Alexandre; Favre, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    development have so far been limited to investigation at the transcription level or to single or few proteins at a time. In the present study, we elucidate proteomic changes of primary intestinal epithelial cells from jejunum during early suckling (1-7 days of age), middle suckling (7-14 days) and weaning...... period (14-35 days) in mice, using a label-free proteomics approach. We show differential expression of 520 proteins during intestinal development and a pronounced change of the proteome during the middle suckling period and weaning. Proteins involved in several metabolic processes were found...

  18. Perfluorooctanoic acid for shotgun proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar Rao Kadiyala

    Full Text Available Here, we describe the novel use of a volatile surfactant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, for shotgun proteomics. PFOA was found to solubilize membrane proteins as effectively as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. PFOA concentrations up to 0.5% (w/v did not significantly inhibit trypsin activity. The unique features of PFOA allowed us to develop a single-tube shotgun proteomics method that used all volatile chemicals that could easily be removed by evaporation prior to mass spectrometry analysis. The experimental procedures involved: 1 extraction of proteins in 2% PFOA; 2 reduction of cystine residues with triethyl phosphine and their S-alkylation with iodoethanol; 3 trypsin digestion of proteins in 0.5% PFOA; 4 removal of PFOA by evaporation; and 5 LC-MS/MS analysis of the resulting peptides. The general applicability of the method was demonstrated with the membrane preparation of photoreceptor outer segments. We identified 75 proteins from 1 µg of the tryptic peptides in a single, 1-hour, LC-MS/MS run. About 67% of the proteins identified were classified as membrane proteins. We also demonstrate that a proteolytic (18O labeling procedure can be incorporated after the PFOA removal step for quantitative proteomic experiments. The present method does not require sample clean-up devices such as solid-phase extractions and membrane filters, so no proteins/peptides are lost in any experimental steps. Thus, this single-tube shotgun proteomics method overcomes the major drawbacks of surfactant use in proteomic experiments.

  19. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei Bsa type III secretion system effectors using hypersecreting mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Broek, Charles W; Chalmers, Kevin J; Stevens, Mark P; Stevens, Joanne M

    2015-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe disease of humans and animals. One of the virulence factors critical for early stages of infection is the Burkholderia secretion apparatus (Bsa) Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS), a molecular syringe that injects bacterial proteins, called effectors, into eukaryotic cells where they subvert cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. Although the Bsa T3SS itself is known to be important for invasion, intracellular replication, and virulence, only a few genuine effector proteins have been identified and the complete repertoire of proteins secreted by the system has not yet been fully characterized. We constructed a mutant lacking bsaP, a homolog of the T3SS "gatekeeper" family of proteins that exert control over the timing and magnitude of effector protein secretion. Mutants lacking BsaP, or the T3SS translocon protein BipD, were observed to hypersecrete the known Bsa effector protein BopE, providing evidence of their role in post-translational control of the Bsa T3SS and representing key reagents for the identification of its secreted substrates. Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ), a gel-free quantitative proteomics technique, was used to compare the secreted protein profiles of the Bsa T3SS hypersecreting mutants of B. pseudomallei with the isogenic parent strain and a bsaZ mutant incapable of effector protein secretion. Our study provides one of the most comprehensive core secretomes of B. pseudomallei described to date and identified 26 putative Bsa-dependent secreted proteins that may be considered candidate effectors. Two of these proteins, BprD and BapA, were validated as novel effector proteins secreted by the Bsa T3SS of B. pseudomallei.

  20. Quantitative liver proteomics identifies FGF19 targets that couple metabolism and proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Harmjan R.; Burgering, Boudewijn M. T.; van Mil, Saskia W. C.

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a gut-derived peptide hormone that is produced following activation of Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). FGF19 is secreted and signals to the liver, where it contributes to the homeostasis of bile acid (BA), lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. FGF19 is a promising therapeutic target for the metabolic syndrome and cholestatic diseases, but enthusiasm for its use has been tempered by FGF19-mediated induction of proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma. To inform future rational design of FGF19-variants, we have conducted temporal quantitative proteomic and gene expression analyses to identify FGF19-targets related to metabolism and proliferation. Mice were fasted for 16 hours, and injected with human FGF19 (1 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle. Liver protein extracts (containing “light” lysine) were mixed 1:1 with a spike-in protein extract from 13C6-lysine metabolically labelled mouse liver (containing “heavy” lysine) and analysed by LC-MS/MS. Our analyses provide a resource of FGF19 target proteins in the liver. 189 proteins were upregulated (≥ 1.5 folds) and 73 proteins were downregulated (≤ -1.5 folds) by FGF19. FGF19 treatment decreased the expression of proteins involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis, i.e., Fabp5, Scd1, and Acsl3 and increased the expression of Acox1, involved in FA oxidation. As expected, FGF19 increased the expression of proteins known to drive proliferation (i.e., Tgfbi, Vcam1, Anxa2 and Hdlbp). Importantly, many of the FGF19 targets (i.e., Pdk4, Apoa4, Fas and Stat3) have a dual function in both metabolism and cell proliferation. Therefore, our findings challenge the development of FGF19-variants that fully uncouple metabolic benefit from mitogenic potential. PMID:28178326

  1. Identification of stromal differentially expressed proteins in the colon carcinoma by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yibing; Chen, Yongheng; Zhang, Guiying; Zhan, Xianquan; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Ting; Li, Guoqing; Li, Maoyu; Xiao, Zhefeng; Gong, Xiaoxiang; Chen, Zhuchu

    2013-06-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays very important roles in the carcinogenesis. A variety of stromal cells in the microenvironment have been modified to support the unique needs of the malignant state. This study was to discover stromal differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) that were involved in colon carcinoma carcinogenesis. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was captured and isolated the stromal cells from colon adenocarcinoma (CAC) and non-neoplastic colon mucosa (NNCM) tissues, respectively. Seventy DEPs were identified between the pooled LCM-enriched CAC and NNCM stroma samples by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Gene Ontology (GO) relationship analysis revealed that DEPs were hierarchically grouped into 10 clusters, and were involved in multiple biological functions that were altered during carcinogenesis, including extracellular matrix organization, cytoskeleton, transport, metabolism, inflammatory response, protein polymerization, and cell motility. Pathway network analysis revealed 6 networks and 56 network eligible proteins with Ingenuity pathway analysis. Four significant networks functioned in digestive system development and its function, inflammatory disease, and developmental disorder. Eight DEPs (DCN, FN1, PKM2, HSP90B1, S100A9, MYH9, TUBB, and YWHAZ) were validated by Western blotting, and four DEPs (DCN, FN1, PKM2, and HSP90B1) were validated by immunohistochemical analysis. It is the first report of stromal DEPs between CAC and NNCM tissues. It will be helpful to recognize the roles of stromas in the colon carcinoma microenvironment, and improve the understanding of carcinogenesis in colon carcinoma. The present data suggest that DCN, FN1, PKM2, HSP90B1, S100A9, MYH9, TUBB, and YWHAZ might be the potential targets for colon cancer prevention and therapy.

  2. Quantitative liver proteomics identifies FGF19 targets that couple metabolism and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massafra, Vittoria; Milona, Alexandra; Vos, Harmjan R; Burgering, Boudewijn M T; van Mil, Saskia W C

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a gut-derived peptide hormone that is produced following activation of Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). FGF19 is secreted and signals to the liver, where it contributes to the homeostasis of bile acid (BA), lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. FGF19 is a promising therapeutic target for the metabolic syndrome and cholestatic diseases, but enthusiasm for its use has been tempered by FGF19-mediated induction of proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma. To inform future rational design of FGF19-variants, we have conducted temporal quantitative proteomic and gene expression analyses to identify FGF19-targets related to metabolism and proliferation. Mice were fasted for 16 hours, and injected with human FGF19 (1 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle. Liver protein extracts (containing "light" lysine) were mixed 1:1 with a spike-in protein extract from 13C6-lysine metabolically labelled mouse liver (containing "heavy" lysine) and analysed by LC-MS/MS. Our analyses provide a resource of FGF19 target proteins in the liver. 189 proteins were upregulated (≥ 1.5 folds) and 73 proteins were downregulated (≤ -1.5 folds) by FGF19. FGF19 treatment decreased the expression of proteins involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis, i.e., Fabp5, Scd1, and Acsl3 and increased the expression of Acox1, involved in FA oxidation. As expected, FGF19 increased the expression of proteins known to drive proliferation (i.e., Tgfbi, Vcam1, Anxa2 and Hdlbp). Importantly, many of the FGF19 targets (i.e., Pdk4, Apoa4, Fas and Stat3) have a dual function in both metabolism and cell proliferation. Therefore, our findings challenge the development of FGF19-variants that fully uncouple metabolic benefit from mitogenic potential.

  3. Streptococcus mutans protein synthesis during mixed-species biofilm development by high-throughput quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marlise I; Xiao, Jin; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M; Yates, John R; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v) was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA) and glucan-binding (gbpB) during this transition (Pspecies biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms) demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm maintenance in the presence of other organisms. Our data provide insights about how S. mutans optimizes its metabolism and adapts/survives within the mixed-species community in response to a dynamically changing environment. This reflects the intricate physiological processes linked to expression of virulence by this bacterium within complex biofilms.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Si; Brown, Joseph N.; Tolic, Nikola; Meng, Da; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Haizhen; Zhao, Rui; Moore, Ronald J.; Pevzner, Pavel A.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2014-05-31

    There are several notable challenges inherent to fully characterizing the entirety of the human saliva proteome using bottom-up approaches, including polymorphic isoforms, post-translational modifications, unique splice variants, deletions, and truncations. To address these challenges, we have developed a top-down based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach, which cataloged 20 major human salivary proteins with a total of 83 proteoforms, containing a broad range of post-translational modifications. Among these proteins, several previously reported disease biomarker proteins were identified at the intact protein level, such as beta-2 microglobulin (B2M). In addition, intact glycosylated proteoforms of several saliva proteins were also characterized, including intact N-glycosylated protein prolactin inducible protein (PIP) and O-glycosylated acidic protein rich protein (aPRP). These characterized proteoforms constitute an intact saliva proteoform database, which was used for quantitative comparison of intact salivary proteoforms among six healthy individuals. Human parotid (PS) and submandibular/sublingual gland (SMSL) secretion samples (2 μg of protein each) from six healthy individuals were compared using RPLC coupled with the 12T FTICR mass spectrometer. Significantly different protein and PTM patterns were resolved with high reproducibility between PS and SMSL glands. The results from this study provide further insight into the potential mechanisms of PTM pathways in oral glandular secretion, expanding our knowledge of this complex yet easily accessible fluid. Intact protein LC-MS approach presented herein can potentially be applied for rapid and accurate identification of biomarkers from only a few microliters of human glandular saliva.

  5. Calibration plot for proteomics: A graphical tool to visually check the assumptions underlying FDR control in quantitative experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giai Gianetto, Quentin; Combes, Florence; Ramus, Claire; Bruley, Christophe; Couté, Yohann; Burger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In MS-based quantitative proteomics, the FDR control (i.e. the limitation of the number of proteins that are wrongly claimed as differentially abundant between several conditions) is a major postanalysis step. It is classically achieved thanks to a specific statistical procedure that computes the adjusted p-values of the putative differentially abundant proteins. Unfortunately, such adjustment is conservative only if the p-values are well-calibrated; the false discovery control being spuriously underestimated otherwise. However, well-calibration is a property that can be violated in some practical cases. To overcome this limitation, we propose a graphical method to straightforwardly and visually assess the p-value well-calibration, as well as the R codes to embed it in any pipeline. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002370 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002370).

  6. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in response to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, He; Yang, Da-Hai; Yao, Heng; Bai, Ge; Zhang, Yi-Han; Xiao, Bing-Guang

    2016-01-15

    Drought is one of the most severe forms of abiotic stresses that threaten the survival of plants, including crops. In turn, plants dramatically change their physiology to increase drought tolerance, including reconfiguration of proteomes. Here, we studied drought-induced proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), a solanaceous plant, using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based protein labeling technology. Of identified 5570 proteins totally, drought treatment increased and decreased abundance of 260 and 206 proteins, respectively, compared with control condition. Most of these differentially regulated proteins are involved in photosynthesis, metabolism, and stress and defense. Although abscisic acid (ABA) levels greatly increased in drought-treated tobacco leaves, abundance of detected ABA biosynthetic enzymes showed no obvious changes. In contrast, heat shock proteins (HSPs), thioredoxins, ascorbate-, glutathione-, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-related proteins were up- or down-regulated in drought-treated tobacco leaves, suggesting that chaperones and redox signaling are important for tobacco tolerance to drought, and it is likely that redox-induced posttranslational modifications play an important role in modulating protein activity. This study not only provides a comprehensive dataset on overall protein changes in drought-treated tobacco leaves, but also shed light on the mechanism by which solanaceous plants adapt to drought stress.

  7. Elevated host lipid metabolism revealed by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid of tuberculous meningitis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Jun [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Yang, Yongtao [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Department of Neurology, Yongchuan Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chen, Jin; Cheng, Ke; Li, Qi; Wei, Yongdong; Zhu, Dan; Shao, Weihua; Zheng, Peng [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Xie, Peng, E-mail: xiepeng@cqmu.edu.cn [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Department of Neurology, Yongchuan Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2015-10-30

    Purpose: Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) remains to be one of the most deadly infectious diseases. The pathogen interacts with the host immune system, the process of which is largely unknown. Various cellular processes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) centers around lipid metabolism. To determine the lipid metabolism related proteins, a quantitative proteomic study was performed here to identify differential proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from TBM patients (n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 12). Methods: CSF samples were desalted, concentrated, labelled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ™), and analyzed by multi-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Gene ontology and proteomic phenotyping analysis of the differential proteins were conducted using Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) Bioinformatics Resources. ApoE and ApoB were selected for validation by ELISA. Results: Proteomic phenotyping of the 4 differential proteins was invloved in the lipid metabolism. ELISA showed significantly increased ApoB levels in TBM subjects compared to healthy controls. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated ApoB levels could distinguish TBM subjects from healthy controls and viral meningitis subjects with 89.3% sensitivity and 92% specificity. Conclusions: CSF lipid metabolism disregulation, especially elevated expression of ApoB, gives insights into the pathogenesis of TBM. Further evaluation of these findings in larger studies including anti-tuberculosis medicated and unmedicated patient cohorts with other center nervous system infectious diseases is required for successful clinical translation. - Highlights: • The first proteomic study on the cerebrospinal fluid of tuberculous meningitis patients using iTRAQ. • Identify 4 differential proteins invloved in the lipid metabolism. • Elevated expression of ApoB gives

  8. A quantitative proteomic approach to highlight Phragmites sp. adaptation mechanisms to chemical stress induced by a textile dyeing pollutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R A; Roma-Rodrigues, C; Davies, L C; Sá-Correia, I; Martins-Dias, S

    2016-12-15

    Phragmites sp. is present worldwide in treatment wetlands though the mechanisms involved in the phytoremediation remain unclear. In this study a quantitative proteomic approach was used to study the prompt response and adaptation of Phragmites to the textile dyeing pollutant, Acid Orange 7 (AO7). Previously, it was demonstrated that AO7 could be successfully removed from wastewater and mineralized in a constructed wetland planted with Phragmites sp. This azo dye is readily taken up by roots and transported to the plant aerial part by the xylem. Phragmites leaf samples were collected from a pilot scale vertical flow constructed wetland after 0.25, 3.25 and 24.25h exposure to AO7 (400mgL(-1)) immediately after a watering cycle used as control. Leaf soluble protein extraction yielded an average of 1560 proteins in a broad pI range (pH3-10) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A time course comparative analysis of leaf proteome revealed that 40 proteins had a differential abundance compared to control (p<0.05) within a 3.25h period. After 24.25h in contact with AO7, leaf proteome was similar to control. Adaptation to AO7 involved proteins related with cellular signalling (calreticulin, Ras-related protein Rab11D and 20S proteasome), energy production and conversion (adenosine triphosphate synthase beta subunit) carbohydrate transport and metabolism (phosphoglucose isomerase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, monodehydroascorbate reductase, frutockinase-1 and Hypothetical protein POPTR_0003s12000g and the Uncharacterized protein LOC100272772) and photosynthesis (sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase and ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase). Therefore, the quantitative proteomic approach used in this work indicates that mechanisms associated with stress cell signalling, energy production, carbohydrate transport and metabolism as well as proteins related with photosynthesis are key players in the initial chemical stress response in the phytoremediation process of AO7. Copyright

  9. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gho, Yong Song; Choi, Dong-Sic; Choi, Do-Young; Hong, Bok Sil; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells actively release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play pleiotropic roles in cancer progression and metastasis, including invasion, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, the proteomic differences between primary and metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs remain unclear. Here, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis between EVs derived from human primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) and their metastat...

  10. Metabolic remodeling of the human red blood cell membrane measured by quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, YongKeun; Best, Catherine; Auth, Thorsten; Gov, Nir S.; Safran, Samuel; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-02-01

    We have quantitatively and systemically measured the morphologies and dynamics of fluctuations in human RBC membranes using a full-field laser interferometry technique that accurately measures dynamic membrane fluctuations. We present conclusive evidence that the presence of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) facilitates nonequilibrium dynamic fluctuations in the RBC membrane and that these fluctuations are highly correlated with specific regions in the biconcave shape of RBCs. Spatial analysis reveals that these nonequilibrium membrane fluctuations are enhanced at the scale of the spectrin mesh size. Our results indicate the presence of dynamic remodeling in the RBC membrane cortex powered by ATP, which results in nonequilibrium membrane fluctuations.

  11. Sodium laurate, a novel protease- and mass spectrometry-compatible detergent for mass spectrometry-based membrane proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Lin

    Full Text Available The hydrophobic nature of most membrane proteins severely complicates their extraction, proteolysis and identification. Although detergents can be used to enhance the solubility of the membrane proteins, it is often difficult for a detergent not only to have a strong ability to extract membrane proteins, but also to be compatible with the subsequent proteolysis and mass spectrometric analysis. In this study, we made evaluation on a novel application of sodium laurate (SL to the shotgun analysis of membrane proteomes. SL was found not only to lyse the membranes and solubilize membrane proteins as efficiently as SDS, but also to be well compatible with trypsin and chymotrypsin. Furthermore, SL could be efficiently removed by phase transfer method from samples after acidification, thus ensuring not to interfere with the subsequent CapLC-MS/MS analysis of the proteolytic peptides of proteins. When SL was applied to assist the digestion and identification of a standard protein mixture containing bacteriorhodoposin and the proteins in rat liver plasma membrane-enriched fractions, it was found that, compared with other two representative enzyme- and MS-compatible detergents RapiGest SF (RGS and sodium deoxycholate (SDC, SL exhibited obvious superiority in the identification of membrane proteins particularly those with high hydrophobicity and/or multiple transmembrane domains.

  12. Sodium laurate, a novel protease- and mass spectrometry-compatible detergent for mass spectrometry-based membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong; Huo, Linju; Liu, Zhonghua; Li, Jianglin; Liu, Yi; He, Quanze; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic nature of most membrane proteins severely complicates their extraction, proteolysis and identification. Although detergents can be used to enhance the solubility of the membrane proteins, it is often difficult for a detergent not only to have a strong ability to extract membrane proteins, but also to be compatible with the subsequent proteolysis and mass spectrometric analysis. In this study, we made evaluation on a novel application of sodium laurate (SL) to the shotgun analysis of membrane proteomes. SL was found not only to lyse the membranes and solubilize membrane proteins as efficiently as SDS, but also to be well compatible with trypsin and chymotrypsin. Furthermore, SL could be efficiently removed by phase transfer method from samples after acidification, thus ensuring not to interfere with the subsequent CapLC-MS/MS analysis of the proteolytic peptides of proteins. When SL was applied to assist the digestion and identification of a standard protein mixture containing bacteriorhodoposin and the proteins in rat liver plasma membrane-enriched fractions, it was found that, compared with other two representative enzyme- and MS-compatible detergents RapiGest SF (RGS) and sodium deoxycholate (SDC), SL exhibited obvious superiority in the identification of membrane proteins particularly those with high hydrophobicity and/or multiple transmembrane domains.

  13. Proteome reference map of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and quantitative proteomics towards understanding the prebiotic action of lactitol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majumder, Avishek; Sultan, Abida; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa Rakownikow

    2011-01-01

    . In the present study the whole‐cell extract proteome of L. acidophilus NCFM grown on glucose until late exponential phase was resolved by 2‐DE (pH 3–7). A total of 275 unique proteins assigned to various physiological processes were identified from 650 spots. Differential 2‐DE (DIGE) (pH 4–7) of L. acidophilus......Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a probiotic bacterium adapted to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and with potential health benefits to the host. Lactitol is a synthetic sugar alcohol used as a sugar replacement in low calorie foods and selectively stimulating growth of L. acidophilus NCFM...... NCFM grown on glucose and lactitol, revealed 68 spots with modified relative intensity. Thirty‐two unique proteins were identified in 41 of these spots changing 1.6–12.7‐fold in relative abundance by adaptation of L. acidophilus NCFM to growth on lactitol. These proteins included β‐galactosidase small...

  14. Benchmarking quantitative label-free LC-MS data processing workflows using a complex spiked proteomic standard dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Claire; Hovasse, Agnès; Marcellin, Marlène; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Mouton-Barbosa, Emmanuelle; Bouyssié, David; Vaca, Sebastian; Carapito, Christine; Chaoui, Karima; Bruley, Christophe; Garin, Jérôme; Cianférani, Sarah; Ferro, Myriam; Van Dorssaeler, Alain; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Schaeffer, Christine; Couté, Yohann; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne

    2016-01-30

    Proteomic workflows based on nanoLC-MS/MS data-dependent-acquisition analysis have progressed tremendously in recent years. High-resolution and fast sequencing instruments have enabled the use of label-free quantitative methods, based either on spectral counting or on MS signal analysis, which appear as an attractive way to analyze differential protein expression in complex biological samples. However, the computational processing of the data for label-free quantification still remains a challenge. Here, we used a proteomic standard composed of an equimolar mixture of 48 human proteins (Sigma UPS1) spiked at different concentrations into a background of yeast cell lysate to benchmark several label-free quantitative workflows, involving different software packages developed in recent years. This experimental design allowed to finely assess their performances in terms of sensitivity and false discovery rate, by measuring the number of true and false-positive (respectively UPS1 or yeast background proteins found as differential). The spiked standard dataset has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange repository with the identifier PXD001819 and can be used to benchmark other label-free workflows, adjust software parameter settings, improve algorithms for extraction of the quantitative metrics from raw MS data, or evaluate downstream statistical methods. Bioinformatic pipelines for label-free quantitative analysis must be objectively evaluated in their ability to detect variant proteins with good sensitivity and low false discovery rate in large-scale proteomic studies. This can be done through the use of complex spiked samples, for which the "ground truth" of variant proteins is known, allowing a statistical evaluation of the performances of the data processing workflow. We provide here such a controlled standard dataset and used it to evaluate the performances of several label-free bioinformatics tools (including MaxQuant, Skyline, MFPaQ, IRMa-hEIDI and Scaffold) in

  15. Free-flow electrophoresis of plasma membrane vesicles enriched by two-phase partitioning enhances the quality of the proteome from Arabidopsis seedlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Michele, Roberto; McFarlane, Heather E; Parsons, Harriet Tempé

    2016-01-01

    The plant plasma membrane is the interface between the cell and its environment undertaking a range of important functions related to transport, signaling, cell wall biosynthesis, and secretion. Multiple proteomic studies have attempted to capture the diversity of proteins in the plasma membrane ...

  16. Characterization of Membrane-shed Microvesicles from Cytokine-stimulated β-Cells Using Proteomics Strategies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Jensen, Søren Skov; Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Lainé, Jeanne; McGuire, James N.; Pociot, Flemming; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2012-01-01

    Microparticles and exosomes are two of the most well characterized membrane-derived microvesicles released either directly from the plasma membrane or released through the fusion of intracellular multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane, respectively. They are thought to be involved in many significant biological processes such as cell to cell communication, rescue from apoptosis, and immunological responses. Here we report for the first time a quantitative study of proteins from β-cell-derived microvesicles generated after cytokine induced apoptosis using stable isotope labeled amino acids in cell culture combined with mass spectrometry. We identified and quantified a large number of β-cell-specific proteins and proteins previously described in microvesicles from other cell types in addition to new proteins located to these vesicles. In addition, we quantified specific sites of protein phosphorylation and N-linked sialylation in proteins associated with microvesicles from β-cells. Using pathway analysis software, we were able to map the most distinctive changes between microvesicles generated during growth and after cytokine stimulation to several cell death and cell signaling molecules including tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A, tumor necrosis factor, α-induced protein 3, tumor necrosis factor-interacting kinase receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 1, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. PMID:22345510

  17. Statistical Model to Analyze Quantitative Proteomics Data Obtained by 18O/16O Labeling and Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Inmaculada; Navarro, Pedro; Martínez-Acedo, Pablo; Núñez, Estefanía; Serrano, Horacio; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Vázquez, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    Statistical models for the analysis of protein expression changes by stable isotope labeling are still poorly developed, particularly for data obtained by 16O/18O labeling. Besides large scale test experiments to validate the null hypothesis are lacking. Although the study of mechanisms underlying biological actions promoted by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on endothelial cells is of considerable interest, quantitative proteomics studies on this subject are scarce and have been performed after exposing cells to the factor for long periods of time. In this work we present the largest quantitative proteomics study to date on the short term effects of VEGF on human umbilical vein endothelial cells by 18O/16O labeling. Current statistical models based on normality and variance homogeneity were found unsuitable to describe the null hypothesis in a large scale test experiment performed on these cells, producing false expression changes. A random effects model was developed including four different sources of variance at the spectrum-fitting, scan, peptide, and protein levels. With the new model the number of outliers at scan and peptide levels was negligible in three large scale experiments, and only one false protein expression change was observed in the test experiment among more than 1000 proteins. The new model allowed the detection of significant protein expression changes upon VEGF stimulation for 4 and 8 h. The consistency of the changes observed at 4 h was confirmed by a replica at a smaller scale and further validated by Western blot analysis of some proteins. Most of the observed changes have not been described previously and are consistent with a pattern of protein expression that dynamically changes over time following the evolution of the angiogenic response. With this statistical model the 18O labeling approach emerges as a very promising and robust alternative to perform quantitative proteomics studies at a depth of several thousand proteins

  18. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals a simple strategy of global resource allocation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Sheng; Silverman, Josh M; Chen, Stephen S; Erickson, David W; Basan, Markus; Wang, Jilong; Hwa, Terence; Williamson, James R

    2015-02-12

    A central aim of cell biology was to understand the strategy of gene expression in response to the environment. Here, we study gene expression response to metabolic challenges in exponentially growing Escherichia coli using mass spectrometry. Despite enormous complexity in the details of the underlying regulatory network, we find that the proteome partitions into several coarse-grained sectors, with each sector's total mass abundance exhibiting positive or negative linear relations with the growth rate. The growth rate-dependent components of the proteome fractions comprise about half of the proteome by mass, and their mutual dependencies can be characterized by a simple flux model involving only two effective parameters. The success and apparent generality of this model arises from tight coordination between proteome partition and metabolism, suggesting a principle for resource allocation in proteome economy of the cell. This strategy of global gene regulation should serve as a basis for future studies on gene expression and constructing synthetic biological circuits. Coarse graining may be an effective approach to derive predictive phenomenological models for other 'omics' studies.

  19. Quantitative proteomics reveals the mechanism and consequence of gliotoxin-mediated dysregulation of the methionine cycle in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares-Miralles, Lara; Sarikaya-Bayram, Özlem; Smith, Elizabeth B; Dolan, Stephen K; Bayram, Özgür; Jones, Gary W; Doyle, Sean

    2016-01-10

    Gliotoxin (GT) is a redox-active metabolite, produced by Aspergillus fumigatus, which inhibits the growth of other fungi. Here we demonstrate how Aspergillus niger responds to GT exposure. Quantitative proteomics revealed that GT dysregulated the abundance of 378 proteins including those involved in methionine metabolism and induced de novo abundance of two S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases. Increased abundance of enzymes S-adenosylhomocysteinase (p=0.0018) required for homocysteine generation from S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and spermidine synthase (p=0.0068), involved in the recycling of Met, was observed. Analysis of Met-related metabolites revealed significant increases in the levels of Met and adenosine, in correlation with proteomic data. Methyltransferase MT-II is responsible for bisthiobis(methylthio)gliotoxin (BmGT) formation, deletion of MT-II abolished BmGT formation and led to increased GT sensitivity in A. niger. Proteomic analysis also revealed that GT exposure also significantly (pniger. Thus, it provides new opportunities to exploit the response of GT-naïve fungi to GT.

  20. Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, Ramadoss

    2016-03-19

    The metamorphosis of planktonic larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) underpins their complex life-history strategy by switching on the molecular machinery required for sessile life and building calcite shells. Metamorphosis becomes a survival bottleneck, which will be pressured by different anthropogenically induced climate change-related variables. Therefore, it is important to understand how metamorphosing larvae interact with emerging climate change stressors. To predict how larvae might be affected in a future ocean, we examined changes in the proteome of metamorphosing larvae under multiple stressors: decreased pH (pH 7.4), increased temperature (30 °C), and reduced salinity (15 psu). Quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS identified more than 1300 proteins. Decreased pH had a negative effect on metamorphosis by down-regulating several proteins involved in energy production, metabolism, and protein synthesis. However, warming switched on these down-regulated pathways at pH 7.4. Under multiple stressors, cell signaling, energy production, growth, and developmental pathways were up-regulated, although metamorphosis was still reduced. Despite the lack of lethal effects, significant physiological responses to both individual and interacting climate change related stressors were observed at proteome level. The metamorphosing larvae of the C. gigas population in the Yellow Sea appear to have adequate phenotypic plasticity at the proteome level to survive in future coastal oceans, but with developmental and physiological costs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. New insights into the mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter pasteurianus using iTRAQ-dependent quantitative proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kai; Zang, Ning; Zhang, Junmei; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yudong; Liu, Ye; Feng, Wei; Liang, Xinle

    2016-12-05

    Acetobacter pasteurianus is the main starter in rice vinegar manufacturing due to its remarkable abilities to resist and produce acetic acid. Although several mechanisms of acetic acid resistance have been proposed and only a few effector proteins have been identified, a comprehensive depiction of the biological processes involved in acetic acid resistance is needed. In this study, iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis was adopted to investigate the whole proteome of different acidic titers (3.6, 7.1 and 9.3%, w/v) of Acetobacter pasteurianus Ab3 during the vinegar fermentation process. Consequently, 1386 proteins, including 318 differentially expressed proteins (pacetic acid stress, where >150 proteins were differentially expressed. Specifically, proteins involved in amino acid metabolic processes and fatty acid biosynthesis were differentially expressed, which may contribute to the acetic acid resistance of Acetobacter. Transcription factors, two component systems and toxin-antitoxin systems were implicated in the modulatory network at multiple levels. In addition, the identification of proteins involved in redox homeostasis, protein metabolism, and the cell envelope suggested that the whole cellular system is mobilized in response to acid stress. These findings provide a differential proteomic profile of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter pasteurianus and have potential application to highly acidic rice vinegar manufacturing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineshram, Ramadoss; Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli; Ko, Ginger Wai Kuen; Zhang, Huoming; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Ravasi, Timothy; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2016-06-01

    The metamorphosis of planktonic larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) underpins their complex life-history strategy by switching on the molecular machinery required for sessile life and building calcite shells. Metamorphosis becomes a survival bottleneck, which will be pressured by different anthropogenically induced climate change-related variables. Therefore, it is important to understand how metamorphosing larvae interact with emerging climate change stressors. To predict how larvae might be affected in a future ocean, we examined changes in the proteome of metamorphosing larvae under multiple stressors: decreased pH (pH 7.4), increased temperature (30 °C), and reduced salinity (15 psu). Quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS identified more than 1300 proteins. Decreased pH had a negative effect on metamorphosis by down-regulating several proteins involved in energy production, metabolism, and protein synthesis. However, warming switched on these down-regulated pathways at pH 7.4. Under multiple stressors, cell signaling, energy production, growth, and developmental pathways were up-regulated, although metamorphosis was still reduced. Despite the lack of lethal effects, significant physiological responses to both individual and interacting climate change related stressors were observed at proteome level. The metamorphosing larvae of the C. gigas population in the Yellow Sea appear to have adequate phenotypic plasticity at the proteome level to survive in future coastal oceans, but with developmental and physiological costs.

  3. Streptococcus mutans protein synthesis during mixed-species biofilm development by high-throughput quantitative proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise I Klein

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA and glucan-binding (gbpB during this transition (P<0.05. Furthermore, S. mutans up-regulates specific adaptation mechanisms to cope with acidic environments (F1F0-ATPase system, fatty acid biosynthesis, branched chain amino acids metabolism, and molecular chaperones (GroEL. Interestingly, the protein levels and gene expression are in general augmented when S. mutans form mixed-species biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm

  4. Quantitative, high-resolution proteomics for data-driven systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, J.; Mann, M.

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology requires comprehensive data at all molecular levels. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has emerged as a powerful and universal method for the global measurement of proteins. In the most widespread format, it uses liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to high-resolution tandem...... primary structure of proteins including posttranslational modifications, to localize proteins to organelles, and to determine protein interactions. Here, we describe the principles of analysis and the areas of biology where proteomics can make unique contributions. The large-scale nature of proteomics...... data and its high accuracy pose special opportunities as well as challenges in systems biology that have been largely untapped so far. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved....

  5. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that antioxidation mechanisms contribute to cold tolerance in plantain (Musa paradisiaca L.; ABB Group) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiao-Song; Wu, Jun-Hua; Li, Chun-Yu; Wei, Yue-Rong; Sheng, Ou; Hu, Chun-Hua; Kuang, Rui-Bin; Huang, Yong-Hong; Peng, Xin-Xiang; McCardle, James A; Chen, Wei; Yang, Yong; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Zhang, Sheng; Yi, Gan-Jun

    2012-12-01

    Banana and its close relative, plantain are globally important crops and there is considerable interest in optimizing their cultivation. Plantain has superior cold tolerance compared with banana and a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms and responses of plantain to cold stress has great potential value for developing cold tolerant banana cultivars. In this study, we used iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis to investigate the temporal responses of plantain to cold stress. Plantain seedlings were exposed for 0, 6, and 24 h of cold stress at 8 °C and subsequently allowed to recover for 24 h at 28 °C. A total of 3477 plantain proteins were identified, of which 809 showed differential expression from the three treatments. The majority of differentially expressed proteins were predicted to be involved in oxidation-reduction, including oxylipin biosynthesis, whereas others were associated with photosynthesis, photorespiration, and several primary metabolic processes, such as carbohydrate metabolic process and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays were performed on seven differentially expressed, cold-response candidate plantain proteins to validate the proteomics data. Similar analyses of the seven candidate proteins were performed in cold-sensitive banana to examine possible functional conservation, and to compare the results to equivalent responses between the two species. Consistent results were achieved by Western blot and enzyme activity assays, demonstrating that the quantitative proteomics data collected in this study are reliable. Our results suggest that an increase of antioxidant capacity through adapted ROS scavenging capability, reduced production of ROS, and decreased lipid peroxidation contribute to molecular mechanisms for the increased cold tolerance in plantain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a global investigation on molecular responses of plantain to cold stress by

  6. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Reveals that Antioxidation Mechanisms Contribute to Cold Tolerance in Plantain (Musa paradisiaca L.;ABB Group) Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiaosong Yang; Junhua Wu; Chunyu Li; Yuerong Wei; Ou Sheng; Chunhua Hu; Ruibin Kuang

    2012-01-01

    Banana and its close relative,plantain are globally important crops and there is of considerable interest in optimizing their cultivation.Plantain has superior cold tolerance compared to banana and a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms and responses of plantain to cold stress has great potential value for developing cold tolerant banana cultivars.In this study,we used iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis to investigate the temporal responses of plantain to cold stress.Plantain seedlings were exposed for 0,6 and 24 h of cold stress at 8℃ and subsequently allowed to recover for 24 h at 28℃.A total of 3,477 plantain proteins were identified,of which 809 showed differential expression from the three treatments.The majority of differentially expressed proteins were predicted to be involved in oxidation-reduction,including oxylipin biosynthesis,while others were associated with photosynthesis,photorespiration and several primary metabolic processes,such as carbohydrate metabolic process and fatty acid beta-oxidation.Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays were performed on 7 differentially expressed,cold-response candidate plantain proteins in order to validate the proteomics data.Similar analyses of the 7 candidate proteins were performed in cold-sensitive banana to examine possible functional conservation and to compare the results to equivalent responses between the two species.Consistent results were achieved by Western blot and enzyme activity assays,demonstrating that the quantitative proteomics data collected in this study are reliable.Our results suggest that an increase of antioxidant capacity through adapted ROS scavenging capability,reduced production of ROS and decreased lipid peroxidation contribute to molecular mechanisms for the higher cold tolerance in plantain.To the best of our knowledge,this is the first report of a global investigation on molecular responses of plantain to cold stress by proteomic analysis.

  7. Quantitative Targeted Proteomics and Electrochromic Shift for Measuring Photosystem Content of Marine Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. M.; Bailleul, B.; Melanson, J. R.; Campbell, D. A.; Cockshutt, A. M.; Cardol, P.

    2016-02-01

    Abundance and stoichiometry data for the photosystems, the intersystem electron transport complexes and the Calvin cycle enzymes are rich in information about light and nutrient acclimation. Quantifying these complexes is essential for understanding limitations on and capacities for photosynthesis. Targeted quantitative immunodetections of conserved subunits (eg. PsbA for PSII; PsaC for PSI) are becoming an established method for absolute measurement of these complexes. An advantage of protein measurements is that they can be done with non-living flash-frozen samples and processed post-field. A pitfall of physical versus functional measures is that in some scenarios, such as during photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII), physical and functional measures give different values, but such disparities are often meaningful, informing targeted studies of regulation, repair and enzyme kinetics. Electrochromic Shift (ECS) is an alternative, fast and noninvasive method which can be exploited to determine functional PSI:PSII ratios in living cells. The basis for ECS is that pigments in the photosynthetic membrane exhibit a shift in their absorption spectra when the electric component of the proton motive force is generated across the membrane in the light. Cross-validation of methods by independent measures builds confidence in results from both approaches and can be useful for ground truthing of underway or high-throughput optical measurements or functional measurements from bioassays. We present comparative data from immunoquantitation and ECS for an array of diatom taxa. The physical data fall within established ranges. The basis for similarities and disparities in the photosystem stoichiometries between the methods are discussed.

  8. MSQuant, an Open Source Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Gouw, Joost W; Olsen, Jesper V

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics critically depends on algorithms for data interpretation. A current bottleneck in the rapid advance of proteomics technology is the closed nature and slow development cycle of vendor-supplied software solutions. We have created an open source software environment...... on precursor ion intensities, including element labels (e.g., (15)N), residue labels (e.g., SILAC and ICAT), termini labels (e.g., (18)O), functional group labels (e.g., mTRAQ), and label-free ion intensity approaches. MSQuant is available, including an installer and supporting scripts, at http://msquant.sourceforge.net ....

  9. Proteome-scale identification of outer membrane proteins in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis using a structure based combined hierarchical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Aarti; Rub, Abdur; Akhter, Yusuf

    2014-07-29

    Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in eubacteria have several important roles, which range from membrane transport to the host-pathogen interactions. These are directly involved in pathogen attachment, entry and activation of several pathogen-induced signaling cascades in the cell. The cardinal structural features of OMPs include the presence of a β-barrel, a signal peptide and the absence of the transmembrane helix. This is the first report on proteome-wide identification of OMPs of ruminant pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The complete proteome of MAP was analyzed using a pipeline of algorithms, which screens the amino acid sequences and structural features shared by OMPs in other bacteria. Secondary structure of these proteins is also analyzed and scores are calculated for amphiphilic β-strands. From the set of 588 exported proteins, 264 proteins are predicted to be inner membrane proteins while 83 proteins are identified as potential OMPs in MAP. Finally, this study identified 57 proteins as top candidates, on the basis of computed isoelectric points, as the core set of OMPs. Significantly, the resulting data for OMPs are not only useful in designing novel vaccines but may also open avenues for the development of early serodiagnostic tools for MAP.

  10. The liposoluble proteome of Mycoplasma agalactiae: an insight into the minimal protein complement of a bacterial membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cacciotto Carla

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasmas are the simplest bacteria capable of autonomous replication. Their evolution proceeded from gram-positive bacteria, with the loss of many biosynthetic pathways and of the cell wall. In this work, the liposoluble protein complement of Mycoplasma agalactiae, a minimal bacterial pathogen causing mastitis, polyarthritis, keratoconjunctivitis, and abortion in small ruminants, was subjected to systematic characterization in order to gain insights into its membrane proteome composition. Results The selective enrichment for M. agalactiae PG2T liposoluble proteins was accomplished by means of Triton X-114 fractionation. Liposoluble proteins were subjected to 2-D PAGE-MS, leading to the identification of 40 unique proteins and to the generation of a reference 2D map of the M. agalactiae liposoluble proteome. Liposoluble proteins from the type strain PG2 and two field isolates were then compared by means of 2D DIGE, revealing reproducible differences in protein expression among isolates. An in-depth analysis was then performed by GeLC-MS/MS in order to achieve a higher coverage of the liposoluble proteome. Using this approach, a total of 194 unique proteins were identified, corresponding to 26% of all M. agalactiae PG2T genes. A gene ontology analysis and classification for localization and function was also carried out on all protein identifications. Interestingly, the 11.5% of expressed membrane proteins derived from putative horizontal gene transfer events. Conclusions This study led to the in-depth systematic characterization of the M. agalactiae liposoluble protein component, providing useful insights into its membrane organization.

  11. Quantitative changes in proteins responsible for flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis in strawberry fruit at different ripening stages: A targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing multiple reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Du, Lina; Li, Li; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, ZhaoQi; Li, XiHong

    2015-06-03

    To better understand the regulation of flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis, a targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing LC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring was conducted on two strawberry cultivars at three ripening stages. This quantitative proteomic workflow was improved through an OFFGEL electrophoresis to fractionate peptides from total protein digests. A total of 154 peptide transitions from 47 peptides covering 21 proteins and isoforms related to anthocyanin biosynthesis were investigated. The normalized protein abundance, which was measured using isotopically-labeled standards, was significantly changed concurrently with increased anthocyanin content and advanced fruit maturity. The protein abundance of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase; anthocyanidin synthase, chalcone isomerase; flavanone 3-hydroxylase; dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, UDP-glucose:flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase, cytochrome c and cytochrome C oxidase subunit 2, was all significantly increased in fruit of more advanced ripeness. An interaction between cultivar and maturity was also shown with respect to chalcone isomerase. The good correlation between protein abundance and anthocyanin content suggested that a metabolic control point may exist for anthocyanin biosynthesis. This research provides insights into the process of anthocyanin formation in strawberry fruit at the level of protein concentration and reveals possible candidates in the regulation of anthocyanin formation during fruit ripening. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms contributing to flavonoids and anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation of strawberry fruit during ripening is challenging due to limited molecular biology tools and established hypothesis. Our targeted proteomic approach employing LC-MS/MS analysis and MRM technique to quantify proteins in relation to flavonoids and anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation in strawberry fruit during fruit ripening is novel. The identification of peptides

  12. Experimental design and data-analysis in label-free quantitative LC/MS proteomics: A tutorial with MSqRob.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeminne, Ludger J E; Gevaert, Kris; Clement, Lieven

    2017-04-05

    Label-free shotgun proteomics is routinely used to assess proteomes. However, extracting relevant information from the massive amounts of generated data remains difficult. This tutorial provides a strong foundation on analysis of quantitative proteomics data. We provide key statistical concepts that help researchers to design proteomics experiments and we showcase how to analyze quantitative proteomics data using our recent free and open-source R package MSqRob, which was developed to implement the peptide-level robust ridge regression method for relative protein quantification described by Goeminne et al. MSqRob can handle virtually any experimental proteomics design and outputs proteins ordered by statistical significance. Moreover, its graphical user interface and interactive diagnostic plots provide easy inspection and also detection of anomalies in the data and flaws in the data analysis, allowing deeper assessment of the validity of results and a critical review of the experimental design. Our tutorial discusses interactive preprocessing, data analysis and visualization of label-free MS-based quantitative proteomics experiments with simple and more complex designs. We provide well-documented scripts to run analyses in bash mode on GitHub, enabling the integration of MSqRob in automated pipelines on cluster environments (https://github.com/statOmics/MSqRob). The concepts outlined in this tutorial aid in designing better experiments and analyzing the resulting data more appropriately. The two case studies using the MSqRob graphical user interface will contribute to a wider adaptation of advanced peptide-based models, resulting in higher quality data analysis workflows and more reproducible results in the proteomics community. We also provide well-documented scripts for experienced users that aim at automating MSqRob on cluster environments. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Identification of human host proteins contributing to H5N1 influenza virus propagation by membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Anding; Guo, Jing; Yang, Jing; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin

    2012-11-02

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus is a highly virulent pathogen that causes respiratory diseases and death in humans and other animal species worldwide. Because influenza is an enveloped virus, the entry, assembly, and budding of virus particles are essential steps in the viral life cycle, and the virus relies on the participation of host cellular membrane proteins for all of these steps. Thus, we took a comparative membrane proteomics approach by using 2-DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS to profile membrane proteins involved in H5N1 virus infection at 6, 12, and 24 h. Forty-two different proteins were found to vary on A549 cells due to H5N1 virus infection. Of these proteins, 57% were membrane or membrane-associated proteins. To further characterize the roles of novel identified proteins in virus propagation, the siRNA technology were applied and complement component C1q binding protein, annexin 2, prohibitin, peroxiredoxin 1 and heat shock protein 90-beta were successfully demonstrated to be contributed to viral propagation. In conclusion, the present study provides important new insight into understanding the roles of host membrane proteins in viral infection progress, and this insight is of particular importance for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. Towards high throughput and spatiotemporal proteomics : analytical workflows and quantitative label-free mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostovenko, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    A large part of modern biology is dedicated to the functional annotation and interpretation of genetic information and its influence on the subject’s phenotype. Proteomics describes the state of the system from the perspective of expression, structure, localization, interaction and function of the p

  15. A Proteome-wide, Quantitative Survey of In Vivo Ubiquitylation Sites Reveals Widespread Regulatory Roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Sebastian Alexander; Beli, Petra; Weinert, Brian Tate;

    2011-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitin is a fundamentally important regulatory mechanism. However, proteome-wide analysis of endogenous ubiquitylation remains a challenging task, and almost always has relied on cells expressing affinity tagged ubiquitin. Here we combine single-s...

  16. Temporal analysis of phosphotyrosine-dependent signaling networks by quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoev, Blagoy; Ong, S.E.; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2004-01-01

    To study the global dynamics of phosphotyrosine-based signaling events in early growth factor stimulation, we developed a mass spectrometric method that converts temporal changes to differences in peptide isotopic abundance. The proteomes of three cell populations were metabolically encoded with ...

  17. Comparative and quantitative proteomics reveal the adaptive strategies of oyster larvae to ocean acidification

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, R.

    2015-10-28

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Decreasing pH due to anthropogenic CO2 inputs, called ocean acidification (OA), can make coastal environments unfavorable for oysters. This is a serious socioeconomical issue for China which supplies >70% of the world\\'s edible oysters. Here, we present an iTRAQ-based protein profiling approach for the detection and quantification of proteome changes under OA in the early life stage of a commercially important oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis. Availability of complete genome sequence for the pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) enabled us to confidently quantify over 1500 proteins in larval oysters. Over 7% of the proteome was altered in response to OA at pHNBS 7.6. Analysis of differentially expressed proteins and their associated functional pathways showed an upregulation of proteins involved in calcification, metabolic processes, and oxidative stress, each of which may be important in physiological adaptation of this species to OA. The downregulation of cytoskeletal and signal transduction proteins, on the other hand, might have impaired cellular dynamics and organelle development under OA. However, there were no significant detrimental effects in developmental processes such as metamorphic success. Implications of the differentially expressed proteins and metabolic pathways in the development of OA resistance in oyster larvae are discussed. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD002138 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002138).

  18. Sperm Proteomics Reveals Intensified Selection on Mouse Sperm Membrane and Acrosome Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Dorus, Steve; Wasbrough, Elizabeth R.; Busby, Jennifer; Wilkin, Elaine C.; Karr, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    Spermatozoa are a focal point for the impact of sexual selection due to sperm competition and sperm–female interactions in a wide range of sexually reproducing organisms. In-depth molecular investigation of the ramifications of these selective regimes has been limited due to a lack of information concerning the molecular composition of sperm. In this study, we utilize three previously published proteomic data sets in conjunction with our whole mouse sperm proteomic analysis to delineate cellu...

  19. Effective correction of experimental errors in quantitative proteomics using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Soo; Wu, Wells W.; Zhou, Yu; Shen, Rong-Fong; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and reliable quantitative proteomics in cell culture has been considerably facilitated by the introduction of the stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), combined with high resolution mass spectrometry. There are however several major sources of quantification errors that commonly occur with SILAC techniques, i.e. incomplete incorporation of isotopic amino acids, arginine-to-proline conversion, and experimental errors in final sample mixing. Dataset normalization is a widely adopted solution to such errors, however this may not completely prevent introducing incorrect expression ratios. Here we demonstrate that a label-swap replication of SILAC experiments was able to effectively correct experimental errors by averaging ratios measured in individual replicates using quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics of ligand treatment of neural cell cultures. Furthermore, this strategy was successfully applied to a SILAC triplet experiment, which presents a much more complicated experimental matrix, affected by both incomplete labeling and arginine-to-proline conversion. Based on our results, we suggest that SILAC experiments should be designed to incorporate label-swap replications for enhanced reliability in expression ratios. PMID:22575385

  20. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications.

  1. Benchmarking sample preparation/digestion protocols reveals tube-gel being a fast and repeatable method for quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Leslie; Fornecker, Luc; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Cianférani, Sarah; Carapito, Christine

    2016-12-01

    Sample preparation, typically by in-solution or in-gel approaches, has a strong influence on the accuracy and robustness of quantitative proteomics workflows. The major benefit of in-gel procedures is their compatibility with detergents (such as SDS) for protein solubilization. However, SDS-PAGE is a time-consuming approach. Tube-gel (TG) preparation circumvents this drawback as it involves directly trapping the sample in a polyacrylamide gel matrix without electrophoresis. We report here the first global label-free quantitative comparison between TG, stacking gel (SG), and basic liquid digestion (LD). A series of UPS1 standard mixtures (at 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 fmol) were spiked in a complex yeast lysate background. TG preparation allowed more yeast proteins to be identified than did the SG and LD approaches, with mean numbers of 1979, 1788, and 1323 proteins identified, respectively. Furthermore, the TG method proved equivalent to SG and superior to LD in terms of the repeatability of the subsequent experiments, with mean CV for yeast protein label-free quantifications of 7, 9, and 10%. Finally, known variant UPS1 proteins were successfully detected in the TG-prepared sample within a complex background with high sensitivity. All the data from this study are accessible on ProteomeXchange (PXD003841).

  2. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the interaction between the endophytic plant-growth-promoting bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus and sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lery, Letícia M S; Hemerly, Adriana S; Nogueira, Eduardo M; von Krüger, Wanda M A; Bisch, Paulo M

    2011-05-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a plant-growth-promoting bacterium that colonizes sugarcane. In order to investigate molecular aspects of the G. diazotrophicus-sugarcane interaction, we performed a quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis by (15)N metabolic labeling of bacteria, root samples, and co-cultures. Overall, more than 400 proteins were analyzed and 78 were differentially expressed between the plant-bacterium interaction model and control cultures. A comparative analysis of the G. diazotrophicus in interaction with two distinct genotypes of sugarcane, SP70-1143 and Chunee, revealed proteins with fundamental roles in cellular recognition. G. diazotrophicus presented proteins involved in adaptation to atypical conditions and signaling systems during the interaction with both genotypes. However, SP70-1143 and Chunee, sugarcane genotypes with high and low contribution of biological nitrogen fixation, showed divergent responses in contact with G. diazotrophicus. The SP70-1143 genotype overexpressed proteins from signaling cascades and one from a lipid metabolism pathway, whereas Chunee differentially synthesized proteins involved in chromatin remodeling and protein degradation pathways. In addition, we have identified 30 bacterial proteins in the roots of the plant samples; from those, nine were specifically induced by plant signals. This is the first quantitative proteomic analysis of a bacterium-plant interaction, which generated insights into early signaling of the G. diazotrophicus-sugarcane interaction.

  3. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  4. The identification of global patterns and unique signatures of proteins across 14 environments using outer membrane proteomics of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliep, Martin; Ryall, Ben; Ferenci, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    We test the hypothesis that organisms sourced from different environments exhibit unique fingerprints in macromolecular composition. Experimentally, we followed proteomic changes with 14 different sub-lethal environmental stimuli in Escherichia coli at controlled growth rates. The focus was on the outer membrane sub-proteome, which is known to be extremely sensitive to environmental controls. The analyses surprisingly revealed that pairs of proteins belonging to very different regulons, such as Slp and OmpX or FadL and OmpF, have the closest patterns of change with the 14 conditions. Fe-limited and cold-cultured bacteria have the most distinct global patterns of spot changes, but the patterns with fast growth and oxygen limitation are the closest amongst the 14 environments. These unexpected but statistically robust results suggest that we have an incomplete picture of bacterial regulation across different stress responses; baseline choices and growth-rate influences are probably underestimated factors in such systems-level analysis. In terms of our aim of getting a unique profile for each of the 14 investigated environments, we find that it is unnecessary to compare all the proteins in a proteome and that a panel of five proteins is sufficient for identification of environmental fingerprints. This demonstrates the future feasibility of tracing the history of contaminating bacteria in hospitals, foods or industrial settings as well as for released organisms and biosecurity purposes.

  5. Quantitative analysis of proteome and lipidome dynamics reveals functional regulation of global lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casanovas, Albert; Sprenger, Richard R; Tarasov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    architecture and processes during physiological adaptations in yeast. Our results reveal that activation of cardiolipin synthesis and remodeling supports mitochondrial biogenesis in the transition from fermentative to respiratory metabolism, that down-regulation of de novo sterol synthesis machinery prompts......Elucidating how and to what extent lipid metabolism is remodeled under changing conditions is essential for understanding cellular physiology. Here, we analyzed proteome and lipidome dynamics to investigate how regulation of lipid metabolism at the global scale supports remodeling of cellular...

  6. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Vasopressin-Responsive Nuclear Proteins in Collecting Duct Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk, Laura K.; Bolger, Steven J.; Luginbuhl, Kelli; Gonzales, Patricia A.; Rinschen, Markus M.; Yu, Ming-Jiun; Hoffert, Jason D.; Pisitkun, Trairak; Knepper, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Vasopressin controls transport in the renal collecting duct, in part, by regulating transcription. This complex process, which can involve translocation and/or modification of transcriptional regulators, is not completely understood. Here, we applied a method for large-scale profiling of nuclear proteins to quantify vasopressin-induced changes in the nuclear proteome of cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cells. Using stable isotope labeling and tandem mass spectrometry, we quantified 3987 nucl...

  7. Deep and quantitative top-down proteomics in clinical and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Neil L; Thomas, Paul M; Ntai, Ioanna; Compton, Philip D; LeDuc, Richard D

    2014-12-01

    It has long been understood that it is proteins, expressed and post-translationally modified, that are the primary regulators of both the fate and the function of cells. The ability to measure differences in the expression of the constellation of unique protein forms (proteoforms) with complete molecular specificity has the potential to sharply improve the return on investment for mass spectrometry-based proteomics in translational research and clinical diagnostics.

  8. Quantitative proteomic analysis of serum from pregnant women carrying a fetus with conotruncal heart defect using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available To identify differentially expressed proteins from serum of pregnant women carrying a conotruncal heart defects (CTD fetus, using proteomic analysis.The study was conducted using a nested case-control design. The 5473 maternal serum samples were collected at 14-18 weeks of gestation. The serum from 9 pregnant women carrying a CTD fetus, 10 with another CHD (ACHD fetus, and 11 with a normal fetus were selected from the above samples, and analyzed by using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry(2D LC-MS/MS. The differentially expressed proteins identified by iTRAQ were further validated with Western blot.A total of 105 unique proteins present in the three groups were identified, and relative expression data were obtained for 92 of them with high confidence by employing the iTRAQ-based experiments. The downregulation of gelsolin in maternal serum of fetus with CTD was further verified by Western blot.The identification of differentially expressed protein gelsolin in the serum of the pregnant women carrying a CTD fetus by using proteomic technology may be able to serve as a foundation to further explore the biomarker for detection of CTD fetus from the maternal serum.

  9. A systematic evaluation of normalization methods in quantitative label-free proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välikangas, Tommi; Suomi, Tomi; Elo, Laura L

    2016-10-02

    To date, mass spectrometry (MS) data remain inherently biased as a result of reasons ranging from sample handling to differences caused by the instrumentation. Normalization is the process that aims to account for the bias and make samples more comparable. The selection of a proper normalization method is a pivotal task for the reliability of the downstream analysis and results. Many normalization methods commonly used in proteomics have been adapted from the DNA microarray techniques. Previous studies comparing normalization methods in proteomics have focused mainly on intragroup variation. In this study, several popular and widely used normalization methods representing different strategies in normalization are evaluated using three spike-in and one experimental mouse label-free proteomic data sets. The normalization methods are evaluated in terms of their ability to reduce variation between technical replicates, their effect on differential expression analysis and their effect on the estimation of logarithmic fold changes. Additionally, we examined whether normalizing the whole data globally or in segments for the differential expression analysis has an effect on the performance of the normalization methods. We found that variance stabilization normalization (Vsn) reduced variation the most between technical replicates in all examined data sets. Vsn also performed consistently well in the differential expression analysis. Linear regression normalization and local regression normalization performed also systematically well. Finally, we discuss the choice of a normalization method and some qualities of a suitable normalization method in the light of the results of our evaluation.

  10. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential biological processes in healthy neonatal cord neutrophils and adult neutrophils

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiang

    2014-06-11

    Neonatal neutrophils are characterized by the immaturity of bactericidal mechanisms that contributes largely to neonatal mortality. However, underlying molecular mechanism associated with the immaturity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analysis on neonatal neutrophils derived from human cord blood and adult peripheral neutrophils. A total of 1332 proteins were identified and quantified, and 127 proteins were characterized as differentially expressed between adult and cord neutrophils. The differentially expressed proteins are mapped in KEGG pathways into five clusters and indicated impaired functions of neonatal neutrophils in proteasome, lysosome, phagosome, and leukocyte transendothelial migration. In particular, many proteins associated with NETosis, a critical mechanism for antimicrobial process and auto-clearance, were also found to be downregulated in cord neutrophils. This study represents a first comparative proteome profiling of neonatal and adult neutrophils, and provides a global view of differentially expressed proteome for enhancing our understanding of their various functional difference. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Tachyplesin I Targets in U251 Gliomaspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tachyplesin I is a cationic peptide isolated from hemocytes of the horseshoe crab and its anti-tumor activity has been demonstrated in several tumor cells. However, there is limited information providing the global effects and mechanisms of tachyplesin I on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Here, by using two complementary proteomic strategies (2D-DIGE and dimethyl isotope labeling-based shotgun proteomics, we explored the effect of tachyplesin I on the proteome of gliomaspheres, a three-dimensional growth model formed by a GBM cell line U251. In total, the expression levels of 192 proteins were found to be significantly altered by tachyplesin I treatment. Gene ontology (GO analysis revealed that many of them were cytoskeleton proteins and lysosomal acid hydrolases, and the mostly altered biological process was related to cellular metabolism, especially glycolysis. Moreover, we built protein–protein interaction network of these proteins and suggested the important role of DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha (TOP2A in the signal-transduction cascade of tachyplesin I. In conclusion, we propose that tachyplesin I might down-regulate cathepsins in lysosomes and up-regulate TOP2A to inhibit migration and promote apoptosis in glioma, thus contribute to its anti-tumor function. Our results suggest tachyplesin I is a potential candidate for treatment of glioma.

  12. Low Mass Blood Peptides Discriminative of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Severity: A Quantitative Proteomic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasinger, Valerie C; Yau, Yunki; Duo, Xizi; Zeng, Ming; Campbell, Beth; Shin, Sean; Luber, Raphael; Redmond, Diane; Leong, Rupert W L

    2016-01-01

    Breakdown of the protective gut barrier releases effector molecules and degradation products into the blood stream making serum and plasma ideal as a diagnostic medium. The enriched low mass proteome is unexplored as a source of differentiators for diagnosing and monitoring inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) activity, that is less invasive than colonoscopy. Differences in the enriched low mass plasma proteome (Peptides differentiating controls from IBD originate from secreted phosphoprotein 24 (SPP24, p = 0.000086, 0.009); whereas those in remission and healthy can be differentiated in UC by SPP24 (p = 0.00023, 0.001), α-1-microglobulin (AMBP, p = 0.006) and CD by SPP24 (p = 0.019, 0.05). UC and CD can be differentiated by Guanylin (GUC2A, p = 0.001), and Secretogranin-1 (CHGB p = 0.035). Active and quiescent disease can also be differentiated in UC and CD by CHGB (p ≤ 0.023) SPP24 (p ≤ 0.023) and AMBP (UC p = 0.046). Five peptides discriminating IBD activity and severity had very little-to-no correlation to erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, white cell or platelet counts. Three of these peptides were found to be binding partners to SPP24 protein alongside other known matrix proteins. These proteins have the potential to improve diagnosis and evaluate IBD activity, reducing the need for more invasive techniques. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002821.

  13. Comparison of Milk Fat Globule Membrane (MFGM Proteins of Chianina and Holstein Cattle Breed Milk Samples Through Proteomics Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Pariset

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification of proteins involved in milk production is important to understand the biology of lactation. Many studies have advanced the understanding of mammary function and milk secretion, but the critical molecular mechanisms implicated in milk fat secretion is still incomplete. Milk Fat Globules are secreted from the apical surface of the mammary cells, surrounded by a thin membrane bilayer, the Milk Fat Globule Membrane (MFGM, formed by proteins which have been suggested to be cholesterolemia-lowering factors, inhibitors of cancer cell growth, vitamin binders, bactericidal, suppressors of multiple sclerosis. Using a proteomic approach, we compared MFGM from milk samples of individuals belonging to two different cattle breeds, Chianina and Holstein, representative of selection for milk and meat traits, respectively. We were able to isolate some of the major MFGM proteins in the examined samples and to identify differences between the protein fractions of the two breeds. We detected differences in the amount of proteins linked to mammary gland development and lipid droplets formation, as well as host defence mechanisms. We have shown that proteomics is a suitable, unbiased method for the study of milk fractions proteins and a powerful tool in nutritional genomics.

  14. The Proteome of Biologically Active Membrane Vesicles from Piscirickettsia salmonis LF-89 Type Strain Identifies Plasmid-Encoded Putative Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Piscirickettsia salmonis is the predominant bacterial pathogen affecting the Chilean salmonid industry. This bacterium is the etiological agent of piscirickettsiosis, a significant fish disease. Membrane vesicles (MVs released by P. salmonis deliver several virulence factors to host cells. To improve on existing knowledge for the pathogenicity-associated functions of P. salmonis MVs, we studied the proteome of purified MVs from the P. salmonis LF-89 type strain using multidimensional protein identification technology. Initially, the cytotoxicity of different MV concentration purified from P. salmonis LF-89 was confirmed in an in vivo adult zebrafish infection model. The cumulative mortality of zebrafish injected with MVs showed a dose-dependent pattern. Analyses identified 452 proteins of different subcellular origins; most of them were associated with the cytoplasmic compartment and were mainly related to key functions for pathogen survival. Interestingly, previously unidentified putative virulence-related proteins were identified in P. salmonis MVs, such as outer membrane porin F and hemolysin. Additionally, five amino acid sequences corresponding to the Bordetella pertussis toxin subunit 1 and two amino acid sequences corresponding to the heat-labile enterotoxin alpha chain of Escherichia coli were located in the P. salmonis MV proteome. Curiously, these putative toxins were located in a plasmid region of P. salmonis LF-89. Based on the identified proteins, we propose that the protein composition of P. salmonis LF-89 MVs could reflect total protein characteristics of this P. salmonis type strain.

  15. Salinity-Induced Palmella Formation Mechanism in Halotolerant Algae Dunaliella salina Revealed by Quantitative Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Wei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Palmella stage is critical for some unicellular algae to survive in extreme environments. The halotolerant algae Dunaliella salina is a good single-cell model for studying plant adaptation to high salinity. To investigate the molecular adaptation mechanism in salinity shock-induced palmella formation, we performed a comprehensive physiological, proteomics and phosphoproteomics study upon palmella formation of D. salina using dimethyl labeling and Ti4+-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC proteomic approaches. We found that 151 salinity-responsive proteins and 35 salinity-responsive phosphoproteins were involved in multiple signaling and metabolic pathways upon palmella formation. Taken together with photosynthetic parameters and enzyme activity analyses, the patterns of protein accumulation and phosphorylation level exhibited the mechanisms upon palmella formation, including dynamics of cytoskeleton and cell membrane curvature, accumulation and transport of exopolysaccharides, photosynthesis and energy supplying (i.e., photosystem II stability and activity, cyclic electron transport, and C4 pathway, nuclear/chloroplastic gene expression regulation and protein processing, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, and salt signaling transduction. The salinity-responsive protein–protein interaction (PPI networks implied that signaling and protein synthesis and fate are crucial for modulation of these processes. Importantly, the 3D structure of phosphoprotein clearly indicated that the phosphorylation sites of eight proteins were localized in the region of function domain.

  16. Semi-quantitative proteomics of mammalian cells upon short-term exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzniar, Arnold; Laffeber, Charlie; Eppink, Berina; Bezstarosti, Karel; Dekkers, Dick; Woelders, Henri; Zwamborn, A Peter M; Demmers, Jeroen; Lebbink, Joyce H G; Kanaar, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The potential effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), such as those emitted by power-lines (in extremely low frequency range), mobile cellular systems and wireless networking devices (in radio frequency range) on human health have been intensively researched and debated. However, how exposure to these EMFs may lead to biological changes underlying possible health effects is still unclear. To reveal EMF-induced molecular changes, unbiased experiments (without a priori focusing on specific biological processes) with sensitive readouts are required. We present the first proteome-wide semi-quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of human fibroblasts, osteosarcomas and mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to three types of non-ionizing EMFs (ELF 50 Hz, UMTS 2.1 GHz and WiFi 5.8 GHz). We performed controlled in vitro EMF exposures of metabolically labeled mammalian cells followed by reliable statistical analyses of differential protein- and pathway-level regulations using an array of established bioinformatics methods. Our results indicate that less than 1% of the quantitated human or mouse proteome responds to the EMFs by small changes in protein abundance. Further network-based analysis of the differentially regulated proteins did not detect significantly perturbed cellular processes or pathways in human and mouse cells in response to ELF, UMTS or WiFi exposure. In conclusion, our extensive bioinformatics analyses of semi-quantitative mass spectrometry data do not support the notion that the short-time exposures to non-ionizing EMFs have a consistent biologically significant bearing on mammalian cells in culture.

  17. Semi-quantitative proteomics of mammalian cells upon short-term exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffeber, Charlie; Eppink, Berina; Bezstarosti, Karel; Dekkers, Dick; Woelders, Henri; Zwamborn, A. Peter M.; Demmers, Jeroen; Lebbink, Joyce H. G.; Kanaar, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The potential effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), such as those emitted by power-lines (in extremely low frequency range), mobile cellular systems and wireless networking devices (in radio frequency range) on human health have been intensively researched and debated. However, how exposure to these EMFs may lead to biological changes underlying possible health effects is still unclear. To reveal EMF-induced molecular changes, unbiased experiments (without a priori focusing on specific biological processes) with sensitive readouts are required. We present the first proteome-wide semi-quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of human fibroblasts, osteosarcomas and mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to three types of non-ionizing EMFs (ELF 50 Hz, UMTS 2.1 GHz and WiFi 5.8 GHz). We performed controlled in vitro EMF exposures of metabolically labeled mammalian cells followed by reliable statistical analyses of differential protein- and pathway-level regulations using an array of established bioinformatics methods. Our results indicate that less than 1% of the quantitated human or mouse proteome responds to the EMFs by small changes in protein abundance. Further network-based analysis of the differentially regulated proteins did not detect significantly perturbed cellular processes or pathways in human and mouse cells in response to ELF, UMTS or WiFi exposure. In conclusion, our extensive bioinformatics analyses of semi-quantitative mass spectrometry data do not support the notion that the short-time exposures to non-ionizing EMFs have a consistent biologically significant bearing on mammalian cells in culture. PMID:28234898

  18. LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics quantitatively detects the interaction between p53 and MDM2 in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Zhong, Ting; Chen, Yun

    2017-01-30

    In breast cancer, p53 could be functionally compromised by interaction with several proteins. Among those proteins, MDM2 serves as a pivotal negative regulator and counteracts p53 activation. Thus, the ability to quantitatively and accurately monitor the changes in level of p53-MDM2 interaction with disease state can enable an improved understanding of this protein-protein interaction (PPI), provide a better insight into cancer development and allow the emergence of advanced treatments. However, rare studies have evaluated the quantitative extent of PPI including p53-MDM2 interaction so far. In this study, a LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was developed and coupled with co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) for the quantification of p53-MDM2 complex. A p53 antibody with the epitope residing at 156-214 residues achieved the greatest IP efficiency. 321KPLDGEYFTLQIR333 (p53) and 327ENWLPEDK334 (MDM2) were selected as surrogate peptides in the targeted analysis. Stable isotope-labeled synthetic peptides were used as internal standards. An LOQ (limit of quantification) of 2ng/mL was obtained. Then, the assay was applied to quantitatively detect total p53, total MDM2 and p53-MDM2 in breast cells and tissue samples. Western blotting was performed for a comparison. Finally, a quantitative time-course analysis in MCF-7 cells with the treatment of nutlin-3 as a PPI inhibitor was also monitored.

  19. Quantitative determination of fucoidan using polyion-sensitive membrane electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Min; Nguyen, Loc; Barr, Mary Frances; Morabito, Michael; Stringer, Damien; Fitton, J Helen; Mowery, Kelly A

    2015-06-02

    The use of polyanion and polycation-sensitive membrane electrodes to detect five different preparations of fucoidan is described. Unlike linear polyanionic molecules previously measured with polymer membrane-based electrochemical sensors, fucoidans from marine brown algae are all highly branched, sulfated polysaccharides with varying charge densities and structures, depending on the species of seaweed, method of extraction used and extent of purification. When tridodecylmethylammonium (TDMA) was used as the ion-exchanger, a large, non-equilibrium EMF response was observed over a concentration range of 0.5-50 μg mL(-1) fucoidan. Fucoidan was also measured by titration with polycationic protamine, using a dinonylnaphthalene sulfonate (DNNS)-doped membrane electrode as the potentiometric endpoint detector. Potentiometric titration was used to determine the binding ratio between protamine and fucoidan at the neutralization endpoint for each fucoidan preparation. This binding ratio was then used to successfully determine the fucoidan content of commercially available nutritional supplements. Fucoidan was also measured in undiluted blood serum, demonstrating that this method may be applicable for measuring fucoidan for clinical applications.

  20. The mzqLibrary--An open source Java library supporting the HUPO-PSI quantitative proteomics standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Da; Zhang, Huaizhong; Fan, Jun; Perkins, Simon; Pisconti, Addolorata; Simpson, Deborah M; Bessant, Conrad; Hubbard, Simon; Jones, Andrew R

    2015-09-01

    The mzQuantML standard has been developed by the Proteomics Standards Initiative for capturing, archiving and exchanging quantitative proteomic data, derived from mass spectrometry. It is a rich XML-based format, capable of representing data about two-dimensional features from LC-MS data, and peptides, proteins or groups of proteins that have been quantified from multiple samples. In this article we report the development of an open source Java-based library of routines for mzQuantML, called the mzqLibrary, and associated software for visualising data called the mzqViewer. The mzqLibrary contains routines for mapping (peptide) identifications on quantified features, inference of protein (group)-level quantification values from peptide-level values, normalisation and basic statistics for differential expression. These routines can be accessed via the command line, via a Java programming interface access or a basic graphical user interface. The mzqLibrary also contains several file format converters, including import converters (to mzQuantML) from OpenMS, Progenesis LC-MS and MaxQuant, and exporters (from mzQuantML) to other standards or useful formats (mzTab, HTML, csv). The mzqViewer contains in-built routines for viewing the tables of data (about features, peptides or proteins), and connects to the R statistical library for more advanced plotting options. The mzqLibrary and mzqViewer packages are available from https://code.google.com/p/mzq-lib/. © 2015 The Authors. PROTEOMICS Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Analysis of membrane proteome by data-dependent LC-MS/MS combined with data-independent LC-MSE technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kwon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics work resembles the search for a needle in a haystack. The identification of protein biomarker requires the removal of the false protein data from the whole protein mixture. For high quality proteomic data, even a strict filtration step using the false discovery rate (FDR is insufficient for obtaining perfect protein information from the biological samples. In this study, the cyanobacterial whole membrane fraction was applied to the data-dependent analysis (DDA mode of LC-MS/MS, which was used along with the data-independent LC-MSE technique in order to evaluate the membrane proteomic data. Furthermore, the identified MSE-information (MSE-i data based on the peptide mass and the retention time were validated by the other database search, i.e., the probability-based MASCOT and de novo search engine PEAKS. In this present study, 208 cyanobacterial proteins with FDR of 5% were identified using the data-independent nano-UPLC/MSE acquisition with the Protein Lynx Global Server (PLGS, and 56 of these proteins were the predicted membrane proteins. When a total of 208 MSE-i proteomic data were applied to the DDA mode of LC-MS/MS, the number of identified membrane proteins was 26 and 33 from MASCOT and PEAKS with a FDR of 5%, respectively. The number of totally overlapped membrane proteins was 25. Therefore, the data-independent LC-MSE identified more proteins with a high confidence.

  2. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Bromotetrandrine and Tetrandrine in K562 Cell Line Using 18O-labeling Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Ying; GE Zhi-qiang; LIU Chang-xiao

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare quantitative proteomic analysis of bromotetrandrine (W198) which was a Class Ⅰ new antitumor drug in China and tetrandrine (Tet) in K562 cell line using 18O-labeling method.Methods To illustrate its mechanism,a shotgun quantitative proteomic strategy employing 2D LC-MS-MS and trypsin catalyzed 18O-labeling quantification was carried out in this study.Compared to normal chronic leukemia cell line K562 and K562 induced by Tet,the proteomic changes of K562 induced by W198 were investigated.In order to validate the quantitation by the 18O-labeling,the analysis was done on an equivalent sample composed of the same amount of labeled and unlabeled proteins from normally cultured cells to act as a reference to the comparative sample.Results A threshold of ± 2-fold change for deciding whether a protein concentration was changed was settled for the following experiments.Comparing the 105 identified soluble proteins' expression levels of the apoptosis starting up K562 cells after W198 induction with the normally cultured cells,16 proteins were found with significantly altered expression levels after W198 treatment.Eight proteins were up-expressed including HMGB2,peroxiredoxin-2,and eIF4A-I,etc.Eight proteins were down-expressed including TCP-1,GRP94,GST-π,and SFGHs,etc.Compared to K562 induced by Tet,eight proteins of K562 were found with significantly altered expression levels after W198 treatment.Five proteins were up-expressed including HSP 90-β and 40S ribosomal protein S15a,etc.Three proteins were down-expressed including phosphoglycerate kinase 1,isoform 5 of interleukin enhancer-binding factor 3,etc.Conclusion The 18O-labeling MS-MS-based method is ideal as a discovery tool,but it is not suitable for validation using a large number of samples.Other more effective methods,such as Western blotting should be used for further validation of candidate cancer proteins discovered from 18O-labeling samples.In total,105 soluble proteins were discovered

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial Proteins Reveals Pro-Survival Mechanisms in the Perpetuation of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Stefani N.; Waters, Katrina M.; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Baulch, Janet E.

    2012-07-26

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon that is measured as mitotically heritable genetic alterations observed in the progeny of an irradiated cell. The mechanisms that perpetuate this instability are unclear, however, a role for chronic oxidative stress has consistently been demonstrated. In the chromosomally unstable LS12 cell line, oxidative stress and genomic instability were correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To clarify this mitochondrial dysfunction and gain insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation induced genomic instability we have evaluated the mitochondrial sub-proteome and performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of LS12 cells. Of 98 quantified mitochondrial proteins, 17 met criteria for fold changes and reproducibility; and 11 were statistically significant in comparison with the stable parental GM10115 cell line. Previous observations implicated defects in the electron transport chain (ETC) in the LS12 cell mitochondrial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis supports these observations, demonstrating significantly reduced levels of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the intermediary between complexes III and IV of the ETC. Results also suggest that LS12 cells compensate for ETC dysfunction and oxidative stress through increased levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and up-regulation of proteins that protect against oxidative stress and apoptosis. More than one cellular defect is likely to contribute to the genomic instability phenotype. These data suggest that LS12 cells have adapted mechanisms that allow survival under sub-optimal conditions of oxidative stress and compromised mitochondrial function to perpetuate genomic instability.

  4. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using 16O /18O labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xin; Tian, Changhai; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yongxiang; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Sharma, Seema; Yu, Fang; Fu, Kai; Zheng, Jialin; Ding, Shi-Jian

    2012-04-06

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) hold great promise for regenerative medicine as well as for investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of various diseases. Understanding of key intracellular signaling pathways and protein targets that control development of iPSC from somatic cells is essential for designing new approaches to improve reprogramming efficiency. Here we report the development and application of an integrated quantitative proteomics platform for investigating differences in protein expressions between mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and MEF-derived iPSC. This platform consists of 16O/18O labeling, multidimensional peptide separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, and data analysis with UNiquant software. Using this platform a total of 2,481 proteins were identified and quantified from the 16O/18O-labeled MEF-iPSC proteome mixtures with a false discovery rate of 0.01. Among them, 218 proteins were significantly upregulated, while 247 proteins were significantly downregulated in iPSC compared to MEF. Many nuclear proteins, including Hdac1, Dnmt1, Pcna, Ccnd1, Smarcc1, and subunits in DNA replication and RNA polymerase II complex were found to be enhanced in iPSC. Protein network analysis revealed that Pcna functions as a hub orchestrating complicated mechanisms including DNA replication, epigenetic inheritance (Dnmt1) and chromatin remodeling (Smarcc1) to reprogram MEF and maintain stemness of iPSC.

  5. SWATH-MS Quantitative Proteomic Investigation Reveals a Role of Jasmonic Acid during Lead Response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fu-Yuan; Chan, Wai-Lung; Chen, Mo-Xian; Kong, Ricky P W; Cai, Congxi; Wang, Qiaomei; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Lo, Clive

    2016-10-07

    Lead (Pb) pollution is a growing environment problem that continuously threatens the productivity of crops. To understand the molecular mechanisms of plant adaptation to Pb toxicity, we examined proteome changes in Arabidopsis seedlings following Pb treatment by SWATH-MS, a label-free quantitative proteomic platform. We identified and quantified the expression of 1719 proteins in water- and Pb-treated plants. Among them, 231 proteins showed significant abundance changes (151 elevated and 80 reduced) upon Pb exposure. Functional categorization revealed that most of the Pb-responsive proteins are involved in different metabolic processes. For example, down-regulation of photosynthesis and biosynthesis of isoprenoids and tetrapyrroles in chloroplasts were observed. On the contrary, pathways leading to glutathione, jasmonic acid (JA), glucosinolate (GSL), and phenylpropanoid production are up-regulated. Experimental characterizations demonstrated a rapid elevation of endogenic JA production in Pb-treated Arabidopsis seedlings, while a JA-deficient mutant and a JA-insensitive mutant showed hypersensitivity to root inhibition by Pb, implicating an essential role of JA during Pb responses. Consistently, methyl jasmonate supplementation alleviated Pb toxicity in the wild-type and JA-deficient mutant. Furthermore, GSL levels were substantially enhanced following Pb treatment, while such induction was not detected in the JA mutant, suggesting that the Pb-induced GSL accumulation is JA-dependent. Overall, our work represents the first SWATH-MS analysis in Arabidopsis and highlights a potential mediating role of JA during Pb stress.

  6. Integrated GlycoProteome Analyzer (I-GPA) for Automated Identification and Quantitation of Site-Specific N-Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gun Wook; Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, Heeyoun; Lee, Ju Yeon; Ahn, Young Hee; Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Jeong, Hoi Keun; Yun, Ki Na; Kim, Yong-Sam; Ko, Jeong-Heon; An, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Han; Paik, Young-Ki; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2016-02-17

    Human glycoproteins exhibit enormous heterogeneity at each N-glycosite, but few studies have attempted to globally characterize the site-specific structural features. We have developed Integrated GlycoProteome Analyzer (I-GPA) including mapping system for complex N-glycoproteomes, which combines methods for tandem mass spectrometry with a database search and algorithmic suite. Using an N-glycopeptide database that we constructed, we created novel scoring algorithms with decoy glycopeptides, where 95 N-glycopeptides from standard α1-acid glycoprotein were identified with 0% false positives, giving the same results as manual validation. Additionally automated label-free quantitation method was first developed that utilizes the combined intensity of top three isotope peaks at three highest MS spectral points. The efficiency of I-GPA was demonstrated by automatically identifying 619 site-specific N-glycopeptides with FDR ≤ 1%, and simultaneously quantifying 598 N-glycopeptides, from human plasma samples that are known to contain highly glycosylated proteins. Thus, I-GPA platform could make a major breakthrough in high-throughput mapping of complex N-glycoproteomes, which can be applied to biomarker discovery and ongoing global human proteome project.

  7. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Populus cathayana Females Are More Sensitive and Respond More Sophisticatedly to Iron Deficiency than Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Yunxiang; Cao, Yanchun; Lei, Yanbao; Jiang, Hao

    2016-03-04

    Previous studies have shown that there are significant sexual differences in the morphological and physiological responses of Populus cathayana Rehder to nitrogen and phosphorus deficiencies, but little is known about the sex-specific differences in responses to iron deficiency. In this study, the effects of iron deficiency on the morphology, physiology, and proteome of P. cathayana males and females were investigated. The results showed that iron deficiency (25 days) significantly decreased height growth, photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll content, and tissue iron concentration in both sexes. A comparison between the sexes indicated that iron-deficient males had less height inhibition and photosynthesis system II or chloroplast ultrastructural damage than iron-deficient females. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis revealed that 144 and 68 proteins were decreased in abundance (e.g., proteins involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, and gene expression regulation) and 78 and 39 proteins were increased in abundance (e.g., proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and stress response) according to the criterion of ratio ≥1.5 in females and males, respectively. A comparison between the sexes indicated that iron-deficient females exhibited a greater change in the proteins involved in photosynthesis, carbon and energy metabolism, the redox system, and stress responsive proteins. This study reveals females are more sensitive and have a more sophisticated response to iron deficiency compared with males and provides new insights into differential sexual responses to nutrient deficiency.

  8. In vivo quantitative proteomics of somatosensory cortical synapses shows which protein levels are modulated by sensory deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butko, Margaret T; Savas, Jeffrey N; Friedman, Beth; Delahunty, Claire; Ebner, Ford; Yates, John R; Tsien, Roger Y

    2013-02-19

    Postnatal bilateral whisker trimming was used as a model system to test how synaptic proteomes are altered in barrel cortex by sensory deprivation during synaptogenesis. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we quantified more than 7,000 synaptic proteins and identified 89 significantly reduced and 161 significantly elevated proteins in sensory-deprived synapses, 22 of which were validated by immunoblotting. More than 95% of quantified proteins, including abundant synaptic proteins such as PSD-95 and gephyrin, exhibited no significant difference under high- and low-activity rearing conditions, suggesting no tissue-wide changes in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic density. In contrast, several proteins that promote mature spine morphology and synaptic strength, such as excitatory glutamate receptors and known accessory factors, were reduced significantly in deprived synapses. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the reduction in SynGAP1, a postsynaptic scaffolding protein, was restricted largely to layer I of barrel cortex in sensory-deprived rats. In addition, protein-degradation machinery such as proteasome subunits, E2 ligases, and E3 ligases, accumulated significantly in deprived synapses, suggesting targeted synaptic protein degradation under sensory deprivation. Importantly, this screen identified synaptic proteins whose levels were affected by sensory deprivation but whose synaptic roles have not yet been characterized in mammalian neurons. These data demonstrate the feasibility of defining synaptic proteomes under different sensory rearing conditions and could be applied to elucidate further molecular mechanisms of sensory development.

  9. Quantitative proteomics analysis of varicose veins: identification of a set of differentially expressed proteins related to ATP generation and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chao-Jen; Liang, Shih-Shin; Hsi, Edward; Chiou, Shyh-Horng; Lin, Sin-Daw

    2013-11-01

    Although morphological and anatomical studies indicate that varicose veins are characterized by venous wall weakening and subendothelial fibrosis, the exact underlying biochemical mechanism of their development remains unknown. Additionally, no quantitative proteomic study of venous proteins leading to decreased contractility of varicose veins has been reported to date. Therefore, to elucidate the molecular mechanism of altered vascular contractility, this study performed shotgun proteomic analysis to obtain protein expression profiles in patients with varicose veins. Stable isotope dimethyl labeling coupled with nanoLC-MS/MS revealed downregulation in 12 polypeptides, including myosin light chain kinase, creatine kinase B-type, ATP synthase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and pyruvate kinase. However, analyses of protein species associated with cytoskeletal assembly or with cellular morphology showed no clear up- or down-regulation. These results indicate that defects in ATP generation and utilization may account for the dysfunction of vascular smooth muscle following formation of varicose veins. Collectively, the severity of varicose veins depends on the regulatory roles of various protein factors in the metabolic coordination of physiological functions. This pilot study improves understanding of the pathogenesis of varicose veins and lays the foundation for further validation and clinical translation of biomarkers for targeted therapies in treating this disease.

  10. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

  11. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Optimal Cutting Temperature (OCT) Embedded Core-Needle Biopsy of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaozheng; Huffman, Kenneth E.; Fujimoto, Junya; Canales, Jamie Rodriguez; Girard, Luc; Nie, Guangjun; Heymach, John V.; Wistuba, Igacio I.; Minna, John D.; Yu, Yonghao

    2017-07-01

    With recent advances in understanding the genomic underpinnings and oncogenic drivers of pathogenesis in different subtypes, it is increasingly clear that proper pretreatment diagnostics are essential for the choice of appropriate treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tumor tissue preservation in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) compound is commonly used in the surgical suite. However, proteins recovered from OCT-embedded specimens pose a challenge for LC-MS/MS experiments, due to the large amounts of polymers present in OCT. Here we present a simple workflow for whole proteome analysis of OCT-embedded NSCLC tissue samples, which involves a simple trichloroacetic acid precipitation step. Comparisons of protein recovery between frozen versus OCT-embedded tissue showed excellent consistency with more than 9200 proteins identified. Using an isobaric labeling strategy, we quantified more than 5400 proteins in tumor versus normal OCT-embedded core needle biopsy samples. Gene ontology analysis indicated that a number of proliferative as well as squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) marker proteins were overexpressed in the tumor, consistent with the patient's pathology based diagnosis of "poorly differentiated SqCC". Among the most downregulated proteins in the tumor sample, we noted a number of proteins with potential immunomodulatory functions. Finally, interrogation of the aberrantly expressed proteins using a candidate approach and cross-referencing with publicly available databases led to the identification of potential druggable targets in DNA replication and DNA damage repair pathways. We conclude that our approach allows LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses on OCT-embedded lung cancer specimens, opening the way to bring powerful proteomics into the clinic. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Optimal Cutting Temperature (OCT) Embedded Core-Needle Biopsy of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaozheng; Huffman, Kenneth E.; Fujimoto, Junya; Canales, Jamie Rodriguez; Girard, Luc; Nie, Guangjun; Heymach, John V.; Wistuba, Igacio I.; Minna, John D.; Yu, Yonghao

    2017-10-01

    With recent advances in understanding the genomic underpinnings and oncogenic drivers of pathogenesis in different subtypes, it is increasingly clear that proper pretreatment diagnostics are essential for the choice of appropriate treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tumor tissue preservation in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) compound is commonly used in the surgical suite. However, proteins recovered from OCT-embedded specimens pose a challenge for LC-MS/MS experiments, due to the large amounts of polymers present in OCT. Here we present a simple workflow for whole proteome analysis of OCT-embedded NSCLC tissue samples, which involves a simple trichloroacetic acid precipitation step. Comparisons of protein recovery between frozen versus OCT-embedded tissue showed excellent consistency with more than 9200 proteins identified. Using an isobaric labeling strategy, we quantified more than 5400 proteins in tumor versus normal OCT-embedded core needle biopsy samples. Gene ontology analysis indicated that a number of proliferative as well as squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) marker proteins were overexpressed in the tumor, consistent with the patient's pathology based diagnosis of "poorly differentiated SqCC". Among the most downregulated proteins in the tumor sample, we noted a number of proteins with potential immunomodulatory functions. Finally, interrogation of the aberrantly expressed proteins using a candidate approach and cross-referencing with publicly available databases led to the identification of potential druggable targets in DNA replication and DNA damage repair pathways. We conclude that our approach allows LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses on OCT-embedded lung cancer specimens, opening the way to bring powerful proteomics into the clinic. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Optimized Clinical Use of RNALater and FFPE Samples for Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Kastaniegaard, Kenneth; Padurariu, Simona

    Introduction and Objectives The availability of patient samples is essential for clinical proteomic research. Biobanks worldwide store mainly samples stabilized in RNAlater as well as formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) biopsies. Biobank material is a potential source for clinical...... we compare to FFPE and frozen samples being the control. Methods From the sigmoideum of two healthy participants’ twenty-four biopsies were extracted using endoscopy. The biopsies was stabilized either by being directly frozen, RNAlater, FFPE or incubated for 30 min at room temperature prior to FFPE...

  14. Quantitative proteomics of primary tumors with varying metastatic capabilities using stable isotope-labeled proteins of multiple histogenic origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke Raaen; Terp, Mikkel Green; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    The development of metastasis is a complex, multistep process that remains poorly defined. To identify proteins involved in the colonization phase of the metastatic process, we compared the proteome of tumors derived from inoculation of a panel of isogenic human cancer cell lines with different...... multiple histogenic origins and displayed superior features compared to standard super-SILAC. The expression of some proteins correlated with metastatic capabilities, such as myosin-9 (non-muscle myosin II A) and L-lactate dehydrogenase A, while the expression of elongation factor tu correlated inversely...... to metastatic capabilities. The expression of these proteins was biochemically-validated, and expression of myosin-9 in clinical breast cancer samples was further shown to be altered in primary tumors vs. corresponding lymph node metastasis. Our study demonstrates an improved strategy for quantitative...

  15. Identification of targets of miR-200b by a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arivusudar Marimuthu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available miRNAs regulate gene expression by binding to cognate mRNAs causing mRNA degradation or translational repression. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis is being widely used to identify miRNA targets. The miR-200b miRNA cluster is often overexpressed in multiple cancer types, but the identity of the targets remains elusive. Using SILAC-based analysis, we examined the effects of overexpression of a miR-200b mimic or a control miRNA in fibrosarcoma cells. We identified around 300 potential targets of miR-200b based on a change in the expression of protein levels. We validated a subset of potential targets at the transcript level using quantitative PCR.

  16. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics analysis of gene regulation by SprC in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huanqiang; Hu, Fupin; Yang, Han; Ding, Baixing; Xu, Xiaogang; He, Chunyan; Cui, Zelin; Shu, Wen; Liu, Qingzhong

    2017-09-06

    To explore the complete gene networks regulated by small RNA SprC and its targets in Staphylococcus aureus. The isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation and bioinformatic methods were utilized to identify and analyze the target proteins affected by SprC in S. aureus N315. Proteomic analysis showed that the expression of 44 proteins was modulated by SprC. Further, bioinformatic analysis displayed that these affected proteins mainly associated with metabolic and cellular process, biological regulation and catalytic activity. Our data provide a rich resource of SprC targets in S. aureus, although the mechanism of regulation by SprC is yet to be elucidated.

  17. Natural product proteomining, a quantitative proteomics platform, allows rapid discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters for different classes of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbens, Jacob; Zhu, Hua; Girard, Geneviève; Song, Lijiang; Florea, Bogdan I; Aston, Philip; Ichinose, Koji; Filippov, Dmitri V; Choi, Young H; Overkleeft, Herman S; Challis, Gregory L; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2014-06-19

    Information on gene clusters for natural product biosynthesis is accumulating rapidly because of the current boom of available genome sequencing data. However, linking a natural product to a specific gene cluster remains challenging. Here, we present a widely applicable strategy for the identification of gene clusters for specific natural products, which we name natural product proteomining. The method is based on using fluctuating growth conditions that ensure differential biosynthesis of the bioactivity of interest. Subsequent combination of metabolomics and quantitative proteomics establishes correlations between abundance of natural products and concomitant changes in the protein pool, which allows identification of the relevant biosynthetic gene cluster. We used this approach to elucidate gene clusters for different natural products in Bacillus and Streptomyces, including a novel juglomycin-type antibiotic. Natural product proteomining does not require prior knowledge of the gene cluster or secondary metabolite and therefore represents a general strategy for identification of all types of gene clusters.

  18. Generation of High-Quality SWATH(®) Acquisition Data for Label-free Quantitative Proteomics Studies Using TripleTOF(®) Mass Spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W; Hunter, Christie L

    2017-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition is a powerful mass spectrometry technique that enables comprehensive MS and MS/MS analysis of all detectable species, providing an information rich data file that can be mined deeply. Here, we describe how to acquire high-quality SWATH(®) Acquisition data to be used for large quantitative proteomic studies. We specifically focus on using variable sized Q1 windows for acquisition of MS/MS data for generating higher specificity quantitative data.

  19. Quantitative high-throughput profiling of snake venom gland transcriptomes and proteomes (Ovophis okinavensis and Protobothrops flavoviridis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Steven D; Watanabe, Yutaka; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Roy, Michael C; Terada, Kouki; Mikheyev, Alexander S

    2013-11-14

    Advances in DNA sequencing and proteomics have facilitated quantitative comparisons of snake venom composition. Most studies have employed one approach or the other. Here, both Illumina cDNA sequencing and LC/MS were used to compare the transcriptomes and proteomes of two pit vipers, Protobothrops flavoviridis and Ovophis okinavensis, which differ greatly in their biology. Sequencing of venom gland cDNA produced 104,830 transcripts. The Protobothrops transcriptome contained transcripts for 103 venom-related proteins, while the Ovophis transcriptome contained 95. In both, transcript abundances spanned six orders of magnitude. Mass spectrometry identified peptides from 100% of transcripts that occurred at higher than contaminant (e.g. human keratin) levels, including a number of proteins never before sequenced from snakes. These transcriptomes reveal fundamentally different envenomation strategies. Adult Protobothrops venom promotes hemorrhage, hypotension, incoagulable blood, and prey digestion, consistent with mammalian predation. Ovophis venom composition is less readily interpreted, owing to insufficient pharmacological data for venom serine and metalloproteases, which comprise more than 97.3% of Ovophis transcripts, but only 38.0% of Protobothrops transcripts. Ovophis venom apparently represents a hybrid strategy optimized for frogs and small mammals. This study illustrates the power of cDNA sequencing combined with MS profiling. The former quantifies transcript composition, allowing detection of novel proteins, but cannot indicate which proteins are actually secreted, as does MS. We show, for the first time, that transcript and peptide abundances are correlated. This means that MS can be used for quantitative, non-invasive venom profiling, which will be beneficial for studies of endangered species.

  20. Quantitative high-throughput profiling of snake venom gland transcriptomes and proteomes (Ovophis okinavensis and Protobothrops flavoviridis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Advances in DNA sequencing and proteomics have facilitated quantitative comparisons of snake venom composition. Most studies have employed one approach or the other. Here, both Illumina cDNA sequencing and LC/MS were used to compare the transcriptomes and proteomes of two pit vipers, Protobothrops flavoviridis and Ovophis okinavensis, which differ greatly in their biology. Results Sequencing of venom gland cDNA produced 104,830 transcripts. The Protobothrops transcriptome contained transcripts for 103 venom-related proteins, while the Ovophis transcriptome contained 95. In both, transcript abundances spanned six orders of magnitude. Mass spectrometry identified peptides from 100% of transcripts that occurred at higher than contaminant (e.g. human keratin) levels, including a number of proteins never before sequenced from snakes. These transcriptomes reveal fundamentally different envenomation strategies. Adult Protobothrops venom promotes hemorrhage, hypotension, incoagulable blood, and prey digestion, consistent with mammalian predation. Ovophis venom composition is less readily interpreted, owing to insufficient pharmacological data for venom serine and metalloproteases, which comprise more than 97.3% of Ovophis transcripts, but only 38.0% of Protobothrops transcripts. Ovophis venom apparently represents a hybrid strategy optimized for frogs and small mammals. Conclusions This study illustrates the power of cDNA sequencing combined with MS profiling. The former quantifies transcript composition, allowing detection of novel proteins, but cannot indicate which proteins are actually secreted, as does MS. We show, for the first time, that transcript and peptide abundances are correlated. This means that MS can be used for quantitative, non-invasive venom profiling, which will be beneficial for studies of endangered species. PMID:24224955

  1. Quantitative Proteomic and Transcriptomic Study on Autotetraploid Paulownia and Its Diploid Parent Reveal Key Metabolic Processes Associated with Paulownia Autotetraploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanpeng; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Fan, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidy plays a very important role in speciation and plant evolution by way of genomic merging and doubling. In the process of polyploidy, rapid genomic, and transcriptomic changes have been observed and researched. However, proteomic divergence caused by the effects of polyploidization is still poorly understood. In the present study, we used iTRAQ coupled with mass spectrometry to quantitatively analyze proteomic changes in the leaves of autotetraploid Paulownia and its diploid parent. A total of 2963 proteins were identified and quantified. Among them, 463 differentially abundant proteins were detected between autotetraploid Paulownia and its diploid parent, and 198 proteins were found to be non-additively abundant in autotetraploid Paulownia, suggesting the presence of non-additive protein regulation during genomic merger and doubling. We also detected 1808 protein-encoding genes in previously published RNA sequencing data. We found that 59 of the genes that showed remarkable changes at mRNA level encoded proteins with consistant changes in their abundance levels, while a further 48 genes that showed noteworthy changes in their expression levels encoded proteins with opposite changes in their abundance levels. Proteins involved in posttranslational modification, protein turnover, and response to stimulus, were significantly enriched among the non-additive proteins, which may provide some of the driving power for variation and adaptation in autopolyploids. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis verified the expression patterns of related protein-coding genes. In addition, we found that the percentage of differentially abundant proteins that matched previously reported differentially expressed genes was relatively low.

  2. LFQuant: a label-free fast quantitative analysis tool for high-resolution LC-MS/MS proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jiyang; Xu, Changming; Li, Ning; Liu, Hui; Ma, Jie; Zhu, Yunping; Xie, Hongwei

    2012-12-01

    Database searching based methods for label-free quantification aim to reconstruct the peptide extracted ion chromatogram based on the identification information, which can limit the search space and thus make the data processing much faster. The random effect of the MS/MS sampling can be remedied by cross-assignment among different runs. Here, we present a new label-free fast quantitative analysis tool, LFQuant, for high-resolution LC-MS/MS proteomics data based on database searching. It is designed to accept raw data in two common formats (mzXML and Thermo RAW), and database search results from mainstream tools (MASCOT, SEQUEST, and X!Tandem), as input data. LFQuant can handle large-scale label-free data with fractionation such as SDS-PAGE and 2D LC. It is easy to use and provides handy user interfaces for data loading, parameter setting, quantitative analysis, and quantitative data visualization. LFQuant was compared with two common quantification software packages, MaxQuant and IDEAL-Q, on the replication data set and the UPS1 standard data set. The results show that LFQuant performs better than them in terms of both precision and accuracy, and consumes significantly less processing time. LFQuant is freely available under the GNU General Public License v3.0 at http://sourceforge.net/projects/lfquant/. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. 1D and 2D annotation enrichment: a statistical method integrating quantitative proteomics with complementary high-throughput data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Juergen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Quantitative proteomics now provides abundance ratios for thousands of proteins upon perturbations. These need to be functionally interpreted and correlated to other types of quantitative genome-wide data such as the corresponding transcriptome changes. We describe a new method, 2D annotation enrichment, which compares quantitative data from any two 'omics' types in the context of categorical annotation of the proteins or genes. Suitable genome-wide categories are membership of proteins in biochemical pathways, their annotation with gene ontology terms, sub-cellular localization, the presence of protein domains or the membership in protein complexes. 2D annotation enrichment detects annotation terms whose members show consistent behavior in one or both of the data dimensions. This consistent behavior can be a correlation between the two data types, such as simultaneous up- or down-regulation in both data dimensions, or a lack thereof, such as regulation in one dimension but no change in the other. For the statistical formulation of the test we introduce a two-dimensional generalization of the nonparametric two-sample test. The false discovery rate is stringently controlled by correcting for multiple hypothesis testing. We also describe one-dimensional annotation enrichment, which can be applied to single omics data. The 1D and 2D annotation enrichment algorithms are freely available as part of the Perseus software.

  4. Quantitative proteome analysis of an antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli exposed to tetracycline reveals multiple affected metabolic and peptidoglycan processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Dias, Daniela; Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Moura, Inês Barata; Manageiro, Vera; Igrejas, Gilberto; Caniça, Manuela; Matthiesen, Rune

    2017-03-06

    Tetracyclines are among the most commonly used antibiotics administrated to farm animals for disease treatment and prevention, contributing to the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Although tetracycline mechanisms of resistance are well known, the role of metabolism in bacterial reaction to antibiotic stress is still an important assignment and could contribute to the understanding of tetracycline related stress response. In this study, spectral counts-based label free quantitative proteomics has been applied to study the response to tetracycline of the environmental-borne Escherichia coli EcAmb278 isolate soluble proteome. A total of 1484 proteins were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry at a false discovery rate threshold of 1%, of which 108 were uniquely identified under absence of tetracycline whereas 126 were uniquely identified in presence of tetracycline. These proteins revealed interesting difference in e.g. proteins involved in peptidoglycan-based cell wall proteins and energy metabolism. Upon treatment, 12 proteins were differentially regulated showing more than 2-fold change and presistant E. coli provides novel insight into tetracycline related stress. The lack of new antibiotics to fight infections caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms has motivated the use of old antibiotics, and the search for new drug targets. The evolution of antibiotic resistance is complex, but it is known that agroecosystems play an important part in the selection of antibiotic resistance bacteria. Tetracyclines are still used as phytopharmaceutical agents in crops, selecting resistant bacteria and changing the ecology of farm soil. Little is known about the metabolic response of genetically resistant populations to antibiotic exposure. Indeed, to date there are no quantitative tetracycline resistance studies performed with the latest generation of high resolution mass spectrometers allowing high mass accuracy in both

  5. iTRAQ quantitative analysis of plasma proteome changes of cow from pregnancy to lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Lu; BU Deng-pan; YANG Yong-xing; YAN Su-mei; WANG Jia-qi

    2015-01-01

    Dairy cows undergo tremendous changes in physiological, metabolism and the immune function from pregnancy to lac-tation that are associated with cows being susceptible to metabolic and infectious diseases. The objective of this study is to investigate the changes of plasma proteome on 21 d before expected calving and 1 d after calving from dairy cows using an integrated proteomic approach consisting of minor abundance protein enrichment by ProteoMiner beads, protein labeling by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantiifcation, and protein identiifcation by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Nineteen proteins were changed around the time of calving. These proteins were asso-ciated with response to stress, including acute-phase response and defense response, based on the proteins annotation. In particular, three up-regulated proteins after calving including factor V,α2-antiplasmin and prothrombin were assigned into the complement and coagulation pathway. These results may provide new information in elucidating host response to lactation and parturition stress, and inlfammatory-like conditions at the protein level. Differential proteins may serve as potential markers to regulate the lactation and parturition stress in periparturient dairy cows.

  6. Triple quad ICPMS (ICPQQQ) as a new tool for absolute quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez Fernández, Silvia; Sugishama, Naoki; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2012-07-17

    It is clear that sensitive and interference-free quantification of ICP-detectable elements naturally present in proteins will boost the role of ICPMS in proteomics. In this study, a completely new way of polyatomic interference removal in ICPMS for detection of sulfur (present in the majority of proteins as methionine or cysteine) and phosphorus (present in phosphorylated proteins) is presented. It is based on the concept of tandem mass spectrometry (QQQ) typically used in molecular MS. Briefly, the first quadrupole can be operated as 1 amu window band-pass mass filter to select target analyte ions ((31)P, (32)S, and their on-mass polyatomic interferences). In this way, only selected ions enter the cell and react with O(2), reducing the interferences produced by matrix ions as well as background noise. After optimization of the cell conditions, product ions formed for the targets, (47)PO(+) and (48)SO(+), could be detected with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. The coupling to capillary HPLC allowed analysis of S- and P-containing species with the lowest detection limits ever published (11 and 6.6 fmol, respectively). The potential of the approach for proteomics studies was demonstrated for the highly sensitive simultaneous absolute quantification of different S-containing peptides and phosphopeptides.

  7. Dissection of brassinosteroid-regulated proteins in rice embryos during germination by quantitative proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian-Feng; Xiong, Min; Xu, Peng; Huang, Li-Chun; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs), essential plant-specific steroidal hormones, function in a wide spectrum of plant growth and development events, including seed germination. Rice is not only a monocotyledonous model plant but also one of the most important staple food crops of human beings. Rice seed germination is a decisive event for the next-generation of plant growth and successful seed germination is critical for rice yield. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms on how BR modulates seed germination in rice. In the present study, we used isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based proteomic approach to study BR-regulated proteome during the early stage of seed germination. The results showed that more than 800 BR-responsive proteins were identified, including 88 reliable target proteins responsive to stimuli of both BR-deficiency and BR-insensitivity. Moreover, 90% of the 88 target proteins shared a similar expression change pattern. Gene ontology and string analysis indicated that ribosomal structural proteins, as well as proteins involved in protein biosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolisms were highly clustered. These findings not only enrich BR-regulated protein database in rice seeds, but also allow us to gain novel insights into the molecular mechanism of BR regulated seed germination. PMID:27703189

  8. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  9. High-performance hybrid Orbitrap mass spectrometers for quantitative proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James C; Edwards, Alistair V G; Verano-Braga, Thiago;

    2016-01-01

    We present basic workups and quantitative comparisons for two current generation Orbitrap mass spectrometers, the Q Exactive Plus and Orbitrap Fusion Tribrid, which are widely considered two of the highest performing instruments on the market. We assessed the performance of two quantitative methods...

  10. Analysis of the outer membrane proteome and secretome of Bacteroides fragilis reveals a multiplicity of secretion mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena M Wilson

    Full Text Available Bacteroides fragilis is a widely distributed member of the human gut microbiome and an opportunistic pathogen. Cell surface molecules produced by this organism likely play important roles in colonization, communication with other microbes, and pathogenicity, but the protein composition of the outer membrane (OM and the mechanisms used to transport polypeptides into the extracellular space are poorly characterized. Here we used LC-MS/MS to analyze the OM proteome and secretome of B. fragilis NCTC 9343 grown under laboratory conditions. Of the 229 OM proteins that we identified, 108 are predicted to be lipoproteins, and 61 are predicted to be TonB-dependent transporters. Based on their proximity to genes encoding TonB-dependent transporters, many of the lipoprotein genes likely encode proteins involved in nutrient or small molecule uptake. Interestingly, protease accessibility and biotinylation experiments indicated that an unusually large fraction of the lipoproteins are cell-surface exposed. We also identified three proteins that are members of a novel family of autotransporters, multiple potential type I protein secretion systems, and proteins that appear to be components of a type VI secretion apparatus. The secretome consisted of lipoproteins and other proteins that might be substrates of the putative type I or type VI secretion systems. Our proteomic studies show that B. fragilis differs considerably from well-studied Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli in both the spectrum of OM proteins that it produces and the range of secretion strategies that it utilizes.

  11. Analysis of the membrane proteome of ciprofloxacin-resistant macrophages by stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Caceres

    Full Text Available Overexpression of multidrug transporters is a well-established mechanism of resistance to chemotherapy, but other changes may be co-selected upon exposure to drugs that contribute to resistance. Using a model of J774 macrophages made resistant to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin and comparing it with the wild-type parent cell line, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis using the stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture technology coupled with liquid chromatography electrospray ionization Fourier transform tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-FT-MS/MS on 2 samples enriched in membrane proteins (fractions F1 and F2 collected from discontinuous sucrose gradient. Nine hundred proteins were identified with at least 3 unique peptides in these 2 pooled fractions among which 61 (F1 and 69 (F2 showed a significantly modified abundance among the 2 cell lines. The multidrug resistance associated protein Abcc4, known as the ciprofloxacin efflux transporter in these cells, was the most upregulated, together with Dnajc3, a protein encoded by a gene located downstream of Abcc4. The other modulated proteins are involved in transport functions, cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization, immune response, signal transduction, and metabolism. This indicates that the antibiotic ciprofloxacin is able to trigger a pleiotropic adaptative response in macrophages that includes the overexpression of its efflux transporter.

  12. Quantitative proteomics analysis using 2D-PAGE to investigate the effects of cigarette smoke and aerosol of a prototypic modified risk tobacco product on the lung proteome in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Ashraf; Titz, Bjoern; Dijon, Sophie; Merg, Celine; Geertz, Marcel; Schneider, Thomas; Martin, Florian; Schlage, Walter K; Frentzel, Stefan; Talamo, Fabio; Phillips, Blaine; Veljkovic, Emilija; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-08-11

    Smoking is associated with several serious diseases, such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Within our systems toxicology framework, we are assessing whether potential modified risk tobacco products (MRTP) can reduce smoking-related health risks compared to conventional cigarettes. In this article, we evaluated to what extent 2D-PAGE/MALDI MS/MS (2D-PAGE) can complement the iTRAQ LC-MS/MS results from a previously reported mouse inhalation study, in which we assessed a prototypic MRTP (pMRTP). Selected differentially expressed proteins identified by both LC-MS/MS and 2D-PAGE approaches were further verified using reverse-phase protein microarrays. LC-MS/MS captured the effects of cigarette smoke (CS) on the lung proteome more comprehensively than 2D-PAGE. However, an integrated analysis of both proteomics data sets showed that 2D-PAGE data complement the LC-MS/MS results by supporting the overall trend of lower effects of pMRTP aerosol than CS on the lung proteome. Biological effects of CS exposure supported by both methods included increases in immune-related, surfactant metabolism, proteasome, and actin cytoskeleton protein clusters. Overall, while 2D-PAGE has its value, especially as a complementary method for the analysis of effects on intact proteins, LC-MS/MS approaches will likely be the method of choice for proteome analysis in systems toxicology investigations. Quantitative proteomics is anticipated to play a growing role within systems toxicology assessment frameworks in the future. To further understand how different proteomics technologies can contribute to toxicity assessment, we conducted a quantitative proteomics analysis using 2D-PAGE and isobaric tag-based LC-MS/MS approaches and compared the results produced from the 2 approaches. Using a prototypic modified risk tobacco product (pMRTP) as our test item, we show compared with cigarette smoke, how 2D-PAGE results can complement and support LC-MS/MS data, demonstrating

  13. Multidimensional electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) for quantitative analysis of the proteome and phosphoproteome in clinical and biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loroch, Stefan; Schommartz, Tim; Brune, Wolfram; Zahedi, René Peiman; Sickmann, Albert

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics have become key disciplines in understanding cellular processes. Fundamental research can be done using cell culture providing researchers with virtually infinite sample amounts. In contrast, clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research is often restricted to minute sample amounts and requires an efficient analysis with only micrograms of protein. To address this issue, we generated a highly sensitive workflow for combined LC-MS-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics by refining an ERLIC-based 2D phosphoproteomics workflow into an ERLIC-based 3D workflow covering the global proteome as well. The resulting 3D strategy was successfully used for an in-depth quantitative analysis of both, the proteome and the phosphoproteome of murine cytomegalovirus-infected mouse fibroblasts, a model system for host cell manipulation by a virus. In a 2-plex SILAC experiment with 150 μg of a tryptic digest per condition, the 3D strategy enabled the quantification of ~75% more proteins and even ~134% more peptides compared to the 2D strategy. Additionally, we could quantify ~50% more phosphoproteins by non-phosphorylated peptides, concurrently yielding insights into changes on the levels of protein expression and phosphorylation. Beside its sensitivity, our novel three-dimensional ERLIC-strategy has the potential for semi-automated sample processing rendering it a suitable future perspective for clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. msVolcano: A flexible web application for visualizing quantitative proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhdeep; Hein, Marco Y; Stewart, A Francis

    2016-09-01

    We introduce msVolcano, a web application for the visualization of label-free mass spectrometric data. It is optimized for the output of the MaxQuant data analysis pipeline of interactomics experiments and generates volcano plots with lists of interacting proteins. The user can optimize the cutoff values to find meaningful significant interactors for the tagged protein of interest. Optionally, stoichiometries of interacting proteins can be calculated. Several customization options are provided to the user for flexibility, and publication-quality outputs can also be downloaded (tabular and graphical). msVolcano is implemented in R Statistical language using Shiny. It can be accessed freely at http://projects.biotec.tu-dresden.de/msVolcano/. © 2016 The Authors. Proteomics Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Quantitative analysis of proteome and lipidome dynamics reveals functional regulation of global lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, Albert; Sprenger, Richard R; Tarasov, Kirill; Ruckerbauer, David E; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Jensen, Ole N; Ejsing, Christer S

    2015-03-19

    Elucidating how and to what extent lipid metabolism is remodeled under changing conditions is essential for understanding cellular physiology. Here, we analyzed proteome and lipidome dynamics to investigate how regulation of lipid metabolism at the global scale supports remodeling of cellular architecture and processes during physiological adaptations in yeast. Our results reveal that activation of cardiolipin synthesis and remodeling supports mitochondrial biogenesis in the transition from fermentative to respiratory metabolism, that down-regulation of de novo sterol synthesis machinery prompts differential turnover of lipid droplet-associated triacylglycerols and sterol esters during respiratory growth, that sphingolipid metabolism is regulated in a previously unrecognized growth stage-specific manner, and that endogenous synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids constitutes an in vivo upstream activator of peroxisomal biogenesis, via the heterodimeric Oaf1/Pip2 transcription factor. Our work demonstrates the pivotal role of lipid metabolism in adaptive processes and provides a resource to investigate its regulation at the cellular level.

  16. SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung cell response to copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Mariola J; Shack, Leslie A; Naske, Caitlin D; Walters, Keisha B; Nanduri, Bindu

    2014-01-01

    Copper (II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NP) are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the signaling pathways represented by BEAS-2B proteins responsive to the NP included mTOR signaling, protein ubiquitination pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling and epithelial adherens junction signaling. Follow-up experiments showed that CuO NP altered actin cytoskeleton, protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination level.

  17. SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung cell response to copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola J Edelmann

    Full Text Available Copper (II oxide (CuO nanoparticles (NP are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the signaling pathways represented by BEAS-2B proteins responsive to the NP included mTOR signaling, protein ubiquitination pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling and epithelial adherens junction signaling. Follow-up experiments showed that CuO NP altered actin cytoskeleton, protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination level.

  18. Comparative proteomics of milk fat globule membrane proteins from transgenic cloned cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunchao Sui

    Full Text Available The use of transgenic livestock is providing new methods for obtaining pharmaceutically useful proteins. However, the protein expression profiles of the transgenic animals, including expression of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM proteins, have not been well characterized. In this study, we compared the MFGM protein expression profile of the colostrum and mature milk from three lines of transgenic cloned (TC cattle, i.e., expressing recombinant human α-lactalbumin (TC-LA, lactoferrin (TC-LF or lysozyme (TC-LZ in the mammary gland, with those from cloned non-transgenic (C and conventionally bred normal animals (N. We identified 1, 225 proteins in milk MFGM, 166 of which were specifically expressed only in the TC-LA group, 265 only in the TC-LF group, and 184 only in the TC-LZ group. There were 43 proteins expressed only in the transgenic cloned animals, but the concentrations of these proteins were below the detection limit of silver staining. Functional analysis also showed that the 43 proteins had no obvious influence on the bovine mammary gland. Quantitative comparison revealed that MFGM proteins were up- or down-regulated more than twofold in the TC and C groups compared to N group: 126 in colostrum and 77 in mature milk of the TC-LA group; 157 in colostrum and 222 in mature milk of the TC-LF group; 49 in colostrum and 98 in mature milk of the TC-LZ group; 98 in colostrum and 132 in mature milk in the C group. These up- and down-regulated proteins in the transgenic animals were not associated with a particular biological function or pathway, which appears that expression of certain exogenous proteins has no general deleterious effects on the cattle mammary gland.

  19. Quantitative proteomics identifies vasopressin-responsive nuclear proteins in collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Laura K; Bolger, Steven J; Luginbuhl, Kelli; Gonzales, Patricia A; Rinschen, Markus M; Yu, Ming-Jiun; Hoffert, Jason D; Pisitkun, Trairak; Knepper, Mark A

    2012-06-01

    Vasopressin controls transport in the renal collecting duct, in part, by regulating transcription. This complex process, which can involve translocation and/or modification of transcriptional regulators, is not completely understood. Here, we applied a method for large-scale profiling of nuclear proteins to quantify vasopressin-induced changes in the nuclear proteome of cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cells. Using stable isotope labeling and tandem mass spectrometry, we quantified 3987 nuclear proteins and identified significant changes in the abundance of 65, including previously established targets of vasopressin signaling in the collecting duct. Vasopressin-induced changes in the abundance of the transcription factors JunB, Elf3, Gatad2b, and Hmbox1; transcriptional co-regulators Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) and Crebbp; subunits of the Mediator complex; E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4; nuclear transport regulator RanGap1; and several proteins associated with tight junctions and adherens junctions. Bioinformatic analysis showed that many of the quantified transcription factors have putative binding sites in the 5'-flanking regions of genes coding for the channel proteins Aqp2, Aqp3, Scnn1b (ENaCβ), and Scnn1g (ENaCγ), which are known targets of vasopressin. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the increase in β-catenin in nuclear fractions was accompanied by an even larger increase in its phosphorylated form (pSer552). The findings provide a new online database resource for nuclear proteomics (http://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/mNPD/) and generate new hypotheses regarding vasopressin-mediated transcriptional regulation in the collecting duct.

  20. A targeted quantitative proteomics strategy for global kinome profiling of cancer cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-04-01

    Kinases are among the most intensively pursued enzyme superfamilies as targets for anti-cancer drugs. Large data sets on inhibitor potency and selectivity for more than 400 human kinases became available recently, offering the opportunity to design rationally novel kinase-based anti-cancer therapies. However, the expression levels and activities of kinases are highly heterogeneous among different types of cancer and even among different stages of the same cancer. The lack of effective strategy for profiling the global kinome hampers the development of kinase-targeted cancer chemotherapy. Here, we introduced a novel global kinome profiling method, based on our recently developed isotope-coded ATP-affinity probe and a targeted proteomic method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM), for assessing simultaneously the expression of more than 300 kinases in human cells and tissues. This MRM-based assay displayed much better sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy than the discovery-based shotgun proteomic method. Approximately 250 kinases could be routinely detected in the lysate of a single cell line. Additionally, the incorporation of iRT into MRM kinome library rendered our MRM kinome assay easily transferrable across different instrument platforms and laboratories. We further employed this approach for profiling kinase expression in two melanoma cell lines, which revealed substantial kinome reprogramming during cancer progression and demonstrated an excellent correlation between the anti-proliferative effects of kinase inhibitors and the expression levels of their target kinases. Therefore, this facile and accurate kinome profiling assay, together with the kinome-inhibitor interaction map, could provide invaluable knowledge to predict the effectiveness of kinase inhibitor drugs and offer the opportunity for individualized cancer chemotherapy.

  1. Urinary proteomic and non-prefractionation quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis during pregnancy and non-pregnancy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zheng, Jianhua; Liu, Liguo; Wang, Jin; Jin, Qi

    2013-01-01

    .... Furthermore, we also apply a non-prefractionation quantitative phosphoproteomic approach using mTRAQ labeling to evaluate the expression of specific phosphoproteins during pregnancy comparison with non-pregnancy...

  2. On-Beads Digestion in Conjunction with Data-Dependent Mass Spectrometry: A Shortcut to Quantitative and Dynamic Interaction Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Turriziani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of the “-omics” era, biological research has shifted from functionally analyzing single proteins to understanding how entire protein networks connect and adapt to environmental cues. Frequently, pathological processes are initiated by a malfunctioning protein network rather than a single protein. It is therefore crucial to investigate the regulation of proteins in the context of a pathway first and signaling network second. In this study, we demonstrate that a quantitative interaction proteomic approach, combining immunoprecipitation, in-solution digestion and label-free quantification mass spectrometry, provides data of high accuracy and depth. This protocol is applicable, both to tagged, exogenous and untagged, endogenous proteins. Furthermore, it is fast, reliable and, due to a label-free quantitation approach, allows the comparison of multiple conditions. We further show that we are able to generate data in a medium throughput fashion and that we can quantify dynamic interaction changes in signaling pathways in response to mitogenic stimuli, making our approach a suitable method to generate data for system biology approaches.

  3. Quantitative proteomics reveals regulatory differences in the chondrocyte secretome from human medial and lateral femoral condyles in osteoarthritic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Johan; Rüetschi, Ulla; Skiöldebrand, Eva; Kärrholm, Johan; Lindahl, Anders

    2013-10-04

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a destructive joint disease and there are no known biomarkers available for an early diagnosis. To identify potential disease biomarkers and gain further insight into the disease mechanisms of OA we applied quantitative proteomics with SILAC technology on the secretomes from chondrocytes of OA knees, designated as high Mankin (HM) scored secretome. A quantitative comparison was made between the secretomes of the medial and lateral femur condyle chondrocytes in the same knee since the medial femur condyle is usually more affected in OA than the lateral condyle, which was confirmed by Mankin scoring. The medial/lateral comparison was also made on the secretomes from chondrocytes taken from one individual with no clinically apparent joint-disease, designated as low Mankin (LM) scored secretome. We identified 825 proteins in the HM secretome and 69 of these showed differential expression when comparing the medial and lateral femoral compartment. The LM scored femoral condyle showed early signs of OA in the medial compartment as assessed by Mankin score. We here report the identification and relative quantification of several proteins of interest for the OA disease mechanism e.g. CYTL1, DMD and STAB1 together with putative early disease markers e.g. TIMP1, PPP2CA and B2M. The present study reveals differences in protein abundance between medial/lateral femur condyles in OA patients. These regulatory differences expand the knowledge regarding OA disease markers and mechanisms.

  4. Development of a Quantitative SRM-Based Proteomics Method to Study Iron Metabolism of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorijoki, Linda; Isojärvi, Janne; Kallio, Pauli; Kouvonen, Petri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Corthals, Garry L; Jones, Patrik R; Muth-Pawlak, Dorota

    2016-01-04

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S. 6803) is a well-established model species in oxygenic photosynthesis research and a potential host for biotechnological applications. Despite recent advances in genome sequencing and microarray techniques applied in systems biology, quantitative proteomics approaches with corresponding accuracy and depth are scarce for S. 6803. In this study, we developed a protocol to screen changes in the expression of 106 proteins representing central metabolic pathways in S. 6803 with a targeted mass spectrometry method, selected reaction monitoring (SRM). We evaluated the response to the exposure of both short- and long-term iron deprivation. The experimental setup enabled the relative quantification of 96 proteins, with 87 and 92 proteins showing adjusted p-values 6803 was demonstrated by providing quantitative data for altogether 64 proteins that previously could not be detected with the classical data-dependent MS approach under similar conditions. This highlights the effectiveness of SRM for quantification and extends the analytical capability to low-abundance proteins in unfractionated samples of S. 6803. The SRM assays and other generated information are now publicly available via PASSEL and Panorama.

  5. Differential effects of a post-anthesis fertilizer regimen on the wheat flour proteome determined by quantitative 2-DE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altenbach Susan B

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mineral nutrition during wheat grain development has large effects on wheat flour protein content and composition, which in turn affect flour quality and immunogenic potential for a commodity of great economic value. However, it has been difficult to define the precise effects of mineral nutrition on protein composition because of the complexity of the wheat flour proteome. Recent improvements in the identification of flour proteins by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and the availability of a comprehensive proteome map of flour from the US wheat Butte 86 now make it possible to document changes in the proportions of individual flour proteins that result from the application of mineral nutrition. Results Plants of Triticum aestivum 'Butte 86' were grown with or without post-anthesis fertilization (PAF and quantitative 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE was used to analyze protein composition of the resulting flour. Significant changes in the proportions of 54 unique proteins were observed as a result of the treatment. Most omega-gliadins, high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS and serpins as well as some alpha-gliadins increased in proportion with PAF. In contrast, alpha-amylase/protease inhibitors, farinins, purinins and puroindolines decreased in proportion. Decreases were also observed in several low molecular weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS, globulins, defense proteins and enzymes. The ratio of HMW-GS to LMW-GS in the flour increased from 0.61 to 0.95 and the ratio of gliadins to glutenins increased from 1.02 to 1.30 with PAF. Because flour protein content doubled with PAF from 7 to 14%, most protein types actually increased in absolute amount (μg/mg flour protein. Data further suggest that flour proteins change with PAF according to their content of sulfur-containing amino acids Cys + Met. Conclusions A 2-DE approach revealed changes in the wheat flour proteome due to PAF that are important for flour

  6. Characterization of host response to Cryptococcus neoformans through quantitative proteomic analysis of cryptococcal meningitis co-infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvan, Lakshmi Dhevi N; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi K; Kumar, Satwant; Yelamanchi, Soujanya D; Madugundu, Anil K; Anil, Abhijith K; Renuse, Santosh; Nair, Bipin G; Gowda, Harsha; Mathur, Premendu P; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Shankar, S K; Mahadevan, Anita; Keshava Prasad, T S

    2015-09-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common opportunistic fungal infection causing morbidity and mortality (>60%) in HIV-associated immunocompromised individuals caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal infection in brain have been studied using experimental animal models and cell lines. There are limited studies for the molecular understanding of cryptococcal meningitis in human brain. The proteins involved in the process of invasion and infection in human brain still remains obscure. To this end we carried out mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics of frontal lobe brain tissues from cryptococcal meningitis patients and controls to identify host proteins that are associated with the pathogenesis of cryptococcal meningitis. We identified 317 proteins to be differentially expressed (≥2-fold) from a total of 3423 human proteins. We found proteins involved in immune response and signal transduction to be differentially expressed in response to cryptococcal infection in human brain. Immune response proteins including complement factors, major histocompatibility proteins, proteins previously known to be involved in fungal invasion to brain such as caveolin 1 and actin were identified to be differentially expressed in cryptococcal meningitis brain tissues co-infected with HIV. We also validated the expression status of 5 proteins using immunohistochemistry. Overexpression of major histocompatibility complexes, class I, B (HLA-B), actin alpha 2 smooth muscle aorta (ACTA2) and caveolin 1 (CAV1) and downregulation of peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2) and alpha crystallin B chain (CRYAB) in cryptococcal meningitis were confirmed by IHC-based validation experiments. This study provides the brain proteome profile of cryptococcal meningitis co-infected with HIV for a better understanding of the host response associated with the disease.

  7. Quantitative Proteomic Analyses Identify ABA-Related Proteins and Signal Pathways in Maize Leaves under Drought Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Yankai; Yang, Hao; Wang, Wei; Wu, Jianyu; Hu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of major factors resulting in maize yield loss. The roles of abscisic acid (ABA) have been widely studied in crops in response to drought stress. However, more attention is needed to identify key ABA-related proteins and also gain deeper molecular insights about drought stress in maize. Based on this need, the physiology and proteomics of the ABA-deficient maize mutant vp5 and its wild-type Vp5 under drought stress were examined and analyzed. Malondialdehyde content increased and quantum efficiency of photosystem II decreased under drought stress in both genotypes. However, the magnitude of the increase or decrease was significantly higher in vp5 than in Vp5. A total of 7051 proteins with overlapping expression patterns among three replicates in the two genotypes were identified by Multiplex run iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods, of which the expression of only 150 proteins (130 in Vp5, 27 in vp5) showed changes of at least 1.5-fold under drought stress. Among the 150 proteins, 67 and 60 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated by drought stress in an ABA-dependent way, respectively. ABA was found to play active roles in regulating signaling pathways related to photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation (mainly related to ATP synthesis), and glutathione metabolism (involved in antioxidative reaction) in the maize response to drought stress. Our results provide an extensive dataset of ABA-dependent, drought-regulated proteins in maize plants, which may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of ABA-enhanced tolerance to drought stress in maize.

  8. Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification-based Comparative Proteomics Reveals the Features of Plasma Membrane-Associated Proteomes of Pollen Grains and Pollen Tubes from Lilium davidii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Han; Sixue Chen; Shaojun Dai; Ning Yang; Tai Wang

    2010-01-01

    Mature pollen grains (PGs) from most plant species are metabolically quiescent. However, once pollinated onto stigma, they quickly hydrate and germinate. APG can give rise to a vegetative cell-derived polarized pollen tube (PT), which represents a specialized polar cell. The polarized PT grows by the tip and requires interaction of different signaling molecules localized in the apical plasma membrane and active membrane trafficking. The mechanisms underlying the interaction and membrane trafficking are not well understood. In this work, we purified PG and PT plasma-membrane vesicles from Lilium davidii Duch. using the aqueous two-phase partition technique, then enriched plasma membrane proteins by using Brij58 and KCl to remove loosely bound contaminants. We identified 223 integral and membrane-associated proteins in the plasma membrane of PGs and PTs by using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and 2-D high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. More than 68% of the proteins have putative transmembrane domains and/or lipid-modified motifs. Proteins involved in signal transduction, membrane trafficking and transport are predominant in the plasma-membrane proteome. We revealed most components of the clathrin-dependent endocytosis pathway. Statistical analysis revealed 14 proteins differentially expressed in the two development stages: in PTs, six upregulated and eight downregulated are mainly involved in signaling, transport and membrane trafficking. These results provide novel insights into polarized PT growth.

  9. Extending the Limits of Quantitative Proteome Profiling with Data-Independent Acquisition and Application to Acetaminophen-Treated Three-Dimensional Liver Microtissues*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruderer, Roland; Bernhardt, Oliver M.; Gandhi, Tejas; Miladinović, Saša M.; Cheng, Lin-Yang; Messner, Simon; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Zanotelli, Vito; Butscheid, Yulia; Escher, Claudia; Vitek, Olga; Rinner, Oliver; Reiter, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    The data-independent acquisition (DIA) approach has recently been introduced as a novel mass spectrometric method that promises to combine the high content aspect of shotgun proteomics with the reproducibility and precision of selected reaction monitoring. Here, we evaluate, whether SWATH-MS type DIA effectively translates into a better protein profiling as compared with the established shotgun proteomics. We implemented a novel DIA method on the widely used Orbitrap platform and used retention-time-normalized (iRT) spectral libraries for targeted data extraction using Spectronaut. We call this combination hyper reaction monitoring (HRM). Using a controlled sample set, we show that HRM outperformed shotgun proteomics both in the number of consistently identified peptides across multiple measurements and quantification of differentially abundant proteins. The reproducibility of HRM in peptide detection was above 98%, resulting in quasi complete data sets compared with 49% of shotgun proteomics. Utilizing HRM, we profiled acetaminophen (APAP)1-treated three-dimensional human liver microtissues. An early onset of relevant proteome changes was revealed at subtoxic doses of APAP. Further, we detected and quantified for the first time human NAPQI-protein adducts that might be relevant for the toxicity of APAP. The adducts were identified on four mitochondrial oxidative stress related proteins (GATM, PARK7, PRDX6, and VDAC2) and two other proteins (ANXA2 and FTCD). Our findings imply that DIA should be the preferred method for quantitative protein profiling. PMID:25724911

  10. Quantitative Analysis of the Human Milk Whey Proteome Reveals Developing Milk and Mammary-Gland Functions across the First Year of Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In-depth understanding of the changing functions of human milk (HM proteins and the corresponding physiological adaptions of the lactating mammary gland has been inhibited by incomplete knowledge of the HM proteome. We analyzed the HM whey proteome (n = 10 women with samples at 1 week and 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months using a quantitative proteomic approach. One thousand three hundred and thirty three proteins were identified with 615 being quantified. Principal component analysis revealed a transition in the HM whey proteome-throughout the first year of lactation. Abundance changes in IgG, sIgA and sIgM display distinct features during the first year. Complement components and other acute-phase proteins are generally at higher levels in early lactation. Proteomic analysis further suggests that the sources of milk fatty acids (FA shift from more direct blood influx to more de novo mammary synthesis over lactation. The abundances of the majority of glycoproteins decline over lactation, which is consistent with increased enzyme expression in glycoprotein degradation and decreased enzyme expression in glycoprotein synthesis. Cellular detoxification machinery may be transformed as well, thereby accommodating increased metabolic activities in late lactation. The multiple developing functions of HM proteins and the corresponding mammary adaption become more apparent from this study.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of the Human Milk Whey Proteome Reveals Developing Milk and Mammary-Gland Functions across the First Year of Lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Cundiff, Judy K; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Woo, Jessica G; Davidson, Barbara S; Morrow, Ardythe L

    2013-09-03

    In-depth understanding of the changing functions of human milk (HM) proteins and the corresponding physiological adaptions of the lactating mammary gland has been inhibited by incomplete knowledge of the HM proteome. We analyzed the HM whey proteome (n = 10 women with samples at 1 week and 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months) using a quantitative proteomic approach. One thousand three hundred and thirty three proteins were identified with 615 being quantified. Principal component analysis revealed a transition in the HM whey proteome-throughout the first year of lactation. Abundance changes in IgG, sIgA and sIgM display distinct features during the first year. Complement components and other acute-phase proteins are generally at higher levels in early lactation. Proteomic analysis further suggests that the sources of milk fatty acids (FA) shift from more direct blood influx to more de novo mammary synthesis over lactation. The abundances of the majority of glycoproteins decline over lactation, which is consistent with increased enzyme expression in glycoprotein degradation and decreased enzyme expression in glycoprotein synthesis. Cellular detoxification machinery may be transformed as well, thereby accommodating increased metabolic activities in late lactation. The multiple developing functions of HM proteins and the corresponding mammary adaption become more apparent from this study.

  12. Elucidation of the outer membrane proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium utilising a lipid-based protein immobilization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleton Hazel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The outer membrane proteins expressed by S. Typhimurium mediate the process of adhesion and internalisation within the intestinal epithelium of the host thus influencing the progression of disease. Since the outer membrane proteins are surface-exposed, they provide attractive targets for the development of improved antimicrobial agents and vaccines. Various techniques have been developed for their characterisation, but issues such as carryover of cytosolic proteins still remain a problem. In this study we attempted to characterise the surface proteome of S. Typhimurium using Lipid-based Protein Immobilisation technology in the form of LPI™ FlowCells. No detergents are required and no sample clean up is needed prior to downstream analysis. The immobilised proteins can be digested with proteases in multiple steps to increase sequence coverage, and the peptides eluted can be characterised directly by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and identified from mass spectral database searches. Results In this study, 54 outer membrane proteins, were identified with two or more peptide hits using a multi-step digest approach. Out of these 28 were lipoproteins, nine were involved in transport and three with enzyme activity These included the transporters BtuB which is responsible for the uptake of vitamin B12, LamB which is involved in the uptake of maltose and maltodextrins and LolB which is involved in the incorporation of lipoproteins in the outer membrane. Other proteins identified included the enzymes MltC which may play a role in cell elongation and division and NlpD which is involved in catabolic processes in cell wall formation as well as proteins involved in virulence such as Lpp1, Lpp2 and OmpX. Conclusion Using a multi-step digest approach the LPI™ technique enables the incorporation of a

  13. Quantitative proteome profiling of respiratory virus-infected lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Angela; Brand, H Kim; Sama, Iziah; Lambooy, Lambert H J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van der Well, Leontine; Huynen, Martijn; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Andeweg, Arno C; Hermans