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Sample records for quantitative immunochemical fecal

  1. Fecal Occult Blood Test and Fecal Immunochemical Test

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    ... Visit Global Sites Search Help? Fecal Occult Blood Test and Fecal Immunochemical Test Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Test Common Questions Ask Us Related Pages The Test How is it used? When is it ordered? ...

  2. Predictive power of quantitative and qualitative fecal immunochemical tests for hemoglobin in population screening for colorectal neoplasm.

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    Huang, Yanqin; Li, Qilong; Ge, Weiting; Cai, Shanrong; Zhang, Suzhan; Zheng, Shu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of qualitative and quantitative fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) in population screening for colorectal neoplasm. A total of 9000 participants aged between 40 and 74 years were enrolled in this study. Each participant received two stool sampling tubes and was asked to simultaneously submit two stool samples from the same bowel movement. The stool samples of each participant were tested using an immunogold labeling FIT dipstick (qualitative FIT) and an automated fecal blood analyzer (quantitative FIT). Colonoscopy was performed for those who test positive in either FIT. The positive predictive values and population detection rates of the FITs for predicting colorectal neoplasm were compared. A total of 6494 (72.16%) participants simultaneously submitted two stool samples. The diagnostic consistency for a positive result between quantitative and qualitative FITs was poor (κ=0.278, 95% confidence interval=0.223-0.333). The positive predictive values of the quantitative FIT were significantly higher than those of the qualitative FIT for predicting large (≥1 cm) adenomas (23 cases, 14.29% and 16 cases, 6.72%, P=0.013) and colorectal cancer (10 cases, 6.21% and 5 cases, 2.10%, P=0.034); however, the population detection rate for advanced neoplasm of the quantitative FIT was not significantly different from that of the qualitative FIT. Quantitative FIT is superior to qualitative FIT in predicting advanced colorectal neoplasm during colorectal cancer screening. Further studies are needed to elucidate the causes of the predictive superiority.

  3. A comparison of qualitative and quantitative fecal immunochemical tests in the Korean national colorectal cancer screening program.

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    Park, Mi Jin; Choi, Kui Son; Lee, You Kyoung; Jun, Jae Kwan; Lee, Hoo-Yeon

    2012-04-01

    The National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) has since 2004 provided annual colorectal cancer screening using the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) for individuals aged 50 years or older. The aim of this study was to examine the positivity and detection rates of the FIT and to compare the detection rates of the qualitative and quantitative FITs in participants in the 2009 NCSP. We analyzed positivity and detection rates according to FIT type (qualitative and quantitative). We used a multinomial logistic regression to analyze the odds ratio of "benign" or "suspicious cancer and cancer" compared to "normal," adjusted for gender, age, health insurance type, region of residence, hospital type, and FIT type. Of the 1,181,904 participants, 72.8% received a qualitative and 27.2% a quantitative FIT. The positivity rates were 8.1% for the qualitative and 2.5% for the quantitative FIT. The detection rate was 5.2% for the qualitative and 14.4% for the quantitative FIT. The odds ratio of a "suspicious cancer and cancer" versus a "normal" result was 2.73 (95% CI = 2.22-3.35) for the quantitative compared to qualitative FIT, after adjustment. The positivity rate of the qualitative FIT was around three times higher than that of the quantitative FIT. However, the odds ratio for detection of "suspicious cancer and cancer" versus "normal" of the quantitative FIT was about three times higher than that of the qualitative FIT. These findings suggest that quality control may be important, particularly for the qualitative FIT.

  4. Quantitative immunochemical fecal occult blood testing for colorectal adenoma detection: evaluation in the target population of screening and comparison with qualitative tests.

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    Haug, Ulrike; Hundt, Sabrina; Brenner, Hermann

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative and qualitative immunochemical fecal occult blood tests (FOBTs) have been proposed for noninvasive colorectal cancer screening, but comparative evaluation is lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of two (quantitative) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based immunochemical FOBTs for identifying colorectal adenomas in the target population of screening and to compare the results with six (qualitative) immunochromatographic FOBTs, previously evaluated in the same study participants using the same stool samples. A total of 1,319 participants of screening colonoscopy at average risk for colorectal neoplasia (mean age 63 years; age range 31-86 years; 50% men) were recruited prospectively from January 2006 to December 2007 in collaboration with 20 gastroenterological practices in Germany. Fecal hemoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin levels were measured using an automated ELISA (RIDASCREEN). Test performance characteristics at different cutoff values were derived by comparing the results of stool testing with the results of colonoscopy in a blinded manner. A total of 130 participants (10%) had an advanced adenoma. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve with regard to advanced adenomas was 0.68 (0.65-0.71) for hemoglobin and 0.64 (0.61-0.67) for hemoglobin-haptoglobin (P=0.034). At a specificity of approximately 95%, the sensitivity (95% confidence interval) for advanced adenomas was 33% (25-42%) for hemoglobin and 24% (17-32%) for hemoglobin-haptoglobin, respectively. The sensitivity for hemoglobin was very close to sensitivities of the six qualitative FOBTs at (strongly divergent) levels of specificity observed for the latter. ELISA-based measurement of hemoglobin was superior to hemoglobin-haptoglobin, but showed a similar sensitivity for advanced adenomas compared with (qualitative) immunochromatographic FOBTs at defined levels of specificity. Compared with the latter, its quantitative nature

  5. Correlating Quantitative Fecal Immunochemical Test Results with Neoplastic Findings on Colonoscopy in a Population-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Program: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Shahidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC recommends a fecal immunochemical test- (FIT- positive predictive value (PPV for all adenomas of ≥50%. We sought to assess FIT performance among average-risk participants of the British Columbia Colon Screening Program (BCCSP. Methods. From Nov-2013 to Dec-2014 consecutive participants of the BCCSP were assessed. Data was obtained from a prospectively collected database. A single quantitative FIT (NS-Plus, Alfresa Pharma Corporation, Japan with a cut-off of ≥10 μg/g (≥50 ng/mL was used. Results. 20,322 FIT-positive participants underwent CSPY. At a FIT cut-off of ≥10 μg/g (≥50 ng/mL the PPV for all adenomas was 52.0%. Increasing the FIT cut-off to ≥20 μg/g (≥100 ng/mL would increase the PPV for colorectal cancer (CRC by 1.5% and for high-risk adenomas (HRAs by 6.5% at a cost of missing 13.6% of CRCs and 32.4% of HRAs. Conclusions. As the NS-Plus FIT cut-off rises, the PPV for CRC and HRAs increases but at the cost of missed lesions. A cut-off of ≥10 μg/g (≥50 ng/mL produces a PPV for all adenomas exceeding national recommendations. Health authorities need to take into consideration endoscopic resources when selecting a FIT positivity threshold.

  6. Genetic Biomarker Prevalence Is Similar in Fecal Immunochemical Test Positive and Negative Colorectal Cancer Tissue.

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    Levin, Theodore R; Corley, Douglas A; Jensen, Christopher D; Marks, Amy R; Zhao, Wei K; Zebrowski, Alexis M; Quinn, Virginia P; Browne, Lawrence W; Taylor, William R; Ahlquist, David A; Lidgard, Graham P; Berger, Barry M

    2017-03-01

    Fecal immunochemical test (FIT) screening detects most asymptomatic colorectal cancers. Combining FIT screening with stool-based genetic biomarkers increases sensitivity for cancer, but whether DNA biomarkers (biomarkers) differ for cancers detected versus missed by FIT screening has not been evaluated in a community-based population. To evaluate tissue biomarkers among Kaiser Permanente Northern California patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer within 2 years after FIT screening. FIT-negative and FIT-positive colorectal cancer patients 50-77 years of age were matched on age, sex, and cancer stage. Adequate DNA was isolated from paraffin-embedded specimens in 210 FIT-negative and 211 FIT-positive patients. Quantitative allele-specific real-time target and signal amplification assays were performed for 7 K-ras mutations and 10 aberrantly methylated DNA biomarkers (NDRG4, BMP3, SFMBT2_895, SFMBT2_896, SFMBT2_897, CHST2_7890, PDGFD, VAV3, DTX1, CHST2_7889). One or more biomarkers were found in 414 of 421 CRCs (98.3%). Biomarker expression was not associated with FIT status, with the exception of higher SFMBT2_897 expression in FIT-negative (194 of 210; 92.4%) than in FIT-positive cancers (180 of 211; 85.3%; p = 0.02). There were no consistent differences in biomarker expression by FIT status within age, sex, stage, and cancer location subgroups. The biomarkers of a currently in-use multi-target stool DNA test (K-ras, NDRG4, and BMP3) and eight newly characterized methylated biomarkers were commonly expressed in tumor tissue specimens, independent of FIT result. Additional study using stool-based testing with these new biomarkers will allow assessment of sensitivity, specificity, and clinical utility.

  7. Academic hospital staff compliance with a fecal immunochemical test-based colorectal cancer screening program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgia Vlachonikolou; Paraskevas Gkolfakis; Athanasios D Sioulas; Ioannis S Papanikolaou; Anastasia Melissaratou; Giannis-Aimant Moustafa; Eleni Xanthopoulou; Gerasimos Tsilimidos; Ioanna Tsironi; Paraskevas Filippidis; Chrysoula Malli; George D Dimitriadis; Konstantinos Triantafyllou

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To measure the compliance of an Academic Hospital staff with a colorectal cancer(CRC) screening program using fecal immunochemical test(FIT).METHODS: All employees of "Attikon" University General Hospital aged over 50 years were thoroughly informed by a team of physicians and medical students about the study aims and they were invited to undergo CRC screening using two rounds of FIT(DyoniFOB~ Combo H, DyonMed SA, Athens, Greece). The tests were provided for free and subjects tested positive were subsequently referred for colonoscopy. One year after completing the two rounds, participants were asked to be re-screened by means of the same test.RESULTS: Among our target population consisted of 211 employees, 59(27.9%) consented to participate, but only 41(19.4%) and 24(11.4%) completed the first and the second FIT round, respectively. Female gender was significantly associated with higher initial participation(P = 0.005) and test completion- first and second round-(P = 0.004 and P = 0.05) rates, respectively. Phy sician’s(13.5% vs 70.2%, P < 0.0001) participation and test completion rates(7.5% vs 57.6%, P < 0.0001 for the first and 2.3% vs 34%, P < 0.0001 for the second round) were significantly lower compared to those of the administrative/technical staff. Similarly, nurses participated(25.8% vs 70.2%, P = 0.0002) and completed the first test round(19.3% vs 57.6%, P = 0.004) in a significant lower rate than the administrative/technical staff. One test proved false positive. No participant repeated the test one year later.CONCLUSION: Despite the well-organized, guided and supervised provision of the service, the compliance of the Academic Hospital personnel with a FIT-based CRC screening program was suboptimal, especially among physicians.

  8. Quantitative immunochemical evaluation of fish metallothionein upon exposure to cadmium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yudkovski, Yana; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Yankelevich, Irena

    2008-01-01

    mormyrus by introducing to the assay recombinant MT and beta-actin standards. Commercial antibodies for cod MT and mammalian actin were implemented. In addition, a sensitive anti L. mormyrus MT antibody was produced, adequate only for solid phase immunochemical assays. Cadmium was applied to the fish...... clean natural sites, indicating applicability of MT as biomarker of exposure to a multi-factorial pollution, in comparison to its low revealed sensitivity to controlled cadmium exposure....

  9. Implementation of population screening for colorectal cancer by repeated Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT: third round

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    Stegeman Inge

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is the most common cancer in Europe with a mortality rate of almost 50%. The prognosis of patients is largely determined by the clinical and pathological stage at the time of diagnosis. Population screening has been shown to reduce CRC-related mortality rate. Most screening programs worldwide rely on fecal immunochemical testing (FIT. The effectiveness of a FIT screening program is not only influenced by initial participation rate, but also by program adherence during consecutive screening rounds. We aim to evaluate the participation rate in and yield of a third CRC screening round using FIT. Methods and design Four years after the first screening round and two years after the second round, a total number of approximately 11,000 average risk individuals (50 to 75 years of age will be invited to participate in a third round of FIT-based CRC screening. We will select individuals in the same target area as in the previous screening rounds, using the electronic database of the regional municipal administration registrations. We will invite all FIT-negatives and all non-participants in previous screening rounds, as well as eligible first time invitees who have moved into the area or have become 50 years of age. FITs will be analyzed in the special technique laboratory of the Academic Medical Center of the University of Amsterdam. All FIT-positives will be invited for a consultation at the outpatient clinic. In the absence of contra-indications, a colonoscopy will follow at the Academic Medical Center or at the Flevohospital. The primary outcome measures are the participation rate, defined as the proportion of invitees that return a FIT in this third round of FIT-screening, and the diagnostic yield of the program. Implications This study will provide precise data on the participation in later FIT screening rounds. This enables to estimate the effectiveness of CRC screening programs that rely on repeated

  10. Similar fecal immunochemical test results in screening and referral colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sietze T van Turenhout; Leo GM van Rossum; Frank A Oort; Robert JF Laheij; Anne F van Rijn; Jochim S Terhaar sive Droste; Paul Fockens

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To improve the interpretation of fecal immunochemical test (FIT) results in colorectal cancer (CRC)cases from screening and referral cohorts.METHODS:In this comparative observational study,two prospective cohorts of CRC cases were compared.The first cohort was obtained from 10 322 average risk subjects invited for CRC screening with FIT,of which,only subjects with a positive FIT were referred for colonoscopy.The second cohort was obtained from 3637subjects scheduled for elective colonoscopy with a positive FIT result.The same FIT and positivity threshold (OC sensor; ≥ 50 ng/mL) was used in both cohorts.Colonoscopy was performed in all referral subjects and in FIT positive screening subjects.All CRC cases were selected from both cohorts.Outcome measurements were mean FIT results and FIT scores per tissue tumor stage (T stage).RESULTS:One hundred and eighteen patients with CRC were included in the present study:28 cases obtained from the screening cohort (64% male; mean age 65 years,SD 6.5) and 90 cases obtained from the referral cohort (58% male; mean age 69 years,SD 9.8).The mean FIT results found were higher in the referral cohort (829 ± 302 ng/mL vs 613 ± 368 ng/mL,P =0.02).Tissue tumor stage (T stage) distribution was different between both populations [screening population:13 (46%) T1,eight (29%) T2,six (21%) T3,one (4%)T4 carcinoma; referral population:12 (13%) T1,22(24%) T2,52 (58%) T3,four (4%) T4 carcinoma],and higher T stage was significantly associated with higher FIT results (P < 0.001).Per tumor stage,no significant difference in mean F1T results was observed (screening vs referral:T1 498 ± 382 ng/mL vs 725 ± 374 ng/mL,P =0.22; T2 787 ± 303 ng/mL vs 794 ± 341 ng/mL,P=0.79; T3 563 ± 368 ng/mL vs 870 ± 258 ng/mL,P =0.13; T4 not available).Alter correction for T stage in logistic regression analysis,no significant differences in mean FIT results were observed between both types of cohorts (P =0.10).CONCLUSION

  11. DNA from fecal immunochemical test can replace stool for detection of colonic lesions using a microbiota-based model.

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    Baxter, Nielson T; Koumpouras, Charles C; Rogers, Mary A M; Ruffin, Mack T; Schloss, Patrick D

    2016-11-14

    There is a significant demand for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening methods that are noninvasive, inexpensive, and capable of accurately detecting early stage tumors. It has been shown that models based on the gut microbiota can complement the fecal occult blood test and fecal immunochemical test (FIT). However, a barrier to microbiota-based screening is the need to collect and store a patient's stool sample. Using stool samples collected from 404 patients, we tested whether the residual buffer containing resuspended feces in FIT cartridges could be used in place of intact stool samples. We found that the bacterial DNA isolated from FIT cartridges largely recapitulated the community structure and membership of patients' stool microbiota and that the abundance of bacteria associated with CRC were conserved. We also found that models for detecting CRC that were generated using bacterial abundances from FIT cartridges were equally predictive as models generated using bacterial abundances from stool. These findings demonstrate the potential for using residual buffer from FIT cartridges in place of stool for microbiota-based screening for CRC. This may reduce the need to collect and process separate stool samples and may facilitate combining FIT and microbiota-based biomarkers into a single test. Additionally, FIT cartridges could constitute a novel data source for studying the role of the microbiome in cancer and other diseases.

  12. Population Screening for Colorectal Cancer Means Getting FIT: The Past, Present, and Future of Colorectal Cancer Screening Using the Fecal Immunochemical Test for Hemoglobin (FIT)

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    Fraser, Callum G.; Halloran, Stephen P.; Young, Graeme P.

    2014-01-01

    Fecal immunochemical tests for hemoglobin (FIT) are changing the manner in which colorectal cancer (CRC) is screened. Although these tests are being performed worldwide, why is this test different from its predecessors? What evidence supports its adoption? How can this evidence best be used? This review addresses these questions and provides an understanding of FIT theory and practices to expedite international efforts to implement the use of FIT in CRC screening. PMID:24672652

  13. Screening by Total Colonoscopy Following Fecal Immunochemical Tests and Determinants of Colorectal Neoplasia in Japanese Men With Alcohol Dependence.

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    Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Akira; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Onuki, Shuka; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2017-03-09

    Alcohol consumption increases the risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is a widely used screening method for detecting colorectal neoplasia. We evaluated the results of screening and risk factors for colorectal neoplasia in individuals with alcohol dependence. Total colonoscopic screening was performed for 1006 Japanese men with alcohol dependence (462 FIT-positive and 544 FIT-negative). Advanced neoplasia was defined as neoplasia ≥10 mm, villous or tubulovillous adenoma, high-grade adenoma, or carcinoma. The detection rates for non-advanced adenoma, advanced neoplasia and intramucosal or invasive carcinoma were 38.7%, 39.4% and 9.7% for the FIT-positive group, and 33.3%, 10.8% and 2.2% for the FIT-negative group, respectively. Advanced neoplasia, especially carcinoma, was detected more frequently in the distal colon than in the proximal colon in the FIT-positive group. The respective multivariate odds ratios (ORs; 95% confidence interval) for non-advanced adenoma and advanced neoplasia were 2.83 (2.06–3.88) and 9.13 (6.19–13.5) for a positive FIT (vs. negative), 1.68 (1.39–2.02) and 1.83 (1.45–2.30) for age (per +10 years), 1.54 (1.06–2.23) and 1.88 (1.17–3.03) for current smoking (vs. non-smokers), and 1.35 (0.96–1.92) and 1.59 (1.02–2.48) for the presence of marked macrocytosis (mean corpuscular volume ≥106 fl vs. alcohol dehydrogenase-1B and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 did not affect the risk of colorectal neoplasia. The detection rate for advanced colorectal neoplasia was extremely high in the FIT-positive group but remained high even in the FIT-negative group. An older age, smoking and macrocytosis were predictors of advanced colorectal neoplasia. Total colonoscopic screening was performed for 1006 Japanese alcoholic men (462 fecal immunochemical test [FIT]-positive and 544 FIT-negative). The detection rate for advanced colorectal neoplasia was extremely high in the FIT-positive group (39.4%) and high in

  14. Quantitative aspects of fecal Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi in foals.

    OpenAIRE

    Takai, S.; Ohkura, H; Watanabe, Y.; Tsubaki, S

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative aspects of fecal Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi in newborn foals for 12 weeks after birth were investigated on two horse breeding farms. R. equi was found in the feces of foals during week 1 of life. The greatest numbers of R. equi were present in the feces of foals during the first 8 weeks of their lives, which coincides with the age when foals are most liable to be exposed to R. equi.

  15. Performance of the Fecal Immunochemical Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening Using Different Stool-Collection Devices: Preliminary Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Shin, Hye Young; Suh, Mina; Baik, Hyung Won; Choi, Kui Son; Park, Boyoung; Jun, Jae Kwan; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Lee, Chan Wha; Oh, Jae Hwan; Lee, You Kyoung; Han, Dong Soo; Lee, Do-Hoon

    2016-11-15

    We are in the process of conducting a randomized trial to determine whether compliance with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) for colorectal cancer screening differs according to the stool-collection method. This study was an interim analysis of the performance of two stool-collection devices (sampling bottle vs conventional container). In total, 1,701 individuals (age range, 50 to 74 years) were randomized into the sampling bottle group (intervention arm) or the conventional container group (control arm). In both groups, we evaluated the FIT positivity rate, the positive predictive value for advanced neoplasia, and the detection rate for advanced neoplasia. The FIT positivity rates were 4.1% for the sampling bottles and 2.0% for the conventional containers; these values were significantly different. The positive predictive values for advanced neoplasia in the sampling bottles and conventional containers were 11.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], -3.4 to 25.6) and 12.0% (95% CI, -0.7 to 24.7), respectively. The detection rates for advanced neoplasia in the sampling bottles and conventional containers were 4.5 per 1,000 persons (95% CI, 2.0 to 11.0) and 2.4 per 1,000 persons (95% CI, 0.0 to 5.0), respectively. The impact of these findings on FIT screening performance was unclear in this interim analysis. This impact should therefore be evaluated in the final analysis following the final enrollment period.

  16. A community-based trial of educational interventions with fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening uptake among blacks in community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Shannon M; Davis, Stacy N; Williams, Kimberly R; Zhao, Xiuhua; Govindaraju, Swapomthi K; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Lin, Hui-Yi; Sutton, Steven K; Roethzeim, Richard R; Shibata, David; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2016-11-15

    Intervention studies among individuals in diverse community settings are needed to reduce health disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and mortality rates. The current study compared the efficacy of 2 intervention conditions promoting CRC screening among black individuals. Black individuals ages 50 to 75 years (N = 330) were recruited in community settings in 4 Tampa Bay counties. After obtaining consent and conducting a baseline interview to assess sociodemographic and health-related variables, participants received either a culturally targeted CRC photonovella booklet plus a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit or a standard CRC screening brochure plus an FIT kit. The primary outcome was FIT kit screening uptake. FIT screening uptake at 6 months was 86.7% overall (90.3% in the brochure group and 81.9% in the photonovella group). Controlling for baseline between-group differences, there was no influence of intervention on FIT kit uptake (P = .756). Significant predictors of not returning an FIT kit included being unable to work (P = .010), having higher religious belief scores (P = .015), and living farther from the cancer center (P = .015). Providing FIT kits and educational print materials to black individuals in community settings resulted in high rates of CRC screening. The study also identified subgroups of participants who were less likely to return an FIT kit and provides insight for future interventions. Cancer 2016;122:3288-3296. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  17. Immunochemical quantitation, size distribution, and cross-reactivity of lepidoptera (moth) aeroallergens in southeastern Minnesota

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    Wynn, S.R.; Swanson, M.C.; Reed, C.E.; Penny, N.D.; Showers, W.B.; Smith, J.M.

    1988-07-01

    With an immunochemical method, we analyzed outdoor air samples during a 3-year period for concentrations of the predominant local species of moth, Pseudaletia unipuncta (Haworth). Airborne particulates were collected on fiberglass filter sheets with an Accu-Vol sampler located 1.5 m above ground on the southeastern Minnesota prairie. Filter eluates analyzed by RIA inhibition contained concentrations of moth protein peaking in June and August to September of each year, with levels comparable to reported immunochemically measured levels of pollen and mold allergens. These peaks also corresponded with total numbers of moths captured in light traps. Moth-allergen activity was distributed in particle sizes ranging from 0.8 to greater than 4.1 micron when sized samples were obtained by use of an Andersen cascade impaction head. By RIA inhibition, there was cross-reactivity between P. unipuncta and insects of different genera, families, and orders, but not with pollens or molds. Forty-five percent of 257 patients with immediate positive skin tests to common aeroallergens had positive skin tests to one or more commercially available whole body insect extracts. Of 120 patients with allergic rhinitis believed to be primarily caused by ragweed sensitivity, 5% also had elevated specific IgE to moths. We conclude that airborne concentrations of Lepidoptera can be measured immunochemically and that moths may be a seasonal allergen in the United States.

  18. The performance of three-sample qualitative immunochemical fecal test to detect colorectal adenoma and cancer in gastrointestinal outpatients: an observational study.

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    Dong Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Repeated qualitative fecal immunochemical test (qlFIT is a clinical strategy widely used to detect lower gastrointestinal lesions, but its diagnostic power has not been assessed in opportunistic screening for colorectal neoplasia. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the performance of three-sample qlFIT in screening for colorectal cancer and its precursors in high-risk participants. METHODS: 513 gastrointestinal outpatients yielded three qlFITs before a standard colonoscopy. We evaluated the diagnostic value of one, two, and three positive qlFITs serving as the positivity threshold. The risk factors of colorectal neoplasia to yield positive qlFITs were also determined. RESULTS: 52 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 70 with advanced adenomatous polyp. For colorectal cancer, the sensitivity and specificity of one positive qlFIT were 90.4% and 53.8%, of two were 80.8% and 75.1%, and of three were 53.9% and 88.5%, respectively. For advanced adenomatous polyp, the sensitivity and specificity of one positive qlFIT were 81.4% and 54.2%, of two were 50.0% and 72.5%, and of three were 28.6% and 86.2%. Left-sided location (OR 2.50, 95%CI 1.26-4.95 and advanced histology of tumors (OR 3.08, 95%CI 1.58-6.01 were independently associated with positive qlFITs. CONCLUSIONS: Three-sample qlFIT is a reasonably good method to detect colorectal neoplasia in high-risk population. Tumors in the left side or with advanced pathological features are more likely to produce positive qlFITs.

  19. Outcomes and cost evaluation of the first two rounds of a colorectal cancer screening program based on immunochemical fecal occult blood test in northern Italy.

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    Parente, F; Boemo, C; Ardizzoia, A; Costa, M; Carzaniga, P; Ilardo, A; Moretti, R; Cremaschini, M; Parente, E M; Pirola, M E

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening aims to reduce mortality by detecting cancers at an early stage and removing adenomatous polyps at an acceptable cost. The aim of the current study were to assess the outcomes and costs of the first two biennial rounds of a population-based CRC screening program using the immunochemical fecal occult blood test (i-FOBT) in a northern Italian province. All residents aged 50 - 69 years were invited to take part in a biennial screening program using a 1-day i-FOBT, followed by colonoscopy in positive individuals. The i-FOBT uptake, compliance to colonoscopy, detection rate for cancer or advanced adenomas according to age and sex, and direct cost analysis were carried out separately for the 1st and 2nd rounds of screening. In 78 083 (1st round) and 81 619 (2nd round) individuals who were invited to screening, the participation rates were 49.7 % and 54.4 % and i-FOBT positivity rates were 6.2 % and 5.8 %, respectively. Detection rates for cancer and advanced adenomas were lower in the 2nd screening compared with the 1st one (1.6‰ vs. 2.5‰ for cancers and 15.8‰ vs. 17.9‰ for advanced adenomas, respectively), whereas positive predictive values for cancer and advanced adenoma were similar in both rounds. In 165 adenocarcinomas detected, 52 % were Dukes' stage A and 21 % were stage B. All cost indicators were slightly higher in the 1st round of screening compared with the 2nd. The direct cost per cancer or advanced adenoma detection was similar in the two rounds (€ 1252 and € 1260, respectively). Compliance and diagnostic yield of i-FOBT screening were satisfactory. Most detected cancers were at a very early stage. Program costs were reasonable and did not increase with repeat screening. Screening could contribute to decreasing the cost of CRC care by improving the stage at diagnosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Quantitative CrAssphage PCR Assays for Human Fecal ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental waters are monitored for fecal pollution to protect public health and water resources. Traditionally, general fecal indicator bacteria are used; however, they cannot distinguish human fecal waste from pollution from other animals. Recently, a novel bacteriophage, crAssphage, was discovered by metagenomic data mining and reported to be abundant in and closely associated with human fecal waste. To confirm bioinformatic predictions, 384 primer sets were designed along the length of the crAssphage genome. Based upon initial screening, two novel crAssphage qPCR assays (CPQ_056 and CPQ_064) were designed and evaluated in reference fecal samples and water matrices. The assays exhibited high specificities (98.6%) when tested against a large animal fecal reference library and were highly abundant in raw sewage and sewage impacted water samples. In addition, CPQ_056 and CPQ_064 assay performance was compared to HF183/BacR287 and HumM2 methods in paired experiments. Findings confirm viral crAssphage qPCR assays perform at a similar level to well established bacterial human-associated fecal source identification technologies. These new viral based assays could become important water quality management and research tools. To inform the public.

  1. False negative fecal occult blood tests due to delayed sample return in colorectal cancer screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, L.G.M. van; Rijn, A.F. van; Oijen, M.G.H. van; Fockens, P.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Dekker, E.

    2009-01-01

    Delayed return of immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) samples to a laboratory might cause false negatives because of hemoglobin degradation. Quantitative iFOBT's became increasingly more accepted in colorectal cancer screening. Therefore, we studied the effects of delay between sampling a

  2. Comparative analysis of fecal fat quantitation via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and gravimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpi-Steiner, Nichole L; Ward, Jennie N; Kumar, Vivek; McConnell, Joseph P

    2009-02-01

    Fecal-fat is typically measured by extracting lipid from homogenized feces with subsequent gravimetric/titrimetric analyses that are time-consuming and involve toxic solvents. Accordingly, an efficient and more safe method to quantitate fecal-fat is needed. The present objective was to adapt CEM SmartTrac technology (i.e. (1)H NMR) to rapidly (fecal-fat and compare (1)H NMR and gravimetric performance characteristics. (1)H NMR and gravimetric measurements of stool-fat were conducted using excess stool samples (72 h collection; n=107) homogenized to semi-liquid consistency prior to analyses. The (1)H NMR method demonstrated acceptable linearity (R(2)=0.9999) and recovery (mean=105%) with imprecision (intra-assay CV=1.2-6.5%; inter-assay CV=1.8-5.8%) comparable to or better than gravimetry (intra-assay CV=1.0-17.2%; inter-assay CV=3.8-6.5%). Excellent correlation between fecal-fat quantitation by (1)H NMR and gravimetry (n=107; R(2)=0.983; y=1.0173x-0.6859) was exhibited; moreover, (1)H NMR demonstrated good sensitivity (92.3%), specificity (94.5%), negative-predictive value (92.9%) and positive-predictive value (94.1%) for malabsorption using the reference cut-off of fat/24 h. These data demonstrate that (1)H NMR permits rapid and safe quantitation of fecal-fat while maintaining acceptable performance characteristics, thereby supporting the utility of (1)H NMR as an alternative method to gravimetry for fecal-fat quantitation.

  3. Quantitative PCR for Detection and Enumeration of Genetic Markers of Bovine Fecal Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate assessment of health risks associated with bovine (cattle) fecal pollution requires a reliable host-specific genetic marker and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for the detection of two recently described cow feces-spec...

  4. Quantitative detection of fecal contamination with domestic poultry feces in environments in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Fang-Fang; Li, Hu; Zhou, Xin-Yuan; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Su, Jian-Qiang

    2017-12-01

    Poultry are an important source of fecal contamination in environments. However, tools for detecting and tracking this fecal contamination are in the early stages of development. In practice, we have found that source tracking methods targeting the 16S rRNA genes of poultry-specific microbiota are not sufficiently sensitive. We therefore developed two quantitative PCR assays for detection of poultry fecal contamination, by targeting chicken and duck mitochondrial genes: NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) and cytochrome b (cytb). The sensitivity of both assays was 100% when tested on 50 chicken and duck fecal samples from 10 provinces of China. These assays were also tested in field samples, including soil and water collected adjacent to duck farms, and soils fertilized with chicken manure. Poultry mitochondrial DNA was detected in most of these samples, indicating that the assays are a robust method for monitoring environmental contamination with poultry feces. Complemented with existing indicators of fecal contamination, these markers should improve the efficiency and accuracy of microbial source tracking.

  5. A human fecal contamination index for ranking impaired recreational watersusing the HF183 quantitative real-time PCR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human fecal pollution of surface water remains a public health concern worldwide. As a result, there is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for recreational water quality risk managem...

  6. A human fecal contamination index for ranking impaired recreational watersusing the HF183 quantitative real-time PCR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human fecal pollution of surface water remains a public health concern worldwide. As a result, there is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for recreational water quality risk managem...

  7. Comparison of fecal and cecal microbiotas reveals qualitative similarities but quantitative differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dragana; Geier, Mark S; Chen, Honglei; Hughes, Robert J; Moore, Robert J

    2015-02-27

    quantitatively different. Fecal samples can be effectively used to detect some shifts and responses of cecal microbiota.

  8. A randomized controlled trial of a multicomponent, targeted, low-literacy educational intervention compared with a nontargeted intervention to boost colorectal cancer screening with fecal immunochemical testing in community clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Stacy N; Christy, Shannon M; Chavarria, Enmanuel A; Abdulla, Rania; Sutton, Steven K; Schmidt, Alyssa R; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Simmons, Vani N; Ufondu, Chukwudi B; Ravindra, Chitra; Schultz, Ida; Roetzheim, Richard G; Shibata, David; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2017-04-15

    The objective of the current study was to improve colorectal cancer (CRC) screening uptake with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT). The current study investigated the differential impact of a multicomponent, targeted, low-literacy educational intervention compared with a standard, nontargeted educational intervention. Patients aged 50 to 75 years who were of average CRC risk and not up-to-date with CRC screening were recruited from either a federally qualified health center or a primary care community health clinic. Patients were randomized to the intervention condition (targeted photonovella booklet/DVD plus FIT kit) or comparison condition (standard Centers for Disease Control and Prevention brochure plus FIT kit). The main outcome was screening with FIT within 180 days of delivery of the intervention. Of the 416 participants, 54% were female; the participants were racially and ethnically diverse (66% white, 10% Hispanic, and 28% African American), predominantly of low income, and insured (the majority had county health insurance). Overall, the FIT completion rate was 81%, with 78.1% of participants in the intervention versus 83.5% of those in the comparison condition completing FIT (P =  .17). In multivariate analysis, having health insurance was found to be the primary factor predicting a lack of FIT screening (adjusted odds ratio, 2.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-4.26 [P =  .04]). The multicomponent, targeted, low-literacy materials were not found to be significantly different or more effective in increasing FIT uptake compared with the nontargeted materials. Provision of a FIT test plus education may provide a key impetus to improve the completion of CRC screening. The type of educational material (targeted vs nontargeted) may matter less. The findings of the current study provide a unique opportunity for clinics to adopt FIT and to choose the type of patient education materials based on clinic, provider, and patient preferences. Cancer 2017

  9. Quantitative CrAssphage PCR Assays for Human Fecal Pollution Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental waters are monitored for fecal pollution to protect public health and water resources. Traditionally, general fecal indicator bacteria are used; however, they cannot distinguish human fecal waste from pollution from other animals. Recently, a novel bacteriophage, cr...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5180 - Fecal calprotectin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fecal calprotectin immunological test system. 866....5180 Fecal calprotectin immunological test system. (a) Identification. A fecal calprotectin... measure, by immunochemical techniques, fecal calprotectin in human stool specimens. The device is...

  11. Immunochemical quantitation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts in subcellular liver fractions following a hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumford, N R; Roberts, D W; Benson, R W; Hinson, J A

    1990-08-01

    The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen correlates with the formation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts. Using a sensitive and specific immunochemical assay, we quantitated the formation of these protein adducts in liver fractions and serum after administration of a hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (400 mg/kg) to B6C3F1 mice. Adducts in the cytosolic fraction increased to 3.6 nmol/mg protein at 2 hr and then decreased to 1.1 nmol/mg protein by 8 hr. Concomitant with the decrease in adducts in the cytosol, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts appeared in serum and their levels paralleled increases in serum alanine aminotransferase. Microsomal protein adducts peaked at 1 hr (0.7 nmol/mg protein) and subsequently decreased to 0.2 nmol/mg at 8 hr. The 4000 g pellet (nuclei, plasma membranes, and cell debris) had the highest level of adducts (3.5 nmol/mg protein), which remained constant from 1 to 8 hr. Evaluation of fractions purified from a 960 g pellet indicated that the highest concentration of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts was located in plasma membranes and mitochondria; peak levels were 10.3 and 5.1 nmol/mg respectively. 3-(Cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts were detected in nuclei only after enzymatic hydrolysis of the proteins. The localization of high levels of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts in plasma membranes and mitochondria may play a critical role in acetaminophen toxicity.

  12. HUMAN FECAL SOURCE IDENTIFICATION: REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR METHOD STANDARDIZATION - abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method standardization or the formal development of a protocol that establishes uniform performance benchmarks and practices is necessary for widespread adoption of a fecal source identification approach. Standardization of a human-associated fecal identification method has been...

  13. Human Fecal Source Identification: Real-Time Quantitative PCR Method Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method standardization or the formal development of a protocol that establishes uniform performance benchmarks and practices is necessary for widespread adoption of a fecal source identification approach. Standardization of a human-associated fecal identification method has been...

  14. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-time quantitative PCR assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster have been found to be some of the top performing methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. The United States Environmental Protection Agency is planning to conduct a ...

  15. Data Acceptance Criteria for Standardized Human-Associated Fecal Source Identification Quantitative Real-Time PCR Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal sourceidentification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality management. The transition from a research tool to a standardized protocol requires a high degree of confidence in data q...

  16. Data Acceptance Criteria for Standardized Human-Associated Fecal Source Identification Quantitative Real-Time PCR Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal sourceidentification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality management. The transition from a research tool to a standardized protocol requires a high degree of confidence in data q...

  17. Immunochemical quantitation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum and liver proteins of acetaminophen-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumford, N R; Hinson, J A; Potter, D W; Rowland, K L; Benson, R W; Roberts, D W

    1989-01-01

    Using a recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts we have quantitated the formation of these specific adducts in liver and serum protein of B6C3F1 male mice dosed with acetaminophen. Administration of acetaminophen at doses of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg to mice resulted in evidence of hepatotoxicity (increase in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase) at 4 hr in the 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg treatment groups only. The formation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in liver protein was not observed in the groups receiving 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses, but was observed in the groups receiving doses above 300 mg/kg of acetaminophen. Greater levels of adduct formation were observed at the higher doses. 3-(Cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts were also observed in serum of mice receiving hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen. After a 400 mg/kg dose of acetaminophen, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in the liver protein reached peak levels 2 hr after dosing. By 12 hr the levels decreased to approximately 10% of the peak level. In contrast, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum protein were delayed, reaching a sustained peak 6 to 12 hr after dosing. The dose-response correlation between the appearance of serum aminotransferases and 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum protein and the temporal correlation between the decrease in 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in liver protein and the appearance of adducts in serum protein are consistent with a hepatic origin of the adducts detected in serum protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Semi-quantitative evaluation of fecal contamination potential by human and ruminant sources using multiple lines of evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, D.M.; Stelzer, E.A.; Stogner, R.W.; Mau, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Protocols for microbial source tracking of fecal contamination generally are able to identify when a source of contamination is present, but thus far have been unable to evaluate what portion of fecal-indicator bacteria (FIB) came from various sources. A mathematical approach to estimate relative amounts of FIB, such as Escherichia coli, from various sources based on the concentration and distribution of microbial source tracking markers in feces was developed. The approach was tested using dilute fecal suspensions, then applied as part of an analytical suite to a contaminated headwater stream in the Rocky Mountains (Upper Fountain Creek, Colorado). In one single-source fecal suspension, a source that was not present could not be excluded because of incomplete marker specificity; however, human and ruminant sources were detected whenever they were present. In the mixed-feces suspension (pet and human), the minority contributor (human) was detected at a concentration low enough to preclude human contamination as the dominant source of E. coli to the sample. Without the semi-quantitative approach described, simple detects of human-associated marker in stream samples would have provided inaccurate evidence that human contamination was a major source of E. coli to the stream. In samples from Upper Fountain Creek the pattern of E. coli, general and host-associated microbial source tracking markers, nutrients, and wastewater-associated chemical detections-augmented with local observations and land-use patterns-indicated that, contrary to expectations, birds rather than humans or ruminants were the predominant source of fecal contamination to Upper Fountain Creek. This new approach to E. coli allocation, validated by a controlled study and tested by application in a relatively simple setting, represents a widely applicable step forward in the field of microbial source tracking of fecal contamination. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    2012-01-01

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study, DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal...... samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples; however, differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six...... different primer pairs targeting 16S rRNA genes of significant bacterial groups, and the community composition was evaluated by comparing specific ratios of the calculated abundances. In seven of nine cases, the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene ratio was significantly higher in fecal samples...

  20. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal...... samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples, however differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six different...... primer pairs targeting 16S rRNA genes of significant bacterial groups and the community composition was evaluated by comparing specific ratios of the calculated abundances. In seven out of nine cases the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene ratio was significantly higher in fecal-samples that had...

  1. Quantitative effects of diet on fecal corticosterone metabolites in two strains of laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of glucocorticoids excreted in feces is becoming a widespread technique for determining animal wellbeing in a wide variety of settings. In the present study an extraction protocol and an ELISA assay for quantifying fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in BALB/c and C57bl/6 mice were...... validated. Lower ratios of solvent (ethanol) to mass of fecal sample were found to be sufficient in extracting FCM compared to what has been reported previously. Feeding mice a high energy diet, high in fat content (60% of calories from fat), significantly lowered the FCM excretion, approximately halving...... the FCM output. This diet also reduced the fecal mass voided to approximately a third of that of the regular diet. The two reductions were not correlated. A difference in defecation pattern was seen between the two strains, with the BALB/c mice having a more pronounced diurnal rhythm compared to the C57bl...

  2. Quantitative effects of diet on fecal corticosterone metabolites in two strains of laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte;

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of glucocorticoids excreted in feces is becoming a widespread technique for determining animal wellbeing in a wide variety of settings. In the present study an extraction protocol and an ELISA assay for quantifying fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in BALB/c and C57bl/6 mice were...... validated. Lower ratios of solvent (ethanol) to mass of fecal sample were found to be sufficient in extracting FCM compared to what has been reported previously. Feeding mice a high energy diet, high in fat content (60% of calories from fat), significantly lowered the FCM excretion, approximately halving......, but had a considerably lesser impact on data than did the difference in diet. The study demonstrates some problematic consequences of expressing FCM excretion as a measure of fecal dry mass. The study also serves to emphasize the caution that must be exercised when interpreting FCM excretion...

  3. Quantitative Real-Time PCR Fecal Source Identification in the Tillamook Basin (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers in the Tillamook Basin play a vital role in supporting a thriving dairy and cheese-making industry, as well as providing a safe water resource for local human and wildlife populations. Historical concentrations of fecal bacteria in these waters are at times too high to all...

  4. Quantitative role of shrimp fecal bacteria in organic matter fluxes in a recirculating shrimp aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Christine; Moss, Shaun; Malfatti, Francesca; Azam, Farooq

    2011-07-01

    Microorganisms play integral roles in the cycling of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) for fish and shellfish production. We quantified the pathways of shrimp fecal bacterial activities and their role in C- and N-flux partitioning relevant to culturing Pacific white shrimp, Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei, in RAS. Freshly produced feces from P. vannamei contained 0.6-7 × 10(10) bacteria g(-1) dry wt belonging to Bacteroidetes (7%), Alphaproteobacteria (4%), and, within the Gammaproteobacteria, almost exclusively to the genus Vibrio (61%). Because of partial disintegration of the feces (up to 27% within 12 h), the experimental seawater became inoculated with fecal bacteria. Bacteria grew rapidly in the feces and in the seawater, and exhibited high levels of aminopeptidase, chitinase, chitobiase, alkaline phosphatase, α- and β-glucosidase, and lipase activities. Moreover, fecal bacteria enriched the protein content of the feces within 12 h, potentially enriching the feces for the coprophagous shrimp. The bacterial turnover time was much faster in feces (1-10 h) than in mature RAS water (350 h). Thus, shrimp fecal bacteria not only inoculate RAS water but also contribute to bacterial abundance and productivity, and regulate system processes important for shrimp health.

  5. Quantitative effects of diet on fecal corticosterone metabolites in two strains of laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte; Hau, Jann; Abelson, Klas S P

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of glucocorticoids excreted in feces is becoming a widespread technique for determining animal wellbeing in a wide variety of settings. In the present study an extraction protocol and an ELISA assay for quantifying fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in BALB/c and C57bl/6 mice were validated. Lower ratios of solvent (ethanol) to mass of fecal sample were found to be sufficient in extracting FCM compared to what has been reported previously. Feeding mice a high energy diet, high in fat content (60% of calories from fat), significantly lowered the FCM excretion, approximately halving the FCM output. This diet also reduced the fecal mass voided to approximately a third of that of the regular diet. The two reductions were not correlated. A difference in defecation pattern was seen between the two strains, with the BALB/c mice having a more pronounced diurnal rhythm compared to the C57bl/6 mice. Furthermore, throughout the experiment, the C57bl/6 mice excreted significantly higher levels of FCM compared to the BALB/c mice. The mice were also challenged with synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and dexamethasone (DEX). The effect of the challenges could readily be detected, but had a considerably lesser impact on data than did the difference in diet. The study demonstrates some problematic consequences of expressing FCM excretion as a measure of fecal dry mass. The study also serves to emphasize the caution that must be exercised when interpreting FCM excretion in conjunction with an uncontrolled or varied diet, or perturbations of gastro-intestinal functioning.

  6. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of total and propidium monoazide-resistant fecal indicator bacteria in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, M; Field, R; Stinson, M; Rukovets, B; Wymer, L; Haugland, R

    2009-11-01

    A real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method and a modification of this method incorporating pretreatment of samples with propidium monoazide (PMA) were evaluated for respective analyses of total and presumptively viable Enterococcus and Bacteroidales fecal indicator bacteria. These methods were used in the analyses of wastewater samples to investigate their feasibility as alternatives to current fecal indicator bacteria culture methods for predicting the efficiency of viral pathogen removal by standard treatment processes. PMA treatment was effective in preventing qPCR detection of target sequences from non-viable cells. Concentrates of small volume, secondary-treated wastewater samples, collected from a publicly owned treatment works (POTW) under normal operating conditions, had little influence on this effectiveness. Higher levels of total suspended solids, such as those associated with normal primary treatment and all treatment stages during storm flow events, appeared to interfere with PMA effectiveness under the sample preparation conditions employed. During normal operating conditions at three different POTWs, greater reductions were observed in PMA-qPCR detectable target sequences of both Enterococcus and Bacteroidales than in total qPCR detectable sequences. These reductions were not as great as those observed for cultivable fecal indicator bacteria in response to wastewater disinfection. Reductions of PMA-qPCR as well as total qPCR detectable target sequences from enterococci and, to a lesser extent, Bacteroidales correlated well with reductions in infectious viruses during both normal and storm flow operating conditions and therefore may have predictive value in determining the efficiency at which these pathogens are removed.

  7. Probabilistic quantitative microbial risk assessment model of norovirus from wastewater irrigated vegetables in Ghana using genome copies and fecal indicator ratio conversion for estimating exposure dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owusu-Ansah, Emmanuel de-Graft Johnson; Sampson, Angelina; Amponsah, Samuel K.

    2017-01-01

    The need to replace the commonly applied fecal indicator conversions ratio (an assumption of 1:10− 5 virus to fecal indicator organism) in Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) with models based on quantitative data on the virus of interest has gained prominence due to the different...... physical and environmental factors that might influence the reliability of using indicator organisms in microbial risk assessment. The challenges facing analytical studies on virus enumeration (genome copies or particles) have contributed to the already existing lack of data in QMRA modelling. This study...... to estimate the norovirus count. In all scenarios of using different water sources, the application of the fecal indicator conversion ratio underestimated the norovirus disease burden, measured by the Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), when compared to results using the genome copies norovirus data...

  8. Diagnostic performance of fecal quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of Lawsonia intracellularis–associated proliferative enteropathy in nursery pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ken Steen; Stege, Helle; Jensen, Tim Kåre;

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tests for detection and quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis in feces from pigs have been developed. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of a fecal qPCR test for detection of nursery pigs with L...

  9. Data Acceptance Criteria for Standardized Human-Associated Fecal Source Identification Quantitative Real-Time PCR Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Orin C; Kelty, Catherine A; Oshiro, Robin; Haugland, Richard A; Madi, Tania; Brooks, Lauren; Field, Katharine G; Sivaganesan, Mano

    2016-05-01

    There is growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality management. The transition from a research tool to a standardized protocol requires a high degree of confidence in data quality across laboratories. Data quality is typically determined through a series of specifications that ensure good experimental practice and the absence of bias in the results due to DNA isolation and amplification interferences. However, there is currently a lack of consensus on how best to evaluate and interpret human fecal source identification qPCR experiments. This is, in part, due to the lack of standardized protocols and information on interlaboratory variability under conditions for data acceptance. The aim of this study is to provide users and reviewers with a complete series of conditions for data acceptance derived from a multiple laboratory data set using standardized procedures. To establish these benchmarks, data from HF183/BacR287 and HumM2 human-associated qPCR methods were generated across 14 laboratories. Each laboratory followed a standardized protocol utilizing the same lot of reference DNA materials, DNA isolation kits, amplification reagents, and test samples to generate comparable data. After removal of outliers, a nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to establish proficiency metrics that include lab-to-lab, replicate testing within a lab, and random error for amplification inhibition and sample processing controls. Other data acceptance measurements included extraneous DNA contamination assessments (no-template and extraction blank controls) and calibration model performance (correlation coefficient, amplification efficiency, and lower limit of quantification). To demonstrate the implementation of the proposed standardized protocols and data acceptance criteria, comparable data from two additional laboratories were reviewed. The data acceptance criteria

  10. Glycerol as a reference material for fecal fat quantitation using low-resolution time domain ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, James P; Sterry, Judy; Sakpal, Manisha; Lefevre, Brian H; Ryan, Dan

    2011-11-01

    To assess glycerol as reference material for low-resolution time-domain (1)H NMR analysis of fecal fat. NMR analysis of fecal fat in stool samples with added glycerol was used to assess linearity, recovery, and relationship with NMR lipid signal. The study revealed for added glycerol excellent linearity (r=0.9998), recovery (101-104%), and linear relationship with simulated fecal fat content. Glycerol is an effective reference material for NMR fecal fat analysis. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of commercial DNA extraction kits and quantitative PCR systems for better sensitivity in detecting the causative agent of paratuberculosis in dairy cow fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fock-Chow-Tho, D; Topp, E; Ibeagha-Awemu, E A; Bissonnette, N

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes ruminant paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) worldwide. Oral-fecal contamination is the most important mode of transmission of paratuberculosis, so eradicating MAP-shedding animals could prevent disease propagation. Fecal culture, a well-known method for MAP diagnosis, requires costly specialized media and a long incubation time that sometimes ends in disappointing bacterial contamination. To facilitate the efforts of control programs, we evaluated the performance of direct fecal quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for their sensitivity and robustness for MAP detection. Commercial kits use different strategies for extracting DNA, combined with qPCR systems, to detect the presence of MAP in fecal samples. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of 3 commercially available DNA extraction kits (A, B, and C) combined with 2 qPCR systems (T and V) for the detection of MAP in infectious cows. A total of 49 dairy cows from 5 herds were sampled twice a year for 3 yr and diagnosed using fecal culture and ELISA. Eight replicates of their fecal samples from the first sampling were tested using each DNA extraction method and qPCR detection system. Although all 3 of the commercial DNA extraction kits have been previously described as very efficient for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis, kit B provided the highest sensitivity. Indeed, 89% of the cows declared positive for paratuberculosis by both fecal culture and ELISA were identified with kit B, whereas only 23 and 43% of the cows were identified with kits A and C, respectively. Interestingly, kit B was able to detect some low-MAP shedders. The qPCR detection system also played a critical role: system T yielded qPCR with the highest sensitivity. The results of this study suggest that DNA extraction kit B combined with detection system T provides the best amplification of MAP DNA from fecal samples with the highest sensitivity and specificity. Although 1 DNA extraction and q

  12. Schistosomiasis japonica in Barrio San Antonio, Basey, Samar in the Philippines: II. Quantitative fecal examination and circumoval precipitin tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogore, M G; Lewert, R M; Blas, B L

    1978-09-01

    An improved quantitative stool examination technique (MFCT) and two variations in the performance of the circumoval precipitin test, one using whole serum (SCOPT) and the other employing the eluate from finger prick blood dried on filter paper (FPCOPT), were evaluated in a field study to detect infection with S. japonicum among residents of an endemic barrio in Samar. The sensitivity of SCOPT was above 90%, that of MFCT was between 80 to 90%, while that of FPCOPT was only about 50%. Intensity of infection as judged by fecal egg excretion and duration of infection as indicated by age were shown to be determinants of serum reactivity (and hence sensitivity of the two serodiagnostic tests). The relative insensitivity of FPCOPT observed in this work, also evident in some published data of previous workers, puts to doubt the wisdom of using this technique as the procedure of choice in epidemiologic surveys in the Philippines as currently favored in that country. Atypical positive reactions in circumoval precipitin tests using whole serum were detected which may make the differentiation of relatively recent from old infections possible.

  13. Preparation and characterization of enzymatically hydrolyzed prolamins from wheat, rye, and barley as references for the immunochemical quantitation of partially hydrolyzed gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessendorfer, Benedict; Koehler, Peter; Wieser, Herbert

    2009-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent gastrointestinal disorder characterized by the intolerance to a group of proteins called gluten present in wheat, rye, barley, and possibly oats. The only therapy is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. The standard method for gluten determination in foods produced for CD patients is the R5-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as proposed by the recent Codex Alimentarius Draft Revised Standard. This test is based on the determination of prolamins, the alcohol-soluble proteins of gluten, and is available as a sandwich ELISA for intact proteins and as a competitive ELISA for gluten-derived peptides. While the suitability of the sandwich ELISA including a wheat prolamin (gliadin) reference for calibration has been shown by various studies and a ring test, the competitive ELISA still lacks a convenient reference for the quantitation of gluten peptides in fermented cereal foods (e.g., sourdough products, starch syrup, malt extracts, beer). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to prepare a suitable reference for the quantitation of partially hydrolyzed gluten in fermented wheat, rye, and barley products. The prolamin fractions from barley (hordein) and rye (secalin) were isolated from corresponding flours by means of a modified preparative Osborne fractionation. The prolamin fraction from wheat was obtained as reference gliadin from the Prolamin Working Group. The prolamin fractions were successively digested by pepsin and trypsin or pepsin and chymotrypsin procedures, which have been used for CD-specific toxicity tests on cereal storage proteins for many years. The protein/peptide content (N x 5.7) of the prolamin fractions and digests, which was the basis for the calculation of the gluten content by means of ELISA, varied between 67.1% and 96.0%. The prolamin fractions and enzymatic digests were then tested for their response in both sandwich and competitive assays. Intact prolamins responded similarly in both ELISA showing

  14. Quantitative Detection of Hepatitis A Virus and Enteroviruses Near the United States-Mexico Border and Correlation with Levels of Fecal Indicator Bacteria▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gersberg, Richard M.; Rose, Michael A.; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Dhar, Arun K.

    2006-01-01

    For decades, untreated sewage flowing northward from Tijuana, Mexico, via the Tijuana River has adversely affected the water quality of the recreational beaches of San Diego, California. We used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure the levels of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and enteroviruses in coastal waters near the United States-Mexico border and compared these levels to those of the conventional fecal indicators, Escherichia coli and enterococci. Over a 2-year period from 2003 to ...

  15. Immunochemical approach to indoor aeroallergen quantitation with a new volumetric air sampler: studies with mite, roach, cat, mouse, and guinea pig antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, M.C.; Agarwal, M.K.; Reed, C.E.

    1985-11-01

    We describe a new high-volume air sampler for determining antigen concentrations in homes and illustrate its use for quantitating airborne house dust mite, cat, cockroach, mouse, and guinea pig antigens. The concentration of house dust-mite antigen was similar from houses in Rochester, Minn. and tenement apartments in Harlem, N. Y., but cockroach and mouse urinary proteins were present only in Harlem. The amount of cat or guinea pig antigen varied as expected with the number of pets in the home. In calm air the airborne concentration of mite and cat antigen was similar throughout the house but increased greatly in a bedroom when bedding was changed. In calm air most of the cat and mite antigens were associated with respirable particles less than 5 microns mean aerodynamic mass diameter, but in air sampled after the bedding was changed, more cat antigen was found in particles greater than 5 microns. The apparatus and technique described can provide objective data concerning the magnitude and the relative distribution and duration of suspended particles of defined sizes, which contain allergen activity.

  16. Comparison of PCR and quantitative real-time PCR methods for the characterization of ruminant and cattle fecal pollution sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    The state of California has mandated the preparation of a guidance document on the application of fecal source identification methods for recreational water quality management. California contains the fifth highest population of cattle in the United States, making the inclusio...

  17. Interlaboratory comparison of three microbial source tracking quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays from fecal-source and environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Strickler, Kriston M.; Schill, William B.

    2012-01-01

    During summer and early fall 2010, 15 river samples and 6 fecal-source samples were collected in West Virginia. These samples were analyzed by three laboratories for three microbial source tracking (MST) markers: AllBac, a general fecal indicator; BacHum, a human-associated fecal indicator; and BoBac, a ruminant-associated fecal indicator. MST markers were analyzed by means of the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method. The aim was to assess interlaboratory precision when the three laboratories used the same MST marker and shared deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracts of the samples, but different equipment, reagents, and analyst experience levels. The term assay refers to both the markers and the procedure differences listed above. Interlaboratory precision was best for all three MST assays when using the geometric mean absolute relative percent difference (ARPD) and Friedman's statistical test as a measure of interlaboratory precision. Adjustment factors (one for each MST assay) were calculated using results from fecal-source samples analyzed by all three laboratories and applied retrospectively to sample concentrations to account for differences in qPCR results among labs using different standards and procedures. Following the application of adjustment factors to qPCR results, ARPDs were lower; however, statistically significant differences between labs were still observed for the BacHum and BoBac assays. This was a small study and two of the MST assays had 52 percent of samples with concentrations at or below the limit of accurate quantification; hence, more testing could be done to determine if the adjustment factors would work better if the majority of sample concentrations were above the quantification limit.

  18. Duplex quantitative real-time PCR assay for the detection and discrimination of the eggs of Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati (Nematoda, Ascaridoidea in soil and fecal samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durant Jean-Francois

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxocarosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Toxocara canis (T. canis and/or Toxocara cati (T. cati, two worldwide distributed roundworms which are parasites of canids and felids, respectively. Infections of humans occur through ingestion of embryonated eggs of T. canis or T. cati, when playing with soils contaminated with dogs or cats feces. Accordingly, the assessment of potential contamination of these areas with these roundworms eggs is paramount. Methods A duplex quantitative real-time PCR (2qPCR targeting the ribosomal RNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS2 has been developed and used for rapid and specific identification of T. canis and T. cati eggs in fecal and soil samples. The assay was set up on DNA samples extracted from 53 adult worms including T. canis, T. cati, T. leonina, Ascaris suum (A. suum and Parascaris equorum (P. equorum. The assay was used to assess the presence of T. cati eggs in several samples, including 12 clean soil samples spiked with eggs of either T. cati or A. suum, 10 actual soil samples randomly collected from playgrounds in Brussels, and fecal samples from cats, dogs, and other animals. 2qPCR results on dogs and cats fecal samples were compared with results from microscopic examination. Results 2qPCR assay allowed specific detection of T. canis and T. cati, whether adult worms, eggs spiked in soil or fecal samples. The 2qPCR limit of detection (LOD in spiked soil samples was 2 eggs per g of soil for a turnaround time of 3 hours. A perfect concordance was observed between 2qPCR assay and microscopic examination on dogs and cats feces. Conclusion The newly developed 2qPCR assay can be useful for high throughput prospective or retrospective detection of T.canis and/or T. cati eggs in fecal samples as well as in soil samples from playgrounds, parks and sandpits.

  19. Validation of Bacteroidales quantitative PCR assays targeting human and animal fecal contamination in the public and domestic domains in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagiri, Mitsunori; Schriewer, Alexander; Hanley, Kaitlyn; Wuertz, Stefan; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Jenkins, Marion W

    2015-01-01

    We compared host-associated Bacteroidales qPCR assays developed in the continental United States and Europe for the purpose of measuring the effect of improved sanitation on human fecal exposure in rural Indian communities where both human and animal fecal loading are high. Ten candidate Bacteroidales qPCR assays were tested against fecal samples (human, sewage, cow, buffalo, goat, sheep, dog and chicken) from a test set of 30 individual human, 5 sewage, and 60 pooled animal samples collected in coastal Odisha, India. The two universal/general Bacteroidales assays tested (BacUni, GenBac3) performed equally well, achieving 100% sensitivity on the test set. Across the five human-associated assays tested (HF183 Taqman, BacHum, HumM2, BacH, HF183 SYBR), we found low sensitivity (17 to 49%) except for HF183 SYBR (89%), and moderate to high cross-reactivity with dog (20 to 80%) and chicken fecal samples (60 to 100%). BacHum had the highest accuracy (67%), amplified all sewage samples within the range of quantification (ROQ), and did not cross-react with any fecal samples from cows, the most populous livestock animal in India. Of the ruminant- and cattle-associated assays tested (BacCow, CowM2), BacCow was more sensitive in detecting the full range of common Indian livestock animal fecal sources, while CowM2 only detected cow sources with 50% sensitivity. Neither assay cross-reacted with human sources. BacCan, the dog-associated assay tested, showed no cross-reactivity with human sources, and high sensitivity (90%) for dog fecal samples. Overall, our results indicate BacUni, BacHum, HumM2, BacCan and BacCow would be the most suitable MST assays to distinguish and quantify relative amounts of human-associated and livestock/domestic animal-associated contributions to fecal contamination in Odisha, India.

  20. Estimating the Sensitivity and Specificity of Real-Time Quantitative PCR of Fecal Samples for Diagnosis of Rhodococcus equi Pneumonia in Foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, S D; Cohen, N D; Chaffin, M K; Blodgett, G P; Syndergaard, M; Hurych, D

    2015-01-01

    Real-time, quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods for detecting Rhodococcus equi in feces have been developed as a noninvasive, rapid diagnostic test for R. equi pneumonia, but have not been evaluated in a large population of foals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of fecal PCR as a diagnostic test for R. equi pneumonia in foals using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methods. 186 foals born in 2011 at an R. equi-endemic ranch in Texas. Fecal samples were collected at the time of onset of clinical signs for pneumonic foals (n = 31). Foals with pneumonia were matched by age and birth date to healthy (n = 31) and subclinical (n = 124) control foals; fecal samples were collected from these controls. DNA was extracted from feces using commercial kits and concentration of virulent R. equi in feces was determined by qPCR. Concentration of R. equi in feces differed significantly (P equi pneumonia was 89% (95% CI, 83-99), with a sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 72%. qPCR of feces can be useful as an alternative to tracheobronchial aspiration for the diagnosis of R. equi in foals with clinical signs of pneumonia. Caution should be used in extrapolating results of this study to other populations because fecal concentration of R. equi might vary by geographic location or management practices. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. Quantitative Detection of Hepatitis A Virus and Enteroviruses Near the United States-Mexico Border and Correlation with Levels of Fecal Indicator Bacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersberg, Richard M.; Rose, Michael A.; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Dhar, Arun K.

    2006-01-01

    For decades, untreated sewage flowing northward from Tijuana, Mexico, via the Tijuana River has adversely affected the water quality of the recreational beaches of San Diego, California. We used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure the levels of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and enteroviruses in coastal waters near the United States-Mexico border and compared these levels to those of the conventional fecal indicators, Escherichia coli and enterococci. Over a 2-year period from 2003 to 2005, a total of 20 samples were assayed at two sites during both wet and dry weather: the surfzone at the mouth of the Tijuana River and the surfzone near the pier at Imperial Beach (IB), California (about 2 km north of the mouth of the Tijuana River). HAV and enterovirus were detected in 79 and 93% of the wet-weather samples, respectively. HAV concentrations in these samples ranged from 105 to 30,771 viral particles/liter, and enterovirus levels ranged from 7 to 4,417 viral particles/liter. The concentrations of HAV and enterovirus were below the limit of detection for all dry weather samples collected at IB. Regression analyses showed a significant correlation between the densities of both fecal bacterial indicators and the levels of HAV (R2 > 0.61, P 0.70, P < 0.0001), a finding that supports the use of conventional bacterial indicators to predict the levels of these viruses in recreational marine waters. PMID:16980430

  2. Quantitative detection of hepatitis a virus and enteroviruses near the United States-Mexico border and correlation with levels of fecal indicator bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersberg, Richard M; Rose, Michael A; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Dhar, Arun K

    2006-12-01

    For decades, untreated sewage flowing northward from Tijuana, Mexico, via the Tijuana River has adversely affected the water quality of the recreational beaches of San Diego, California. We used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure the levels of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and enteroviruses in coastal waters near the United States-Mexico border and compared these levels to those of the conventional fecal indicators, Escherichia coli and enterococci. Over a 2-year period from 2003 to 2005, a total of 20 samples were assayed at two sites during both wet and dry weather: the surfzone at the mouth of the Tijuana River and the surfzone near the pier at Imperial Beach (IB), California (about 2 km north of the mouth of the Tijuana River). HAV and enterovirus were detected in 79 and 93% of the wet-weather samples, respectively. HAV concentrations in these samples ranged from 105 to 30,771 viral particles/liter, and enterovirus levels ranged from 7 to 4,417 viral particles/liter. The concentrations of HAV and enterovirus were below the limit of detection for all dry weather samples collected at IB. Regression analyses showed a significant correlation between the densities of both fecal bacterial indicators and the levels of HAV (R2>0.61, P0.70, P<0.0001), a finding that supports the use of conventional bacterial indicators to predict the levels of these viruses in recreational marine waters.

  3. Effects of Holding Time, Storage, and the Preservation of Samples on Sample Integrity for the Detection of Fecal Indicator Bacteria by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR)-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this project was to answer questions related to storage of samples to be analyzed by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based assays for fecal indicator bacteria. The project was divided into two parts. The first part was to determine if filters th...

  4. Development of a non invasion real-time PCR assay for the quantitation of chicken parvovirus in fecal swabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study describes the development of a real time Taqman polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using a fluorescent labeled probe for the detection and quantitation of chicken parvovirus (ChPV) in feces. The primers and probes were designed based on the nucleotide sequence of the non struct...

  5. Immunochemical approach for zearalenone-4-glucoside determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloglazova, N V; De Boevre, M; Goryacheva, I Yu; Werbrouck, S; Guo, Y; De Saeger, S

    2013-03-15

    Zearalenone-4-β-D-glucopyranoside (zearalenone-4-glucoside) detection techniques, based on a combination of acidic or enzymatic hydrolysis of the masked mycotoxin to the parent form (i.e. zearalenone), and immunochemical determination of zearalenone-4-glucoside as a difference between the zearalenone concentration after and before cleavage of the glycosidic bond were developed. The limit of detection for zearalenone-4-glucoside, achieved for the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, was 3 μg kg(-1); the cut-off level for the sum of zearalenone and zearalenone-4-glucoside determination by a qualitative gel-based immunoassay was 50 μg kg(-1). Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid was checked for acidic hydrolysis and resulted in approximately 70% of glycosidic bond cleavage in optimal conditions. Seven different glycoside hydrolases were tested during the design of the enzymatic hydrolysis technique. Enzymatic hydrolysis combined with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and gel-based immunoassay determinations was applied for the determination of zearalenone-4-glucoside or the sum of zearalenone and zearalenone-4-glucoside in cereal samples. The chosen enzyme (glucosidase from Aspergillus niger) allowed to cleave 102% of zearalenone-4-glucoside in standard solutions and 85% in cereal samples. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was used as confirmatory method. As a result, good correlations between immunochemical techniques and the chromatographic data were obtained. The developed technique is suitable for simultaneous immunochemical determination of zearalenone and its masked form, zearalenone-4-glucoside. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. QUANTITATIVE FLUORESCENCE IN-SITU HYBRIDIZATION OF BIFIDOBACTERIUM SPP WITH GENUS-SPECIFIC 16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA-TARGETED PROBES AND ITS APPLICATION IN FECAL SAMPLES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LANGENDIJK, PS; SCHUT, F; JANSEN, GJ; RAANGS, GC; KAMPHUIS, GR; WILKINSON, MHF; WELLING, GW

    1995-01-01

    Three 16S rRNA hybridization probes were developed and tested for genus-specific detection of Bifidobacterium species in the human fecal flora. Variable regions V2, V4, and VS of the 16S rRNA contained sequences unique to this genus and proved applicable as target sites for oligodeoxynucleotide prob

  7. Fecal microbiota transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007703.htm Fecal microbiota transplant To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) helps to replace some of the "bad" ...

  8. Immunochemical Methods for Quantitation of Vitamin B6

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-30

    Vitamin Binder Reference Biotir, Avidin Horsburgh and Gompertz (1978)29 Riboflavin Apoprotein from Bashor and Tillotson (1978)30 egg white Cobalamin...1978). 30 M. M. Bashor and J. A. Tillotson, Isolation of a riboflavin binding apoprotein frum chicken egg white and its use in a radioassay for urinary...Revs. 37, 313 (1979). Bashor, M. M. and J. A. Tillotson, Isolation of a riboflavin binding apoprotein from chicken egg white and its use in a

  9. [BIOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYREACTIVE IMMUNOGLOBULINS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A previously unknown phenomenon of acquired polyreactivity for serum immunoglobulins, which were subjected either to solutions of KSCN (3.0-5.0 M), low/high pH (pH 2.2-3.0), or heating to 58-60 degrees C, was described by us in 1990 year. Much later, eleven years after that, similar data were published by others, which completely confirmed our results concerning the influence of either chaotropic ions or the drastic shift of pH on immunoglobulins polyreactive properties. Our further investigations of polyreactive serum immunoglobulins (PRIG) properties have shown that the mechanism of non-specific interaction between PRIG and antigens much differs from the mechanism of interaction between specific antibodies and corresponding antigens. Later we have shown that the increasing of PRIG reactivity could be induced in vivo, and PRIG are one of serum components for human or animal sera. Then, it could be suggested that PRIG can perform certain biological functions. Studying of PRIG's effect on the phagocytosis of microbes by peritoneal cells or the tumor growth have shown that PRIG can play a certain role in protecting the body from infections and probably can influence on the development of various pathological processes. Recently we have also found that PRIG IgG contents significantly increases in aged people. These data demonstrate that further investigations of PRIG's immunochemical properties and studying of their biological role in organism protection from various diseases is very intriguing and important.

  10. Demonstration isolation and identification of culturable microfungi and bacteria in horse hair and dandruff. Immunochemical comparison with allergic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, S; Løwenstein, H; Weeke, B

    1978-04-01

    Horse hiar and dandruff have been investigated for their content of microfungi and bacteria. Inoculation and incubation on V-8 agar containing penicillin and streptomycin, with subsequent colony counting and identification, revealed more than nine and five different genera of microfungi and bacteria respectively, in horse hair and dandruff. Isolation and cultivation of the quantitatively dominating species, and preparation of an extract of these were performed, followed by immunochemical comparison with extract of the horse hair and dandruff using crossed-line immuno-electrophoresis. As no immunochemical identity was demonstrated it was concluded that the identified microorganisms might serve as a guideline to suspected sensitizing substances when patients with a typical case history of horse allergy do not react to extracts of horse hair and dandruff.

  11. Immunochemical determination of xenobiotics with endocrine disrupting effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez-Alberola, M.C.; Marco, M.P. [Department of Biological Organic Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona, 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-02-01

    This paper is a review with more than 100 references discussing the immunochemical methods reported in the literature for the most important man-made chemicals with suspected endocrine disrupting activity. Details regarding immunizing hapten design, antibody production, and the features (limit of detection, dynamic range, specificity) of the most important immunochemical methods developed (ELISA, FIIA, immunosorbents, immunosensors, etc.) are presented for important environmental pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, alkylphenol polyethoxylates, alkylphenols, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and dioxins. Availability of commercial reagents and methods is reported. (orig.)

  12. Control of Lipid Synthesis during Soybean Seed Development: Enzymic and Immunochemical Assay of Acyl Carrier Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlrogge, J B; Kuo, T M

    1984-03-01

    During soybean seed (Glycine max, var Am Soy 71) development, the rate of lipid biosynthesis per seed increases greatly. As the seed reaches maturity, lipid synthesis declines. To study the controls over the oil synthesis and storage process, we have chosen acyl carrier protein (ACP) as a representative marker for the fatty acid synthetase pathway. We have quantitated soybean ACP levels by both enzymic and immunochemical methods. Escherichia coli acyl-ACP synthetase was used as an assay for enzymically active ACP. Total ACP protein was determined by immunoassay using antibodies prepared in rabbits against spinach ACP. These antibody preparations also bind ACP isolated from soybeans, allowing development of a radioimmunoassay based on competition with [(3)H]palmitoyl-ACP. The enzymic and immunochemical measurement of ACP at various stages of seed development have indicated that ACP activity and ACP antigen increase markedly in correlation with the in vivo increase in lipid synthesis. These results indicate that a major control over the increase in lipid synthesis arises through regulation of the levels of the fatty acid biosynthetic proteins. However, as the seed reaches maturity and lipid biosynthesis declines, ACP per seed remains relatively high. In the mature seed, we found that more than 95% of the ACP is localized in the cotyledons, less than 5% is in the axis, and less than 1% is in the seed coat.

  13. Immunochemical determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics in cattle hair: a strategy to ensure food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Fátima; Pinacho, Daniel G; Gratacós-Cubarsí, Marta; García-Regueiro, José-Antonio; Castellari, Massimo; Sánchez-Baeza, Francisco; Marco, M-Pilar

    2014-08-15

    Enrofloxacin (ERFX) is a synthetic antibiotic of the fluoroquinolone (FQ) family, which is commonly administered in veterinary medicine. ERFX and its metabolite, ciprofloxacin (CPFX), have been reported to accumulate in hair of treated animals. Therefore, hair analysis is an attractive non-invasive alternative to control misuse of such antibiotic and to ensure food safety by preventing such food derived products arrive to the consumer. In this context, an immunochemical analytical protocol has been established to detect ERFX and CPFX residues in cattle hair samples. Unpigmented and pigmented hair were collected from ERFX-treated and non-treated calves, and the aqueous NH4OH extracts were directly analyzed by ELISA, being possible to achieve limits of detection in the range of 10-30 μg kg(-1). A good concordance between HPLC and ELISA measurements was observed. The results demonstrate the potential of the immunochemical procedure reported here to rapidly screen and quantitate FQ residues in hair samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An immunochemical assay to detect DNA damage in bovine sperm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Haring, R.; Dijk- Knijnenburg, H.C.M. van; Bruijnzeel, P.L.B.; Daas, N.H.G. den

    2000-01-01

    An immunochemical assay has been developed to detect oxidative damage in bovine sperm DNA. Sperm DNA contains a large amount of oxidative damage as a result of exposure to exogenous agents, but damage also can caused by normal metabolic processes and the absence of DNA repair in the later stages of

  15. Fecal Incontinence in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children and teens in our Learning Center . FAQs Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Childbirth and Delivery Neurologic Disease or Injury Colorectal Cancer Other Contributing Factors Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's ...

  16. Implementation of immunochemical faecal occult blood test in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jakob Søgaard; Bro, Flemming; Hornung, Nete

    2016-01-01

    anvendelsen af immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT) i almen praksis. iFOBT detekterer humant globin i fæces og indikerer gastrointestinal blødning. Studiet udgør en del af et ph.d.-studie, der bidrager med ny viden til at optimere udredningen af patienter med tarmkræft. Der er et stort behov...

  17. [Comparative immunochemical study of the serum proteins of Lacertilia (Reptilia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, F

    1978-09-01

    The immunochemical relationships of the serum proteins of Uromastix acanthinurus, Agama mutabilis, Oplurus cuvieri, O. quadrimaculatus, Chamaeleo chamaeleon, Chalcides ocellatus and Lacerta lepida were studied by means of immunoelectrophoresis with an antiserum anti-Uromastix successively absorbed. Homogeneity of the Iguania species was pointed out and they were found more closely related to the Scincid Chalcides ocellatus than to the Lacertid Lacerta lepida. Within the Iguania, the two Agamids are immunologically more closely related to the Chamaeleon than to the two Iguanids.

  18. The fecal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  19. [Fecal microbiota transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šturdík, Igor; Hlavatý, Tibor; Payer, Juraj

    2016-02-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a therapeutic method, in which the fecal microflora from healthy donors is transmitted to the patient to restore the healthy microbial composition of the gut. In the recent years, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic potential of FMT in various diseases. The standard FMT protocols do not exist. Procedures of FMT vary in several aspects such as donor selection, preparation of fecal material, preparation of the recipient and administration way. FMT appears to be the most successful in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), randomized controlled studies reported 90 % success rate. There is a limited evidence for FMT as a treatment of ulcerative colitis. FMT has been also studied as treatment of diseases with impaired gut microbiota, such as cardiovascular, autoimmune and metabolic diseases. Many unanswered questions with regard to FMT remain and further research is needed.

  20. Gaining Control Over Fecal Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gump, Kendra; Schmelzer, Marilee

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that improve the regularity and efficiency of defecation can eliminate or minimize episodes of fecal incontinence. The medical-surgical nurse's role in identifying patients with fecal incontinence is discussed, along with various treatments to control bowel elimination.

  1. Pooling of porcine fecal samples for quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis by real-time polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ken Steen; Johansen, Markku; Jorsal, Sven Erik Lind;

    2014-01-01

    obtained by averaging test results from individual fecal samples in relation to a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) test for Lawsonia intracellularis. Ten diarrheic and 10 normal fecal samples were submitted from each of 43 Danish swine herds (n = 860 fecal samples). Pools (n = 43), each...

  2. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, S.S. (Vermont Univ., Burlington, VT (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics); Erlanger, B.F. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Microbiology)

    1992-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, {Beta}-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis.

  3. Imaging fecal incontinence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchsjaeger, Michael H. E-mail: michael.fuchsjaeger@univie.ac.at; Maier, Andrea G

    2003-08-01

    Fecal incontinence is the inability to defer release of gas or stool from the anus and rectum by mechanisms of voluntary control. It is an important medical disorder affecting the quality of life of up to 20% of the population above 65 years. The most common contributing factors include previous vaginal deliveries, pelvic or perineal trauma, previous anorectal surgery, and rectal prolapse. Many physicians lack experience and knowledge related to pelvic floor incontinence disorders, but advancing technology has improved this knowledge. Increased experience with endoanal ultrasound and endoanal magnetic resonance imaging have given us a better understanding not only of the anatomy of the anal canal but also of the underlying morphological defects in fecal incontinence. Current imaging methods are emphasized and recent literature is reviewed.

  4. Phenolics: Occurrence and Immunochemical Detection in Environment and Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline P. Meulenberg

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds may be of natural or anthropogenic origin and be present in the environment as well as in food. They comprise a large and diverse group of compounds that may be either beneficial or harmful for consumers. In this review first a non-exhausting overview of interesting phenolics is given, in particular with regards to their presence in environment and food. For some of these compounds, beneficial, toxicological and/or optionally endocrine disrupting activities will be presented. Further, immunochemical detection and/or isolation methods developed will be discussed, including advantages and disadvantages thereof in comparison with conventional analytical methods such as HPLC, GC, MS. A short overview of new sensor-like methods will also be included for present and future application.

  5. Immunochemical studies of 22S protein from isolated mitotic apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibring, T; Baxandall, J

    1969-05-01

    Evidence is presented that the "22S protein" of mitotic apparatus isolated from sea urchin eggs is not microtubule protein. An antibody preparation active against 22S protein is described, and immunochemical studies of the distribution of 22S protein in various cellular fractions and among morphological features of mitotic apparatus are reported. The protein is ubiquitous in the metaphase egg fractions that were tested but is not found in sperm flagella. It is immunologically distinct from proposed microtubule protein isolated from mitotic apparatus by the method of Sakai, and from proposed microtubule protein obtained after extraction with mild acid. It exists in nontubule material of isolated mitotic apparatus but is not detectable in microtubules.

  6. Detection of Toxic Phytoplankton Species by Immunochemical Particle Analysis Based on Flow Cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Engel G.; Gieskes, Winfried W.C.; Zeijl, Wilhelmus J.M. van; Veenhuis, Marten

    1994-01-01

    Particulate suspended matter in oceanic, coastal, and estuarine regions can be specifically marked immunochemically with a fluorescent probe using antisera recognizing antigens present on their surface. Of the particulate matter, phytoplankton is a major component. Toxic species that may form

  7. Providing Quantitative Information and a Nudge to Undergo Stool Testing in a Colorectal Cancer Screening Decision Aid: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Peter H; Perkins, Susan M; Schmidt, Karen K; Muriello, Paul F; Althouse, Sandra; Rawl, Susan M

    2017-08-01

    Guidelines recommend that patient decision aids should provide quantitative information about probabilities of potential outcomes, but the impact of this information is unknown. Behavioral economics suggests that patients confused by quantitative information could benefit from a "nudge" towards one option. We conducted a pilot randomized trial to estimate the effect sizes of presenting quantitative information and a nudge. Primary care patients (n = 213) eligible for colorectal cancer screening viewed basic screening information and were randomized to view (a) quantitative information (quantitative module), (b) a nudge towards stool testing with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) (nudge module), (c) neither a nor b, or (d) both a and b. Outcome measures were perceived colorectal cancer risk, screening intent, preferred test, and decision conflict, measured before and after viewing the decision aid, and screening behavior at 6 months. Patients viewing the quantitative module were more likely to be screened than those who did not ( P = 0.012). Patients viewing the nudge module had a greater increase in perceived colorectal cancer risk than those who did not ( P = 0.041). Those viewing the quantitative module had a smaller increase in perceived risk than those who did not ( P = 0.046), and the effect was moderated by numeracy. Among patients with high numeracy who did not view the nudge module, those who viewed the quantitative module had a greater increase in intent to undergo FIT ( P = 0.028) than did those who did not. The limitations of this study were the limited sample size and single healthcare system. Adding quantitative information to a decision aid increased uptake of colorectal cancer screening, while adding a nudge to undergo FIT did not increase uptake. Further research on quantitative information in decision aids is warranted.

  8. Incontinencia fecal del adulto

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    El propósito de esta revisión es actualizar los conocimientos sobre esta patología, destacando su evolución clínica, estudio y tratamiento, aspectos que ameritan un enfoque multidisciplinario, ya que, además de su compleja fisiopatología, puede asociarse a incontinencia urinaria y prolapso de los tres compartimentos de la pelvis. La incontinencia fecal (IF) constituye una patología altamente prevalente que afecta al menos un 2% de la población y hasta el 45% de los pacientes en casas de repos...

  9. [Fecal microbiota transplantation: review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbut, F; Collignon, A; Butel, M-J; Bourlioux, P

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has gained an increasing medical interest, since the recognition of the role of disturbed microbiota in the development of various diseases. To date, FMT is an established treatment modality for multiple recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI), despite lack of standardization of the procedure. Persisting normalization of the disturbed colonic microbiota associated with RCDI seems to be responsible for the therapeutic effect of FMT. For other diseases, FMT should be considered strictly experimental, only offered to patients in an investigational clinical setting. Although the concept of FMT is appealing, current expectations should be damped until future evidence arises. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Fecal microbiota composition and frailty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tongeren, SP; Slaets, JPJ; Harmsen, HJM; Welling, GW

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between fecal microbiota composition and frailty in the elderly was studied. Fecal samples from volunteers with high frailty scores showed a significant reduction in the number of lactobacilli (26-fold). At much higher population levels, both the Bacteroides/Prevotella (threefold) a

  11. Fecal microbiota composition and frailty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tongeren, SP; Slaets, JPJ; Harmsen, HJM; Welling, GW

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between fecal microbiota composition and frailty in the elderly was studied. Fecal samples from volunteers with high frailty scores showed a significant reduction in the number of lactobacilli (26-fold). At much higher population levels, both the Bacteroides/Prevotella (threefold)

  12. Coprotest® quantitativo: quantificação de ovos de helmintos em amostras fecais utilizando-se sistema de diagnóstico comercial Quantitative Coprotest®: quantification of helminth eggs in fecal samples by commercial diagnostic kit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Julia Urias Santos Araújo

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A técnica coproparasitológica de concentração em formol acetato de etila foi empregada para a quantificação de ovos de helmintos. O método quantitativo proposto foi padronizado utilizando-se o sistema comercial Coprotest® e amostras fecais contendo diferentes cargas de ovos de Ascaris lumbricoides. Para a comparação do Coprotest® quantitativo com outros métodos de quantificação de ovos, foi preparada em laboratório uma série de amostras fecais, com carga decrescente de ovos de A. lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura e Schistosoma mansoni. Discutem-se as vantagens de se empregar um método capaz de detectar maior número de espécies de helmintos, além de protozoários, e que permita, concomitantemente, estimar a intensidade das infecções por geo-helmintos e S. mansoni nas populações. O Coprotest® quantitativo mostrou ser de aplicação viável, fornecendo resultados comparáveis a outros métodos quantitativos já descritos na literatura.The formol ethyl acetate concentration technique was applied for the quantification of helminth eggs in fecal samples. The proposed quantitative method was standardized through the use of a commercial kit, Coprotest®, and fecal samples with different counts of Ascaris lumbricoides eggs. For the comparison of the quantitative Coprotest® with other methods of egg quantification, a series of fecal samples was prepared in laboratory, with decreasing number of A. lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and Schistosoma mansoni eggs. It is discussed the advantages of a method that is able of detecting different helminth and also protozoa species, allowing, in concomitance, to estimate in the populations the intensity of S. mansoni and geohelminth infections. The quantitative Coprotest® showed to be feasible, providing results that were comparable to the other quantitative methods already described in the literature.

  13. Economic cost of fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao; Menees, Stacy B; Zochowski, Melissa K; Fenner, Dee E

    2012-05-01

    Despite its prevalence and deleterious impact on patients and families, fecal incontinence remains an understudied condition. Few data are available on its economic burden in the United States. The aim of this study was to quantify per patient annual economic costs associated with fecal incontinence. A mail survey of patients with fecal incontinence was conducted in 2010 to collect information on their sociodemographic characteristics, fecal incontinence symptoms, and utilization of medical and nonmedical resources for fecal incontinence. The analysis was conducted from a societal perspective and included both direct and indirect (ie, productivity loss) costs. Unit costs were determined based on standard Medicare reimbursement rates, national average wholesale prices of medications, and estimates from other relevant sources. All cost estimates were reported in 2010 US dollars. This study was conducted at a single tertiary care institution. The analysis included 332 adult patients who had fecal incontinence for more than a year with at least monthly leakage of solid, liquid, or mucous stool. The primary outcome measured was the per patient annual economic costs associated with fecal incontinence. The average annual total cost for fecal incontinence was $4110 per person (median = $1594; interquartile range, $517-$5164). Of these costs, direct medical and nonmedical costs averaged $2353 (median, $1176; interquartile range, $294-$2438) and $209 (median, $75; interquartile range, $17-$262), whereas the indirect cost associated with productivity loss averaged $1549 per patient annually (median, $0; interquartile range, $0-$813). Multivariate regression analyses suggested that greater fecal incontinence symptom severity was significantly associated with higher annual direct costs. This study was based on patient self-reported data, and the sample was derived from a single institution. Fecal incontinence is associated with substantial economic cost, calling for more

  14. [Fecal microbiota transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García-de-Paredes, Ana; Rodríguez-de-Santiago, Enrique; Aguilera-Castro, Lara; Ferre-Aracil, Carlos; López-Sanromán, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can no longer be seen as an enemy. Nowadays, there is enough evidence to place the microbiota as a key element in human homeostasis. Despite initial skepticism, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a real therapeutic alternative for patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Moreover, this procedure has shown promising results in ulcerative colitis and other non-gastrointestinal disorders. There is still a lack of knowledge and clinical trials with long- term follow-up. Therefore, the available data should be interpreted with caution. In this document we provide a detailed review of the literature on the intestinal microbiota and FMT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  15. Specific probiotics or 'fecal transplantation'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal ecosystem consists mainly of the enteric flora and to a large extent determines intestinal but also extraintestinal health and disease. General alterations and specific molecular changes of intestinal bacteria cause local as well as systemic immune reactions. Nonantibiotic treatment of the enteric flora has a long tradition and spans a range of different interventions from nutrition to specific probiotics and complete fecal transplantation. When comparing therapy to specific probiotics and fecal transplantation, several aspects need to be considered, like biological consequences, safety and therapeutic evidence. The introduction of probiotics into therapy occurred more than hundred years ago. In contrast, experiences with fecal transplantation are more recent and more limited. Safety issues have not been definitively clarified. Because of the different biological activities of probiotics and fecal transplantation, it can be hypothesized that they may play different roles in the treatment of various diseases. More research is needed before the details, safety and therapeutic effects of bacteriotherapy for IBD become sufficiently clear.

  16. Fecal lactoferrin, a marker of intestinal inflammation in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowska, Anna; Liberek, Anna; Łuczak, Grażyna; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Plata-Nazar, Katarzyna; Korzon, Maria; Kamińska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the usefulness of fecal lactoferrin in the diagnosis and monitoring of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. The study included 52 children with IBD (24 with Crohn's disease and 28 with ulcerative colitis) aged between 0.92 and 18 years, and 41 IBD-free controls of similar age. Fecal concentration of lactoferrin was determined with a quantitative immunoenzymatic test. Fecal concentration of lactoferrin in children with IBD was significantly higher than in the controls. The cut-off value of fecal lactoferrin concentration optimally distinguishing between the children with IBD and the controls was identified as 13 μg/g. The sensitivity and specificity of this cut-off value equaled 80.7% and 92.7%, respectively, and its positive and negative prognostic values were 96.8% and 63.3%, respectively. Patients diagnosed with moderate Crohn's disease had significantly higher fecal concentrations of lactoferrin than children with the mild or inactive disease. Similarly, children with moderate ulcerative colitis showed significantly higher fecal concentrations of lactoferrin than individuals with the mild condition. No significant relationship was found between the fecal concentration of lactoferrin and the severity of endoscopic lesions. Patients with IBD and a positive result of fecal occult blood test were characterized by significantly higher concentrations of lactoferrin than the individuals with IBD and a negative result of this test. In conclusion, fecal concentration of lactoferrin seems to be a useful parameter for diagnosis and monitoring of IBD in children.

  17. Assessment of the climate change impacts on fecal coliform contamination in a tidal estuarine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chan, Wen-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is one of the key factors affecting the future microbiological water quality in rivers and tidal estuaries. A coupled 3D hydrodynamic and fecal coliform transport model was developed and applied to the Danshuei River estuarine system for predicting the influences of climate change on microbiological water quality. The hydrodynamic and fecal coliform model was validated using observational salinity and fecal coliform distributions. According to the analyses of the statistical error, predictions of the salinity and the fecal coliform concentration from the model simulation quantitatively agreed with the observed data. The validated model was then applied to predict the fecal coliform contamination as a result of climate change, including the change of freshwater discharge and the sea level rise. We found that the reduction of freshwater discharge under climate change scenarios resulted in an increase in the fecal coliform concentration. The sea level rise would decrease fecal coliform distributions because both the water level and the water volume increased. A reduction in freshwater discharge has a negative impact on the fecal coliform concentration, whereas a rising sea level has a positive influence on the fecal coliform contamination. An appropriate strategy for the effective microbiological management in tidal estuaries is required to reveal the persistent trends of climate in the future.

  18. An analysis of the duplicate testing strategy of an Irish immunochemical FOBT colorectal cancer screening programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelley, Leanne

    2013-06-10

    AIM: This study examined the relevance of using a two sample quantitative immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT or FIT) at a high cut off stringency by the first population-based colorectal cancer (CRC) pilot screening programme in Ireland. METHOD: Approximately ten thousand individuals between the ages of 50-74 years were invited to perform two consecutive FITs. These were analysed in tandem using the OC-Sensor and participants with at least one positive result with a haemoglobin cut off for positivity at 100 ng\\/ml were offered colonoscopy. RESULTS: A total of 5023 (52%) (2177 (43%) male; 2846 (57%) female) individuals with a median age of 64 years participated. At least one positive FIT test was detected from 514 (10%) individuals. From the 419 (82%) patients who proceeded to colonoscopy 17 (4%) had CRC and 132(33%) had an advanced adenoma. The detection rate for these screen relevant lesions was 3% (95% CIs = 2.5% - 3.5%) and the FIT positive + colonoscopy detection rate was 36% (95% CI = 31% - 40%). The numbers needed to colonoscope to find an advanced lesion was 2.8. The two test system detected four (23.5%) additional patients with CRC and 37 (28%) with an advanced adenoma compared with a single test. CONCLUSION: The CRC miss rate estimated for a single test (23.5%) was unacceptably high when the goal was to maximize the discovery of advanced lesions in the initial screening round. We conclude that the two test protocol at a high cut off threshold is suitable to optimize FIT screening in Ireland. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair. Technical progress report, May 1, 1989--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, S.S. [Vermont Univ., Burlington, VT (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Erlanger, B.F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Microbiology

    1992-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, {Beta}-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis.

  20. Fecal microbiota transplantation: in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shaan; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Petrof, Elaine O

    2016-03-01

    There has been increasing interest in understanding the role of the human gut microbiome to elucidate the therapeutic potential of its manipulation. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the administration of a solution of fecal matter from a donor into the intestinal tract of a recipient in order to directly change the recipient's gut microbial composition and confer a health benefit. FMT has been used to successfully treat recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. There are preliminary indications to suggest that it may also carry therapeutic potential for other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and functional gastrointestinal disorders.

  1. [Immunochemical properties of the excretory-secretory antigen of Trichinella spiralis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akibekov, O S; Lider, L A; Odoevskiĭ, I M; Tokpan, S S; Ospanova, A Z

    2015-01-01

    In vitro cultivation of Trichinella spiralis provided data on the structure of somatic and excretory-secretory antigens of T. spiralis larvae, their immunochemical properties were studied. The findings suggest that work should be continued to produce monoclonal antibodies and to develop highly sensitive and specific ELISA test systems for the diagnosis of human and animal trichinosis.

  2. Immunochemical properties of NAD+-linked glycerol dehydrogenases from Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, J C; Forage, R G; Lin, E C

    1982-01-01

    An NAD+-linked glycerol dehydrogenase hyperproduced by a mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 was found to be immunochemically homologous to a minor glycerol dehydrogenase of unknown physiological function in Klebsiella pneumoniae 1033, but not to the glycerol dehydrogenase of the dha system responsible for anaerobic dissimilation of glycerol or to the 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase of K. pneumoniae.

  3. Immunochemical detection of sulfur mustard adducts with keratins in the stratum corneum of human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Noort, D.; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Fidder, A.; Chau, L.F.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Benschop, H.P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a program to develop methods for diagnosis of exposure to chemical warfare agents, we developed immunochemical methods for detection of adducts of sulfur mustard to keratin in human skin. Three partial sequences of keratins containing glutamine or asparagine adducted with a

  4. Detection of Toxic Phytoplankton Species by Immunochemical Particle Analysis Based on Flow Cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Engel G.; Gieskes, Winfried W.C.; Zeijl, Wilhelmus J.M. van; Veenhuis, Marten

    1994-01-01

    Particulate suspended matter in oceanic, coastal, and estuarine regions can be specifically marked immunochemically with a fluorescent probe using antisera recognizing antigens present on their surface. Of the particulate matter, phytoplankton is a major component. Toxic species that may form harmfu

  5. CDC Study Finds Fecal Contamination in Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Communication (404) 639-3286 CDC study finds fecal contamination in pools A study of public pools done ... The E. coli is a marker for fecal contamination. Finding a high percentage of E. coli-positive ...

  6. Home Use Tests: Fecal Occult Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Home Use Tests Fecal Occult Blood Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... test kit to measure the presence of hidden (occult) blood in your stool (feces). What is fecal ...

  7. Bowel Control Problems (Fecal Incontinence)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical test results. In addition to a general medical history, the health care provider may ask the following questions: When did fecal ... delivery hemorrhoids and rectal prolapse rectocele inactivity ... on a person’s medical history, physical exam, and medical test results. Treatment ...

  8. Sensitive immunochemical approaches for quantitative (FPIA) and qualitative (lateral flow tests) determination of gentamicin in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloglazova, N V; Shmelin, P S; Eremin, S A

    2016-01-01

    Three kinds of immunoassays for the determination of gentamicin in milk samples were developed and validated. First, a fast and easily-performed fluorescence polarization immunoassay was used for characterization of the employed polyclonal antibody. The calculated Kaff were (1.9±0.4)×10(9)М(-1) and (6.0±0.2)×10(6)М(-1) for the high- and low-affinity fractions respectively. The assay was characterized with a good sensitivity, the limit of detection being 5μgkg(-1). Two different kinds of detection labels, i.e. colloidal gold (CG) and quantum dots (QDs), were evaluated for use in lateral-flow format with respect to rapid visual on-site testing. The cut-off levels for both qualitative formats were selected based on the maximum level for gentamicin in milk established by the European Commission, 100μgkg(-1), resulting in a 10μgkg(-1) cut-off considering sample dilution. The intra-laboratory validation was performed with sterilized milk samples artificially spiked with gentamicin at concentrations less than, equal to, and greater than the cut-off level. It was shown that milk products could be analyzed without any sample preparation, except for dilution with the buffer solution. The rates of false-positive and false-negative results were below 5% for both labels. The different developed immunoassays were tested towards gentamicin determination in artificially-spiked and naturally contaminated milk samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of Population and Latrines on Fecal Contamination of Ponds in Rural Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappett, Peter S. K.; Escamilla, Veronica; Layton, Alice; McKay, Larry D.; Emch, Michael; Williams, Daniel E.; Huq, Md. R.; Alam, Md. J.; Farhana, Labony; Mailloux, Brian J.; Ferguson, Andy; Sayler, Gary S.; Ahmed, Kazi M.; van Geen, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A majority of households in Bangladesh rely on pond water for hygiene. Exposure to pond water fecal contamination could therefore still contribute to diarrheal disease despite the installation of numerous tubewells for drinking. The objectives of this study are to determine the predominant sources (human or livestock) of fecal pollution in ponds and examine the association between local population, latrine density, latrine quality and concentrations of fecal bacteria and pathogens in pond water. Forty-three ponds were analyzed for E. coli using culture-based methods and E. coli, Bacteroidales and adenovirus using quantitative PCR. Population and sanitation spatial data were collected and measured against pond fecal contamination. Humans were the dominant source of fecal contamination in 79% of the ponds according to Bacteroidales measurements. Ponds directly receiving latrine effluent had the highest concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (up to 106 Most Probable Number (MPN) of culturable E. coli per 100 mL). Concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria correlated with population surveyed within a distance of 30-70 m (p<0.05) and total latrines surveyed within 50-70 m (p<0.05). Unsanitary latrines (visible effluent or open pits) within the pond drainage basin were also significantly correlated to fecal indicator concentrations (p<0.05). Water in the vast majority of the surveyed ponds contained unsafe levels of fecal contamination attributable primarily to unsanitary latrines, and to lesser extent to sanitary latrines and cattle. Since the majority of fecal pollution is derived from human waste, continued use of pond water could help explain the persistence of diarrheal disease in rural South Asia. PMID:21632095

  10. Prospective evaluation of fecal calprotectin as a screening biomarker for colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limburg, Paul J; Devens, Mary E; Harrington, Jonathan J; Diehl, Nancy N; Mahoney, Douglas W; Ahlquist, David A

    2003-10-01

    Stool testing is a well established method of screening for colorectal neoplasia. Emerging data suggest that novel biomarkers may offer performance advantages over fecal occult blood. In this large, prospective study, we assessed fecal calprotectin (a leukocyte-derived protein) as a screening biomarker for colorectal neoplasia. Fecal calprotectin was directly compared to fecal hemoglobin (Hb) and colonoscopy as the existing criterion standards for stool screening and structural evaluation, respectively. Subjects included colonoscopy patients with a personal history of colorectal neoplasia, family history of colorectal cancer, or iron deficiency anemia. Stool specimens were collected before purgation, processed appropriately, and quantitatively analyzed for calprotectin (Nycomed Pharma, Oslo, Norway) and for Hb (Mayo Medical Laboratories, Rochester, MN) by masked technicians. Colonoscopies were performed by experienced endoscopists without prior knowledge of the fecal assay results. Among 412 subjects, 97 (24%) subjects had one or more colorectal neoplasms (including three with adenocarcinomas). Fecal calprotectin levels did not differ significantly between subjects with versus subjects without colorectal neoplasms (p = 0.33). Neither tumor number (p = 0.85) nor tumor size (p = 0.86) significantly influenced the observed fecal calprotectin concentrations. Estimates of the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of fecal calprotectin for any colorectal neoplasms were 37%, 63%, 23%, and 76%, respectively. Comparable performance estimates for fecal Hb were 3%, 97%, 27%, and 77%, respectively. In this cohort of colonoscopy patients at above average risk, fecal calprotectin was a poor screening biomarker for colorectal neoplasia. Further investigation of tumor-derived, rather than blood-based, biomarkers may be a more rewarding approach to stool screening for colorectal neoplasia.

  11. Screening for colorectal cancer: random comparison of guaiac and immunochemical faecal occult blood testing at different cut-off levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, L; Wilschut, J A; van Ballegooijen, M; van Vuuren, A J; van der Valk, H; Reijerink, J C I Y; van der Togt, A C M; Kuipers, E J; Habbema, J D F; van Leerdam, M E

    2009-01-01

    Immunochemical faecal occult blood testing (FIT) provides quantitative test results, which allows optimisation of the cut-off value for follow-up colonoscopy. We conducted a randomised population-based trial to determine test characteristics of FIT (OC-Sensor micro, Eiken, Japan) screening at different cut-off levels and compare these with guaiac-based faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) screening in an average risk population. A representative sample of the Dutch population (n=10 011), aged 50–74 years, was 1 : 1 randomised before invitation to gFOBT and FIT screening. Colonoscopy was offered to screenees with a positive gFOBT or FIT (cut-off 50 ng haemoglobin/ml). When varying the cut-off level between 50 and 200 ng ml−1, the positivity rate of FIT ranged between 8.1% (95% CI: 7.2–9.1%) and 3.5% (95% CI: 2.9–4.2%), the detection rate of advanced neoplasia ranged between 3.2% (95% CI: 2.6–3.9%) and 2.1% (95% CI: 1.6–2.6%), and the specificity ranged between 95.5% (95% CI: 94.5–96.3%) and 98.8% (95% CI: 98.4–99.0%). At a cut-off value of 75 ng ml−1, the detection rate was two times higher than with gFOBT screening (gFOBT: 1.2%; FIT: 2.5%; P<0.001), whereas the number needed to scope (NNscope) to find one screenee with advanced neoplasia was similar (2.2 vs 1.9; P=0.69). Immunochemical faecal occult blood testing is considerably more effective than gFOBT screening within the range of tested cut-off values. From our experience, a cut-off value of 75 ng ml−1 provided an adequate positivity rate and an acceptable trade-off between detection rate and NNscope. PMID:19337257

  12. [Complex immunochemical analysis of the proteinogram and the system of soluble leukocytic antigens in children with chronic and recurrent infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunin, D D; Khakhalin, L N; Porkhovatyĭ, S Ia; Olefirenko, G A

    1985-09-01

    The immunochemical study of the blood sera of children with chronic and relapsing infections has shown an increase in the content of alpha 2-macroglobulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin in the absence of significant changes in the concentration of immunoglobulins and complement components. The immunochemical analysis of the system of soluble leukocytic antigens (SLA) has revealed a decrease in the level of SLA-1 simultaneously with the presence of redundant amounts of SLA-5 and SLA-8.

  13. Degradation of copepod fecal pellets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Louise K.; Iversen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Copepod fecal pellets are often degraded at high rates within the upper part of the water column. However, the identity of the degraders and the processes governing the degradation remain unresolved. To identify the pellet degraders we collected water from Oresund (Denmark) approximately every...... second month from July 2004 to July 2005. These water samples were divided into 5 fractions (pellet degradation rate and species composition of the plankton from triplicate incubations of each fraction and a known, added...... amount of fecal pellets. The total degradation rate of pellets by the natural plankton community of Oresund followed the phytoplankton biomass, with maximum degradation rate during the spring bloom (2.5 +/- 0.49 d(-1)) and minimum (0.52 +/- 0.14 d(-1)) during late winter. Total pellet removal rate ranged...

  14. Fecal transplant policy and legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Dinesh; Aekka, Apoorva; Vyas, Arpita

    2015-01-07

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has garnered significant attention in recent years in the face of a reemerging Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) epidemic. Positive results from the first randomized control trial evaluating FMT have encouraged the medical community to explore the process further and expand its application beyond C. difficile infections and even the gastrointestinal domain. However promising and numerous the prospects of FMT appear, the method remains limited in scope today due to several important barriers, most notably a poorly defined federal regulatory policy. The Food and Drug Administration has found it difficult to standardize and regulate the administration of inherently variable, metabolically active, and ubiquitously available fecal material. The current cumbersome policy, which classifies human feces as a drug, has prevented physicians from providing FMT and deserving patients from accessing FMT in a timely fashion, and subsequent modifications seem only to be temporary. The argument for reclassifying fecal material as human tissue is well supported. Essentially, this would allow for a regulatory framework that is sufficiently flexible to expand access to care and facilitate research, but also appropriately restrictive and centralized to ensure patient safety. Such an approach can facilitate the advancement of FMT to a more refined, controlled, and aesthetic process, perhaps in the form of a customized and well-characterized stool substitute therapy.

  15. Immunochemical and immunocytochemical studies of the crustacean vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusy, J J; Martin, G; Soyez, D; van Deijnen, J E; Gallo, J M

    1987-09-01

    Immunochemical investigations, using dot immunobinding assay (DIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunocytochemical studies reveal the following new information about crustacean vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH): (1) The structure of VIH is sufficiently different from that of the other sinus gland neuropeptides to allow a selective recognition of VIH by polyclonal antibodies. (2) From immunochemical criteria, VIH does not seem strictly species specific. The antisera raised against VIH of Homarus americanus cross-react with sinus gland extracts of Palaemonetes varians, Palaemon serratus, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, Carcinus maenas, and Porcellio dilatatus. (3) In the sinus gland of H. americanus, VIH immunoreactivity is localized mainly in electron-dense granules of medium size (110-185 nm in diameter) while, in P. dilatatus, the labeling is mostly on the largest granules (200-270 nm in diameter).

  16. High turnover rates of copepod fecal pellets due to Noctiluca scintillans grazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Copepod fecal pellet production and vertical flux, as well as vertical distributions of copepods, fecal pellets and the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans were monitored in an upwelling plume off the coast of Brazil during 5 d in austral spring. Less than half (20 to 45......%) of the pellets produced in the overlying water column reached sediment traps positioned at 30 to 60 m depth, and specific sinking losses computed from steady-state considerations varied inversely with trap depth between 0.3 and 2.9 d-1. Total specific losses varied between 0.6 and 16 d-1, and the major part...... as the latter aged, up to 5 x 105 cells m-2, and fecal pellets occurred commonly in the food vacuoles of N. scintillans. Specific fecal pellet remineralization rates were linearly related to the abundance of N. scintillans. This relation can be quantitatively accounted for if N. scintillans clears the water...

  17. Demonstration and immunochemical characterization of carcinoembryonic antigen in human pancreatic juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, R P; Kupchik, H Z; Saravis, C A; Broitman, S A; Gregg, J A; Zamcheck, N

    1976-05-01

    Pancreatic juice collected from 10 patients without evidence of malignant disease of the pancreas or other organs was pooled, extracted, and fractionated by Sepharose 6-B and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) activity in the material was demonstrated and studied by: a) radioimmunoassay, b) competitive binding to antibodies against CEA, c) precipitin inhibition, and d) Ouchterlony analysis. The immunochemical identity of the active material to CEA purified from liver metastases of colon cancer was demonstrated.

  18. Physiological, morphological, and immunochemical parameters used for the characterization of clinical and environmental isolates of Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Finco, A; Costa, A O; Silva, S K; Ramada, J S; Furst, C; Stinghen, A E; De Figueiredo, B C; De Moura, J; Alvarenga, L M

    2013-03-01

    The factors that characterize Acanthamoeba strains as harmless or potentially pathogenic have not been elucidated. Analysing the in vitro and in vivo parameters of Acanthamoeba samples, including heat tolerance at temperatures close to that of the human body, cytopathic effects, and their ability to cause infections in animals, has been proposed to identify their pathogenic potential. Another promising criterion for differentiating strains is the analysis of their biochemical and immunochemical properties. In this study, a comparative evaluation between clinical and environmental Acanthamoeba isolates was performed on the basis of physiological, morphological, and immunochemical criteria. Crude antigens were used to characterize the protein profiles by electrophoresis and immunize mice to produce polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. The antibodies were characterized using ELISA, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence techniques. The results obtained with polyclonal antibodies suggest the presence of specific proteins for each studied isolate and co-reactive immunochemical profiles among conserved components. Ten monoclonal antibody clones were obtained; mAb3 recognized 3 out of 4 samples studied. The results of this study may help standardize criteria for identifying and characterizing Acanthamoeba strains. Taken together, our results support the view that a set of features may help differentiate Acanthamoeba species and isolates.

  19. Alternative SERRS probes for the immunochemical localization of ovalbumin in paintings: an advanced mapping detection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciutto, Giorgia; Litti, Lucio; Lofrumento, Cristiana; Prati, Silvia; Ricci, Marilena; Gobbo, Marina; Roda, Aldo; Castellucci, Emilio; Meneghetti, Moreno; Mazzeo, Rocco

    2013-08-21

    In the field of analytical chemistry, many scientific efforts have been devoted to develop experimental procedures for the characterization of organic substances present in heterogeneous artwork samples, due to their challenging identification. In particular, performances of immunochemical techniques have been recently investigated, optimizing ad hoc systems for the identification of proteins. Among all the different immunochemical approaches, the use of metal nanoparticles - for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection - remains one of the most powerful methods that has still not been explored enough for the analysis of artistic artefacts. For this reason, the present research work was aimed at proposing a new optimized and highly efficient indirect immunoassay for the detection of ovalbumin. In particular, the study proposed a new SERRS probe composed of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalised with Nile Blue A and produced with an excellent green and cheap alternative approach to the traditional chemical nanoparticles synthesis: the laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS). This procedure allows us to obtain stable nanoparticles which can be easily functionalized without any ligand exchange reaction or extensive purification procedures. Moreover, the present research work also focused on the development of a comprehensive analytical approach, based on the combination of potentialities of immunochemical methods and Raman analysis, for the simultaneous identification of the target protein and the different organic and inorganic substances present in the paint matrix. An advanced mapping detection system was proposed to achieve the exact spatial location of all the components through the creation of false colour chemical maps.

  20. Effects of dietary fiber from wheat, corn, and soy hull bran on excretion of fecal bile acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, E W; Emken, E A; Klevay, L M; Sandstead, H H

    1981-06-01

    Effects of dietary fiber on bile acid excretion and fecal bile acid concentration have been studied for seven subjects fed 26 g of either soft white wheat bran, corn bran, soybean hulls, or hard red spring wheat bran. Results indicate that even in a controlled study using a metabolic word, individual subject variation has a major impact on fecal bile acid excretion. This observation has not been fully appreciated in previous human studies. No significant change in the composition of fecal bile acids could be associated with the decrease in serum lipid levels previously reported. A method for the isolation and quantitation of fecal bile acids is described which does not require purification by thin-layer chromatography. A preliminary study of lyophilized fecal samples stored at -10 to -30 degrees C showed very little or no change in bile acid content. Samples stored at room temperatures for 11 months showed a substantial reduction in bile acid content.

  1. Men with negative results of guaiac-based fecal occult blood test have higher prevalences of colorectal neoplasms than women with positive results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Birkner, Berndt; Stock, Christian

    2014-06-15

    Guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests (gFOBTs) are the most commonly applied tests for colorectal cancer screening globally but have relatively poor sensitivity to detect colorectal neoplasms. Men have higher prevalences of colorectal neoplasms than women. In case of a positive gFOBT result, participants are referred to colonoscopy, independent of sex. To assess performance of gFOBT in routine screening practice, we assessed age and sex specific prevalences (age groups: 55-59, 60-64, 65-69 and 70-74) of colorectal neoplasms in 182,956 women and men undergoing colonoscopy for primary screening and in 20,884 women and men undergoing colonoscopy to follow-up a positive gFOBT in Bavaria, Germany, in 2007-2009. We conducted model calculations to estimate prevalences among gFOBT negative individuals. Analogous model calculations were performed for women and men tested positive or negative with fecal immunochemical tests. In all age groups (55-59, 60-64, 65-69 and 70-74 years), men undergoing colonoscopy for primary screening had substantially higher prevalences of any colorectal neoplasms and essentially the same prevalences of advanced colorectal neoplasms compared to women undergoing colonoscopy to follow-up a positive gFOBT. Model calculations suggest that men with negative gFOBT likewise have substantially higher prevalences of colorectal neoplasms than gFOBT positive women in each age group. Model calculations further indicate that no such sex paradoxon occurs, and a much clearer risk stratification can be achieved with fecal immunochemical tests. Our findings underline need to move forward from and overcome shortcomings of gFOBT-based colorectal cancer screening. © 2013 UICC.

  2. Fecal Continence Revisited : The Anal External Sphincter Continence Reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broens, Paul M. A.; Penninckx, Freddy M.; Boix Ochoa, Jose

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: None of the current theories on fecal incontinence can explain fecal continence adequately. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the mechanism controlling fecal continence. DESIGN: Anal electrosensitivity, anorectal pressures, and rectal pressure volumetry tests were performed in 17

  3. Human-, Ovine-, and Bovine-Specific Viral Source Tracking Tools to Discriminate Between the Major Fecal Sources in Agricultural Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusiñol, Marta; Moriarty, Elaine; Lin, Susan; Bofill-Mas, Sílvia; Gilpin, Brent

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the sources of fecal contamination in different river catchments, using a combination of microbial source tracking tools, for human, ruminant, ovine and bovine livestock, in order to define appropriate water management strategies. Every source of waterway pollution was evaluated in river water samples from one urban river catchment and two important farming regions in New Zealand. Fecal pollution was initially measured by testing Escherichia coli and evaluating the presence of human- and ruminant-associated DNA markers of Bacteroidales (BiAdo, BacHum-UCD, BacH, and BacR) and human and ruminant fecal sterols/stanols ratios. Then specific fecal pollution sources were assessed with previously reported quantitative PCR assays targeting human-, bovine-, and ovine-specific viruses: human adenoviruses (HAdV), human JC polyomaviruses, bovine polyomaviruses (BPyV), and ovine polyomaviruses (OPyV). High level of ruminant fecal contamination was detected all over the farming areas, whereas no ruminant sources were identified in the urban river sampling sites. BacR was the most frequently observed ruminant marker and OPyV and BPyV allowed the identification of ovine and bovine fecal sources. The human fecal viral marker (HAdV) was the most frequently observed human marker, highly abundant in the urban sites, and also present in farming areas. This is the first study using simultaneously the ovine and the bovine viral markers to identify and quantify both bovine and ovine fecal pollution.

  4. Fecal source tracking in water using a mitochondrial DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Nguyet-Minh; Villemur, Richard; Payment, Pierre; Brousseau, Roland; Topp, Edward; Masson, Luke

    2013-01-01

    A mitochondrial-based microarray (mitoArray) was developed for rapid identification of the presence of 28 animals and one family (cervidae) potentially implicated in fecal pollution in mixed activity watersheds. Oligonucleotide probes for genus or subfamily-level identification were targeted within the 12S rRNA - Val tRNA - 16S rRNA region in the mitochondrial genome. This region, called MI-50, was selected based on three criteria: 1) the ability to be amplified by universal primers 2) these universal primer sequences are present in most commercial and domestic animals of interest in source tracking, and 3) that sufficient sequence variation exists within this region to meet the minimal requirements for microarray probe discrimination. To quantify the overall level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in samples, a quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR) universal primer pair was also developed. Probe validation was performed using DNA extracted from animal tissues and, for many cases, animal-specific fecal samples. To reduce the amplification of potentially interfering fish mtDNA sequences during the MI-50 enrichment step, a clamping PCR method was designed using a fish-specific peptide nucleic acid. DNA extracted from 19 water samples were subjected to both array and independent PCR analyses. Our results confirm that the mitochondrial microarray approach method could accurately detect the dominant animals present in water samples emphasizing the potential for this methodology in the parallel scanning of a large variety of animals normally monitored in fecal source tracking.

  5. Endoluminal magnetic resonance imaging in fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Rociu (Elena)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractFecal incontinence is a chronic disability, has serious emotional impact and increased risk for social isolation. Imaging has become important in the diagnostic work-up of fecal incontinence. The research described in this thesis continues the line of efforts to improve the quality and t

  6. Assessment of Fecal Contamination in Oklahoma Water Systems through the Use of Sterol Fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueming Lu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fecal contamination is a major concern for water quality management, since the fecal materials are associated with pathogens that can cause illness wherever water is used for recreational, drinking and aquaculture purposes. In order to monitor source(s of fecal contamination in Oklahoma water systems, sterol profiles were previously examined in rural and urban samples collected from the Illinois River Basin and the Norman Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP, respectively. Two distinctive, qualitatively and quantitatively, sterol fingerprints were recognized. Despite the effective removal of organic material by the Norman WWTP, human-derived sterol fingerprints, characterized by a predominance of fecal stanols such as coprostanol, were still significant in the output from the plant. The source of fecal material in the Illinois River samples (rural was defined as being characteristic of corn-feed chicken manure originating from surrounding feedlots through the principal component analysis (PCA of the sterol distributions and carbon compound specific isotope analysis of selected sterols (CSIA, δ13C. Thiosteranes, formed during sludge treatments, were also shown to be useful tracers for monitoring sludge application in agriculture fields. The results obtained were used to provide water management authorities with qualitative insights into the source of fecal material inputs into the environment.

  7. Distribution of Genetic Marker Concentrations for Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Sewage and Animal Feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods for the identification of fecal microorganisms in surface waters has the potential to revolutionize water quality monitoring worldwide. Unlike traditional cultivation methods, qPCR estimates the concentration of gen...

  8. Interlaboratory Comparison of Real-time PCR Protocols for Quantification of General Fecal Indicator Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for the rapid identification of fecal bacteria in environmental waters is being considered for use as a national water quality metric in the United States. The transition from research tool to a standardized proto...

  9. Performance of human fecal anaerobe-associated PCR-based assays in a multi-laboratory method evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Blythe A.; Cao, Yiping; Ebentier, Darcy L.; Hanley, Kaitlyn; Ballesté, Elisenda; Brandão, João; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Converse, Reagan; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Gentry-Shields, Jennifer; Gourmelon, Michèle; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung; Lozach, Solen; Madi, Tania; Meijer, Wim G.; Noble, Rachel; Peed, Lindsay; Reischer, Georg H.; Rodrigues, Raquel; Rose, Joan B.; Schriewer, Alexander; Sinigalliano, Chris; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Stewart, Jill; ,; Laurie, C.; Wang, Dan; Whitman, Richard; Wuertz, Stefan; Jay, Jenny; Holden, Patricia A.; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Shanks, Orin; Griffith, John F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of PCR-based methods for detecting human fecal material in environmental waters have been developed over the past decade, but these methods have rarely received independent comparative testing in large multi-laboratory studies. Here, we evaluated ten of these methods (BacH, BacHum-UCD, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BtH), BsteriF1, gyrB, HF183 endpoint, HF183 SYBR, HF183 Taqman®, HumM2, and Methanobrevibacter smithii nifH (Mnif)) using 64 blind samples prepared in one laboratory. The blind samples contained either one or two fecal sources from human, wastewater or non-human sources. The assay results were assessed for presence/absence of the human markers and also quantitatively while varying the following: 1) classification of samples that were detected but not quantifiable (DNQ) as positive or negative; 2) reference fecal sample concentration unit of measure (such as culturable indicator bacteria, wet mass, total DNA, etc); and 3) human fecal source type (stool, sewage or septage). Assay performance using presence/absence metrics was found to depend on the classification of DNQ samples. The assays that performed best quantitatively varied based on the fecal concentration unit of measure and laboratory protocol. All methods were consistently more sensitive to human stools compared to sewage or septage in both the presence/absence and quantitative analysis. Overall, HF183 Taqman® was found to be the most effective marker of human fecal contamination in this California-based study.

  10. Biofeedback therapy for fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, D A; Hodges, K; Hershe, T; Jinich, H

    1980-10-01

    Operant conditioning offers a new therapeutic modality for fecal incontinence. Our experience with biofeedback therapy in six male and six female patients (ages 12-78 years) is presented. Incontinence was associated with a surgical procedure in six patients and with a medical condition in six patients. Rectosphincteric manometry was performed using a three balloon technic, with one balloon positioned in the rectum as a distending stimulus and the others at the internal and external sphinchters. Pressure responses to measured volumes of rectal distention were displayed on a polygraph. Rectosphincteric reflexes and sensory thresholds for rectal distention were determined. Patients were then encouraged to elevate sphinchter pressures while observing their manometric responses. Follow-up of 10-96 weeks showed ten patients had good responses, with complete continence in six patients. Nine of 10 responders required only one treatment session. Operant conditioning is a valuable technic in properly selected patients with an 80% probability of success.

  11. Immunochemical approach to the study of DNA repair. Proposed technical program and technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    A simple immunochemical assay to quantify DNA lesions is being developed in order to facilitate the study of DNA repair. Antibodies have been raised to 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine and to thymine dimers and these have been used to measure DNA damages produced by osmium tetroxide and ultraviolet light, respectively. An enzyme immunoassay has been developed and the sensitivity of this method will be compared to physical, enzymatic, and chemical methods using PM2 bacteriophage DNA. Finally DNA repair will be assayed in several model systems.

  12. Urinary proteins of tubular origin: basic immunochemical and clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherberich, J E

    1990-01-01

    A variety of tubular marker proteins, as compared to healthy controls, are excreted at an increased rate in the urine of patients with renal damage. Beside cytoplasmic glutathione-S-transferase and lysosomal beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (beta-NAG) the majority of kidney-related urine proteins derives from membrane surface components of the most vulnerable proximal tubule epithelia, among them ala-(leu-gly)-aminopeptidase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), the tubular portion of angiotensinase A, the major brush border glycoprotein 'SGP-240' and adenosine-deaminase-binding protein. Urinary tissue proteins, e.g. brush border (BB) microvilli, are immunologically identical with those antigens prepared from cell membranes of the human kidney itself. BB antigens are shed into the urine of patients with glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, systemic diseases, e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), diabetes mellitus and multiple myeloma, arterial hypertension, infectious diseases (malaria, AIDS) and after operations, renal grafting and administration of X-ray contrast media, aminoglycosides or certain cytostatics (cis-platinum). Tissue proteinuria of tubular proteins is determined by enzyme-kinetic or quantitative immunological assays applying either poly- or monoclonal antikidney antibodies. Clinical, ultrastructural and histochemical studies support the idea that both 'soluble' and high-molecular-weight membrane particles (vacuolar blebs, greater than 10(6) dalton) as well as microfilamental components of the epithelial cytoskeleton contribute to tubular 'histuria' which appears as a sensitive parameter in monitoring tubular damage under clinical conditions at a very early phase.

  13. A new insight into fecal hemoglobin concentration-dependent predictor for colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Wang, Po-En; Lin, Sheng-Che; Chen, Yao-Der; Liao, Chao-Sheng; Yeh, Yen-Po; Lee, Yi-Chia; Chiu, Han-Mo; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2014-09-01

    We sought to assess how much of the variation in incidence of colorectal neoplasia is explained by baseline fecal hemoglobin concentration (FHbC) and also to assess the additional predictive value of conventional risk factors. We enrolled subjects aged 40 years and over who attended screening for colorectal cancer with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in Keelung community-based integrated screening program. The accelerated failure time model was used to train the clinical weights of covariates in the prediction model. Datasets from two external communities were used for external validation. The area under curve (AUC) for the model containing only FHbC was 83.0% (95% CI: 81.5-84.4%), which was considerably greater than the one containing only conventional risk factors (65.8%, 95% CI: 64.2-67.4%). Adding conventional risk factors did not make significant additional contribution (p = 0.62, AUC = 83.5%, 95% CI: 82.1-84.9%) to the predictive model with FHbC only. Males showed a stronger linear dose-response relationship than females, yielding gender-specific FHbC predictive models. External validation confirms these results. The high predictive ability supported by a dose-dependent relationship between baseline FHbC and the risk of developing colorectal neoplasia suggests that FHbC may be useful for identifying cases requiring closer postdiagnosis clinical surveillance as well as being an early indicator of colorectal neoplasia risk in the general population. Our findings may also make contribution to the development of the FHbC-guided screening policy but its pros and cons in connection with cost and effectiveness of screening should be evaluated before it can be applied to population-based screening for colorectal cancer.

  14. Moving fecal microbiota transplantation into the mainstream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Robert; Griesbach, Cheryl L; DiBaise, John K

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, fecal microbiota transplantation (aka fecal transplantation, fecal bacteriotherapy, FMT) has become increasing utilized to treat recurrent and refractory Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Almost 600,000 cases of CDI occur each year in the United States. Of these, an estimated 15,000 patients have a recurrence. The management of recurrent disease has been challenging for patients and clinicians. Increasingly, FMT has been recognized as an effective option for these patients. This article explores why FMT has reemerged as a practical therapeutic modality. In the process, the logistics by which the procedure is performed and the factors that may affect quality, safety, and patient outcomes will be described.

  15. Immunochemical Detection Methods for Gluten in Food Products: Where Do We Go from Here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot, I D Bruins; van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Bremer, M G E G; Hamer, R J

    2016-11-17

    Accurate and reliable quantification methods for gluten in food are necessary to ensure proper product labeling and thus safeguard the gluten sensitive consumer against exposure. Immunochemical detection is the method of choice, as it is sensitive, rapid and relatively easy to use. Although a wide range of detection kits are commercially available, there are still many difficulties in gluten detection that have not yet been overcome. This review gives an overview of the currently commercially available immunochemical detection methods, and discusses the problems that still exist in gluten detection in food. The largest problems are encountered in the extraction of gluten from food matrices, the choice of epitopes targeted by the detection method, and the use of a standardized reference material. By comparing the available techniques with the unmet needs in gluten detection, the possible benefit of a new multiplex immunoassay is investigated. This detection method would allow for the detection and quantification of multiple harmful gluten peptides at once and would, therefore, be a logical advancement in gluten detection in food.

  16. Fecal Transplant Shows Early Promise Against Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 163263.html Fecal Transplant Shows Early Promise Against Autism Small study found giving healthy gut bacteria to ... study suggests a novel treatment for kids with autism: Give these young patients a fresh supply of ...

  17. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nood, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, several aspects of donor feces infusion, also called Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT), are investigated. Historically, FMTs are given mainly for antibiotic associated diarrhea, caused by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium difficile. Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are mo

  18. Torrefaction Processing of Human Fecal Waste Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New technology is needed to collect, stabilize, safen, recover useful materials, and store human fecal waste for long duration missions. The current SBIR Phase I...

  19. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Just a Fancy Trend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Pierard, Denis; De Greef, Elisabeth

    2015-07-01

    The risks and advantages of the administration of fecal material of healthy people to patients are heavily debated. In adults, recurrent Clostridium difficile has become an accepted indication. In addition to all of the possible indications, many other questions need to be answered before pediatric indications and recommendations can be established. Optimal donor selection, fresh versus frozen stools versus capsules containing only microbiota, volume, and route of administration are just a few examples of the areas with missing data to allow in formulating recommendations for fecal microbiota or fecal material administration in children. A careful but not-too-complex regulation is the first priority in order to minimize the risk of administration of fecal slurry from unselected donors at home without medical supervision.

  20. Highly Efficient Fecal Waste Incinerator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Volume reduction is a critical element of Solid Waste Management for manned spacecraft and planetary habitations. To this end, the proposed fecal waste incinerator...

  1. Immunochemical detection of sulfur mustard-adducts with DNA and proteins: Exploratory research on adducts with proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Noort, D.; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Dijk-Knijnenburg, H.C.M. van; Fidder, A.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed two modes of a standard operating procedure (SOP) for immunochemical detection of sulfur mustard adducts to DNA in human blood and skin. In the shortened mode data could be generated within 9 h after in vitro exposure of human blood to > 1 μM sulfur mustard. The sensitive mode allo

  2. Normative Fecal Calprotectin Concentrations in Guatemalan Preschoolers Are High Relative to Children Reported Elsewhere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Méndez, María-José; Romero-Abal, María-Eugenia; Schümann, Klaus; Gil, Ángel; Solomons, Noel W

    2017-02-01

    Calprotectin is a fecal marker of intraintestinal inflammation derived from activated enteric neutrophils and macrophages. It is useful as a clinical marker in inflammatory bowel diseases; furthermore, it may have a role in public health epidemiology. The aim of the study was to describe the distribution of fecal calprotectin in Guatemalan preschool children sharing a common institutional diet; to relate it collectively to pediatric distributions in other geographic settings, and individually to concomitant indicators of intestinal infection or colonization and other descriptive features of the child. Fecal samples were collected in 87 subjects, ages 2 to 7 years across 3 daycare centers sharing a common institutional menu, but from different ecological settings. Stools were examined, variously by routine light microscopy, quantitative egg counts, and a Giardia antigen test, for microbiological diagnosis, and an ELISA assay for fecal calprotectin (CalproLab). The median fecal calprotectin value was 58 mg/kg, with a mean of 98 ± 136 mg/kg and a range from 10 to 950 mg/kg; 61% of values were above the manufacturer's cut-off for elevated concentration and 51% exceeded an age-adjusted criterion. There were no associations between sex, age, growth indicators, or fecal microbiological findings by microscopy or ELISA assays, alone or in combination. The central tendency (mean or median) and distribution were generally shifted to the right in relation to comparable reports from children across the world literature. Although specific, low-grade intestinal infections do not define calprotectin subgroups, right-shifted fecal calprotectin status in this population may reflect a general and diffuse stress of adverse environmental sanitation.

  3. Fecal Fat Analyses in Chronic Pancreatitis Importance of Fat Ingestion before Stool Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engjom, Trond; Jurmy, Palwasha; Tjora, Erling; Gilja, Odd Helge; Dimcevski, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Objective Quantitative determination of fecal fat still is the gold standard for measuring malabsorption. We evaluated the importance of standardized food intake before and under the collection of feces. Material and Methods In a project, evaluating patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis (CP) and healthy volunteers (HC), stools were collected for 72 hours coupled to registration of nutritional intake over five consecutive days. Patient groups were created by a modified Layer score, which includes imaging findings, clinical parameters and pancreas function testing. Results We found 12 patients with CP, 11 patients without CP and 13 healthy individuals in our database. Median fecal fat in CP patients was 12 g/day, in non-CP patients 5 g/day and in healthy controls 5 g/day. Median fat absorption coefficient was 81% in those with chronic pancreatitis, 92% in those without CP and 92% in healthy controls. Corresponding median fat intake was 65 g/day, 68 g/day and 81 g/day in the respective groups. Spearman Rank Order Correlation between fecal fat (g/d) and fat absorption coefficient in all study subjects (n = 36) was good (-0.88 (p<0.001)). When we stratified groups according to fat intake, correlation between fecal fat and fat absorption was also good (-0.86 to -0.95). Conclusion In the diagnoses of fat malabsorption, calculating the ratio of fat absorption did not give additional information compared to fecal fat. PMID:28095460

  4. Detection and persistence of fecal Bacteroidales as water quality indicators in unchlorinated drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Aron M.; Kristiansen, Anja; Lund, Marie B.

    2009-01-01

    The results of this study support the use of fecal Bacteroidales qPCR as a rapid method to complement traditional, culture-dependent, water quality indicators in systems where drinking water is supplied without chlorination or other forms of disinfection. A SYBR-green based, quantitative PCR assay...... was developed to determine the concentration of fecal Bacteroidales 16S rRNA gene copies. The persistence of aBacteroides vulgatus pure culture and fecal Bacteroidales from a wastewater inoculum was determined in unchlorinated drinking water at 10 °C. B. vulgatus 16S rRNA gene copies persisted throughout...... the experimental period (200 days) in sterile drinking water but decayed faster in natural drinking water, indicating that the natural microbiota accelerated decay. In a simulated fecal contamination of unchlorinated drinking water, the decay of fecal Bacteroidales 16S rRNA gene copies was considerably faster than...

  5. Diet and environment shape fecal bacterial microbiota composition and enteric pathogen load of grizzly bears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diet and environment impact the composition of mammalian intestinal microbiota; dietary or health disturbances trigger alterations in intestinal microbiota composition and render the host susceptible to enteric pathogens. To date no long term monitoring data exist on the fecal microbiota and pathogen load of carnivores either in natural environments or in captivity. This study investigates fecal microbiota composition and the presence of pathogenic Escherichia coli and toxigenic clostridia in wild and captive grizzly bears (Ursus arctos and relates these to food resources consumed by bears. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Feces were obtained from animals of two wild populations and from two captive animals during an active bear season. Wild animals consumed a diverse diet composed of plant material, animal prey and insects. Captive animals were fed a regular granulated diet with a supplement of fruits and vegetables. Bacterial populations were analyzed using quantitative PCR. Fecal microbiota composition fluctuated in wild and in captive animals. The abundance of Clostridium clusters I and XI, and of C. perfringens correlated to regular diet protein intake. Enteroaggregative E. coli were consistently present in all populations. The C. sordellii phospholipase C was identified in three samples of wild animals and for the first time in Ursids. CONCLUSION: This is the first longitudinal study monitoring the fecal microbiota of wild carnivores and comparing it to that of captive individuals of the same species. Location and diet affected fecal bacterial populations as well as the presence of enteric pathogens.

  6. RNA-Based Methods Increase the Detection of Fecal Bacteria and Fecal Identifiers in Environmental Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the use of qPCR RNA-based methods in the detection of fecal bacteria in environmental waters. We showed that RNA methods can increase the detection of fecal bacteria in multiple water matrices. The data suggest that this is a viable alternative for the detection of a...

  7. Fecal calprotectin in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Pietro; Rispo, Antonio; Imperatore, Nicola; Caporaso, Nicola; Tortora, Raffaella

    2014-01-14

    We would like to share with the readers the results of our experience in 50 celiac disease (CD) patients, enrolled between September 2012 and April 2013, who were referred to our third-level CD Unit. The fecal calprotectin (FC) concentration of 50 adults with newly diagnosed CD was compared to that of a control group of 50 healthy subjects. FC level was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay with diagnostic cut-off of 75 μg/g. In addition, we tried to correlate the FC level with symptoms, histological severity of CD (Marsh grade) and level of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (aTg) in CD patients. Finally, FC level was increased in five CD patients and in four controls (10% vs 8%, P = NS); mean FC concentration of patients and controls were 57.7 (SD ± 29.1) and 45.1 (SD ± 38.4) respectively. Furthermore, no significant correlation was seen between FC levels and symptoms/Marsh grade/aTg. The five CD patients did not show inflammatory lesions (e.g., ulcers, erosions) at upper endoscopy. The four healthy controls with positive FC were followed-up for further six months; in this observational period they did not show clinical signs of any underlying disease. On these bases, we think that FC is not able to investigate the subclinical inflammatory changes of active CD and FC should be considered a useless tool in the diagnostic work-up of uncomplicated CD but it should be accompanied by aTg when ruling out organic disease in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

  8. Fecal calprotectin in coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Pietro; Rispo, Antonio; Imperatore, Nicola; Caporaso, Nicola; Tortora, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    We would like to share with the readers the results of our experience in 50 celiac disease (CD) patients, enrolled between September 2012 and April 2013, who were referred to our third-level CD Unit. The fecal calprotectin (FC) concentration of 50 adults with newly diagnosed CD was compared to that of a control group of 50 healthy subjects. FC level was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay with diagnostic cut-off of 75 μg/g. In addition, we tried to correlate the FC level with symptoms, histological severity of CD (Marsh grade) and level of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (aTg) in CD patients. Finally, FC level was increased in five CD patients and in four controls (10% vs 8%, P = NS); mean FC concentration of patients and controls were 57.7 (SD ± 29.1) and 45.1 (SD ± 38.4) respectively. Furthermore, no significant correlation was seen between FC levels and symptoms/Marsh grade/aTg. The five CD patients did not show inflammatory lesions (e.g., ulcers, erosions) at upper endoscopy. The four healthy controls with positive FC were followed-up for further six months; in this observational period they did not show clinical signs of any underlying disease. On these bases, we think that FC is not able to investigate the subclinical inflammatory changes of active CD and FC should be considered a useless tool in the diagnostic work-up of uncomplicated CD but it should be accompanied by aTg when ruling out organic disease in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:24574734

  9. Development of an Intervention for implementing Immunochemical Faecal Occult Blood Test in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jakob Søgaard; Vedsted, Peter; Bro, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Denne korte artikel handler om udviklingen af en intervention til implementering af immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT) i almen praksis. Artiklen gennemgår processen fra de tidlige udviklingsstadier, over pilot-testning og frem til de endelige justeringer før selve implementeringen blev...... iværksat i almen praksis. Erfaringerne fra pilot-testningen betød, at vejledningen til brugen af iFOBT blev ændret – fra en fast og ”rigid” vejledning, som byggede på helt specifikke indikationer, til en mere ”fleksibel” vejledning, som i højere grad byggede på den praktiserende læges egen kliniske...

  10. Cytotoxic and Immunochemical Properties of Viscumin Encapsulated 
in Polylactide Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotova, E S; Egorova, S G; Ramonova, A A; Bogorodski, S E; Popov, V K; Agapov, I I; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradable polylactide microparticles with encapsulated cytotoxic protein viscumin were obtained via the ultrasound-assisted supercritical fluid technique. The size of the microparticles was 10-50 µM, as shown by electron microscopy. The time course of viscumin release from microparticles was studied using an immunoenzyme test system with anti-viscumin monoclonal antibodies. It was found that 99.91% of the cytotoxic protein was incorporated into polymer microparticles. Only 0.08% of the initially encapsulated viscumin was released from the microparticles following incubation for 120 h in a phosphate-buffered saline at neutral pH. Importantly, the method of ultrasonic dry supercritical fluid encapsulation failed to alter both the cytotoxic potency and the immunochemical properties of the encapsulated viscumin. Thus, this procedure can be used to generate biodegradable polylactide microparticles with encapsulated bioactive substances.

  11. Fecal DNA Screening in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Richter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common type of cancer diagnosed in Canada, and is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in nonsmokers. Although CRC is considered to be 90% curable if detected early, the majority of patients present with advanced stage III or IV disease. An effective screening test may significantly decrease disease burden. The present paper examines the rationale and potential of fecal DNA testing as an alternative and adjunct to other CRC screening tests. The most efficacious fecal DNA test developed to date has a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 82%, respectively. The approach has a higher positive predictive value than the currently used fecal occult blood test and offers a noninvasive option to patients. It is not reliant on the presence of bleeding, which may be intermittent or altogether absent. The test is now commercially available and is supported by a number of American insurers. Current challenges include cost reduction and demonstration of mortality benefit in a rigorous clinical trial. Despite current challenges, fecal DNA testing is worth pursuing. Both the American Gastroenterological Society and the American Cancer Society maintain that molecular testing is in its infancy but is promising. Fecal DNA testing has the potential to be an exciting addition to the current armament of CRC screening options.

  12. Protein content of antivenoms and relationship with their immunochemical reactivity and neutralization assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roodt, A R; Clement, H; Dolab, J A; Litwin, S; Hajos, S E; Boyer, L; Alagón, A

    2014-07-01

    Therapy for snakebites relies on the application of antivenoms, which may be produced with different immunogenic mixtures of venom and possess different pharmaceutical characteristics. For these reasons, immunological cross-reactivity and heterologous neutralization were analyzed relative to the protein content of three antivenoms used in the Americas. The antivenoms studied were composed of equine F(ab')2 fragments from animals immunized with Crotalinae venoms. The antivenoms were tested against venoms of seven pit viper species from Argentina, seven from Mexico, one from Costa Rica, and one from Colombia. Immunoblotting showed high cross-reactivity of all major protein bands with all the antivenoms tested. ELISA results also showed high cross-reactivity among the different venoms and antivenoms, and a high heterologous neutralization was observed. The results can be interpreted in different ways depending on whether the reactivity is considered in terms of the volume of antivenom used or by the amount of protein contained in this volume of antivenom. The antivenoms with high immunochemical reactivity and neutralizing capacity were those with higher protein content per vial; but when doses were adjusted by protein content, antivenoms of apparently lower neutralizing capacity and immunochemical reactivity showed at least similar potency and reactivity although volumetrically at higher doses. Protein content relative to neutralization potency of different products must be taken into account when antivenoms are compared, in addition to the volume required for therapeutic effect. These results show the importance of obtaining high-affinity and high-avidity antibodies to achieve good neutralization using low protein concentration and low-volume antivenoms.

  13. [Immunochemical properties of West Nile virus protein prM and protein M C-end].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachek, M V; Protopopova, E V; Ternovoĭ, V A; Kachko, A V; Ivanova, A V; Ivanisenko, V A; Shvalov, A N; Loktev, V B

    2007-01-01

    Complementary DNA fragments (nucleotides 466-966 and 878-1088) encoding prM protein and polypeptide M31-75-E1-30 of West Nile virus (WNV), strain LEIV-Vlg99-27889-human, were obtained and cloned. Recombinant polypeptides prM and M3175-E1-30 having amino acid sequences corresponding to the cloned cDNA fragments were purified by affinity chromatography. According to ELISA and Western blotting prM protein interacted with polyclonal antibodies against WNV. This is indicative the immunochemical similarity of WNV recombinant and native protein prM. 6 types of species-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against recombinant polypeptide prM recognized at least four epitopes within recombinant polypeptides prM and M31-75-E1-30. MAbs 7D11 were active in the virus - neutralization assay. Analysis of interaction of the MAbs with recombinant polypeptides prM, M31-75-EI-30, E1-180, E260-466 revealed cross-reactive epitopes within 260-466 amino acid residues (aa) of WNV protein E, 31-75 aa of polypeptide M31-75-E1-30 and protein prM. Proposed spatial model of proteins E and M C-end fragments shown similarity of their three-dimensional structures confirming results of immunochemical assay. Neutralization of viral infectivity by MAbs 7D11 raised against epitope within 31-75 aa t of protein M is evidence of important function of C-end region in the process of flaviviral penetration into host cell.

  14. Teschoviruses as Indicators of Porcine Fecal Contamination of Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel; Fernández, Carlos; Ortiz, José Antonio; Pro, Javier; Carbonell, Gregoria; Tarazona, José Vicente; Roblas, Neftalí; Ley, Victoria

    2003-01-01

    Teschoviruses specifically infect pigs and are shed in pig feces. Hence, their presence in water should indicate contamination with pig fecal residues. To assess this hypothesis, we have developed a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) method that allows the quantitative detection of pig teschovirus (PTV) RNA. The method is able to detect 92 fg of PTV RNA per ml of sample. Using this method, we have detected the presence of PTV RNA in water and fecal samples from all pig farms examined (n = 5). Feces from other animal species (cattle, sheep, and goats) were negative in this test. To compare the PTV RNA detection method with conventional chemical determinations currently in use for evaluation of water contamination, we analyzed water samples collected downstream from a pig slurry spillage site. We have found a positive correlation within both types of determinations. The sensitivity of the PTV detection assay was similar to that achieved by unspecific organic matter determination and superior to all other conventional chemical analyses performed. Furthermore, the new method is highly specific, revealing the porcine origin of the contamination, a feature that is lacking in currently available methods for the assessment of water contamination. PMID:14532098

  15. Effect of Freezing Conditions on Fecal Bacterial Composition in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara U. Metzler-Zebeli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sample preservation and recovery of intact DNA from gut samples may affect the inferred gut microbiota composition in pigs. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the freezing process and storage temperature prior to DNA extraction on DNA recovery and bacterial community composition in pig feces using quantitative PCR. Fresh fecal samples from six growing pigs were collected and five aliquots of each prepared: (1 total DNA extracted immediately; (2 stored at −20 °C; (3 snap frozen and stored at −20 °C; (4 stored at −80 °C; and (5 snap frozen and stored at −80 °C. Results showed that DNA yields from fresh fecal samples were, on average, 25 to 30 ng higher than those from the various stored samples. The DNA extracted from fresh samples had more gene copies of total bacteria and all targeted bacterial groups per gram feces compared to DNA extraction from frozen samples. Data presentation also modified the observed effect of freeze storage; as results for Lactobacillus group, Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Clostridium cluster IV, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas and Enterobacteriaceae showed the opposite effect when expressed as relative abundance, by being greater in freeze stored feces than in fresh feces. Snap freezing increased the relative proportion of Clostridium cluster IV by 24%. In conclusion, the freezing process affected DNA yield and bacterial abundances, whereas snap freezing and storage temperature had only little influence on abundances of bacterial populations in pig feces.

  16. Clostridium difficile Infection and Fecal Microbiota Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubakka, Alyssa; Vaughn, Byron P

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for hospitalized patients. Although most patients have a clinical response to existing antimicrobial therapies, recurrent infection develops in up to 30% of patients. Fecal microbiota transplant is a novel approach to this complex problem, with an efficacy rate of nearly 90% in the setting of multiple recurrent CDI. This review covers the current epidemiology of CDI (including toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains, risk factors for infection, and recurrent infection), methods of diagnosis, existing first-line therapies in CDI, the role of fecal microbiota transplant for multiple recurrent CDIs, and the potential use of fecal microbial transplant for patients with severe or refractory infection. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  17. Fecal microbiota transplantation inducing remission in Crohn's colitis and the associated changes in fecal microbial profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Dina; Hotte, Naomi; Gillevet, Patrick; Madsen, Karen

    2014-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing disorder of the intestine of unclear etiology. Increasing evidence has pointed to intestinal dysbiosis as a potential factor in a genetically susceptible individual. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been used to treat inflammatory bowel disease with variable degrees of success. Herein, we report a patient with Crohn's colitis, previously failing an immunosuppressant, who achieved clinical, endoscopic, and histologic remission after a single fecal microbiota transplantation infusion. We have further characterized the changes in the fecal microbiota associated with this observation.

  18. Immunochemical estimations of allergenic activities from outdoor aero-allergens, collected by a high-volume air sampler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J; Poulsen, L K; Mygind, K;

    1989-01-01

    To quantify airborne allergens in amorphus and morphological particles, a survey with collection of aero-allergens on glass fibre filters by means of a high-volume air-sampler (HIVOL) was conducted. In preliminary laboratory experiments we compared various filter elution techniques......, and the pulverizing elution technique was found to be optimal with regard to yield and convenience. When a surfactant, Tween 20 (0.5% v/v), was added to the elution buffer, a recovery of 80% could be obtained. Allergens in eluates were analysed by means of an IgG-subclass RAST inhibition assay. This immunochemical...... method for quantification of airborne allergens was validated, as a high recovery of timothy grass pollen allergens was eluted from air filters, and eluates were shown specific by RAST inhibition. The amount of immunochemically measured airborne timothy and birch allergens collected by means of the HIVOL...

  19. Verification, Dosimetry and Biomonitoring of Mustard Gas Exposure via Immunochemical Detection of Mustard Gas Adducts to DNA and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    11.11.2. The samples resulting from the various treatments were tested in the competitive ELISA . Treatment Vih alkli Single-stranded calf-thymus DNA...exposure, Biomonitoring, Verification, Immunochemical detection, Competitive ELISA , Interstrand DNA crossslinking, Alkaline elution. Monoclonal antibodies...material at 50 ng per well. A competitive ELISA was developed in which mustard gas adducts to DNA could be detected with a minimum detectable amount of a few

  20. 78 FR 12763 - Fecal Microbiota for Transplantation; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Fecal Microbiota for Transplantation; Public Workshop AGENCY... ``Fecal Microbiota for Transplantation.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to exchange information... fecal microbiota for transplantation (FMT). ] Date and Time: The public workshop will be held on May...

  1. Therapeutic potential of fecal microbiota transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, L.P.; Bouter, K.E.C.; Vos, de W.M.; Borody, T.J.; Nieuwdorp, M.

    2013-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of fecal microbiota for the treatment of patients with chronic gastrointestinal infections and inflammatory bowel diseases. Lately, there has also been interest in its therapeutic potential for cardiometabolic, autoimmune, and other extraintestinal conditio

  2. [Biofeedback effectiveness in patients with fecal incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Mora, José Raúl; Buenrostro-Acebes, José María; Erciga-Vergara, Nancy; Zubieta-O'Farrill, Gregorio; Castillo-Calcáneo, Juan de Dios; Mosqueda, Maria Elena; Monroy-Argumedo, Montserrat; González-Alvarado, Carlos; Villanueva-Saenz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is defined as an involuntary bowel movement through the anal canal in inadequate time and place. There are different types of therapies for the management of fecal incontinence, being biofeedback therapy one of the most effective techniques. The aim of this study was to evaluate the necessary number of sessions of biofeedback electromyographyc therapy to achieve the maximum sphincteric complex contraction. Descriptive, retrospective and longitudinal study. 65 patients with fecal incontinence were included. Weekly electromyographyc biofeedback therapies were applied, with a maximum of 6, in which the sphincteric complex contraction was measured. A two ways Friedman analysis was made to determine the significant differences between the sessions. A total of 65 patients were evaluated for fecal incontinence. The values for pelvic floor contraction were significantly higher in the third session, and did not show any significant difference in posterior sessions. The maximum contraction of the sphicnteric complex was achieved in the third weekly biofeedback session, without any significant differences in the posterior sessions.

  3. Fecal Transplants: What Is Being Transferred?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana P Bojanova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fecal transplants are increasingly utilized for treatment of recurrent infections (i.e., Clostridium difficile in the human gut and as a general research tool for gain-of-function experiments (i.e., gavage of fecal pellets in animal models. Changes observed in the recipient's biology are routinely attributed to bacterial cells in the donor feces (~1011 per gram of human wet stool. Here, we examine the literature and summarize findings on the composition of fecal matter in order to raise cautiously the profile of its multipart nature. In addition to viable bacteria, which may make up a small fraction of total fecal matter, other components in unprocessed human feces include colonocytes (~107 per gram of wet stool, archaea (~108 per gram of wet stool, viruses (~108 per gram of wet stool, fungi (~106 per gram of wet stool, protists, and metabolites. Thus, while speculative at this point and contingent on the transplant procedure and study system, nonbacterial matter could contribute to changes in the recipient's biology. There is a cautious need for continued reductionism to separate out the effects and interactions of each component.

  4. Therapeutic potential of fecal microbiota transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, L.P.; Bouter, K.E.C.; Vos, de W.M.; Borody, T.J.; Nieuwdorp, M.

    2013-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of fecal microbiota for the treatment of patients with chronic gastrointestinal infections and inflammatory bowel diseases. Lately, there has also been interest in its therapeutic potential for cardiometabolic, autoimmune, and other extraintestinal conditio

  5. Fecal microbiota transplantation and donor standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Casey; Broussard, Elizabeth; Surawicz, Christina

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile diarrhea is a common and severe infectious disease. Antibiotics, which are standard initial treatment, are less effective for treating refractory or recurrent infection. Fecal microbiota transplantation, where healthy donor stool is transplanted into a patient, is an alternative to antibiotic therapy that requires standardization for donors and patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fecal occult blood testing for the prediction of small-bowel pathology detected by capsule endoscopy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Diana E.; Vijayan, Sanju; Avni, Tomer; Douglas, Sarah; Kopylov, Uri; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2017-01-01

    Background Fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) has been suggested as a potential screening tool for small-bowel capsule endoscopy (CE). We conducted a meta-analysis of studies correlating FOBT and CE findings to examine the predictive value of positive FOBT for CE findings. Methods PubMed and Embase search. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) were calculated. Results Six studies were identified. Four used fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), one used FIT and guaiac FOBT, one used hemoglobin/haptoglobin complex testing (Hb/Hpt). Five of the 6 studies were suitable for statistical analysis. For all positive FOBT, sensitivity for small-bowel findings was 0.60 (95%CI 0.50-0.69), specificity was 0.72 (95%CI 0.52-0.86), and DOR was 3.96 (95%CI 1.50-10.4). For the 4 studies using only FIT, sensitivity was 0.48 (95%CI 0.36-0.61), specificity was 0.60 (95%CI 0.42-0.76), and DOR was 1.41 (95%CI 0.72-2.75). Conclusions Although a number of modalities have been suggested for screening small-bowel CE referrals, none of them, including FOBT, offer a comprehensive solution. Further work is required to refine screening methods for small-bowel CE referrals.

  7. Tracing fecal pollution sources in karst groundwater by Bacteroidales genetic biomarkers, bacterial indicators, and environmental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Kelly, Walton R; Panno, Samuel V; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-08-15

    Fecal contamination in Midwestern karst regions was evaluated by simultaneously measuring traditional bacterial indicators (coliforms and Escherichia coli), Bacteroidales-based biomarkers, and environmental variables. Water samples from springs and wells were collected from karst regions in Illinois (IL), Wisconsin (WI), Kentucky (KY), and Missouri (MO). Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) with seven primer sets targeting different members of Bacteroidales was used to determine the origin of fecal contamination (i.e., from human waste, livestock waste, or both). Most samples were contaminated by both human and animal waste, with a few samples showing pollution solely by one or the other. Spring water tended to have higher levels of contamination than well water, and higher concentrations of fecal biomarkers were detected in urban springs compared to rural spring systems. However, there were discrepancies on contamination profile determined by Bacteroidales-based biomarkers and by traditional bacterial indicators. Among all the environmental parameters examined, E. coli, sulfate, total dissolved solids (TDS), and silicon were significantly correlated (pgroundwater systems in Midwestern regions, and the inclusion of traditional bacterial indicators, environmental variables, and Bacteroidales-based MST is an effective approach for identifying fecal contamination in karst regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of fecal indicators with pathogenic bacteria and rotavirus in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Andrew S.; Layton, Alice C.; Mailloux, Brian J; Culligan, Patricia J.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Sayler, Gary S.; Feighery, John; McKay, Larry; Knappett, Peter S.K.; Alexandrova, Ekaterina; Arbit, Talia; Emch, Michael; Escamilla, Veronica; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Streatfield, P. Kim; Yunus, Mohammad; van Geen, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater is routinely analyzed for fecal indicators but direct comparisons of fecal indicators to the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens are rare. This study was conducted in rural Bangladesh where the human population density is high, sanitation is poor, and groundwater pumped from shallow tubewells is often contaminated with fecal bacteria. Five indicator microorganisms (E. coli, total coliform, F+RNA coliphage, Bacteroides and human-associated Bacteroides) and various environmental parameters were compared to the direct detection of waterborne pathogens by quantitative PCR in groundwater pumped from 50 tubewells. Rotavirus was detected in groundwater filtrate from the largest proportion of tubewells (40%), followed by Shigella (10%), Vibrio (10%), and pathogenic E. coli (8%). Spearman rank correlations and sensitivity-specificity calculations indicate that some, but not all, combinations of indicators and environmental parameters can predict the presence of pathogens. Culture-dependent fecal indicator bacteria measured on a single date did not predict total bacterial pathogens, but annually averaged monthly measurements of culturable E. coli did improve prediction for total bacterial pathogens. A qPCR-based E. coli assay was the best indicator for the bacterial pathogens. F+RNA coliphage were neither correlated nor sufficiently sensitive towards rotavirus, but were predictive of bacterial pathogens. Since groundwater cannot be excluded as a significant source of diarrheal disease in Bangladesh and neighboring countries with similar characteristics, the need to develop more effective methods for screening tubewells with respect to microbial contamination is necessary. PMID:22705866

  9. Comparative analysis of fecal microbiota and intestinal microbial metabolic activity in captive polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Clarissa; Gänzle, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota depends on gut physiology and diet. Ursidae possess a simple gastrointestinal system composed of a stomach, small intestine, and indistinct hindgut. This study determined the composition and stability of fecal microbiota of 3 captive polar bears by group-specific quantitative PCR and PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) using the 16S rRNA gene as target. Intestinal metabolic activity was determined by analysis of short-chain fatty acids in feces. For comparison, other Carnivora and mammals were included in this study. Total bacterial abundance was approximately log 8.5 DNA gene copies·(g feces)-1 in all 3 polar bears. Fecal polar bear microbiota was dominated by the facultative anaerobes Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci, and the Clostridium cluster I. The detection of the Clostridium perfringens α-toxin gene verified the presence of C. perfringens. Composition of the fecal bacterial population was stable on a genus level; according to results obtained by PCR-DGGE, dominant bacterial species fluctuated. The total short-chain fatty acid content of Carnivora and other mammals analysed was comparable; lactate was detected in feces of all carnivora but present only in trace amounts in other mammals. In comparison, the fecal microbiota and metabolic activity of captive polar bears mostly resembled the closely related grizzly and black bears.

  10. Steatorrhea cannot be excluded where there is a fecal weight below 0.200 kg per day and a high fecal consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirup, P

    1998-01-01

    We surveyed one year's results of fecal fat (feces alifatic carboxylates) analyses, which are used in the diagnosis of malabsorption (steatorrhea), by calculating the relationship between fecal fat, fecal weight (fecal mass excretion rate) and fecal consistency (in terms of the volume of water...

  11. Risk factors for false positive and for false negative test results in screening with fecal occult blood testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeman, Inge; de Wijkerslooth, Thomas R; Stoop, Esther M; van Leerdam, Monique; van Ballegooijen, M; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A; Fockens, Paul; Kuipers, Ernst J; Dekker, Evelien; Bossuyt, Patrick M

    2013-11-15

    Differences in the risk of a false negative or a false positive fecal immunochemical test (FIT) across subgroups may affect optimal screening strategies. We evaluate whether subgroups are at increased risk of a false positive or a false negative FIT result, whether such variability in risk is related to differences in FIT sensitivity and specificity or to differences in prior CRC risk. Randomly selected, asymptomatic individuals were invited to undergo colonoscopy. Participants were asked to undergo one sample FIT and to complete a risk questionnaire. We identified patient characteristics associated with a false negative and false positive FIT results using logistic regression. We focused on statistically significant differences as well as on variables influencing the false positive or negative risk for which the odds ratio exceeded 1.25. Of the 1,426 screening participants, 1,112 (78%) completed FIT and the questionnaire; 101 (9.1%) had advanced neoplasia. 102 Individuals were FIT positive, 65 (64%) had a false negative FIT result and 66 (65%) a false positive FIT result. Participants at higher age and smokers had a significantly higher risk of a false negative FIT result. Males were at increased risk of a false positive result, so were smokers and regular NSAID users. FIT sensitivity was lower in females. Specificity was lower for males, smokers and regular NSAID users. FIT sensitivity was lower in women. FIT specificity was lower in males, smokers and regular NSAID users. Our results can be used for further evidence based individualization of screening strategies.

  12. Development of hypoimmunogenic muffins: batter rheology, quality characteristics, microstructure and immunochemical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwini; Umashankar, K; Rajiv, Jyotsna; Prabhasankar, P

    2016-01-01

    A high demand exists for gluten free and hypoimmunogenic products from gluten sensitive population. The present study focuses on the development of hypoimmunogenic muffins using a combination of the blend (CB) consisting of modified (protease treated) Whole Wheat Flour (WWF) and Pearl Millet Flour (PMF). The batter density of CB was 0.97, and it varied between 0.91-0.93 and 0.97-0.99 g/cc with the use of emulsifiers and hydrocolloids respectively. The volume of the muffin made using CB was 70 mL, and it increased to 120 mL with the combination of additives (CAD) comprising of Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (CMC) and Polysorbate-60 (PS-60). The muffins made of CB + CAD had the lowest hardness (19.8 N) and gumminess (6.6 N) values and highest springiness value (13.3 mm) indicating that the texture was soft. Sensory characteristics of the muffin made with CB + CAD were good and had an overall quality score of 90.5 out of 100. Rheometer studies showed that the incorporation of additives improved the visco-elastic properties of muffin batters. Microstructure studies showed a change in gluten matrix of muffins followed by treatments. Immunochemical validation of muffins made using CB + CAD showed that the immunogenicity reduced by 70.8 % which may be suitable for patients with gluten sensitivity.

  13. [Use of various methods to isolate exopolysaccharide of eltor cholera Vibrios and its immunochemical characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarenko, O A; Alekseeva, L P; Tlelesmanich, N R; Markina, O V; Chemisova, O S; Pisanov, R V; Kruglikov, V D; Shestialtynova, I S; Uskova, N N

    2012-01-01

    Isolation of Vibrio eltor exopolysaccharide and study of its immunochemical properties. Rugose variants of strains V. eltor 18895 and V. eltor 18843 obtained by us by selection in M9 medium were used in the study. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) were isolated by K. Kierek (2003), S.P. Zadnova (2004), N.P. Elinova (1984) methods and analyzed for carbohydrate, protein, nucleic acid content and lipopolysaccharide impurity. EPS, LPS, R-LPS structure was compared by high-pressure chromatography. Neutral sugars and amino sugars were identified by thin layer chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies were produced against EPS preparation isolated by N.P. Elinova (1984) method. Specific activity of obtained mice sera was tested by DIA method. EPS isolated by N.P. Elinova method (1984) was shown not to contain extraneous impurities. V. eltor EPS structure differs from LPS and R-LPS. Monosaccharide composition of EPS from ctx+ V. eltor 18895 strain is presented by a wider specter of carbohydrates including glucose, mannose, rhamnose, galacturonic acid. Use in DIA of specific sera produced against EPS from toxigenic strain did not reveal general epitopes with capsule polysaccharides of V. cholerae O139, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. Use of EPS as an immunogen promoted production of sera that are specific against EPS and rugose variants of Vibrio cholerae eltor that can be used for their detection or characterization.

  14. Immunochemical characterization of polysaccharide antigens from six clinical strains of Enterococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huebner Johannes

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococci have become major nosocomial pathogens due to their intrinsic and acquired resistance to a broad spectrum of antibiotics. Their increasing drug resistance prompts us to search for prominent antigens to develop vaccines against enterococci. Given the success of polysaccharide-based vaccines against various bacterial pathogens, we isolated and characterized the immunochemical properties of polysaccharide antigens from five strains of Enterococcus faecalis and one strain of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium. Results We cultured large batches of each strain, isolated sufficient quantities of polysaccharides, analyzed their chemical structures, and compared their antigenic specificity. Three classes of polysaccharides were isolated from each strain, including a polyglucan, a teichoic acid, and a heteroglycan composed of rhamnose, glucose, galactose, mannosamine, and glucosamine. The polyglucans from all six strains are identical and appear to be dextran. Yields of the teichoic acids were generally low. The most abundant polysaccharides are the heteroglycans. The six heteroglycans are structurally different as evidenced by NMR spectroscopy. They also differ in their antigenic specificities as revealed by competitive ELISA. The heteroglycans are not immunogenic by themselves but conjugation to protein carriers significantly enhanced their ability to induce antibodies. Conclusion The six clinical strains of enterococci express abundant, strain-specific cell-surface heteroglycans. These polysaccharides may provide a molecular basis for serological typing of enterococcal strains and antigens for the development of vaccines against multi-drug resistant enterococci.

  15. Immunochemical characterization of polysaccharide antigens from six clinical strains of Enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Carolyn T; Ganong, Amanda L; Reinap, Barbara; Mourelatos, Zafiria; Huebner, Johannes; Wang, Julia Y

    2006-07-12

    Enterococci have become major nosocomial pathogens due to their intrinsic and acquired resistance to a broad spectrum of antibiotics. Their increasing drug resistance prompts us to search for prominent antigens to develop vaccines against enterococci. Given the success of polysaccharide-based vaccines against various bacterial pathogens, we isolated and characterized the immunochemical properties of polysaccharide antigens from five strains of Enterococcus faecalis and one strain of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium. We cultured large batches of each strain, isolated sufficient quantities of polysaccharides, analyzed their chemical structures, and compared their antigenic specificity. Three classes of polysaccharides were isolated from each strain, including a polyglucan, a teichoic acid, and a heteroglycan composed of rhamnose, glucose, galactose, mannosamine, and glucosamine. The polyglucans from all six strains are identical and appear to be dextran. Yields of the teichoic acids were generally low. The most abundant polysaccharides are the heteroglycans. The six heteroglycans are structurally different as evidenced by NMR spectroscopy. They also differ in their antigenic specificities as revealed by competitive ELISA. The heteroglycans are not immunogenic by themselves but conjugation to protein carriers significantly enhanced their ability to induce antibodies. The six clinical strains of enterococci express abundant, strain-specific cell-surface heteroglycans. These polysaccharides may provide a molecular basis for serological typing of enterococcal strains and antigens for the development of vaccines against multi-drug resistant enterococci.

  16. Physicochemical and immunochemical assays for monitoring consistent production of tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Bernard; Tilstra, Wichard; van der Put, Robert; Spruit, Nanda; van den Ijssel, Jan; Robert, Jolanda; Hendriksen, Coenraad; Kersten, Gideon

    2013-07-01

    The detoxification of tetanus toxin by formaldehyde is a crucial step in the production of tetanus toxoid. The inactivation results in chemically modified proteins and it determines largely the ultimate efficacy and safety of the vaccine. Currently, the quality of tetanus toxoid lots is evaluated in potency and safety tests performed in animals. As a possible alternative, this article describes a panel of in vitro methods, which provides detailed information about the quality of tetanus toxoid. Ten experimental lots of tetanus toxoid were prepared using increasing concentrations of formaldehyde and glycine to obtain tetanus toxoids having differences in antigenicity, immunogenicity, residual toxicity and protein structure. The structural properties of each individual toxoid were determined using immunochemical and physicochemical methods, including biosensor analysis, ELISA, circular dichroism, TNBS assay, differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence and SDS-PAGE. The quality of a tetanus toxoid lot can be assessed by these set of analytical techniques. Based on antigenicity, immunogenicity and residual toxicity data, criteria are formulated that tetanus toxoids lot have to meet in order to have a high quality. The in vitro methods are a valuable selection of techniques for monitoring consistency of production of tetanus toxoid, especially for the detoxification process of tetanus toxin.

  17. Combining land use information and small stream sampling with PCR-based methods for better characterization of diffuse sources of human fecal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peed, Lindsay A; Nietch, Christopher T; Kelty, Catherine A; Meckes, Mark; Mooney, Thomas; Sivaganesan, Mano; Shanks, Orin C

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse sources of human fecal pollution allow for the direct discharge of waste into receiving waters with minimal or no treatment. Traditional culture-based methods are commonly used to characterize fecal pollution in ambient waters, however these methods do not discern between human and other animal sources of fecal pollution making it difficult to identify diffuse pollution sources. Human-associated quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods in combination with low-order headwatershed sampling, precipitation information, and high-resolution geographic information system land use data can be useful for identifying diffuse source of human fecal pollution in receiving waters. To test this assertion, this study monitored nine headwatersheds over a two-year period potentially impacted by faulty septic systems and leaky sanitary sewer lines. Human fecal pollution was measured using three different human-associated qPCR methods and a positive significant correlation was seen between abundance of human-associated genetic markers and septic systems following wet weather events. In contrast, a negative correlation was observed with sanitary sewer line densities suggesting septic systems are the predominant diffuse source of human fecal pollution in the study area. These results demonstrate the advantages of combining water sampling, climate information, land-use computer-based modeling, and molecular biology disciplines to better characterize diffuse sources of human fecal pollution in environmental waters.

  18. [Research progress of fecal microbiota transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ting; Tang, Tongyu

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal microbial ecosystem is the most complex and the largest micro-ecosystem of the mammals. The use of antibiotics can lead to a lot of major changes of the flora, making the intestinal flora damaged and impacted, even developing Clostridium difficile infection. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) as a special organ transplant therapy, which can rebuild the intestinal flora, has raised the clinical concerns. It has been used in the refractory Clostridium difficile, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and some non-intestinal diseases related to the metabolic disorders. But this method of treatment has not become a normal treatment, and many clinicians and patients can not accept it. This paper reviews relevant literature in terms of origin, indications, mechanism, production process, current situation and future research, and provide a reference for the clinical application of the treatment of fecal microbiota transplantation.

  19. Donor Considerations in Fecal Microbiota Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Danielle; Park, K T

    2017-03-01

    Tremendous acceleration has been made in understanding the gut microbiota in the past decade and, with it, further understanding of the pathologic role of dysbiosis and the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) as therapy. FMT has been studied in many disease states including the most common indication of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), though many questions regarding stool donor selection remain. Though traditionally, one donor has provided stool for one patient, research is underway to explore many donor selection considerations from the use of pooled donor stool to selection of a high diversity donor. It is well-known that dietary intake shapes the gut microbiota and the potential implications of this on FMT donor selection are being explored. Though further high-quality research is needed, optimizing the fecal microbiota inoculum holds great promise.

  20. Ethical aspects of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloiso, V; Minacori, R; Refolo, P; Sacchini, D; Craxì, L; Gasbarrini, A; Spagnolo, A G

    2015-09-01

    The importance of human microbiota in preserving human organism healthy is nowadays well acknowledged. The alteration of the microbiota can be the consequence of a persistent use of antibiotics or immunosuppressive medications or abdominal irradiation or surgery, wrong diet, or can be caused by surgery or anatomical condition. These alterations can cause many infections and diseases that today can be treated with Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT), also called Bacteriotherapy, that is the administration of a fecal solution from a donor into the intestinal tract of a recipient. Although to date, FMT appears to be safe and without serious adverse effects, there are some ethical issues that are worthy to be investigated. The aim of this article is to highlight these issues in order to give some notes for a better implementation of this particular clinical practice.

  1. The fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S Suchodolski

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that microbes play an important role in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI diseases in various animal species, but only limited data is available about the microbiome in cats with GI disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea. Fecal samples were obtained from healthy cats (n = 21 and cats with acute (n = 19 or chronic diarrhea (n = 29 and analyzed by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and PICRUSt was used to predict the functional gene content of the microbiome. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA effect size (LEfSe revealed significant differences in bacterial groups between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea. The order Burkholderiales, the families Enterobacteriaceae, and the genera Streptococcus and Collinsella were significantly increased in diarrheic cats. In contrast the order Campylobacterales, the family Bacteroidaceae, and the genera Megamonas, Helicobacter, and Roseburia were significantly increased in healthy cats. Phylum Bacteroidetes was significantly decreased in cats with chronic diarrhea (>21 days duration, while the class Erysipelotrichi and the genus Lactobacillus were significantly decreased in cats with acute diarrhea. The observed changes in bacterial groups were accompanied by significant differences in functional gene contents: metabolism of fatty acids, biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids, metabolism of biotin, metabolism of tryptophan, and ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, were all significantly (p<0.001 altered in cats with diarrhea. In conclusion, significant differences in the fecal microbiomes between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea were identified. This dysbiosis was accompanied by changes in bacterial functional gene categories. Future studies are warranted to evaluate if these microbial changes correlate with changes in fecal concentrations of microbial metabolites in cats with diarrhea for the identification of potential diagnostic or

  2. Norfloxacin binds to human fecal material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, C; Lindqvist, L; Nord, C E

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies have reported very high (120 to 2,700 mg/kg) concentrations of norfloxacin in feces after therapeutic doses. MICs for fecal microorganisms are with few exceptions far below these levels. Nevertheless, clinical investigations show that the main part of the aerobic gram-positive and the anaerobic microflora remains unaffected after norfloxacin administration. In this study, the binding of [14C]norfloxacin to fecal material was analyzed. The binding of a group of nonlabeled quinolones to feces and the interactions between Enterococcus faecium, Bacteroides fragilis, and norfloxacin were also investigated. The results showed that norfloxacin has the ability to bind to feces. The specific binding was reversible, saturated after 90 min of incubation at 37 degrees C, and increased linearly with fecal concentration. Scatchard plots and nonlinear regression computer analyses revealed two different binding classes. The primary specific binding had a dissociation constant (KD) of 1.0 microM and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 0.12 mumol/g of feces. The KD and Bmax of the secondary, more unspecific binding were 450 microM and 11.8 mumol/g of feces, respectively. The binding of unlabeled ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin, and norfloxacin to feces was comparable to that of [14C]norfloxacin. The results of norfloxacin binding to suspensions of B. fragilis suggested that the main part of the binding is to the bacterial fraction of feces. In the presence of 8.0 g (dry weight) of B. fragilis per liter, the MBC of norfloxacin for E. faecium increased from 8 to 256 micrograms/ml. The finding of the present study indicated that binding of norfloxacin to feces may explain the paradox of high fecal concentrations of norfloxacin versus the actual effect on the normal gastrointestinal microflora. PMID:2854456

  3. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer.

  4. Therapeutic potential of fecal microbiota transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Loek P; Bouter, Kristien E C; de Vos, Willem M; Borody, Thomas J; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2013-11-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of fecal microbiota for the treatment of patients with chronic gastrointestinal infections and inflammatory bowel diseases. Lately, there has also been interest in its therapeutic potential for cardiometabolic, autoimmune, and other extraintestinal conditions that were not previously considered to be associated with the intestinal microbiota. Although it is not clear if changes in the microbiota cause these conditions, we review the most current and best methods for performing fecal microbiota transplantation and summarize clinical observations that have implicated the intestinal microbiota in various diseases. We also discuss case reports of fecal microbiota transplantations for different disorders, including Clostridium difficile infection, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, insulin resistance, multiple sclerosis, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. There has been increasing focus on the interaction between the intestinal microbiome, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases, and we explore these relationships and the potential roles of different microbial strains. We might someday be able to mine for intestinal bacterial strains that can be used in the diagnosis or treatment of these diseases. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fecal microbiota transplantation for gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Mizuno, Shinta; Hayashi, Atsushi; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Naganuma, Makoto; Kanai, Takanori

    2014-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a treatment to restore the normal microbial composition of the gut by introducing fecal microbiota obtained from a healthy donor into a diseased individual. There has been a growing interest in the use of FMT as a treatment of various diseases including Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. Despite the increasing application of FMT, there are no standard protocols. Many aspects of FMT procedures vary regarding donor selection, preparation of fecal materials, recipient preparation, and route of administration. FMT is most successful in treating recurrent CDI. A randomized controlled trial reported a success rate of approximaetly 90%. Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a potentially good indication for FMT, although limited evidence is available on the use of FMT for the treatment of UC. Only several small case series have been reported, and the results in terms of efficacy are inconsistent. FMT can also be used to treat diseases other than gastrointestinal disorders in which the gut microbiota is disturbed, e.g., cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, and metabolic disorders. There remain many unanswered questions with regard to FMT, and more research is required in this field.

  6. Surface Sampling Collection and Culture Methods for Escherichia coli in Household Environments with High Fecal Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exum, Natalie G; Kosek, Margaret N; Davis, Meghan F; Schwab, Kellogg J

    2017-08-22

    Empiric quantification of environmental fecal contamination is an important step toward understanding the impact that water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions have on reducing enteric infections. There is a need to standardize the methods used for surface sampling in field studies that examine fecal contamination in low-income settings. The dry cloth method presented in this manuscript improves upon the more commonly used swabbing technique that has been shown in the literature to have a low sampling efficiency. The recovery efficiency of a dry electrostatic cloth sampling method was evaluated using Escherichia coli and then applied to household surfaces in Iquitos, Peru, where there is high fecal contamination and enteric infection. Side-by-side measurements were taken from various floor locations within a household at the same time over a three-month period to compare for consistency of quantification of E. coli bacteria. The dry cloth sampling method in the laboratory setting showed 105% (95% Confidence Interval: 98%, 113%) E. coli recovery efficiency off of the cloths. The field application demonstrated strong agreement of side-by-side results (Pearson correlation coefficient for dirt surfaces was 0.83 (p samples (Pearson (0.53, p method can be utilized in households with high bacterial loads using either continuous (quantitative) or categorical (semi-quantitative) data. The standardization of this low-cost, dry electrostatic cloth sampling method can be used to measure differences between households in intervention and non-intervention arms of randomized trials.

  7. In-depth process understanding of RECOMBIVAX HB® maturation and potential epitope improvements with redox treatment: multifaceted biochemical and immunochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinjian; Towne, Victoria; Brown, Martha; Wang, Yang; Abraham, Dicky; Oswald, C Brent; Gimenez, Juan A; Washabaugh, Michael W; Kennedy, Ronald; Sitrin, Robert D

    2011-10-19

    Recombinant Hepatitis B surface antigen virus-like particles (VLPs) produced in yeast undergo spontaneous maturation during the vaccine production process, and the biophysical characteristics of the particles with respect to maturation were described in Zhao et al. (2006) [13]. Here we report additional biochemical and immunochemical characterization by various techniques, including the use of a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that differ in their selectivity and conformation-sensitivity, for probing surface epitope structures. Crosslinking via interchain disulfide formation and binding of conformational specific antibodies in the mature particles were shown to be progressively enhanced. We show that redox-mediated VLP maturation is superior to heat-induced maturation in terms of generating VLPs which exhibit more complete crosslinking (>95%) and 2- to 3-fold higher antigenicity as defined by conformational antibodies. Therefore, the resulting VLPs from redox treatment resemble more closely their plasma-derived counterparts. The value of using multiple mAbs for probing surface epitopes was clearly demonstrated as different mAbs showed different degrees of sensitivity to the structural changes during HBsAg VLP maturation. The rapid, label-free technology of surface plasmon resonance performed at a single antigen concentration was shown to correlate well with a sandwich ELISA using parallel line analysis, currently implemented for product release and stability testing of RECOMBIVAX HB(®). Surface plasmon resonance offers both convenience and flexibility; multiple mAbs can be tested one at a time in the same set of experiments, providing a means to assess changes to individual epitopes. Taken together, these quantitative analytical tools enable more rapid, in-depth, and comprehensive process monitoring, process optimization, and assessment of product consistency and stability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Broad-specificity immunoassays for sulfonamide detection: immunochemical strategy for generic antibodies and competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franek, Milan; Diblikova, Iva; Cernoch, Ivo; Vass, Maria; Hruska, Karel

    2006-03-01

    Development of antibodies with broad specificity recognition for sulfonamide drugs was found to be surprisingly difficult when conventional immunochemical strategies were applied to hapten design. To improve the cross-reactivity pattern of antibodies for the family of sulfonamide drugs, a novel strategy based on the single-ring (fragment-derived) hapten moieties with different spacer substituent lengths was employed for the preparation of immunogens, coating conjugates, and enzyme competitors. The rabbit antibodies raised against a common (one-ring) p-aminobenzenesulfonamide hapten moiety (attached to a carrier protein through the N-1 position) in combination with a homologous hapten-peroxidase tracer allowed the detection of 15 sulfonamide species at the maximum residue limit level using direct ELISA. The two-ring 6-(4-aminobenzensulfonylamino)hexanoic hapten mimics, previously reported in the literature as a weak generic antigen, generated surprisingly superior immune responses in rabbits. The antibodies raised against this two-ring hapten were capable of detecting at least 19 and 17 sulfonamides in a direct ELISA system at the regulatory level with sensitivities corresponding to 20 and 50% binding inhibition, respectively. A negligible cross-reaction with N4 metabolites makes it possible to measure responses of parent sulfonamides in the presence of their metabolized forms. In skimmed milk, the highest limit of detection (LOD) for sulfacetamide defined as 20% inhibition was 65.2 microg x L(-1) (IC20 value), whereas the additional 18 sulfonamides tested exhibited LODs in the range of 0.2-36.8 microg x L(-1). This sensitivity allows simple multisulfonamide tests to be established for use in the laboratory or on site.

  9. Uptake of faecal immunochemical test screening among nonparticipants in a flexible sigmoidoscopy screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, Lieke; Kuipers, Ernst J; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; van Vuuren, Anneke J; Reijerink, Jaqueline C I Y; Habbema, Dik J F; van Leerdam, Monique E

    2012-05-01

    Screening programmes based on single modality testing may prevent individuals with a preference for a different test from participating. We conducted a population-based trial to determine whether nonparticipants in flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) screening were willing to attend faecal immunochemical test (FIT) screening. In total, 8,407 subjects were invited in a primary FS screening programme. Invitees did not know at the time of FS invitation that nonparticipants would be offered FIT screening. A total of 4,407 nonparticipants of FS screening were invited for FIT screening (cut-off 50 ng haemoglobin/ml). The participation rate to FS screening was 31% [95% confidence interval (CI): 30-32%]. Among the FS nonparticipants 25% (CI: 24-26%) did attended FIT screening. The participation rate of the two-stage recruitment for FS and FIT screening was 45% (CI: 44-46%). FIT screenees were older (p = 0.02), more often women (p < 0.001) and had a lower social economic status (p = 0.01) than FS screenees. The detection rate (DR) for advanced adenoma was 3.5% (CI: 2.5-4.8%), and for colorectal cancer (CRC) it was 0.3% (CI: 0.1-0.8%) among participants to FIT screening. The DR of the two-stage recruitment was 6.1% (n = 202) for an advanced adenoma and 0.5% (n = 16) for a CRC. In conclusion, offering FIT screening to nonparticipants in a FS screening programme increases the overall participation rate considerably, as a quarter of nonparticipants of FS screening was willing to attend FIT screening. The participation rate remains lower for primary FIT screening in the same population (62%). Women in the target population were more likely to refuse FS than FIT screening. Countries introducing FS screening should be aware of these preferences. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  10. Immunochemical homology between elasmobranch scale and tooth extracellular matrix proteins in Cephaloscyllium ventriosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, N; Bessem, C; Bringas, P; Slavkin, H C

    1987-01-01

    Studies were designed to test the hypothesis that homologous proteins are expressed in elasmobranch scale, tooth enameloid, and mammalian enamel. Using indirect immunohistochemistry and high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with immunoblotting, mouse enamel proteins were compared with placoid scale and enameloid proteins from the swell shark, Cephaloscyllium ventriosum. Swiss Webster mouse molar teeth show a characteristic enamel protein pattern consisting of two anionic enamel proteins of 72 kDa (pI 5.8) and 46 kDa (pI 5.5) and several more basic and lower-molecular-weight enamel polypeptides. Both anionic and basic classes of enamel proteins cross-reacted with either antiamelogenin or antienamelin antibodies. Placoid scale and tooth enameloid contained two anionic proteins identified as 58 kDa (pI 5.7) and 46 kDa (pI 5.5), which cross-reacted with either antimouse amelogenin or antihuman enamelin IgG antibodies. A minor antigenically related protein of 43 kDa (pI 6.2) was detected. Immunochemical staining showed localization within placoid scale, swell shark inner enamel epithelia, enameloid, and mouse inner enamel epithelia and enamel. We interpret these results to suggest that both placoid scale and enameloid proteins share epitopes and that these epitopes are also shared with mammalian enamel proteins. Based on molecular weights, isoelectric pH values, and amino acid compositions, placoid scale and enameloid ECM proteins do not contain amelogenin proteins. We suggest that enamelinlike proteins are highly conserved during vertebrate evolution and that these relatively anionic macromolecules may serve a primary function in the initiation of calcium hydroxyapatite formation during enameloid biomineralization.

  11. Immunochemical studies of Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergens, Lol p I, II, and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A A; Kihara, T K; Marsh, D G

    1987-12-15

    It was reported earlier that human immune responses to three perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne) pollen allergens, Lol p I, II, and III, are associated with histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3. Rye-allergic people are often concordantly sensitive to all three of these allergens. Since earlier studies suggested that these antigens are non-cross-reactive, their immunologic relatedness by double antibody radioimmunoassay (DARIA) was studied in order to understand further the immunochemical basis for the concordant recognition of the three allergens. Direct binding DARIA studies were performed with human sera from 189 allergic subjects. Inhibition DARIA studies were carried out with 17 human sera from grass-allergic patients who were on grass immunotherapy, one goat anti-serum, and six rabbit antisera. None of the sera detected any significant degree of two-way cross-reactivity between Lol p I and II, or between Lol p I and III. However, the degree of two-way cross-reactivity between Lol p II and III exhibited by individual human and animal antisera varied between undetectable and 100%. In general, the degree of cross-reactivity between Lol p II and III was higher among human sera than among animal sera. Taken together with earlier findings that antibody responses to Lol p I, II and III are associated with HLA-HDR3, and that most Lol p II and III responders are also Lol p I responders, but not vice versa, our present results suggest the following: the HLA-DR3-encoded Ia molecule recognizes a similar immunodominant Ia recognition site (agretope) shared between Lol p I and Lol p II and/or III; in addition, Lol p I appears to contain unique Ia recognition site(s) not present in Lol p II and III. However, further epitope analyses are required to investigate these possibilities.

  12. Complete Pelvic Floor Repair in Treating Fecal Incontinence

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Patrick Y. H.; Steele, Scott R

    2005-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is associated with 20 to 40% of the patients with pelvic floor prolapse. Successful management of fecal incontinence requires not only an understanding of anorectal function but also a thorough understanding of pelvic floor anatomy and how pelvic floor prolapse affects fecal continence. Imaging techniques have been instrumental in visualizing pelvic floor prolapse and have helped correlate surgical findings. Stabilization of the perineal body appears to be a key component t...

  13. Chapter A7. Section 7.2. Fecal Indicator Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushon, Rebecca N.

    2003-01-01

    More than 100 types of human pathogenic viruses may be present in fecal-contaminated waters. Coliphages are used as indicators of virus-related fecal contamination and of the microbiological quality of waters. This report provides information on the equipment, sampling protocols, and laboratory methods that are in standard use by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel for the collection of data on fecal indicator viruses.

  14. Profiling Living Bacteria Informs Preparation of Fecal Microbiota Transplantations

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Nathaniel D.; Smith, Mark B.; Perrotta, Allison R.; Kassam, Zain; Alm, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is a compelling treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, with potential applications against other diseases associated with changes in gut microbiota. But variability in fecal bacterial communities—believed to be the therapeutic agent—can complicate or undermine treatment efficacy. To understand the effects of transplant preparation methods on living fecal microbial communities, we applied a DNA-sequencing method (PMA-seq) that uses propidium ...

  15. Complete pelvic floor repair in treating fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Patrick Y H; Steele, Scott R

    2005-02-01

    Fecal incontinence is associated with 20 to 40% of the patients with pelvic floor prolapse. Successful management of fecal incontinence requires not only an understanding of anorectal function but also a thorough understanding of pelvic floor anatomy and how pelvic floor prolapse affects fecal continence. Imaging techniques have been instrumental in visualizing pelvic floor prolapse and have helped correlate surgical findings. Stabilization of the perineal body appears to be a key component to the success of pelvic floor repair and fecal continence, but the optimal repair is far from being established.

  16. A Pilot Study on Integrating Videography and Environmental Microbial Sampling to Model Fecal Bacterial Exposures in Peri-Urban Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R Julian

    Full Text Available Diarrheal diseases are a leading cause of under-five mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa. Quantitative exposure modeling provides opportunities to investigate the relative importance of fecal-oral transmission routes (e.g. hands, water, food responsible for diarrheal disease. Modeling, however, requires accurate descriptions of individuals' interactions with the environment (i.e., activity data. Such activity data are largely lacking for people in low-income settings. In the present study, we collected activity data and microbiological sampling data to develop a quantitative microbial exposure model for two female caretakers in peri-urban Tanzania. Activity data were combined with microbiological data of contacted surfaces and fomites (e.g. broom handle, soil, clothing to develop example exposure profiles describing second-by-second estimates of fecal indicator bacteria (E. coli and enterococci concentrations on the caretaker's hands. The study demonstrates the application and utility of video activity data to quantify exposure factors for people in low-income countries and apply these factors to understand fecal contamination exposure pathways. This study provides both a methodological approach for the design and implementation of larger studies, and preliminary data suggesting contacts with dirt and sand may be important mechanisms of hand contamination. Increasing the scale of activity data collection and modeling to investigate individual-level exposure profiles within target populations for specific exposure scenarios would provide opportunities to identify the relative importance of fecal-oral disease transmission routes.

  17. Characterizing relationships among fecal indicator bacteria ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bed sediments of streams and rivers may store high concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogens. Due to resuspension events, these contaminants can be mobilized into the water column and affect overall water quality. Other bacterial indicators such as microbial source tracking (MST) markers, developed to determine potential sources of fecal contamination, can also be resuspended from bed sediments. The primary objective of this study was to predict occurrence of waterborne pathogens in water and streambed sediments using a simple statistical model that includes traditionally measured FIB, environmental parameters and source allocation, using MST markers as predictor variables. Synoptic sampling events were conducted during baseflow conditions downstream from agricultural (AG), forested (FORS), and wastewater pollution control plant (WPCP) land uses. Concentrations of FIB and MST markers were measured in water and sediments, along with occurrences of the enteric pathogens Campylobacter, Listeria and Salmonella, and the virulence gene that carries Shiga toxin, stx2. Pathogens were detected in water more often than in underlying sediments. Shiga toxin was significantly related to land use, with concentrations of the ruminant marker selected as an independent variable that could correctly classify 76% and 64% of observed Shiga toxin occurrences in water and sediment, respectively. FIB concentrations and water quality parameters were also selected a

  18. Associations among Human-Associated Fecal Contamination, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Microcystin at Lake Erie Beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Marion, Jason W; Cheung, Melissa; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-09-11

    Lake Erie beaches exhibit impaired water quality due to fecal contamination and cyanobacterial blooms, though few studies address potential relationships between these two public health hazards. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Microcystis aeruginosa was monitored in conjunction with a human-associated fecal marker (Bacteroides fragilis group; g-Bfra), microcystin, and water quality parameters at two beaches to evaluate their potential associations. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 32 times from both Euclid and Villa Angela beaches. The phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) and the microcystin-producing (mcyA) gene in M. aeruginosa were quantified with qPCR. PC-IGS and mcyA were detected in 50.0% and 39.1% of samples, respectively, and showed increased occurrences after mid-August. Correlation and regression analyses showed that water temperature was negatively correlated with M. aeruginosa markers and microcystin. The densities of mcyA and the g-Bfra were predicted by nitrate, implicating fecal contamination as contributing to the growth of M. aeruginosa by nitrate loading. Microcystin was correlated with mcyA (r = 0.413, p microcystin production. Additionally, microcystin was correlated with total phosphorus (r = 0.628, p microcystin concentrations at Euclid.

  19. Impact of two different colistin dosing strategies on healthy piglet fecal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, M A; Jouy, E; Eono, F; Cariolet, R; Couet, W; Gobin, P; Le Goff, O; Blanquet-Diot, S; Alric, M; Kempf, I

    2016-08-01

    Colistin is often used in piglets but underdosing and overdosing are frequent. The impact of such administrations on fecal microbiota was studied. Piglets were given either underdoses of colistin by oral gavage for five days or overdoses by in-feed medication for 14days. The composition of fecal microbiota was studied by quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA sequencing, culture of Enterobacteriaceae, and quantification of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The mean colistin concentrations during the treatment for underdosed and overdosed groups were 14.4μg/g and 64.9μg/g of feces respectively. Whatever the piglet and the sampling day, the two main phyla were Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, The main families were Lactobacillaceae, Clostridiales, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae. The main perturbation was the significant but transitory decrease in the Escherichia coli population during treatment, yet all the E. coli isolates were susceptible to colistin. Moreover, colistin did not affect the production of SCFAs. These results show that under- or overdoses of colistin do not result in any major disturbance of piglet fecal microbiota and rarely select for chromosomal resistance in the dominant E. coli population.

  20. Reduced fecal sterol excretion in subjects with familial hypoalphalipoproteinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Harchaoui, Karim; Franssen, Remco; Hovingh, G. Kees; Bisoendial, Radjesh J.; Stellaard, Frans; Kuipers, Folkert; Kastelein, John J. P.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Groen, Albert K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fecal bile acid and neutral sterol excretion are the obligate endpoints of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway (RCT). In studies in mice, no evidence was found for a relation between HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and fecal sterol excretion. In this study, we have evaluated this re

  1. Distinguishing bovine fecal matter on spinach leaves using field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detection of fecal contaminants on leafy greens in the field will allow for decreasing cross-contamination of produce during and post-harvest. Fecal contamination of leafy greens has been associated with E.coli O157:H7 outbreaks and foodbourne illnesses. In this study passive field spectroscopy, mea...

  2. Comparison of different immunochemical methods for the detection and quantification of hazelnut proteins in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelman, S J; Knulst, A C; Koers, W J; Penninks, A H; Peppelman, H; Vlooswijk, R; Pigmans, I; van Duijn, G; Hessing, M

    1999-10-29

    Hazelnuts are widely used in the food industry owing to their nutritive value and taste. The amount of hazelnut present in a recipe is usually considered as a mark of quality. On the other hand, contamination of foods that normally do not contain hazelnuts is a threat for patients with a hazelnut allergy. For this reason, the availability of a method for the detection and quantification of hazelnuts in foods would be desirable. The objective of this study was to develop a method for the detection and quantification of minor amounts of hazelnut protein in food products that is potentially applicable for the food industry. Several immunochemical methods, e.g., immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), were developed with antibodies from both hazelnut-sensitized patient sera and the sera of rabbits hyperimmunized with hazelnut protein. Immunoblotting appeared to be non-specific when the sera of patients were used as a source of antibodies. Using immunopurified antibodies from rabbits immunized with hazelnuts, immunoblotting became specific, but the sensitivity of this method was limited. Inhibition of IgE binding is a generally used test in clinical laboratories to establish contamination with hazelnuts. This approach is sensitive and specific, but not readily accessible for the food industry since patient serum is needed. Similar results in terms of sensitivity and specificity were obtained with a sandwich ELISA constructed with an immunopurified antibody from rabbits sensitized to hazelnuts. No substantial cross-reactivity with other nuts, legumes or other food constituents was observed, and concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml, corresponding to 1 ppm in food products, were detected. In a field test, several consumer products regarded to be free of hazelnuts were shown to contain traces of hazelnut. This sandwich ELISA constructed with immunopurified antibodies from rabbits sensitized with hazelnut protein is a sensitive and specific method to detect

  3. Double sampling of a faecal immunochemical test is not superior to single sampling for detection of colorectal neoplasia: a colonoscopy controlled prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A. Oort (Frank); S.T. Van Turenhout (Sietze T.); V.M.H. Coupé (Veerle); R.W.M. van der Hulst (René); E.I.C. Wesdorp (Eric); J.S. Terhaar sive Droste (Jochim); I.B. Larbi (Ilhame); S.L. Kanis (Shannon); E. Van Hengel (Edwin); A.A. Bouman (Anneke); C.J.L.M. Meijer (Chris); C.J.J. Mulder (Chris)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ A single sampled faecal immunochemical test (FIT) has moderate sensitivity for colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas. Repeated FIT sampling could improve test sensitivity. The aim of the present study is to determine whether any of three different strategies of doub

  4. Fecal microbial determinants of fecal and systemic estrogens and estrogen metabolites: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High systemic estrogen levels contribute to breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women, whereas low levels contribute to osteoporosis risk. Except for obesity, determinants of non-ovarian systemic estrogen levels are undefined. We sought to identify members and functions of the intestinal microbial community associated with estrogen levels via enterohepatic recirculation. Methods Fifty-one epidemiologists at the National Institutes of Health, including 25 men, 7 postmenopausal women, and 19 premenopausal women, provided urine and aliquots of feces, using methods proven to yield accurate and reproducible results. Estradiol, estrone, 13 estrogen metabolites (EM, and their sum (total estrogens were quantified in urine and feces by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In feces, β-glucuronidase and β-glucosidase activities were determined by realtime kinetics, and microbiome diversity and taxonomy were estimated by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA amplicons. Pearson correlations were computed for each loge estrogen level, loge enzymatic activity level, and microbiome alpha diversity estimate. For the 55 taxa with mean relative abundance of at least 0.1%, ordinal levels were created [zero, low (below median of detected sequences, high] and compared to loge estrogens, β-glucuronidase and β-glucosidase enzymatic activity levels by linear regression. Significance was based on two-sided tests with α=0.05. Results In men and postmenopausal women, levels of total urinary estrogens (as well as most individual EM were very strongly and directly associated with all measures of fecal microbiome richness and alpha diversity (R≥0.50, P≤0.003. These non-ovarian systemic estrogens also were strongly and significantly associated with fecal Clostridia taxa, including non-Clostridiales and three genera in the Ruminococcaceae family (R=0.57−0.70, P=0.03−0.002. Estrone, but not other EM, in urine correlated significantly with

  5. Bacteriophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes in fecal waste from cattle, pigs, and poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Imamovic, Lejla; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates the occurrence of bacteriophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes in animal environments. bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M) (clusters 1 and 9), and mecA were quantified by quantitative PCR in 71 phage DNA samples from pigs, poultry, and cattle fecal wastes. Densities of 3 to 4 log(10) gene copies (GC) of bla(TEM), 2 to 3 log(10) GC of bla(CTX-M), and 1 to 3 log(10) GC of mecA per milliliter or gram of sample were detected, suggesting that bacteriophages can be environmental vectors for the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes.

  6. QMRAcatch: Human-Associated Fecal Pollution and Infection Risk Modeling for a River/Floodplain Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derx, Julia; Schijven, Jack; Sommer, Regina; Zoufal-Hruza, Christa M; van Driezum, Inge H; Reischer, Georg; Ixenmaier, Simone; Kirschner, Alexander; Frick, Christina; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Blaschke, Alfred Paul

    2016-07-01

    Protection of drinking water resources requires addressing all relevant fecal pollution sources in the considered catchment. A freely available simulation tool, QMRAcatch, was recently developed to simulate concentrations of fecal indicators, a genetic microbial source tracking (MST) marker, and intestinal pathogens in water resources and to conduct a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). At the same time, QMRAcatch was successfully applied to a region of the Danube River in Austria, focusing on municipal wastewater emissions. Herein, we describe extension of its application to a Danube River floodplain, keeping the focus on fecal sources of human origin. QMRAcatch was calibrated to match measured human-associated MST marker concentrations for a dry year and a wet year. Appropriate performance characteristics of the human-associated MST assay were proven by simulating correct and false-positive marker concentrations, as determined in human and animal feces. With the calibrated tool, simulated and measured enterovirus concentrations in the rivers were compared. Finally, the calibrated tool allowed demonstrating that 4.5 log enterovirus and 6.6 log norovirus reductions must be achieved to convert current surface water to safe drinking water that complies with a health-based target of 10 infections person yr. Simulations of the low- and high-pollution scenarios showed that the required viral reductions ranged from 0 to 8 log. This study has implications for water managers with interests in assessing robust catchment protection measures and water treatment criteria by considering the fate of fecal pollution from its sources to the point of abstraction.

  7. Fecal indicators and zoonotic pathogens in household drinking water taps fed from rainwater tanks in Southeast Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, W; Hodgers, L; Sidhu, J P S; Toze, S

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the microbiological quality of household tap water samples fed from rainwater tanks was assessed by monitoring the numbers of Escherichia coli bacteria and enterococci from 24 households in Southeast Queensland (SEQ), Australia. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was also used for the quantitative detection of zoonotic pathogens in water samples from rainwater tanks and connected household taps. The numbers of zoonotic pathogens were also estimated in fecal samples from possums and various species of birds by using qPCR, as possums and birds are considered to be the potential sources of fecal contamination in roof-harvested rainwater (RHRW). Among the 24 households, 63% of rainwater tank and 58% of connected household tap water (CHTW) samples contained E. coli and exceeded Australian drinking water guidelines of tanks and 83% of CHTW samples also contained enterococci. In all, 21%, 4%, and 13% of rainwater tank samples contained Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and Giardia lamblia, respectively. Similarly, 21% of rainwater tank and 13% of CHTW samples contained Campylobacter spp. and G. lamblia, respectively. The number of E. coli (P = 0.78), Enterococcus (P = 0.64), Campylobacter (P = 0.44), and G. lamblia (P = 0.50) cells in rainwater tanks did not differ significantly from the numbers observed in the CHTW samples. Among the 40 possum fecal samples tested, Campylobacter spp., Cryptosporidium parvum, and G. lamblia were detected in 60%, 13%, and 30% of samples, respectively. Among the 38 bird fecal samples tested, Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., C. parvum, and G. lamblia were detected in 24%, 11%, 5%, and 13% of the samples, respectively. Household tap water samples fed from rainwater tanks tested in the study appeared to be highly variable. Regular cleaning of roofs and gutters, along with pruning of overhanging tree branches, might also prove effective in reducing animal fecal contamination of rainwater tanks.

  8. Fecal pollution source tracking toolbox for identification, evaluation and characterization of fecal contamination in receiving urban surface waters and groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Han; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2015-12-15

    The quality of surface waters/groundwater of a geographical region can be affected by anthropogenic activities, land use patterns and fecal pollution sources from humans and animals. Therefore, the development of an efficient fecal pollution source tracking toolbox for identifying the origin of the fecal pollution sources in surface waters/groundwater is especially helpful for improving management efforts and remediation actions of water resources in a more cost-effective and efficient manner. This review summarizes the updated knowledge on the use of fecal pollution source tracking markers for detecting, evaluating and characterizing fecal pollution sources in receiving surface waters and groundwater. The suitability of using chemical markers (i.e. fecal sterols, fluorescent whitening agents, pharmaceuticals and personal care products, and artificial sweeteners) and/or microbial markers (e.g. F+RNA coliphages, enteric viruses, and host-specific anaerobic bacterial 16S rDNA genetic markers) for tracking fecal pollution sources in receiving water bodies is discussed. In addition, this review also provides a comprehensive approach, which is based on the detection ratios (DR), detection frequencies (DF), and fate of potential microbial and chemical markers. DR and DF are considered as the key criteria for selecting appropriate markers for identifying and evaluating the impacts of fecal contamination in surface waters/groundwater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of near infrared reflectance analysis of fecal fat, nitrogen and water with conventional methods, and fecal energy content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Neucker, A; Bijleveld, CMA; Wolthers, BG; Swaaneburg, JCJM; Kester, ADM; van Kreel, B; Forget, PP

    Objectives: To evaluate Near-Infrared Analysis (NIRA) method for determining fecal fat, water and nitrogen. Design and methods: The results of fecal fat, water and nitrogen by NIRA were compared with results of van de Kamer and Acid Steatocrit (AS), Dumas and vacuum drying methods for fat, nitrogen

  10. Comparison of near infrared reflectance analysis of fecal fat, nitrogen and water with conventional methods, and fecal energy content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neucker, Anita Van den; Bijleveld, Charles M A; Wolthers, Bert G; Swaaneburg, Joost C J M; Kester, Arnold D M; Kreel, Bernard van; Forget, Pierre Philippe

    2002-02-01

    To evaluate Near-Infrared Analysis (NIRA) method for determining fecal fat, water and nitrogen. The results of fecal fat, water and nitrogen by NIRA were compared with results of van de Kamer and Acid Steatocrit (AS), Dumas and vacuum drying methods for fat, nitrogen and water respectively. Results of fat determining methods were also compared with total fecal energy as obtained by bomb calorimeter. NIRA results correlated significantly (p fat (r = 0.84 and r = 0.88 for van de Kamer and AS respectively) and water (r = 0.91). The limits of agreement for nitrogen and fat results were too wide for the methods to be used interchangeably. The fecal fat results correlated significantly (p fecal energy results. NIRA may be valuable for monitoring malabsorption but the diagnostic value remains to be determined.

  11. [Potential Applicability of Fecal NIRs: A Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu; Du, Zhou-he; Bai, Shi-qie; Zuo, Yan-chun; Zhou, Xiao-kang; Kou, Jing; Yan, Jia-jun; Zhang, Jian-bo; Li, Ping; You, Ming-hong; Zhang, Yu; Li, Da-xu; Zhang, Chang-bing; Zhang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) is an inexpensive, rapid, environment-friendly and non-invasive analytical technique that has been extensively applied in the analysis of the dietary attributes and the animal products. Acquisition of dietary attributes is essential for nutritional diagnoses to provide animals with reasonable diet. Traditionally, the calibration equations for the prediction of dietary attributes (e. g. crude protein) are developed from feed NIR spectra and the results of conventional chemical analysis (i. e. reference data). It is difficult to obtain the NIR spectra of forages consumed by grazing animals, so the method of this calibration is inappropriate for free-grazing herbivores. Feces, as the animal's metabolites, contain the information about both the animal's diet and the animal itself. Recently, Fecal-NIRS (F. NIRS) has been directly used to monitor diet information (botanical composition, chemical composition and digestibility), based on correlation between reference data and fecal NIR profile. Subsequently, some additional application (such as sex and species discrimination, reproductive and parasite status) of F. NIRS also is outlined. In the last, application of NIRS in animal manure is summarized. NIRS was shown to be an alternative to conventional wet chemical methods for analyzing some nutrient concentrations in animal manure rapidly. Overall, this paper proves that F. NIRS is a rapid and valid tool for the determination of the dietary attributes and of the physiological status of animal, although more efforts need to be done to improve the accuracy of the F. NIRS technique. Several researchers in English have reviewed the applications of F. NIRS. In China, however, there is a paucity of research and application regarding F. NIRS. We expect that this paper in Chinese will be helpful to the development of F. NIRS in China. At the same time, we propose NIRS as a simple and rapid analytical method for predicting the main

  12. Comparison of fecal pooling methods and DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Akiko; Mori, Yasuyuki; Nakagawa, Tetsuo; Tasaki, Tomoko; Utiyama, Katsuo; Mori, Hitomi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a sensitive method using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) with pooled fecal samples for the screening of Johne's disease (JD). Manufacturer-specified and our new pooling method in combination with five commercial kits for DNA extraction and purification were compared. Different volumes of pooled fecal suspensions were tested, and the results were compared for individual samples and three pool sizes (5, 10, and 50 samples); each of the fecal suspensions, which were prepared from healthy dairy and beef cattle was spiked with 0, 10, 100, or 1000 cultured Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) organisms or was mixed with fecal suspensions from experimentally infected cattle. The MAP DNA detection proportion with our pooling method in combination with Johne-Spin kit (Fasmac, Japan) was 100% for all models and all pool sizes, except for the low shedder model with a pool size of 50. There was no loss of sensitivity in pools of 10 subjects or less by using the new method. These results suggest that new method is a sensitive, practical, and cost-effective screening test for the detection of MAP-infected cattle and the monitoring of JD-free herds.

  13. Quantification of Human and Animal Viruses to Differentiate the Origin of the Fecal Contamination Present in Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Bofill-Mas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many different viruses are excreted by humans and animals and are frequently detected in fecal contaminated waters causing public health concerns. Classical bacterial indicator such as E. coli and enterococci could fail to predict the risk for waterborne pathogens such as viruses. Moreover, the presence and levels of bacterial indicators do not always correlate with the presence and concentration of viruses, especially when these indicators are present in low concentrations. Our research group has proposed new viral indicators and methodologies for determining the presence of fecal pollution in environmental samples as well as for tracing the origin of this fecal contamination (microbial source tracking. In this paper, we examine to what extent have these indicators been applied by the scientific community. Recently, quantitative assays for quantification of poultry and ovine viruses have also been described. Overall, quantification by qPCR of human adenoviruses and human polyomavirus JC, porcine adenoviruses, bovine polyomaviruses, chicken/turkey parvoviruses, and ovine polyomaviruses is suggested as a toolbox for the identification of human, porcine, bovine, poultry, and ovine fecal pollution in environmental samples.

  14. Profiling Living Bacteria Informs Preparation of Fecal Microbiota Transplantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Nathaniel D; Smith, Mark B; Perrotta, Allison R; Kassam, Zain; Alm, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is a compelling treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, with potential applications against other diseases associated with changes in gut microbiota. But variability in fecal bacterial communities-believed to be the therapeutic agent-can complicate or undermine treatment efficacy. To understand the effects of transplant preparation methods on living fecal microbial communities, we applied a DNA-sequencing method (PMA-seq) that uses propidium monoazide (PMA) to differentiate between living and dead fecal microbes, and we created an analysis pipeline to identify individual bacteria that change in abundance between samples. We found that oxygen exposure degraded fecal bacterial communities, whereas freeze-thaw cycles and lag time between donor defecation and transplant preparation had much smaller effects. Notably, the abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii-an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium whose absence is linked to inflammatory bowel disease-decreased with oxygen exposure. Our results indicate that some current practices for preparing microbiota transplant material adversely affect living fecal microbial content and highlight PMA-seq as a valuable tool to inform best practices and evaluate the suitability of clinical fecal material.

  15. Profiling Living Bacteria Informs Preparation of Fecal Microbiota Transplantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Nathaniel D.; Smith, Mark B.; Perrotta, Allison R.; Kassam, Zain; Alm, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is a compelling treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, with potential applications against other diseases associated with changes in gut microbiota. But variability in fecal bacterial communities—believed to be the therapeutic agent—can complicate or undermine treatment efficacy. To understand the effects of transplant preparation methods on living fecal microbial communities, we applied a DNA-sequencing method (PMA-seq) that uses propidium monoazide (PMA) to differentiate between living and dead fecal microbes, and we created an analysis pipeline to identify individual bacteria that change in abundance between samples. We found that oxygen exposure degraded fecal bacterial communities, whereas freeze-thaw cycles and lag time between donor defecation and transplant preparation had much smaller effects. Notably, the abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii—an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium whose absence is linked to inflammatory bowel disease—decreased with oxygen exposure. Our results indicate that some current practices for preparing microbiota transplant material adversely affect living fecal microbial content and highlight PMA-seq as a valuable tool to inform best practices and evaluate the suitability of clinical fecal material. PMID:28125667

  16. Fecal corticoid monitoring in whooping cranes (Grus americana) undergoing reintroduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartup, Barry K.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Czekala, Nancy M.

    2005-01-01

    We used radioimmunoassay to determine fecal corticoid concentrations and assess potential stress in 10 endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) undergoing reintroduction to the wild. Fecal samples were collected shortly after hatching at a captive facility in Maryland, during field training in Wisconsin, and throughout a human-led migration to Florida. After a 14-day decline following hatching, fecal corticoid concentrations stabilized at baseline levels for the duration of the captive period, despite exposure to potentially stressful stimuli. Shipment of the cranes to the field training site was correlated with an eight- to 34-fold increase in fecal corticoid concentrations, which returned to baseline levels within 1 week. Increases were positively correlated with age but not body weight at the time of shipping. Fecal corticoid concentrations during the training period increased slightly and exhibited greater variation than levels observed at the captive facility, but were well within expected norms based on previous studies. Fecal corticoid concentrations increased twofold following premigration physical examinations and placement of radiotransmitters, and persisted for up to 4 days before they returned to baseline levels. Though fecal corticoid concentrations and variation during the migration period were similar to training levels, there was an overall decline in fecal corticoid concentrations during the artificial migration. Acute stressors, such as capture, restraint, and severe storms, were associated with stress responses by the cranes that varied in accordance with lasting physical or psychological stimuli. The overall reintroduction process of costume-rearing, ultralight aircraft habituation, training, and artificial migration was not associated with elevations in fecal corticoid concentrations suggestive of chronic stress.

  17. Immunochemical and immunoelectron microscope studies on localization of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase on rat liver microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    By the use of ferritin-conjugated antibody (conjugate) indirect immunoelectron microscopy, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase was localized on rat liver microsomes. Most microsomes in the sections had from 1 to 12 conjugates on their outer surfaces. Among the conjugates, 83% was estimated to bind to NADPH-cytochrome c reductase at a molecular ratio of 1:1, 12% at the ratio of 2:1, and 5% at the ratio of 3 or 4:1. The correlation between immunochemical and morphological data confirmed that most of the NADPH-cytochrome c reducatase reacted with the conjugates. Subsequent morphological analyses have revealed that the enzyme is distributed homogeneously on the outer surfaces of microsomes but heterogeneously within microsomes in groups of three to five enzyme molecules. PMID:812876

  18. Localization of proteins in paint cross-sections by scanning electrochemical microscopy as an alternative immunochemical detection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciutto, Giorgia; Prati, Silvia [Microchemistry and Microscopy Art Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Bologna, Via Guaccimanni 42, Ravenna 48121 (Italy); Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Via Selmi, Bologna 2 40126 (Italy); Mazzeo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.mazzeo@unibo.it [Microchemistry and Microscopy Art Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Bologna, Via Guaccimanni 42, Ravenna 48121 (Italy); Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Via Selmi, Bologna 2 40126 (Italy); Zangheri, Martina; Roda, Aldo; Bardini, Luca; Valenti, Giovanni; Rapino, Stefania [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Via Selmi, Bologna 2 40126 (Italy); Marcaccio, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.marcaccio@unibo.it [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Via Selmi, Bologna 2 40126 (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Advanced immuno-electrochemical detection of proteins in paint samples by SECM. • Analysis performed directly on cross-section with high spatial resolution. • Identification of HRP catalytic activity for a selective location of analyte. • Satisfactory results were obtained for aged real samples. • The way forward for an extensive application of SECM in conservation science is shown. - Abstract: The qualitative identification of proteinaceous substances, as well as their location within a complex paint stratigraphy, is one of the most challenging issues in the characterization of painting materials. Nevertheless, information on paint components represent a crucial task for studies concerning both the ancient painting techniques adopted and the state of conservation, being fundamental investigations for the selection of appropriate conservation actions. The present research was aimed at developing a new detection approach for the immunochemical localization of ovalbumin in paint cross-sections based on the use of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The immunochemical analyses were performed using an anti-ovalbumin primary antibody and a secondary antibody labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). SECM measurements were performed in feedback mode using benzoquinone (BQ)/hydroquinone (H{sub 2}Q) redox couple. In presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), HRP catalyzes the re-oxidation of H{sub 2}Q to BQ and the increment of BQ concentration in correspondence of the target protein was detected by SECM through the electrochemical reduction of the regenerated BQ at the microelectrode. Indeed, the localization of ovalbumin was possible thanks to a clear discrimination of SECM currents, achieved by the comparison of the measurements recorded before and after H{sub 2}O{sub 2} administration, based on the HRP on/off approach. The method was evaluated both on samples from standard mocks-up and on a historical sample, collected from a

  19. Identifying fecal matter contamination in produce fields using multispectral reflectance imaging under ambient solar illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    An imaging device to detect fecal contamination in fresh produce fields could allow the producer to avoid harvesting fecal-contaminated produce. E.coli O157:H7 outbreaks have been associated with fecal-contaminated leafy greens. In this study, in-field spectral profiles of bovine fecal matter, soil,...

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF CHICKEN-SPECIFIC FECAL MICROBIAL SEQUENCES USING A METAGENOMIC APPROACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we applied a genome fragment enrichment (GFE) method to select for genomic regions that differ between different fecal metagenomes. Competitive DNA hybridizations were performed between chicken fecal DNA and pig fecal DNA (C-P) and between chicken fecal DNA and an ...

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF CHICKEN-SPECIFIC FECAL MICROBIAL SEQUENCES USING A METAGENOMIC APPROACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we applied a genome fragment enrichment (GFE) method to select for genomic regions that differ between different fecal metagenomes. Competitive DNA hybridizations were performed between chicken fecal DNA and pig fecal DNA (C-P) and between chicken fecal DNA and an ...

  2. Dansylation isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for parallel profiling of human urinary and fecal submetabolomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Xiaoling [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Wang, Nan [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Chen, Deying [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Li, Yunong [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Lu, Yingfeng [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Huan, Tao [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Xu, Wei [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Li, Lanjuan, E-mail: ljli@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Human urine and feces can be non-invasively collected for metabolomics-based disease biomarker discovery research. Because urinary and fecal metabolomes are thought to be different, analysis of both biospecimens may generate a more comprehensive metabolomic profile that can be better related to the health state of an individual. Herein we describe a method of using differential chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for parallel metabolomic profiling of urine and feces. Dansylation labeling was used to quantify the amine/phenol submetabolome changes among different samples based on {sup 12}C-labeling of individual samples and {sup 13}C-labeling of a pooled urine or pooled feces and subsequent analysis of the {sup 13}C-/{sup 12}C-labeled mixture by LC-MS. The pooled urine and pooled feces are further differentially labeled, mixed and then analyzed by LC-MS in order to relate the metabolite concentrations of the common metabolites found in both biospecimens. This method offers a means of direct comparison of urinary and fecal submetabolomes. We evaluated the analytical performance and demonstrated the utility of this method in the analysis of urine and feces collected daily from three healthy individuals for 7 days. On average, 2534 ± 113 (n = 126) peak pairs or metabolites could be detected from a urine sample, while 2507 ± 77 (n = 63) peak pairs were detected from a fecal sample. In total, 5372 unique peak pairs were detected from all the samples combined; 3089 and 3012 pairs were found in urine and feces, respectively. These results reveal that the urine and fecal metabolomes are very different, thereby justifying the consideration of using both biospecimens to increase the probability of finding specific biomarkers of diseases. Furthermore, the CIL LC-MS method described can be used to perform parallel quantitative analysis of urine and feces, resulting in more complete coverage of the human metabolome

  3. Inspection of fecal contamination on strawberries using fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yung-Kun; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Kim, Moon S.; Delwiche, Stephen R.; Lo, Y. Martin; Chen, Suming; Chan, Diane E.

    2013-05-01

    Fecal contamination of produce is a food safety issue associated with pathogens such as Escherichia coli that can easily pollute agricultural products via animal and human fecal matters. Outbreaks of foodborne illnesses associated with consuming raw fruits and vegetables have occurred more frequently in recent years in the United States. Among fruits, strawberry is one high-potential vector of fecal contamination and foodborne illnesses since the fruit is often consumed raw and with minimal processing. In the present study, line-scan LED-induced fluorescence imaging techniques were applied for inspection of fecal material on strawberries, and the spectral characteristics and specific wavebands of strawberries were determined by detection algorithms. The results would improve the safety and quality of produce consumed by the public.

  4. Study Questions 'Fecal Transplant' Treatment for Gut Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fecal Transplant' Treatment for Gut Infection In direct comparison, researchers found no real difference compared to antibiotics To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. (*this news item will not be available after ...

  5. Changes of Cattle Fecal Microbiome Under Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to study the microbiome in wastewater, sewage sludge, and feces. Previous microbial survival studies have shown different fecal-associated microbes have different decay rates and regrowth behaviors.

  6. Fecal Indicator Bacteria and Environmental Observations: Validation of Virtual Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of recreational waters by fecal material is often assessed using indicator bacteria such as enterococci. Enumeration based on culturing methods can take up to 48 hours to complete, limiting the accuracy of water quality evaluations. Molecular microbial techniques em...

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonization associated with fecal microbiota treatment failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Fecal microbiota therapy (FMT) has emerged as the gold standard for treatment of persistent, symptomatic Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) that does not respond to conventional antimicrobial treatment. Probiotics are commonly recommended in addition to antimicrobial treatment for CD...

  8. Repeated fecal microbiota transplantation in a child with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka; Arai, Katsuhiro; Abe, Jun; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Yoshioka, Takako; Hosoi, Kenji; Kuroda, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old girl with ulcerative colitis refractory to conventional therapy, who was subsequently treated successfully with repeated fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). The patient was steroid dependent despite several infliximab treatments, and colectomy was proposed to improve quality of life. After repeated FMT, she was able to maintain remission with on minimal dose of steroid. Although her fecal microbiota was dysbiotic before FMT, it was restored to a similar pattern as the donor after repeated FMT.

  9. Triplex polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of major soil-transmitted helminths, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Necator americanus, in fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuphisut, Orawan; Yoonuan, Tippayarat; Sanguankiat, Surapol; Chaisiri, Kittipong; Maipanich, Wanna; Pubampen, Somchit; Komalamisra, Chalit; Adisakwattana, Poom

    2014-03-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Necator americanus are medically important soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) occurring frequently worldwide including Thailand. Fecal examination using a microscope has been recommended as the gold standard for diagnosis of STH infections, but suffers from low sensitivity. Recently, highly sensitive and specific assays, such as multiplex quantitative PCR, has been established, but the high cost and need for special instruments are still barriers limiting their applications in routine diagnosis. Therefore, a conventional multiplex PCR assay, with its lower cost and greater simplicity, was developed, for the simultaneous detection of STHs in fecal samples. The multiplex PCR assay was species-specific to the three STHs, and could detect one copy of DNA target. Compared with microscopic examination of fecal samples, sensitivity and specificity of the multiplex PCR was 87% and 83%, respectively. This multiplex PCR assay provides an alternative method for routine diagnosis of STHs infection, and might be applied for epidemiological studies of STHs in endemic areas.

  10. More Poop, More Precision: Improving Epidemiologic Surveillance of Soil-Transmitted Helminths with Multiple Fecal Sampling using the Kato-Katz Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengfang; Lu, Louise; Zhang, Linxiu; Bai, Yu; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott; Smith, Darvin Scott; Zhou, Changhai; Zang, Wei

    2017-07-03

    Soil-transmitted helminths, or parasitic intestinal worms, are among the most prevalent and geographically widespread parasitic infections in the world. Accurate diagnosis and quantification of helminth infection are critical for informing and assessing deworming interventions. The Kato-Katz thick smear technique, the most widely used laboratory method to quantitatively assess infection prevalence and infection intensity of helminths, has often been compared with other methods. Only a few small-scale studies, however, have considered ways to improve its diagnostic sensitivity. This study, conducted among 4,985 school-age children in an area of rural China with moderate prevalence of helminth infection, examines the effect on diagnostic sensitivity of the Kato-Katz technique when two fecal samples collected over consecutive days are examined and compared with a single sample. A secondary aim was to consider cost-effectiveness by calculating an estimate of the marginal costs of obtaining an additional fecal sample. Our findings show that analysis of an additional fecal sample led to increases of 23%, 26%, and 100% for Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworm prevalence, respectively. The cost of collecting a second fecal sample for our study population was approximately USD4.60 per fecal sample. Overall, the findings suggest that investing 31% more capital in fecal sample collection prevents an underestimation of prevalence by about 21%, and hence improves the diagnostic sensitivity of the Kato-Katz method. Especially in areas with light-intensity infections of soil-transmitted helminths and limited public health resources, more accurate epidemiological surveillance using multiple fecal samples will critically inform decisions regarding infection control and prevention.

  11. The role of fecal calprotectin in investigating inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Erbayrak

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Invasive and non-invasive tests can be used to evaluate the activity of inflammatory bowel diseases. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease activity and the correlation of fecal calprotectin with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein values in inflammatory bowel disease. METHOD: Sixty-five patients affected with inflammatory bowel disease were enrolled. Twenty outpatients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease comprised the control group. RESULTS: In the present study, all patients in the control group had an fecal calprotectin value lower than the cut-off point (50 mg/kg. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, fecal calprotectin was found to be strongly associated with colorectal inflammation indicating organic disease. Fecal calprotectin is a simple and non-invasive method for assessing excretion of macrophages into the gut lumen. Fecal calprotectin values can be used to evaluate the response to treatment, to screen asymptomatic patients, and to predict inflammatory bowel disease relapses.

  12. Colitis following fecal diversion: still a challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Leonaldson dos Santos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available After fecal diversion, nonspecific colitis may be seen in the defunctionalized colon. The purpose of this prospective study is to identify specific findings that could help in the differential diagnosis between diversion colitis and other inflammatory bowel diseases in order to avoid inappropriate diagnosis and therapy. It was studied, prospectively, thirteen consecutive patients from two public hospitals of Rio de Janeiro who had undergone temporary colostomy for indications other than inflammatory bowel disease. They were submitted to endoscopy with biopsy of both proximal and distal colorectal segments, and prospectively evaluated before and after restoration of intestinal continuity. Endoscopy with biopsy of both proximal and distal excluded colorectal segments showed a nonspecific mucosal and submucosal inflammation, resembling ulcerative colitis ( p < 0.01. There was endoscopic resolution in all patients once restoration of intestinal continuity was established (p < 0.01 and also histologic improvement after the stoma closure. In conclusion there are no specific findings that make possible an unequivocal distinction between diversion colitis and other nonspecific inflammatory diseases. Diagnosis should be achieved if after stoma closure occur remission of endoscopic large bowel inflammatory signs with improvement in mucosal histologic appearance and prompt relief of clinical complaints.

  13. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The gut bacterial microbiome, particularly its role in disease and inflammation, has gained international attention with the successful use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. This success has led to studies exploring the role of FMT in other conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal system that have multifactorial etiologies. A shift in gut microbial composition in genetically susceptible individuals, an altered immune system, and environmental factors are all hypothesized to have a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. While numerous case reports and cohort studies have described the use of FMT in patients with IBD over the last 2 decades, the development of new sequencing techniques and results from 2 recent randomized, controlled trials have allowed for a better understanding of the relationship between the microbiome and the human host. However, despite these efforts, knowledge remains limited and the role of FMT in the management of IBD remains uncertain. Further investigation is necessary before FMT joins the current armamentarium of treatment options in clinical practice. PMID:27493597

  14. Fecal microbiota transplantation: facts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nood, Els; Speelman, Peter; Nieuwdorp, Max; Keller, Josbert

    2014-01-01

    To review the current evidence on fecal microbiota transplantations (FMTs) for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs), metabolic syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Recently, a randomized trial confirmed the efficacy of this treatment strategy in patients with recurrent CDI. For other disorders, evidence is still limited. To date, studies have been performed to try and influence the course of metabolic syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. There is increasing interest in the role of altered microbiota in the development of a myriad of diseases. Together with new insights comes an interest in influencing this altered microbiota as a potential target for therapy. FMTs are effective against recurrent CDI, a disorder caused by disruption of the normal microbiota. Restoration of intestinal flora and thereby restoration of colonization resistance is thought to be the mechanism responsible for cure. With the developments in FMT and the extension of this treatment modality to both intestinal and extra-intestinal diseases, a new field of targeted therapy awaits. The ultimate goal is the development of powerful probiotic regimens that can replace FMT. Currently, FMT should only be given in a strict experimental setting for other conditions than CDI.

  15. Prediction of Fecal Nitrogen and Fecal Phosphorus Content for Lactating Dairy Cows in Large-scale Dairy Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QU Qing-bo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate efficient and sustainable manure management and reduce potential pollution, it's necessary for precise prediction of fecal nutrient content. The aim of this study is to build prediction models of fecal nitrogen and phosphorus content by the factors of dietary nutrient composition, days in milk, milk yield and body weight of Chinese Holstein lactating dairy cows. 20 kinds of dietary nutrient composition and 60 feces samples were collected from lactating dairy cows from 7 large-scale dairy farms in Tianjin City; The fecal nitrogen and phosphorus content were analyzed. The whole data set was divided into training data set and testing data set. The training data set, including 14 kinds of dietary nutrient composition and 48 feces samples, was used to develop prediction models. The relationship between fecal nitrogen or phosphorus content and dietary nutrient composition was illustrated by means of correlation and regression analysis using SAS software. The results showed that fecal nitrogen(FN content was highly positively correlated with organic matter intake(OMI and crude fat intake(CFi, and correlation coefficients were 0. 836 and 0. 705, respectively. Negative correlation coefficient was found between fecal phosphorus(FP content and body weight(BW, and the correlation coefficient was -0.525. Among different approaches to develop prediction models, the results indicated that determination coefficients of multiple linear regression equations were higher than those of simple linear regression equations. Specially, fecal nitrogen content was excellently predicted by milk yield(MY, days in milk(DIM, organic matter intake(OMI and nitrogen intake(NI, and the model was as follows:y=0.43+0.29×MY+0.02×DIM+0.92×OMI-13.01×NI (R2=0.96. Accordingly, the highest determination coefficient of prediction equation of FP content was 0.62, when body weight(BW, phosphorus intake(PI and nitrogen intake(NI were combined as predictors. The prediction

  16. Current and future trends in fecal source tracking and deployment in the Lake Taihu Region of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Charles; Liang, Xinqiang

    The emerging discipline of microbial and/or chemical source tracking (collectively termed fecal source tracking (FST)) is being used to identify origins of fecal contamination in polluted waters in many countries around the world. FST has developed rapidly because standard methods of measuring contamination in water by enumerating fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) such as fecal coliforms and enterococci do not identify the sources of the contamination. FST is an active area of research and development in both the academic and private sectors and includes: Developing and testing new microbial and chemical FST methods. Determining the geographic application and animal host ranges of existing and emerging FST techniques. Conducting experimental comparisons of FST techniques. Combining direct monitoring of human pathogens associated with waterborne outbreaks and zoonotic pathogens responsible for infections among people, wildlife, or domesticated animals with the use of FST techniques. Applying FST to watershed analysis and coastal environments. Designing appropriate statistical and probability analysis of FST data and developing models for mass loadings of host-specific fecal contamination. This paper includes a critical review of FST with emphasis on the extent to which methods have been tested (especially in comparison with other methods and/or with blind samples), which methods are applicable to different situations, their shortcomings, and their usefulness in predicting public health risk or pathogen occurrence. In addition, the paper addresses the broader question of whether FST and fecal indicator monitoring is the best approach to regulate water quality and protect human health. Many FST methods have only been tested against sewage or fecal samples or isolates in laboratory studies (proof of concept testing) and/or applied in field studies where the “real” answer is not known, so their comparative performance and accuracy cannot be assessed. For FST to be

  17. 实时荧光定量PCR法研究不同年龄段健康人群肠道菌群特点%Characterization of fecal microbiota across different age groups by real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘萍; 郭珍红; 董丽娜; 韩轶; 杨云峰; 王俊平

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo analyze the characteristics of intestinal microbiota during different age groups by quantitative PCR method, and to compare the differences among the age groups.Methods Collected the fetal meconium and fresh feces of infant group,youth group, adult group and elderly group,and preserved the samples regularly and strictly.6 major bacterial groups include Bifidobacterium,Lactobacillus, Enterobacteria,Bacterooides,Enterococcus and Clostridium were detected.Got the various intestinal bacterial copy number and B/E value of each samples by quantitative PCR technology.Used SPSS19.0 statistical software to process and analyze the data,and reviewed and analyzed the composition and characteristics of intestinal bacterial in different age.Results Quantitative PCR assay showed:The numbers of Bifibacterium, nterobacteriaceae,Lactobacillus,Bacteroides,E. coli between fetuses group and infants group were not clear statistically insignificant(P>0.05).The numbers of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus in elderly group,adult group and juvenile group were obviously lower than those in fetuses and infants groups(P0.05).The B/E values of Elderly,adult and juvenile group were obviously lower than that of fetuses and infants groups,the B/E values of Elderly and adults group were obviously lower than that of juvenile group,the B/E values of Elderly group were obviously lower than that of adults group,the above inter-group differences were obviously statistically significant(P0.05)。与胎儿和婴幼儿组相比,老年组、成年组和少年组双歧杆菌、乳酸菌数量明显降低(P0.05)。老年组、成年组和少年组B/E值明显低于胎儿组和婴幼儿组,老年组和成年组B/E值亦明显低于少年组,老年组B/E值亦明显低于成年组(P<0.05)。结论年龄是肠道菌群变化的一个重要因素,随着年龄增长,肠道有益菌数量明显减少,而肠道中性菌数量明显增加,肠道定植抗力明显下降。

  18. Effect of platform, reference material, and quantification model on enumeration of Enterococcus by quantitative PCR methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is increasingly being used for the quantitative detection of fecal indicator bacteria in beach water. QPCR allows for same-day health warnings, and its application is being considered as an optionn for recreational water quality testi...

  19. Comparison of two methods of bacterial DNA extraction from human fecal samples contaminated with Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Jun; Kurosaki, Morito; Kawakami, Yuta; Kashimoto, Takashi; Tsunomori, Yoshie; Sato, Koji; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Keiji; Watahiki, Masanori; Shima, Tomoko; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Etoh, Yoshiki; Horikawa, Kazumi; Fukushima, Hiroshi; Goto, Ryoichi; Shirabe, Komei

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 2 methods of DNA extraction were evaluated for use in conjunction with the screening system Rapid Foodborne Bacterial Screening 24 (RFBS24), which employs multiplex real-time SYBR Green polymerase chain reaction (SG-PCR) and can simultaneously detect 24 target genes of foodborne pathogens in fecal DNA samples. The QIAamp DNA Stool mini kit (Qkit) and Ultra Clean Fecal DNA Isolation Kit (Ukit) were used for bacterial DNA extraction from fecal samples artificially inoculated with Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Campylobacter jejuni. SG-PCR and simplex real-time quantitative PCR (S-qPCR) analyses revealed higher copy numbers (8-234 times) of DNA in samples obtained using Ukit compared with those obtained using Qkit, resulting in lower cycle threshold values for the Ukit samples of the 4 bacteria on SG-PCR analysis. Fecal DNA samples from patients infected during foodborne outbreaks of Salmonella and Campylobacter were also prepared by Qkit and Ukit methods and subjected to RFBS24 analyses. Higher numbers of RFBS24 bacterial target genes were detected in DNA samples obtained using Ukit compared with those obtained using Qkit. Thus, the higher DNA extraction efficiency of the Ukit method compared with Qkit renders the former more useful in achieving improved detection rates of these 4 bacteria in fecal samples using SG-PCR.

  20. Aeroallergen analyses and their clinical relevance. II. Sampling by high-volume airsampler with immunochemical quantification versus Burkard pollen trap sampling with morphologic quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, C R; Weeke, E R; Nielsen, J

    1992-01-01

    , was analysed, and close correlations between the 2 sampling techniques were found (rs 0.5-0.8, p .... Pollen counts and immunochemical estimation were compared with the symptom score recordings of allergic persons for birch season 1989 and for grass seasons 1986, 1988, and 1989. A close correlation was found for both sampling techniques for the grass seasons in 1986 and 1989 (rs 0.51-0.61, p

  1. Immunochemical faecal occult blood tests have superior stability and analytical performance characteristics over guaiac-based tests in a controlled in vitro study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Chun Seng

    2011-06-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to determine the measurement accuracy of a widely used guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) compared with an immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT) during in vitro studies, including their analytical stability over time at ambient temperature and at 4°C; and (2) to compare analytical imprecision and other characteristics between two commercially available iFOBT methods.

  2. Survival and persistence of fecal host-specific Bacteroidales cells and their DNA assessed by PMA-qPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, S.; Bombardelli, F.; Wuertz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding and managing microbial pollutions in water is one of the foremost challenges of establishing effective managements and remediation strategies to impaired water bodies polluted by uncharacterized fecal sources. Quantitative microbial source tracking (MST) approaches using fecal Bacteroidales and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to measure gene copies of host-specific 16S rRNA genetic markers are promising because they can allow for identifying and quantifying fecal loadings from a particular animal host and understanding the fate and transport of host-specific Bacteroidales over a range of conditions in water bodies. Similar to the case of traditional fecal indicator bacteria, a relatively long persistence of target DNA may hamper applied MST studies, if genetic markers cannot be linked to recent fecal pollution in water. We report a successful approach to removing the qPCR signal derived from free DNA and dead host-specific Bacteroidales cells by selectively binding the DNA and consequently inhibiting PCR amplification using light- activated propidium monoazide (PMA). Optimal PMA-qPCR conditions were determined as 100 µM of PMA concentration and a 10-min light exposure time at different solids concentrations in order to mimic a range of water samples. Under these conditions, PMA-qPCR resulted in the selective exclusion of DNA from heat- treated cells of non-culturable Bacteroidales in human feces and wastewater influent and effluent samples. Also, the persistence of feces-derived host-specific Bacteroidales DNA and their cells (determined by universal, human-, cow- and dog-specific Bacteroidales qPCR assays) in seawater was investigated in microcosms at environmental conditions. The average T99 (two log reduction) value for host-specific viable Bacteroidales cells was 28 h, whereas that for total host-specific Bacteroidales DNA was 177 h. Natural sunlight did not have a strong influence on the fate of fecal Bacteroidales cells and their DNA, presumably

  3. Loss of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Fecal Dominance in an Organ Transplant Patient With Clostridium difficile Colitis After Fecal Microbiota Transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Stripling, Joshua; Kumar, Ranjit; Baddley, John W.; Nellore, Anoma; DIXON, PAULA; Howard, Donna; Ptacek, Travis; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Tallaj, Jose A.; Benjamin, William H.; Morrow, Casey D.; Rodriguez, J Martin

    2015-01-01

    We report the use of fecal microbiota transplantation in a single heart-kidney transplant recipient with recurrent Clostridium difficile, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) fecal dominance, and recurrent VRE infections. Fecal microbiota transplantation resulted in the reconstruction of a diverse microbiota with (1) reduced relative abundance of C difficile and VRE and (2) positive clinical outcome.

  4. Droplet digital PCR for simultaneous quantification of general and human-associated fecal indicators for water quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yiping; Raith, Meredith R; Griffith, John F

    2015-03-01

    Despite wide application to beach water monitoring and microbial source identification, results produced by quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods are subject to bias introduced by reliance on quantitative standards. Digital PCR technology provides direct, standards-free quantification and may potentially alleviate or greatly reduce other qPCR limitations such as difficulty in multiplexing and susceptibility to PCR inhibition. This study examined the efficacy of employing a duplex droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay that simultaneously quantifies Enterococcus spp. and the human fecal-associated HF183 marker for water quality assessment. Duplex ddPCR performance was evaluated side-by-side with qPCR and simplex ddPCR using reference material and 131 fecal and water samples. Results for fecal and water samples were highly correlated between ddPCR and simplex qPCR (coefficients > 0.93, p competition and resulted in non-detection or underestimation of the target with low concentration relative to the other, while results produced by simplex and duplex ddPCR were consistent and often indistinguishable from one another. ddPCR showed greater tolerance for inhibition, with no discernable effect on quantification at inhibitor concentrations one to two orders of magnitude higher than that tolerated by qPCR. Overall, ddPCR also exhibited improved precision, higher run-to-run repeatability, similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity on the HF183 marker, but a lower upper limit of quantification than qPCR. Digital PCR has the potential to become a reliable and economical alternative to qPCR for recreational water monitoring and fecal source identification. Findings from this study may also be of interest to other aspects of water research such as detection of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes.

  5. The fecal viral flora of wild rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung G Phan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequent interactions of rodents with humans make them a common source of zoonotic infections. To obtain an initial unbiased measure of the viral diversity in the enteric tract of wild rodents we sequenced partially purified, randomly amplified viral RNA and DNA in the feces of 105 wild rodents (mouse, vole, and rat collected in California and Virginia. We identified in decreasing frequency sequences related to the mammalian viruses families Circoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Parvoviridae, Papillomaviridae, Adenoviridae, and Coronaviridae. Seventeen small circular DNA genomes containing one or two replicase genes distantly related to the Circoviridae representing several potentially new viral families were characterized. In the Picornaviridae family two new candidate genera as well as a close genetic relative of the human pathogen Aichi virus were characterized. Fragments of the first mouse sapelovirus and picobirnaviruses were identified and the first murine astrovirus genome was characterized. A mouse papillomavirus genome and fragments of a novel adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus were also sequenced. The next largest fraction of the rodent fecal virome was related to insect viruses of the Densoviridae, Iridoviridae, Polydnaviridae, Dicistroviriade, Bromoviridae, and Virgaviridae families followed by plant virus-related sequences in the Nanoviridae, Geminiviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Secoviridae, Partitiviridae, Tymoviridae, Alphaflexiviridae, and Tombusviridae families reflecting the largely insect and plant rodent diet. Phylogenetic analyses of full and partial viral genomes therefore revealed many previously unreported viral species, genera, and families. The close genetic similarities noted between some rodent and human viruses might reflect past zoonoses. This study increases our understanding of the viral diversity in wild rodents and highlights the large number of still uncharacterized viruses in

  6. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, but it is thought to arise from an aberrant immune response to a change in colonic environment in a genetically susceptible individual. The intestinal microbiota are located at the complex interface of the epithelial barrier and are sensitive to changes in environmental factors, such as diets, drugs or smoking and signals derived from the intestinal immune system and the gut-brain axis. In patients with IBD, an imbalance in the structural and/or functional configuration of the intestinal microbiota leading to the disruption of the host-microorganism homeostasis (dysbiosis) has been reproducibly reported. As animal models of IBD require gut bacteria to induce inflammation, it is hypothesized that the dysbiosis observed in patients is not only a surrogate of changes at the intestinal barrier but also a potential cause or at least enhancer of the mucosal inflammatory process. That burgeoning notion has stimulated thoughts to modify the intestinal microbiota and rekindled interest in previous work on the efficacy of antibiotics in patients with IBD. The feasibility and tremendous success of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) to treat antibiotic resistant Clostridium difficile has finally paved the way to embark into the unchartered territory of IBD using FMT. Different routes and number of administrations, choices of donors, disease status and permitted therapies might have contributed to mixed results, particularly from the so far published randomized controlled trials. However, microbiome analysis suggests that a durable transplantation of donor bacteria to the host appears feasible and might be associated with a higher likelihood of response. On the other hand, this raises the concern of transplanting not only anti-inflammatory active bacteria and their products, but also not-yet-known dispositions for other diseases including cancer. Attempts are being made to better characterize those components of

  7. Fecal Microbiota Transplant: Respice, Adspice, Prospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    Respice, Adspice, Prospice, look to the past, look to the present, look to the future, is one of life's valuable axioms; for it is only if one knows where one has been can one intelligently prepare for the future. I have used this approach here to review fecal microbiota transplant (FMT). First used in fourth-century China to treat an assortment of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, today FMT is primarily used for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI). In the future, however, it is likely that microbiotic therapy will be extended beyond treatment of RCDI. Early on, fresh feces from patient-identified donors was used and administered by several routes. FMT cure rates for RCDI remain approximately 82% and 91% when fresh stool is given by the upper GI and lower GI routes, respectively, but now we are moving in the direction of using carefully vetted volunteers whose stool is processed into a variety of formulations including lyophilized material and even capsules. It is very likely that an array of products derived from feces or based on specific microbiotic profiles and commercially prepared in a controlled environment will be available to restore eubiosis to a dysbiotic intestinal microbial community, and thereby correct a variety of GI and non-GI disorders. We are witnessing a paradigm shift in therapeutics. Previously, bacteria were thought of only as potential pathogens, whereas now we appreciate that a diverse community of bacteria is crucial to the health of the host. We are now learning that to restore such diversity once it has been interrupted can result in miraculous cure. The future of microbiotic therapy is bright.

  8. Human-induced trophic cascades along the fecal detritus pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Nichols

    Full Text Available Human presence and activity in tropical forest is thought to exert top-down regulation over the various 'green-world' pathways of plant-based foodwebs. However, these effects have never been explored for the 'brown-world' pathways of fecal-detritus webs. The strong effects of humans on tropical game mammals are likely to indirectly influence fecal detritivores (including Scarabaeine dung beetles, with subsequent indirect impacts on detrivore-mediated and plant-facilitating detrital processes. Across a 380-km gradient of human influence in the western Brazilian Amazon, we conducted the first landscape-level assessment of human-induced cascade effects on the fecal detritus pathway, by coupling data on human impact, game mammal and detritivore community structure, and rate measurements of a key detritus process (i.e. dung beetle-mediated secondary seed dispersal. We found evidence that human impact indirectly influences both the diversity and biomass of fecal detritivores, but not detritivore-mediated processes. Cascade strength varied across detritivore groups defined by species' traits. We found smaller-bodied dung beetles were at higher risk of local decline in areas of human presence, and that body size was a better predictor of cascade structure than fecal resource manipulation strategy. Cascade strength was also stronger in upland, unflooded forests, than in seasonally flooded forests. Our results suggest that the impact of human activity in tropical forest on fecal-detritus food web structure is mediated by both species' traits and habitat type. Further research will be required to determine the conditions under which these cascade effects influence fecal-detritus web function.

  9. Comparison of DNA extraction kits and modification of DNA elution procedure for the quantitation of subdominant bacteria from piggery effluents with real‐time PCR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Desneux, Jérémy; Pourcher, Anne‐Marie

    2014-01-01

    Four commercial DNA extraction kits and a minor modification in the DNA elution procedure were evaluated for the quantitation of bacteria in pig manure samples. The PowerSoil ® , PowerFecal ® , NucleoSpin...

  10. Diversity, abundance, and possible sources of fecal bacteria in the Yangtze River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haohao; He, Xiwei; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wu, Bing; Ren, Hongqiang

    2017-03-01

    The fecal bacteria in natural waters may pose serious risks on human health. Although many source tracking methods have been developed and used to determine the possible sources of the fecal pollution, little is known about the overall diversity and abundance of fecal bacterial community in natural waters. In this study, a method based on fecal bacterial sequence library was introduced to evaluate the fecal bacterial profile in the Yangtze River (Nanjing section). Our results suggested that the Yangtze River water harbors diverse fecal bacteria. Fifty-eight fecal operational taxonomic units (97% identity level) were detected in the Yangtze River water samples and the relative abundance of fecal bacteria in these samples ranged from 0.1 to 8%. It was also found that the relative abundances of the fecal bacteria in locations near to the downstream of wastewater treatment plants were obviously higher than those in other locations. However, the high abundance of fecal bacteria could decrease to the normal level in 2~4 km in the river due to degradation or dilution, and the overall fecal bacteria level changed little when the Yangtze River flew through the Nanjing City. Moreover, the fecal bacteria in the Yangtze River water were found to be highly associated (Spearman rho = 0.804, P bacteria. Collectively, the findings in this study reveal the diversity, abundance, and possible sources of fecal bacteria in the Yangtze River and advance our understandings of the fecal bacteria community in the natural waters.

  11. Gut microbiota composition modifies fecal metabolic profiles in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Wu, Junfang; Li, Jia V; Zhou, Ning-Yi; Tang, Huiru; Wang, Yulan

    2013-06-07

    The gut microbiome is known to be extensively involved in human health and disease. In order to reveal the metabolic relationship between host and microbiome, we monitored recovery of the gut microbiota composition and fecal profiles of mice after gentamicin and/or ceftriaxone treatments. This was performed by employing (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint of gut microbiota. The common features of fecal metabolites postantibiotic treatment include decreased levels of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), amino acids and primary bile acids and increased oligosaccharides, d-pinitol, choline and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic acid). This suggests suppressed bacterial fermentation, protein degradation and enhanced gut microbial modification of bile acids. Barnesiella, Prevotella, and Alistipes levels were shown to decrease as a result of the antibiotic treatment, whereas levels of Bacteroides, Enterococcus and Erysipelotrichaceae incertae sedis, and Mycoplasma increased after gentamicin and ceftriaxone treatment. In addition, there was a strong correlation between fecal profiles and levels of Bacteroides, Barnesiella, Alistipes and Prevotella. The integration of metabonomics and gut microbiota profiling provides important information on the changes of gut microbiota and their impact on fecal profiles during the recovery after antibiotic treatment. The correlation between gut microbiota and fecal metabolites provides important information on the function of bacteria, which in turn could be important in optimizing therapeutic strategies, and developing potential microbiota-based disease preventions and therapeutic interventions.

  12. To chew or not to chew: fecal particle size in herbivorous reptiles and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Julia; Hummel, Jürgen; Kienzle, Ellen; Streich, W Jürgen; Clauss, Marcus

    2010-11-01

    A major difference between reptile and mammalian herbivores is that the former do not masticate their food. Actually, food particle size reduction by chewing is usually considered one of the adaptations facilitating the higher metabolic rates of mammals. However, quantitative comparisons of ingesta particle size between the clades have, to our knowledge, not been performed so far. We measured mean fecal particle size (MPS) in 79 captive individuals of 14 reptile herbivore species (tortoises, lizards, and Corucia zebrata) by wet sieving and compared the results with a mammalian dataset. MPS increased with body mass in both clades, but at a significantly higher level in reptiles. Limited evidence in free-ranging and captive individuals of Testudo hermanni indicates that in reptiles, the ability to crop food and food particle size significantly influence fecal particle size. The opportunistic observation of a drastic particle size difference between stomach and intestinal contents corroborates findings that in reptiles, in contrast to terrestrial mammals, significant ingesta particle size reduction does occur in the gastrointestinal tract, most likely owing to microbial action during very long ingesta retention. Whether behavioral adaptations to controlling ingesta particle size, such as deliberate small bite sizes, are adaptive strategies in reptiles remains to be investigated.

  13. Chinese physicians’ perceptions of fecal microbiota transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Rong-Rong; Sun, Gang; Yang, Yun-Sheng; Peng, Li-Hua; Wang, Shu-Fang; Shi, Xiao-Hong; Zhao, Jing-Quan; Ban, Yong-Ling; Pan, Fei; Wang, Xue-Hong; Lu, Wei; Ren, Jian-Lin; Song, Ying; Wang, Jiang-Bin; Lu, Qi-Ming; Bai, Wen-Yuan; Wu, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Zi-Kai; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore Chinese physicians’ perceptions towards fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and to provide information and an assessment of FMT development in China. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire was developed according to the FMT practice guidelines and was distributed to physicians in hospitals via Internet Research Electronic Data Capture (REDcap) software and electronic mails to assess their attitudes toward and knowledge of FMT. The questionnaire included a brief introduction of FMT that was followed by 20 questions. The participants were required to respond voluntarily, under the condition of anonymity and without compensation. Except for the fill-in-the-blank questions, all of the other questions were required in the REDcap data collection systems, and the emailed questionnaires were completed based on eligibility. RESULTS: Up to December 9, 2014, 844 eligible questionnaires were received out of the 980 distributed questionnaires, with a response rate of 86.1%. Among the participants, 87.3% were from tertiary hospitals, and there were 647 (76.7%) gastroenterologists and 197 (23.3%) physicians in other departments (non-gastroenterologists). Gastroenterologists’ awareness of FMT prior to the survey was much higher than non-gastroenterologists’ (54.3 vs 16.5%, P FMT was not statistically different (92.4 vs 87.1%, P = 0.1603). Major concerns of FMT included the following: acceptability to patients (79.2%), absence of guidelines (56.9%), and administration and ethics (46.5%). On the basis of understanding, the FMT indications preferred by physicians were recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (86.7%), inflammatory bowel disease combined with Clostridium difficile infection (78.6%), refractory ulcerative colitis (70.9%), ulcerative colitis (65.4%), Crohn’s disease (59.4%), chronic constipation (43.7%), irritable bowel syndrome (39.1%), obesity (28.1%) and type 2 diabetes (23.9%). For donor selection, the majority of physicians preferred

  14. Dietary marker effects on fecal microbial ecology, fecal VFA, nutrient digestibility coefficients, and growth performance in finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, B J; Weber, T E; Ziemer, C J

    2015-05-01

    Use of indigestible markers such as Cr2O3, Fe2O3, and TiO2 are commonly used in animal studies to evaluate digesta rate of passage and nutrient digestibility. Yet, the potential impact of indigestible markers on fecal microbial ecology and subsequent VFA generation is not known. Two experiments utilizing a total of 72 individually fed finishing pigs were conducted to describe the impact of dietary markers on fecal microbial ecology, fecal ammonia and VFA concentrations, nutrient digestibility, and pig performance. All pigs were fed a common diet with no marker or with 0.5% Cr2O3, Fe2O3, or TiO2. In Exp. 1, after 33 d of feeding, fresh fecal samples were collected for evaluation of microbial ecology, fecal ammonia and VFA concentrations, and nutrient digestibility, along with measures of animal performance. No differences were noted in total microbes or bacterial counts in pig feces obtained from pigs fed the different dietary markers while Archaea counts were decreased (P = 0.07) in feces obtained from pigs fed the diet containing Fe2O 3compared to pigs fed the control diet. Feeding Cr2O3, Fe2O3, or TiO2 increased fecal bacterial richness (P = 0.03, 0.01, and 0.10; respectively) when compared to pigs fed diets containing no marker, but no dietary marker effects were noted on fecal microbial evenness or the Shannon-Wiener index. Analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis gels did not reveal band pattern alterations due to inclusion of dietary markers in pig diets. There was no effect of dietary marker on fecal DM, ammonia, or VFA concentrations. Pigs fed diets containing Cr2O3 had greater Ca, Cu, Fe, and P (P ≤ 0.02), but lower Ti ( P= 0.08) digestibility compared to pigs fed the control diet. Pigs fed diets containing Fe2O3 had greater Ca (P = 0.08) but lower Ti (P = 0.01) digestibility compared to pigs fed the control diet. Pigs fed diets containing TiO2 had greater Fe and Zn (P ≤ 0.09), but lower Ti ( P= 0.01) digestibility compared to pigs fed the

  15. Media Discourse on the Social Acceptability of Fecal Transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuong, Kim H; O'Doherty, Kieran C; Secko, David M

    2015-10-01

    Advances in human microbiome research have generated considerable interest in elucidating the role of bacteria in health and the application of microbial ecosystem therapies and probiotics. Fecal transplants involve the introduction of gut microbes from a healthy donor's stool to the patient and have been documented as effective for treating Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) and some other gastrointestinal disorders. However, the treatment has encountered regulatory hurdles preventing widespread uptake. We examined dominant representations of fecal transplants in Canadian media and found that fecal transplants are often represented as being inherently disgusting or distasteful (the "ick factor"). This "ick factor" is used to construct different messages about the treatment's social acceptability and legitimacy. We conclude that an over-emphasis on the "ick factor" constrains public discourse from a more nuanced discussion of the social challenges, scientific concerns, and regulatory issues surrounding the treatment.

  16. [The usefulness of fecal tests in colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni

    2014-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is a paradigm of neoplasms that are amenable to preventative measures, especially screening. Currently, to carry this out, there are various strategies that have proven effective and efficient. In countries that have organized population-level screening programs, the most common strategy is fecal occult blood testing. In recent years, new methods have appeared that could constitute viable alternatives in the near future, among which the detection of changes in fecal DNA is emphasized. In this article, we review the most relevant papers on colorectal cancer screening presented at the annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Chicago in May 2014, with special emphasis on the medium and long-term performance of strategies to detect occult blood in feces and the first results obtained with fecal DNA testing.

  17. Fecal coliform analyses. Method evaluation for stressed organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L B; Winston, H G

    1986-01-01

    No significant difference was found between two tests for fecal coliform densities using water samples from the treated sanitary waste outfalls at the Savannah River Plant, a nuclear materials production site located near Aiken, SC. These two methods of concern were the most probable number index (MPN) and the membrane filtration procedure (MF). The MPN method is the accepted method for determining fecal coliform densities in chlorinated effluents, but requires more than the MF procedure. Per Microbiological Methods for Monitoring the Environment (1978) by EPA, any decision to use the MF test for stressed organisms requires parallel testing with the MPN test. The MPN index is the number of fecal coliform bacteria that, more probably than any other number, would give the results shown by laboratory examination. It is not an actual count of coliform bacteria. The MF procedure is a direct plating method and the colonies are directly counted.

  18. Fecal microbiota transplantation via colonoscopy for recurrent C. difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Jessica R; Korzenik, Joshua R; Hamilton, Matthew J

    2014-12-08

    Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) is a safe and highly effective treatment for recurrent and refractory C. difficile infection (CDI). Various methods of FMT administration have been reported in the literature including nasogastric tube, upper endoscopy, enema and colonoscopy. FMT via colonoscopy yields excellent cure rates and is also well tolerated. We have found that patients find this an acceptable and tolerable mode of delivery. At our Center, we have initiated a fecal transplant program for patients with recurrent or refractory CDI. We have developed a protocol using an iterative process of revision and have performed 24 fecal transplants on 22 patients with success rates comparable to the current published literature. A systematic approach to patient and donor screening, preparation of stool, and delivery of the stool maximizes therapeutic success. Here we detail each step of the FMT protocol that can be carried out at any endoscopy center with a high degree of safety and success.

  19. Low dietary copper increases fecal free radical production, fecal water alkaline phosphatase activity and cytotoxicity in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Cindy D

    2003-02-01

    One possible dietary factor that may increase susceptibility to colon cancer is inadequate copper intake. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of low and adequate copper intakes on copper nutriture and putative risk factors for colon cancer susceptibility in healthy men. Seventeen healthy free-living nonsmoking men aged 21-52 y completed a 13-wk controlled feeding study in a randomized crossover design. The basal diet contained 0.59 mg Cu/13.65 MJ. After a 1-wk equilibration period in which the men consumed the basal diet supplemented with 1.0 mg Cu/d, they were randomly assigned to receive either the basal diet or the basal diet supplemented with 2 mg Cu/d for 6 wk. After the first dietary period, the men immediately began to consume the other level of Cu for the last 6 wk. They collected their feces during the equilibration period and during the last 2 wk of the two dietary periods for free radical and fecal water analysis. Low dietary copper significantly (P copper significantly (P copper concentrations but did not affect fecal water volume, pH, iron or zinc concentrations. In contrast to the fecal analysis, hematological indicators of copper status were not significantly affected by the dietary treatments. These results suggest that low dietary copper adversely affects fecal free radical production and fecal water alkaline phosphatase activity, which are putative risk factors for colon cancer.

  20. Fecal pellets: role in sedimentation of pelagic diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, H J

    1971-10-01

    Membrane-enclosed fecal pellets of planktonic herbivores were sampled at several depths in the Baltic Sea (459 meters deep) and off Portugal (4000 meters deep) by means of a Simonsen multinet. Pellets contained mainly empty shells of planktonic diatoms and silicoflagellates. Two kinds of fecal pellets were found, those with the remains of one species (for example, Thalassiosira baltica) and those with the remains of several species (for example, Chaetoceros, Achnanthes, and Thalassiosira). Siliceous skeletons were protected from dissolution during settling by a membrane around the pellet.

  1. A Content Incontinent: Report of Liposomal Bupivacaine Induced Fecal Incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel A. Shapera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper surgical management of anal fistula demands sound clinical judgment and extraordinary care to prevent incontinence and adequate postoperative pain control and provide satisfactory resolution to optimize quality of life. Fecal incontinence can be a devastating complication of procedures performed for fistula in ano. We report a unique case in which temporary incontinence (for less than 4 days followed injection of liposomal bupivacaine for postoperative pain control after draining seton placement for fistula in ano. Patients and physicians should be aware as it may be mistaken for a more serious anatomical and permanent cause of fecal incontinence.

  2. Fecal specimens preparation methods for PCR diagnosis of human taeniosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes Cáris Maroni

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sample preparation and DNA extraction protocols for DNA amplification by PCR, which can be applied in human fecal samples for taeniasis diagnosis, are described. DNA extracted from fecal specimens with phenol/chloroform/isoamilic alcohol and DNAzol® reagent had to be first purified to generate fragments of 170 pb and 600 pb by HDP2-PCR. This purification step was not necessary with the use of QIAmp DNA stool mini kit®. Best DNA extraction results were achieved after eggs disruption with glass beads, either with phenol/chloroform/isoamilic alcohol, DNAzol® reagent or QIAmp DNA stool mini kit®.

  3. The metabolizable energy of dietary resistant maltodextrin is variable and alters fecal microbiota composition in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, David J; Stote, Kim S; Henderson, Theresa; Paul, David R; Okuma, Kazuhiro; Tagami, Hiroyuki; Kanahori, Sumiko; Gordon, Dennis T; Rumpler, William V; Ukhanova, Maria; Culpepper, Tyler; Wang, Xiaoyu; Mai, Volker

    2014-07-01

    Resistant maltodextrin (RM) is a novel soluble, nonviscous dietary fiber. Its metabolizable energy (ME) and net energy (NE) values derived from nutrient balance studies are unknown, as is the effect of RM on fecal microbiota. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study was conducted (n = 14 men) to determine the ME and NE of RM and its influence on fecal excretion of macronutrients and microbiota. Participants were assigned to a sequence consisting of 3 treatment periods [24 d each: 0 g/d RM + 50 g/d maltodextrin and 2 amounts of dietary RM (25 g/d RM + 25 g of maltodextrin/d and 50 g/d RM + 0 g/d maltodextrin)] and were provided all the foods they were to consume to maintain their body weight. After an adaptation period, excreta were collected during a 7-d period. After the collection period, 24-h energy expenditure was measured. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and 454 titanium technology-based 16S rRNA sequencing were used to analyze fecal microbiota composition. Fecal amounts of energy (544, 662, 737 kJ/d), nitrogen (1.5, 1.8, 2.1 g/d), RM (0.3, 0.6, 1.2 g/d), and total carbohydrate (11.1, 14.2, 16.2 g/d) increased with increasing dose (0, 25, 50 g) of RM (P maltodextrin placebo. Total counts of fecal bacteria increased by 12% for the 25 g/d RM dose (P = 0.17) and 18% for the 50 g/d RM dose (P = 0.019). RM intake was associated with statistically significant increases (P < 0.001) in various operational taxonomic units matching closest to ruminococcus, eubacterium, lachnospiraceae, bacteroides, holdemania, and faecalibacterium, implicating RM in their growth in the gut. Our findings provide empirical data important for food labeling regulations related to the energy value of RM and suggest that RM increases fecal bulk by enhancing the excretion of nitrogen and carbohydrate and the growth of specific microbial populations.

  4. Microbial source tracking of private well water samples across at-risk regions in southern Ontario and analysis of traditional fecal indicator bacteria assays including culture and qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolik, Julia; Maier, Allison; Thompson, Shawna; Majury, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Many people living in rural areas rely on privately owned wells as their primary source of drinking water. These water sources are at risk for fecal contamination of human, wildlife, and livestock origin. While traditional bacteriological testing involves culture-based methods, microbial source tracking (MST) assays present an opportunity to additionally determine the source of fecal contamination. This study investigated the main host sources of contamination in private well water samples with high levels of Escherichia coli (E. coli), using MST with human and multi-species specific markers. Fecal contamination of human origin was detected in approximately 50% of samples, indicating that current contamination prevention strategies require reconsideration. The relationship between cattle density and fecal contamination of bovine origin was investigated using a Bovine Bacteroidales specific MST assay. Regional variations of microbial sources were examined, and may inform local primary prevention strategies. Additionally, in order to assess MST and E. coli quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays as indicators of fecal contamination, these were compared to E. coli culture methods. Variation in results was observed across all assay methods investigated, suggesting the most appropriate routine bacteriological testing methodology cannot be determined without comparison to a method that directly detects the presence of fecal contamination.

  5. Investigation of Combined Detection of Fecal Occult Blood Test and Fecal DNA Test in the Opportunity Screening for Colorectal Cancer%联合检测粪隐血试验与粪便 DNA 在大肠癌机会性筛查中的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟选芳; 甘爱华; 张晓慧; 许岸高; 肖丹

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application and significance of opportunistic screening for colorectal cancer using combined detection of fecal occult blood test and fecal DNA test. Methods Forty-six patients with colorectal cancer and 30 normal volunteers were given with opportunistic screening,and were tested using immuno-chemical fecal occult blood tests(IFOBT),as well as the APC,P53 and K-ras mutations in the feces were detected by using polymerase chain reaction single strand conformation polymorphism(PCR-SSCP). Results The positive rate of IFOBT was 45. 7%(21 / 46)and 13. 3%(4 / 30)in the colorectal cancer group and the normal group,respec-tively. Meanwhile,the mutation rate of APC,P53,K-ras genes in the colorectal cancer group were 58. 7%(27 / 46), 65. 2%(30 / 46)and 60. 9%(28 / 46);and were 3. 3%(1 / 30),0. 0%(0 / 30)and 0. 0%(0 / 30)in the normal group. There was no significant difference in the sensitivity and specificity between IFOBT and fecal DNA screening of colorectal cancer,and the sensitivity of joint detection was higher than any single detection method. Conclusion The combined detection of fecal occult blood test and fecal DNA can raise the efficacy of the colorectal cancer screening,it can be used to become an effective noninvasive method of colorectal cancer in the opportunistic screen-ing of early diagnosis and screening.%目的:探讨联合检测粪隐血试验与粪便 DNA 用于大肠癌机会性筛查的应用和意义。方法入组行机会性筛查的46例大肠癌患者和30例正常者的粪便,分别应用免疫法粪便隐血试验(IFOBT)2次,应用PCR-SSCP 方法检测粪便中 APC、P53和 K-ras 基因突变情况。结果大肠癌组和正常组粪便 IFOBT 的阳性率分别为45.7%(21/46)和13.3%(4/30),APC、P53、K-ras 的突变率分别为58.7%(27/46)、65.2%(30/46)、60.9%(28/46)和3.3%(1/30)、0.0%(0/30)、0.0%(0/30),IFOBT 和粪便 DNA 筛查大肠癌的敏感性和特异性差

  6. Human fecal and pathogen exposure pathways in rural Indian villages and the effect of increased latrine coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagiri, Mitsunori; Schriewer, Alexander; Daniels, Miles E; Wuertz, Stefan; Smith, Woutrina A; Clasen, Thomas; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Jin, Yujie; Torondel, Belen; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Jenkins, Marion W

    2016-09-01

    Efforts to eradicate open defecation and improve sanitation access are unlikely to achieve health benefits unless interventions reduce microbial exposures. This study assessed human fecal contamination and pathogen exposures in rural India, and the effect of increased sanitation coverage on contamination and exposure rates. In a cross-sectional study of 60 villages of a cluster-randomized controlled sanitation trial in Odisha, India, human and domestic animal fecal contamination was measured in community tubewells and ponds (n = 301) and via exposure pathways in homes (n = 354), using Bacteroidales microbial source tracking fecal markers validated in India. Community water sources were further tested for diarrheal pathogens (rotavirus, adenovirus and Vibrio cholerae by quantitative PCR; pathogenic Escherichia coli by multiplex PCR; Cryptosporidium and Giardia by immunomagnetic separation and direct fluorescent antibody microscopy). Exposure pathways in intervention and control villages were compared and relationships with child diarrhea examined. Human fecal markers were rarely detected in tubewells (2.4%, 95%CI: 0.3-4.5%) and ponds (5.6%, 95%CI: 0.8-10.3%), compared to homes (35.4%, 95%CI: 30.4-40.4%). In tubewells, V. cholerae was the most frequently detected pathogen (19.8%, 95%CI: 14.4-25.2%), followed by Giardia (14.8%, 95%CI: 10.0-19.7%). In ponds, Giardia was most often detected (74.5%, 95%CI: 65.7-83.3%), followed by pathogenic E. coli (48.1%, 95%CI: 34.8-61.5%) and rotavirus (44.4%, 95%CI: 34.2-54.7%). At village-level, prevalence of fecal pathogen detection in community drinking water sources was associated with elevated prevalence of child diarrhea within 6 weeks of testing (RR 2.13, 95%CI: 1.25-3.63) while within homes, higher levels of human and animal fecal marker detection were associated with increased risks of subsequent child diarrhea (P = 0.044 and 0.013, respectively). There was no evidence that the intervention, which increased

  7. Enterococcus and Escherichia coli fecal source apportionment with microbial source tracking genetic markers - is it feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecal pollution is measured in surface waters using culture-based measurements of enterococci and Escherichia coli bacteria. Source apportionment of these two fecal indicator bacteria is an urgent need for prioritizing remediation efforts and quantifying health risks associated...

  8. Differential decay of Enterococci and Escherichia coli originating from two fecal pollution sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using in situ subtropical aquatic mesocosms, fecal source (cattle manure versus sewage) was shown to be the most important contributor to differential loss in viability of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), specifically enterococci in freshwater and Escherichia coli in marine habita...

  9. Laboratory Testing of Donors and Stool Samples for Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Michael H; Neish, Emma M; Miller, Nancy S; Dhere, Tanvi; Burd, Eileen M; Carpentieri, Cynthia; Sitchenko, Kaitlin L; Kraft, Colleen S

    2017-04-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is an efficacious and inexpensive therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, yet its safety is thought to depend on appropriate fecal donor screening. FDA guidance for regulation of this procedure is in flux, but screening and manufacture of fecal material from asymptomatic donors present many challenges to clinical laboratories. This minireview summarizes FDA regulatory changes, principles of donor selection, and recommended laboratory screening practices for fecal microbiota transplantation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Fecal bile acid excretion and messenger RNA expression levels of ileal transporters in high risk gallstone patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Juan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol gallstone disease (GS is highly prevalent among Hispanics and American Indians. In GS, the pool of bile acids (BA is decreased, suggesting that BA absorption is impaired. In Caucasian GS patients, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporters are decreased. We aimed to determine fecal BA excretion rates, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporter genes and of regulatory genes of BA synthesis in Hispanic GS patients. Results Excretion of fecal BA was measured in seven GS females and in ten GS-free individuals, all with a body mass index 2O3 (300 mg/day for 10 days, and fecal specimens were collected on the last 3 days. Chromium was measured by a colorimetric method, and BA was quantitated by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Intake of calories, nutrients, fiber and cholesterol were similar in the GS and GS-free subjects. Mean BA excretion levels were 520 ± 80 mg/day for the GS-free group, and 461 ± 105 mg/day for the GS group. Messenger RNA expression levels were determined by RT-PCR on biopsy samples obtained from ileum during diagnostic colonoscopy (14 GS-free controls and 16 GS patients and from liver during surgery performed at 8 and 10 AM (12 GS and 10 GS-free patients operated on for gastrointestinal malignancies, all with a body mass index Conclusion Hispanics with GS have fecal BA excretion rates and mRNA levels of genes for ileal BA transporters that are similar to GS-free subjects. However, mRNA expression levels of Cyp7A1 are increased in GS, indicating that regulation of BA synthesis is abnormal in Hispanics with GS.

  11. Fecal collection, ambient preservation, and DNA extraction for PCR amplification of bacterial and human markers from human feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechvatal, Jordan M; Ram, Jeffrey L; Basson, Marc D; Namprachan, Phanramphoei; Niec, Stephanie R; Badsha, Kawsar Z; Matherly, Larry H; Majumdar, Adhip P N; Kato, Ikuko

    2008-02-01

    Feces contain intestinal bacteria and exfoliated epithelial cells that may provide useful information concerning gastrointestinal tract health. Intestinal bacteria that synthesize or metabolize potential carcinogens and produce anti-tumorigenic products may have relevance to colorectal cancer, the second most common cause of cancer deaths in the USA. To facilitate epidemiological studies relating bacterial and epithelial cell DNA and RNA markers, preservative/extraction methods suitable for self-collection and shipping of fecal samples at room temperature were tested. Purification and PCR amplification of fecal DNA were compared after preservation of stool samples in RNAlater (R) or Paxgene (P), or after drying over silica gel (S) or on Whatman FTA cards (W). Comparisons were made to samples frozen in liquid nitrogen (N2). DNA purification methods included Whatman (accompanying FTA cards), Mo-Bio Fecal (MB), Qiagen Stool (QS), and others. Extraction methods were compared for amount of DNA extracted, DNA amplifiable in a real-time SYBR-Green quantitative PCR format, and the presence of PCR inhibitors. DNA can be extracted after room temperature storage for five days from W, R, S and P, and from N2 frozen samples. High amounts of total DNA and PCR-amplifiable Bacteroides spp. DNA (34%+/-9% of total DNA) with relatively little PCR inhibition were especially obtained with QS extraction applied to R preserved samples (method QS-R). DNA for human reduced folate carrier (SLC19A1) genomic sequence was also detected in 90% of the QS-R extracts. Thus, fecal DNA is well preserved by methods suitable for self-collection that may be useful in future molecular epidemiological studies of intestinal bacteria and human cancer markers.

  12. Evaluation of different storage methods to characterize the fecal bacterial communities of captive western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlčková, Klára; Mrázek, Jakub; Kopečný, Jan; Petrželková, Klára J

    2012-10-01

    Freezing is considered to be the best method for long-term storage of bacterial DNA from feces; however this method cannot be usually applied for samples of wild primates collected in the challenging conditions of the tropical forest. In order to find an alternative conservation method of fecal samples from wild great apes, we compared freezing with other fixation methods. Fecal samples from 11 captive gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) from three Czech Zoos were stored using freezing, RNA Stabilization Reagent (RNAlater), and 96% ethanol. Subsequently, the samples were examined using culture-independent methods (PCR-DGGE, and Real-time PCR) to qualitatively and quantitatively assess fecal microbiota composition and to compare differences among the storage methods. Noticeably, freezing samples resulted in the highest recoveries of DNA. No significant differences in DNA recovery were found between freezing and using RNAlater; however, significantly lower DNA concentrations were recovered from samples stored in 96% ethanol. Using PCR-DGGE we found that either 96% ethanol, RNAlater or freezing were suitable for preserving bacterial DNA; however fingerprints obtained from RNAlater storage were more similar to those obtained from the frozen method; in comparison to the patterns resulting from storing samples in ethanol. Using qPCR, frozen samples yielded the highest values of bacterial counts, with the exception of Enterobacteriaceae, which showed the highest numbers using samples stored in ethanol. Sequences of amplicons obtained from PCR-DGGE belonged to the families Clostridiaceae, Lactobacillaceae, Staphylococcaceae, and Lachnospiraceae, phylum Firmicutes; however most amplicons showed sequence similarity to previously uncultured microorganisms. Bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes were the most frequently identified species in the fecal bacterial communities of captive western gorillas. The study showed that RNAlater is an optimal storage method when

  13. Isolating the impact of septic systems on fecal pollution in streams of suburban watersheds in Georgia, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowah, Robert A; Habteselassie, Mussie Y; Radcliffe, David E; Bauske, Ellen; Risse, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The presence of multiple sources of fecal pollution at the watershed level presents challenges to efforts aimed at identifying the influence of septic systems. In this study multiple approaches including targeted sampling and monitoring of host-specific Bacteroidales markers were used to identify the impact of septic systems on microbial water quality. Twenty four watersheds with septic density ranging from 8 to 373 septic units/km(2) were monitored for water quality under baseflow conditions over a 3-year period. The levels of the human-associated HF183 marker, as well as total and ruminant Bacteroidales, were quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Human-associated Bacteroidales yield was significantly higher in high density watersheds compared to low density areas and was negatively correlated (r = -0.64) with the average distance of septic systems to streams in the spring season. The human marker was also positively correlated with the total Bacteroidales marker, suggesting that the human source input was a significant contributor to total fecal pollution in the study area. Multivariable regression analysis indicates that septic systems, along with forest cover, impervious area and specific conductance could explain up to 74% of the variation in human fecal pollution in the spring season. The results suggest septic system impact through contributions to groundwater recharge during baseflow or failing septic system input, especially in areas with >87 septic units/km(2). This study supports the use of microbial source tracking approaches along with traditional fecal indicator bacteria monitoring and land use characterization in a tiered approach to isolate the influence of septic systems on water quality in mixed-use watersheds.

  14. Chocolate consumption, fecal water antioxidant activity, and hydroxyl radical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Ian R; McInerney, Jennifer K; Noakes, Manny; Bird, Anthony R

    2003-01-01

    As part of a larger study into the effects of polyphenols derived from chocolate on bowel health we have compared the effects of consumption of chocolate containing either 200 mg of flavanols and related procyanidins or a similar chocolate containing less than 10 mg of polyphenols on fecal free radical production and antioxidant activity in 18 volunteers. In a double-blind crossover trail volunteers consumed chocolate for two 4-wk periods separated by a 4-wk washout period. During the time the volunteers consumed the chocolate they also consumed a low-polyphenol diet. Free radical production in the fecal water was lowered from 122 +/- 10 micromol/l/h to 94 +/- 9 micromol/l/h (P = 0.009) when the high procyanidin chocolate diet was consumed and from 117 +/- 14 micromol/l/h to 86 +/- 12 micromol/l/h when the low procyanidin chocolate was consumed (P = 0.014). Fecal water antioxidant capacity measured by either the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity or ferric reducing ability of plasma procedure was not significantly affected. Consumption of either chocolate reduced the production of free radicals in fecal water. This suggests that some component of the chocolate other than the flavanols and related procyanidins may have been effective.

  15. Fecal Viral Concentration and Diarrhea in Norovirus Gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nelson; Chan, Martin C.W.; Wong, Bonnie; Choi, K. W.; Sin, Winnie; Lui, Grace; Chan, Paul K. S.; Lai, Raymond W. M.; Cockram, C S; Joseph J Y Sung; Leung, Wai K

    2007-01-01

    Fecal viral concentrations of 40 patients infected with norovirus genogroup GII.4 correlated with diarrhea duration and frequency of vomiting. Higher viral concentration and older age were independently associated with prolonged diarrhea (>4 days). These findings provide information on the pathogenesis and transmission of norovirus infections.

  16. Advances in Fecal Occult Blood Tests: The FIT Revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P. Young; E.L. Symonds (Erin L.); J.E. Allison (James E.); S.R. Cole (Stephen R.); C.G. Fraser (Callum G.); S. Halloran (S.); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); H.E. Seaman (Helen E.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThere is a wide choice of fecal occult blood tests (FOBTs) for colorectal cancer screening. Goal: To highlight the issues applicable when choosing a FOBT, in particular which FOBT is best suited to the range of screening scenarios. Four scenarios characterize the constraints and expectat

  17. Avian influenza infection alters fecal odor in mallards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A Kimball

    Full Text Available Changes in body odor are known to be a consequence of many diseases. Much of the published work on disease-related and body odor changes has involved parasites and certain cancers. Much less studied have been viral diseases, possibly due to an absence of good animal model systems. Here we studied possible alteration of fecal odors in animals infected with avian influenza viruses (AIV. In a behavioral study, inbred C57BL/6 mice were trained in a standard Y-maze to discriminate odors emanating from feces collected from mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos infected with low-pathogenic avian influenza virus compared to fecal odors from non-infected controls. Mice could discriminate odors from non-infected compared to infected individual ducks on the basis of fecal odors when feces from post-infection periods were paired with feces from pre-infection periods. Prompted by this indication of odor change, fecal samples were subjected to dynamic headspace and solvent extraction analyses employing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify chemical markers indicative of AIV infection. Chemical analyses indicated that AIV infection was associated with a marked increase of acetoin (3-hydroxy-2-butanone in feces. These experiments demonstrate that information regarding viral infection exists via volatile metabolites present in feces. Further, they suggest that odor changes following virus infection could play a role in regulating behavior of conspecifics exposed to infected individuals.

  18. Requirement of the laying hen for apparent fecal digestible lysine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J.B.; Smink, W.

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the requirement for lysine of a White Leghorn strain of hens with a body weight of approximately 1,600 g. Before starting the experiment, apparent fecal digestibility of amino acids of the basal diet was determined in an in vivo digestibility trial with six individ

  19. Can fecal microbiota transplantation cure irritable bowel syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam; Boolsen, Anders Watt; Günther, Stig

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To verify the utility of treatment with fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: We searched EMBASE, Cochrane Library and PubMed in March, 2017. The reviewed literature was based on two systematic searches in each of the databases. The ...

  20. What do fecal coliforms indicate in tropical waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    High densities of total and fecal coliform bacteria have been detected in pristine streams and in ground water samples collected from many tropical parts of the world, even in epiphytic vegetation 10 m above ground in the rain forest of Puerto Rico. Nucleic acid (DNA) analyses of Escherichia coli from pristine tropical environs has indicated that they are identical to clinical isolates of E. coli. Many tropical source waters have been shown to have enteric pathogens in the complete absence of coliforms. Diffusion chamber studies with E. coli at several tropical sites reveal that this bacterium can survive indefinitely in most freshwaters in Puerto Rico. An evaluation of methods for the enumeration of fecal coliforms showed that currently used media have poor reliability as a result of large numbers of false positive and false negative results when applied to tropical water samples. Total and fecal coliform bacteria are not reliable indicators of recent biological contamination of waters in tropical areas. Fecal streptococci and coliphages in tropical waters, violate the same under lying assumptions of indicator assays as the coliforms. Anaerobic bacteria like Bifidobacterium spp. and Clostridium perfringens show some promise in terms of survival but not in ease of enumeration and media specificity. The best course at present lies in using current techniques for direct enumeration of pathogens by fluorescent staining and nucleic acid analysis and developing tropical maximum containmant levels for certain resistant pathogens in tropical waters. 66 refs.

  1. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Nathaniel A; Ben Ami, Ronen; Guzner-Gur, Hanan; Santo, Moshe E; Halpern, Zamir; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a problem most hospital-based physicians will face in their career. This review aims to refresh current knowledge with regard to Clostridium difficile infection and bring physicians up to date with the latest developments in the growing field of fecal microbiota transplantation, the benefits it offers, and the promise this and other developments hold for the future.

  2. Fecal Microbiota Transplant Protocol for Clostridium Difficile Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tauxe, William M.; Dhere, Tanvi; Ward, Angela; Racsa, Lori D.; Varkey, Jay B.; Kraft, Colleen S.

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplant has become more acceptable as a therapeutic for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. The FDA has an enforcement discretion policy for practitioner's performing this therapy, which includes informed consent for this experimental treatment. This manuscript describes a typical procedure that can be followed that includes the important aspects of this preparation and treatment.

  3. Distinguishing Bovine Fecal Matter on Spinach Leaves Using Field Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colm D. Everard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Detection of fecal contaminants on leafy greens in the field will allow for decreasing cross-contamination of produce during and post-harvest. Fecal contamination of leafy greens has been associated with Escherichia coli (E. coli O157:H7 outbreaks and foodborne illnesses. In this study, passive field spectroscopy measuring reflectance and fluorescence created by the sun’s light, coupled with numerical normalization techniques, are used to distinguish fecal contaminants on spinach leaves from soil on spinach leaves and uncontaminated spinach leaf portions. A Savitzky-Golay first derivative transformation and a waveband ratio of 710:688 nm as normalizing techniques were assessed. A soft independent modelling of class analogies (SIMCA procedure with a 216 sample training set successfully predicted all 54 test set sample types using the spectral region of 600–800 nm. The ratio of 710:688 nm along with set thresholds separated all 270 samples by type. Application of these techniques in-field to avoid harvesting of fecal contaminated leafy greens may lead to a reduction in foodborne illnesses as well as reduced produce waste.

  4. Quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  5. Factors affecting genotyping success in giant panda fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Liu, Hong-Yi; Yang, Hai-Qiong; Li, Yu-Dong; Zhang, He-Min

    2017-01-01

    Fecal samples play an important role in giant panda conservation studies. Optimal preservation conditions and choice of microsatellites for giant panda fecal samples have not been established. In this study, we evaluated the effect of four factors (namely, storage type (ethanol (EtOH), EtOH -20 °C, 2-step storage medium, DMSO/EDTA/Tris/salt buffer (DETs) and frozen at -20 °C), storage time (one, three and six months), fragment length, and repeat motif of microsatellite loci) on the success rate of microsatellite amplification, allelic dropout (ADO) and false allele (FA) rates from giant panda fecal samples. Amplification success and ADO rates differed between the storage types. Freezing was inferior to the other four storage methods based on the lowest average amplification success and the highest ADO rates (P < 0.05). The highest microsatellite amplification success was obtained from either EtOH or the 2-step storage medium at three storage time points. Storage time had a negative effect on the average amplification of microsatellites and samples stored in EtOH and the 2-step storage medium were more stable than the other three storage types. We only detected the effect of repeat motif on ADO and FA rates. The lower ADO and FA rates were obtained from tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci. We suggest that freezing should not be used for giant panda fecal preservation in microsatellite studies, and EtOH and the 2-step storage medium should be chosen on priority for long-term storage. We recommend candidate microsatellite loci with longer repeat motif to ensure greater genotyping success for giant panda fecal studies.

  6. Factors affecting genotyping success in giant panda fecal samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fecal samples play an important role in giant panda conservation studies. Optimal preservation conditions and choice of microsatellites for giant panda fecal samples have not been established. In this study, we evaluated the effect of four factors (namely, storage type (ethanol (EtOH, EtOH −20 °C, 2-step storage medium, DMSO/EDTA/Tris/salt buffer (DETs and frozen at −20 °C, storage time (one, three and six months, fragment length, and repeat motif of microsatellite loci on the success rate of microsatellite amplification, allelic dropout (ADO and false allele (FA rates from giant panda fecal samples. Amplification success and ADO rates differed between the storage types. Freezing was inferior to the other four storage methods based on the lowest average amplification success and the highest ADO rates (P < 0.05. The highest microsatellite amplification success was obtained from either EtOH or the 2-step storage medium at three storage time points. Storage time had a negative effect on the average amplification of microsatellites and samples stored in EtOH and the 2-step storage medium were more stable than the other three storage types. We only detected the effect of repeat motif on ADO and FA rates. The lower ADO and FA rates were obtained from tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci. We suggest that freezing should not be used for giant panda fecal preservation in microsatellite studies, and EtOH and the 2-step storage medium should be chosen on priority for long-term storage. We recommend candidate microsatellite loci with longer repeat motif to ensure greater genotyping success for giant panda fecal studies.

  7. Association Between Time to Colonoscopy After a Positive Fecal Test Result and Risk of Colorectal Cancer and Cancer Stage at Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Douglas A; Jensen, Christopher D; Quinn, Virginia P; Doubeni, Chyke A; Zauber, Ann G; Lee, Jeffrey K; Schottinger, Joanne E; Marks, Amy R; Zhao, Wei K; Ghai, Nirupa R; Lee, Alexander T; Contreras, Richard; Quesenberry, Charles P; Fireman, Bruce H; Levin, Theodore R

    2017-04-25

    The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is commonly used for colorectal cancer screening and positive test results require follow-up colonoscopy. However, follow-up intervals vary, which may result in neoplastic progression. To evaluate time to colonoscopy after a positive FIT result and its association with risk of colorectal cancer and advanced-stage disease at diagnosis. Retrospective cohort study (January 1, 2010-December 31, 2014) within Kaiser Permanente Northern and Southern California. Participants were 70 124 patients aged 50 through 70 years eligible for colorectal cancer screening with a positive FIT result who had a follow-up colonoscopy. Time (days) to colonoscopy after a positive FIT result. Risk of any colorectal cancer and advanced-stage disease (defined as stage III and IV cancer). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were adjusted for patient demographics and baseline risk factors. Of the 70 124 patients with positive FIT results (median age, 61 years [IQR, 55-67 years]; men, 52.7%), there were 2191 cases of any colorectal cancer and 601 cases of advanced-stage disease diagnosed. Compared with colonoscopy follow-up within 8 to 30 days (n = 27 176), there were no significant differences between follow-up at 2 months (n = 24 644), 3 months (n = 8666), 4 to 6 months (n = 5251), or 7 to 9 months (n = 1335) for risk of any colorectal cancer (cases per 1000 patients: 8-30 days, 30; 2 months, 28; 3 months, 31; 4-6 months, 31; and 7-9 months, 43) or advanced-stage disease (cases per 1000 patients: 8-30 days, 8; 2 months, 7; 3 months, 7; 4-6 months, 9; and 7-9 months, 13). Risks were significantly higher for examinations at 10 to 12 months (n = 748) for any colorectal cancer (OR, 1.48 [95% CI, 1.05-2.08]; 49 cases per 1000 patients) and advanced-stage disease (OR, 1.97 [95% CI, 1.14-3.42]; 19 cases per 1000 patients) and more than 12 months (n = 747) for any colorectal cancer (OR, 2.25 [95% CI, 1.89-2.68]; 76 cases per 1000

  8. Immunochemical visualization and identification of rat liver proteins adducted by 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M; Thompson, D C

    1997-10-01

    Several alkylphenols (e.g., 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, BHT) form reactive quinone methide intermediates (e.g., 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylene-2,5-cyclohexadienone, BHT-QM) upon oxidation by cellular enzymes. In order to pursue the role of protein alkylation in alkylphenol toxicity, we used an immunochemical approach to identify protein targets alkylated by BHT. Synthetic BHT-N-acetylcysteine (BHT-NAC) was coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and used as an antigen from which polyclonal antibodies were raised in New Zealand white rabbits. Rabbit serum contained an antibody which was highly specific for BHT-NAC, as determined by competitive ELISA. The BHT antibody was used as a probe to look for the presence of BHT-protein adducts in in vitro incubations with rat liver microsomes or tissue slices and also in vivo in liver tissue from male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to BHT. Western blotting of protein gels revealed BHT-dependent protein alkylation over a wide molecular weight range. Prominent recurrent bands were observed at approximately 34.5, 52, 64.5, 74, and 97 kDa. Detection of adducts was inhibited in microsomal incubations by cytochrome P450 inhibitors, deuterated BHT, and the omission of NADPH. Similar protein alkylation patterns were observed in rat liver microsomes exposed to synthetically prepared BHT-QM as in the enzyme-mediated incubations. In rats gavaged with up to 1000 mg/kg BHT, the amount of protein alkylation observed was maximal at 24 h postdosing and was dose-dependent. Two alkylated proteins were isolated and identified by N-terminal sequencing: a mitochondrial beta-oxidation enzyme, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and a plasma membrane/cytoskeletal linker protein from the ezrin/moesin/radixin family.

  9. Demonstration of immunochemical identity between the nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein and the cell adhesion molecule L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, E; Richter-Landsberg, C; Faissner, A

    1985-01-01

    -treated rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells yielded comigrating bands by SDS-PAGE. NILE antibodies reacted with immunopurified L1 antigen, but not with N-CAM and other L2 epitope-bearing glycoproteins from adult mouse brain. Finally, by sequential immunoprecipitation from detergent extracts of [35S......The nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein and the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 were shown to be immunochemically identical. Immunoprecipitation with L1 and NILE antibodies of [3H]fucose-labeled material from culture supernatants and detergent extracts of NGF...

  10. Consequences of Increasing Time to Colonoscopy Examination After Positive Result From Fecal Colorectal Cancer Screening Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Reinier G S; Zauber, Ann G; Doubeni, Chyke A; Jensen, Christopher D; Quinn, Virginia P; Helfand, Mark; Dominitz, Jason A; Levin, Theodore R; Corley, Douglas A; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris

    2016-10-01

    Delays in diagnostic testing after a positive result from a screening test can undermine the benefits of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, but there are few empirical data on the effects of such delays. We used microsimulation modeling to estimate the consequences of time to colonoscopy after a positive result from a fecal immunochemical test (FIT). We used an established microsimulation model to simulate an average-risk United States population cohort that underwent annual FIT screening (from ages 50 to 75 years), with follow-up colonoscopy examinations for individuals with positive results (cutoff, 20 μg/g) at different time points in the following 12 months. Main evaluated outcomes were CRC incidence and mortality; additional outcomes were total life-years lost and net costs of screening. For individuals who underwent diagnostic colonoscopy within 2 weeks of a positive result from an FIT, the estimated lifetime risk of CRC incidence was 35.5/1000 persons, and mortality was 7.8/1000 persons. Every month added until colonoscopy was associated with a 0.1/1000 person increase in cancer incidence risk (an increase of 0.3%/month, compared with individuals who received colonoscopies within 2 weeks) and mortality risk (increase of 1.4%/month). Among individuals who received colonoscopy examinations 12 months after a positive result from an FIT, the incidence of CRC was 27.0/1000 persons (increase of 4%, compared with 2 weeks), and mortality was 9.1/1000 persons (increase of 16%). Total years of life gained for the entire screening cohort decreased from an estimated 93.7/1000 persons with an almost immediate follow-up colonoscopy (cost savings of $208 per patient, compared with no colonoscopy) to 84.8/1000 persons with follow-up colonoscopies at 12 months (decrease of 9%; cost savings of $100/patient, compared with no colonoscopy). By using a microsimulation model of an average-risk United States screening cohort, we estimated that delays of up to 12 months after a

  11. Antibiotic resistance analysis of fecal coliforms to determine fecal pollution sources in a mixed-use watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnes, Brian S

    2003-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance analysis was performed on fecal coliform (FC) bacteria from a mixed-use watershed to determine the source, human or nonhuman, of fecal coliform contamination. The study consisted of discriminant analysis of antibiotic resistance patterns generated by exposure to four concentrations of six antibiotics (ampicillin, gentamicin sulfate, kanamycin, spectinomycin dihydrochloride, streptomycin sulfate, and tetracycline hydrochloride). A reference database was constructed from 1125 fecal coliform isolates from the following sources: humans, domestic animals (cats and dogs), agricultural animals (chickens, cattle, and horses), and wild animals. Based on similar antibiotic resistance patterns, cat and dog isolates were grouped as domestic animals and horse and cattle isolates were grouped as livestock. The resulting average rate of correct classification (ARCC) for human and nonhuman isolates was 94%. A total of 800 FC isolates taken from the watershed during either a dry event or a wet event were classified according to source. Human sources contribute a majority (> 50%) of the baseflow FC isolates found in the watershed in urbanized areas. Chicken and livestock sources are responsible for the majority of the baseflow FC isolates found in the rural reaches of the watershed. Stormwater introduces FC isolates from domestic (approximately 16%) and wild (approximately 21%) sources throughout the watershed and varying amounts (up to 60%) from chicken and livestock sources. These results suggest that antibiotic resistance patterns of FC may be used to determine sources of fecal contamination and aid in the direction of water quality improvement.

  12. Evaluation of a fecal pancreatic elastase-1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: Assessment versus an established assay and implication in classifying pancreatic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, J Alan; Aldeen, William E; Grenache, David G; Ashwood, Edward R

    2008-11-01

    Disagreement continues regarding 2 fecal pancreatic elastase-1 (PE-1) ELISAs and their respective capabilities to assess pancreatic function. The BioServ Diagnostics polyclonal PE-1 ELISA was validated and its performance characteristics compared to the previously validated ScheBo Biotech monoclonal PE-1 ELISA. Split sample study results were analyzed by Deming regression and Bland-Altman plot analysis. Data mining was utilized to explore PE-1 distribution and evaluate PE-1 and fecal fat correlation. Analysis demonstrates limited quantitative agreement; slope=0.9640, intercept=10.787, R(2)=0.633. Means were 228.8 and 226.2 microg PE-1/g stool for the polyclonal and monoclonal assays respectively. Bland-Altman analysis showed 91% of paired values within 2 SD of their means. There was good qualitative agreement when interpreted against established intervals with 91% of results equivalent in pancreatic function classification. The remaining 9% varied by one classification level with no bias evident. The distribution of PE-1 concentrations (n=400, 0-25 years) classified 78% of subjects with normal pancreatic function, 7% with moderate pancreatic insufficiency and 15% with severe insufficiency. There was little agreement between PE-1 and fecal fat results. The polyclonal PE-1 ELISA is an acceptable alternative to the monoclonal PE-1 ELISA. PE-1 is a potential substitute for fecal fat for evaluating pancreatic function.

  13. Design and Investigation of PolyFermS In Vitro Continuous Fermentation Models Inoculated with Immobilized Fecal Microbiota Mimicking the Elderly Colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlbaum, Sophie; Chassard, Christophe; Haug, Martina C; Fourmestraux, Candice; Derrien, Muriel; Lacroix, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In vitro gut modeling is a useful approach to investigate some factors and mechanisms of the gut microbiota independent of the effects of the host. This study tested the use of immobilized fecal microbiota to develop different designs of continuous colonic fermentation models mimicking elderly gut fermentation. Model 1 was a three-stage fermentation mimicking the proximal, transverse and distal colon. Models 2 and 3 were based on the new PolyFermS platform composed of an inoculum reactor seeded with immobilized fecal microbiota and used to continuously inoculate with the same microbiota different second-stage reactors mounted in parallel. The main gut bacterial groups, microbial diversity and metabolite production were monitored in effluents of all reactors using quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing, and HPLC, respectively. In all models, a diverse microbiota resembling the one tested in donor's fecal sample was established. Metabolic stability in inoculum reactors seeded with immobilized fecal microbiota was shown for operation times of up to 80 days. A high microbial and metabolic reproducibility was demonstrated for downstream control and experimental reactors of a PolyFermS model. The PolyFermS models tested here are particularly suited to investigate the effects of environmental factors, such as diet and drugs, in a controlled setting with the same microbiota source.

  14. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, nova amostra isolada de fezes de um pinguim (Pygoscelis adeliae Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a new strain isolated from a fecal matter of a penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilma Maciel Garcia

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Os Autores apresentam os resultados obtidos com a amostra "pinguim" de Paracoccidioides, isolada por GEZUELE et al. (1989 na Antártica uruguaia. Das fezes de um desses animais, foi isolado um fungo considerado, recentemente, como nova espécie de Paracoccididoides - P. antarclicus. Os exames micológico e imunoquímico demonstraram tratar-se de Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, inclusive com a verificação da presença da glicoproteína 43 kDa pelos métodos de imunodifusão dupla, SDS-PAGE e imunoeletroforese. A possibilidade de se tratar de uma variedade do Paracoccididoides brasiliensis somente poderá ser confirmada através de outros estudos baseados na chamada taxonomía molecular, incluindo cariotipagem. Os Autores registram o significado epidemiológico deste achado, sugerindo uma revisão nos conhecimentos do nicho ecológico do P. brasiliensis.The Authors show lhe results obtained through the study of a Paracoccidioides strain isolated from a penguin in the Uruguaian An-lartide by GEZUELE et al. (1989. From the fecal matter it was isolated a fungus which was recently considered as a new species of the genus Paracoccidioides - P. antarcticus. However, the mycological and immunochemical studies including the demonstration of the 43 kDa glycoprotein by immunodiffusion test, SDS-PAGE and immunoelectrophoresis disclosed that such strain is similar to P. brasiliensis. Other studies, based on molecular taxonomy, including karyotyping, are the only tools to confirm Lhe possibility of such strain to be a variant of P. brasiliensis. The Authors report the epidemiological significance of that finding and suggest a review in the knowledge of the ecological "niche" of P. brasiliensis.

  15. A predictive model combining fecal calgranulin B and fecal occult blood tests can improve the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Chang Kim

    Full Text Available AIM: Current fecal screening tools for colorectal cancer (CRC, such as fecal occult blood tests (FOBT, are limited by their low sensitivity. Calgranulin B (CALB was previously reported as a candidate fecal marker for CRC. This study investigated whether a combination of the FOBT and fecal CALB has increased sensitivity and specificity for a diagnosis of CRC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with CRC (n = 175, and healthy individuals (controls; n = 151 were enrolled into the development (81 cases and 51 controls and validation (94 cases and 100 controls sets. Stool samples were collected before bowel preparation. CALB levels were determined by western blotting. FOBT and fecal CALB results were used to develop a predictive model based on logistic regression analysis. The benefit of adding CALB to a model with only FOBT was evaluated as an increased area under the receiver operating curve (AUC, partial AUC, and reclassification improvement (RI in cases and controls, and net reclassification improvement (NRI. RESULTS: Mean CALB level was significantly higher in CRC patients than in controls (P<0.001. CALB was not associated with tumor stage or cancer site, but positivity on the FOBT was significantly higher in advanced than in earlier tumor stages. At a specificity of 90%, the cross-validated AUC and sensitivity were 89.81% and 82.72%, respectively, in the development set, and 92.74% and 79.79%, respectively, in the validation set. The incremental benefit of adding CALB to the model, as shown by the increase in AUC, had a p-value of 0.0499. RI in cases and controls and NRI all revealed that adding CALB significantly improved the prediction model. CONCLUSION: A predictive model using a combination of FOBT and CALB may have greater sensitivity and specificity and AUC for predicting CRC than models using a single marker.

  16. Survivin exists in immunochemically distinct subcellular pools and is involved in spindle microtubule function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortugno, Paola; Wall, Nathan R; Giodini, Alessandra; O'Connor, Daniel S; Plescia, Janet; Padgett, Karen M; Tognin, Simona; Marchisio, Pier Carlo; Altieri, Dario C

    2002-02-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis gene family that has been implicated in both apoptosis inhibition and regulation of mitosis. However, the subcellular distribution of survivin has been controversial and variously described as a microtubule-associated protein or chromosomal passenger protein. Here, we show that antibodies directed to the survivin sequence Ala(3)-Ile(19) exclusively recognized a nuclear pool of survivin that segregated with nucleoplasmic proteins, but not with outer nuclear matrix or nuclear matrix proteins. By immunofluorescence, nuclear survivin localized to kinetochores of metaphase chromosomes, and to the central spindle midzone at anaphase. However, antibodies to Cys(57)-Trp(67) identified a cytosolic pool of survivin, which associated with interphase microtubules, centrosomes, spindle poles and mitotic spindle microtubules at metaphase and anaphase. Polyclonal antibodies recognizing survivin epitopes Ala(3)-Ile(19), Met(38)-Thr(48), Pro(47)-Phe(58) and Cys(57)-Trp(67) identified both survivin pools within the same mitotic cell. A ratio of approximately 1:6 for nuclear versus cytosolic survivin was obtained by quantitative subcellular fractionation. In synchronized cultures, cytosolic survivin abruptly increased at mitosis, physically associated with p34(cdc2), and was phosphorylated by p34(cdc2) on Thr(34), in vivo. By contrast, nuclear survivin began to accumulate in S phase, was not complexed with p34(cdc2) and was not phosphorylated on Thr(34). Intracellular loading of a polyclonal antibody to survivin caused microtubule defects and resulted in formation of multipolar mitotic spindles, but did not interfere with cytokinesis. These data demonstrate that although both reported localizations of survivin exist in mitotic cells, the preponderant survivin pool is associated with microtubules and participates in the assembly of a bipolar mitotic spindle.

  17. On the origin and specificity of antibodies to neuromuscular blocking (muscle relaxant) drugs: an immunochemical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, B A; Fisher, M M; Pham, N H

    2009-03-01

    Following the demonstration 25 years ago that substituted ammonium groups on neuromuscular blocking drugs (NMBDs) are the main allergenic structures recognized by IgE antibodies in the sera of some patients who experience anaphylaxis during anaesthesia, immunoassays for these drugs were quickly applied to supplement skin tests in the diagnostic assessment of suspected adverse reactions to anaesthetic agents. Many subjects who react to an NMBD do so on first exposure and this led to the speculation that the origin of allergic sensitization is an environmental agent(s) or another drug containing an ammonium ion. Direct antibody binding and hapten inhibition studies revealed that morphine, which contains a tertiary amino group, was strongly recognized by IgE in sera from anaphylactic patients and a morphine-solid phase immunoassay was found to be superior to NMBD-based assays for the detection of NMBD-reactive IgE antibodies. Extensive inhibition experiments indicate the likelihood of antibody combining site heterogeneity with recognition at the fine structural level of features additional, and adjacent to, ammonium ions. Further quantitative investigations are needed to identify these neighbouring groups on different NMBDs. Recent work has implicated the morphine analogue pholcodine as the sensitizing agent in Norway where, unlike Sweden, anaphylactic reactions to NMBDs are not uncommon and the medicament is available over-the-counter. This has led to the suggestion that allergenic sensitization to the ammonium group of pholcodine may account for the different incidences of anaphylaxis during anaesthesia in the two countries. This work is subjected to critical review and some alternative speculations on the nature and origin of the sensitizing agent(s) are presented.

  18. Three-dimensional modeling of fecal coliform in the Tidal Basin and Washington Channel, Washington, DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Sen; Lung, Wu-Seng

    2006-01-01

    Fecal coliform are widely used as bacterial indicator in the United States and around the world. Fecal coliform impaired water is highly possible to be polluted by pathogenic bacteria. The Tidal Basin and Washington Channel in Washington, DC are on the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) list due to the high fecal coliform level. To support TMDL development, a three-dimensional numerical model of fecal coliform was developed using the EFDC framework. The model calculates the transport of fecal coliform under the influences of flap gate operations and tidal elevation. The original EFDC code was modified to calculate the die-off of fecal coliform under the impact of temperature and solar radiation intensity. The watershed contribution is expressed as storm water inflow and the load carried by the runoff. Model results show that fecal coliform vary strongly in space in both the Tidal Basin and Washington Channel. The storm water only impacts a small area around the storm water outfall in the Tidal Basin and the impacts are negligible in the Washington Channel due to dilution. The water from the Potomac River may affect the fecal coliform level in the area close to the flap gate in the Tidal Basin. The fecal coliform level in the Washington Channel is mainly controlled by the fecal coliform level in the Anacostia River, which is located at the open boundary of the Washington Channel. The potential sediment layer storage of fecal coliform was analyzed and it was found that the sediment layer fecal coliform level could be much higher than the water column fecal coliform level and becomes a secondary source under high bottom shear stress condition. The developed model built solid connection of fecal coliform source and concentration in the water column and has been used to develop TMDL.

  19. Prediction of the presence of ovarian cancer at surgery by an immunochemical panel: CA 125 and copper-to-zinc ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, D; Lischinsky, S; Friedman, M; Zinder, O

    1989-11-01

    Preoperative levels of the trace elements copper and zinc, in addition to the level of the known marker CA 125, were studied in sera of 32 patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy for suspicion of ovarian cancer and in sera of 49 patients with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer prior to second-look operation. Most patients (63/81) had stage III or IV disease. CA 125 levels greater than 35 U/ml, copper levels greater than 1.5 mg/liter, and zinc levels less than 0.9 mg/liter were considered pathologic. An immunochemical panel composed of CA 125 serum level and ratio of copper to zinc (Cu/Zn) (normal less than 1.65) was found to be most sensitive (98%) in predicting the existence of ovarian cancer before laparotomy, and its overall predictability was 89%. In 14 of 14 patients (100%) who had complete primary surgery for ovarian cancer, the panel was correct in predicting no tumor at second-look operation. In 13 of 14 patients (93%) who had incomplete primary surgery but had no clinical evidence of disease prior to second-look operation, the panel was correct in predicting ovarian cancer. In these two groups of patients, second-look operation could have been replaced by the results of the immunochemical panel.

  20. Single-port laparoscopic fecal diversion: more than cosmetic benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Erman; Stocchi, Luca; Williams, Ryan; Remzi, Feza H; Costedio, Meagan M

    2014-08-01

    Single-port laparoscopic surgery is usually performed on patients with minor comorbidities. The aim of the study was to evaluate feasibility and efficacy of single-port fecal diversion in patients who had previous abdominal operations or comorbidities. Between October 2010 and March 2012, 14 patients with a median age of 57 years were diverted. The reasons for diversion were perianal infection/abscess (n=5), anal incontinence (n=3), radiation proctitis (n=2), colovesical fistula causing sepsis (n=1), outlet obstruction of ileal S pouch (n=1), perforation during pouchoscopy (n=1), and peritoneal carcinomatosis with enterocutaneus fistula (n=1). Median estimated blood loss was 20 mL, operative time was 52 minutes, and length of hospital stay was 4 days. Two patients had ileus postoperatively. One patient had a parastomal hernia 4 months after diversion. Single-port laparoscopic fecal diversion is a safe and feasible operation for patients with significant comorbidities and a history of multiple abdominal operations.

  1. Treating Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome with Fecal Microbiota Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotz, Clarisse A; Zarrinpar, Amir

    2016-09-01

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic syndrome, which includes obesity and its associated diseases, is rising rapidly. The human gut microbiome is recognized as an independent environmental modulator of host metabolic health and disease. Research in animal models has demonstrated that the gut microbiome has the functional capacity to induce or relieve metabolic syndrome. One way to modify the human gut microbiome is by transplanting fecal matter, which contains an abundance of live microorganisms, from a healthy individual to a diseased one in the hopes of alleviating illness. Here we review recent evidence suggesting efficacy of fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) in animal models and humans for the treatment of obesity and its associated metabolic disorders.

  2. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Current Applications, Effectiveness, and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Cho, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the infusion of liquid filtrate feces from a healthy donor into the gut of a recipient to cure a specific disease. A fecal suspension can be administered by nasogastric or nasoduodenal tube, colonoscope, enema, or capsule. The high success rate and safety in the short term reported for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection has elevated FMT as an emerging treatment for a wide range of disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, myoclonus dystopia, multiple sclerosis, obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and autism. There are many unanswered questions regarding FMT, including donor selection and screening, standardized protocols, long-term safety, and regulatory issues. This article reviews the efficacy and safety of FMT used in treating a variety of diseases, methodology, criteria for donor selection and screening, and various concerns regarding FMT. PMID:26956193

  3. Treating Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome with Fecal Microbiota Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotz, Clarisse A.; Zarrinpar, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic syndrome, which includes obesity and its associated diseases, is rising rapidly. The human gut microbiome is recognized as an independent environmental modulator of host metabolic health and disease. Research in animal models has demonstrated that the gut microbiome has the functional capacity to induce or relieve metabolic syndrome. One way to modify the human gut microbiome is by transplanting fecal matter, which contains an abundance of live microorganisms, from a healthy individual to a diseased one in the hopes of alleviating illness. Here we review recent evidence suggesting efficacy of fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) in animal models and humans for the treatment of obesity and its associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27698622

  4. [Effects of nifuroxazide on fecal flora in healthy subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Y; Larribaud, J

    1989-01-01

    Effect of nifuroxazide on fecal flora was studied in 12 healthy volunteers receiving, in hazardous order and double-blind procedure, three six-days courses of treatment separated by eight-days spaces of time: the conventional dosage of 400 mg twice a day, a dosage of 1200 mg once a day, and placebo. Among six settled bacteriological index (wealth of the fecal flora, percentage of gram-negative bacteria, numbers of E. coli, Enterococcus, Clostridium and Bacteroides), no significant variation was found by means of statistical study between D0, D2 and D7, nor between the three courses of treatment. Therefore nifuroxazide, even in high dosage, does not injure integrity of microbial intestinal ecosystem under so defined experimental conditions, similar with clinical conditions.

  5. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Current Applications, Effectiveness, and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Cho, Young-Seok

    2016-05-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the infusion of liquid filtrate feces from a healthy donor into the gut of a recipient to cure a specific disease. A fecal suspension can be administered by nasogastric or nasoduodenal tube, colonoscope, enema, or capsule. The high success rate and safety in the short term reported for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection has elevated FMT as an emerging treatment for a wide range of disorders, including Parkinson's disease, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, myoclonus dystopia, multiple sclerosis, obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and autism. There are many unanswered questions regarding FMT, including donor selection and screening, standardized protocols, long-term safety, and regulatory issues. This article reviews the efficacy and safety of FMT used in treating a variety of diseases, methodology, criteria for donor selection and screening, and various concerns regarding FMT.

  6. Fecal microbiota transplantation in treating Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William R

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an increasingly common and severe international health problem. Customary treatment of this infection, usually with antibiotics, is often ineffective and its recurrence is common. In recent years the treatment of recurrent or refractory CDI by the transfer of stool from an uninfected person, so called fecal "microbiota transplantation" has become recognized as effective and generally safe. The effectiveness of this novel treatment is incompletely defined but is likely to be due to its correction of the intestinal dysbiosis that characterizes the disease. Practical methods for the administration of the transplantation have been described. This review summarizes the current reported experiences with fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment for CDI. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. How to Manipulate the Microbiota: Fecal Microbiota Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Susana; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a rather straightforward therapy that manipulates the human gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota, by which a healthy donor microbiota is transferred into an existing but disturbed microbial ecosystem. This is a natural process that occurs already at birth; infants are rapidly colonized by a specific microbial community, the composition of which strongly depends on the mode of delivery and which therefore most likely originates from the mother (Palmer et al. 2007; Tannock et al. 1990). Since this early life microbial community already contains most, if not all, of the predominantly anaerobic microbes that are only found in the GI tract, it is reasonable to assume that early life colonization is the ultimate natural fecal transplantation.

  8. [Fecal microbiota transplantation: first case report in Chile and review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Ricardo; Quera, Rodrigo; Meyer, Lital; Rivera, Daniela

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile (CD) infection is increasing in frequency and severity in in-hospital and outpatient clinical settings, with a recurrence that can reach 30% after first episode. The recurrences are usually treated with longer courses of metronidazole or vancomycin. Other treatments have been used, such as probiotics, fidaxomicin, rifaximin, immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies against toxins A and B. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a promising strategy in this group of patients, with effectiveness greater than 90%. We present the first case reported in Chile of this therapeutic strategy in a patient with Crohn's disease and recurrent CD infection who presented after the fecal transplantation an Escherichia coli bacteremia, suggesting the need for caution in the use of this strategy. 10 months after the FMT the patient presented a new episode of E. coli bacteremia and two episodes of diarrhea due to CD infection, treated both of them with vancomycin with good clinical response.

  9. Fecal microbiota transplantation: current clinical efficacy and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman KA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn A Bowman,1 Elizabeth K Broussard,2 Christina M Surawicz2 1Department of Medicine, 2Division of Gastroenterology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT has gained mainstream attention with its remarkable efficacy in treating recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI when there are no other effective therapies. Methods of selecting donors and routes of administration vary among studies, but there are now randomized controlled trials showing efficacy of FMT in treating RCDI. Ongoing trials of FMT for other disease such as inflammatory bowel disease are underway; this therapy should not be used for these conditions unless there is strong evidence for efficacy. Long-term safety data are sorely needed, as well as clarification of regulatory concerns. Keywords: fecal microbiota transplant, recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, Clostridium difficile infection, microbiome, inflammatory bowel disease

  10. Treatment strategies in obstructed defecation and fecal incontinence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marat Khaikin; Steven D Wexner

    2006-01-01

    Obstructed defecation (OD) and fecal incontinence(FI) are challenging clinical problems, which are commonly encountered in the practice of colorectal surgeons and gastroenterologists. These disorders socially and psychologically distress patients and greatly impair their quality of life. The underlying anatomical and pathophysiological changes are complex, often incompletely understood and cannot always be determined. As a consequence, many medical, surgical,and behavioral approaches have been described, with no panacea. Over the past decade, advances in an understanding of these disorders together with rational and similar methods of evaluation in anorectal physiology laboratories (ARP), radiology studies, and new surgical techniques have led to promising results. In this brief review, we discuss treatment strategies and recent updates on clinical and therapeutic aspects of obstructed defecation and fecal incontinence.

  11. Fecal microbiota imbalance in Mexican children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-León, María Esther; Petrosino, Joseph F; Ajami, Nadim Jose; Domínguez-Bello, María Gloria; de la Barca, Ana María Calderón

    2014-01-22

    Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota affecting the gut barrier could be triggering Type 1 Diabetes (T1D), the second most frequent autoimmune disease in childhood. This study compared the structure of the fecal microbiota in 29 mestizo children aged 7-18 years, including 8 T1D at onset, 13 T1D after 2 years treatment, and 8 healthy controls. Clinical information was collected, predisposing haplotypes were determined; the fecal DNA was extracted, the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene amplified and 454-pyrosequenced. The newly diagnosed T1D cases had high levels of the genus Bacteroides (p microbiota dominated by Prevotella. Children with T1D treated for ≥2 years had levels of Bacteroides and Prevotella compared to those of the control group. The gut microbiota of newly diagnosed T1D cases is altered, but whether it is involved in disease causation or is a consequence of host selection remains unclear.

  12. Survival of Fecal Coliforms in Dry-Composting Toilets

    OpenAIRE

    Redlinger, Thomas; Graham, Jay; Corella-Barud, Verónica; Avitia, Raquel

    2001-01-01

    The dry-composting toilet, which uses neither water nor sewage infrastructure, is a practical solution in areas with inadequate sewage disposal and where water is limited. These systems are becoming increasingly popular and are promoted to sanitize human excreta and to recycle them into fertilizer for nonedible plants, yet there are few data on the safety of this technology. This study analyzed fecal coliform reduction in approximately 90 prefabricated, dry-composting toilets (Sistema Integra...

  13. Survival of fecal coliforms in dry-composting toilets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlinger, T; Graham, J; Corella-Barud, V; Avitia, R

    2001-09-01

    The dry-composting toilet, which uses neither water nor sewage infrastructure, is a practical solution in areas with inadequate sewage disposal and where water is limited. These systems are becoming increasingly popular and are promoted to sanitize human excreta and to recycle them into fertilizer for nonedible plants, yet there are few data on the safety of this technology. This study analyzed fecal coliform reduction in approximately 90 prefabricated, dry-composting toilets (Sistema Integral de Reciclamiento de Desechos Orgánicos [SIRDOs]) that were installed on the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico. The purpose of this study was to determine fecal coliform reduction over time and the most probable method of this reduction. Biosolid waste samples were collected and analyzed at approximately 3 and 6 months and were classified based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. Results showed that class A compost (high grade) was present in only 35.8% of SIRDOs after 6 months. The primary mechanism for fecal coliform reduction was found to be desiccation rather than biodegradation. There was a significant correlation (P = 0.008) between classification rating and percent moisture categories of the biosolid samples: drier samples had a greater proportion of class A samples. Solar exposure was critical for maximal class A biosolid end products (P = 0.001). This study only addressed fecal coliforms as an indicator organism, and further research is necessary to determine the safety of composting toilets with respect to other pathogenic microorganisms, some of which are more resistant to desiccation.

  14. Production of a fecal mutagen by Bacteroides spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Tassel, R L; MacDonald, D K; Wilkins, T D

    1982-01-01

    Forty species of anaerobes were screened for the ability to produce an ether-extractable mutagen which is present in the feces of 15 to 20% of individuals in populations at high risk for colon cancer. This mutagen can be produced in vitro by incubating the feces of these individuals anaerobically or by supplementing anaerobic broths with methanol extracts of the feces and incubating them with a dilute fecal inoculum. Of the anaerobes screened, strains of five species of Bacteroides (B. thetai...

  15. Can chronic gastritis cause an increase in fecal calprotectin concentrations?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimo; Montalto; Antonella; Gallo; Gianluca; Ianiro; Luca; Santoro; Ferruccio; D; Onofrio; Riccardo; Ricci; Giovanni; Cammarota; Marcello; Covino; Monica; Vastola; Antonio; Gasbarrini; Giovanni; Gasbarrini

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate fecal calprotectin concentrations(FCCs) in subjects with chronic gastritis and the correlation between FCCs and gastritis activity score.METHODS:FCCs were measured in 61 patients with histological diagnosis of gastritis and in 74 healthy volunteers.Histological grading of gastritis was performed according to the updated Sydney gastritis classification.Patients were subdivided into 2 groups according to the presence/absence of an active gastritis.Patients with chronic active gastritis were di...

  16. The Fecal Microbiota Profile and Bronchiolitis in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Linnemann, Rachel W; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Ajami, Nadim J; Espinola, Janice A; Petrosino, Joseph F; Piedra, Pedro A; Stevenson, Michelle D; Sullivan, Ashley F; Thompson, Amy D; Camargo, Carlos A

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the association of gut microbiota, a potentially modifiable factor, with bronchiolitis in infants. We aimed to determine the association of fecal microbiota with bronchiolitis in infants. We conducted a case-control study. As a part of multicenter prospective study, we collected stool samples from 40 infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis. We concurrently enrolled 115 age-matched healthy controls. By applying 16S rRNA gene sequencing and an unbiased clustering approach to these 155 fecal samples, we identified microbiota profiles and determined the association of microbiota profiles with likelihood of bronchiolitis. Overall, the median age was 3 months, 55% were male, and 54% were non-Hispanic white. Unbiased clustering of fecal microbiota identified 4 distinct profiles: Escherichia-dominant profile (30%), Bifidobacterium-dominant profile (21%), Enterobacter/Veillonella-dominant profile (22%), and Bacteroides-dominant profile (28%). The proportion of bronchiolitis was lowest in infants with the Enterobacter/Veillonella-dominant profile (15%) and highest in the Bacteroides-dominant profile (44%), corresponding to an odds ratio of 4.59 (95% confidence interval, 1.58-15.5; P = .008). In the multivariable model, the significant association between the Bacteroides-dominant profile and a greater likelihood of bronchiolitis persisted (odds ratio for comparison with the Enterobacter/Veillonella-dominant profile, 4.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.56-12.0; P = .005). In contrast, the likelihood of bronchiolitis in infants with the Escherichia-dominant or Bifidobacterium-dominant profile was not significantly different compared with those with the Enterobacter/Veillonella-dominant profile. In this case-control study, we identified 4 distinct fecal microbiota profiles in infants. The Bacteroides-dominant profile was associated with a higher likelihood of bronchiolitis. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Fecal microbiota transplantation for the management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Krishna; Young, Vincent B

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The disruption of the normal gut microbiota is central to the pathogenesis of CDI, and disruption persists in recurrent disease. The use of FMT for recurrent CDI is characterized by a high response rate and short term safety is excellent, although the long-term effects of FMT are as yet unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recovery of the gut microbiome following fecal microbiota transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekatz, Anna M; Aas, Johannes; Gessert, Charles E; Rubin, Timothy A; Saman, Daniel M; Bakken, Johan S; Young, Vincent B

    2014-06-17

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most common health care-associated infections, and up to 40% of patients suffer from recurrence of disease following standard antibiotic therapy. Recently, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been successfully used to treat recurrent C. difficile infection. It is hypothesized that FMT aids in recovery of a microbiota capable of colonization resistance to C. difficile. However, it is not fully understood how this occurs. Here we investigated changes in the fecal microbiota structure following FMT in patients with recurrent C. difficile infection, and imputed a hypothetical functional profile based on the 16S rRNA profile using a predictive metagenomic tool. Increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and decreased abundance of Proteobacteria were observed following FMT. The fecal microbiota of recipients following transplantation was more diverse and more similar to the donor profile than the microbiota prior to transplantation. Additionally, we observed differences in the imputed metagenomic profile. In particular, amino acid transport systems were overrepresented in samples collected prior to transplantation. These results suggest that functional changes accompany microbial structural changes following this therapy. Further identification of the specific community members and functions that promote colonization resistance may aid in the development of improved treatment methods for C. difficile infection. Within the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection has surpassed other bacterial infections to become the leading cause of nosocomial infections. Antibiotic use, which disrupts the gut microbiota and its capability in providing colonization resistance against C. difficile, is a known risk factor in C. difficile infection. In particular, recurrent C. difficile remains difficult to treat with standard antibiotic therapy. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has provided a successful treatment method for

  19. Fecal microbiota transplantation: current clinical efficacy and future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman KA; Broussard EK; Surawicz CM

    2015-01-01

    Kathryn A Bowman,1 Elizabeth K Broussard,2 Christina M Surawicz2 1Department of Medicine, 2Division of Gastroenterology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has gained mainstream attention with its remarkable efficacy in treating recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI) when there are no other effective therapies. Methods of selecting donors and routes of administration vary among studies, but there are now ra...

  20. Dietary Fiber Supplementation for Fecal Incontinence: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fiber supplements are used to manage fecal incontinence (FI), but little is known about the fiber type to recommend or the level of effectiveness of such supplements, which appear related to the fermentability of the fiber. The aim of this single-blind, randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of three dietary fiber supplements (carboxymethylcellulose [CMC], gum arabic [GA], or psyllium) with differing levels of fermentability to a placebo in community-living individuals...

  1. Comparative analysis of fecal microbiota in infants with and without eczema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying Hong

    Full Text Available Eczema is a chronic form of childhood disorder that is gaining in prevalence in affluent societies. Previous studies hypothesized that the development of eczema is correlated with changes in microbial profile and composition of early life endemic microbiota, but contradictory conclusions were obtained, possibly due to the lack of minimization of apparent non-health related confounders (e.g., age, antibiotic consumption, diet and mode of delivery. In this study, we recruited seven caesarean-delivered and total formula-fed infants, and comparatively examined the early-life endemic microbiota in these infants with and without eczema. Using 16S pyrosequencing, infants' fecal microbiota were observed to comprise Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes as the four main phyla, and the presence and absence of specific populations within these four phyla are primarily mediated by ageing. Quantitative analysis of bacterial targets on a larger sample size (n = 36 at 1, 3, and 12 months of age revealed that the abundances of Bifidobacterium and Enterobacteriaceae were different among caesarean-delivered infants with and without eczema, and the bacterial targets may be potential biomarkers that can correlate to the health status of these infants. Our overall findings suggest that the minimization of possible confounders is essential prior to comparative evaluation and correlation of fecal microbiota to health status, and that stool samples collected from caesarean-delivered infants at less than 1 year of age may represent a good cohort to study for potential biomarkers that can distinguish infants with eczema from those without. These findings would greatly facilitate future efforts in understanding the possible pathogenesis behind certain bacterial targets, and may lead to a timely intervention that reduces the occurrence of early life eczema and possibly allergic disorders in later life.

  2. [Preliminary study on bacteroides as the potential fecal contamination indicator bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing-yan; Chen, Zhi-jin; Ding, Xiao-bei; Huang, Wei; Yang, Rui-jia; Pei, Xiao-fang

    2011-03-01

    To explore the possibility of Bacteroides spp. as fecal contamination indicator bacteria with real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) assay through analyzing the correlation between Bacteroides spp. and coliform group in external environment. Quantity of coliform group and Bacteroides in water samples were detected by most-probable-number method (MPN) and RT-PCR, respectively, and their detection correlation was evaluated with linear correlation analysis. Both methods were also applied to detect the contaminated time limits and river water samples collected at four sampling sites in three different times. Seventy two hours were needed for the numeration of coliform group with MPN method, while RT-PCR could detect Bacteroides within 3 hours. The contaminated time limit of indoor and outdoor water samples of coliform group was more than 40 days and 9 days, and Bacteroides 13 days and 5 days, respectively. Also, the positive correlation between the quantity of Bacteroides and coliform group in outdoor water samples was obtained, the quantity of Bacteroides was from 8.3 × 10(6) copies/ml to less than 10(4) copies/ml during the first day to the fifth day, while coliform group was 4.3 × 10(6) MPN/100 ml to 2.4 × 10(3) MPN/100 ml. A 100% coincidence rate of the detection results with both methods was also observed. These results indicated that the detection results of both methods had perfect consistency. Bacteroides spp. can be potentially used as fecal contamination indicator bacteria with RT-PCR rapid detection.

  3. Holding-time and method comparisons for the analysis of fecal-indicator bacteria in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushon, Rebecca N; Brady, Amie M G; Lindsey, Bruce D

    2015-11-01

    As part of the US Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program, groundwater samples from domestic- and public-supply wells were collected and analyzed for fecal-indicator bacteria. A holding time comparison for total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and enterococci was done by analyzing samples within 8 h using presence/absence methods and within 18-30 h using quantitative methods. The data indicate that results obtained within 18-30 h were not significantly different from those obtained within 8 h for total coliforms and enterococci, by Colilert® and Enterolert® methods (IDEXX Laboratories Inc., Westbrook, ME), respectively. Quantitative laboratory methods for samples analyzed within 18-30 h showed a statistically significant higher detection frequency when compared to presence/absence methods done within 8 h for the following methods, E. coli by Colilert and enterococci by membrane filtration on mEI agar. Additionally, a comparison of methods for the enumeration of enterococci was done. Using non-parametric statistical analyses, results from the two methods were statistically different. In this study, the membrane filtration method on mEI agar was more sensitive, resulted in more detections of enterococci, and results were easier to interpret than with the quantitative Enterolert method. The quantitative Enterolert method produced varying levels of fluorescence, which required additional verification steps to eliminate false-positive results. It may be more advantageous to analyze untreated groundwater for enterococci using the membrane filtration method on mEI agar.

  4. Towards diagnostic metagenomics of Campylobacter in fecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sandra Christine; Kiil, Kristoffer; Harder, Christoffer Bugge

    2017-01-01

    of the challenges in diagnostic metagenomics are, that it requires a great next-generation sequencing depth and unautomated data analysis. DNA from human fecal samples spiked with 7.75 × 101-7.75 × 107 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml Campylobacter jejuni and chicken fecal samples spiked with 1 × 102-1 × 106 CFU....../g Campylobacter jejuni was sequenced and data analysis was done by the metagenomic tools Kraken and CLARK. More hits were obtained at higher spiking levels, however with no significant linear correlations (human samples p = 0.12, chicken samples p = 0.10). Therefore, no definite detection limit could...... be determined, but the lowest spiking levels found positive were 7.75 × 104 CFU/ml in human feces and 103 CFU/g in chicken feces. Eight human clinical fecal samples with estimated Campylobacter infection loads from 9.2 × 104-1.0 × 109 CFU/ml were analyzed using the same methods. It was possible to detect...

  5. Altered fecal microbiota composition in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiyin; Ling, Zongxin; Zhang, Yonghua; Mao, Hongjin; Ma, Zhanping; Yin, Yan; Wang, Weihong; Tang, Wenxin; Tan, Zhonglin; Shi, Jianfei; Li, Lanjuan; Ruan, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Studies using animal models have shown that depression affects the stability of the microbiota, but the actual structure and composition in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are not well understood. Here, we analyzed fecal samples from 46 patients with depression (29 active-MDD and 17 responded-MDD) and 30 healthy controls (HCs). High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that, according to the Shannon index, increased fecal bacterial α-diversity was found in the active-MDD (A-MDD) vs. the HC group but not in the responded-MDD (R-MDD) vs. the HC group. Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria strongly increased in level, whereas that of Firmicutes was significantly reduced in the A-MDD and R-MDD groups compared with the HC group. Despite profound interindividual variability, levels of several predominant genera were significantly different between the MDD and HC groups. Most notably, the MDD groups had increased levels of Enterobacteriaceae and Alistipes but reduced levels of Faecalibacterium. A negative correlation was observed between Faecalibacterium and the severity of depressive symptoms. These findings enable a better understanding of changes in the fecal microbiota composition in such patients, showing either a predominance of some potentially harmful bacterial groups or a reduction in beneficial bacterial genera. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the temporal and causal relationships between gut microbiota and depression and to evaluate the suitability of the microbiome as a biomarker.

  6. Fecal microbiome analysis as a diagnostic test for diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, L; Budding, A E; de Korte, N; Eck, A; Bogaards, J A; Stockmann, H B; Consten, E C; Savelkoul, P H; Boermeester, M A

    2014-11-01

    Disease-specific variations in intestinal microbiome composition have been found for a number of intestinal disorders, but little is known about diverticulitis. The purpose of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota of diverticulitis patients with control subjects from a general gastroenterological practice and to investigate the feasibility of predictive diagnostics based on complex microbiota data. Thirty-one patients with computed tomography (CT)-proven left-sided uncomplicated acute diverticulitis were included and compared with 25 control subjects evaluated for a range of gastrointestinal indications. A high-throughput polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based profiling technique (IS-pro) was performed on DNA isolates from baseline fecal samples. Differences in bacterial phylum abundance and diversity (Shannon index) of the resulting profiles were assessed by conventional statistics. Dissimilarity in microbiome composition was analyzed with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) based on cosine distance measures. To develop a prediction model for the diagnosis of diverticulitis, we used cross-validated partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratios and Proteobacteria load were comparable among patients and controls (p = 0.20). The Shannon index indicated a higher diversity in diverticulitis for Proteobacteria (p Diverticulitis patients have a higher diversity of fecal microbiota than controls from a mixed population, with the phylum Proteobacteria defining the difference. The analysis of intestinal microbiota offers a novel way to diagnose diverticulitis.

  7. Fecal microbiota transplantation for management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnavi, Chetana

    2014-07-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) to become a common problem with pronounced medical and economic effects. The recurrence of CDI after treatment with standard antibiotics is becoming more common with the emergence of more resistant strains of C. difficile. As CDI is an antibiotic-associated disease, further treatment with antibiotic is best avoided. As the gut flora is severely disturbed in CDI, approaches that restore the gut microbiota may become good alternative modes of CDI therapies. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the procedure of transplantation of fecal bacteria from a healthy donor individual into a patient for restoration of the normal colonic flora. Thus, FMT helps in the eradication of C. difficile and resolution of clinical symptoms such as diarrhea, cramping, and urgency. Though this approach to treatment is not new, presently, it has become an alternative and promising way of combating infections. The procedure is not in regular use because of the time required to identify a suitable donor, the risk of introducing opportunistic pathogens, and a general patient aversion to the transplant. However, FMT is gaining popularity because of its success rate as a panacea for recurrent attacks of CDI and is being increasingly used in clinical practice. This review describes the rationale, the indications, the results, the techniques, the potential donors, the benefits as well as the complications of fecal microbiota instillation to CDI patients in order to restore the normal gut flora.

  8. Fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Matthew; Mellow, Mark; Tierney, William M

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, Clostridium difficile infections have become more frequent, more severe, more refractory to standard treatment, and more likely to recur. Current antibiotic treatment regimens for Clostridium difficile infection alter the normal gut flora, which provide colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile. Over the past few years, there has been a marked increase in the knowledge of the gut microbiota and its role in health maintenance and disease causation. This has, fortuitously, coincided with the use of a unique microbial replacement therapy, fecal microbiota transplantation, in the treatment of patients with multiple recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. We briefly review current knowledge of the gut microbiota's functions. We then review the indications for use of fecal microbiota transplantation in Clostridium difficile infection, the techniques employed, and results of treatment. Fecal microbiota transplantation has been shown to be efficacious for patients with multiply recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (reported cure rates of 90%), with an excellent short-term safety profile, and has been included in the American College of Gastroenterology treatment guidelines for this troublesome disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An uncooked vegan diet shifts the profile of human fecal microflora: computerized analysis of direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography profiles of bacterial cellular fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, R; Ling, W H; Hänninen, O; Eerola, E

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an uncooked extreme vegan diet on fecal microflora was studied by direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of bacterial cellular fatty acids and by quantitative bacterial culture by using classical microbiological techniques of isolation, identification, and enumeration of different bacterial species. Eighteen volunteers were divided randomly into two groups. The test group received an uncooked vegan diet for 1 month and a conventional diet of mixed Western type for the other month of the study. The control group consumed a conventional diet throughout the study period. Stool samples were collected. Bacterial cellular fatty acids were extracted directly from the stool samples and measured by GLC. Computerized analysis of the resulting fatty acid profiles was performed. Such a profile represents all bacterial cellular fatty acids in a sample and thus reflects its microflora and can be used to detect changes, differences, or similarities of bacterial flora between individual samples or sample groups. GLC profiles changed significantly in the test group after the induction and discontinuation of the vegan diet but not in the control group at any time, whereas quantitative bacterial culture did not detect any significant change in fecal bacteriology in either of the groups. The results suggest that an uncooked extreme vegan diet alters the fecal bacterial flora significantly when it is measured by direct stool sample GLC of bacterial fatty acids. PMID:1482187

  10. A simple method to screen cilantro and parsley for fecal indicator viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endley, Seema; Johnson, Erin; Pillai, Suresh D

    2003-08-01

    A protocol has been developed to process cilantro and parsley samples for male-specific coliphages. Coliphage recovery depended on the duration of peptone rinsing, and whether the products were intact or cut. After 60 min of rinsing with 0.1% peptone, 78% of spiked coliphages were recovered from intact cilantro samples, and 60% of the spiked coliphages were recovered from cut cilantro samples. The protocol was field tested on a limited scale using cilantro and parsley samples from six retail outlets using enrichment-based and quantitative coliphage assays. Of the 18 retail cilantro and parsley samples that were analyzed, 50% (9 of 18) of the cilantro samples were positive for male-specific coliphages using the enrichment-based assay compared to 39% (7 of 18) of the parsley samples. Using the quantitative coliphage assay, only 28% (5 of 18) of the cilantro samples were positive, and none of the parsley samples were positive. The number of male-specific coliphages ranged between 1 and 11 plaque-forming units per 10 g of cilantro samples. None of the samples was positive for Escherichia coli. The results suggest that simplified male-specific coliphage screening of herb samples is possible and that male-specific coliphages be used along with conventional bacteriological indicators to screen produce for presence of fecal contamination.

  11. The impact of long-term dietary pattern of fecal donor on in vitro fecal fermentation properties of inulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junyi; Rose, Devin J

    2016-04-01

    Although the composition of the gut microbiota is of interest, the functionality, or metabolic activity, of the gut microbiota is of equal importance: the gut microbiota can produce either harmful metabolites associated with human disease or beneficial metabolites that protect against disease. The purposes of this study were to determine the associations between dietary intake variables and fecal short and branched chain fatty acid (S/BCFA) concentrations; to determine the associations between dietary intake variables and inulin degradation, short and branched chain fatty acid (S/BCFA) production, and ammonia production during in vitro fecal fermentation of a highly fermentable substrate (inulin); and finally to compare results from the fermentation of inulin with those obtained in a previous report using a poorly fermentable substrate (whole wheat; Yang and Rose, Nutr. Res., 2014, 34, 749-759). Stool samples from eighteen individuals that had completed one-year dietary records were used in an in vitro fecal fermentation system with long-chain inulin as substrate. Few dietary intake variables were correlated with fecal S/BCFA concentrations; however, intakes of several plant-based foods, especially whole grain, dry beans, and certain vegetables that provided dietary fiber, plant protein, and B vitamins, were associated with acetate, propionate, butyrate, and total SCFA production during inulin fermentation. In contrast, intake of dairy and processed meats that provided cholesterol and little fiber, were associated with ammonia and BCFA production. Comparing results between inulin and whole wheat fermentations, significant correlations were only found for butyrate and BCFA, suggesting that regardless of the type of carbohydrate provided to the microbiota, long-term diet may have a pronounced effect on the propensity of the gut microbiota toward either beneficial metabolism (butyrate production) or detrimental metabolism (BCFA production). These results may help in

  12. Clostridium Difficile and Fecal Microbial Transplant in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvin Sanaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Critically-ill patients constitute majority of the patients hospitalized in ICU wards (1, 2. This group of patients demands special considerations and measures of care (3-6. Clostridium difficile infection causes dangerous, painful and persistent diarrhea in critically ill patients. Its treatment consists of enteral metronidazol or vancomycin in combination with IV antibiotics cessation. Recently, probiotics have been considered as an alternative treatment for pseudomembranous colitis. In 1958, fecal microbial transplant was first described from healthy individuals to sick patients to displace pathogenic microbes from the intestine by re-establishing a healthy microbial community. Since then, it has gained value as “express stool treatment” or currently known as “fecal transplant”. Last year, FDA classified stool as drug, which typically requires an Investigational New Drug application (IND. However, in July 2013, the FDA issued guidance stating that it would exercise enforcement discretion for physicians administering FMT to treat patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Accordingly, considering stool as a tissue product or giving it its own classification, as FDA approved for blood, would keep patients safe, ensure broad access and facilitate research (7. It should be taken into consideration that some complications might accompany fecal microbial transplant such as making patients susceptible for conditions like obesity or autoimmune disorders. Safety and quality assurance starts from pre-enrollment donor screening, donor testing (17 serological and stool-based assays, donor monitoring and process control. The composition of the bacterial community has been shown to change when stored at -80oC compared to the samples stored at -20oC and it has been recommended to store the samples of intestinal content at -20oC before use for bacterial community analysis, instead of the current practice at -80oC (7, 8. However, if

  13. Enzymic and immunochemical properties of lysozyme. Accurate definition of the antigenic site around the disulphide bridge 30-115 (site 3) by 'surface-simulation' synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C L; Atassi, M Z

    1977-12-01

    1. Previous reports from this laboratory have shown that both Lys-33 and Lys-116 are parts of an antigenic site in native lysozyme. Similar studies of tyrosine derivatives indicated that one or both of Tyr-20 and Tyr-23 are located in or very close to an antigenic site in lysozyme. The site, which was located around the disulphide bridge 30-115, was recently shown unequivocally to include the residues Tyr-20, Arg-21, Lys-116, Asn-113, Arg-114, Phe-34 and Lys-33. This was confirmed by the ;surface-simulation' synthetic approach that we have recently developed, in which the foregoing eight surface residues were directly linked via peptide bonds, with intervening spacers where appropriate, into a single peptide. The peptide does not exist in native lysozyme, but simulates a surface region of it. 2. In the present work several surface-simulation peptides were synthesized representing various parts of the region, to determine the minimum structural feature that retains full antigenic reactivity and to investigate if the spatially constructed antigenic site has a preferred direction. 3. The peptide Lys-Asn-Arg-Gly-Phe-Lys exhibited a remarkable inhibitory activity towards the immune reaction of lysozyme and accounted entirely for the maximum expected reactivity of the site in the native protein (i.e. about one-third of the total lysozyme reactivity). An immunoadsorbent of the peptide bound about one-third of the total antibody to lysozyme. 4. The residues Tyr-20 and Arg-21 are not part of the site. The previously reported immunochemical effect observed on nitration of Tyr-20 was due to a deleterious ionic effect exerted by the modified tyrosine residue on the adjacent Lys-96, which is in an entirely different antigenic site of lysozyme. Thus the modification of Tyr-20 impairs the reactivity of an adjacent antigenic site, even though the residue itself is not part of a site. The conformational and immunochemical implications of this finding are discussed. 5. The antigenic

  14. Assessment of Fecal Contamination in Oklahoma Water Systems through the Use of Sterol Fingerprints

    OpenAIRE

    Yueming Lu; R. Paul Philp; Coralie Biache

    2016-01-01

    Fecal contamination is a major concern for water quality management, since the fecal materials are associated with pathogens that can cause illness wherever water is used for recreational, drinking and aquaculture purposes. In order to monitor source(s) of fecal contamination in Oklahoma water systems, sterol profiles were previously examined in rural and urban samples collected from the Illinois River Basin and the Norman Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), respectively. Two distinctive, qual...

  15. Fecal Contamination in the Surface Waters of a Rural- and an Urban-Source Watershed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stea, Emma C.; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Jamieson, Rob C.

    2015-01-01

    Surface waters are commonly used as source water for drinking water and irrigation. Knowledge of sources of fecal pollution in source watersheds benefits the design of effective source water protection plans. This study analyzed the relationships between enteric pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H...... and fecal marker concentrations in the waterways. The employment of multiple FST methods suggested failing onsite wastewater systems contribute to human fecal pollution in both watersheds....

  16. Stimulation of fecal bacteria in ambient waters by experimental inputs of organic and inorganic phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudoba, Elizabeth A; Mallin, Michael A; Cahoon, Lawrence B; Skrabal, Stephen A

    2013-06-15

    Fecal microbial pollution of recreational and shellfishing waters is a major human health and economic issue. Microbial pollution sourced from stormwater runoff is especially widespread, and strongly associated with urbanization. However, non-point source nutrient pollution is also problematic, and may come from sources different from fecal-derived pollution (i.e. fertilization of farm fields, lawns and gardens, and ornamental urban areas). Fecal bacteria require nutrients; thus the impact of such nutrient loading on survival and abundance of fecal coliform bacteria in ambient waters was experimentally investigated in a constructed wetland in coastal North Carolina, USA. A series of nutrient-addition bioassays testing impacts of inorganic and organic nitrogen and phosphorus demonstrated that additions of neither organic nor inorganic nitrogen stimulated fecal coliform bacteria. However, phosphorus additions provided significant stimulation of fecal coliform growth at times; on other occasions such additions did not. Dilution bioassays combined with nutrient additions were subsequently devised to assess potential impacts of microzooplankton grazing on the target fecal bacteria populations. Results demonstrated grazing to be a significant bacterial reduction factor in 63% of tests, potentially obscuring nutrient effects. Thus, combining dilution experiments with nutrient addition bioassays yielded simultaneous information on microzooplankton grazing rates on fecal bacteria, fecal bacterial growth rates, and nutrient limitation. Overall, when tested against a non-amended control, additions of either organic or inorganic phosphorus significantly stimulated fecal coliform bacterial growth on 50% of occasions tested, with organic phosphorus generally providing greater stimulation. The finding of significant phosphorus stimulation of fecal bacteria indicates that extraneous nutrient loading can, at times, augment the impacts of fecal microbial pollution of shellfishing

  17. Comparison of Fecal Microbiota in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Neurotypical Siblings in the Simons Simplex Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Joshua S; Zheng, Ling J; Rowehl, Leahana M; Tian, Xinyu; Zhang, Yuanhao; Zhu, Wei; Litcher-Kelly, Leighann; Gadow, Kenneth D; Gathungu, Grace; Robertson, Charles E; Ir, Diana; Frank, Daniel N; Li, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess potential associations between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) phenotype, functional GI disorders and fecal microbiota, we recruited simplex families, which had only a single ASD proband and neurotypical (NT) siblings, through the Simons Simplex Community at the Interactive Autism Network (SSC@IAN). Fecal samples and metadata related to functional GI disorders and diet were collected from ASD probands and NT siblings of ASD probands (age 7-14). Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) were assessed using the parent-completed ROME III questionnaire for pediatric FGIDs, and problem behaviors were assessed using the Child Behavior Check List (CBCL). Targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were conducted on selected taxa implicated in ASD, including Sutterella spp., Bacteroidetes spp. and Prevotella spp. Illumina sequencing of the V1V2 and the V1V3 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes from fecal DNA was performed to an average depth of 208,000 and 107,000 high-quality reads respectively. Twenty-five of 59 ASD children and 13 of 44 NT siblings met ROME III criteria for at least one FGID. Functional constipation was more prevalent in ASD (17 of 59) compared to NT siblings (6 of 44, P = 0.035). The mean CBCL scores in NT siblings with FGID, ASD children with FGID and ASD without FGID were comparably higher (58-62 vs. 44, P siblings. There was no significant difference in ASD severity scores between ASD children with and without FGID. No significant difference in diversity or overall microbial composition was detected between ASD children with NT siblings. Exploratory analysis of the 16S rRNA sequencing data, however, identified several low abundance taxa binned at the genus level that were associated with ASD and/or first order ASD*FGID interactions (FDR <0.1).

  18. Patients' experience compared with physicians' recommendations for treating fecal incontinence: a qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichowski, Sara B; Dunivan, Gena C; Rogers, Rebecca G; Komesu, Yuko M

    2014-07-01

    Using qualitative methods, we compared physician-recommended treatment options for fecal incontinence to patient knowledge of treatment options. Our hypothesis was that physician recommendations were not being communicated well to patients and that this impaired patients' ability to cope with fecal incontinence. Cognitive interviews were conducted with physicians who routinely care for women with fecal incontinence. Physicians were asked to describe their typical nonsurgical treatment recommendations and counseling for fecal incontinence. Women with bothersome fecal incontinence were recruited to participate in focus groups and asked about personal experience with fecal incontinence symptoms and treatment options. For both physician interviews and patient focus groups, qualitative data analysis was performed using grounded-theory methodology. Physicians identified several barriers patients face when seeking treatment: lack of physician interest toward fecal incontinence, and patient embarrassment in discussing fecal incontinence. Physicians universally recommended fiber and pelvic floor exercise; they felt the majority (approximately 70-80 %) of patients will improve with these therapies. Collectively, patients were able to identify all treatment recommendations given by physicians, although many had discovered these treatments through personal experience. Three concepts emerged regarding treatment options that physicians did not identify but that patients felt were important in their treatment: hope for improvement, personal effort to control symptoms, and encouragement to go on living life fully. Whereas physicians had treatment to offer women with fecal incontinence, women had already found the best treatments through personal research and effort. Women want to hear a message of hope and encouragement and perceive personal effort from providers.

  19. Fecal microbiota transplantation for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Giovanni; Ianiro, Gianluca; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    By systematic review, we assessed the impact of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for the treatment of Clostridium difficile (CD)-associated diarrhea. Fecal microbiota microbiota transplantation from a healthy donor into an individual with CD infection (CDI) can resolve symptoms. We conducted systematic searches in PubMed, SCOPUS, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library. The last search was run on February 8, 2013. The following Medical Subject Headings terms and keywords were used alone or in combination: Clostridium difficile; Clostridium infection; pseudomembranous colitis; feces; stools; fecal suspension; fecal transplantation; fecal transfer; fecal infusion; microbiota; bacteriotherapy; enema; nasogastric tube; colonoscopy; gastroscopy; fecal donation; donor. A critical appraisal of the clinical research evidence on the effectiveness and safety of FMT for the treatment of patients with CD-associated diarrhea was made. Twenty full-text case series, 15 case reports, and 1 randomized controlled study were included for the final analysis. Almost all patients treated with donors' fecal infusion experienced recurrent episodes of CD-associated diarrhea despite standard antibiotic treatment. Of a total of 536 patients treated, 467 (87%) experienced resolution of diarrhea. Diarrhea resolution rates varied according to the site of infusion: 81% in the stomach; 86% in the duodenum/jejunum; 93% in the cecum/ascending colon; and 84% in the distal colon. No severe adverse events were reported with the procedure. FMT seems efficacious and safe for the treatment of recurrent CDI. Hospitals should encourage the development of fecal transplantation programs to improve therapy of local patients.

  20. Inflixmab in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease rapidly decreases fecal calprotectin levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anssi H(a)m(a)l(a)inen; Taina Sipponen; Kaija-Leena Kolho

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the response to infliximab in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as reflected in fecal calprotectin levels.METHODS: Thirty-six pediatric patients with IBD [23 Crohn’s disease (CD), 13 ulcerative colitis (UC); median age 14 years] were treated with infliximab. Fecal calprotectin was measured at baseline, and 2 and 6 wk after therapy, and compared to blood inflammatory markers. Maintenance medication was unaltered until the third infusion but glucocorticoids were tapered off if the patient was doing well.RESULTS: At introduction of infliximab, median fecal calprotectin level was 1150 μg/g (range 54-6032 μg/g). By week 2, the fecal calprotectin level had declined to a median 261 μg/g (P < 0.001). In 37% of the patients, fecal calprotectin was normal (< 100 μg/g) at 2 wk. By week 6, there was no additional improvement in the fecal calprotectin level (median 345 μg/g). In 22% of the patients, fecal calprotectin levels increased by week 6 to pretreatment levels or above, suggesting no response (or a loss of early response). Thus, in CD, the proportion of non-responsive patients by week 6 seemed lower, because only 9% showed no improvement in their fecal calprotectin level when compared to the respective figure of 46% of the UC patients (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: When treated with infliximab, fecal calprotectin levels reflecting intestinal inflammation normalized rapidly in one third of pediatric patients suggesting complete mucosal healing.

  1. Tracking the Sources of Fecal Contaminations: an Interdisciplinary Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneau, L.; Jarde, E.; Derrien, M.; Gruau, G.; Solecki, O.; Pourcher, A.; Marti, R.; Wéry, N.; Caprais, M.; Gourmelon, M.; Mieszkin, S.; Jadas-Hécart, A.; Communal, P.

    2011-12-01

    Fecal contaminations of inland and coastal waters induce risks to human health and economic losses. In order to improve water management, it is necessary to identify the sources of contamination, which implies the development of specific markers. In order to be considered as a valuable host-specific marker, one must (1) be source specific, (2) occur in high concentration in polluting matrices, (3) exhibit extra-intestinal persistence similar to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and (4) not grow out of the host. However, up to day no single marker has fulfilled all those criteria. Thus, it has been suggested to use a combination of markers in order to generate more reliable data. This has lead to the development of a Microbial Source Tracking (MST) toolbox including FIB and microbial and chemical specific markers in order to differentiate between human, bovine and porcine fecal contaminations. Those specific markers are, (1) genotypes of F-specific RNA bacteriophages, (2) bacterial markers belonging to the Bacteroidales (human-specific HF183, ruminant-specific Rum-2-Bac and pig-specific Pig-2-Bac markers), to the Bifidobacterium (Bifidobacterium adolescentis) and pig-specific Lactobacillus amylovorus, (3) fecal stanols and (4) caffeine. The development of this MST toolbox was composed of four steps, from the molecular scale to the watershed scale. At the molecular scale, the specificity and the concentration of those markers were studied in cattle and pig manures and in waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and influents. At the microcosm scale, the transfer of bovine and porcine specific markers was investigated by rainfall simulations on agricultural plots amended with cattle or pig manure. Moreover, the relative persistence of FIB and human, porcine and bovine specific markers was investigated in freshwater and seawater microcosms inoculated with a WWTP influent, pig manure and cow manure. Finally, the aforementioned MST toolbox has been validated at the

  2. ELECTROPHORETIC AND IMMUNOCHEMICAL TECHNIQUES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    albumins of seed storage proteins of pea (Pisum sativum), bean (Vicia faba), lentil (Lens esculentum) and chick pea (Cicer .... All chemicals used in this experiment were purchased from Sigma .... share largely the same sub-unit composition.

  3. Diffusion limited immunochemical sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent surface coverage of antigen-antibody complexes for a sensor in which antigens are bound to surface immobilized antibodies is determined analytically. Assuming a reversible first order reaction between the antigens and antibodies, a model is derived describing the dynamical

  4. Fecal calprotectin excretion in preterm infants during the neonatal period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Rougé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fecal calprotectin has been proposed as a non-invasive marker of intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease in adults and children. Fecal calprotectin levels have been reported to be much higher in both healthy full-term and preterm infants than in children and adults. OBJECTIVE: To determine the time course of fecal calprotectin (f-calprotectin excretion in preterm infants from birth until hospital discharge and to identify factors influencing f-calprotectin levels in the first weeks of life, including bacterial establishment in the gut. METHODOLOGY: F-calprotectin was determined using an ELISA assay in 147 samples obtained prospectively from 47 preterm infants (gestational age, and birth-weight interquartiles 27-29 weeks, and 880-1320 g, respectively at birth, and at 2-week intervals until hospital discharge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Although median f-calprotectin excretion was 138 microg/g, a wide range of inter- and intra-individual variation in f-calprotectin values (from day 3 to day 78 was observed (86% and 67%, respectively. In multivariate regression analysis, f-calprotectin correlated negatively with ante and per natal antibiotic treatment (p = 0.001, and correlated positively with the volume of enteral feeding (mL/kg/d (p = 0.009, the need to interrupt enteral feeding (p = 0.001, and prominent gastrointestinal colonization by Clostridium sp (p = 0.019 and Staphylococcus sp (p = 0.047. CONCLUSION: During the first weeks of life, the high f-calprotectin values observed in preterm infants could be linked to the gut bacterial establishment.

  5. Successful therapy of Clostridium difficile infection with fecal microbiota transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, P C; Koziel, J; Dieterich, W; Haziri, D; Wirtz, S; Glowczyk, I; Konturek, K; Neurath, M F; Zopf, Y

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea and represents an important burden for healthcare worldwide. Symptoms of severe CDI include watery, foul-smelling diarrhea, peripheral leucocytosis, increased C-reactive protein (CRP), acute renal failure, hypotension and pseudomembranous colitis. Recent studies indicate that the main cause of CDI is dysbiosis, an imbalance in the normal gut microbiota. The restoration of a healthy gut microbiota composition via fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) recently became more popular. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of FMT on the healing of CDI and to analyze the changes in the level of pro-inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, fecal calprotectin) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Eighteen patients with CDI were included in our study (6 males and 12 females) with recurrent and/or severe CDI. The FMT was performed in 17 patients using colonoscopy, including 16 patients receiving a one-time FMT and 1 patient who needed 2 additional FMTs. One patient was treated with a single round of FMT using push-and-pull enteroscopy. In all CDI patients, before and 3 weeks after FMT, the following parameters were analyzed: C-reactive protein, fecal calprotectin, and plasma interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). In addition, the plasma level of LL-37, a cathelicidine peptide was assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) before and 3 months after FMT. Finally, in 7 patients a microbiome analysis was performed by sequencing of 16SrRNA in stool probes obtained before and 3 weeks after FMT. The healing rate of CDI was 94%. In all successfully treated patients no recurrent CDI was observed during follow-up (16 months). The serum level of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-12) significantly decreased after FMT. Similarly, CRP and fecal calprotectin normalized after FMT. 3 months after FMT a significant

  6. Step-up fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bota; Li, Pan; Xu, Lijuan; Peng, Zhaoyuan; Xiang, Jie; He, Zhi; Zhang, Ting; Ji, Guozhong; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Faming

    2016-07-03

    Gut dysbiosis is a characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective strategy to restore intestinal microbial diversity and has been reported to have a potential therapeutic value in IBD. Our recent study reported a holistic integrative therapy called "step-up FMT strategy," which was beneficial in treating steroid-dependent IBD patients. This strategy consists of scheduled FMTs combined with steroids, anti-TNF-α antibody treatment or enteral nutrition. Herein, we will elaborate the strategy thoroughly, introducing the concept, potential indication, methodology, and safety of "step-up FMT strategy" in detail.

  7. Daily variability of strongyle fecal egg counts in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helena; Larsen, Lene; Ritz, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Strongyle parasites are ubiquitous in grazing horses and constitute a potential threat to equine health. Feces were collected from six horses four times daily over a period of 5 days. Fecal egg counts (FECs) were performed to identify any diurnal rhythms in strongyle egg shedding and to quantify...... variability at the different levels: individual horses, repeated counts, repeated subsamples, different time points, and different days. No significant differences in FECs were found between the different time points (P = .11). The variables-horse, day, subsample, and egg count-accounted for a variance of 104...

  8. Fecal microbiota transplantation: current clinical efficacy and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kathryn A; Broussard, Elizabeth K; Surawicz, Christina M

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has gained mainstream attention with its remarkable efficacy in treating recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI) when there are no other effective therapies. Methods of selecting donors and routes of administration vary among studies, but there are now randomized controlled trials showing efficacy of FMT in treating RCDI. Ongoing trials of FMT for other disease such as inflammatory bowel disease are underway; this therapy should not be used for these conditions unless there is strong evidence for efficacy. Long-term safety data are sorely needed, as well as clarification of regulatory concerns.

  9. Run-off studies demonstrate parallel transport behaviour for a marker of poultry fecal contamination and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidhaas, J; Garner, E; Basden, T; Harwood, V J

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether poultry litter marker gene LA35 is correlated with pathogens and fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in run-off from poultry litter-amended plots. A rainfall simulator with various vegetative filter strip lengths was employed to evaluate the correlation of a microbial source tracking (MST) marker for poultry feces/litter (the 16S rRNA gene of Brevibacterium sp. LA35 [LA35] measured by quantitative PCR) with pathogens and FIB in run-off. LA35 was correlated with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp. and Bacteroidales levels. Salmonella was present at low concentration in litter, but became undetectable by qPCR in run-off. Escherichia coli, LA35 and Staph. aureus exhibited mass-based first flush behaviour in the run-off. Correlation of LA35 with FIB and pathogens in run-off from poultry litter-amended fields suggest comparable transport mechanisms and that LA35 is a useful tracer for harmful bacteria in the environment released from poultry litter. To protect human health, an effective marker for poultry fecal contamination should exhibit similar fate and transport characteristics compared to pathogens. This study is among the first to demonstrate such a relationship in run-off for a MST marker. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Distribution of genetic markers of fecal pollution on a freshwater sandy shoreline in proximity to wastewater effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmiller, Jessica J; Hicks, Randall E; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2013-04-02

    Water, sand, and sediment from a Lake Superior harbor site continuously receiving wastewater effluent was sampled monthly for June to October 2010 and from May to September 2011. Understanding the dynamics of genetic markers of fecal bacteria in these matrices is essential to accurately characterizing health risks. Genetic markers for enterococci, total Bacteroides, and human-associated Bacteroides were measured in site-water, sand, and sediment and in final effluent by quantitative PCR. The similarity between the quantity of molecular markers in the water column and effluent indicated that the abundance of genetic markers in the water column was likely controlled by effluent inputs. Effluent turbidity was positively correlated (p ≤ 0.05) with AllBac and HF183 in final effluent and AllBac in the water column. In sand and sediment, Entero1 and AllBac were most abundant in the upper 1-3 cm depths, whereas HF183 was most abundant in the upper 1 cm of sand and at 7 cm in sediment. The AllBac and Entero1 markers were 1- and 2-orders of magnitude more abundant in sand and sediment relative to the water column per unit mass. These results indicate that sand and sediment may act as reservoirs for genetic markers of fecal pollution at some freshwater sites.

  11. The quantitative Morse theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Ta Le; Phien, Phan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a proof of the quantitative Morse theorem stated by {Y. Yomdin} in \\cite{Y1}. The proof is based on the quantitative Sard theorem, the quantitative inverse function theorem and the quantitative Morse lemma.

  12. Unsealed Tubewells Lead to Increased Fecal Contamination of Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappett, Peter S. K.; McKay, Larry D.; Layton, Alice; Williams, Daniel E.; Alam, Md. J.; Mailloux, Brian J.; Ferguson, Andrew S.; Culligan, Patricia J.; Serre, Marc L.; Emch, Michael; Ahmed, Kazi M.; Sayler, Gary S.; van Geen, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh is underlain by shallow aquifers in which millions of drinking water wells are emplaced without annular seals. Fecal contamination has been widely detected in private tubewells. To evaluate the impact of well construction on microbial water quality 35 private tubewells (11 with intact cement platforms, 19 without) and 17 monitoring wells (11 with the annulus sealed with cement, 6 unsealed) were monitored for cultured E. coli over 18 months. Additionally, two “snap shot” sampling events were performed on a subset of wells during late-dry and early-wet seasons, wherein the fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) E. coli, Bacteroidales and the pathogenicity genes eltA (ETEC E. coli), ipaH (Shigella) and 40/41 hexon (adenovirus) were detected using qPCR. No difference in E. coli detection frequency was found between tubewells with and without platforms. Unsealed private wells, however, contained cultured E. coli more frequently and higher concentrations of FIB than sealed monitoring wells (p<0.05), suggestive of rapid downward flow along unsealed annuli. As a group the pathogens ETEC, Shigella and adenovirus were detected more frequently (10/22) during the wet season than the dry season (2/20). This suggests proper sealing of private tubewell annuli may lead to substantial improvements in microbial drinking water quality. PMID:23165714

  13. Parasitological diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni: fecal examination and rectal biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Teles Rabello

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Even with all progress in the search of sensitive and methods for the immunological diagnosis of schistosomiasis, the microscopic detection of eggs of the parasite in the stool still remains the most widely used tool for the actual diagnosis of active infection. Among the coproscopic methods, Kato's technic modified by Katz et al (Kato/Katz has the advantages of higher sensitivity, the possibility of egg quantification, its low operational cost and its feasibility in areas with minimal infra-structure. The oorgram of the rectal mucosa is valuable in initial clinical trials of schistosomicides, when it is needed to observe egg morphology in tissue. It could be an alternative method for individual diagnosis, being more sensitive than a single stool exam in low intensity infection. However, the increased sensitivity of a higher number of fecal exams makes that invasiveprocedure unnecessary. In the assessment of cure of schistosomiasis, Kato/Katz method (three fecal samples in one, three and six months after treatment and the rectal biopsy four months after treatment, are equally reliable.

  14. Solid-phase microextraction and the human fecal VOC metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Dixon

    Full Text Available The diagnostic potential and health implications of volatile organic compounds (VOCs present in human feces has begun to receive considerable attention. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME has greatly facilitated the isolation and analysis of VOCs from human feces. Pioneering human fecal VOC metabolomic investigations have utilized a single SPME fiber type for analyte extraction and analysis. However, we hypothesized that the multifarious nature of metabolites present in human feces dictates the use of several diverse SPME fiber coatings for more comprehensive metabolomic coverage. We report here an evaluation of eight different commercially available SPME fibers, in combination with both GC-MS and GC-FID, and identify the 50/30 µm CAR-DVB-PDMS, 85 µm CAR-PDMS, 65 µm DVB-PDMS, 7 µm PDMS, and 60 µm PEG SPME fibers as a minimal set of fibers appropriate for human fecal VOC metabolomics, collectively isolating approximately 90% of the total metabolites obtained when using all eight fibers. We also evaluate the effect of extraction duration on metabolite isolation and illustrate that ex vivo enteric microbial fermentation has no effect on metabolite composition during prolonged extractions if the SPME is performed as described herein.

  15. Alcohol induced alterations to the human fecal VOC metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin D Couch

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption impacts the intestinal microbiota composition, causing disruption of homeostasis (dysbiosis. However, this observed change is not indicative of the dysbiotic intestinal microbiota function that could result in the production of injurious and toxic products. Thus, knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the intestinal microbiota function and their metabolites is warranted, in order to better understand the role of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol associated organ failure. Here, we report the results of a differential metabolomic analysis comparing volatile organic compounds (VOC detected in the stool of alcoholics and non-alcoholic healthy controls. We performed the analysis with fecal samples collected after passage as well as with samples collected directly from the sigmoid lumen. Regardless of the approach to fecal collection, we found a stool VOC metabolomic signature in alcoholics that is different from healthy controls. The most notable metabolite alterations in the alcoholic samples include: (1 an elevation in the oxidative stress biomarker tetradecane; (2 a decrease in five fatty alcohols with anti-oxidant property; (3 a decrease in the short chain fatty acids propionate and isobutyrate, important in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell health and barrier integrity; (4 a decrease in alcohol consumption natural suppressant caryophyllene; (5 a decrease in natural product and hepatic steatosis attenuator camphene; and (6 decreased dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, microbial products of decomposition. Our results showed that intestinal microbiota function is altered in alcoholics which might promote alcohol associated pathologies.

  16. Studies on streptococci. I. Distribution of fecal streptococci in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Shimohashi, H; Kawai, Y; Mutai, M

    1981-01-01

    To understand the significance to the host of streptococci as part of the intestinal microflora, we first tried to investigate the distribution of human fecal streptococci on the species level. Of the selective media compared, KMN agar was more effective than the other media for the isolation of streptococci from human feces. We made an effort to improve streptococcal classification. Especially we used utilization of 1% pyruvate, 1% arginine, and 1% citrate for differentiation between Streptococcus faecalis and S. faecium. In a tellurite tolerance test, S. faecalis was distinguished more clearly from S. faecium in the medium containing 0.16 or 0.32% tellurite. We devised methods of presumptive identification of fecal streptococci from the results of the characteristics of 1,442 isolates. These methods enabled us to identify many strains rapidly. Different results in the distribution of species of streptococci between children and adults were observed. S. faecalis and S. faecium were isolated constantly from both groups. S. bovis and S. avium were isolated frequently from the feces of children. On the other hand, "viridans" streptococci, e.g. S. salivarius, S. mitis and S. MG-intermedius were present at a high frequency in, and no S. avium could be isolated from, the feces of adults.

  17. Control of the gut microbiome by fecal microRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirong Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery in the early 90s, microRNAs (miRNAs, small non-coding RNAs, have mainly been associated with posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression on a cell-autonomous level. Recent evidence has extended this role by adding inter-species communication to the manifold functional range. In our latest study [Liu S, et al., 2016, Cell Host & Microbe], we identified miRNAs in gut lumen and feces of both mice and humans. We found that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC and Hopx+ cells were the two main sources of fecal miRNA. Deficiency of IEC-miRNA resulted in gut dysbiosis and WT fecal miRNA transplantation restored the gut microbiota. We investigated potential mechanisms for this effect and found that miRNAs were able to regulate the gut microbiome. By culturing bacteria with miRNAs, we found that host miRNAs were able to enter bacteria, specifically regulate bacterial gene transcripts and affect bacterial growth. Oral administration of synthetic miRNA mimics affected specific bacteria in the gut. Our findings describe a previously unknown pathway by which the gut microbiome is regulated by the host and raises the possibility that miRNAs may be used therapeutically to manipulate the microbiome for the treatment of disease.

  18. Fecal Microbiota and Diet of Children with Chronic Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Gomes de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many factors explain dysbiosis in chronic constipation (CC, such as a low-fiber diet. The objective of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota of constipated and nonconstipated children and their intake frequencies of food. Methods. This observational study included 79 children (M/F 43/36 aged six to 36 months divided into two groups: cases (39 constipated children and controls (40 nonconstipated children. We used a structured form to collect demographic variables, conducted anthropometric assessment, and collected food intake frequency data. The fecal microbiota of the stool samples was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR using the fluorophore SYBR® Green. Results. Constipated children had a smaller concentration of Lactobacillus per milligram of stool (p=0.015 than nonconstipated children, but the concentration of Bifidobacterium per milligram of stool (p=0.323 and the intake of fruits, vegetables (p=0.563, and junk food (p=0.093 of the two groups did not differ. Constipated children consumed more dairy products (0.45±0.8; p>0.001, were more frequently delivered via caesarean section (69.2%, were weaned earlier (median: 120; 60Q1–240Q3, and had a family history of constipation (71.8%. Conclusions. Children with CC have a smaller concentration of Lactobacillus in their stools and consume more dairy products.

  19. Fecal Microbiota and Diet of Children with Chronic Constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Joyce Gomes; Motta, Maria Eugênia Farias de Almeida; Beltrão, Monique Ferraz de Sá; Salviano, Taciana Lima; da Silva, Giselia Alves Pontes

    2016-01-01

    Many factors explain dysbiosis in chronic constipation (CC), such as a low-fiber diet. The objective of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota of constipated and nonconstipated children and their intake frequencies of food. Methods. This observational study included 79 children (M/F 43/36) aged six to 36 months divided into two groups: cases (39 constipated children) and controls (40 nonconstipated children). We used a structured form to collect demographic variables, conducted anthropometric assessment, and collected food intake frequency data. The fecal microbiota of the stool samples was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the fluorophore SYBR® Green. Results. Constipated children had a smaller concentration of Lactobacillus per milligram of stool (p = 0.015) than nonconstipated children, but the concentration of Bifidobacterium per milligram of stool (p = 0.323) and the intake of fruits, vegetables (p = 0.563), and junk food (p = 0.093) of the two groups did not differ. Constipated children consumed more dairy products (0.45 ± 0.8; p > 0.001), were more frequently delivered via caesarean section (69.2%), were weaned earlier (median: 120; 60Q1-240Q3), and had a family history of constipation (71.8%). Conclusions. Children with CC have a smaller concentration of Lactobacillus in their stools and consume more dairy products.

  20. Gut microbiota modulation: probiotics, antibiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Giovanni; Ianiro, Gianluca; Bibbò, Stefano; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Gut microbiota is known to have a relevant role in our health, and is also related to both gastrointestinal and extradigestive diseases. Therefore, restoring the alteration of gut microbiota represents an outstanding clinical target for the treatment of gut microbiota-related diseases. The modulation of gut microbiota is perhaps an ancestral, innate concept for human beings. At this time, the restoration of gut microbiota impairment is a well-established concept in mainstream medicine, and several therapeutic approaches have been developed in this regard. Antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics are the best known and commercially available options to overcome gastrointestinal dysbiosis. Fecal microbiota transplantation is an old procedure that has recently become popular again. It has shown a clear effectiveness in the treatment of C. difficile infection, and now represents a cutting-edge option for the restoration of gut microbiota. Nevertheless, such weapons should be used with caution. Antibiotics can indeed harm and alter gut microbiota composition. Probiotics, instead, are not at all the same thing, and thinking in terms of different strains is probably the only way to improve clinical outcomes. Moreover, fecal microbiota transplantation has shown promising results, but stronger proofs are needed. Considerable efforts are needed to increase our knowledge in the field of gut microbiota, especially with regard to the future use in its modulation for therapeutic purposes.

  1. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile Infection: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drekonja, Dimitri; Reich, Jon; Gezahegn, Selome; Greer, Nancy; Shaukat, Aasma; MacDonald, Roderick; Rutks, Indy; Wilt, Timothy J

    2015-05-05

    The role of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is not well-known. To assess the efficacy, comparative effectiveness, and harms of FMT for CDI. MEDLINE (1980 to January 2015), Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov, followed by hand-searching references from systematic reviews and identified studies. Any study of FMT to treat adult patients with CDI; case reports were only used to report harms. Data were extracted by 1 author and verified by another; 2 authors independently assessed risk of bias and strength of evidence. Two randomized, controlled trials (RCTs); 28 case-series studies; and 5 case reports were included. Two RCTs and 21 case-series studies (516 patients receiving FMT) reported using FMT for patients with recurrent CDI. A high proportion of treated patients had symptom resolution; however, the role of previous antimicrobials is unclear. One RCT comparing FMT with 2 control groups (n = 43) reported resolution of symptoms in 81%, 31%, and 23% of the FMT, vancomycin, or vancomycin-plus-bowel lavage groups, respectively (P Fecal microbiota transplantation may have a substantial effect with few short-term adverse events for recurrent CDI. Evidence is insufficient on FMT for refractory or initial CDI treatment and on whether effects vary by donor, preparation, or delivery method. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  2. An occurrence of sepsis during inpatient fecal disimpaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Cory J; Devito, Justin F

    2014-01-01

    Functional constipation is a common pediatric problem that is often treated through well-established algorithms. Fecal disimpaction is the initial therapeutic step, and severe cases require hospitalization for intensive therapies. We describe a significant unexpected complication of this common clinical situation. An 8-year-old boy with suspected chronic functional constipation was hospitalized for disimpaction by continuous nasogastric administration of polyethylene glycol electrolyte (PEG-E) solution. On the sixth day of disimpaction, the patient abruptly developed fever, tachycardia, and tachypnea. Evaluation included blood culture, which grew Escherichia coli, and treatment with a course of appropriate antibiotics was provided. The safety of PEG-E solutions has been shown in studies of children with constipation, which made this patient's illness surprising. Several potential etiologies of his infection were considered, including bacterial translocation (BT). BT is defined as the passage of live microbes and microbial products from the gastrointestinal tract to extraintestinal sites, such as the bloodstream. It has been shown to occur in a variety of clinical conditions but is of unclear clinical significance. In this case, physical damage to the intestinal mucosa was thought to contribute to the potential occurrence of BT, and prolonged disimpaction was considered as a risk factor. E coli sepsis in a child undergoing inpatient nasogastric fecal disimpaction with PEG-E represents a clinical problem never before reported in the literature and should increase clinicians' indices of suspicion for uncommon complications of common procedures.

  3. Fecal microbiota transplantation for Clostridium difficile infection: benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Cohen, Mitchell B

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have increased worldwide in the past two decades. A principal function of the gut microbiota is to protect the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Increasingly, the gut microbiota have been shown to influence susceptibility to other genetic and environmentally acquired conditions. Transplantation of healthy donor fecal material in patients with CDI may re-establish the normal composition of the gut microbiota and has been shown to be effective in recurrent CDI. We intend to review the most recent data on fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and critically discuss potential advantages and handicaps of this new therapeutic approach. Evidence from case series and only one randomized clinical trial suggests that FMT is able to restore the wide diversity of microflora, improve C. difficile-related symptoms and prevent CDI recurrence. FMT is a promising treatment option for serious and recurrent CDI, and current evidence (although weak) demonstrates consistent and excellent efficacy in clinical outcomes. However, many questions should be answered before it may be recommended as routine standard treatment. Mechanisms of action need to be better understood. Long-term follow-up studies are needed to determine long-lasting effects (including the association with autoimmune diseases).

  4. Extraction of 3,4,4′-Trichlorocarbanilide from Rat Fecal Samples for Determination by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah C. Kennedy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Triclocarban (3,4,4′-Trichlorocarbanilide; TCC in the environment has been well documented. Methods have been developed to monitor TCC levels from various matrices including water, sediment, biosolids, plants, blood and urine; however, no method has been developed to document the concentration of TCC in fecal content after oral exposure in animal studies. In the present study, we developed and validated a method that uses liquid extraction coupled with HPLC-MS/MS determination to measure TCC in feces. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation in control rats without TCC exposure was 69.0 ng/g and 92.9 ng/g of feces, respectively. The base levels of TCC in feces were lower than LOD. At 12 days of treatment, the fecal TCC concentration increased to 2220 µg/g among 0.2% w/w exposed animals. The concentration in fecal samples decreased over the washout period in 0.2% w/w treated animals to 0.399 µ/g feces after exposure was removed for 28 days. This method required a small amount of sample (0.1 g with simple sample preparation. Given its sensitivity and efficiency, this method may be useful for monitoring TCC exposure in toxicological studies of animals.

  5. Waveband selection and algorithm development to distinguish fecal contamination using multispectral imaging with solar light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecal contamination in fresh produce fields caused by animals or livestock entering the fields can lead to outbreaks of foodbourne illnesses. E.coli O157:H7 originating in the intestines of animals can transfer onto leafy greens via fecal matter. Leafy greens are often eaten fresh without thermal tr...

  6. Can the outcome of pelvic-floor rehabilitation in patients with fecal incontinence be predicted?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Terra; M. Deutekom (Marije); A.C. Dobben (Annette); C.G.M.I. Baeten; L.W.M. Janssen (Lucas); G.E. Boeckxstaens (Guy); A.F. Engel (Alexander); R.J.F. Felt-Bersma; J.F.W. Slors; M.F. Gerhards (Michael); A.B. Bijnen (Bart); E. Everhardt; W.R. Schouten (Ruud); B. Berghmans; P.M.M. Bossuyt (Patrick); J. Stoker (Jacob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Pelvic-floor rehabilitation does not provide the same degree of relief in all fecal incontinent patients. We aimed at studying prospectively the ability of tests to predict the outcome of pelvic-floor rehabilitation in patients with fecal incontinence. Materials and methods: Two

  7. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecal culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis, however, PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in fecal material is widely used today, having demonstrated great sensitivity and specificity. To insure the most efficient and rep...

  8. Fecal microbial composition of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease patients in remission and subsequent exacerbation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wills, E.S.; Jonkers, D.M.; Savelkoul, P.H.; Masclee, A.A.M.; Pierik, M.J.; Penders, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited studies have examined the intestinal microbiota composition in relation to changes in disease course of IBD over time. We aimed to study prospectively the fecal microbiota in IBD patients developing an exacerbation during follow-up. DESIGN: Fecal samples from 10 Crohn's disease (

  9. 33 CFR 159.319 - Fecal coliform and total suspended solids standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Certain Alaskan Waters by Cruise Vessel Operations § 159.319 Fecal coliform and total suspended solids... suspended solids standards. 159.319 Section 159.319 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Alaska shall not have a fecal coliform bacterial count of greater than 200 per 100 ml nor total suspended...

  10. Fecal progestagens to detect and monitor pregnancy in captive female cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Itsuki; Kusuda, Satoshi; Kawai, Hitomi; Ohazama, Megumi; Taniguchi, Atsushi; Kondo, Natsuko; Yoshihara, Masato; Okuda, Ryuta; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kanda, Iwai; Doi, Osamu

    2011-04-01

    The purposes of the present study were to establish a noninvasive monitoring assay of fecal progestagen measurement to detect pregnancy and to identify the components of fecal progestagens in early, middle and late pregnancy in cheetahs. Feces were collected from 7 female cheetahs and analyzed from 30 days before the last copulation to parturition in 9 pregnancies. Blood was collected from one cheetah. Fecal progestagen and serum progesterone concentrations were determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The profiles of the fecal progestagen concentrations were similar to the serum progesterone profile. Fecal progestagen and serum progesterone concentrations remained at the baseline until copulation. In the mean fecal progestagen profile during pregnancy (92.8 ± 0.4 days; from the last copulation to parturition), the concentrations increased 3-4 days after the last copulation and remained high until parturition. To investigate changes in the components of progestagen metabolites in the tripartite periods of gestation, fecal progestagens were analyzed by HPLC-EIA. Marked immunoreactive peaks consistent with 5α-pregnan-3α/β-ol-20-one and 5α-pregnan-3,20-dione and small peaks consistent with 5β-pregnan-3α/β-ol-20-one were detected. There were no distinct difference in the components of progestagens among the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy. The hormone assay, as an indicator of fecal 5α-reduced pregnanes, is useful for detecting pregnancy and monitoring pregnant luteal activity in cheetahs.

  11. Development of Cross-Assembly Phage PCR-Based Methods for Human Fecal Source Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technologies that can characterize human fecal pollution in environmental waters offer many advantages over traditional general indicator approaches. However, many human-associated methods cross-react with non-human animal sources and lack suitable sensitivity for fecal source id...

  12. Associations between fecal indicator bacteria prevalence and demographic data in private water supplies in Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tamara; Krometis, Leigh-Anne H; Hagedorn, Charles; Lawrence, Annie H; Benham, Brian; Ling, Erin; Ziegler, Peter; Marmagas, Susan West

    2014-12-01

    Over 1.7 million Virginians rely on private water sources to provide household water. The heaviest reliance on these systems occurs in rural areas, which are often underserved with respect to available financial resources and access to environmental health education. This study aimed to identify potential associations between concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (coliforms, Escherichia coli) in over 800 samples collected at the point-of-use from homes with private water supply systems and homeowner-provided demographic data (household income and education). Of the 828 samples tested, 349 (42%) of samples tested positive for total coliform and 55 (6.6%) tested positive for E. coli. Source tracking efforts targeting optical brightener concentrations via fluorometry and the presence of a human-specific Bacteroides marker via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) suggest possible contamination from human septage in over 20 samples. Statistical methods implied that household income has an association with the proportion of samples positive for total coliform, though the relationship between education level and FIB is less clear. Further exploration of links between demographic data and private water quality will be helpful in building effective strategies to improve rural drinking water quality.

  13. Plant polyphenols alter a pathway of energy metabolism by inhibiting fecal Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bin; Xie, Jinli; Huang, Jiachen; Chen, Long; Gao, Lijuan; Ou, Shiyi; Wang, Yong; Peng, Xichun

    2016-03-01

    The function of plant polyphenols in controlling body weight has been in focus for a long time. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of plant polyphenols on fecal microbiota utilizing oligosaccharides. Three plant polyphenols, quercetin, catechin and puerarin, were added into liquid media for fermenting for 24 h. The pH values, OD600 of the cultures and the content of carbohydrates at 0, 6, 10, 14, 18 and 24 h were determined. The abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes in each culture was quantified with qPCR after 10 h of fermentation, and the bacterial composition was analyzed using the software Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology. The results revealed that all three plant polyphenols could significantly inhibit the growth of Bacteroidetes (P polyphenols, catechin presented the most intense inhibitory activity towards the growth of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and quercetin was the second. Only the samples with catechin had a significantly lower energy metabolism (P polyphenols can change the pathway of degrading FOS or even energy metabolism in vivo by altering gut microbiota composition. It may be one of the mechanisms in which plant polyphenols can lead to body weight loss. It's the first report to study in vitro gastrointestinal microbiota fermenting dietary fibers under the intervention of plant polyphenols.

  14. Transfer of Viral Communities between Human Individuals during Fecal Microbiota Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Chehoud

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a highly effective treatment for refractory Clostridium difficile infections. However, concerns persist about unwanted cotransfer of pathogenic microbes such as viruses. Here we studed FMT from a single healthy human donor to three pediatric ulcerative colitis patients, each of whom received a course of 22 to 30 FMT treatments. Viral particles were purified from donor and recipient stool samples and sequenced; the reads were then assembled into contigs corresponding to viral genomes or partial genomes. Transfer of selected viruses was confirmed by quantitative PCR. Viral contigs present in the donor could be readily detected in recipients, with up to 32 different donor viral contigs appearing in a recipient sample. Reassuringly, none of these were viruses are known to replicate on human cells. Instead, viral contigs either scored as bacteriophage or could not be attributed taxonomically, suggestive of unstudied phage. The two most frequently transferred gene types were associated with temperate-phage replication. In addition, members of Siphoviridae, the group of typically temperate phages that includes phage lambda, were found to be transferred with significantly greater efficiency than other groups. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the temperate-phage replication style may promote efficient phage transfer between human individuals. In summary, we documented transfer of multiple viral lineages between human individuals through FMT, but in this case series, none were from viral groups known to infect human cells.

  15. Interlaboratory comparison of real-time pcr protocols for quantification of general fecal indicator bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, O.C.; Sivaganesan, M.; Peed, L.; Kelty, C.A.; Blackwood, A.D.; Greene, M.R.; Noble, R.T.; Bushon, R.N.; Stelzer, E.A.; Kinzelman, J.; Anan'Eva, T.; Sinigalliano, C.; Wanless, D.; Griffith, J.; Cao, Y.; Weisberg, S.; Harwood, V.J.; Staley, C.; Oshima, K.H.; Varma, M.; Haugland, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    The application of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for the rapid identification of fecal bacteria in environmental waters is being considered for use as a national water quality metric in the United States. The transition from research tool to a standardized protocol requires information on the reproducibility and sources of variation associated with qPCR methodology across laboratories. This study examines interlaboratory variability in the measurement of enterococci and Bacteroidales concentrations from standardized, spiked, and environmental sources of DNA using the Entero1a and GenBac3 qPCR methods, respectively. Comparisons are based on data generated from eight different research facilities. Special attention was placed on the influence of the DNA isolation step and effect of simplex and multiplex amplification approaches on interlaboratory variability. Results suggest that a crude lysate is sufficient for DNA isolation unless environmental samples contain substances that can inhibit qPCR amplification. No appreciable difference was observed between simplex and multiplex amplification approaches. Overall, interlaboratory variability levels remained low (<10% coefficient of variation) regardless of qPCR protocol. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. Application of leftover sample material from waterborne protozoa monitoring for the molecular detection of Bacteroidales and fecal source tracking markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we examined the potential for detecting fecal bacteria and microbial source tracking markers in samples discarded during the concentration of Cryptosporidium and Giardia using USEPA Method 1623. Recovery rates for different fecal bacteria were determined using sp...

  17. Application of leftover sample material from waterborne protozoa monitoring for the molecular detection of Bacteroidales and fecal source tracking markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we examined the potential for detecting fecal bacteria and microbial source tracking markers in samples discarded during the concentration of Cryptosporidium and Giardia using USEPA Method 1623. Recovery rates for different fecal bacteria were determined using sp...

  18. Sediment and Fecal Indicator Bacteria Loading in a Mixed Land Use Watershed: Contributions from Suspended and Bed Load Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water quality studies that quantify sediment and fecal bacteria loading commonly focus on suspended contaminants transported during high flows. Fecal contaminants in bed sediments are typically ignored and need to be considered because of their potential to increase pathogen load...

  19. Long-term dietary pattern of fecal donor correlates with butyrate production and markers of protein fermentation during in vitro fecal fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junyi; Rose, Devin J

    2014-09-01

    Diet influences gut microbiota composition. Therefore, we hypothesized that diet would impact the extent of dietary fiber utilization and the types of metabolic end-products produced by the microbiota during in vitro fecal fermentation. By obtaining long-term dietary records from fecal donors, we aimed to determine the correlations between dietary intake variables and dietary fiber degradation and short-/branched-chain fatty acid (BCFA) and ammonia production during in vitro fecal fermentation. Eighteen subjects completed 1-year diet history questionnaires and provided fecal samples that were used for in vitro fermentation of a whole wheat substrate. The percentage of dietary fiber fermented was not correlated with nutrient intakes; however, butyrate production was correlated with fecal donor intake of many nutrients of which principal component analysis revealed were mostly contributed by grain-, nut-, and vegetable-based foods. Negative correlations were found for propionate with intake of total carbohydrate, added sugar, and sucrose and for ammonia and BCFA production with intake of unsaturated fats. Thus, our analysis did not support our first hypothesis: the percentage of dietary fiber fermented during in vitro fermentation was not correlated with dietary records. However, production of butyrate; BCFA; ammonia; and, to a lesser extent, propionate was correlated with the diet records of fecal donors, thus supporting our second hypothesis. These results suggest that diets high in plant-based foods and high in unsaturated fats are associated with microbial metabolism that is consistent with host health.

  20. Efficacy of combined jejunal and colonic fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sudhir K; Girotra, Mohit; Garg, Shashank; Dutta, Anand; von Rosenvinge, Erik C; Maddox, Cynthia; Song, Yang; Bartlett, John G; Vinayek, Rakesh; Fricke, W Florian

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI) is increasing; fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective therapy. However, there have been no studies of the efficacy of a single session of combined enteral and colonic FMT or characterizations of changes in the microbiota between donors and recipients. We performed a study of 27 patients with RCDI who were given a fixed volume of processed fecal filtrate via enteroscopy and colonoscopy in a single session. Patients were closely monitored, and fecal samples were collected from 2 patient-donor pairs for 16S rRNA analysis. All patients had reduced stool frequency, abdominal pain, white blood cell counts, and elimination of fecal C difficile toxin (P fecal microbiota in 2 patients with RCDI.

  1. Feeding on copepod fecal pellets: a new trophic role of dinoflagellates as detritivores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Louise K.; Moldrup, M.; Berge, T.;

    2011-01-01

    Recent field studies indicate that dinoflagellates are key degraders of copepod fecal pellets. This study is the first to publish direct evidence of pellet grazing by dinoflagellates. Feeding and growth on copepod fecal pellets were studied for both heterotrophic (4 species) and mixotrophic...... dinoflagellates (3 species) using a combination of classic incubation experiments and video recordings of feeding behavior. Fecal pellets were produced by adult Acartia tonsa feeding on Rhodomonas salina. Two mixotrophic species (Karlodinium armiger, a gymnodinoid dinoflagellate, Gy1) and all heterotrophic...... dinoflagellates (Gyrodinium dominans, Gyrodinium spirale, Diplopsalis lenticula, Protoperidinium depressum) studied fed on fecal pellets. Using natural concentrations of dinoflagellates and copepod fecal pellets, average ingestion rates of 0.2 and 0.1 pellets cell−1 d−1 and clearance rates of between 0.2 and 0...

  2. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency: Comparing fecal elastase 1 with 72-h stool for fecal fat estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sudipta Dhar; Kurien, Reuben Thomas; Ramachandran, Anup; Joseph, Anjilivelil Joseph; Simon, Ebby George; Dutta, Amit Kumar; David, Deepu; Kumar C, Bharath; Samuel, Prassana; Balasubramaniam, K A

    2016-11-01

    Identification of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) is important in the management of chronic pancreatitis. The 72-h stool for fecal fat estimation (FFE) has long been considered a gold standard indirect test for the diagnosis of PEI. However, the test is cumbersome for both patients and laboratory personnel alike. In this study, we aimed to assess fecal elastase 1 (FE1) as an alternate to FFE for the diagnosis of PEI. In all, 87 consecutive patients diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis were included in this study. FFE and FE1 estimation was done for all the patients. For FE1, two cutoffs (analysis. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value and PABAK (prevalence and bias adjusted kappa) for FE1 <100 μg was 84.9, 47.6, 83.6, 50, and 0.52, respectively. For FE1 <200 μg, it was 90.9, 9.5, 75.95, 25, and 0.43, respectively. FE1 is a sensitive test; however, it does not have a good agreement with FFE. FE1 may be used as screening test for PEI in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  3. High-throughput DNA sequence analysis reveals stable engraftment of gut microbiota following transplantation of previously frozen fecal bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Matthew J.; Weingarden, Alexa R.; Unno, Tatsuya; Khoruts, Alexander; Michael J Sadowsky

    2013-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is becoming a more widely used technology for treatment of recurrent Clostridum difficile infection (CDI). While previous treatments used fresh fecal slurries as a source of microbiota for FMT, we recently reported the successful use of standardized, partially purified and frozen fecal microbiota to treat CDI. Here we report that high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed stable engraftment of gut microbiota following FMT using frozen fecal bacteria...

  4. COMPARISON OF ENTEROCOCCUS MEASUREMENTS IN FRESHWATER AT TWO RECREATIONAL BEACHES BY QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION AND MEMBRANE FILER CULTURE ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell densities of the fecal pollution indicator genus, Enterococcus, were determined by a rapid (2-3 hr) quantitative PCR (QPCR) analysis based method in 100 ml water samples collected from recreational beaches on Lake Michigan and Lake Erie during the summer of 2003. Enumeration...

  5. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING PCR AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSES OF BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional methods for assessing fecal pollution in environmental systems, such as monitoring for fecal coliforms are not capable of discriminating between different sources fecal pollution. Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate betw...

  6. Purification and immunochemical properties of Escherichia coli B polysaccharide cross-reacting with Salmonella typhi Vi antigen: preliminary evidence for cross-reaction of the polysaccharide with Escherichia coli K1 antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Szewczyk, B; Taylor, A

    1983-01-01

    An acidic polysaccharide of Escherichia coli B was isolated by a mild procedure and purified to homogeneity. The polysaccharide was found to react in Salmonella typhi Vi antisera and E. coli K1 antisera. Serological analysis and preliminary chemical characterization of the polysaccharide indicated that it is an aminouronic acid polymer which, although not structurally identical to either Vi or K1, appears more like the Vi antigen, both immunochemically and chemically.

  7. Hypogonadism alters cecal and fecal microbiota in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Naoki; Hanaoka, Ryo; Hanada, Kazuki; Izawa, Takeshi; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-11-01

    Low testosterone levels increase the risk for cardiovascular disease in men and lead to shorter life spans. Our recent study showed that androgen deprivation via castration altered fecal microbiota and exacerbated risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including obesity, impaired fasting glucose, excess hepatic triglyceride accumulation, and thigh muscle weight loss only in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed male mice. However, when mice were administered antibiotics that disrupted the gut microbiota, castration did not increase cardiovascular risks or decrease the ratio of dried feces to food intake. Here, we show that changes in cecal microbiota (e.g., an increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and number of Lactobacillus species) were consistent with changes in feces and that there was a decreased cecal content secondary to castration in HFD mice. Castration increased rectal body temperature and plasma adiponectin, irrespective of diet. Changes in the gut microbiome may provide novel insight into hypogonadism-induced cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Transient bladder and fecal incontinence following epidural blood patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomero-Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Palacio-Abinzada, Francisco J.; Campollo, Sara Chacón; Laporta-Báez, Yolanda; Mendez Cendón, Jose Carlos; López-García, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patch (EBP) is the currently accepted treatment of choice for postdural puncture headache because of its high initial success rates and infrequent complications. Many authors recommended a small volume (10-20 mL) of blood to be delivered for an effective EBP. Here, we report an obstetric patient who developed a transient bladder and fecal incontinence after 19 mL of blood EBP at L1 -L2 level. Since the magnetic resonance image did not demonstrate any definitive spinal cord lesion, the exact mechanism remains unclear. We suggest that accumulation of blood performed at L1 to L2 level in a closed relationship with the sacral cord, may have trigger a significant pressure elevation of the epidural space at this level, resulting in a temporal spinal cord-related injury in the sacral cord. PMID:26543470

  9. Microbial diversity in fecal samples depends on DNA extraction method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi, Hengameh; Persson, Søren; Struve, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are challenges, when extracting bacterial DNA from specimens for molecular diagnostics, since fecal samples also contain DNA from human cells and many different substances derived from food, cell residues and medication that can inhibit downstream PCR. The purpose of the study...... was to evaluate two different DNA extraction methods in order to choose the most efficient method for studying intestinal bacterial diversity using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). FINDINGS: In this study, a semi-automatic DNA extraction system (easyMag®, BioMérieux, Marcy I'Etoile, France......) and a manual one (QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) were tested on stool samples collected from 3 patients with Inflammatory Bowel disease (IBD) and 5 healthy individuals. DNA extracts obtained by the QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit yield a higher amount of DNA compared to DNA extracts obtained...

  10. Optimal purification and sensitive quantification of DNA from fecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Nygaard; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Application of reliable, rapid and sensitive methods to laboratory diagnosis of zoonotic infections continues to challenge microbiological laboratories. The recovery of DNA from a swine fecal sample and a bacterial culture extracted by a conventional phenol-chloroform extraction method was compared......, the detection range of X-DNA of a spectrophotometric and a fluorometric (PicoGreen) method was compared. The PicoGreen showed a quantification limit of 1 ng/mL, consistent triplicate measurements, and finally a linear relationship between the concentrations of DNA standards and the fluorescence readings (R-2...... = 0.99 and R-2 = 1.00). In conclusion, silica-membrane, columns can provide a more convenient and less hazardous alternative to the conventional phenol-based method. The results have implication for further improvement of sensitive amplification methods for laboratory diagnosis....

  11. Increased fecal viral content associated with obesity in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hariom; Yadav; Shalini; Jain; Ravinder; Nagpal; Francesco; Marotta

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of total gut viral content in obese mice, and establish correlation with obesity associated metabolic measures and gut microbiome.METHODS: Fresh fecal samples were collected from normal and obese(Leptin deficient Lepob/ob) mice. Total viral DNA and RNA was isolated and quantified for establishing the correlation with metabolic measures and composition of gut bacterial communities.RESULTS: In this report, we found that obese mice feces have higher viral contents in terms of total viral DNA and RNA(P 0.6), whilst negatively correlated with bacteroidetes and bifidobacteria. CONCLUSION: This study suggests the strong correlation of increased viral population into the gut of obese mice and opens new avenues to explore the role of gut virome in pathophysiology of obesity.

  12. Fecal microbiota transplantation in children: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourigan, Suchitra K; Oliva-Hemker, Maria

    2016-07-01

    There has been a growing interest in fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) over recent years, in part due to the increasing prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and expanding association of intestinal dysbiosis with a wide range of human diseases. Many adult studies have shown that FMT is an effective treatment for recurrent CDI and may possibly have applications in other illnesses such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, there is a paucity of data available in children who may differ from adults for many reasons including having a dynamic developing microbiome compared to adults who have a relatively stable microbiome. Here, we review published studies looking at FMT in children, for CDI and IBD, and discuss special considerations needed when conducting FMT in children.

  13. Fecal microbiota transplantation: A 'How-To' guide for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, Sharyn; Borody, Thomas Julius; Jiang, Chongnan; Campbell, Jordana

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is emerging as one of the most exciting treatments of this century. Rarely has one treatment provided the opportunity to treat a myriad of diseases, not only within the gastrointestinal tract but also in extra-intestinal organs; such is the power of the gastrointestinal microbiota to modulate the immune system and eradicate infections, even where antibiotics have previously failed. The demand for this therapy, both among patients and physicians, is increasing, and a search of the literature reveals numerous reviews, case reports and discussion on the topic. However, to date, much of the literature addresses the procedure from a physician's point of view, and can therefore be lacking in practical detail. As nurses are often the 'unsung heroes' of the procedure, it is timely to address the subject from a nursing perspective.

  14. Fecal microbiota transplantation: indications, methods, evidence, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borody, Thomas J; Paramsothy, Sudarshan; Agrawal, Gaurav

    2013-08-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has attracted great interest in recent years, largely due to the global Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) epidemic and major advances in metagenomic sequencing of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota, with growing understanding of its structure and function. FMT is now recommended as the most effective therapy for relapsing CDI and, with further refinement, may even be used in "first-time" CDI. There is interest also in other conditions related to GI dysbiosis--for example, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, and diabetes mellitus--although quality evidence is at present lacking. A few trials are now underway in FMT for ulcerative colitis. Many unanswered questions remain, including FMT methodology--for example, optimal route of administration, what makes a "good donor," safety issues, and long-term effects of FMT.

  15. Abordaje quirúrgico de la incontinencia fecal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Ceciliano-Romero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes: los pacientes con incontinencia fecal enfrentan graves problemas sociales y psicológicos, por lo que el propósito fue analizar la evolución de 27 pacientes operados con la técnica de Malone, de Neo-apéndice y botón de Chait, para hacerles enemas anterógrados, así como evaluar la repercusión en su calidad de vida. Metodología: la investigación es descriptiva-retrospectiva. Los datos se obtuvieron de los expedientes clínicos del periodo 2000-2010. Para la definición de caso fue necesario que tuvieran incontinencia fecal y que se les hubiera hecho una operación de Malone, Neo-apéndice y colocación de botón de Chait durante ese periodo. Resultados: de los 27 pacientes analizados, 21 tenían como causa de la incontinencia una malformación anorrectal, 3 mielomeningocele, 1 enfermedad de Hirschsprung, 1 rabdomiosarcoma y 1 constipación. En 17 se realizó la técnica de Malone, en 6 un Neo-apéndice, y en 4 se colocó un botón de Chait. Las complicaciones observadas fueron: fuga del neo-apéndice con peritonitis y reintervención en 1 caso, estenosis de la boca en 9 casos, granulomas en 4 casos y prolapso en 1. En 24 casos los pacientes se mantienen limpios de heces y tanto ellos como sus familiares están satisfechos. En 10 casos ellos son independientes y se realizan sus propios enemas. Conclusiones: los resultados obtenidos permiten considerar que las intervenciones quirúrgicas efectuadas para hacer los enemas anterógrados, son una buena opción para mejorar la calidad de su vida.

  16. Vertically transmitted fecal IgA levels distinguish extra-chromosomal phenotypic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Meghan A.; D, Carey-Ann; Burnham; Virgin, Herbert W.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The proliferation of genetically modified mouse models has exposed phenotypic variation between investigators and institutions that has been challenging to control1-5. In many cases, the microbiota is the presumed culprit of the variation. Current solutions to account for phenotypic variability include littermate and maternal controls or defined microbial consortia in gnotobiotic mice6,7. In conventionally raised mice, the microbiome is transmitted from the dam2,8,9. Here we show that microbially–driven dichotomous fecal IgA levels in WT mice within the same facility mimic the effects of chromosomal mutations. We observed in multiple facilities that vertically-transmissible bacteria in IgA-Low mice dominantly lowered fecal IgA levels in IgA-High mice after cohousing or fecal transplantation. In response to injury, IgA-Low mice showed increased damage that was transferable by fecal transplantation and driven by fecal IgA differences. We found that bacteria from IgA-Low mice degraded the secretory component (SC) of SIgA as well as IgA itself. These data indicate that phenotypic comparisons between mice must take into account the non-chromosomal hereditary variation between different breeders. We propose fecal IgA as one marker of microbial variability and conclude that cohousing and/or fecal transplantation enables analysis of progeny from different dams. PMID:25686606

  17. Use of Sacral Nerve Stimulation for the Treatment of Overlapping Constipation and Fecal Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreepati, Gouri; James-Stevenson, Toyia

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 51 Final Diagnosis: Fecal incontinence Symptoms: Constipation • fecal incontinence Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Sacral nerve stimulator Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Fecal incontinence and constipation are common gastrointestinal complaints, but rarely occur concurrently. Management of these seemingly paradoxical processes is challenging, as treatment of one symptom may exacerbate the other. Case Report: A 51-year-old female with lifelong neurogenic bladder secondary to spina bifida occulta presented with progressive symptoms of daily urge fecal incontinence as well as hard bowel movements associated with straining and a sensation of incomplete evacuation requiring manual disimpaction. Pelvic floor testing showed poor ability to squeeze the anal sphincter, which indicated sphincter weakness as a major contributor to her fecal incontinence symptoms. Additionally, on defecography she was unable to widen her posterior anorectal angle or relax the anal sphincter during defecation consistent with dyssynergic defecation. A sacral nerve stimulator was placed for management of her fecal incontinence. Interestingly, her constipation also dramatically improved with sacral neuromodulation. Conclusions: This unique case highlights the emerging role of sacral nerve stimulation in the treatment of complex pelvic floor dysfunction with improvement in symptoms beyond fecal incontinence in a patient with dyssynergic-type constipation. PMID:28265107

  18. Identifying fecal matter contamination in produce fields using multispectral reflectance imaging under ambient solar illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Colm D.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Hoonsoo; O'Donnell, Colm P.

    2016-05-01

    An imaging device to detect fecal contamination in fresh produce fields could allow the producer avoid harvesting fecal contaminated produce. E.coli O157:H7 outbreaks have been associated with fecal contaminated leafy greens. In this study, in-field spectral profiles of bovine fecal matter, soil, and spinach leaves are compared. A common aperture imager designed with two identical monochromatic cameras, a beam splitter, and optical filters was used to simultaneously capture two-spectral images of leaves contaminated with both fecal matter and soil. The optical filters where 10 nm full width half maximum bandpass filters, one at 690 nm and the second at 710 nm. These were mounted in front of the object lenses. New images were created using the ratio of these two spectral images on a pixel by pixel basis. Image analysis results showed that the fecal matter contamination could be distinguished from soil and leaf on the ratio images. The use of this technology has potential to allow detection of fecal contamination in produce fields which can be a source of foodbourne illnesses. It has the added benefit of mitigating cross-contamination during harvesting and processing.

  19. Update on clinical and research application of fecal biomarkers for gastrointestinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Imran; Majid, Hafsa; Abid, Shahab

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases comprise a large spectrum of clinical conditions ranging from indigestion to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) and carcinomas. Endoscopy is the usual method employed to diagnose these condition. Another noninvasive way to assess and diagnose GI conditions are fecal biomarkers. Fecal biomarkers provide information regarding a specific disease process and are perhaps more acceptable to clinicians and patients alike because of their non-invasivity compared to endoscopy. Aim of this review was to evaluate the current status of the fecal biomarkers in clinical and research for in GI diseases. Multiple types of fecal biomarkers are discussed in this review including; markers to assess IBD, which are released as a results of an inflammatory insults to intestinal epithelia such as antimicrobial peptides (lactoferrin) or inflammation related proteins (calprotectin). While markers related to function of digestion are primarily related to partially digested food or mucosal proteins such as abnormal amount of fecal fat α1-antitrypsin, elastase and secretary IgA. The upcoming fecal biomarker like M2 pyruvate kinase and neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin are discussed as well. Apart from above mention, the fecal biomarkers under exploration for possible clinical use in future are also discussed. These include cathelicidins, osteoprotegerin, β-glucuronidase, Eosinophil proteins, etc. PMID:28217373

  20. Reproductive effects on fecal nitrogen as an index of diet quality: an experimental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Kyle B.; Monteith, Kevin L.; Bowyer, R. Terry; Leslie,, David M.; Jenks, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Concentration of fecal nitrogen has been used widely as an indicator of dietary quality for free-ranging ruminants. Differences in digestive function between species of dimorphic ungulates render interspecific comparisons of fecal nitrogen unreliable; however, whether intraspecific sexual differences in digestive function also bias this nutritional index is unknown. Our objective was to compare sex-specific variation in concentration of fecal nitrogen using male, nonlactating female, and lactating female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) on high- and low-quality diets. During weekly trials over spring and summer (2008-2009), we monitored intake rates, collected feces twice daily, and used micro-Kjeldahl procedures to determine percent fecal nitrogen. We also determined nitrogen content of feces following a neutral detergent fiber (NDF) rinse during pre-, peak, and postlactation. Fecal nitrogen reflected general differences in dietary quality between diets; however, fecal nitrogen of lactating females in both dietary groups was lower than for males or nonlactating females throughout lactation. Nitrogen concentration following an NDF rinse also was lower for lactating females during peak lactation. We hypothesize that the remodeling of the digestive tract and increased rumination by lactating females may enhance their ability to extract nitrogen from their forage. These adjustments may expand the foraging options of lactating females by increasing their ability to process low-quality foods, but also affects the interpretation of fecal nitrogen during the season of lactation.

  1. Fecal Progestin Extraction and Analysis for Non-invasive Monitoring of Ovarian Cycle in Beef Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yimer§, Y. Rosnina*, H. Wahid, M.M. Bukar, A. Malik, K.C. Yap, M. Fahmi, P. Ganesamurthi and A.A. Saharee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to determine presence of immunoreactive progestins in feces, correlate fecal progestins with plasma progesterone (P4 concentrations and subsequently assess the role of fecal progestins in monitoring estrous cycle in Kedah Kelantan (KK beef cows. A total of 12 cycling cows were subjected to blood and matched fecal sampling twice a week for 9 weeks. The concentrations of plasma P4 and fecal progestins extracted using a modified technique, were determined by a P4 radioimmunoassay (RIA kit. There was a significant positive correlation between the concentrations of fecal progestins and plasma P4 (r = 0.6, P<0.01, as tested for the whole group except one animal. High performance liquid chromatographic separation of fecal extracts and subsequent radioimmunoassay revealed presence of four immunoreactive progestins against the P4 antibodies. These results imply that the non-invasive measure of fecal progestins using a DSL-3900 RIA kit can be used to monitor the ovarian activity in beef cows.

  2. Anal plugs and retrograde colonic irrigation are helpful in fecal incontinence or constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcel Cazemier; Richelle JF Felt-Bersma; Chris JJ Mulder

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility, clinical effect and predicting factors for favorable outcome of treatment with anal plugs in fecal incontinence and retrograde colonic irrigation (RCI) in patients with fecal incontinence or constipation.METHODS: Patients who received treatment with an anal plug or RCI between 1980 and 2005 were investigated with a questionnaire.RESULTS: Of the 201 patients (93 adults, 108 children), 101 (50%) responded. Adults: anal plugs (8), five stopped immediately, one stopped after 20 mo and two used it for 12-15 mo. RCI (40, 28 fecal incontinence, 12 constipation), 63% are still using it (mean 8.5 years), 88% was satisfied. Younger adults (< 40 years) were more satisfied with RCI (94 % vs 65%, P = 0.05). Children: anal plugs (7), 5 used it on demand for an average of 2.5 years with satisfactory results, one stopped immediately and one after 5 years. RCI (26 fecal incontinence, 22 constipation), 90% are still using it (mean time 6.8 years) and felt satisfied. Children tend to be more satisfied (P = 0.001). Besides age, no predictive factors for success were found. There was no difference in the outcome between patients with fecal incontinence or constipation.CONCLUSION: RCI is more often applied than anal plugs and is helpful in patients with fecal incontinence or constipation, especially for younger patients. Anal plugs can be used incidentally for fecal incontinence, especially in children.

  3. Sacral nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence Neuromodulación de raíces sacras en incontinencia fecal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Pascual

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze short-term outcomes and complications for our first fifty patients with fecal incontinence undergoing sacral root stimulation. Patients: fifty patients with fecal incontinence receiving sacral neuromodulation in 4 hospitals are reviewed. Discussed variables include: age, sex, incontinence duration, incontinence cause, prior surgery for incontinence, Wexner scale score, anorectal manometry parameters, and endoanal ultrasonographic findings. Following the procedure Wexner scale score, anorectal manometry parameters, and associated complications are reviewed. Results: mean age of patients is 59.9 years, with females predominating. Most common causes of incontinence include obstetric procedures, idiopathic origin, and prior anal surgery. Mean follow-up is 17.02 months. Follow-up revealed a statistically significant reduction in Wexner scale score and increase in voluntary anal pressure. Technique-derived minor complications included: 2 surgical wound infections that led to stimulator withdrawal; 2 patients with pain who were managed conservatively; 1 case of externalization in a gluteal stimulator; and 1 broken tetrapolar electrode. Conclusions: sacral nerve stimulation is a simple technique that improves Wexner scores in a statistically significant manner with a low complications rate.Objetivo: analizar los resultados y complicaciones a corto plazo de nuestros primeros cincuenta pacientes con incontinencia fecal tratados mediante estimulación de raíces sacras. Pacientes: se revisan cincuenta pacientes con incontinencia fecal tratados mediante neuromodulación de raíces sacras en 4 centros hospitalarios. Las variables analizadas son: edad, sexo, tiempo de evolución de la incontinencia, causa de la incontinencia, cirugías previas para tratar la incontinencia, puntuación en la escala de Wexner, parámetros de la manometría anorrectal y los hallazgos en la ecografía endoanal. Tras la intervención se revisa la puntuaci

  4. Screening for colorectal cancer and advanced colorectal neoplasia in kidney transplant recipients: cross sectional prevalence and diagnostic accuracy study of faecal immunochemical testing for haemoglobin and colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael G; Teo, Edward; Cole, Stephen R; Chan, Choy-Yoke; McDonald, Stephen P; Russ, Graeme R; Young, Graeme P; Bampton, Peter A; Coates, P Toby

    2012-07-25

    To investigate whether screening kidney transplant recipients aged over 50 years for colorectal cancer with a faecal immunochemical test for haemoglobin might be justified, by determining the prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia and evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of faecal haemoglobin testing compared with colonoscopy in a population of kidney transplant recipients at otherwise average risk. Cross sectional prevalence and diagnostic accuracy study with index test of faecal haemoglobin and reference standard of colonoscopy. Outpatient clinics in metropolitan and regional hospitals in South Australia. 229 kidney transplant recipients aged 50 years and over, who were at least 6 months (mean 9.0 (SD 8.4) years) post-transplant and otherwise at average risk of colorectal cancer, completed the study between June 2008 and October 2011. Faecal immunochemical testing (Enterix Insure) for human haemoglobin, followed by colonoscopy with histological evaluation of retrieved samples. Prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia, defined as an adenoma at least 10 mm in diameter, villous features, high grade dysplasia, or colorectal cancer; sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of faecal haemoglobin testing for advanced neoplasia compared with colonoscopy. Advanced colorectal neoplasia was found in 29 (13%, 95% confidence interval 9% to 18%) participants, including 2% (n=4) with high grade dysplasia and 2% (n=5) with colorectal cancer. Faecal testing for haemoglobin was positive in 12% (n=28); sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for advanced neoplasia were 31.0% (15.3% to 50.8%), 90.5% (85.6% to 94.2%), 32.1% (15.9% to 52.4%), and 90.1% (85.1% to 93.8%). Colonoscopy was well tolerated, with no significant adverse outcomes. To identify one case of advanced neoplasia, 8 (6 to 12) colonoscopies were needed. Kidney transplant recipients aged over 50 years have a high prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia. Faecal haemoglobin

  5. Fecal microbiota transplantation for fulminant Clostridium difficile infection in an allogeneic stem cell transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neemann, K; Eichele, D D; Smith, P W; Bociek, R; Akhtari, M; Freifeld, A

    2012-12-01

    We present a case of severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in a non-neutropenic allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient who was treated successfully with fecal microbiota therapy after standard pharmacologic therapy had failed. Following naso-jejunal instillation of donor stool, the patient's symptoms resolved within 48 h. Bowel resection was averted. This is the first case in the literature, to our knowledge, to describe fecal microbiota therapy in a profoundly immunocompromised host with severe CDI. We propose that fecal microbiota therapy be considered as a therapeutic option in immunosuppressed patients with refractory severe CDI. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. In vitro fermentation of sugar beet arabino-oligosaccharides by fecal microbiota obtained from patients with ulcerative colitis to selectively stimulate the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigsnæs, Louise Kristine; Holck, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S.

    were monitored after 24 h by quantitative real-time PCR and short-chain fatty acid analysis. With a few minor exceptions, AOS affected the communities similarly to what was seen for FOS. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were selectively increased...... after fermentation of AOS or FOS by fecal microbiota derived from UC patients. The stimulation of growth of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. was accompanied by a high production of acetate and hence a decrease of pH. The fermentation of AOS may thus help improve the inflammatory conditions...

  7. A microbial signature approach to identify fecal pollution in the waters off an urbanized coast of Lake Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Ryan J; Bootsma, Melinda J; Morrison, Hilary G; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L

    2013-05-01

    Urban coasts receive watershed drainage from ecosystems that include highly developed lands with sewer and stormwater infrastructure. In these complex ecosystems, coastal waters are often contaminated with fecal pollution, where multiple delivery mechanisms that often contain multiple fecal sources make it difficult to mitigate the pollution. Here, we exploit bacterial community sequencing of the V6 and V6V4 hypervariable regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to identify bacterial distributions that signal the presence of sewer, fecal, and human fecal pollution. The sequences classified to three sewer infrastructure-associated bacterial genera, Acinetobacter, Arcobacter, and Trichococcus, and five fecal-associated bacterial families, Bacteroidaceae, Porphyromonadaceae, Clostridiaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcaceae, served as signatures of sewer and fecal contamination, respectively. The human fecal signature was determined with the Bayesian source estimation program SourceTracker, which we applied to a set of 40 sewage influent samples collected in Milwaukee, WI, USA to identify operational taxonomic units (≥ 97 % identity) that were most likely of human fecal origin. During periods of dry weather, the magnitudes of all three signatures were relatively low in Milwaukee's urban rivers and harbor and nearly zero in Lake Michigan. However, the relative contribution of the sewer and fecal signature frequently increased to > 2 % of the measured surface water communities following sewer overflows. Also during combined sewer overflows, the ratio of the human fecal pollution signature to the fecal pollution signature in surface waters was generally close to that of sewage, but this ratio decreased dramatically during dry weather and rain events, suggesting that nonhuman fecal pollution was the dominant source during these weather-driven scenarios. The qPCR detection of two human fecal indicators, human Bacteroides and Lachno2, confirmed the urban fecal footprint

  8. Comparison of immunohistochemical, histochemical and immunochemical methods for the detection of wheat protein allergens in meat samples and cooked, dry, raw and fermented sausage samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukášková, Z Řezáčová; Tremlová, B; Pospiech, M; Renčová, E; Randulová, Z; Steinhauser, L; Reichová, A; Bednář, J

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays is it a common practice to add vegetable protein in the production of meat products. Because of the possible substitution of high-quality raw meat with vegetable protein without the labelling the product package and because of the allergenic potential of many vegetable proteins, it is important to develop accurate methods for its detection. The objective of the study was to compare histochemical, immunochemical (ELISA, ALERT gliadin screening test) and immunohistochemical methods for the detection of wheat protein in meat samples and sausages. Histochemical methods were useful for the detection of flour in meat samples, but the immunohistochemical method was better for the detection of wheat protein. ALERT gliadin screening test detected gliadin from 10 mg kg(-1), while an immunohistochemical method detected wheat protein concentrations from 1 g kg(-1) and an ELISA method detected wheat protein concentrations from 4 g kg(-1). ALERT gliadin screening test showed results within 1 day, whilst an ELISA detection method took 2 days, and an immunohistochemical procedure took 5 days at the soonest, all including sample preparation. This study also focused on optimisation of an immunohistochemical method for samples of cooked sausage. In addition, three samples were sufficient for wheat protein detection at a concentration of 1 g kg(-1) (and greater) with a confidence level greater than 95%.

  9. Evaluation of dietary fructan supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, meat quality, fecal microbial flora, and fecal noxious gas emission in finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P Y; Wang, J P; Kim, I H

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of dietary fructan supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, meat quality, fecal microbial flora, and fecal noxious gas emission in finishing pigs. A total of 96 finishing pigs [(Yorkshire×Landrace)×Duroc] with an average BW of 73.1±2.5 kg were used in a 6-wk study. Pigs were randomly allotted to 1 of 3 dietary treatments: 1) CON, basal diet, 2) CON+1% fructan (FC1), and 3) CON+2% fructan (FC2) with 8 replicate pens per treatment and 2 barrows and 2 gilts per pen. During the overall study, pigs fed the fructan supplementation diets had a greater (Ppigs fed the CON diet. The levels of fructan supplementation did not affect growth performance and ATTD of DM, N, and GE. Fecal E. coli concentrations in the fructan treatments were lower (Ppigs.

  10. Effect of diet on fecal and urinary estrogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, H A; Knowlton, K F; Meyer, M T; Khunjar, W O; Love, N G

    2010-05-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency has identified estrogens from animal feeding operations as a major environmental concern, but few data are available to quantify the excretion of estrogenic compounds by dairy cattle. The objectives of this study were to quantify variation in estrogenic activity in feces and urine due to increased dietary inclusion of phytoestrogens. Ten Holstein heifers were assigned to 2 groups balanced for age and days pregnant; groups were randomly assigned to treatment sequence in a 2-period crossover design. Dietary treatments consisted of grass hay or red clover hay, and necessary supplements. Total collection allowed for sampling of feed refusals, feces, and urine during the last 4 d of each period. Feces and urine samples were pooled by heifer and period, and base extracts were analyzed for estrogenic activity (estrogen equivalents) using the yeast estrogen screen bioassay. Feces and urine samples collected from 5 heifers were extracted and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to quantify excretion of 7 phytoestrogenic compounds. Excretion of 17-beta estradiol equivalents in urine was higher and tended to be higher in feces for heifers fed red clover hay (84.4 and 120.2 mg/d for feces and urine, respectively) compared with those fed grass hay (57.4 and 35.6 mg/d). Analysis by LC-MS/MS indicated greater fecal excretion of equol, genistein, daidzein, coumestrol, and formononetin by heifers fed red clover hay (1634, 29.9, 96.3, 27.8, and 163 mg/d, respectively) than heifers fed grass hay (340, 3.0, 46.2, 8.8, and 18.3 mg/d, respectively). Diet had no effect on fecal biochanin A or 2-carbethoxy-5, 7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavone. Four phytoestrogens were detected in urine (2-carbethoxy-5, 7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavone, daidzein, equol, and formononetin) and their excretion was not affected by diet. Identifying sources of variation in estrogenic activity of manure will aid in the

  11. Colite de derivação fecal Diversion colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Edilson Leite Pinto Júnior

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available A colite de derivação fecal (CD é um processo inflamatório que ocorre no segmento colorretal desfuncionalizado, após uma cirurgia de desvio do trânsito intestinal. As principais características dessa entidade clínica são: apresenta-se na desfuncionalização do cólon ou reto; não há doença inflamatória intestinal preexistente; nunca acomete o sítio proximal à colostomia e ocorre resolução do processo após a restauração do trânsito intestinal. Diversas são as hipóteses postuladas para explicar o seu aparecimento; todavia, a deficiência nutricional do epitélio colônico, pela ausência dos ácidos graxos de cadeia curta (AGCC, no segmento desfuncionalizado, é a mais aceita na atualidade. Os autores fazem uma revisão da literatura enfocando os aspectos clínicos, histopatológicos e terapêuticos desta doença.The authors present a revision of diversion colitis. It is an inflammatory disorder that occurs in the colorectum segment after a diverting colostomy. The main features of this disease are: colon or rectum disfunction; no previous intestinal inflammatory disorder; it never attacks the colon upper colostomy; after intestinal transit restoration, the inflammatory process is solved. Many hypothesis are postulated to explain its occurrance. They include: fecal stasis; changes in the bacterial population of colon; nutritional deficiency of colonic epithelium due to the absence of short chain fatty acids in the defunctionalized segment is the most accepted nowadays. The absence of fatty acids produces energetic defficiency in colon mucosa, reduced electrolite absorption and secretion, and reduced mucus production. The patients have abdominal pain, mucus diarrhoea and bleeding. Histopathological features include chronical inflamation of colon wall, vascular congestion and changes in mucosa cripts. Lynphoid hiperplasy of mucosa and submucosa are common. The diagnosis is done by endoscopy, radiology, pathology and

  12. Treatment of relapsing Clostridium difficile infection using fecal microbiota transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak R

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rahul Pathak,1 Hill Ambrose Enuh,1 Anish Patel,1 Prasanna Wickremesinghe21Department of Internal Medicine, New York Medical College, Internal Medicine Program at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USA; 2Department of Gastrointestinal Medicine, New York Medical College, Internal Medicine Program at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USABackground: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI has become a global concern over the last decade. In the United States, CDI escalated in incidence from 1996 to 2005 from 31 to 64/100,000. In 2010, there were 500,000 cases of CDI with an estimated mortality up to 20,000 cases a year. The significance of this problem is evident from the hospital costs of over 3 billion dollars annually. Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT was first described in 1958 and since then about 500 cases have been published in literature in various small series and case reports. This procedure has been reported mainly from centers outside of the United States and acceptance of the practice has been difficult. Recently the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA labeled FMT as a biological drug; as a result, guidelines will soon be required to help establish it as a mainstream treatment. More US experience needs to be reported to popularize this procedure here and form guidelines.Method: We did a retrospective review of our series of patients with relapsing CDI who were treated with FMT over a 3-year period. We present our experience with FMT at a community hospital as a retrospective review and describe our procedure.Results: There were a total of 12 patients who underwent FMT for relapsing C. difficile. Only one patient failed to respond and required a second FMT. There were no complications associated with the transplant and all patients had resolution of symptoms within 48 hours of FMT.Conclusion: FMT is a cheap, easily available, effective therapy for recurrent CDI; it can be safely performed in a

  13. Fecal Calprotectin in Healthy Children Aged 1-4 Years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingling Zhu

    Full Text Available Calprotectin has been well emulated recently in adults as well as in children. The aim of this study was to assess fecal calprotectin concentrations in healthy children aged from 1 to 4 years.Volunteers were enlisted from 3 nurseries. A brief questionnaire was used to ensure these children meet the inclusion criteria, and some clinical and sociodemographic factors were collected. Anthro software (version 3.1 was used to calculated Length-for-age Z-scores (LAZ, weight-for-age Z-scores (WAZ, and weight-for-length Z-scores (WLZ respectively. Fecal calprotectin was detected by a commercially available ELISA.In total 274 children were recruited, with age ranging from 1 to 4 years old. The median FC concentration was 83.19 μg/g [range 4.58 to 702.50 μg/g, interquartile range (IQR 14.69-419.45 μg/g] or 1.92 log10 μg/g (range 0.66 log10 to 2.85 log10 μg/g, IQR 1.17 log10-2.62 log10 μg/g. All of the children were divided into three groups, 1-2 years (12-24 months, 2-3 years (24-36 months, 3-4 years (36-48 months, with median FC concentrations 96.14 μg/g (1.98 log10 μg/g, 81.48 μg/g (1.91 log10 μg/g, 65.36 μg/g (1.82 log10 μg/g, respectively. There was similar FC level between boys and girls. FC concentrations showed a downward trend by the growing age groups. A statistic difference was found in FC concentrations among groups 1-2 years, 2-3 years and 3-4 years (P = 0.016. In inter-groups comparison, a significant difference was found between children aged 1-2 years and children aged 3-4 years (P = 0.007. A negative correlation trend was found between age and FC concentration (Spearman's rho = -0.167, P = 0.005 in all the participants. A simple correlation was performed among WLZ, WAZ, birth weight, or birth length with FC, and there was no correlation being observed.Children aged from 1 to 4 years old have lower FC concentrations compared with healthy infants (<1years, and higher FC concentrations when comparing with children older than 4

  14. Pediatric fecal microbiota harbor diverse and novel antibiotic resistance genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimée M Moore

    Full Text Available Emerging antibiotic resistance threatens human health. Gut microbes are an epidemiologically important reservoir of resistance genes (resistome, yet prior studies indicate that the true diversity of gut-associated resistomes has been underestimated. To deeply characterize the pediatric gut-associated resistome, we created metagenomic recombinant libraries in an Escherichia coli host using fecal DNA from 22 healthy infants and children (most without recent antibiotic exposure, and performed functional selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from eight drug classes. Resistance-conferring DNA fragments were sequenced (Illumina HiSeq 2000, and reads assembled and annotated with the PARFuMS computational pipeline. Resistance to 14 of the 18 antibiotics was found in stools of infants and children. Recovered genes included chloramphenicol acetyltransferases, drug-resistant dihydrofolate reductases, rRNA methyltransferases, transcriptional regulators, multidrug efflux pumps, and every major class of beta-lactamase, aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme, and tetracycline resistance protein. Many resistance-conferring sequences were mobilizable; some had low identity to any known organism, emphasizing cryptic organisms as potentially important resistance reservoirs. We functionally confirmed three novel resistance genes, including a 16S rRNA methylase conferring aminoglycoside resistance, and two tetracycline-resistance proteins nearly identical to a bifidobacterial MFS transporter (B. longum s. longum JDM301. We provide the first report to our knowledge of resistance to folate-synthesis inhibitors conferred by a predicted Nudix hydrolase (part of the folate synthesis pathway. This functional metagenomic survey of gut-associated resistomes, the largest of its kind to date, demonstrates that fecal resistomes of healthy children are far more diverse than previously suspected, that clinically relevant resistance genes are present even without recent selective

  15. Alterations in fecal microbiota composition by probiotic supplementation in healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nadja B; Bryrup, Thomas; Allin, Kristine H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effects of probiotic supplementation on fecal microbiota composition in healthy adults have not been well established. We aimed to provide a systematic review of the potential evidence for an effect of probiotic supplementation on the composition of human fecal microbiota...... references of relevant papers. Search terms included healthy adult, probiotic, bifidobacterium, lactobacillus, gut microbiota, fecal microbiota, intestinal microbiota, intervention, and (clinical) trial. RCTs of solely probiotic supplementation and placebo in healthy adults that examined alteration...... methodological quality assessment of reports of the clinical trials based on revised tools from PRISMA/Cochrane and by the Jadad score. RESULTS: Seven RCTs investigating the effect of probiotic supplementation on fecal microbiota in healthy adults were identified and included in the present systematic review...

  16. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultiva...

  17. The dual influences of age and obstetric history on fecal continence in parous women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Eogan, Maeve

    2011-02-01

    To assess whether women who underwent forceps delivery were more likely than those who delivered either normally (spontaneous vaginal delivery [SVD]) or by cesarean to experience deterioration in fecal continence as they aged.

  18. Application of enteric viruses for fecal pollution source tracking in environmental waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial source tracking (MST) tools are used to identify sources of fecal pollution for accurately assessing public health risk and implementing best management practices (BMPs). This review focuses on the potential of enteric viruses for MST applications. Following host infect...

  19. In Vitro fermentability of sugar beet pulp derived oligosaccharides using human and pig fecal inocula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijdekkers, A.G.M.; Aguirre, M.; Venema, K.; Bosch, G.; Gruppen, H.; Schols, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro fermentation characteristics of different classes of sugar beet pectic oligosaccharides (SBPOS) were studied using human and pig fecal inocula. The SBPOS consisted mainly of partially acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-oligosaccharides and partially methyl esterified/acetylated

  20. Application of fecal calprotectin and myeloperoxidase in evaluation of disease activity of ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柏明见

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of fecal calprotectin and myeloperoxidase in evaluation of ulcerative colitis(UC) activity.Methods Specimens of serum and feces over the same period were collected from

  1. Salmonella y Shigella a partir de muestras fecales en la poblacion Santa Rosa, Maracaibo-Venezuela

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandrea-Toledo, Lisette; Avila-Roo, Yeiny; Paz-Montes, America; Corpas-Guerrero, Carmen; Petit-Capriles, Kalina; Ocando-Vilchez, Newlsa

    2007-01-01

    ... con escasas condiciones socio-sanitarias como la poblacion indigena de Santa Rosa. El proposito de esta investigacion fue detectar la presencia de Salmonella y Shigella a partir de muestras fecales en la poblacion de Santa Rosa...

  2. Application of enteric viruses for fecal pollution source tracking in environmental waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial source tracking (MST) tools are used to identify sources of fecal pollution for accurately assessing public health risk and implementing best management practices (BMPs). This review focuses on the potential of enteric viruses for MST applications. Following host infect...

  3. Differential Decay of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of different human fecal pollution sources is necessary for proper implementation of many water quality management practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, the decay of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fe...

  4. The bacterial communities associated with fecal types and body weight of rex rabbits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zeng, Bo; Han, Shushu; Wang, Ping; Wen, Bin; Jian, Wensu; Guo, Wei; Yu, Zhiju; Du, Dan; Fu, Xiangchao; Kong, Fanli; Yang, Mingyao; Si, Xiaohui; Zhao, Jiangchao; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Rex rabbit is an important small herbivore for fur and meat production. However, little is known about the gut microbiota in rex rabbit, especially regarding their relationship with different fecal types and growth of the hosts...

  5. [Occurrence of gastrointestinal parasites in fecal samples of cats in Andradina City, São Paulo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Willian Marinho Dourado; do Amarante, Alessandro Francisco Talamini; de Soutello, Ricardo Velludo Gomes; Meireles, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Bresciani, Katia Denise Saraiva

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the occurrence of gastrointestinal parasites in fecal samples from cats of the Andradina city, SP. This work was carried out from March to November of 2007, and used 51 cats delivered to the Center of Zoonoses Control of that city. Techniques of Willis and Faust were used in the fecal examination and resulted in detection of Ancylostoma spp. in 96.1% of the animals; Toxocara spp. in 43.1%; Cystoisospora spp. in 43.1%; Dipylidium caninum in 21.6% and Giardia spp. in 5.9% samples. Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected in 3.9% fecal samples by the use of malachite green negative stain. There was no significant association between the occurrence of endoparasites and consistency of fecal samples. The results confirm that these cats represent important hosts of parasites, some of those with high zoonotic potential.

  6. Prospective regenerative medicine therapies for obstetric trauma-induced fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Nina; Kumar, Lalit; Emmanuel, Anton; Day, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a major public health issue that has yet to be adequately addressed. Obstetric trauma and injury to the anal sphincter muscles are the most common cause of fecal incontinence. New therapies are emerging aimed at repair or regeneration of sphincter muscle and restoration of continence. While regenerative medicine offers an attractive option for fecal incontinence there are currently no validated techniques using this approach. Although many challenges are yet to be resolved, the advent of regenerative medicine is likely to offer disruptive technologies to treat and possibly prevent the onset of this devastating condition. This article provides a review on regenerative medicine approaches for treating fecal incontinence and a critique of the current landscape in this area.

  7. Predicting Fecal Indicator Bacteria Concentrations in the South Fork Broad River Watershed Using Virtual Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtual Beach (VB) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) at recreational beaches. Although primarily designed for making decisions regarding beach closures or issuance of swimming advisories based on...

  8. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultiva...

  9. Differential Decay of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of different human fecal pollution sources is necessary for proper implementation of many water quality management practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, the decay of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fe...

  10. Study of fecal bacterial diversity in Yunnan snub-nosed monkey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    Based on the phylogenetic analysis, the fecal bacteria of R. bieti distributed mainly in 6 bacteriophyta of ... R. bieti, which constitute a complex and dynamic equili- brium of ..... Kocherginskaya SA, Aminov RI, White BA (2001). Analysis of the ...

  11. Relief of fecal incontinence by sacral nerve stimulation linked to focal brain activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Lilli; Møller, Arne; Buntzen, Steen

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that sacral nerve stimulation affects afferent vagal projections to the central nervous system associated with frontal cortex activation in patients with fecal incontinence....

  12. Predicting Fecal Indicator Bacteria Concentrations in the South Fork Broad River Watershed Using Virtual Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtual Beach (VB) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) at recreational beaches. Although primarily designed for making decisions regarding beach closures or issuance of swimming advisories based on...

  13. Identifying factors associated with clinical success in patients treated with NASHA®/Dx injection for fecal incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin H

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Howard Franklin,1 Andrew C Barrett,1 Ray Wolf2 1Department of Medical Affairs, Salix, a Division of Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC, Bridgewater, NJ, USA; 2Department of Medical Affairs, Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC, Wilton Manors, FL, USA Purpose: Injection with the bulking agent consisting of non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid/dextranomer (NASHA®/Dx is well tolerated and efficacious for the treatment of fecal incontinence (FI; however, the patient population that may derive maximum benefit has not been established. This post hoc responder analysis assessed demographic and baseline characteristics predictive of responsiveness to NASHA/Dx treatment. Methods: Adults with a Cleveland Clinic Florida fecal incontinence score (CCFIS ≥10 were randomized to receive NASHA/Dx or sham treatment. The primary end point was response to treatment (ie, decrease from baseline of ≥50% in number of FI episodes at 6 months; a prespecified secondary end point was change in fecal incontinence quality of life (FIQL score at 6 months. Post hoc subgroup analyses were performed for baseline and demographic characteristics and prior FI treatments. Results: Overall, response to treatment was significantly greater with NASHA/Dx versus sham injection (52.7% vs 32.1%; P=0.0089. All subgroups analyzed demonstrated evidence of improvement, favoring NASHA/Dx versus sham treatment for both response to treatment and change in the FIQL coping/behavior subscale score. For the primary end point, a significantly greater percentage of patients with CCFIS ≤15, FI symptoms ≤5 years’ duration, or obstetric causes of FI responded to NASHA/Dx treatment versus patients receiving sham treatment (51.1% vs 28.3%, P=0.0169; 55.4% vs 25.7%, P=0.0026; and 53.6% vs 23.1%, P=0.0191, respectively. The mean change in the FIQL coping/behavior score significantly favored NASHA/Dx versus sham treatment for patients with CCFIS ≤15 (P=0.0371, FI symptoms ≤5 years

  14. Comparison of Fecal Microbiota in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Neurotypical Siblings in the Simons Simplex Collection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua S Son

    Full Text Available In order to assess potential associations between autism spectrum disorder (ASD phenotype, functional GI disorders and fecal microbiota, we recruited simplex families, which had only a single ASD proband and neurotypical (NT siblings, through the Simons Simplex Community at the Interactive Autism Network (SSC@IAN. Fecal samples and metadata related to functional GI disorders and diet were collected from ASD probands and NT siblings of ASD probands (age 7-14. Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID were assessed using the parent-completed ROME III questionnaire for pediatric FGIDs, and problem behaviors were assessed using the Child Behavior Check List (CBCL. Targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR assays were conducted on selected taxa implicated in ASD, including Sutterella spp., Bacteroidetes spp. and Prevotella spp. Illumina sequencing of the V1V2 and the V1V3 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes from fecal DNA was performed to an average depth of 208,000 and 107,000 high-quality reads respectively. Twenty-five of 59 ASD children and 13 of 44 NT siblings met ROME III criteria for at least one FGID. Functional constipation was more prevalent in ASD (17 of 59 compared to NT siblings (6 of 44, P = 0.035. The mean CBCL scores in NT siblings with FGID, ASD children with FGID and ASD without FGID were comparably higher (58-62 vs. 44, P < 0.0001 when compared to NT children without FGID. There was no significant difference in macronutrient intake between ASD and NT siblings. There was no significant difference in ASD severity scores between ASD children with and without FGID. No significant difference in diversity or overall microbial composition was detected between ASD children with NT siblings. Exploratory analysis of the 16S rRNA sequencing data, however, identified several low abundance taxa binned at the genus level that were associated with ASD and/or first order ASD*FGID interactions (FDR <0.1.

  15. Fecal sterols, seasonal variability, and probable sources along the ring of cenotes, Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcega-Cabrera, F; Velázquez-Tavera, N; Fargher, L; Derrien, M; Noreña-Barroso, E

    2014-11-01

    Rapid development in Yucatan has had a dramatic impact on the environment, especially the water supply. Groundwater is the only source of water in Yucatan, since surface water is virtually absent due to the karstic nature of the soil. The ring of cenotes (RC) is a geological feature which functions as a source of water and as nodes in the underground river system that canalizes water towards the coast. Numerous productive and domestic activities take place around the RC in the absence of wastewater treatment or sewage systems. Consequently, a number of researchers have hypothesized that pollutants could migrate from the land surface to the underlying aquifer and, eventually, to the coast. Therefore, the present study investigates the relationship among sources of fecal sterols and their levels in cenotes, using the expected levels of fecal sterols obtained by a spatial analysis of the sources and a Pollution Source Index. Accordingly, expected levels are compared with the detected levels of fecal sterols in 5 areas around the RC. Regarding levels, observed during a sampling campaign carried out along the RC during September 2011 (rainy season) and May 2012 (dry season), varied from low to high concentrations of sterols (0.5-2396.42 μg g(-1)) and fecal sterols (0.3-1690.18 μg g(-1)). These concentrations showed no relationship between neighboring cenotes, where similar fecal sterol concentrations or gradients were expected. When comparing expected fecal sterols levels with the detected ones, only two of the five analyzed areas concur, suggesting that no clear relationship exists among sources and fecal sterols levels at the regional scale. Multivariate analysis showed that fecal sterols were associated with sterols and fine grain particulates during the rainy season, which suggests co-transport. During the dry season, fecal sterols associated with fine grain particulate and organic matter, which indicates a change to a deposition phenomenon. These findings

  16. Fecal sterols, seasonal variability, and probable sources along the ring of cenotes, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcega-Cabrera, F.; Velázquez-Tavera, N.; Fargher, L.; Derrien, M.; Noreña-Barroso, E.

    2014-11-01

    Rapid development in Yucatan has had a dramatic impact on the environment, especially the water supply. Groundwater is the only source of water in Yucatan, since surface water is virtually absent due to the karstic nature of the soil. The ring of cenotes (RC) is a geological feature which functions as a source of water and as nodes in the underground river system that canalizes water towards the coast. Numerous productive and domestic activities take place around the RC in the absence of wastewater treatment or sewage systems. Consequently, a number of researchers have hypothesized that pollutants could migrate from the land surface to the underlying aquifer and, eventually, to the coast. Therefore, the present study investigates the relationship among sources of fecal sterols and their levels in cenotes, using the expected levels of fecal sterols obtained by a spatial analysis of the sources and a Pollution Source Index. Accordingly, expected levels are compared with the detected levels of fecal sterols in 5 areas around the RC. Regarding levels, observed during a sampling campaign carried out along the RC during September 2011 (rainy season) and May 2012 (dry season), varied from low to high concentrations of sterols (0.5-2396.42 μg g- 1) and fecal sterols (0.3-1690.18 μg g- 1). These concentrations showed no relationship between neighboring cenotes, where similar fecal sterol concentrations or gradients were expected. When comparing expected fecal sterols levels with the detected ones, only two of the five analyzed areas concur, suggesting that no clear relationship exists among sources and fecal sterols levels at the regional scale. Multivariate analysis showed that fecal sterols were associated with sterols and fine grain particulates during the rainy season, which suggests co-transport. During the dry season, fecal sterols associated with fine grain particulate and organic matter, which indicates a change to a deposition phenomenon. These findings indicate

  17. Zooplankton fecal pellets, marine snow, phytodetritus and the ocean's biological pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jefferson T.

    2015-01-01

    The 'biological pump' is the process by which photosynthetically-produced organic matter in the ocean descends from the surface layer to depth by a combination of sinking particles, advection or vertical mixing of dissolved organic matter, and transport by animals. Particulate organic matter that is exported downward from the euphotic zone is composed of combinations of fecal pellets from zooplankton and fish, organic aggregates known as 'marine snow' and phytodetritus from sinking phytoplankton. Previous reviews by Turner and Ferrante (1979) and Turner (2002) focused on publications that appeared through late 2001. Since that time, studies of the biological pump have continued, and there have been >300 papers on vertical export flux using sediment traps, large-volume filtration systems and other techniques from throughout the global ocean. This review will focus primarily on recent studies that have appeared since 2001. Major topics covered in this review are (1) an overview of the biological pump, and its efficiency and variability, and the role of dissolved organic carbon in the biological pump; (2) zooplankton fecal pellets, including the contribution of zooplankton fecal pellets to export flux, epipelagic retention of zooplankton fecal pellets due to zooplankton activities, zooplankton vertical migration and fecal pellet repackaging, microbial ecology of fecal pellets, sinking velocities of fecal pellets and aggregates, ballasting of sinking particles by mineral contents, phytoplankton cysts, intact cells and harmful algae toxins in fecal pellets, importance of fecal pellets from various types of zooplankton, and the role of zooplankton fecal pellets in picoplankton export; (3) marine snow, including the origins, abundance, and distributions of marine snow, particles and organisms associated with marine snow, consumption and fragmentation of marine snow by animals, pathogens associated with marine snow; (4) phytodetritus, including pulsed export of

  18. Source tracking swine fecal waste in surface water proximal to swine concentrated animal feeding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Christopher D; Myers, Kevin; Wing, Steve; Hall, Devon; Baron, Dothula; Stewart, Jill R

    2015-04-01

    Swine farming has gone through many changes in the last few decades, resulting in operations with a high animal density known as confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations produce a large quantity of fecal waste whose environmental impacts are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate microbial water quality in surface waters proximal to swine CAFOs including microbial source tracking of fecal microbes specific to swine. For one year, surface water samples at up- and downstream sites proximal to swine CAFO lagoon waste land application sites were tested for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus) and candidate swine-specific microbial source-tracking (MST) markers (Bacteroidales Pig-1-Bac, Pig-2-Bac, and Pig-Bac-2, and methanogen P23-2). Testing of 187 samples showed high fecal indicator bacteria concentrations at both up- and downstream sites. Overall, 40%, 23%, and 61% of samples exceeded state and federal recreational water quality guidelines for fecal coliforms, E. coli, and Enterococcus, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac showed the highest specificity to swine fecal wastes and were 2.47 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.03, 5.94) and 2.30 times (95% CI=0.90, 5.88) as prevalent proximal down- than proximal upstream of swine CAFOs, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac were also 2.87 (95% CI=1.21, 6.80) and 3.36 (95% CI=1.34, 8.41) times as prevalent when 48 hour antecedent rainfall was greater than versus less than the mean, respectively. Results suggest diffuse and overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters where swine CAFO density is high. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac are useful for tracking off-site conveyance of swine fecal wastes into surface waters proximal to and downstream of swine CAFOs and during rain events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Human parvovirus 4 in nasal and fecal specimens from children, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Reber, Ulrike; Muth, Doreen; Herzog, Petra; Annan, Augustina; Ebach, Fabian; Sarpong, Nimarko; Acquah, Samuel; Adlkofer, Julia; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Panning, Marcus; Tannich, Egbert; May, Jürgen; Drosten, Christian; Eis-Hübinger, Anna Maria

    2012-10-01

    Nonparenteral transmission might contribute to human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PARV4 DNA was detected in 8 (0.83%) of 961 nasal samples and 5 (0.53%) of 943 fecal samples from 1,904 children in Ghana. Virus concentrations ≤ 6-7 log(10) copies/mL suggest respiratory or fecal-oral modes of PARV4 transmission.

  20. Fecal Kinetics and Digestibilities of Hays and Supplements Estimated by Marker Methods in the Horse

    OpenAIRE

    Hargreaves, Belinda Jane

    1998-01-01

    Fecal Kinetics and Digestibilities of Hays and Supplements Estimated by Marker Methods in the Horse by Belinda J. Hargreaves David S. Kronfeld, Chairman Department of Animal and Poultry Science (ABSTRACT) A marker model of fecal kinetics using chromic oxide (Cr) or ytterbium chloride (Yb) is being developed for grazing horses. The model consists of removal of feces at a constant rate from a single compartment, the prefecal mass. It was tested in experiments on stall-fed h...

  1. Levan Enhances Associated Growth of Bacteroides, Escherichia, Streptococcus and Faecalibacterium in Fecal Microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Kaarel Adamberg; Katrin Tomson; Tiina Talve; Ksenia Pudova; Marju Puurand; Triinu Visnapuu; Tiina Alamäe; Signe Adamberg

    2015-01-01

    The role of dietary fiber in supporting healthy gut microbiota and overall well-being of the host has been revealed in several studies. Here, we show the effect of a bacterial polyfructan levan on the growth dynamics and metabolism of fecal microbiota in vitro by using isothermal microcalorimetry. Eleven fecal samples from healthy donors were incubated in phosphate-buffered defined medium with or without levan supplementation and varying presence of amino acids. The generation of heat, change...

  2. Self-Administered Home Series Fecal "Minitransplants" for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection on a Rectal Remnant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Daniel; Laszlo, Mihaela; Ciobanu, Lidia; Ucenic, Elena; Mihalache, Manuela; Pascu, Oliviu

    2015-12-01

    A fecal microbiota transplant has proved to be an extremely effective method for patients with recurrent infections with Clostridium difficile. We present the case of a 65-year-old female patient with multiple Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) relapses on the rectal remnant, post-colectomy for a CDI-related toxic megacolon. The patient also evidenced associated symptomatic Clostridium difficile vaginal infection. She was successfully treated with serial fecal "minitransplants" (self-administered at home) and metronidazole ovules.

  3. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira R Abeles

    Full Text Available Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances.

  4. Designing fecal microbiota transplant trials that account for differences in donor stool efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Scott W; Gurry, Thomas; Alm, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is a highly effective intervention for patients suffering from recurrent Clostridium difficile, a common hospital-acquired infection. Fecal microbiota transplantation's success as a therapy for C. difficile has inspired interest in performing clinical trials that experiment with fecal microbiota transplantation as a therapy for other conditions like inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, diabetes, and Parkinson's disease. Results from clinical trials that use fecal microbiota transplantation to treat inflammatory bowel disease suggest that, for at least one condition beyond C. difficile, most fecal microbiota transplantation donors produce stool that is not efficacious. The optimal strategies for identifying and using efficacious donors have not been investigated. We therefore examined the optimal Bayesian response-adaptive strategy for allocating patients to donors and formulated a computationally tractable myopic heuristic. This heuristic computes the probability that a donor is efficacious by updating prior expectations about the efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation, the placebo rate, and the fraction of donors that produce efficacious stool. In simulations designed to mimic a recent fecal microbiota transplantation clinical trial, for which traditional power calculations predict 100% statistical power, we found that accounting for differences in donor stool efficacy reduced the predicted statistical power to 9%. For these simulations, using the heuristic Bayesian allocation strategy more than quadrupled the statistical power to 39%. We use the results of similar simulations to make recommendations about the number of patients, the number of donors, and the choice of clinical endpoint that clinical trials should use to optimize their ability to detect if fecal microbiota transplantation is effective for treating a condition.

  5. Source tracking swine fecal waste in surface water proximal to swine concentrated animal feeding operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Christopher D.; Myers, Kevin; Wing, Steve; Hall, Devon; Baron, Dothula; Stewart, Jill R.

    2015-01-01

    Swine farming has gone through many changes in the last few decades, resulting in operations with a high animal density known as confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations produce a large quantity of fecal waste whose environmental impacts are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate microbial water quality in surface waters proximal to swine CAFOs including microbial source tracking of fecal microbes specific to swine. For one year, surface water samples at up- and downstream sites proximal to swine CAFO lagoon waste land application sites were tested for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus) and candidate swine-specific microbial source-tracking (MST) markers (Bacteroidales Pig-1-Bac, Pig-2-Bac, and Pig-Bac-2, and methanogen P23-2). Testing of 187 samples showed high fecal indicator bacteria concentrations at both up- and downstream sites. Overall, 40%, 23%, and 61% of samples exceeded state and federal recreational water quality guidelines for fecal coliforms, E. coli, and Enterococcus, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac showed the highest specificity to swine fecal wastes and were 2.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03, 5.94) and 2.30 times (95% CI = 0.90, 5.88) as prevalent proximal down- than proximal upstream of swine CAFOs, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac were also 2.87 (95% CI = 1.21, 6.80) and 3.36 (95% CI = 1.34, 8.41) times as prevalent when 48 hour antecedent rainfall was greater than versus less than the mean, respectively. Results suggest diffuse and overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters where swine CAFO density is high. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac are useful for tracking off-site conveyance of swine fecal wastes into surface waters proximal to and downstream of swine CAFOs and during rain events. PMID:25600418

  6. The effect of sampling and storage on the fecal microbiota composition in healthy and diseased subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyta I Tedjo

    Full Text Available Large-scale cohort studies are currently being designed to investigate the human microbiome in health and disease. Adequate sampling strategies are required to limit bias due to shifts in microbial communities during sampling and storage. Therefore, we examined the impact of different sampling and storage conditions on the stability of fecal microbial communities in healthy and diseased subjects. Fecal samples from 10 healthy controls, 10 irritable bowel syndrome and 8 inflammatory bowel disease patients were collected on site, aliquoted immediately after defecation and stored at -80 °C, -20 °C for 1 week, at +4°C or room temperature for 24 hours. Fecal transport swabs (FecalSwab, Copan were collected and stored for 48-72 hours at room temperature. We used pyrosequencing of the 16S gene to investigate the stability of microbial communities. Alpha diversity did not differ between all storage methods and -80 °C, except for the fecal swabs. UPGMA clustering and principal coordinate analysis showed significant clustering by test subject (p < 0.001 but not by storage method. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity and (unweighted UniFrac showed a significant higher distance between fecal swabs and -80 °C versus the other methods and -80 °C samples (p < 0.009. The relative abundance of Ruminococcus and Enterobacteriaceae did not differ between the storage methods versus -80 °C, but was higher in fecal swabs (p < 0.05. Storage up to 24 hours (at +4 °C or room temperature or freezing at -20 °C did not significantly alter the fecal microbial community structure compared to direct freezing of samples from healthy subjects and patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

  7. Microbiota transplantation restores normal fecal bile acid composition in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Alexa R; Chen, Chi; Bobr, Aleh; Yao, Dan; Lu, Yuwei; Nelson, Valerie M; Sadowsky, Michael J; Khoruts, Alexander

    2014-02-15

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a highly effective therapy for refractory, recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), which develops following antibiotic treatments. Intestinal microbiota play a critical role in the metabolism of bile acids in the colon, which in turn have major effects on the lifecycle of C. difficile bacteria. We hypothesized that fecal bile acid composition is altered in patients with recurrent CDI and that FMT results in its normalization. General metabolomics and targeted bile acid analyses were performed on fecal extracts from patients with recurrent CDI treated with FMT and their donors. In addition, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to determine the bacterial composition of pre- and post-FMT fecal samples. Taxonomic bacterial composition of fecal samples from FMT recipients showed rapid change and became similar to the donor after the procedure. Pre-FMT fecal samples contained high concentrations of primary bile acids and bile salts, while secondary bile acids were nearly undetectable. In contrast, post-FMT fecal samples contained mostly secondary bile acids, as did non-CDI donor samples. Therefore, our analysis showed that FMT resulted in normalization of fecal bacterial community structure and metabolic composition. Importantly, metabolism of bile salts and primary bile acids to secondary bile acids is disrupted in patients with recurrent CDI, and FMT corrects this abnormality. Since individual bile salts and bile acids have pro-germinant and inhibitory activities, the changes suggest that correction of bile acid metabolism is likely a major mechanism by which FMT results in a cure and prevents recurrence of CDI.

  8. Correlation between Fecal Concentrations of Ciprofloxacin and Fecal Counts of Resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Piglets Treated with Ciprofloxacin: toward New Means To Control the Spread of Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Huy, Clarisse; Cambier, Carole; de Gunzburg, Jean; Mentré, France; Andremont, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    We assessed in a piglet model the relationship between fecal ciprofloxacin concentrations and ciprofloxacin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae counts. Twenty-nine piglets were orally treated with placebo or with 1.5 or 15 mg ciprofloxacin/kg of body weight/day from day 1 (D1) to D5. Areas under the curve (AUC) of concentrations increased sharply with dose and correlated positively with AUC of resistant bacteria log counts between D1 and D9. Removing residual colonic quinolones could help to control the emergence of resistance in fecal flora. PMID:22751547

  9. Modeling fecal bacteria transport and retention in agricultural and urban soils under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkhair, Khaled S

    2017-03-01

    Pathogenic bacteria, that enter surface water bodies and groundwater systems through unmanaged wastewater land application, pose a great risk to human health. In this study, six soil column experiments were conducted to simulate the vulnerability of agricultural and urban field soils for fecal bacteria transport and retention under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions. HYDRUS-1D kinetic attachment and kinetic attachment-detachment models were used to simulate the breakthrough curves of the experimental data by fitting model parameters. Results indicated significant differences in the retention and drainage of bacteria between saturated and unsaturated flow condition in the two studied soils. Flow under unsaturated condition retained more bacteria than the saturated flow case. The high bacteria retention in the urban soil compared to agricultural soil is ascribed not only to the dynamic attachment and sorption mechanisms but also to the greater surface area of fine particles and low flow rate. All models simulated experimental data satisfactorily under saturated flow conditions; however, under variably saturated flow, the peak concentrations were overestimated by the attachment-detachment model and underestimated by the attachment model with blocking. The good match between observed data and simulated concentrations by the attachment model which was supported by the Akaike information criterion (AIC) for model selection indicates that the first-order attachment coefficient was sufficient to represent the quantitative and temporal distribution of bacteria in the soil column. On the other hand, the total mass balance of the drained and retained bacteria in all transport experiments was in the range of values commonly found in the literature. Regardless of flow conditions and soil texture, most of the bacteria were retained in the top 12 cm of the soil column. The approaches and the models used in this study have proven to be a good tool for simulating fecal

  10. Evaluation of Fecal Microbiota Transfer as Treatment for Postweaning Diarrhea in Research-Colony Puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Erin N; O'Connor, Erin; Ericsson, Aaron C; Franklin, Craig L

    2016-01-01

    Frequently just prior to or at weaning (approximate age, 6 to 8 wk), puppies in research settings often develop diarrheal disease, which may be due, in part, to an immature and unstable intestinal microbiota that is permissive to opportunistic pathogens. The overall objective of this study was to assess whether fecal microbiota transfer (FMT) increased the transmission of a stable maternal microbiota to pups and decreased the incidence of postweaning diarrhea. Puppies were designated by litter as treated (FMT) or sham-treated. The FMT group received fecal inoculum orally for 5 consecutive days during weaning (at 6 to 8 wk of age). Diarrhea was evaluated according to a published scoring system for 11 d during the weaning period. Fresh feces were collected from dams and puppies at 3 d before weaning and 3, 10, and 24 d after weaning for analysis of the fecal microbiota by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. The composition of fecal inoculum refrigerated at 3 to 5 °C was stable for at least 5 d. No diarrhea was reported in either group during the study period, making comparison of treated and control groups problematic. However, 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed microbial variability across time in both groups. Therefore, although the fecal microbiota of neither group of puppies mirrored the dam at any of the designated time points, the data provided fundamental and novel information regarding the dynamic maturation process of the fecal microbiota of puppies after weaning.

  11. Temporary Fecal Diversion in the Management of Colorectal and Perianal Crohn’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Mennigen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the results of temporary fecal diversion in colorectal and perianal Crohn’s disease. Method. We retrospectively identified 29 consecutive patients (14 females, 15 males; median age: 30.0 years, range: 18–76 undergoing temporary fecal diversion for colorectal (n=14, ileal (n=4, and/or perianal Crohn’s disease (n=22. Follow-up was in median 33.0 (3–103 months. Response to fecal diversion, rate of stoma reversal, and relapse rate after stoma reversal were recorded. Results. The response to temporary fecal diversion was complete remission in 4/29 (13.8%, partial remission in 12/29 (41.4%, no change in 7/29 (24.1%, and progress in 6/29 (20.7%. Stoma reversal was performed in 19 out of 25 patients (76% available for follow-up. Of these, the majority (15/19, 78.9% needed further surgical therapies for a relapse of the same pathology previously leading to temporary fecal diversion, including colorectal resections (10/19, 52.6% and creation of a definitive stoma (7/19, 36.8%. At the end of follow-up, only 4/25 patients (16% had a stable course without the need for further definitive surgery. Conclusion. Temporary fecal diversion can induce remission in otherwise refractory colorectal or perianal Crohn’s disease, but the chance of enduring remission after stoma reversal is low.

  12. Micro-zooplankton grazing as a means of fecal bacteria removal in stormwater BMPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtchett, Jade M; Mallin, Michael A; Cahoon, Lawrence B

    2017-06-01

    A priority for environmental managers is control of stormwater runoff pollution, especially fecal microbial pollution. This research was designed to determine if fecal bacterial grazing by micro-zooplankton is a significant control on fecal bacteria in aquatic best management practices (BMPs); if grazing differs between a wet detention pond and a constructed wetland; and if environmental factors enhance grazing. Both 3-day grazing tests and 24-h dilution assays were used to determine grazing differences between the two types of BMP. Micro-zooplankton grazing was a stronger bacteria removal mechanism in stormwater wetlands rich in aquatic vegetation compared to a standard wet detention pond, although grazing was important in detention ponds as well. Our experiments indicated that the majority of grazers that fed on fecal bacteria were <20 μm in size. Grazing rates were positively correlated with fecal coliform abundance and increased water temperatures. Enumeration of grazers demonstrated that protozoans were significantly more abundant among wetland vegetation than in open water, and open wetland waters contained more flagellates and dinoflagellates than open wet detention pond waters. Grazing on fecal bacteria in BMPs is enhanced by aquatic vegetation, and grazing in aquatic BMPs in warmer climates should be greater than in cooler climates.

  13. Fecal calprotectin as a biomarker of inflammatory lesions of the small bowel seen by videocapsule endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Egea-Valenzuela

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The levels of calprotectin in the stools are proportional to neutrophil activity in the enteric lumen, so fecal calprotectin is a useful intestinal inflammatory biomarker. It is an extended tool as predictor of colonic pathology but there is scare evidence about its utility in the small bowel. Objective: To test the yield of fecal calprotectin to detect lesions in the small bowel. Material and methods: We have retrospectively included 71 patients sent for small bowel capsule endoscopy in study for suspected inflammatory bowel disease. All of them had a determination of fecal calprotectin and had been sent to colonoscopy with no findings. Patients have been divided in groups: A, fecal calprotectin 100 µg/g, and we have analyzed which of them presented inflammatory lesions in capsule endoscopy studies. Results: The rate of patients with signi ficative lesions was 1 out of 10 (10% in group A, 6 out of 24 (25% in group B, and 21 out of 34 (62% in group C. If we consider levels over 50 µg/g pathologic, fecal calprotectin presents sensitivity: 96%, specificity: 23%, NPV: 90% and PPV: 56%. If we consider levels over 100 µg/g pathologic these values are sensitivity: 75%, specificity: 67%, NPV: 79% and PPV: 62%. Conclusions: Fecal calprotectin has high sensitivity but not so good specificity for predicting small bowel lesions after a normal colonoscopy. In daily practice it will be more useful to establish in 100 µg/g the limit to indicate capsule endoscopy studies.

  14. Salmonella spp. fecal shedding detected by real-time PCR in competing endurance horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, C Langdon; Meier, Chloe A; Magdesian, K Gary; Pusterla, Nicola

    2013-09-01

    Fecal shedding of Salmonella spp. was recently documented in 8% of endurance horses presented to equine referral centers for colic. Previous studies have documented fecal shedding of Salmonella spp. in as few as 0.8% of the general horse population, although horses with colic appear to be at higher risk. Fecal Salmonella spp. shedding before and after endurance horse competitions has not been evaluated. Fecal samples were collected from 204 horses during three separate 100 mile endurance competitions. Following incubation in selenite broth, 289 fecal samples were tested by real-time PCR analysis for Salmonella spp. Only one post-race sample (0.5% tested positive for Salmonella spp. in this study and no pre-race sample was available from this horse. Results suggest that fecal shedding of Salmonella spp. is uncommon in endurance horses during competitions. Further research is needed to confirm and identify the source of Salmonella spp. infection in endurance horses with colic requiring treatment at referral centers.

  15. Evaluation and Improved Use of Fecal Occult Blood Test in the Constipated Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilway, Denise M

    2016-01-01

    This quality improvement project examined the use of fecal occult blood test in the constipated child in a pediatric gastroenterology outpatient clinic. A retrospective chart review was completed on 100 children seen for an initial visit with the gastroenterology provider. The number of fecal occult blood tests performed and the child's coinciding symptoms were tallied and compared with the North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition recommendations. An educational intervention was held with the pediatric gastroenterology providers consisting of a PowerPoint presentation summarizing aims of the quality improvement project and reviewing recommendations for use of fecal occult blood test in the constipated child. Pre- and post-intervention chart review data sets were compared. Results showed a 19.6% decrease in the use of fecal occult blood tests performed during the post-intervention timeframe. However, when used in conjunction with North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition recommendations, the appropriateness of fecal occult blood test use increased by 71.4% in the post-intervention patients. Reviewing the recommendations with gastroenterology providers assisted in optimizing the meaningful use of fecal occult blood test, improving quality and safety of care for children seen in the pediatric gastroenterology outpatient clinic.

  16. Virulence genotypes of Escherichia coli canine isolates from pyometra, cystitis and fecal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus, Luisa; Henriques, Sofia; Merino, Carolina; Pomba, Constança; Lopes da Costa, Luís; Silva, Elisabete

    2013-10-25

    Pyometra is the most common diestrual uterine disease of bitches. Escherichia coli is the most frequent bacterium isolated from the uterine content of pyometra uteri and it is associated with the most severe clinical signs, leading to endotoxemia and sepsis. In this study, canine E. coli isolates from pyometra (n=31), cystitis (n=23) and fecal (n=26) origin were compared regarding the prevalence of 23 potential virulence traits (15 virulence factor (VF) genes and 8 pathogenicity associated islands-PAIs), detected by PCR assays. Overall, there was a considerable overlap between pyometra, cystitis and fecal isolates regarding the phylogenetic grouping and virulence traits. Virulence traits more prevalent in pyometra than in cystitis and fecal isolates included two PAIs (PAI IV536 and PAI ICFT073) and three VF genes (sfa/focDE, fyuA and chuA). Regardless the isolates' origin, the average number of virulence traits per strain was higher in B2 than in the other phylogenetic groups (A, B1 and D). The prevalence of phylogenetic group B2 was significantly higher in pyometra (94%) than in cystitis (48%) and fecal (39%) isolates. In conclusion, pyometra isolates have a high potential of virulence and a broad virulence genotype, although being similar to a subset of cystitis and fecal isolates. This leads to the suggestion that cystitis and fecal isolates may be able to induce pyometra in receptive hosts.

  17. The Host Shapes the Gut Microbiota via Fecal MicroRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shirong; da Cunha, Andre Pires; Rezende, Rafael M; Cialic, Ron; Wei, Zhiyun; Bry, Lynn; Comstock, Laurie E; Gandhi, Roopali; Weiner, Howard L

    2016-01-13

    The host gut microbiota varies across species and individuals but is relatively stable over time within an individual. How the host selectively shapes the microbiota is largely unclear. Here, we show that fecal microRNA (miRNA)-mediated inter-species gene regulation facilitates host control of the gut microbiota. miRNAs are abundant in mouse and human fecal samples and present within extracellular vesicles. Cell-specific loss of the miRNA-processing enzyme, Dicer, identified intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and Hopx-positive cells as predominant fecal miRNA sources. These miRNAs can enter bacteria, such as F. nucleatum and E. coli, specifically regulate bacterial gene transcripts, and affect bacterial growth. IEC-miRNA-deficient (Dicer1(ΔIEC)) mice exhibit uncontrolled gut microbiota and exacerbated colitis, and WT fecal miRNA transplantation restores fecal microbes and ameliorates colitis. These findings identify both a physiologic role by which fecal miRNA shapes the gut microbiota and a potential strategy for manipulating the microbiome.

  18. Modulation of mice fecal microbiota by administration of casein glycomacropeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsen Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Casein glycomacropeptide (GMP is known to promote the in vitro growth of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. In this paper, we used conven- tional culture techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH techniques to investigate the effect of casein GMP on mice fecal microbiota. The population structure of the intestinal microbiota, including Lactobacillus, Bifidobacteria, Enterococcus, coliforms and Enterobacteriaceae, was tested and compared. After consecutive administration of casein GMP for 15 days, numbers of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria increased significantly (P<0.01, numbers of Enterobacteriaceae and Coliforms decreased significantly (P<0.05 while no significant changes were observed for Enterococcus. The detection limits of FISH technique were significantly lower (P<0.01 than the traditional culture method. These results suggested that consumption of casein GMP had a prebiotic effect on male BALB/c mice. Casein GMP helped establish a healthier intestinal microbiota. Additionally, FISH was proved to be a rapid and relatively low-cost detection method that can be used to further our understanding of human intestinal microbiota.

  19. Fecal microbiota transplantation broadening its application beyond intestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng-Que; Cao, Hai-Long; Wang, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Shan; Cao, Xiao-Cang; Yan, Fang; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-01-07

    Intestinal dysbiosis is now known to be a complication in a myriad of diseases. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), as a microbiota-target therapy, is arguably very effective for curing Clostridium difficile infection and has good outcomes in other intestinal diseases. New insights have raised an interest in FMT for the management of extra-intestinal disorders associated with gut microbiota. This review shows that it is an exciting time in the burgeoning science of FMT application in previously unexpected areas, including metabolic diseases, neuropsychiatric disorders, autoimmune diseases, allergic disorders, and tumors. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on FMT in metabolic syndrome by infusing microbiota from lean donors or from self-collected feces, with the resultant findings showing that the lean donor feces group displayed increased insulin sensitivity, along with increased levels of butyrate-producing intestinal microbiota. Case reports of FMT have also shown favorable outcomes in Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, myoclonus dystonia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. FMT is a promising approach in the manipulation of the intestinal microbiota and has potential applications in a variety of extra-intestinal conditions associated with intestinal dysbiosis.

  20. Fecal contamination of wastewater treatment plants in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Manuela; Serrano, Isa; Van Harten, Sofia; Bessa, Lucinda J; Bernardo, Fernando; da Costa, Paulo Martins

    2016-07-01

    Reutilization of effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) for non-potable applications is increasing due to the reduction of sustainable water resources. These products mostly come from municipal WWTP and also from slaughterhouses effluents. The microbiological certification of these products is mandatory before their discharge into the environment. This study evaluates if the treatment applied in WWTP to municipal waters or to poultry slaughterhouse effluents distributed over the Portuguese continental territory is efficient in reducing the microbiological risk associated with the reutilization of those wastewaters and sludges. Fecal indicators Escherichia coli and enterococci were evaluated in 42 and 24 wastewater samples from 14 municipal WWTP and 8 poultry slaughterhouse treatment plants, respectively, by the conventional culture method and a rapid Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Bacterial enumeration in inflow water from most WWTP was rather high (generally >10(5) cells/ml), for both E. coli and Enterococcus spp., and the bacterial quantification by FISH was generally higher than enumeration by the conventional culture method. In both types of treatment plants studied, bacterial load from effluents and sludges was not statistically different from the inflows, indicating that the treatment applied seems to be equally unable to reduce the microbiological load of the effluents. These findings may jeopardize the safe reuse of treated wastewaters in agriculture and the quality of the water environment. Therefore, products like water, sewage sludge, and biosolids originated from the municipal and slaughterhouse WWTP studied should not be reutilized, and effluents treatment should be urgently reviewed.

  1. Colite de derivação fecal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Edilson Leite Pinto Júnior

    Full Text Available A colite de derivação fecal (CD é um processo inflamatório que ocorre no segmento colorretal desfuncionalizado, após uma cirurgia de desvio do trânsito intestinal. As principais características dessa entidade clínica são: apresenta-se na desfuncionalização do cólon ou reto; não há doença inflamatória intestinal preexistente; nunca acomete o sítio proximal à colostomia e ocorre resolução do processo após a restauração do trânsito intestinal. Diversas são as hipóteses postuladas para explicar o seu aparecimento; todavia, a deficiência nutricional do epitélio colônico, pela ausência dos ácidos graxos de cadeia curta (AGCC, no segmento desfuncionalizado, é a mais aceita na atualidade. Os autores fazem uma revisão da literatura enfocando os aspectos clínicos, histopatológicos e terapêuticos desta doença.

  2. Distribution of Fecal Indicator Bacteria along the Malibu, California, Coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John

    2011-01-01

    Each year, over 550 million people visit California's public beaches. To protect beach-goers from exposure to waterborne disease, California state law requires water-quality monitoring for fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), such as enterococci and Escherichia coli (E. coli), at beaches having more than 50,000 yearly visitors. FIB are used to assess the microbiological quality of water because, although not typically disease causing, they are correlated with the occurrence of certain waterborne diseases. Tests show that FIB concentrations occasionally exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) public health standards for recreational water in Malibu Lagoon and at several Malibu beaches (Regional Water Quality Control Board, 2009). Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) California Water Science Center are doing a study to identify the distribution and sources of FIB in coastal Malibu waters (fig. 1). The study methods were similar to those used in a study of FIB contamination on beaches in the Santa Barbara, California, area (Izbicki and others, 2009). This report describes the study approach and presents preliminary results used to evaluate the distribution and source of FIB in the Malibu area. Results of this study will help decision-makers address human health issues associated with FIB contamination in Malibu, and the methods used in this study can be used in other coastal areas affected by FIB contamination.

  3. Fecal microbiota transplantation: effectiveness, complexities, and lingering concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamer, E G

    2014-03-01

    The mammalian colon is home to a microbial ecosystem that enhances resistance to infection, stimulates mucosal immune defenses, synthesizes essential vitamins, and promotes caloric uptake by hydrolyzing complex carbohydrates. The bacterial populations inhabiting the gut are complex and vary between different individuals. Clinical and experimental studies reveal that the colonic microbiota can enhance or ameliorate intestinal and systemic inflammatory diseases. Because of its potential to enhance resistance to infection and to reduce inflammatory diseases, targeted manipulation of microbial populations is a growing focus of investigation. The most dramatic manipulation of the intestinal microbiota involves fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy donors to individuals with specific diseases. Remarkable clinical effectiveness of FMT has been demonstrated for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and ongoing studies are investigating FMT for other diseases. Transplantation of complex microbial populations to recipients likely triggers mucosal immune responses that, depending on the microbiota composition and the recipient's genotype, could range from pro- to anti-inflammatory. The impact of FMT on the recipient immune system is complex and unpredictable. Ongoing discovery of commensal microbes and investigations of their impact on the host will lead to the development of new probiotic agents and microbial consortia that will eventually replace FMT.

  4. Fecal microbiota transplantation in inflammatory bowel disease: beyond the excitement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Bibbò, Stefano; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Cammarota, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to perform a systematic review of the literature on the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).There is an increasing interest of both physicians and patients in assessing the possible role of the FMT in the treatment of IBD.Electronic and manual bibliographic searches were performed to identify original reports in which subjects with IBD were treated with FMT. Because of the scarcity of studies with adequate sample size, case series and case reports were also considered. A critical appraisal of the clinical research evidence on the effectiveness, safety, and other parameters related to FMT was made. Data extraction was independently performed by 2 reviewers.We found a total of 31 publications on the use of FMT in IBD. The majority were case reports or case series, whereas 8 publications reported data from open-label trials including a very less number of patients. A total of 133 patients with IBD were managed with FMT. Of these, 57 subjects (43%) had a Clostridium difficile infection. A resolution or reduction of symptoms was reported in 80 of 113 (71%) patients with evaluable IBD. Moreover, FMT does not seem to provide the same safety profile showed for non-IBD individuals with C difficile infection.The available evidence is limited and weak. FMT has the potential to be somehow of help in managing patients with IBD, but considerable further efforts are necessary to make this procedure a valid option for these subjects.

  5. Multiple modes of water quality impairment by fecal contamination in a rapidly developing coastal area: southwest Brunswick County, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Lawrence B; Hales, Jason C; Carey, Erin S; Loucaides, Socratis; Rowland, Kevin R; Toothman, Byron R

    2016-02-01

    Fecal contamination of surface waters is a significant problem, particularly in rapidly developing coastal watersheds. Data from a water quality monitoring program in southwest Brunswick County, North Carolina, gathered in support of a regional wastewater and stormwater management program were used to examine likely modes and sources of fecal contamination. Sampling was conducted at 42 locations at 3-4-week intervals between 1996 and 2003, including streams, ponds, and estuarine waters in a variety of land use settings. Expected fecal sources included human wastewater systems (on-site and central), stormwater runoff, and direct deposition by animals. Fecal coliform levels were positively associated with rainfall measures, but frequent high fecal coliform concentrations at times of no rain indicated other modes of contamination as well. Fecal coliform levels were also positively associated with silicate levels, a groundwater source signal, indicating that flux of fecal-contaminated groundwater was a mode of contamination, potentially elevating FC levels in impacted waters independent of stormwater runoff. Fecal contamination by failing septic or sewer systems at many locations was significant and in addition to effects of stormwater runoff. Rainfall was also linked to fecal contamination by central sewage treatment system failures. These results highlight the importance of considering multiple modes of water pollution and different ways in which human activities cause water quality degradation. Management of water quality in coastal regions must therefore recognize diverse drivers of fecal contamination to surface waters.

  6. Colon cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  7. Fecal Collection and Stabilization Methods for Improved Fecal DNA Test for Colorectal Cancer in a Screening Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Maria Carozzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of CRC and adenomas reduces CRC-related mortality. The optimal screening test for CRC is still a subject of debate, and molecular stool sample analysis could provide a valid alternative to conventional methods in terms of compliance and practicability. Seven fecal DNA storage systems were evaluated in two successive phases. In the first phase of the study was selected the preservative buffer able to ensure the best human DNA recovery. In the second phase was evaluated human DNA stability, amplificability and integrity in DNA extracted from selected buffer. Results showed that the best performance was obtained in samples stored in 100 mM EDTA buffer and Genefec buffer. Likewise buffer addition yielded a significant increase in DNA stability and integrity without PCR inhibition, compared to the matched aliquots with no buffer added. Our study shows that samples collected in stabilization solution stabilize DNA so that intact nucleic acids, are more effectively detectable in the molecular assay. DNA buffer preservation and storage conditions could be useful to guarantee the most consistent yield in human DNA. Stabilization buffer addition to stool samples prior to transport presents an easily implemented solution that appears to be highly effective. Overall DNA extracted from faeces preserved in preservative buffer can feasibility been used for molecular analysis leading to an increase of assay sensitivity.

  8. Comparative effects of cellulose and soluble fibers (pectin, konjac glucomannan, inulin) on fecal water toxicity toward Caco-2 cells, fecal bacteria enzymes, bile acid, and short-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Lin, You-Mei; Wang, Yi-Chun

    2010-09-22

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of cellulose and three soluble dietary fibers, pectin, konjac glucomannan (KGM), and inulin, on the cytotoxicity and DNA damage of fecal water-treated Caco-2 cells, a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, and to investigate the fecal components that potentially modulate the fecal toxicity, that is, bacterial enzymes, bile acids, and short-chain fatty acids. Six-week-old BALB/cJ mice were randomly allocated to consume an AIN-93 diet that contained no dietary fiber (fiber-free) or 5% (w/w) cellulose, pectin, KGM, and inulin for 3 weeks. Feces were collected during days 18-21. Fecal waters were co-incubated with Caco-2 cells to determine the cytotoxicity and DNA damage. In addition, the fecal bacterial enzymes, bile acids, and short-chain fatty acids were determined. Results indicated that all fiber diets similarly increased the survival rate (%) of fecal water-treated Caco-2 cells as compared with the fiber-free diet. The inhibition of fecal water-induced DNA damage in Caco-2 cells was greater for the pectin and inulin diets than for the cellulose and KGM diets. In contrast, cellulose exerted the greatest inhibitory effect on the fecal β-glucuronidase activity. Cellulose and all soluble dietary fibers reduced the secondary bile acid concentrations in the fecal water, but only soluble fibers increased the fecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids, as compared with no fiber. Therefore, this study suggests that all dietary fibers substantially reduced the fecal water toxicity, which is associated with decreased secondary bile acid levels by all fibers, reduced fecal β-glucuronidase activity by cellulose, and increased short-chain fatty acid levels by soluble dietary fibers.

  9. Correlation between quantitative PCR and Culture-Based methods for measuring Enterococcus spp. over various temporal scales at three California marine beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several studies have examined how fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) measurements compare between quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and the culture methods it is intended to replace. Here we extend those studies by examining the stability of that relationship within a be...

  10. Comparison of Enterococcus quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis results from midwest U.S. river samples using EPA Method 1611 and Method 1609 PCR reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has provided recommended beach advisory values in its 2012 recreational water quality criteria (RWQC) for states wishing to use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for the monitoring of Enterococcus fecal indicator bacteria...

  11. Comparison of Enterococcus quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis results from midwest U.S. river samples using EPA Method 1611 and Method 1609 PCR reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has provided recommended beach advisory values in its 2012 recreational water quality criteria (RWQC) for states wishing to use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for the monitoring of Enterococcus fecal indicator bacteria...

  12. Quantitative lithofacies palaeogeography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng-Zhao; Feng; Xiu-Juan; Zheng; Zhi-Dong; Bao; Zhen-Kui; Jin; Sheng-He; Wu; You-Bin; He; Yong-Min; Peng; Yu-Qing; Yang; Jia-Qiang; Zhang; Yong-Sheng; Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative lithofacies palaeogeography is an important discipline of palaeogeography.It is developed on the foundation of traditional lithofacies palaeogeography and palaeogeography,the core of which is the quantitative lithofacies palaeogeographic map.Quantity means that in the palaeogeographic map,the division and identification of each palaeogeographic unit are supported by quantitative data and quantitative fundamental maps.Our lithofacies palaeogeographic maps are quantitative or mainly quantitative.A great number of quantitative lithofacies palaeogeographic maps have been published,and articles and monographs of quantitative lithofacies palaeogeography have been published successively,thus the quantitative lithofacies palaeogeography was formed and established.It is an important development in lithofacies palaeogeography.In composing quantitative lithofacies palaeogeographic maps,the key measure is the single factor analysis and multifactor comprehensive mapping method—methodology of quantitative lithofacies palaeogeography.In this paper,the authors utilize two case studies,one from the Early Ordovician of South China and the other from the Early Ordovician of Ordos,North China,to explain how to use this methodology to compose the quantitative lithofacies palaeogeographic maps,and to discuss the palaeogeographic units in these maps.Finally,three characteristics,i.e.,quantification,multiple orders and multiple types,of quantitative lithofacies palaeogeographic maps are conclusively discussed.

  13. Influence of dietary fiber type and amount on energy and nutrient digestibility, fecal characteristics, and fecal fermentative end-product concentrations in captive exotic felids fed a raw beef-based diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, K R; Morris, C L; Burke, S L; Swanson, K S

    2013-05-01

    Little nutritional or metabolic information has been collected from captive exotic cats fed raw diets. In particular, fiber types and concentrations for use in raw meat-based diets for captive exotic felids have not been well studied. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of fiber type and concentration on apparent total tract energy and macronutrient digestibility, fecal characteristics, and fecal fermentative end-products in captive exotic felids. Four animals of each captive exotic species (jaguar (Panthera onca), cheetah (Acinonyz jubatus), Malayan tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti), and Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) were randomized in four 4 × 4 Latin square designs (1 Latin square per species) to 1 of the 4 raw beef-based dietary treatments (94.7 to 96.7% beef trimmings): 2 or 4% cellulose or 2 or 4% beet pulp. Felid species, fiber type, and fiber concentration all impacted digestibility and fecal fermentative end-products. Inclusion of beet pulp increased (P ≤ 0.05) fecal short-chain fatty acids and fecal output in all cats. Inclusion of 2 and 4% cellulose, and 4% beet pulp increased (P ≤ 0.05) fecal bulk and diluted fecal branched-chain fatty acid concentrations compared with 2% beet pulp. Apparent total tract DM, OM, fat, and GE digestibility coefficients decreased (P ≤ 0.05) linearly with BW of cats. Additionally, fecal moisture, fecal score, and concentrations of fermentative end-products increased (P ≤ 0.05) with BW. Although the response of many outcomes was dependent on cat size, in general, beet pulp increased wet fecal weight, fecal scores, and fecal metabolites, and reduced fecal pH. Cellulose generally reduced DM and OM digestibility, but increased dry fecal weight and fecal percent DM. Although beet pulp and cellulose fibers were tested individually in this study, these data indicate that the optimum fiber type and concentration for inclusion in captive exotic felid diets is likely a combination of fermentable and

  14. Dietary fiber supplementation for fecal incontinence: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donna Z; Savik, Kay; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Whitebird, Robin; Lowry, Ann; Sheng, Xiaoyan

    2014-10-01

    Dietary fiber supplements are used to manage fecal incontinence (FI), but little is known about the fiber type to recommend or the level of effectiveness of such supplements, which appears related to the fermentability of the fiber. The aim of this single-blind, randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of three dietary fiber supplements (carboxymethylcellulose [CMC], gum arabic [GA], or psyllium) with differing levels of fermentability to a placebo in community-living individuals incontinent of loose/liquid feces. The primary outcome was FI frequency; secondary outcomes included FI amount and consistency, supplement intolerance, and quality of life (QoL). Possible mechanisms underlying supplement effects were also examined. After a 14-day baseline, 189 subjects consumed a placebo or 16 g total fiber/day of one of the fiber supplements for 32 days. FI frequency significantly decreased after psyllium supplementation versus placebo, in both intent-to-treat and per-protocol mixed model analyses. CMC increased FI frequency. In intent-to-treat analysis, the number of FI episodes/week after supplementation was estimated to be 5.5 for Placebo, 2.5 for Psyllium, 4.3 for GA, and 6.2 for CMC. Only psyllium consumption resulted in a gel in feces. Supplement intolerance was low. QoL scores did not differ among groups. Patients with FI may experience a reduction in FI frequency after psyllium supplementation, and decreased FI frequency has been shown to be an important personal goal of treatment for patients with FI. Formation of a gel in feces appears to be a mechanism by which residual psyllium improved FI.

  15. Systematic Review: Adverse Events of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqiang; Cao, Xiaocang; Piao, Meiyu; Khan, Samiullah; Yan, Fang; Cao, Hailong; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-01-01

    Background Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a microbiota-based therapy that shows therapeutic potential in recurrent or refractory Clostridium difficile infections and other intestinal or extra-intestinal disorders. Nonetheless, adverse events (AEs) remain a major challenge in the application of FMT. Aim To review the AEs of FMT and to address the concerns of safety during the procedure. Methods Publications were retrieved in the databases of Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. AEs were classified according to their causality with FMT or their severity. Results A total of 7562 original articles about FMT were identified in this study, 50 of them fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Totally 78 kinds of AEs were revealed enrolled in these 50 selected publications. The total incidence rate of AEs was 28.5%. Among the 42 publications, 5 kinds were definitely and 38 kinds were probably related to FMT. The commonest FMT-attributable AE was abdominal discomfort, which was reported in 19 publications. For upper gastrointestinal routes of FMT, 43.6% (89/204) patients were compromised by FMT-attributable AE, while the incidence dropped to 17.7% (76/430) for lower gastrointestinal routes. In contrast, the incidences of serious adverse events (SAEs) were 2.0% (4/196) and 6.1% (40/659) for upper and lower gastrointestinal routes, respectively. A total of 44 kinds of SAEs occurred in 9.2% patients, including death (3.5%, 38/1089), infection (2.5%, 27/1089), relapse of inflammatory bowel diseases (0.6%, 7/1089) and Clostridium difficile infection (0.9%, 10/1089). Conclusion Consequently, both AEs and SAEs are not rare and should be carefully monitored throughout FMT. However, high quality randomized controlled trials are still needed for the more definite incidence of AEs of FMT. PMID:27529553

  16. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation as a Novel Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dali; Li, Weiming; Li, Shumin; Cen, Yunyun; Xu, Qingwen; Li, Yijun; Sun, Yanbo; Qi, Yuxing; Lin, Yueying; Yang, Ting; Xu, Pengyuan; Lu, Qiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Variation in clinical evidence has prevented the adoption of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). We aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the efficacy and safety of FMT in UC. A systematic literature search was performed in 5 electronic databases from inception through September 2015. Inclusion criteria were reports of FMT in patients with UC. Studies were excluded if they did not report clinical outcomes or included patients with infections. Clinical remission (CR) was defined as the primary outcome. Eleven studies (2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 1 open-label case-control study, and 8 cohort studies) with a total of 133 UC patients were included in the analysis. In 11 studies (including 8 noncontrol cohort studies and the treatment arms of 3 clinical control trials), the pooled proportion of patients who achieved CR was 30.4% (95% CI 22.6–39.4%), with a low risk of heterogeneity (Cochran Q test, P = 0.139; I2 = 33%). A subgroup analysis suggested that no difference in CR was detected between upper gastrointestinal delivery versus lower gastrointestinal delivery. Furthermore, subgroup analysis revealed that there was no difference in CR between single infusion versus multiple infusions (>1) of FMT. All studies reported mild adverse events. FMT is potentially useful in UC disease management but better-designed RCTs are still required to confirm our findings before wide adoption of FMT is suggested. Additionally, basic guidelines are needed imminently to identify the right patient population and to standardize the process of FMT. PMID:27281075

  17. Patient perceptions of fecal microbiota transplantation for ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Stacy A; Vachon, Ashley; Rodriquez, Dylan; Goeppinger, Sarah R; Surma, Bonnie; Marks, Julia; Rubin, David T

    2013-06-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), the delivery of stool from a healthy prescreened donor to an individual with disease, is gaining increasing recognition as a potential treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases. Our objective was to describe patient interest in and social concerns around FMT. We conducted a survey of adults with ulcerative colitis (UC) seen in outpatient clinic at the University of Chicago IBD Center. All English-speaking patients ≥18 years of age were eligible. Subjects completed a written survey in clinic. Ninety-five participants, median age 39 years, 53% female, were enrolled in the study. Forty-four percent and 49% reported excellent or good/satisfactory medical management of their UC, respectively. Forty-six percent participants were willing to undergo FMT as a treatment of UC, 43% were unsure, and 11% were unwilling to undergo FMT. Subjects who had been hospitalized were more willing to undergo FMT, 54% versus 34%, P = 0.035. Primary concerns included the following: adequate screening for infections (41%), cleanliness (24%), and potential to worsen UC (18%); 21% reported no specific concerns. For donor selection, an equal number of participants (46%) preferred whomever their doctor recommended or family member/spouse. In our center despite reporting satisfactory to excellent disease control with their treatments, the vast majority of patients with UC are interested in or willing to consider FMT. Proof of safety and effectiveness, and failure of other medical therapies are key issues in considering FMT. Strong interest in this as-yet unproven therapy warrants attention and is a pressing priority for clinical research and education.

  18. The Role of Fecal Calprotectin in Investigating Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Ünal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fecal calprotectin (FCP can be found in high concentrations in inflammatory bowel disease due to the increase in leucocyte turnover in intestinal wall or increase of migration of neutrophils into the lumen. In this study, we aimed to determine the FCP values of the ulcerative colitis (UC patients at the time of diagnosis and to investigate the applicability and effectiveness of this non-invasive method in the diagnosis of the disease, routinely.Materials and Methods: A total of 19 patients with UC (10 females, 9 males, age: 11.5±3.5 years old whoose stool samples collected during the diagnosis period and 20 healthy controls (10 female, 10 male, age: 10.3±4.5 years old were included in the study. Stool samples were collected for FCP analysis by ELISA method at the time of diagnosis and before the treatment period.Results: FCP values of the UC group were statistically higher than the control group. FCP values of the UC and control groups were 398.4 µg/gr stool (56.7-2450 and 19.4 µg/gr stool (2-81, respectively (p0.05. High CRP values (89.4%, elevation of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (84.2%, leukocytosis (73.6%, thrombocytosis (68.4%, anemia (89.4%, and hypoalbuminemia (52.6% were found.Conclusions: FCP values of the UC patients were found to be statistically higher than the control group, and increase in FCP values has been observed with increasing disease activity. Therefore, we believe that the determination of FCP could be useful at the time of diagnosis and during follow-up of the patients with UC. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2012; 10: 80-4

  19. Usefulness of fecal lactoferrin in predicting and monitoring the clinical severity of infectious diarrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chien-Chang Chen; Chee-Jen Chang; Tzou-Yien Lin; Ming-Wei Lai; Hsun-Chin Chao; Man-Shan Kong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the value of fecal lactoferrin in predicting and monitoring the clinical severity of infectious diarrhea.``METHODS: Patients with acute infectious diarrhea ranging from 3 mo to 10 years in age were enrolled, and one to three stool samples from each subject were collected. Certain parameters, including white blood cells/differential count, C-reactive protein, fecal mucus, fecal pus cells, duration of fever, vomiting, diarrhea and severity (indicated by Clark and Vesikari scores), were recorded and analyzed. Fecal lactoferrin was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and compared in different pathogen and disease activity. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were also used for analysis.``RESULTS: Data included 226 evaluations for 117 individuals across three differenttime points. Fecal lactoferrin was higher in patients with Salmonella (11.17 )j,g/g ± 2.73 μg/g) or Campyhbacter (10.32 μg/g ± 2.94 μig/g) infections and lower in patients with rotavirus (2.82 μg/g ± 1.27 μg/g) or norovirus (3.16 μg/g ± 1.18 |ag/g) infections. Concentrations of fecal lactoferrin were significantly elevated in patients with severe (11.32 μg/g ± 3.29 μag/g) or moderate (3.77 μg/g ± 2.08 μg/g) disease activity compared with subjects with mild (1.51 yig/g ± 1.36 μg/g) disease activity (P < 0.05). GEE analysis suggests that this marker could be used to monitor the severity and course of gastrointestinal infections and may provide information for disease management.``CONCLUSION: Fecal lactoferrin increased during bacterial infection and with greater disease severity and may be a good marker for predicting and monitoring intestinal inflammation in children with infectious diarrhea.

  20. Comparing wastewater chemicals, indicator bacteria concentrations, and bacterial pathogen genes as fecal pollution indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Fogarty, L.R.; Kolpin, D.W.; Focazio, M.J.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli [EC], and enterococci [ENT]) concentrations with a wide array of typical organic wastewater chemicals and selected bacterial genes as indicators of fecal pollution in water samples collected at or near 18 surface water drinking water intakes. Genes tested included esp (indicating human-pathogenic ENT) and nine genes associated with various animal sources of shiga-toxin-producing EC (STEC). Fecal pollution was indicated by genes and/or chemicals for 14 of the 18 tested samples, with little relation to FIB standards. Of 13 samples with antibiotics were detected in three, and stx1 or stx2 genes (indicating varying animal sources of STEC) were detected in eight. Only the EC eaeA gene was positively correlated with FIB concentrations. Human-source fecal pollution was indicated by the esp gene and the human pharmaceutical carbamazepine in one of the nine samples that met all FIB recreational water quality standards. Escherichia coli rfbO157 and stx2c genes, which are typically associated with cattle sources and are of potential human health significance, were detected in one sample in the absence of tested chemicals. Chemical and gene-based indicators of fecal contamination may be present even when FIB standards are met, and some may, unlike FIB, indicate potential sources. Application of multiple water quality indicators with variable environmental persistence and fate may yield greater confidence in fecal pollution assessment and may inform remediation decisions. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  1. Fecal Calprotectin Level as Diagnostic Marker for Intestinal Inflammation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inflammatory bowel disease diagnosis was still based on invasive examination, such as endoscopy and histopathology. Fecal calprotectin was a non-invasive intestinal inflammation marker, but several study give a different result in its diagnostic value and correlation to inflammatory bowel disease. This research was aimed to prove that fecal calprotectin examination has a high diagnostic value in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease, and also correlate to its clinical stages. Method: This is a cross sectional study to do a diagnostic test in several hospital in Jakarta, from September 2014 to February 2015. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was made to get fecal calprotectin diagnostic level and Krusskal Wallis test was performed to identify fecal calprotectin difference among each inflammatory bowel disease clinical stages. Results: A total of 71 patients with inflammatory bowel disease was invoved in this research, based on colonoscopic examination result. Among them, 57 patients was confirmed to have intestinal inflammation based on histopathology result. Fecal calprotectin level was found to be higher in patients with inflammatory bowel disease than patients without intestinal inflammation (553,8 µg/g vs. 76,95 µg/g, p < 0,001. A cut off point of 179,3 µg/g was gathered, with 96% sensitivity (95% CI: 0,88-0,99, 93% specificity (95% CI: 0,69-0,99, and 99,5% area under curve (AUC 99,5% (95% CI: 0,98-1,00. A significant difference was found between fecal calprotectin in each inflammatory bowel disease clinical stages (p < 0,001. Conclusion: Fecal calprotectin has a high diagnostic value for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and strongly correlate to its disease clinical stages.

  2. Quantitative investment analysis

    CERN Document Server

    DeFusco, Richard

    2007-01-01

    In the "Second Edition" of "Quantitative Investment Analysis," financial experts Richard DeFusco, Dennis McLeavey, Jerald Pinto, and David Runkle outline the tools and techniques needed to understand and apply quantitative methods to today's investment process.

  3. Effect of Fermented Supplementation on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, Blood Characteristics, Fecal Microbial and Fecal Noxious Gas Content in Growing Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 96 growing pigs ((Landrace×Yorkshire×Duroc; BW = 26.58±1.41 kg were used in a 6-wk feeding trail to evaluate the effects of fermented chlorella (FC supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood characteristics, fecal microbial and fecal noxious gas content in growing pigs. Pigs were randomly allotted into 1 of 4 dietary treatments with 6 replicate pens (2 barrows and 2 gilts per treatment. Dietary treatments were: i negative control (NC, basal diet (without antibiotics; ii positive control (PC, NC+0.05% tylosin; iii (fermented chlorella 01 FC01, NC+0.1% FC, and iv fermented chlorella 02 (FC02, NC+0.2% FC. In this study, feeding pigs PC or FC01 diets led to a higher average daily gain (ADG and dry matter (DM digestibility than those fed NC diet (p0.05 was observed on the body weight, average daily feed intake (ADFI, gain:feed (G:F ratio, the apparent total tract digestibility of N and energy throughout the experiment. The inclusion of PC or FC did not affect the blood characteristics (p>0.05. Moreover, dietary FC treatment led to a higher (p<0.05 lactobacillus concentration and lower E. coli concentration than the NC treatment, whereas the antibiotic supplementation only decreased the E. coli concentration. Pigs fed FC or PC diet had reduced (p<0.05 fecal NH3 and H2S content compared with those fed NC diet. In conclusion, our results indicated that the inclusion of FC01 treatment could improve the growth performance, nutrient digestibility, fecal microbial shedding (lower E. coli and higher lactobacillus, and decrease the fecal noxious gas emission in growing pigs when compared with the group fed the basal diet. In conclusion, dietary FC could be considered as a good source of supplementation in growing pigs because of its growth promoting effect.

  4. Influence of sample return time and ambient temperature on the performance of an immunochemical faecal occult blood test with a new buffer for colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancourt, Vincent; Hamza, Samia; Manfredi, Sylvain; Drouillard, Antoine; Bidan, Jeanne-Marie; Faivre, Jean; Lepage, Come

    2016-03-01

    The haemoglobin concentration measured by faecal immunochemical tests (FIT) may be decreased in cases of delayed sample return or high temperature. It is an issue of great importance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sample return time and of season on the performance of an FIT (FOB-Gold) with a new buffer. The study included 20 371 participants involved in the French organized colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme. The probability of a positive screening test, detection rates and positive predictive values for CRC and advanced adenoma were analysed according to sample return time and season of screening. A sample of positive FIT was stored for 7 days in an incubator at 20°C or 30°C. The positivity rate was 4.1% for a sample return time of up to 3 days, 4.1% for 4-5 days and 4.6% for 6-7 days (P=0.25). In multivariate analysis, there was no association between positivity rates, detection rates and positive predictive values for CRC and advanced adenoma and the sample return time or the season of screening. At a constant temperature of 20°C, there was a decrease in the haemoglobin concentration of 5.1% after 7 days. The decrease reached 20.5% at a temperature of 30°C. It was only 4.5% during the first 4 days of storage in the incubator. With the new buffer, delay in sample return or season did not affect the clinical outcome. When temperatures reach 30°C, the faecal sample must be returned promptly.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of population-based screening for colorectal cancer: a comparison of guaiac-based faecal occult blood testing, faecal immunochemical testing and flexible sigmoidoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, L; Tilson, L; Whyte, S; O'Ceilleachair, A; Walsh, C; Usher, C; Tappenden, P; Chilcott, J; Staines, A; Barry, M; Comber, H

    2012-02-28

    Several colorectal cancer-screening tests are available, but it is uncertain which provides the best balance of risks and benefits within a screening programme. We evaluated cost-effectiveness of a population-based screening programme in Ireland based on (i) biennial guaiac-based faecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) at ages 55-74, with reflex faecal immunochemical testing (FIT); (ii) biennial FIT at ages 55-74; and (iii) once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSIG) at age 60. A state-transition model was used to estimate costs and outcomes for each screening scenario vs no screening. A third party payer perspective was adopted. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken. All scenarios would be considered highly cost-effective compared with no screening. The lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER vs no screening euro 589 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained) was found for FSIG, followed by FIT euro 1696) and gFOBT (euro 4428); gFOBT was dominated. Compared with FSIG, FIT was associated with greater gains in QALYs and reductions in lifetime cancer incidence and mortality, but was more costly, required considerably more colonoscopies and resulted in more complications. Results were robust to variations in parameter estimates. Population-based screening based on FIT is expected to result in greater health gains than a policy of gFOBT (with reflex FIT) or once-only FSIG, but would require significantly more colonoscopy resources and result in more individuals experiencing adverse effects. Weighing these advantages and disadvantages presents a considerable challenge to policy makers.

  6. Development of a multiplexed chemiluminescent immunochemical imaging technique for the simultaneous localization of different proteins in painting micro cross-sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciutto, Giorgia; Dolci, Luisa Stella; Buragina, Angela; Prati, Silvia; Guardigli, Massimo; Mazzeo, Rocco; Roda, Aldo

    2011-03-01

    The identification and localization of organic components in the complex stratigraphy of paintings play a crucial role in studies of painting techniques and authentication, restoration, and conservation of artworks. Much scientific effort has been expended for the development of analytical approaches suitable for the investigation and characterization of organic substances, allowing high sensitivity, specificity, and spatial resolution. Proteins (e.g., ovalbumin, casein, and collagen from different animal sources) are one of the classes of organic substances most widely used as painting materials. The analytical techniques commonly used for their analysis (micro Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, chromatographic techniques, and proteomic approaches) have limits related to the lack of specificity or to the absence of information concerning the stratigraphic localization of the detected proteins. Immunological techniques are a promising alternative approach for the characterization of proteins in artworks. Thanks to the high specificity of antigen-antibody reactions, these techniques are widely used for the analysis of proteins in bioanalytical and clinical chemistry and recently they have been successfully applied in the field of science for conservation of cultural heritage. The present research aimed to develop an ultrasensitive chemiluminescent immunochemical procedure for the simultaneous localization of ovalbumin and bovine casein (two common proteins found in binding media or varnishes of artistic and archaeological samples) in resin-embedded painting micro cross-sections. The possibility of performing the simultaneous identification of different proteins in painting cross-sections is of particular relevance in the field of cultural heritage because samples are often small and available in a limited number; therefore, the maximum amount of information must be obtained from each of them.

  7. Carrier priming with CRM 197 or diphtheria toxoid has a different impact on the immunogenicity of the respective glycoconjugates: biophysical and immunochemical interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecetta, S; Lo Surdo, P; Tontini, M; Proietti, D; Zambonelli, C; Bottomley, M J; Biagini, M; Berti, F; Costantino, P; Romano, M R

    2015-01-03

    Glycoconjugate vaccines play an enormous role in preventing infectious diseases. The main carrier proteins used in commercial conjugate vaccines are the non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin (CRM197), diphtheria toxoid (DT) and tetanus toxoid (TT). Modern childhood routine vaccination schedules include the administration of several vaccines simultaneously or in close sequence, increasing the concern that the repeated exposure to conjugates based on these carrier proteins might interfere with the anti-polysaccharide response. Extending previous observations we show here that priming mice with CRM197 or DT does not suppress the response to the carbohydrate moiety of CRM197 meningococcal serogroup A (MenA) conjugates, while priming with DT can suppress the response to DT-MenA conjugates. To explain these findings we made use of biophysical and immunochemical techniques applied mainly to MenA conjugates. Differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism data revealed that the CRM197 structure was altered by the chemical conjugation, while DT and the formaldehyde-treated form of CRM197 were less impacted, depending on the degree of glycosylation. Investigating the binding and avidity properties of IgGs induced in mice by non-conjugated carriers, we found that CRM197 induced low levels of anti-carrier antibodies, with decreased avidity for its MenA conjugates and poor binding to DT and respective MenA conjugates. In contrast, DT induced high antibody titers able to bind with comparable avidity both the protein and its conjugates but showing very low avidity for CRM197 and related conjugates. The low intrinsic immunogenicity of CRM197 as compared to DT, the structural modifications induced by glycoconjugation and detoxification processes, resulting in conformational changes in CRM197 and DT epitopes with consequent alteration of the antibody recognition and avidity, might explain the different behavior of CRM197 and DT in a carrier priming context.

  8. Rigour in quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Leica Sarah

    2015-07-22

    This article which forms part of the research series addresses scientific rigour in quantitative research. It explores the basis and use of quantitative research and the nature of scientific rigour. It examines how the reader may determine whether quantitative research results are accurate, the questions that should be asked to determine accuracy and the checklists that may be used in this process. Quantitative research has advantages in nursing, since it can provide numerical data to help answer questions encountered in everyday practice.

  9. Cross-Reactivity of Porcine Immunoglobulin A Antibodies with Fecal Immunoglobulins of Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) and Other Animal Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang Won; Yoo, Sung J; Sunwoo, Sunyoung; Hyun, Bang Hun; Lyoo, Young S

    2016-06-01

    Fecal samples obtained from wild boar habitats are useful for the surveillance of diseases in wild boar populations; however, it is difficult to determine the species of origin of feces collected in natural habitats. In this study, a fecal IgA ELISA was evaluated as a method for identifying the porcine species from fecal samples. Both domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domestica) and wild boars (Sus scrofa coreanus) showed significantly higher levels of fecal IgA than other animal species. Additionally, age dependent changes in the level of Ig A in wild boars and domestic pigs were identified; Titers of Ig A were highest in suckling period and lowest in weanling period.

  10. Fecal corticoid monitoring in whooping cranes trained to follow ultralight aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartup, B.K.; Czekala, Nancy M.; Olsen, G.H.; Langenberg, J.A.; Chavez-Ramirez, Felipe

    2005-01-01

    The use of fecal corticoid assays to measure stress in North American cranes has been limited to laboratory validation and a single field project involving reintroduced sandhill cranes (Ludders et aI., 1998, 2001; Hartup et aI., 2004). In 2001, we documented trends in corticoid concentrations among a cohort of ten costume-reared whooping cranes subjected to ultralight aircraft training and migration. All samples were analyzed by a validated corticosterone 1251 radioimmunoassay for determination of corticoid levels. Fecal corticoid concentrations in chicks exhibited a logarithmic decline over the first 14 days after hatching (r = 0.86, p cranes increased 8-34 fold during shipment in crates to Wisconsin for field training. Increases in fecal corticoid concentrations were positively correlated with age (r = 0.81, p = 0.01), but not body weight (r = 0.44, P = 0.28) at the time of shipping. Fecal corticoid concentrations returned to baseline levels within seven days, and were sustained throughout the remainder of the training period (median 77 ng/g, range 22- 292 ng/g, n=190). Elevations in fecal corticoid concentrations were observed one (p = 0.035) and four days (p = 0.003) following physical examination and placement of leg bands compared to three days prior to the procedures (median 176 ng/g, range 116 - 553 ng/g, n = 19). Fecal corticoid concentrations decreased to pre-procedure levels within seven days. Fecal corticoid concentrations and variation during the 50 day migration period were similar to training levels in Wisconsin, except for a one day increase observed following a violent storm and escape from the temporary holding pen the preceding night (median 243 ng/g, range 228 - 280 ng/g, n = 7). There was an overall decline in fecal corticoid concentrations from the cranes during the migration (r= 0.42, p cranes that varied in accordance with lasting physical or psychological stimuli. The overall process of costume-rearing, ultralight aircraft habituation

  11. Direct and indirect immunofluorescence staining of fecal streptococci for rapid assessment of water quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlova, M.T.; Beauvais, E.; Brezenski, F.T.; Litsky, W.

    1975-01-01

    Immunofluorescence (IF) techniques were employed in an attempt to develop a rapid test for the identification of fecal streptococci. Fresh isolates were obtained from river waters and raw sewage. Identification to species were made by the conventional physiological, biochemical, and serological tests. Both whole and disrupted cells of representative strains of each species were used for the preparation of the fecal streptococcal vaccine. Globulin fractions of individual and pooled antisera were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and the resulting conjugates were tested with homologous and heterologous antigens. The present findings suggest that the immunofluorescence techniques can be employed in the determination of the presence and source of fecal pollution in water employing the fecal streptococci as indicator organisms. By using this method it was determined that fecal streptococci can be identified from water and sewage samples within 20 hours. Parenthetically it should be noted that the identification procedures using the routine biochemical and serological tests may take as long as 7 to 14 days. The procedure may be automated for continual monitoring.

  12. Contribution of Colonic Fermentation and Fecal Water Toxicity to the Pathophysiology of Lactose-Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windey, Karen; Houben, Els; Deroover, Lise; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-08

    Whether or not abdominal symptoms occur in subjects with small intestinal lactose malabsorption might depend on differences in colonic fermentation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we collected fecal samples from subjects with lactose malabsorption with abdominal complaints (LM-IT, n = 11) and without abdominal complaints (LM-T, n = 8) and subjects with normal lactose digestion (NLD, n = 15). Lactose malabsorption was diagnosed using a (13)C-lactose breath test. Colonic fermentation was characterized in fecal samples at baseline and after incubation with lactose for 3 h, 6 h and 24 h through a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fecal water cytotoxicity was analyzed using a colorimetric assay. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not different between the three groups (Kruskall-Wallis p = 0.164). Cluster analysis of the metabolite patterns revealed separate clusters for NLD, LM-T and LM-IT samples at baseline and after 24 h incubation with lactose. Levels of 5-methyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD whereas those of an unidentified aldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT compared to LM-T and NLD. Incubation with lactose increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations more in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD. In conclusion, fermentation patterns were clearly different in NLD, LM-IT and LM-T, but not related to differences in fecal water cytotoxicity.

  13. Seasonal variation of fecal indicator bacteria in storm events within the US stormwater database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xubin; Jones, Kim D

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria are one of the major causes of surface water impairments in the USA. Over the past several years, best management practices, including detention basins, manufactured devices, grass swales, filters and bioretention cells have been used to remove bacteria and other pollutants from stormwater runoff. However, there are data gaps in the comprehensive studies of bacteria concentrations in stormwater runoff. In this paper, the event mean concentration (EMC) of fecal indicator bacteria (Enterococcus, Escherichia coli, fecal Streptococcus group bacteria, and fecal coliform) across the USA was retrieved from the international stormwater best management practices database to analyze the seasonal variations of inflow and outflow event mean concentrations and removal efficiencies. The Kruskal-Wallis test was employed to determine the seasonal variations of bacteria indicator concentrations and removals, and the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used for comparing different seasonal outcomes. The results indicate that all the inflow EMC of FIB in stormwater runoff is above the water quality criteria. The seasonal differences of fecal Streptococcus group bacteria and fecal coliform are significant. Summer has the potential to increase the bacteria EMC and illustrate the seasonal differences.

  14. Fecal loading in the cecum as a new radiological sign of acute appendicitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andy Petroianu; Luiz Ronaldo Alberti; Renata Indelicato Zac

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Although the radiological features of acute appendicitis have been well documented, the value of plain radiography has not been fully appreciated. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of the association of acute appendicitis with images of fecal loading in the cecum.METHODS: Plain abdominal radiographs of 400 patients operated upon for acute appendicitis (n = 100), acute cholecystitis (n = 100), right acute pelvic inflammatory disease (n = 100) and right nephrolithiasis (n = 100)were assessed. The presence of fecal loading was recorded and the sensitivity and specificity of this sign for acute appendicitis were calculated.RESULTS: The presence of fecal loading in the cecum occurred in 97 patients with acute appendicitis, 13 patients with acute cholecystitis, 12 patients with acute inflammatory pelvic disease and 19 patients with nephrolithiasis. The sensitivity of this sign for appendicitis was 97% and its specificity to this disease was 85.3%. Its positive predictive value for appendicitis was 68.7%; however, its negative predictive value for appendicitis was 98.8%.CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that the presence of radiological images of fecal loading in the cecum may be a useful sign of acute appendicitis, and the absence of this sign probably excludes this disease.This is the first description of fecal loading as a radiological sign for acute appendicitis.

  15. Transport of fecal bacteria by boots and vehicle tires in a rural Alaskan community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Molly K; Ford, Malcolm R; White, Daniel M; Barnes, David L; Schiewer, Silke

    2009-02-01

    People living without piped water and sewer can be at increased risk for diseases transmitted via the fecal-oral route. One rural Alaskan community that relies on hauling water into homes and sewage from homes was studied to determine the pathways of fecal contamination of drinking water and the human environment so that barriers can be established to protect health. Samples were tested for the fecal indicator, Escherichia coli, and the less specific indicator group, total coliforms. Shoes transported fecal contamination from outside to floor material inside buildings. Contamination in puddles on the road, in conjunction with contamination found on all-terrain vehicle (ATV) tires, supports vehicle traffic as a mechanism for transporting contamination from the dumpsite or other source areas to the rest of the community. The abundance of fecal bacteria transported around the community on shoes and ATV tires suggests that centralized measures for waste disposal as well as shoe removal in buildings could improve sanitation and health in the community.

  16. The presence and near-shore transport of human fecal pollution in Lake Michigan beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, S.L.; Liu, L.B.; Phanikumar, M.S.; Jenkins, T.M.; Wong, M.V.; Rose, J.B.; Whitman, R.L.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    The Great Lakes are a source of water for municipal, agricultural and industrial use, and support significant recreation, commercial and sport fishing industries. Every year millions of people visit the 500 plus recreational beaches in the Great Lakes. An increasing public health risk has been suggested with increased evidence of fecal contamination at the shoreline. To investigate the transport and fate of fecal pollution at Great Lakes beaches and the health risk associated with swimming at these beaches, the near-shore waters of Mt Baldy Beach, Lake Michigan and Trail Creek, a tributary discharging into the lake were examined for fecal pollution indicators. A model of surf zone hydrodynamics coupled with a transport model with first-order inactivation of pollutant was used to understand the relative importance of different processes operating in the surf zone (e.g. physical versus biological processes). The Enterococcus human fecal pollution marker, which targets a putative virulence factor, the enterococcal surface protein (esp) in Enterococcus faecium, was detected in 2/28 samples (7%) from the tributaries draining into Lake Michigan and in 6/30 samples (20%) from Lake Michigan beaches. Preliminary analysis suggests that the majority of fecal indicator bactateria variation and water quality changes at the beaches can be explained by inputs from the influential stream and hydrometeorological conditions. Using modeling methods to predict impaired water quality may help reduce potential health threats to recreational visitors.

  17. Hypothesis-driven approach for the identification of fecal pollution sources in water resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reischer, G H; Kollanur, D; Vierheilig, J; Wehrspaun, C; Mach, R L; Sommer, R; Stadler, H; Farnleitner, A H

    2011-05-01

    Water resource management must strive to link catchment information with water quality monitoring. The present study attempted this for the field of microbial fecal source tracking (MST). A fecal pollution source profile based on catchment data (e.g., prevalence of fecal sources) was used to formulate a hypothesis about the dominant sources of pollution in an Austrian mountainous karst spring catchment. This allowed a statistical definition of methodical requirements necessary for an informed choice of MST methods. The hypothesis was tested in a 17-month investigation of spring water quality. The study followed a nested sampling design in order to cover the hydrological and pollution dynamics of the spring and to assess effects such as differential persistence between parameters. Genetic markers for the potential fecal sources as well as microbiological, hydrological, and chemo-physical parameters were measured. The hypothesis that ruminant animals were the dominant sources of fecal pollution in the catchment was clearly confirmed. It was also shown that the concentration of ruminant markers in feces was equally distributed in different ruminant source groups. The developed approach provides a tool for careful decision-making in MST study design and might be applied on various types of catchments and pollution situations.

  18. Seasonal variation of fecal contamination in drinking water sources in developing countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyla, Caroline; Bain, Rob; Cronk, Ryan; Bartram, Jamie

    2015-05-01

    Accounting for fecal contamination of drinking water sources is an important step in improving monitoring of global access to safe drinking water. Fecal contamination varies with time while its monitoring is often infrequent. We sought to understand seasonal trends in fecal contamination to guide best practices to capture seasonal variation and ascertain the extent to which the results of a single sample may overestimate compliance with health guidelines. The findings from 22 studies from developing countries written in English and identified through a systematic review were analyzed. Fecal contamination in improved drinking water sources was shown to follow a statistically significant seasonal trend of greater contamination during the wet season (p<0.001). This trend was consistent across fecal indicator bacteria, five source types, twelve Köppen-Geiger climate zones, and across both rural and urban areas. Guidance on seasonally representative water quality monitoring by the World Health Organization and national water quality agencies could lead to improved assessments of access to safe drinking water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gastric emptying of water in children with severe functional fecal retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P.I. Fernandes

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate gastric emptying (GE in pediatric patients with functional constipation. GE delay has been reported in adults with functional constipation. Gastric emptying studies were performed in 22 children with chronic constipation, fecal retention and fecal incontinence, while presenting fecal retention and after resuming regular bowel movements. Patients (18 boys, median age: 10 years; range: 7.2 to 12.7 years were evaluated in a tertiary pediatric gastroenterology clinic. Gastric half-emptying time of water (reference range: 12 ± 3 min was measured using a radionuclide technique immediately after first patient evaluation, when they presented fecal impaction (GE1, and when they achieved regular bowel movements (GE2, 12 ± 5 weeks after GE1. At study admission, 21 patients had reported dyspeptic symptoms, which were completely relieved after resuming regular bowel movements. Medians (and interquartile ranges for GE1 and GE2 were not significantly different [27.0 (16 and 27.5 (21 min, respectively (P = 0.10]. Delayed GE seems to be a common feature among children with chronic constipation and fecal retention. Resuming satisfactory bowel function and improvement in dyspeptic symptoms did not result in normalization of GE data.

  20. High dose of prebiotics reduces fecal water cytotoxicity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windey, Karen; François, Isabelle; Broekaert, Willem; De Preter, Vicky; Delcour, Jan A; Louat, Thierry; Herman, Jean; Verbeke, Kristin

    2014-11-01

    In vitro and animal studies have shown differential colonic fermentation of structurally different prebiotics. We evaluated the impact of two structurally different prebiotics (wheat bran extract (WBE, containing arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides) and oligofructose) on colonic fermentation and markers of bowel health in healthy volunteers. Nineteen healthy subjects completed a double-blind, cross-over randomized controlled trial. Interventions with WBE, oligofructose or placebo for 2 wk (week 1: 15 g/day; week 2: 30 g/day) were separated by 2-wk wash-out periods. At the end of each study period, colonic fermentation was characterized through a metabolomics approach. Fecal water genotoxicity and cytotoxicity were determined using the comet and WST-1 assay, respectively, as parameters of gut health. Cluster analysis revealed differences in effects of WBE and oligofructose on colonic fermentation. WBE, but not oligofructose, reduced fecal p-cresol (p = 0.009) and isovaleric acid concentrations (p = 0.022), markers of protein fermentation. Fecal water cytotoxicity was significantly lower after intake of WBE (p = 0.015). Both WBE- and oligofructose-intake tended to reduce fecal water genotoxicity compared to placebo (WBE: p = 0.060; oligofructose: p = 0.057). Changes in fermentation were not related to changes in fecal water toxicity. Structurally different prebiotics affect colonic fermentation and gut health in a different way. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.