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Sample records for quantitative backscattered electron

  1. Quantitative analysis of martensite and bainite microstructures using electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongzhe; Hua, Jiajie; Kong, Mingguang; Zeng, Yi; Liu, Junliang; Liu, Ziwei

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, ultra-high-strength steels with multiphase microstructures containing martensite and bainite were prepared by controlling the cooling rate. A new approach was proposed for quantitatively statistical phase analysis using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) based on the band contrast which correlates to the quality and intensity of the diffraction patterns. This approach takes advantage of the inherently greater lattice imperfections of martensite, such as dislocations and low-angle grain boundaries, relative to that of bainite. These can reduce the intensity and quality of the EBSD patterns of martensite, which decrease the band contrast. Thus, combined with morphological observations, Gaussian two-peak fitting was employed to analyze the band contrast profile and confirm the ranges of band contrast for the two phases. The volume fractions of bainite and martensite in different samples were determined successfully. In addition, the results show that increased cooling rates improve the proportion of martensite and the ratio of martensite to bainite. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:814-819, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Quantitative Test of the Evolution of Geant4 Electron Backscattering Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Basaglia, Tullio; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Evolutions of Geant4 code have affected the simulation of electron backscattering with respect to previously published results. Their effects are quantified by analyzing the compatibility of the simulated electron backscattering fraction with a large collection of experimental data for a wide set of physics configuration options available in Geant4. Special emphasis is placed on two electron scattering implementations first released in Geant4 version 10.2: the Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple scattering model and a single Coulomb scattering model based on Mott cross section calculation. The new Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple scattering model appears to perform equally or less accurately than the model implemented in previous Geant4 versions, depending on the electron energy. The new Coulomb scattering model was flawed from a physics point of view, but computationally fast in Geant4 version 10.2; the physics correction released in Geant4 version 10.2p01 severely degrades its computational performance. Evolutions in ...

  3. New Measurements and Quantitative Analysis of Electron Backscattering in the Energy Range of Neutron Beta-Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, J W; Filippone, B W; Hoedl, S A; Ito, T M; Plaster, B; Young, A R; Yuan, J

    2006-01-01

    We report on the first detailed measurements of electron backscattering from plastic scintillator targets, extending our previous work on beryllium and silicon targets. The scintillator experiment posed several additional experimental challenges associated with charging of the scintillator target, and those challenges are addressed in detail. In addition, we quantitatively compare the energy and angular distributions of this data, and our previous data, with electron transport simulations based on the Geant4 and Penelope Monte Carlo simulation codes. The Penelope simulation is found globally to give a superior description of the data. Such information is crucial for a broad array of weak-interaction physics experiments, where electron backscattering can give rise to the dominant detector-related systematic uncertainty.

  4. Detection of Coaxial Backscattered Electrons in SEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We present a coaxial detection of the backscattered electrons in SEM. The lens-aperture has been used to filter in energy and focus the backscattered electrons. This particular geometry allows us to eliminate the iow energy backscattered electrons and collect the backscattered electrons, which are backscattered close to the incident beam orientation. The main advantage of this geometry is adapted to topographic contrast attenuation and atomic number contrast enhancement. Thus this new SEM is very suitable to analyze the material composition.

  5. Monte-Carlo simulation of backscattered electrons in Auger electron spectroscopy. Part 1: Backscattering factor calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tholomier, M.; Vicario, E.; Doghmane, N.

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of backscattered electrons to Auger electrons yield was studied with a multiple scattering Monte-Carlo simulation. The Auger backscattering factor has been calculated in the 5 keV-60 keV energy range. The dependence of the Auger backscattering factor on the primary energy and the beam incidence angle were determined. Spatial distributions of backscattered electrons and Auger electrons are presented for a point incident beam. Correlations between these distributions are briefly investigated.

  6. Pattern matching approach to pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolze, Gert; Winkelmann, Aimo; Boyle, Alan P

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to overcome Kikuchi pattern misindexing problems caused by crystallographic pseudosymmetry in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Based on the quantitative comparison of experimentally measured Kikuchi patterns with dynamical electron diffraction simulations, the algorithm identifies the best-fit orientation from a set of pseudosymmetric candidates. Using measurements on framboidal pyrite (FeS2) as an example, we also show the improvement of the orientation precision using this approach.

  7. Validation Test of Geant4 Simulation of Electron Backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sung Hun; Basaglia, Tullio; Han, Min Cheol; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Saracco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Backscattering is a sensitive probe of the accuracy of electron scattering algorithms implemented in Monte Carlo codes. The capability of the Geant4 toolkit to describe realistically the fraction of electrons backscattered from a target volume is extensively and quantitatively evaluated in comparison with experimental data retrieved from the literature. The validation test covers the energy range between approximately 100 eV and 20 MeV, and concerns a wide set of target elements. Multiple and single electron scattering models implemented in Geant4, as well as preassembled selections of physics models distributed within Geant4, are analyzed with statistical methods. The evaluations concern Geant4 versions from 9.1 to 10.1. Significant evolutions are observed over the range of Geant4 versions, not always in the direction of better compatibility with experiment. Goodness-of-fit tests complemented by categorical analysis tests identify a configuration based on Geant4 Urban multiple scattering model in Geant4 vers...

  8. Electron Backscatter Diffraction in Low Vacuum Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Dasher, B S; Torres, S G

    2008-07-17

    Most current scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) have the ability to analyze samples in a low vacuum mode, whereby a partial pressure of water vapor is introduced into the SEM chamber, allowing the characterization of nonconductive samples without any special preparation. Although the presence of water vapor in the chamber degrades electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns, the potential of this setup for EBSD characterization of nonconductive samples is immense. In this chapter we discuss the requirements, advantages and limitations of low vacuum EBSD (LV-EBSD), and present how this technique can be applied to a two-phase ceramic composite as well as hydrated biominerals as specific examples of when LV-EBSD can be invaluable.

  9. Electron backscatter diffraction in materials characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Stojakovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD is a powerful technique that captures electron diffraction patterns from crystals, constituents of material. Captured patterns can then be used to determine grain morphology, crystallographic orientation and chemistry of present phases, which provide complete characterization of microstructure and strong correlation to both properties and performance of materials. Key milestones related to technological developments of EBSD technique have been outlined along with possible applications using modern EBSD system. Principles of crystal diffraction with description of crystallographic orientation, orientation determination and phase identification have been described. Image quality, resolution and speed, and system calibration have also been discussed. Sample preparation methods were reviewed and EBSD application in conjunction with other characterization techniques on a variety of materials has been presented for several case studies. In summary, an outlook for EBSD technique was provided.

  10. The backscatter electron signal as an additional tool for phase segmentation in electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, E J; Nolze, G

    2013-08-01

    The advent of simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data collection has vastly improved the phase separation capabilities for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping. A major problem remains, however, in distinguishing between multiple cubic phases in a specimen, especially when the compositions of the phases are similar or their particle sizes are small, because the EDS interaction volume is much larger than that of EBSD and the EDS spectra collected during spatial mapping are generally noisy due to time limitations and the need to minimize sample drift. The backscatter electron (BSE) signal is very sensitive to the local composition due to its atomic number (Z) dependence. BSE imaging is investigated as a complimentary tool to EDS to assist phase segmentation and identification in EBSD through examination of specimens of meteorite, Cu dross, and steel oxidation layers. The results demonstrate that the simultaneous acquisition of EBSD patterns, EDS spectra, and the BSE signal can provide new potential for advancing multiphase material characterization in the scanning electron microscope.

  11. A MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF SECONDARY ELECTRON AND BACKSCATTERED ELECTRON IMAGES IN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.M. Li; Z.J. Ding

    2005-01-01

    A new parallel Monte Carlo simulation method of secondary electron (SE) and backscattered electron images (BSE) of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for a complex geometric structure has been developed. This paper describes briefly the simulation method and the modification to the conventional sampling method for the step length. Example simulation results have been obtained for several artificial structures.

  12. Source point calibration from an arbitrary electron backscattering pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Niels Christian Krieger

    1999-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the position of the source point is a requirement if electron backscattering patterns (EBSPs) are to be used for crystal orientation measurements or other types of measurements which demand a geometrical analysis of the patterns. Today, possibly the most popular method...

  13. Present State of Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Prospective Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzer, R A; Field, D P; Adams, B L; Kumar, M; Schwartz, A J

    2008-10-24

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), when employed as an additional characterization technique to a scanning electron microscope (SEM), enables individual grain orientations, local texture, point-to-point orientation correlations, and phase identification and distributions to be determined routinely on the surfaces of bulk polycrystals. The application has experienced rapid acceptance in metallurgical, materials, and geophysical laboratories within the past decade (Schwartz et al. 2000) due to the wide availability of SEMs, the ease of sample preparation from the bulk, the high speed of data acquisition, and the access to complementary information about the microstructure on a submicron scale. From the same specimen area, surface structure and morphology of the microstructure are characterized in great detail by the relief and orientation contrast in secondary and backscatter electron images, element distributions are accessed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), or cathodoluminescence analysis, and the orientations of single grains and phases can now be determined, as a complement, by EBSD.

  14. Dynamical electron backscatter diffraction patterns. Part I: pattern simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick G; De Graef, Marc

    2013-10-01

    A new approach for the simulation of dynamic electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns is introduced. The computational approach merges deterministic dynamic electron-scattering computations based on Bloch waves with a stochastic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the energy, depth, and directional distributions of the backscattered electrons (BSEs). An efficient numerical scheme is introduced, based on a modified Lambert projection, for the computation of the scintillator electron count as a function of the position and orientation of the EBSD detector; the approach allows for the rapid computation of an individual EBSD pattern by bi-linear interpolation of a master EBSD pattern. The master pattern stores the BSE yield as a function of the electron exit direction and exit energy and is used along with weight factors extracted from the MC simulation to obtain energy-weighted simulated EBSD patterns. Example simulations for nickel yield realistic patterns and energy-dependent trends in pattern blurring versus filter window energies are in agreement with experimental energy-filtered EBSD observations reported in the literature.

  15. Many-beam dynamical simulation of electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, Aimo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany)], E-mail: winkelm@mpi-halle.mpg.de; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Sweeney, Francis [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 ONG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Day, Austin P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Dixton Rd., Monmouth, Gwent, NP25 3PP (United Kingdom); Parbrook, Peter [EPSRC National Centre for III-V Technologies, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    We present an approach for the simulation of complete electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns where the relative intensity distributions in the patterns are accurately reproduced. The Bloch wave theory is applied to describe the electron diffraction process. For the simulation of experimental patterns with a large field of view, a large number of reflecting planes has to be taken into account. This is made possible by the Bethe perturbation of weak reflections. Very good agreement is obtained for simulated and experimental patterns of gallium nitride GaN{l_brace}0001{r_brace} at 20 kV electron energy. Experimental features like zone-axis fine structure and higher-order Laue zone rings are accurately reproduced. We discuss the influence of the diffraction of the incident beam in our experiment.

  16. Energy Filtering and Coaxial Detection of the Backscattered Electrons in Scanning Electron Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chang-Zhong; P. Morin; N. Rosenberg

    2000-01-01

    A new detection system in scanning electron microscope, which filters in energy and detects the backscattered electrons close to the microscope axis, is described. This technique ameliorates the dependence of the back. scat tering coefficient on atomic number, and suppresses effectively the relief contrast at the same time. Therefore this new method is very suitable to the composition analysis.

  17. Phase analysis on dual-phase steel using band slope of electron backscatter diffraction pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Man-Been

    2013-08-01

    A quantitative and automated phase analysis of dual-phase (DP) steel using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was attempted. A ferrite-martensite DP microstructure was produced by intercritical annealing and quenching. An EBSD map of the microstructure was obtained and post-processed for phase discrimination. Band slope (BS), which was a measure of pattern quality, exhibited much stronger phase contrast than another conventional one, band contrast. Owing to high sensitivity to lattice defect and little orientation dependence, BS provided handiness in finding a threshold for phase discrimination. Its grain average gave a superior result on the discrimination and volume fraction measurement of the constituent phases in the DP steel.

  18. Monte Carlo Simulation of the Coaxial Electrons Backscattering from Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using the Monte Carlo method, we simulated the trajectories of coaxial backscattering electrons corresponding to a new type of scanning electron microscope. From the calculated results, we obtain a universal expression, which describes with good accuracy the backscattering coefficient versus film thickness under all conditions used. By measuring the coaxial backscattering coefficient and using this universal formula, the thickness of thin films can be determined if the composition is known.

  19. Quantitative Electron Nanodiffraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, John [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-30

    This Final report summarizes progress under this award for the final reporting period 2002 - 2013 in our development of quantitive electron nanodiffraction to materials problems, especially devoted to atomistic processes in semiconductors and electronic oxides such as the new artificial oxide multilayers, where our microdiffraction is complemented with energy-loss spectroscopy (ELNES) and aberration-corrected STEM imaging (9). The method has also been used to map out the chemical bonds in the important GaN semiconductor (1) used for solid state lighting, and to understand the effects of stacking sequence variations and interfaces in digital oxide superlattices (8). Other projects include the development of a laser-beam Zernike phase plate for cryo-electron microscopy (5) (based on the Kapitza-Dirac effect), work on reconstruction of molecular images using the scattering from many identical molecules lying in random orientations (4), a review article on space-group determination for the International Tables on Crystallography (10), the observation of energy-loss spectra with millivolt energy resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution from individual point defects in an alkali halide, a review article for the Centenary of X-ray Diffration (17) and the development of a new method of electron-beam lithography (12). We briefly summarize here the work on GaN, on oxide superlattice ELNES, and on lithography by STEM.

  20. Electron backscattering in a cavity: Ballistic and coherent effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozikov, A. A.; Weinmann, D.; Rössler, C.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-11-01

    Numerous experimental and theoretical studies have focused on low-dimensional systems locally perturbed by the biased tip of a scanning force microscope. In all cases either open or closed weakly gate-tunable nanostructures have been investigated, such as quantum point contacts, open or closed quantum dots, etc. We study the behavior of the conductance of a quantum point contact with a gradually forming adjacent cavity in series under the influence of a scanning gate. Here, an initially open quantum point contact system gradually turns into a closed cavity system. We observe branches and interference fringes known from quantum point contacts coexisting with irregular conductance fluctuations. Unlike the branches, the fluctuations cover the entire area of the cavity. In contrast to previous studies, we observe and investigate branches under the influence of the confining stadium potential, which is gradually built up. We find that the branches exist only in the area surrounded by cavity top gates. As the stadium shrinks, regular fringes originate from tip-induced constrictions leading to quantized conduction. In addition, we observe arclike areas reminiscent of classical electron trajectories in a chaotic cavity. We also argue that electrons emanating from the quantum point contact spread out like a fan leaving branchlike regions of enhanced backscattering.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Venus Radar Backscatter Data in ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S. M.; Grosfils, E. B.

    2005-01-01

    Ongoing mapping of the Ganiki Planitia (V14) quadrangle of Venus and definition of material units has involved an integrated but qualitative analysis of Magellan radar backscatter images and topography using standard geomorphological mapping techniques. However, such analyses do not take full advantage of the quantitative information contained within the images. Analysis of the backscatter coefficient allows a much more rigorous statistical comparison between mapped units, permitting first order selfsimilarity tests of geographically separated materials assigned identical geomorphological labels. Such analyses cannot be performed directly on pixel (DN) values from Magellan backscatter images, because the pixels are scaled to the Muhleman law for radar echoes on Venus and are not corrected for latitudinal variations in incidence angle. Therefore, DN values must be converted based on pixel latitude back to their backscatter coefficient values before accurate statistical analysis can occur. Here we present a method for performing the conversions and analysis of Magellan backscatter data using commonly available ArcGIS software and illustrate the advantages of the process for geological mapping.

  2. Crystallographic Orientation of Cuttlebone Shield Determined by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Maggie; Chung, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In common with many cephalopod mollusks, cuttlefish produce an internal biomineral buoyancy device. This cuttlebone is analogous to a surf board in shape and structure, providing rigidity and a means of controlling buoyancy. The cuttlebone is composed of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite and comprises an upper dorsal shield and a lower lamellar matrix. The lamellar matrix comprises layers of chambers with highly corrugated walls. The dorsal shield comprises bundles of aragonite needles stacked on top of each other. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses of the dorsal shield reveal that the c-axis of aragonite is parallel with the long axis of the needles in the bundles such that any spread in crystallographic orientation is consistent with the spread in orientation of the fibers as they radiate to form the overall structure of the dorsal shield. This arrangement of c-axis coincident with the long axis of the biomineral structure is similar to the arrangement in corals and in contrast to the situation in the molluskan aragonite nacre of brachiopod calcite where the c-axis is perpendicular to the aragonite tablet or calcite fiber, respectively.

  3. Automated twin identification technique for use with electron backscatter diffraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrie, B. L. (Benjamin Lyman); Mason, T. A. (Thomas A.); Bingert, J. F. (John F.)

    2004-01-01

    Historically, twinning information has been obtained by optical microscopy, TEM, and neutron diffraction. Recent research has shown that automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) can be used to extract reliable twinning statistics. An automated twin identification technique for use with EBSD has facilitated a greater understanding of deformation twinning in materials. The key features of this automated framework are the use of the crystallographic definition of twin relationships, the inclination of the common K, plane at a twin boundary, and the correct identification of the parent orientation in a parent/twin pair. The complex nature of the parent/twin interactions required the use of a voting scheme to correctly identify parent orientations. In those few cases were the voting scheme was unable to determine parent orientation (< 2 pct) the algorithm allows for manual selection. Twin area fractions are categorized by operative twin systems along with secondary and tertiary twinning. These statistics are reported for {alpha}-zirconium and 316L stainless steel. These improved twin statistics can help quantify deformation processes as well as provide validation of plasticity models for materials that exhibit deformation twinning.

  4. Composition quantification of electron-transparent samples by backscattered electron imaging in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, E; Gerthsen, D

    2017-02-01

    The contrast of backscattered electron (BSE) images in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) depends on material parameters which can be exploited for composition quantification if some information on the material system is available. As an example, the In-concentration in thin InxGa1-xAs layers embedded in a GaAs matrix is analyzed in this work. The spatial resolution of the technique is improved by using thin electron-transparent specimens instead of bulk samples. Although the BSEs are detected in a comparably small angular range by an annular semiconductor detector, the image intensity can be evaluated to determine the composition and local thickness of the specimen. The measured intensities are calibrated within one single image to eliminate the influence of the detection and amplification system. Quantification is performed by comparison of experimental and calculated data. Instead of using time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations, an analytical model is applied for BSE-intensity calculations which considers single electron scattering and electron diffusion.

  5. Quantitative evaluation of myocardial fibrosis by cardiac integrated backscatter analysis in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lijian; Wang, Renjian; Huang, Min; Zhang, Yongwei; Shen, Jie; Xiao, Tingting

    2016-01-12

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, systemic vasculitis that affects the coronary arteries. However, the relationship between myocardial fibrosis and Kawasaki disease has been completely unknown until now. We aimed to provide quantitative information about myocardial fibrosis using cardiac integrated backscatter in Han race Kawasaki disease patients. Ninety Kawasaki disease patients and 90 healthy control subjects were recruited. Based on Kawasaki disease status, the patients were categorized into 3 groups: acute, subacute, and convalescence phase. Based on coronary artery status, the Kawasaki disease patients were categorized into 3 groups: without coronary artery lesions, with coronary artery dilation, and with coronary artery aneurysms. All subjects underwent two-dimensional and Doppler examinations to measure clinical echocardiographic parameters. Myocardial fibrosis was detected with calibrated integrated backscatter imaging. Left ventricle systolic functions were normal in both the Kawasaki disease and control participants. The myocardial calibrated integrated backscatter values of the left ventricles of the acute (p Kawasaki disease patients were significantly greater than those of the healthy controls. The left ventricle myocardial calibrated integrated backscatter values were significantly smaller in the Kawasaki disease patients without coronary artery lesions than in the Kawasaki disease patients with coronary artery dilations and coronary artery aneurysms in different phases. The left ventricle myocardial calibrated integrated backscatter results were positively correlated with coronary artery status in the acute (r = 0.331, p Kawasaki disease. Our findings may suggest that myocardial fibrosis occurs during early episodes of Kawasaki disease given uncertainties that exist regarding correlations of calibrated integrated backscatter and myocardial fibrosis.

  6. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local ...

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of cavity imaging in pure iron using back-scatter electron scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Garner, F. A.; Shao, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Backscattered electrons (BSE) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) can produce images of subsurface cavity distributions as a nondestructive characterization technique. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the mechanism of void imaging and to identify key parameters in optimizing void resolution. The modeling explores an iron target of different thicknesses, electron beams of different energies, beam sizes, and scan pitch, evaluated for voids of different sizes and depths below the surface. The results show that the void image contrast is primarily caused by discontinuity of energy spectra of backscattered electrons, due to increased outward path lengths for those electrons which penetrate voids and are backscattered at deeper depths. Size resolution of voids at specific depths, and maximum detection depth of specific voids sizes are derived as a function of electron beam energy. The results are important for image optimization and data extraction.

  8. Backscattering/transmission of 2 MeV He{sup ++} ions quantitative correlation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berec, V., E-mail: bervesn@gmail.com [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Germogli, G.; Mazzolari, A.; Guidi, V. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara and Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); De Salvador, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo n.8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, PD (Italy); Bacci, L. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, PD (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    In this work we report on detailed findings of planar channeling oscillations of 2 MeV He{sup ++} particles in (1 1 0) silicon crystal. The exact correlation and coherence mechanism between confined particles oscillating trajectories are analyzed theoretically and experimentally in backscattering/transmission geometry. Regular patterns of channeled He{sup ++} ion planar oscillations are shown to be dominated by the crystal harmonic-oscillator potential and multiple scattering effect. For the first time it was shown that under the planar channeling conditions trajectories of positively charged particles exhibit observable correlation dynamics, including the interference effect. Quantitative estimation of channeling efficiency is performed using path integral method.

  9. Contribution of backscattered electrons to the total electron yield produced in collisions of 8–28 keV electrons with tungsten

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Yadav; R Shanker

    2007-03-01

    It is shown experimentally that under energetic electron bombardment the backscattered electrons from solid targets contribute significantly (∼ 80%) to the observed total electron yield, even for targets of high backscattering coefficients. It is further found that for tungsten ( = 74) with a backscattering coefficient of about 0.50, about 20% of the total electron yield is contributed by the total secondary electrons for impact energies in the range of 8–28 keV. The yield of true backscattered electrons at normal incidence (0), total secondary electrons () and the total electron yield (tot) produced in collisions of 8–28 keV electrons with W have been measured and compared with predictions of available theories. The present results indicate that the constant-loss of primary electrons in the target plays a significant role in producing the secondary electrons and that it yields a better fit to the experiment compared to the power-law.

  10. Quantitative assessments of burn degree by high-frequency ultrasonic backscattering and statistical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Wang, Shyh-Hau [Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, and Institute of Medical Informatics, National Cheng Kung University, No 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chih-Chung, E-mail: shyhhau@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, Fu Jen Catholic University, 510, Chung Cheng Rd, Hsin Chuang, Taipei County 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-07

    An accurate and quantitative modality to assess the burn degree is crucial for determining further treatments to be properly applied to burn injury patients. Ultrasounds with frequencies higher than 20 MHz have been applied to dermatological diagnosis due to its high resolution and noninvasive capability. Yet, it is still lacking a substantial means to sensitively correlate the burn degree and ultrasonic measurements quantitatively. Thus, a 50 MHz ultrasound system was developed and implemented to measure ultrasonic signals backscattered from the burned skin tissues. Various burn degrees were achieved by placing a 100 deg. C brass plate onto the dorsal skins of anesthetized rats for various durations ranged from 5 to 20 s. The burn degrees were correlated with ultrasonic parameters, including integrated backscatter (IB) and Nakagami parameter (m) calculated from ultrasonic signals acquired from the burned tissues of a 5 x 1.4 mm (width x depth) area. Results demonstrated that both IB and m decreased exponentially with the increase of burn degree. Specifically, an IB of -79.0 {+-} 2.4 (mean {+-} standard deviation) dB for normal skin tissues tended to decrease to -94.0 {+-} 1.3 dB for those burned for 20 s, while the corresponding Nakagami parameters tended to decrease from 0.76 {+-} 0.08 to 0.45 {+-} 0.04. The variation of both IB and m was partially associated with the change of properties of collagen fibers from the burned tissues verified by samples of tissue histological sections. Particularly, the m parameter may be more sensitive to differentiate burned skin due to the fact that it has a greater rate of change with respect to different burn durations. These ultrasonic parameters in conjunction with high-frequency B-mode and Nakagami images could have the potential to assess the burn degree quantitatively.

  11. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saowadee, N; Agersted, K; Bowen, J R

    2017-02-20

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local analysis. In this study, lattice constants of cubic STN and cubic YSZ in the pure materials and in co-sintered composites were measured from their EBSPs acquired at 10 kV using a silicon single crystal as a calibration reference. The EBSP distortion was corrected by spherical back projection and Kikuchi band analysis was made using in-house software. The error of the lattice constant measurement was determined to be in the range of 0.09-1.12% compared to values determined by XRD and from literature. The confidence level of the method is indicated by the standard deviation of the measurement, which is approximately 0.04 Å. Studying Kikuchi band size dependence of the measurement precision shows that the measurement error decays with increasing band size (i.e. decreasing lattice constant). However, in practice, the sharpness of wide bands tends to be low due to their low intensity, thus limiting the measurement precision. Possible methods to improve measurement precision are suggested.

  12. The complementary use of electron backscatter diffraction and ion channelling imaging for the characterization of nanotwins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Pantleon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    On the example of electrodeposited nickel films, it is shown that unique information on twins with dimensions on the nanoscale can be obtained by suitable combination of ion channelling imaging and electron backscatter diffraction analysis, whereas both (routine) single techniques cannot meet...

  13. Tackling pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of perovskite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Elisabetta; Kaercher, Pamela; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite minerals form an important mineral group that has applications in Earth science and emerging alternative energy technologies, however crystallographic quantification of these minerals with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is not accurate due to pseudosymmetry problems. The silicate perovskite Bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, is understood to be the dominant phase in the Earth's lower mantle. Gaining insight into its physical and rheological properties is therefore vital to understand the dynamics of the Earth's deep interior. Rock deformation experiments on analogue perovskite phases, for example (Ca,Sr)TiO3, combined with quantitative microstructural analyses of the recovered samples by EBSD, yield datasets that can reveal what deformation mechanisms may dominate the flow of perovskite in the lower mantle. Additionally, perovskite structures have important technological applications as new, suitable cathodes for the operation of more efficient and environmentally-friendly solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In recent years they have also been recognised as a potential substitute for silicon in the next generation of photovoltaic cells for the construction of economic and energy efficient solar panels. EBSD has the potential to be a valuable tool for the study of crystal orientations achieved in perovskite substrates as crystal alignment has a direct control on the properties of these materials. However, perovskite structures currently present us with challenges during the automated indexing of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs). Such challenges are represented by the pseudosymmetric character of perovskites, where atoms are subtly displaced (0.005 nm to 0.05 nm) from their higher symmetry positions. In orthorhombic Pbnm perovskites, for example, pseudosymmetry may be evaluated from the c/a unit cell parameter ratio, which is very close to 1. Two main types of distortions from the higher symmetry structure are recognised: a

  14. Wavelength-dependent backscattering measurements for quantitative real-time monitoring of apoptosis in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Christine S.; Sherwood, Carly A.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2009-11-01

    is the first report of the use of backscattering spectral measurements to quantitatively monitor apoptosis in viable cell cultures in vitro.

  15. Imaging and analysis of subsurface Cu interconnects by detecting backscattered electrons in the scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, L. M.; Kawasaki, M.; Boettcher, S. H.; Wells, O. C.

    2005-06-01

    Cu -SiO2-SiNx interconnects that were located 0.65-2.7-μm below the surface of silicon-integrated circuits were imaged in a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope with a scanning attachment by detecting backscattered electrons (BSEs) with an incident electron-beam energy (Eo) in the range of 30-400keV. BSE images could be used to detect voids in subsurface Cu interconnects, even in regions covered with upper level Cu lines or vias. As Eo was increased from 30to400keV, structures could be seen as a result of atomic number (Z) contrast farther below the surface while structures closer to the surface had reduced Z contrast. The subsurface beam diameter was measured from BSE images as a function of Eo and depth below the surface. For all Eo, the subsurface beam diameter initially rapidly increased with SiO2 overlayer thickness but, for 150keV, a leveling off in the beam spread was seen for depths >1.7μm. Beam broadening affected whether the TaN /Ta liners that surrounded the Cu conductors could be seen at the edges of the lines; this contrast was observed only when the subsurface beam diameter was ⩽1.5× the liner thickness. The BSE information depth for imaging 0.2-μm-sized voids in subsurface Cu -SiO2-SiNx interconnect structures at 30 and 150keV was estimated to be 0.65 and 3μm, respectively.

  16. Backscattered electron imaging and windowless energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis: a new technique for gallstone analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, H.S.; Lillemoe, K.D.; Magnuson, T.H.; Frasca, P.; Pitt, H.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with or without conventional energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis is currently used to identify gallstone microstructure and inorganic composition. Organic calcium salts are among many biliary constituents thought to have a role in gallstone nidation and growth. However, current analytical techniques which identify these salts are destructive and compromise gallstone microstructural data. We have developed a new technique for gallstone analysis which provides simultaneous structural and compositional identification of calcium salts within gallstones. Backscattered electron imaging is used to localize calcium within cholesterol at minimum concentrations of 0.01%. Windowless energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis produces elemental spectra of gallstone calcium salts which are qualitatively and quantitatively different. These combined techniques provide simultaneous structural and compositional information obtained from intact gallstone cross-sections and have been used to identify calcium salts in gallstones obtained at cholecystectomy from 106 patients.

  17. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx, E-mail: sedao.xxx@gmail.com [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Pigeon, Florent [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlight: •Lattice rotation and its distribution in laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the subsurface region on a nickel substrate are revealed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). -- Abstract: We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1–3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  18. Correcting for 3D distortion when using backscattered electron detectors in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    A variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) can produce a topographic surface relief of a physical object under examination, in addition to its two-dimensional (2D) image. This topographic surface relief is especially helpful when dealing with porous rock because it may elucidate the pore-space structure as well as grain shape and size. Whether the image accurately reproduces the physical object depends on the management of the hardware, acquisition, and postprocessing. Two problems become apparent during testing: (a) a topographic surface relief of a precision ball bearing is distorted and does not correspond to the physical dimensions of the actual sphere and (b) an image of a topographic surface relief of a Berea sandstone is geometrically tilted and topographically distorted even after standard corrections are applied. The procedure presented here is to ensure the veracity of the image, and includes: (a) adjusting the brightness and contrast levels originally provided by the manufacturer and (b) tuning the amplifiers of the backscatter detector plates to be equal to each other, and producing zero voltage when VPSEM is idle. This procedure is tested and verified on the said two physical samples. SCANNING 31: 59-64, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Coherent keV backscattering from plasma-wave boosted relativistic electron mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Li, F Y; Chen, M; Wu, H C; Liu, Y; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Mori, W B; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    A new parameter regime of laser wakefield acceleration driven by sub-petawatt femotsecond lasers is proposed, which enables the generation of relativistic electron mirrors further accelerated by the plasma wave. Integrated particle-in-cell simulation including the mirror formation and Thomson scattering demonstrates that efficient coherent backscattering up to keV photon energy can be obtained with moderate driver laser intensities and high density gas targets.

  20. Characterization of the hot electron population with bremsstrahlung and backscatter measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Felicie; Hohenberger, Matthias; Michel, Pierre; Divol, Laurent; Doeppner, Tilo; Dewald, Edward; Bachmann, Benjamin; Ralph, Joseph; Turnbull, David; Goyon, Clement; Thomas, Cliff; Landen, Otto; Moody, John

    2016-10-01

    In indirect-drive ignition experiments, the hot electron population, produced by laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by the interaction of the hot electrons with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the upgraded filter-fluorescer x-ray diagnostic (FFLEX), a 10-channel, time-resolved hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20- to 500-keV range, provides measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum. It typically shows a two-temperature distribution of the hot electron population inside the hohlraum. In SRS, where the laser is coupled to an electron plasma wave, the backscattered spectrum, measured with the NIF full-aperture backscatter system (FABS), is used to infer the plasma wave phase velocity. We will present FFLEX time-integrated and time-resolved measurements of the hot electron population low-temperature component. We will correlate them with electron plasma wave phase velocities inferred from FABS spectra for a range of recent shots performed at the National Ignition Facility. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Thomson backscattering diagnostics of nanosecond electron bunches in high space charge regime

    CERN Document Server

    Paroli, B

    2012-01-01

    The intra-beam repulsions play a significant role in determining the performances of free-electron devices when an high brilliance of the beam is required. The transversal and longitudinal spread of the beam, its energy and density are fundamental parameters in any beam experiment and different beam diagnostics are available to measure such parameters. A diagnostic method based on the Thomson backscattering of a laser beam impinging on the particle beam is proposed in this work for the study of nanosecond electron bunches in high space charge regime. This diagnostics, aimed to the measurement of density, energy and energy spread, was set-up in a Malmberg-Penning trap (generally used for the electron/ion confinment) in two different configurations designed to optimize sensitivity, spatial resolution and electron-beam coincidence in space and time. To this purpose an electron bunch (pulse time <4ns), produced by a photocathode source, was preliminary characterized with different electrostatic diagnostics and...

  2. Thomson backscattering from laser generated, relativistically moving high-density electron layers

    CERN Document Server

    Paz, Athena E; Rödel, Christian; Schnell, Michael; Jäckel, Oliver; Kaluza, Malte C; Paulus, Gerhard G

    2012-01-01

    We show experimentally that XUV radiation is produced when a laser pulse is Thomson backscattered from sheets of relativistic electrons which are formed at the rear-surface of a foil irradiated on its front side by a high-intensity laser. An all-optical setup is realized using the Jena Titanium:Sapphire TW laser system (JETI). The main pulse is split into two pulses: one to accelerate electrons from thin aluminum foil targets to energies of the order of some MeV and the other, counterpropagating probe pulse is Thomson-backscattered off these electrons when they exit the target rear side. The process produced photons within a wide spectral range of some tens of eV as a result of the broad electron energy distribution. The highest scattering intensity is observed when the probe pulse arrives at the target rear surface 100 fs after the irradiation of the target front side by the pump pulse, corresponding to the maximum flux of hot electrons at the interaction region. These results can provide time-resolved infor...

  3. Backscattered electron imaging at low emerging angles: A physical approach to contrast in LVSEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaux, J., E-mail: jacques.cazaux@univ-reims.fr [LISM, EA 4695 Faculty of Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Kuwano, N. [Malaysia–Japan International Institute of Technology, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Semarak, 54100 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sato, K. [Steel Research Laboratory, JFE Steel Corporation, 1 Kawasaki-cho, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-0835 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Due to the influence of refraction effects on the escape probability of the Back-Scattered Electrons (BSE), an expression of the fraction of these BSE is given as a function of the beam energy, E°, and emission angle (with respect to the normal) α. It has been shown that these effects are very sensitive to a local change of the work function in particular for low emerging angles. This sensitivity suggests a new type of contrast in Low Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy (LVSEM for E°<2 keV): the work function contrast. Involving the change of ϕ with crystalline orientation, this possibility is supported by a new interpretation of a few published images. Some other correlated contrasts are also suggested. These are topographical contrasts or contrasts due to subsurface particles and cracks. Practical considerations of the detection system and its optimization are indicated. - Highlights: • Refraction effects experienced by Back-Scattered Electrons at sample/vacuum interfaces are evaluated as a function of energy and angles. • Sensitive to local work function changes with crystalline orientation these effects concern mainly keV-electrons at low emerging angles. • A new type of contrast in SEM is thus deduced and illustrated. • Some other correlated contrasts, topographical contrasts or contrasts due to subsurface particles and cracks are also suggested.

  4. Backscattered electron emission after proton impact on carbon and gold films: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespeels, F.; Heuskin, A.C. [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Scifoni, E. [TIFPA-INFN, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraemer, M. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lucas, S., E-mail: stephane.lucas@unamur.be [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    This work aims at measuring the proton induced secondary electron energy spectra from nanometer thin films. Backscattered electron energy spectra were measured within an energy range from 0 to 600 eV using a Retarding Field Analyser (RFA). This paper presents energy spectra obtained for proton (0.5 MeV; 1 MeV; 1.5 MeV; 2 MeV) irradiation of thin carbon films (50 and 100 nm thick) and thin gold film (200 nm). These experimental spectra were compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on TRAX code and Geant4 simulation toolkit. Good agreement between experimental, TRAX and Geant4 results were observed for the carbon target. For the gold target, we report major differences between both Monte Carlo environments. Limitation of Geant4 models for low energy electron emission was highlighted. On the contrary, TRAX simulations present encouraging results for the modeling of low-energy electron emission from gold target.

  5. Use of Reciprocal Lattice Layer Spacing in Electron Backscatter Diffraction Pattern Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eades, J.A.; Michael, J.R.

    1999-05-10

    In the scanning electron microscope (SEM), using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), it is possible to measure the spacing of the layers in the reciprocal lattice. These values are of great use in confirming the identification of phases. The technique derives the layer spacing from the HOLZ rings which appear in patterns from many materials. The method adapts results from convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). For many materials the measured layer spacing compares well with the calculated layer spacing. A noted exception is for higher atomic number materials. In these cases an extrapolation procedure is described that requires layer spacing measurements at a range of accelerating voltages. This procedure is shown to improves the accuracy of the technique significantly. The application of layer spacing measurements in EBSD is shown to be of use for the analysis of two polytypes of SiC.

  6. Quantitative seafloor characterization using angular backscatter data of the multi-beam echo-sounding system - Use of models and model free techniques

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.

    For quantitative seafloor roughness characterization and classification using multi-beam processed backscatter data, a good correlation is indicated among the power law parameters (composite roughness model) and hybrid ANN architecture results...

  7. Time evolution analysis of the electron distribution in Thomson/Compton back-scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Maroli, C.; Serafini, L.; Rossi, A. R. [INFN-Universitá degli Studi Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-07-28

    We present the time evolution of the energy distribution of a relativistic electron beam after the Compton back-scattering with a counter-propagating laser field, performed in the framework of the Quantum Electrodynamics, by means of the code CAIN. As the correct angular distribution of the spontaneous emission is accounted, the main effect is the formation of few stripes, followed by the diffusion of the more energetic particles toward lower values in the longitudinal phase space. The Chapman-Kolmogorov master equation gives results in striking agreement with the numerical ones. An experiment on the Thomson source at SPARC-LAB is proposed.

  8. Time evolution analysis of the electron distribution in Thomson/Compton back-scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Maroli, C.; Serafini, L.; Rossi, A. R.

    2013-07-01

    We present the time evolution of the energy distribution of a relativistic electron beam after the Compton back-scattering with a counter-propagating laser field, performed in the framework of the Quantum Electrodynamics, by means of the code CAIN. As the correct angular distribution of the spontaneous emission is accounted, the main effect is the formation of few stripes, followed by the diffusion of the more energetic particles toward lower values in the longitudinal phase space. The Chapman-Kolmogorov master equation gives results in striking agreement with the numerical ones. An experiment on the Thomson source at SPARC-LAB is proposed.

  9. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedao, Xxx; Maurice, Claire; Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles; Pigeon, Florent

    2014-05-01

    We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1-3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  10. Energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons from collisions of 5 keV electrons with thick Al, Ti, Ag, W and Pt targets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Yadav; R Shanker

    2007-03-01

    The energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons produced under the impact of 5 keV electrons with thick Al, Ti, Ag, W and Pt targets are measured. The energy range of backscattered electrons is considered between B = 50 eV and 5000 eV. The angle of incidence α and take-off angle are chosen to have values = 0° and 10° and = 100°, 110° and 120° respectively. The measured energy spectra are compared with the available theoretical models for = 0° and 10°. The elastic peak intensity of backscattered electrons is found to be a function of angle of incidence, take-off angle and atomic number of the target material. The considered theories are reasonably in good agreement with experiment for the energy spectra of the backscattered electrons having their reduced energies (= B/0) in the range of 0.20 to 1.00.

  11. Performance of Dynamically Simulated Reference Patterns for Cross-Correlation Electron Backscatter Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian E; Christensen, Jordan J; Singh, Saransh; De Graef, Marc; Fullwood, David T; Homer, Eric R; Wagoner, Robert H

    2016-08-01

    High-resolution (or "cross-correlation") electron backscatter diffraction analysis (HR-EBSD) utilizes cross-correlation techniques to determine relative orientation and distortion of an experimental electron backscatter diffraction pattern with respect to a reference pattern. The integrity of absolute strain and tetragonality measurements of a standard Si/SiGe material have previously been analyzed using reference patterns produced by kinematical simulation. Although the results were promising, the noise levels were significantly higher for kinematically produced patterns, compared with real patterns taken from the Si region of the sample. This paper applies HR-EBSD techniques to analyze lattice distortion in an Si/SiGe sample, using recently developed dynamically simulated patterns. The results are compared with those from experimental and kinematically simulated patterns. Dynamical patterns provide significantly more precision than kinematical patterns. Dynamical patterns also provide better estimates of tetragonality at low levels of distortion relative to the reference pattern; kinematical patterns can perform better at large values of relative tetragonality due to the ability to rapidly generate patterns relating to a distorted lattice. A library of dynamically generated patterns with different lattice parameters might be used to achieve a similar advantage. The convergence of the cross-correlation approach is also assessed for the different reference pattern types.

  12. Characterization of the energy response and backscatter contribution for two electronic personal dosimeter models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Joseph; Kappadath, S Cheenu

    2015-11-08

    We characterized the energy response of personal dose equivalent (Hp(10) in mrem) and the contribution of backscatter to the readings of two electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) models with radionuclides commonly used in a nuclear medicine clinic. The EPD models characterized were the RADOS RAD-60R, and the SAIC PD-10i. The experimental setup and calculation of EPD energy response was based on ANSI/HPS N13.11-2009. Fifteen RAD-60R and 2 PD-10i units were irradiated using (99m)Tc, (131)I, and (18)F radionuclides with emission energies at 140 keV, 364 keV, and 511 keV, respectively. At each energy, the EPDs output in Hp(10) [mrem] were recorded with 15 inch thick PMMA to simulate backscatter form the torso. Simultaneous free-in-air exposure rate measurements were also performed using two Victoreen ionization survey meters to calculate the expected EPD Hp(10) values per ANSI/HPS N13.11-2009. The energy response was calculated by taking the ratio of the EPD Hp(10) readings with the expected Hp(10) readings and a two-tailed z-test was used to determine the significance of the ratio deviating away from unity. The contribution from backscatter was calculated by taking the ratio of the EPD Hp(10) readings with and without backscatter material. A paired, two-tailed t-test was used to determine the significance of change in EPD Hp(10) readings. The RAD-60R mean energy response at 140 keV was 0.85, and agreed to within 5% and 11% at 364 and 511 keV, respectively. The PD-10i mean energy response at 140 keV was 1.20, and agreed to within 5% at 364 and 511 keV, respectively. On average, in the presence of acrylic, RAD-60R values increased by 32%, 12%, and 14%, at 140, 364, and 511 keV, respectively; all increases were statistically significant. The PD-10i increased by 25%, 19%, and 10% at 140 keV, 364 keV, and 511 keV, respectively; however, only the 140 keV measurement was statistically significant. Although both EPD models performed within the manufacturers' specifications of

  13. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F., E-mail: robert.cook@nist.gov

    2016-04-15

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA–AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10{sup −4} in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. - Highlights: • We map strain by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy. • The test vehicle is the multi-axial strain field of wedge-indented silicon. • Strain accuracy is assessed by direct experimental intercomparison. • Accuracy is also assessed by atomic force microscopy and finite element analyses. • Electron diffraction measurements are accurate; Raman measurements need refinement.

  14. Metallographic preparation of Zn-21Al-2Cu alloy for analysis by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, M G; Martínez-Flores, E E; Torres-Villaseñor, G; Escalera, M Dolores

    2014-08-01

    Samples of Zn-21Al-2Cu alloy (Zinalco) that will be heavily deformed were prepared using five different manual mechanical metallographic methods. Samples were analyzed before tensile testing using the orientation imaging microscopy-electron backscatter diffraction (OIM-EBSD) technique. The effect of type and particle size during the final polishing stages for this material were studied in order to identify a method that produces a flat, damage free surface with a roughness of about 50 nm and clean from oxide layers, thereby producing diffraction patterns with high image quality (IQ) and adequate confidence indexes (CI). Our results show that final polishing with alumina and silica, as was previously suggested by other research groups for alloys that are difficult to prepare or alloys with low melting point, are not suitable for manual metallographic preparation of this alloy. Indexes of IQ and CI can be used to evaluate methods of metallographic preparation of samples studied using the OIM-EBSD technique.

  15. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Inconel 718 Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Chou, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the crystallographic texture of an Inconel 718 part fabricated by selective laser melting was investigated. The front surface (X-Z plane) microstructure is characterized by the columnar grains growing along the build direction, and the width of columnar grains is in the range of about 75-150 µm, with the bottom layers having narrower grains as a result of a higher cooling rate. In addition to equiaxed grains, the top surface (X-Y plane) has a feature of patch patterns resulting from the laser scanning strategy. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction results, there appears only weak crystallographic texture in both the X-Z plane and the X-Y plane of the part. From the grain boundary map, the microstructures are composed of high-angle boundaries with a larger fraction of subgrain boundaries.

  16. Adaptive characterization of recrystallization kinetics in IF steel by electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Park, Won-Woong; Lee, Ho Won; Kang, Seong-Hoon; Im, Yong-Taek

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a rigorous methodology for quantifying recrystallization kinetics by electron backscatter diffraction is proposed in order to reduce errors associated with the operator's skill. An adaptive criterion to determine adjustable grain orientation spread depending on the recrystallization stage is proposed to better identify the recrystallized grains in the partially recrystallized microstructure. The proposed method was applied in characterizing the microstructure evolution during annealing of interstitial-free steel cold rolled to low and high true strain levels of 0.7 and 1.6, respectively. The recrystallization kinetics determined by the proposed method was found to be consistent with the standard method of Vickers microhardness. The application of the proposed method to the overall recrystallization stages showed that it can be used for the rigorous characterization of progressive microstructure evolution, especially for the severely deformed material.

  17. Analysis of Orange Peel Defect in St14 Steel Sheet by Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengquan CAO; Jinxu ZHANG; Jiansheng WU; Jiaguang CHEN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the orange peel defect in the surface range of the st14 steel sheet has been investigated using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. It has been found that the orange peel defect in the st14steel sheet was resulted from the local coarse grains which were produced during hot-rolling due to the critical deformation in dual-phase zone. During deep drawing, the coarse grains with {100}<001> microtexture can slip on the {112}<111> slip system to form bulging and yields orange peel defects, while the coarse grains with {112}<110>orientation do not form the defect as the Schmid factor of {112}<111> slip system in it equals zero.

  18. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Inconel 718 Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Chou, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the crystallographic texture of an Inconel 718 part fabricated by selective laser melting was investigated. The front surface (X-Z plane) microstructure is characterized by the columnar grains growing along the build direction, and the width of columnar grains is in the range of about 75-150 µm, with the bottom layers having narrower grains as a result of a higher cooling rate. In addition to equiaxed grains, the top surface (X-Y plane) has a feature of patch patterns resulting from the laser scanning strategy. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction results, there appears only weak crystallographic texture in both the X-Z plane and the X-Y plane of the part. From the grain boundary map, the microstructures are composed of high-angle boundaries with a larger fraction of subgrain boundaries.

  19. Observation of Ferroelectricity in a Confined Crystallite Using Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, P. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Williams, D. B. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Shin, Junsoo [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    LaBGeO{sub 5} is a model transparent ferroelectric glass-ceramic (TFGC) material, developed as an inexpensive alternative to single-crystal nonlinear optical materials. The optical activity of the TFGC originates from the ferroelectric phase which remains under a hydrostatic pressure exerted by the surrounding glass matrix. A combination of two techniques, electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), is employed to monitor the development of the ferroelectric phase. A method is proposed to theoretically construct PFM amplitude maps from EBSD orientation maps. The theoretical vertical piezoresponse map is compared with the experimental piezoresponse map from PFM. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental maps is observed.

  20. Total electron count variability and stratospheric ozone effects on solar backscatter and LWIR emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John S.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2017-05-01

    The development of an accurate ionospheric Total Electron Count (TEC) model is of critical importance to high frequency (HF) radio propagation and satellite communications. However, the TEC is highly variable and is continually influenced by geomagnetic storms, extreme UV radiation, and planetary waves. Being able to capture this variability is essential to improve current TEC models. The growing body of data involving ionospheric fluctuations and stratospheric variations has revealed a correlation. In particular, there is a marked and persistent association between increases in stratospheric ozone and variability of the TEC. The spectral properties of ozone show that it is a greenhouse gas that alters long wave emissions from Earth and interacts with the UV spectrum coming from the sun. This study uses the Laser Environment Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) radiative transfer and atmospheric characterization code to model the effects of changes in stratospheric ozone on solar backscatter and longwave (LWIR) terrestrial emissions and infer TEC and TEC variability.

  1. Improved angular resolution in electron backscatter diffraction analysis by use of image correlation techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI HY; Andrew GODFREY; WANG W

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe a method for improving the angular resolution of the electron backscatter diffraction(EBSD)technique based on a correlative matching of EBSD patterns.Standard image interpolation methods are used to detect shifts between selected regions of the EBSD patterns to an accuracy of one tenth of a pixel.Simulated data sets are used to show that such accuracy,combined with a small angle approximation in calculation of the rotation angle,allows determination of the misorientation between patterns to an accuracy of 0.01 degrees.The method is tested on samples of both single crystal aluminum and recrystallized nickel.The results demonstrate the accuracy and stability of the new method compared to the conventional method.

  2. Large area stress distribution in crystalline materials calculated from lattice deformation identified by electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yongliang; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yongzhong; Dai, Yuanbin; Tian, Yuan; Huo, Qin

    2014-08-05

    We report a method to obtain the stress of crystalline materials directly from lattice deformation by Hooke's law. The lattice deformation was calculated using the crystallographic orientations obtained from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technology. The stress distribution over a large area was obtained efficiently and accurately using this method. Wurtzite structure gallium nitride (GaN) crystal was used as the example of a hexagonal crystal system. With this method, the stress distribution of a GaN crystal was obtained. Raman spectroscopy was used to verify the stress distribution. The cause of the stress distribution found in the GaN crystal was discussed from theoretical analysis and EBSD data. Other properties related to lattice deformation, such as piezoelectricity, can also be analyzed by this novel approach based on EBSD data.

  3. AnyStitch: a tool for combining electron backscatter diffraction data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilchak, A L; Shiveley, A R; Tiley, J S; Ballard, D L

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in electron backscatter diffraction equipment and software have permitted increased data acquisition rates on the order of hundreds of points per second with additional increases in the foreseeable future likely. This increase in speed allows users to collect data from statistically significant areas of samples by combining beam-control scans and automated stage movements. To facilitate data analysis, however, the individual tiles must be combined, or stitched, into a single data set. In this paper, we describe a matlab(®) (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA, USA) program to facilitate stitching of electron backscatter diffraction data. The method offers users a wide range of controls for tile placement including independent overlaps for horizontal and vertical tiles and also includes a parameter to account for systematic stage positioning errors or improperly calibrated scan rotation. The code can stitch data collected on either square or hexagonal grids and contains a function to reduce the resolution of square grid data if the resulting file is too large (or has too many grains) to be opened by the analysis software. The software was primarily written to work with TSL(®) OIM™ data sets and includes a function to quickly read compressed *.osc files into a variable in the matlab(®) workspace as opposed to using slower, text-reading functions. The output file is in *.ang format and can be opened directly by TSL(®) OIM™ Analysis software. A set of functions to facilitate stitching of text-based *.ctf files produced by Oxford Instruments HKL systems are also included. Finally, the code can also be used to combine *.tif images to produce a montage. The source code, a graphical user interface and a compiled version of the software was made available in the online version of this paper.

  4. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  5. Development of Quantitative electron nano-diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is a step towards development of quantitative parallel beam electron nano-diffraction (PBED). It is focused on the superstructure determination of zig-zag and zig-zig NaxCoO2 and analysis of charge distribution in the two polymorphs Nb12O29 using PBED. It has been shown that quantitative

  6. Design of a proton-electron beam overlap monitor for the new RHIC electron lens, based on detecting energetic backscattered electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieberger T.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Minty, M.; Miller, T.; Montag, C.; Pikin, A.

    2012-04-15

    The optimal performance of the two electron lenses that are being implemented for high intensity polarized proton operation of RHIC requires excellent collinearity of the {approx}0.3 mm RMS wide electron beams with the proton bunch trajectories over the {approx}2m interaction lengths. The main beam overlap diagnostic tool will make use of electrons backscattered in close encounters with the relativistic protons. These electrons will spiral along the electron guiding magnetic field and will be detected in a plastic scintillator located close to the electron gun. A fraction of these electrons will have energies high enough to emerge from the vacuum chamber through a thin window thus simplifying the design and operation of the detector. The intensity of the detected electrons provides a measure of the overlap between the e- and the opposing proton beams. Joint electron arrival time and energy discrimination may be used additionally to gain some longitudinal position information with a single detector per lens.

  7. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria‐stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb‐doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D‐EBSD experiments by FIB...

  8. Three-dimensional electron backscattered diffraction analysis of deformation in MgO micropillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, S., E-mail: sandra.korte@cantab.net [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Ritter, M. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Jiao, C. [FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Midgley, P.A.; Clegg, W.J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Small-scale testing is extensively used to study the effects of size on plasticity or characterise plastic deformation of brittle materials, where cracking is suppressed on the microscale. Geometrical and experimental constraints have been shown to affect small-scale deformation and efforts are underway to understand these better. However, current analytical techniques tend to possess high resolution in only one or two dimensions, impeding a detailed analysis of the entire deformed volume. Here electron backscattered diffraction in three dimensions is presented as a way of characterising three-dimensional (3-D) deformation at high spatial resolution. It is shown that, by reconstruction of compressed and then successively sliced and indexed MgO micropillars, this 3-D technique yields information complementary to {mu}-Laue diffraction or electron microscopy, allowing a correlation of experimental artefacts and the distribution of plasticity. In addition, deformation features which are difficult to visualise by standard scanning electron microscopy are easily detected, for example where only small surface traces are produced or minimal plastic strain can be introduced before failure in brittle materials.

  9. Application of backscatter electrons for large area imaging of cavities produced by neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, V. I.; Averin, S. A.; Panchenko, V. L.; Portnykh, I. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Giannuzzi, L. A.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that with proper optimization, backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope can produce images of cavity distribution in austenitic steels over a large specimen surface for a depth of ∼500-700 nm, eliminating the need for electropolishing or multiple specimen production. This technique is especially useful for quantifying cavity structures when the specimen is known or suspected to contain very heterogeneous distributions of cavities. Examples are shown for cold-worked EK-164, a very heterogeneously-swelling Russian fast reactor fuel cladding steel and also for AISI 304, a homogeneously-swelling Western steel used for major structural components of light water cooled reactors. This non-destructive overview method of quantifying cavity distribution can be used to direct the location and number of required focused ion beam prepared transmission electron microscopy specimens for examination of either neutron or ion-irradiated specimens. This technique can also be applied in stereo mode to quantify the depth dependence of cavity distributions.

  10. Crystallographic Characteristic of Intermetallic Compounds in Al-Si-Mg Casting Alloys Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Yongzhi; XU Zhengbing; HE Juan; ZENG Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The Al-Si-Mg alloy which can be strengthened by heat treatment is widely applied to the key components of aerospace and aeronautics. Iron-rich intermetallic compounds are well known to be strongly influential on mechanical properties in Al-Si-Mg alloys. But intermetallic compounds in cast Al-Si-Mg alloy intermetallics are often misidentified in previous metallurgical studies. It was described as many different compounds, such as AlFeSi, Al8Fe2Si, Al5(Fe, Mn)3Si2 and so on. For the purpose of solving this problem, the intermetallic compounds in cast Al-Si alloys containing 0.5% Mg were investigated in this study. The iron-rich compounds in Al-Si-Mg casting alloys were characterized by optical microscope(OM), scanning electron microscope(SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer(EDS), electron backscatter diffraction(EBSD) and X-ray powder diffraction(XRD). The electron backscatter diffraction patterns were used to assess the crystallographic characteristics of intermetallic compounds. The compound which contains Fe/Mg-rich particles with coarse morphologies was Al8FeMg3Si6 in the alloy by using EBSD. The compound belongs to hexagonal system, space group P2m, with the lattice parameter a=0.662 nm, c=0.792 nm. The β-phase is indexed as tetragonal Al3FeSi2, space group I4/mcm, a=0.607 nm and c=0.950 nm. The XRD data indicate that Al8FeMg3Si6 and Al3FeSi2 are present in the microstructure of Al-7Si-Mg alloy, which confirms the identification result of EBSD. The present study identified the iron-rich compound in Al-Si-Mg alloy, which provides a reliable method to identify the intermetallic compounds in short time in Al-Si-Mg alloy. Study results are helpful for identification of complex compounds in alloys.

  11. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis of a CZT growth tip from a vertical gradient freeze furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, S. K.; Henager, C. H.; Edwards, D. J.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Bliss, M.; Riley, B. R.

    2011-08-15

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to characterize the growth-tip region of a 4.2-cm diameter CdZnTe (CZT) boule grown using low-pressure Bridgman method in a vertical gradient freeze furnace. The boule was sectioned and polished and a section taken along the boule longitudinal centerline with an approximate surface area of 1-cm2 was used for optical and scanning electron microscopy. A collage was assembled using EBSD/SEM images to show morphological features, e.g., twin structure, grain structure, and overall crystal growth direction. Severely twinned regions originating from the tip and side walls were observed. The overall growth orientation was close to (1 1 0) and (1 1 2) directions. In some regions, the (0 0 1) poles of the CZT matrix aligned with the growth direction, while twins aligned such that (1 1 1) and (1 1 2) poles aligned with the growth direction. Finally, in some other areas, (1 1 2) or (0 1 1) poles of the CZT matrix aligned with the growth direction. New relationships between the CZT matrix and large Te polycrystalline particles were revealed: {1 1 2-}CZTΙΙ{1 1- 0 0}Te and {0 0 1}CZTII{0 1-1-1}Te.

  12. On the optimum resolution of transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bremen, R; Ribas Gomes, D; de Jeer, L T H; Ocelík, V; De Hosson, J Th M

    2016-01-01

    The work presented aims at determining the optimum physical resolution of the transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD) technique. The resolution depends critically on intrinsic factors such as the density, atomic number and thickness of the specimen but also on the extrinsic experimental set-up of the electron beam voltage, specimen tilt and detector position. In the present study, the so-called physical resolution of a typical t-EBSD set-up was determined with the use of Monte Carlo simulations and confronted to experimental findings. In the case of a thin Au film of 20 nm, the best resolution obtained was 9 nm whereas for a 100 nm Au film the best resolution was 66 nm. The precise dependence of resolution on thickness was found to vary differently depending on the specific elements involved. This means that the resolution of each specimen should be determined individually. Experimentally the median probe size of the t-EBSD for a 140 nm thick AuAg specimen was measured to be 87 nm. The first and third quartiles of the probe size measurements were found to be 60 nm and 118 nm. Simulation of this specimen resulted in a resolution of 94 nm which fits between these quartiles.

  13. Generation of tens-of-MeV photons by compton backscatter from laser-plasma-accelerated GeV electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J. M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Hannasch, A.; LaBerge, M.; Chang, Y.-Y.; Weichman, K.; Welch, J.; Zgadzaj, R.; Henderson, W.; Tsai, H.-E.; Fazel, N.; Wang, X.; Wagner, C.; Donovan, M.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Gordon, J.; Martinez, M.; Spinks, M.; Toncian, T.; Ditmire, T.; Downer, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the use of a plasma mirror (PM), after a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA), for generating Compton γ-rays by retro-reflecting the spent laser pulse into the just-accelerated electrons. Here, we investigate the use of a PM to stimulate Compton backscatter (CBS) by retro-reflecting a spent pulse from the Texas Petawatt (TPW) laser after it has driven a cm-scale, GeV LPA. A comparative analysis between the electron and CBS pointing and divergence reveals strong agreement, from shot-to-shot, suggesting a reliable, non-invasive extension for GeV-beam metrology. Our observations confirm the self-aligning PM method is scalable to GeV LPAs, while also suggesting a technique with unique advantages and a robustness that can potentially be exploited for investigations of nonlinear Compton backscatter from ultralow divergence, GeV electrons using the Texas Petawatt Laser.

  14. Two contributions to the ratio of the mean secondary electron generation of backscattered electrons to primary electrons at high electron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ai-Gen; Zhang, Chen-Yi; Zhong, Kun

    2014-02-01

    Based on the main physical processes of secondary electron emission, experimental results and the characteristics of backscattered electrons (BE), the formula was derived for describing the ratio (βangle) of the number of secondary electrons excited by the larger average angle of emission BE to the number of secondary electrons excited by the primary electrons of normal incidence. This ratio was compared to the similar ratio β obtained in the case of high energy primary electrons. According to the derived formula for βangle and the two reasons why β > 1, the formula describing the ratio βenergy of β to βangle, reflecting the effect that the mean energy of the BE WAVp0 is smaller than the energy of the primary electrons at the surface, was derived. βangle and βenergy computed using the experimental results and the deduced formulae for βangle and βenergy were analyzed. It is concluded that βangle is not dependent on atomic number z, and that βenergy decreases slowly with z. On the basis of the two reasons why β > 1, the definitions of β and βenergy and the number of secondary electrons released per primary electron, the formula for βE-energy (the estimated βenergy) was deduced. The βE-energy computed using WAVp0, energy exponent and the formula for βE-energy is in a good agreement with βenergy computed using the experimental results and the deduced formula for βenergy. Finally, it is concluded that the deduced formulae for βangle and βenergy can be used to estimate βangle and βenergy, and that the factor that WAVp0 increases slowly with atomic number z leads to the results that βenergy decreases slowly with z and β decreases slowly with z.

  15. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N; Ben Britton, T; Wilkinson, Angus J

    2016-09-01

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation.

  16. In situ electron backscatter diffraction investigation of recrystallization in a copper wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, François; Helbert, Anne-Laure; Baudin, Thierry

    2013-08-01

    The microstructural evolution of a cold drawn copper wire (reduction area of 38%) during primary recrystallization and grain growth was observed in situ by electron backscatter diffraction. Two thermal treatments were performed, and successive scans were acquired on samples undergoing heating from ambient temperature to a steady state of 200°C or 215°C. During a third in situ annealing, the temperature was continuously increased up to 600°C. Nuclei were observed to grow at the expense of the deformed microstructure. This growth was enhanced by the high stored energy difference between the nuclei and their neighbors (driving energy in recrystallization) and by the presence of high-angle grain boundaries of high mobility. In the early stages of growth, the nuclei twin and the newly created orientations continue to grow to the detriment of the strained copper. At high temperatures, the disappearance of some twins was evidenced by the migration of the incoherent twin boundaries. Thermal grooving of grain boundaries is observed at these high temperatures and affects the high mobile boundaries but tends to preserve the twin boundaries of lower energy. Thus, grooving may contribute to the twin vanishing.

  17. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Vivian, E-mail: v.tong13@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Britton, T. Ben [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4.

  18. Uncertainty in Quantitative Electron Probe Microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kurt F. J.

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative electron probe analysis is based on models based on the physics or x-ray generation, empirically adjusted to the analyses of specimens of known composition. Their accuracy can be estimated by applying them to a set of specimens of presumably well-known composition. PMID:27446746

  19. Skeletal growth phases of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa shown by scanning electron microscope and electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchi, Vincent; Vonlanthen, Pierre; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Crowley, Quentin G.

    2016-04-01

    Lophelia pertusa is a cold-water coral, which may form reefs by the association of multiple coralites within which a polyp lives. Each individual polyp builds an aragonite skeleton by an initial phase of early mineralization (traditionally referred to as centres of calcification) from which aragonite fibres grow in thickening deposits. The skeleton wall features successive optically opaque and translucent bands previously attributed to different regimes of growth as either uniform in crystal orientation (translucent bands) or with a chaotic organization (opaque bands). The processes involved in any organizational changes are still unknown. Microlayers in the coral wall, which represent separate periods of skeletal growth, have been recently identified and described. These growth patterns are readily visible under scanning electron microscope (SEM) after etching in dilute formic acid, but they do not necessarily form continuously visible structures. Here we present high quality SEM images and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps to study aragonite fibre orientation across the wall of L. pertusa. Both microlayers and opaque and translucent bands are compared to the crystallographic orientation of the aragonite fibres. EBSD maps and SEM images indicate that aragonite fibres do not exhibit a chaotic orientation, even in opaque bands. The absence of continuity of microlayers is partially explained by an association of multiple crystallographic preferred orientations of aragonite fibres. In the case of L. pertusa, careful textural characterisation is necessary prior to elemental or isotope analysis in order to select a skeletal transect representing a linear and continuous time period.

  20. Measured and Monte Carlo simulated electron backscatter to the monitor chamber for the Varian TrueBeam Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Samantha A. M.; Gagne, Isabelle M.; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2016-12-01

    To accurately simulate therapeutic electron beams using Monte Carlo methods, backscatter from jaws into the monitor chamber must be accounted for via the backscatter factor, S b. Measured and simulated values of S b for the TrueBeam are investigated. Two approaches for measuring S b are presented. Both require service mode operation with the dose and pulse forming networking servos turned off in order to assess changes in dose rate with field size. The first approach samples an instantaneous dose rate, while the second approach times the delivery of a fixed number of monitor units to assess dose rate. Dose rates were measured for 6, 12 and 20 MeV electrons for jaw- or MLC-shaped apertures between 1× 1 and 40× 40 cm2. The measurement techniques resulted in values of S b that agreed within 0.21% for square and asymmetric fields collimated by the jaws. Measured values of S b were used to calculate the forward dose component in a virtual monitor chamber using BEAMnrc. Based on this forward component, simulated values of S b were calculated and compared to measurement and Varian’s VirtuaLinac simulations. BEAMnrc results for jaw-shaped fields agreed with measurements and with VirtuaLinac simulations within 0.2%. For MLC-shaped fields, the respective measurement techniques differed by as much as 0.41% and BEAMnrc results differed with measurement by as much as 0.4%, however, all measured and simulated values agreed within experimental uncertainty. Measurement sensitivity was not sufficient to capture the small backscatter effect due to the MLC, and Monte Carlo predicted backscatter from the MLC to be no more than 0.3%. Backscatter from the jaws changed the electron dose rate by up to 2.6%. This reinforces the importance of including a backscatter factor in simulations of electron fields shaped with secondary collimating jaws, but presents the option of ignoring it when jaws are retracted and collimation is done with the MLC.

  1. Electronic Noses Using Quantitative Artificial Neural Networ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The present paper covers a new type of electronic nose(e-nose) with a four-sensor array,which has been applied to detecting gases quantitatively in the presence of interference. This e-nose has adapted fundamental aspects of relative error(RE) in changing quantitative analysis into the artificial neural network (ANN).. Thus, both the quantitative and the qualitative requirements for ANN in implementing e-nose can be satisfied. In addition, the e-nose uses only 4 sensors in the sensor array, and can be designed for different usages simply by changing one or two sensor(s). Various gases were tested by this kind of e-nose, including alcohol vapor, CO, liquefied-petrol-gas and CO2. Satisfactory quantitative results were obtained and no qualitative mistake in prediction was observed for the samples being mixed with interference gases.

  2. The Origin of Graphic Granite: New Insights from Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Wu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Graphic granite, found predominantly in granitic pegmatite, is a leucocratic granitic rock consisting of an intimate intergrowth of alkali feldspar and quartz with a distinctive texture as ancient cuneiform writing when viewed in certain cross sections. Deciphering the graphic texture is important for understanding its origin and the crystallization process of granitic rocks. In this study, we present investigations on petrology, mineral composition, crystallographic relationship and topotaxy of quartz and alkali feldspar in graphic granites from the Fangshan adakitic pluton, Beijing, north China and the Luotian dome in the Northern Dabie Mountains, central China. The euhedral to subhedral coarse-grained feldspar host in graphic granite can be alkali feldspar or plagioclase. Microscopically, the feldspar host is usually a perthite, which is decomposed into irregular intergrowth of sodic and potassic feldspar. The volume content of quartz usually ranges from 20% to 45%, and the composition of feldspar in graphic granite depends greatly on the formation conditions. However, the quartz-feldspar ratio and the composition of feldspar in graphic granite are relatively stable in coeval graphic granites in the same area. The majority of the quartz grains undergrown with host feldspar are in the form of sub-parallel tabular, long rods and unconnected dendritic crystals, which only shows a distinctive graphic texture in certain cross sections. Under cross polarized light microscopy, multiple domains of quartz grains exhibit a nearly simultaneous extinction within a single crystal of feldspar. The crystallographic orientations of the quartz grains and the host feldspar were measured using the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Statistical analyses indicate a definite crystallographic orientation relationship between the majority of graphic quartz grains and the host feldspar in that [11-23]Quartz parallel to [001]Feldspar. Moreover, Dauphiné twin of quartz

  3. Distinguishing between biologically induced and biologically controlled mineralization in fossil organisms using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päßler, Jan-Filip; Jarochowska, Emilia; Bestmann, Michel; Munnecke, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Although carbonate-precipitating cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems today, the criteria used to identify them in the geological record are subjective and rarely testable. Differences in the mode of biomineralization between cyanobacteria and metazoans, i.e. biologically induced calcification (BIM) vs. biologically controlled calcification (BCM) might be possible to discern through different crystallographic structures in which they result. We employed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to investigate the structure of calcareous skeletons in two microproblematica widespread in Paleozoic marine ecosystems: Rothpletzella Wood 1945, considered to be a cyanobacterium, and Allonema Ulrich & Bassler 1904. We used a calcareous trilobite shell as a reference. The shell of Allonema has a simple single-layered structure of acicular crystals perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The c-axes of these crystals are parallel to the elongation and thereby normal to the surface of the organism. The pole figures and misorientation axis distribution reveal a fiber texture around the c-axis with a small degree of variation (up to 30°), indicating a well-organized structure. A comparable pattern was found in the trilobite shell. This structure allows excluding biologically induced mineralization as the mechanism of shell formation in Allonema. In Rothpletzella the c-axes of the microcrystalline sheath show a broader clustering compared to Allonema, but still reveal crystals tending to be perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The misorientation axes of adjacent crystals show a random distribution. However, Rothpletzella also shares other morphological similarities with fossil and extant cyanobacteria. We propose that the strict limitation of rotations (misorientations) between adjacent crystals around a specific axis of the crystal system can be used as a criterion to distinguish shells formed through biologically controlled biomineralization.

  4. Phase space distribution of an electron beam emerging from Compton/Thomson back-scattering by an intense laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, V.; Chaikovska, I.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the energy distribution of a relativistic electron beam after the Compton back-scattering by a counterpropagating laser field. The analysis is performed for parameters in the range of realistic X-γ sources, in the framework of the Quantum Electrodynamics, by means of the code CAIN. The results lead to the conclusion that, in the regime considered, the main effect is the initial formation of stripes, followed by the diffusion of the most energetic particles toward lower values in the longitudinal phase space, with a final increase of the electron energy bandwidth.

  5. The role of dislocations in varied olivine deformation mechanisms investigated using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars; Britton, Ben; Wilkinson, Angus

    2016-04-01

    Experimentally-derived flow laws can be used to predict the rheology of rocks deformed under natural conditions only if the same microphysical processes can be demonstrated to control the rate-limiting deformation mechanism in both cases. Olivine rheology may exert a principle control on the strength of the lithosphere, and therefore considerable research effort has been applied to assessing its rheology through experimental, geological, and geophysical approaches. Nonetheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the dominant deformation mechanisms in the upper mantle. This uncertainty arises in large part due to our limited understanding of the fundamental deformation processes associated with each mechanism. Future improvements to microphysical models of distinct deformation mechanisms require new insight into the contributions those fundamental processes to the macroscopic behaviour. The dynamics of dislocations is central to modelling viscous deformation of olivine, but characterisation techniques capable of constraining dislocation types, densities, and distributions over the critical grain to polycrystal length-scales have been lacking. High angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), developed and increasingly applied in the material sciences, offers an approach capable of such analyses. HR-EBSD utilises diffraction pattern image cross-correlation to achieve dramatically improved angular resolution (~0.01°) of lattice orientation gradients compared to conventional Hough-based EBSD (~0.5°). This angular resolution allows very low densities (≥ 10^11 m^-2) of geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) to be resolved, facilitating analysis of a wide range of dislocation microstructures. We have developed the application of HR-EBSD to olivine and applied it to samples deformed both experimentally and naturally in grain-size sensitive and grain-size insensitive regimes. The results quantitatively highlight variations in the types and

  6. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, David, E-mail: davidwa@earth.ox.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Hansen, Lars N. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Ben Britton, T. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. - Highlights: • Lattice orientation gradients in olivine were measured using HR-EBSD. • The limited number of olivine slip systems enable simple least squares inversion for GND

  7. Scale invariance and scaling law of Thomson backscatter spectra by electron moving in laser-magnetic resonance regime

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Yi-Jia; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-01-01

    The Thomson scattering spectra by an electron moving in the laser-magnetic resonance acceleration regime are computed numerically and analytically. The dependence of fundamental frequency on the laser intensity and magnetic resonance parameter is examined carefully. By calculating the emission of a single electron in a circularly polarized plane-wave laser field and constant external magnetic field, the scale invariance of the radiation spectra is evident in terms of harmonic orders. The scaling law of backscattered spectra are exhibited remarkably for the laser intensity as well for the initial axial momentum of the electron when the cyclotron frequency of the electron approaches the laser frequency. The results indicate that the magnetic resonance parameter plays an important role on the strength of emission. And the rich features of scattering spectra found may be applicable to the radiation source tunability.

  8. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  9. Single-shot radiography using X-rays from Compton-backscattering with laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Döpp, A; Thaury, C; Gautier, J; Andriyash, I; Lifschitz, A; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Malka, V; Rousse, A; Phuoc, K Ta

    2015-01-01

    We present results from the production of high energy femtosecond X-rays by Compton-backscattering of an intense femtosecond laser pulse with quasi-monoenergetic laser-accelerated electron beams using a plasma mirror. In our parameter regime electrons of $\\sim$ 150 MeV peak energy emit a high energy radiation beam with a broad spectrum extending up to $\\sim$ 500 keV. The photon yield from the source is sufficiently high to illuminate a centimeter-size sample placed 90 centimeters behind the source and record a single-shot radiograph. The small diameter of the laser-accelerated electron beams translates into a micrometer X-ray source size, making it a promising candidate for advanced X-ray imaging techniques as e.g. propagation-based phase contrast imaging.

  10. Dark-field imaging based on post-processed electron backscatter diffraction patterns of bulk crystalline materials in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Dark-field (DF) images were acquired in the scanning electron microscope with an offline procedure based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns (EBSPs). These EBSD-DF images were generated by selecting a particular reflection on the electron backscatter diffraction pattern and by reporting the intensity of one or several pixels around this point at each pixel of the EBSD-DF image. Unlike previous studies, the diffraction information of the sample is the basis of the final image contrast with a pixel scale resolution at the EBSP providing DF imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The offline facility of this technique permits the selection of any diffraction condition available in the diffraction pattern and displaying the corresponding image. The high number of diffraction-based images available allows a better monitoring of deformation structures compared to electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) which is generally limited to a few images of the same area. This technique was applied to steel and iron specimens and showed its high capability in describing more rigorously the deformation structures around micro-hardness indents. Due to the offline relation between the reference EBSP and the EBSD-DF images, this new technique will undoubtedly greatly improve our knowledge of deformation mechanism and help to improve our understanding of the ECCI contrast mechanisms.

  11. The sensitivity of backscattering coefficients to elastic scattering cross-sections and electron stopping powers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C G H; Matthew, J A D; El-Gomati, M M

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of Monte Carlo estimates of backscattering coefficients η to the accuracy of their input data is examined by studying the percentage change in η due to changes of 10% and 20% in the differential elastic scattering cross-section dσ/dΩ and corresponding changes in the stopping power S(E) in the primary energy range 200-10,000 eV. To a good approximation equivalent elastic and inelastic scattering changes produce equal and opposite shifts in η, a result consistent with predictions of transport theory. For medium to high atomic numbers an x% error in the specification of either S(E) or dσ/dΩ produces a percentage change in η significantly less than x%, while at low atomic number Δη/η increases approximately linearly with ln E so that Monte Carlo predictions are then more sensitive to parameter precision at high energy.

  12. Comparison between magnetic force microscopy and electron back-scatter diffraction for ferrite quantification in type 321 stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, A D; Harniman, R L; Collins, A M; Davis, S A; Younes, C M; Flewitt, P E J; Scott, T B

    2015-01-01

    Several analytical techniques that are currently available can be used to determine the spatial distribution and amount of austenite, ferrite and precipitate phases in steels. The application of magnetic force microscopy, in particular, to study the local microstructure of stainless steels is beneficial due to the selectivity of this technique for detection of ferromagnetic phases. In the comparison of Magnetic Force Microscopy and Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction for the morphological mapping and quantification of ferrite, the degree of sub-surface measurement has been found to be critical. Through the use of surface shielding, it has been possible to show that Magnetic Force Microscopy has a measurement depth of 105-140 nm. A comparison of the two techniques together with the depth of measurement capabilities are discussed.

  13. Staining plastic blocks with triiodide to image cells and soft tissues in backscattered electron SEM of skeletal and dental tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Boyde

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM is an invaluable method for studying the histology of the hard, mineralised components of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA or other resin embedded skeletal and dental tissues. Intact tissues are studied in micro-milled or polished block faces with an electron-optical section thickness of the order of a half to one micron and with the area of the section as big as a whole – large or small – bone organ. However, BSE SEM does not give information concerning the distribution of uncalcified, ‘soft’, cellular and extracellular matrix components. This can be obtained by confocal microscopy of the same block and the two sorts of images merged but the blocks have to be studied in two microscope systems. The present work shows a new, simple and economic approach to visualising both components by using the triiodide ion in Lugol's iodine solution to stain the block surface prior to the application of any conductive coating – and the latter can be omitted if charging is suppressed by use of poor vacuum conditions in the SEM sample chamber. The method permits the use of archival tissue, and it will be valuable in studies of both normal growth and development and pathological changes in bones and joints, including osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, and tissue adaptation to implants.

  14. Surface Morphology and Microstructural Characterization of KCl Crystals Grown in Halite-Sylvite Brine Solutions by Electron Backscattered Diffraction Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Jiban; Basu, Ritwik; Evitts, Richard William; Besant, Robert William

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a study on the ternary NaCl-KCl-H2O system was carried out by an extractive metallurgy technique from mixed brine solutions of different compositions at room temperature (23°C). The surface morphology and microstructure were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The presence of Na{ }+ was found to reduce the stability of the solutions and increase the crystallization induction period, interfacial energy, energy of formation of the nucleus and greatly reduce the nucleation rate of KCl crystal. The surface morphology of KCl crystals is significantly changed due to presence of 5 to 10% (w/w) of NaCl as impurities in the binary solutions and shows the formation of co-crystals of different crystallographic orientation of NaCl on the KCl surface. In addition X-ray diffraction studies performed on KCl crystals grown in halite-sylvite binary solutions reveals that these crystals are cubic in nature and its lattice constant is 6.2952 Å when the NaCl concentration is small.

  15. Artificial electron heating of winter mesospheric radar clouds (PMWE) and the interpretation of the radar backscatter variation during the heater cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa Bekele, Meseret; Havnes, Ove; La Hoz, Cesar; Baroni, Giovanni; Rietveld, Mike; Biebricher, Alexander

    The effect of artificial electron heating (in our case with the EISCAT Heating Facility) on the Polar Mesospheric Winter Echoes (PMWE) the weak radar clouds which occur in the winter mesosphere between heights 55 to 80 km, is normally different from its effect on the much stronger Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) which occur between 80 and 90 km height. They both show a weakening of the backscatter when the heater is switched on, sometimes close to extinguishing of the radar backscatter, signaling that the increased electron pressure has smoothed the electron density gradients which are responsible for the coherent backscatter. However, while the PMSE backscatter very often show a considerable recovery during the 20 sec the heater (normally) is on and dust particles are charged more negatively by the heated electrons, this recovery is at best very weak for PMWE. The PMWE also have weak overshoots, where the backscatter flares up only by a factor 1.1 to 1.2 when the heater is switched off, compared to the undisturbed PMWE backscatter before the heater was switched on. For PMSE the overshoot factor can be as high as 7. This demonstrate that if dust particles control the PMWE their sizes must be much smaller than the PMSE particles. Modeling has shown that the likely PMWE dust sizes are in the range 3-4 nanometer making it probable that PMWE is associated with the small meteoric smoke particles. When the heater is switched off the charge of the dust particles and the intensity of the backscatter relax back to its undisturbed values. If the decharging mechanism was the same for the larger PMSE and the small PMWE dust particles one would expect a very much longer relaxation time for the PMWE than for the PMSE. The fact that the PMWE relaxation time is comparable to the PMSE show that the small meteoric dust particles must be de-charged by a more effective mechanism than ion attachment. We find that the photodetachment effect where photons of energy less than the

  16. A scanning electron microscope method for automated, quantitative analysis of mineral matter in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A.; Ward, C.R. [R.A. Creelman and Associates, Epping, NSW (Australia)

    1996-07-01

    Quantitative mineralogical analysis has been carried out in a series of nine coal samples from Australia, South Africa and China using a newly-developed automated image analysis system coupled to a scanning electron microscopy. The image analysis system (QEM{asterisk}SEM) gathers X-ray spectra and backscattered electron data from a number of points on a conventional grain-mount polished section under the SEM, and interprets the data from each point in mineralogical terms. The cumulative data in each case was integrated to provide a volumetric modal analysis of the species present in the coal samples, expressed as percentages of the respective coals` mineral matter. Comparison was made of the QEM{asterisk}SEM results to data obtained from the same samples using other methods of quantitative mineralogical analysis, namely X-ray diffraction of the low-temperature oxygen-plasma ash and normative calculation from the (high-temperature) ash analysis and carbonate CO{sub 2} data. Good agreement was obtained from all three methods for quartz in the coals, and also for most of the iron-bearing minerals. The correlation between results from the different methods was less strong, however, for individual clay minerals, or for minerals such as calcite, dolomite and phosphate species that made up only relatively small proportions of the mineral matter. The image analysis approach, using the electron microscope for mineralogical studies, has significant potential as a supplement to optical microscopy in quantitative coal characterisation. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Electron Linac design to drive bright Compton back-scattering gamma-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacci, A.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L. [INFN-MI, Milano (Italy); Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boni, R.; Chiadroni, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Spataro, B.; Vaccarezza, C. [INFN-LNF, Frascati, Roma (Italy); Antici, P.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [University La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Cianchi, A. [University of Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); and others

    2013-05-21

    The technological development in the field of high brightness linear accelerators and high energy/high quality lasers enables today designing high brilliance Compton-X and Gamma-photon beams suitable for a wide range of applications in the innovative field of nuclear photonics. The challenging requirements of this kind of source comprise: tunable energy (1-20 MeV), very narrow bandwidth (0.3%), and high spectral density (10{sup 4} photons/s/eV). We present here a study focused on the design and the optimization of an electron Linac aimed to meet the source specifications of the European Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics project, currently funded and seeking for an innovative machine design in order to outperform state-of-the-art facilities. We show that the phase space density of the electron beam, at the collision point against the laser pulse, is the main quality factor characterizing the Linac.

  18. Characterization of Sputtered CdTe Thin Films with Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Correlation with Device Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Matthew M; Scarpulla, Michael A; Paudel, Naba R; Wieland, Kristopher A; Compaan, Alvin D; Liu, Xiangxin

    2015-08-01

    The performance of polycrystalline CdTe photovoltaic thin films is expected to depend on the grain boundary density and corresponding grain size of the film microstructure. However, the electrical performance of grain boundaries within these films is not well understood, and can be beneficial, harmful, or neutral in terms of film performance. Electron backscatter diffraction has been used to characterize the grain size, grain boundary structure, and crystallographic texture of sputtered CdTe at varying deposition pressures before and after CdCl2 treatment in order to correlate performance with microstructure. Weak fiber textures were observed in the as-deposited films, with (111) textures present at lower deposition pressures and (110) textures observed at higher deposition pressures. The CdCl2-treated samples exhibited significant grain recrystallization with a high fraction of twin boundaries. Good correlation of solar cell efficiency was observed with twin-corrected grain size while poor correlation was found if the twin boundaries were considered as grain boundaries in the grain size determination. This implies that the twin boundaries are neutral with respect to recombination and carrier transport.

  19. Structural analysis of multilayer metal nitride films CrN/MoN using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postolnyi, Bogdan; Bondar, Oleksandr; Opielak, Marek; Rogalski, Przemysław; Araújo, João. Pedro

    2016-12-01

    The electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis method was used for studying structure and properties of multilayer nitride CrN/MoN coatings fabricated by cathode arc physical vapour deposition (Arc-PVD). Samples were deposited on steel substrate with different single layer thickness from tens nanometers to 1 micron and with total thickness of coatings up to 8-13 μm. Colour grains mapping, grain size distribution profiles, pole figures and texture analyses were the main research instruments. Studying of obtained coatings was performed on specially prepared polished cross-section samples. The dependence between single layer thickness and grain size of materials, which is also changing through depth profile of the coating, was observed. In addition, it was possible to study phase composition, prevailing crystals orientation, dominant texture and grains growth. Studying of grains size, as well as other indicated parameters, is a very important task because it gives an information about grains interfaces volume, which causes changes in mechanical properties of material. Obtained results were cross-checked by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) where it was possible.

  20. Standard practice for determining average grain size using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in fully recrystallized polycrystalline materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice is used to determine grain size from measurements of grain areas from automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) scans of polycrystalline materials. 1.2 The intent of this practice is to standardize operation of an automated EBSD instrument to measure ASTM G directly from crystal orientation. The guidelines and caveats of E112 apply here, but the focus of this standard is on EBSD practice. 1.3 This practice is only applicable to fully recrystallized materials. 1.4 This practice is applicable to any crystalline material which produces EBSD patterns of sufficient quality that a high percentage of the patterns can be reliably indexed using automated indexing software. 1.5 The practice is applicable to any type of grain structure or grain size distribution. 1.6 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.7 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parenthe...

  1. Three-dimensional cathodoluminescence imaging and electron backscatter diffraction: tools for studying the genetic nature of diamond inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggers de Vries, D. F.; Drury, M. R.; de Winter, D. A. M.; Bulanova, G. P.; Pearson, D. G.; Davies, G. R.

    2011-04-01

    As a step towards resolving the genesis of inclusions in diamonds, a new technique is presented. This technique combines cathodoluminescence (CL) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) using a focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) instrument with the aim of determining, in detail, the three-dimensional diamond zonation adjacent to a diamond inclusion. EBSD reveals that mineral inclusions in a single diamond have similar crystallographic orientations to the host, within ±0.4°. The chromite inclusions record a systematic change in Mg# and Cr# from core to the rim of the diamond that corresponds with a ~80°C decrease of their formation temperature as established by zinc thermometry. A chromite inclusion, positioned adjacent to a boundary between two major diamond growth zones, is multi-faceted with preferred octahedral and cubic faces. The chromite is surrounded by a volume of non-luminescent diamond (CL halo) that partially obscures any diamond growth structures. The CL halo has apparent crystallographic morphology with symmetrically oriented pointed features. The CL halo is enriched in ~200 ppm Cr and ~80 ppm Fe and is interpreted to have a secondary origin as it overprints a major primary diamond growth structure. The diamond zonation adjacent to the chromite is complex and records both syngenetic and protogenetic features based on current inclusion entrapment models. In this specific case, a syngenetic origin is favoured with the complex form of the inclusion and growth layers indicating changes of growth rates at the diamond-chromite interface. Combined EBSD and 3D-CL imaging appears an extremely useful tool in resolving the ongoing discussion about the timing of inclusion growth and the significance of diamond inclusion studies.

  2. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of isothermally aged SAF 2507 type superduplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobranszky, J.; Szabo, P. J.; Berecz, T.; Hrotko, V.; Portko, M.

    2004-10-01

    Due to thermal effects, several precipitation and segregation processes are known in duplex stainless steels. These microstructural changes influence both of the original phases, but in different ways. Isothermal ageing in a large range of temperature was performed on SAF 2507 type steel. The temperature range was 300-1000 °C, the ageing time was between 100 s and 24 h. This paper discusses the results of ageing at 900 °C. Microstructural changes were investigated by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. This technique allowed the determination of the microstructure of the secondary austenite and sigma phase and their mutual orientation properties. Beside this, thermoelectric power measurements were also performed, which gave information about the kinetics of the precipitation process. Results showed that sigma-phase precipitation started right after 200 s in the case of annealed steel, and faster than 100 s in the cold-rolled state. After 5000 s, the delta-ferrite disappeared. Chemical composition of sigma phase was independent on the ageing time. A small decrease in nickel content was observed with a slight increase of Cr content. Small amount of chi phase had also been observed on the ferrite-ferrite boundaries, but later they changed into sigma phase. Similarly to sigma phase, chi phase showed significant phosphorus enrichment. During ageing, small chrome nitride precipitates developed, which amount increased in time, and some vanadium could be measured in them. The orientation relationship between austenite and sigma phase deviated from Nenno-orientationship with about 24°, and seems to form a [110]‖[310] relationship, which was characteristic right from the beginning of the process, and remains more or less constant.

  3. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis on the microstructures of electrolytic Cu deposition in the through hole filling process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.E., E-mail: ceho1975@hotmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liao, C.W. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Pan, C.X. [School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Chen, H.J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, J.C.; Chen, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-10-01

    Through hole (TH) filling by electrolytic Cu deposition has become a critical process for high density interconnection technologies associated with three-dimensional packaging. In this study, the morphological and crystallographic evolutions of the electrolytic Cu TH filling with the plating time (t) were investigated using an optical microscope and a field-emission scanning electron microscope equipped with an electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis system. The Cu deposition rate in the TH was strongly dependent on t, which was established at a moderate rate of ∼ 0.3 μm/min at t = 40 min–74 min, then dramatically accelerated to ∼ 4 μm/min at t = 74 min–80 min (termed “fast deposition regime”), and subsequently decelerated in the final plating regime (t = 80 min–100 min). EBSD analyses showed that the electrolytic Cu predominantly possessed high-angle grain boundaries with strong coincidence site lattices at ∑3 (60° rotation at <111>) and ∑9 (38.9° rotation at <101>) for all t examined. Interestingly, the [111]‖TD (transverse direction) orientation displayed a relatively strong presence in the initial induction regime, while the [111]‖TD + [101]‖TD orientations with large grain sizes became dominant in the fast deposition regime (i.e., t = 74 min–80 min), and there was a very low concentration of the [111]‖TD orientation in the final deposition regime. This research offered a better understanding of the morphological and crystallographic evolutions in each stage of the electrolytic Cu TH filling. - Highlights: • Through hole (TH) filling by electrolytic Cu deposition • The Cu deposition rate is strongly dependent on the plating time in the THs. • The dominant Cu orientations were [111]‖TD (transverse direction) and [101]‖TD. • Cu possessed high angle grain boundaries with strong coincidence site lattices.

  4. Grain Growth Orientation and Anisotropy in Cu6Sn5 Intermetallic: Nanoindentation and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Soud Farhan; Ladani, Leila

    2014-04-01

    As the size of joints in micro/nano-electronics diminishes, the role of intermetallic (IMC) layers becomes more significant. It was shown that solder joint strength is controlled largely by IMC strength at higher strain rates. Additionally, there is a possibility that very small joints are completely composed of IMCs. Further miniaturization of joints may result in statistical grain size effects. Therefore, it is essential to characterize IMC materials and understand their anisotropic mechanical properties. One of the most common types of IMCs in microelectronic joints is Cu6Sn5, which is formed in a variety of bonding materials with different compositions of Sn, Cu, and Ag. This work studies through nanoindentation elastic-plastic properties of a single grain of Cu6Sn5 IMC in a Sn-3.5Ag/Cu system with reflow soldering. Elastic properties such as elastic modulus and hardness were determined from the nanoindentation load-depth curve. The reverse analysis model described by Dao et al. was used to extract plastic properties such as yield strength and strain hardening exponent from nanoindentation data. Care was taken to achieve indentation of single grains with sufficient accuracy and repeatability. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping was used to determine orientation of Cu6Sn5 grains and to relate the orientation with the load-depth curve results of nanoindentation and the corresponding elastic and plastic properties. The EBSD results indicated that the Cu6Sn5 crystal structure is hexagonal. Columnar growth of the Cu6Sn5 grains was observed as the grains mostly grew along the c-axis of the crystal. Indentation of different grains parallel to the basal plane showed no significant difference in mechanical properties.

  5. Study of ferrous corrosion products on iron archaeological objects by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, Ilanith; Conforto, Egle; Refait, Philippe; Remazeilles, Celine [FRE 3474 CNRS - Universite de La Rochelle, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Ingenieur pour l' Environnement, La Rochelle cedex 01 (France)

    2013-02-15

    The corrosion of iron-based archaeomaterials in anoxic environments leads mainly to Fe(II) compounds, like the hydroxychloride {beta}-Fe{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}Cl, chukanovite Fe{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3} or siderite FeCO{sub 3}. The understanding of the mechanisms then necessarily implies a thorough investigation of the chemical, mechanical and morphological characteristics of the Fe(II)-based layer that develops between the metal surface and the environment. In the peculiar case of Fe(II) compounds, generally very reactive towards O{sub 2}, the main concern is to prevent any transformation by air during the analysis. The EBSD technique is adapted on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) where the samples are analysed under vacuum and consequently sheltered from air. Different options offered by EBSD for phase characterisation and microstructural study were tested for the first time on the rust layers of two archaeological iron nails. Results were confronted to those obtained by micro-Raman spectroscopy, which was used as reference method. Magnetite, Fe(II) hydroxychloride {beta}-Fe{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}Cl and siderite were analysed successfully but improvements have to be brought for the study of other compounds such as iron oxyhydroxides and chukanovite. The choice of experimental parameters in our approach as well as the potentialities and limits of the technique for this kind of application are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Study of ferrous corrosion products on iron archaeological objects by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, Ilanith; Conforto, Egle; Refait, Philippe; Rémazeilles, Céline

    2013-02-01

    The corrosion of iron-based archaeomaterials in anoxic environments leads mainly to Fe(II) compounds, like the hydroxychloride β-Fe2(OH)3Cl, chukanovite Fe2(OH)2CO3 or siderite FeCO3. The understanding of the mechanisms then necessarily implies a thorough investigation of the chemical, mechanical and morphological characteristics of the Fe(II)-based layer that develops between the metal surface and the environment. In the peculiar case of Fe(II) compounds, generally very reactive towards O2, the main concern is to prevent any transformation by air during the analysis. The EBSD technique is adapted on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) where the samples are analysed under vacuum and consequently sheltered from air. Different options offered by EBSD for phase characterisation and microstructural study were tested for the first time on the rust layers of two archaeological iron nails. Results were confronted to those obtained by micro-Raman spectroscopy, which was used as reference method. Magnetite, Fe(II) hydroxychloride β-Fe2(OH)3Cl and siderite were analysed successfully but improvements have to be brought for the study of other compounds such as iron oxyhydroxides and chukanovite. The choice of experimental parameters in our approach as well as the potentialities and limits of the technique for this kind of application are discussed.

  7. Quantitative characterization of electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskin, Rachel S; Yu, Zhiheng; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-12-01

    A new generation of direct electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) promises significant improvement over previous detectors in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, the performance of these new detectors needs to be carefully monitored in order to optimize imaging conditions and check for degradation over time. We have developed an easy-to-use software tool, FindDQE, to measure MTF and DQE of electron detectors using images of a microscope's built-in beam stop. Using this software, we have determined the DQE curves of four direct electron detectors currently available: the Gatan K2 Summit, the FEI Falcon I and II, and the Direct Electron DE-12, under a variety of total dose and dose rate conditions. We have additionally measured the curves for the Gatan US4000 and TVIPS TemCam-F416 scintillator-based cameras. We compare the results from our new method with published curves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative annular dark field electron microscopy using single electron signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lupini, Andrew R; Findlay, Scott D; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2014-02-01

    One of the difficulties in analyzing atomic resolution electron microscope images is that the sample thickness is usually unknown or has to be fitted from parameters that are not precisely known. An accurate measure of thickness, ideally on a column-by-column basis, parameter free, and with single atom accuracy, would be of great value for many applications, such as matching to simulations. Here we propose such a quantification method for annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy by using the single electron intensity level of the detector. This method has the advantage that we can routinely quantify annular dark field images operating at both low and high beam currents, and under high dynamic range conditions, which is useful for the quantification of ultra-thin or light-element materials. To facilitate atom counting at the atomic scale we use the mean intensity in an annular dark field image averaged over a primitive cell, with no free parameters to be fitted. To illustrate the potential of our method, we demonstrate counting the number of Al (or N) atoms in a wurtzite-type aluminum nitride single crystal at each primitive cell over the range of 3-99 atoms.

  10. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  11. Statistiscal Experimental Design for Quantitative Atomic Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aert, S.

    2003-01-01

    Statistical experimental design is applied to set up quantitative atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy experiments. In such experiments, observations of the atomic structure of the object under study are always subject to spontaneous fluctuations. As a result of these fluctuations, the

  12. Method for analysis of low energy backscattering spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnatowicz, V.; Kvitek, J. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Rez. Ustav Jaderne Fyziky); Pelikan, L. (Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslavika). Dept. of Microelectronics); Rybka, V.; Krejci, P. (Tesla, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-04-15

    An analytical formula is proposed describing the shape of the energy spectra of particles backscattered from samples implanted with heavy impurities. The method is suitable for quantitative evaluation of backscattering spectra measured with low energy ions.

  13. Determination of the easy axes of small ferromagnetic precipitates in a bulk material by combined magnetic force microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, L., E-mail: leonardo.batista@izfp.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Non-destructive Testing (IZFP), Campus E3 1, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Rabe, U. [Fraunhofer Institute for Non-destructive Testing (IZFP), Campus E3 1, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); University of the Saarland, LZPQ, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Hirsekorn, S. [Fraunhofer Institute for Non-destructive Testing (IZFP), Campus E3 1, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    A method to determine the magnetic easy axes of micro- and nanoscopic ferromagnetic precipitates embedded in a bulk material is proposed and applied to globular cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) embedded in a ferrite matrix. The method combines magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Magnetic domain structures in globular and in lamellar cementite precipitates in unalloyed pearlitic steels were imaged using MFM. The domain structure of the precipitates was analyzed in dependency of their size, shape and crystallographic orientation. It was found that the magnetic moments of the cementite precipitates are highly geared to their crystalline axes. The combined MFM and EBSD studies allow the conclusion that the cementite easy direction of magnetization is the long [010] axis. For fine lamellae cementite the determination of their crystallographic orientations using electron diffraction techniques is very difficult. With the previous knowledge of the behavior of the domain structure in globular cementite, the crystalline orientations of the fine lamellae cementite can be estimated by simply observing the magnetic microstructures and the topographic profiles. - Highlights: • We develop a method to determine the easy axes of nanoscopic ferromagnetic precipitates in a matrix. • We combine the magnetic force microscopy and the electron backscatter diffraction techniques. • Globular and lamellar cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) precipitates are taken as examples. • MFM images revealed different orientations of the magnetic moments in cementite. • The cementite easy direction of magnetization is the long [010] axis.

  14. Quantitative nanoscale analysis in 3D using electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuebel, Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, INT, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    State-of-the-art electron tomography has been established as a powerful tool to image complex structures with nanometer resolution in 3D. Especially STEM tomography is used extensively in materials science in such diverse areas as catalysis, semiconductor materials, and polymer composites mainly providing qualitative information on morphology, shape and distribution of materials. However, for an increasing number of studies quantitative information, e.g. surface area, fractal dimensions, particle distribution or porosity are needed. A quantitative analysis is typically performed after segmenting the tomographic data, which is one of the main sources of error for the quantification. In addition to noise, systematic errors due to the missing wedge and due to artifacts from the reconstruction algorithm itself are responsible for these segmentation errors and improved algorithms are needed. This presentation will provide an overview of the possibilities and limitations of quantitative nanoscale analysis by electron tomography. Using catalysts and nano composites as applications examples, intensities and intensity variations observed for the 3D volume reconstructed by WBP and SIRT will be quantitatively compared to alternative reconstruction algorithms; implications for quantification of electron (or X-ray) tomographic data will be discussed and illustrated for quantification of particle size distributions, particle correlations, surface area, and fractal dimensions in 3D.

  15. Quantitative methods for the analysis of electron microscope images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skands, Peter Ulrik Vallø

    1996-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is an general introduction to quantitative methods for the analysis of digital microscope images. The images presented are primarily been acquired from Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) and interfermeter microscopes (IFM). The topic is approached though several examples...... foundation of the thesis fall in the areas of: 1) Mathematical Morphology; 2) Distance transforms and applications; and 3) Fractal geometry. Image analysis opens in general the possibility of a quantitative and statistical well founded measurement of digital microscope images. Herein lies also the conditions...

  16. Correlating whisker growth and grain structure on Sn-Cu samples by real-time scanning electron microscopy and backscattering diffraction characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei Fei; Jadhav, Nitin; Chason, Eric [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2012-05-28

    Whiskers/hillocks grow out of Pb-free Sn coatings used in electronics manufacturing. To determine which grains form whiskers/hillocks, we use scanning electron microscopy and backscattering diffraction to simultaneously monitor the surface morphology and grain structure. To reduce surface roughness, we developed a ''peel-off'' method to prepare ultra-flat samples that were measured repeatedly while whiskers/hillocks formed. We find grains that form into whiskers/hillocks are present in the as-deposited film (i.e., not re-nucleated) and many have horizontal grain boundaries beneath them. Grain rotation during whisker/hillock formation means that measurements performed after the features grow do not indicate their initial grain orientations.

  17. Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Analysis of an Austenitic Stainless Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment and Plasma Nitriding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Retraint, Delphine; Chemkhi, Mahdi; Roos, Arjen; Demangel, Clemence

    2015-08-01

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel can be used for orthopedic implants due to its biocompatibility and high corrosion resistance. Its range of applications in this field could be broadened by improving its wear and friction properties. Surface properties can be modified through surface hardening treatments. The effects of such treatments on the microstructure of the alloy were investigated here. Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) is a surface treatment that enhances mechanical properties of the material surface by creating a thin nanocrystalline layer. After SMAT, some specimens underwent a plasma nitriding process to further enhance their surface properties. Using electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the microstructural evolution of the stainless steel after these different surface treatments was characterized. Microstructural features investigated include thickness of the nanocrystalline layer, size of the grains within the nanocrystalline layer, and depth of diffusion of nitrogen atoms within the material.

  18. An electronic nose for quantitative determination of gas concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Grzegorz; Kalinowski, Paweł; Woźniak, Łukasz

    2016-11-01

    The practical application of human nose for fragrance recognition is severely limited by the fact that our sense of smell is subjective and gets tired easily. Consequently, there is considerable need for an instrument that can be a substitution of the human sense of smell. Electronic nose devices from the mid 1980s are used in growing number of applications. They comprise an array of several electrochemical gas sensors with partial specificity and a pattern recognition algorithms. Most of such systems, however, is only used for qualitative measurements. In this article usage of such system in quantitative determination of gas concentration is demonstrated. Electronic nose consist of a sensor array with eight commercially available Taguchi type gas sensor. Performance of three different pattern recognition algorithms is compared, namely artificial neural network, partial least squares regression and support vector machine regression. The electronic nose is used for ammonia and nitrogen dioxide concentration determination.

  19. Averaging of Backscatter Intensities in Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, John J.; Pingitore, Nicholas E.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Low uncertainty measurements on pure element stable isotope pairs demonstrate that mass has no influence on the backscattering of electrons at typical electron microprobe energies. The traditional prediction of average backscatter intensities in compounds using elemental mass fractions is improperly grounded in mass and thus has no physical basis. We propose an alternative model to mass fraction averaging, based of the number of electrons or protons, termed “electron fraction,” which predicts backscatter yield better than mass fraction averaging. PMID:27446752

  20. Lines of Evidence–Incremental Markings in Molar Enamel of Soay Sheep as Revealed by a Fluorochrome Labeling and Backscattered Electron Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdorf, Horst; Kierdorf, Uwe; Frölich, Kai; Witzel, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    We studied the structural characteristics and periodicities of regular incremental markings in sheep enamel using fluorochrome injections for vital labeling of forming enamel and backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope. Microscopic analysis of mandibular first molars revealed the presence of incremental markings with a daily periodicity (laminations) that indicated successive positions of the forming front of interprismatic enamel. In addition to the laminations, incremental markings with a sub-daily periodicity were discernible both in interprismatic enamel and in enamel prisms. Five sub-daily increments were present between two consecutive laminations. Backscattered electron imaging revealed that each sub-daily growth increment consisted of a broader and more highly mineralized band and a narrower and less mineralized band (line). The sub-daily markings in the prisms of sheep enamel morphologically resembled the (daily) prisms cross striations seen in primate enamel. Incremental markings with a supra-daily periodicity were not observed in sheep enamel. Based on the periodicity of the incremental markings, maximum mean daily apposition rates of 17.0 µm in buccal enamel and of 13.4 µm in lingual enamel were recorded. Enamel extension rates were also high, with maximum means of 180 µm/day and 217 µm/day in upper crown areas of buccal and lingual enamel, respectively. Values in more cervical crown portions were markedly lower. Our results are in accordance with previous findings in other ungulate species. Using the incremental markings present in primate enamel as a reference could result in a misinterpretation of the incremental markings in ungulate enamel. Thus, the sub-daily growth increments in the prisms of ungulate enamel might be mistaken as prism cross striations with a daily periodicity, and the laminations misidentified as striae of Retzius with a supra-daily periodicity. This would lead to a considerable overestimation of

  1. Lines of evidence-incremental markings in molar enamel of Soay sheep as revealed by a fluorochrome labeling and backscattered electron imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdorf, Horst; Kierdorf, Uwe; Frölich, Kai; Witzel, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    We studied the structural characteristics and periodicities of regular incremental markings in sheep enamel using fluorochrome injections for vital labeling of forming enamel and backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope. Microscopic analysis of mandibular first molars revealed the presence of incremental markings with a daily periodicity (laminations) that indicated successive positions of the forming front of interprismatic enamel. In addition to the laminations, incremental markings with a sub-daily periodicity were discernible both in interprismatic enamel and in enamel prisms. Five sub-daily increments were present between two consecutive laminations. Backscattered electron imaging revealed that each sub-daily growth increment consisted of a broader and more highly mineralized band and a narrower and less mineralized band (line). The sub-daily markings in the prisms of sheep enamel morphologically resembled the (daily) prisms cross striations seen in primate enamel. Incremental markings with a supra-daily periodicity were not observed in sheep enamel. Based on the periodicity of the incremental markings, maximum mean daily apposition rates of 17.0 µm in buccal enamel and of 13.4 µm in lingual enamel were recorded. Enamel extension rates were also high, with maximum means of 180 µm/day and 217 µm/day in upper crown areas of buccal and lingual enamel, respectively. Values in more cervical crown portions were markedly lower. Our results are in accordance with previous findings in other ungulate species. Using the incremental markings present in primate enamel as a reference could result in a misinterpretation of the incremental markings in ungulate enamel. Thus, the sub-daily growth increments in the prisms of ungulate enamel might be mistaken as prism cross striations with a daily periodicity, and the laminations misidentified as striae of Retzius with a supra-daily periodicity. This would lead to a considerable overestimation of

  2. Comparative Characterization of InGaN/GaN Multiple Quantum Wells by Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Sheng-Qiang; WU Ming-Fang; YAO Shu-De; ZHANG Guo-Yi

    2005-01-01

    @@ The composition, elastic strain and structural defects of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) are comparatively investigated by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering/channelling. The InGaN well layers are fully strained on GaN, i.e. the degree of relaxation is zero.The multilayered structure has a clear defined periodic thickness and abrupt interfaces. The In composition is deduced by XRD simulation. We show how the periodic structure, the In composition, the strain status and the crystalline quality of the InGaN/GaN MQWs can be determined and cross-checked by various techniques.

  3. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis of gold nanoparticles on Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochmann, A.; Teichert, S., E-mail: steffen.teichert@fh-jena.de [University of Applied Sciences Jena, Carl Zeiss Promenade 2, Jena 07745 (Germany); Katzer, C.; Schmidl, F. [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Fürstengraben 1, Jena 07743 (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    It has been shown recently that the incorporation of gold nanoparticles into Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} enhances the superconducting properties of this material in a significant way. Previous XRD and TEM investigations suggest different crystallographic relations of the gold nanoparticles with respect to the epitaxial Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}. Here, detailed investigations of the crystal orientations for a large ensemble of gold nanoparticles with electron backscatter diffraction are reported. The average size of the gold nanoparticles is in the range of 60 nm–80 nm. We identified five different types of heteroepitaxial relationships between the gold nanoparticles and the superconductor film, resulting in complex pole figures. The observed different types of crystallographic orientations are discussed based on good lattice matching and the formation of low energy interfaces.

  4. Quantitative electron microscopic examination of sperm for male infertility diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Ye. Bragina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional study of spermogram readings is a main method for examination of male infertility. However, the spermogram readings may be considerably covered in the group of fertile and infertile men and fail to give a full insight into sperm fertilizing ability. In recent years, tests determining the functional properties of sperm have been intensively developed. This review considers a quantitative electron microscopic technique of sperm (EMTS, which assesses the structure and function of the sperm penetration and motor apparatus. The detection of sperm chromatin structural disorders can understand the causes of early embryonic malformation. Indications for EMTS and interpretation of its results are given.

  5. Quantitative electron microscopic examination of sperm for male infertility diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Ye. Bragina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The traditional study of spermogram readings is a main method for examination of male infertility. However, the spermogram readings may be considerably covered in the group of fertile and infertile men and fail to give a full insight into sperm fertilizing ability. In recent years, tests determining the functional properties of sperm have been intensively developed. This review considers a quantitative electron microscopic technique of sperm (EMTS, which assesses the structure and function of the sperm penetration and motor apparatus. The detection of sperm chromatin structural disorders can understand the causes of early embryonic malformation. Indications for EMTS and interpretation of its results are given.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1998-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy provides a description of the physics of electron-probe formation and of electron-specimen interations The different imaging and analytical modes using secondary and backscattered electrons, electron-beam-induced currents, X-ray and Auger electrons, electron channelling effects, and cathodoluminescence are discussed to evaluate specific contrasts and to obtain quantitative information

  7. Quantitative model studies for interfaces in organic electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, J. Michael

    2016-11-01

    In organic light-emitting diodes and similar devices, organic semiconductors are typically contacted by metal electrodes. Because the resulting metal/organic interfaces have a large impact on the performance of these devices, their quantitative understanding is indispensable for the further rational development of organic electronics. A study by Kröger et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 113022) of an important single-crystal based model interface provides detailed insight into its geometric and electronic structure and delivers valuable benchmark data for computational studies. In view of the differences between typical surface-science model systems and real devices, a ‘materials gap’ is identified that needs to be addressed by future research to make the knowledge obtained from fundamental studies even more beneficial for real-world applications.

  8. Improvement of depth resolution and detection efficiency by control of secondary-electrons in single-event three-dimensional time-of-flight Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo, Satoshi, E-mail: s-abo@stec.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Hamada, Yasuhisa [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Seidl, Albert [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Engineering Science and Industrial Design, Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Sciences, Breitscheidstraße 2, 39114 Magdeburg (Germany); Wakaya, Fujio; Takai, Mikio [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    An improvement of a depth resolution and a detection efficiency in single-event three-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is discussed on both simulation and experiment by control of secondary electron trajectories using sample bias voltage. The secondary electron, used for a start signal in single-event TOF-RBS, flies more directly to a secondary electron detector with the positive sample bias voltage of several tens of volt than that without sample bias voltage in the simulation. The simulated collection efficiency of the secondary electrons also increases with the positive sample bias voltage of several tens of volt. These simulation results indicate the possibility of a smaller depth resolution and a shorter measurement time in single-event TOF-RBS with positive sample bias voltage. The measurement time for the Pt-stripe sample using single-event three-dimensional TOF-RBS with the sample bias voltage of +100 V is 65% shorter than that without sample bias voltage, resulting in a less sample damage by a probe beam. The depth resolution for the Pt stripes under the 50-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} cover-layer with the sample bias voltage of +100 V is 4 nm smaller than that without sample bias voltage. Positive sample bias voltage improves the depth resolution and the detection efficiency in single-event three-dimensional TOF-RBS without an influence on the beam focusing.

  9. Accurate virus quantitation using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) detector in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancett, Candace D; Fetterer, David P; Koistinen, Keith A; Morazzani, Elaine M; Monninger, Mitchell K; Piper, Ashley E; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Kearney, Brian J; Norris, Sarah L; Rossi, Cynthia A; Glass, Pamela J; Sun, Mei G

    2017-10-01

    A method for accurate quantitation of virus particles has long been sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron Microscopy (EM) quantitation is a valuable technique because it provides direct morphology information and counts of all viral particles, whether or not they are infectious. In the past, EM negative stain quantitation methods have been cited as inaccurate, non-reproducible, and with detection limits that were too high to be useful. To improve accuracy and reproducibility, we have developed a method termed Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Virus Quantitation (STEM-VQ), which simplifies sample preparation and uses a high throughput STEM detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with commercially available software. In this paper, we demonstrate STEM-VQ with an alphavirus stock preparation to present the method's accuracy and reproducibility, including a comparison of STEM-VQ to viral plaque assay and the ViroCyt Virus Counter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Jiang, Jun; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-05-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270-1480 MPa.

  11. Effect of Welding Heat Input on Microstructure and Texture of Inconel 625 Weld Overlay Studied Using the Electron Backscatter Diffraction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Suk; Lee, Hae-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The grain size and the texture of three specimens prepared at different heat inputs were determined using optical microscopy and the electron backscatter diffraction method of scanning electron microscopy. Each specimen was equally divided into fusion line zone (FLZ), columnar dendrite zone (CDZ), and surface zone (SZ), according to the location of the weld. Fine dendrites were observed in the FLZ, coarse dendrites in the CDZ, and dendrites grew perpendicular to the FLZ and CDZ. As the heat input increased, the melted zone in the vicinity of the FLZ widened due to the higher Fe content. A lower image quality value was observed for the FLZ compared to the other zones. The results of grain size measurement in each zone showed that the grain size of the SZ became larger as the heat input increased. From the inverse pole figure (IPF) map in the normal direction (ND) and the rolling direction (RD), as the heat input increased, a specific orientation was formed. However, a dominant [001] direction was observed in the RD IPF map.

  12. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazder, Azdiar A., E-mail: azdiar@uow.edu.au [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Mitchell, David R.G. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. - Highlights: • Multi-condition segmentation of austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite and ferrite in bainite. • Ferrites in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite segmented by variation in relative carbon counts. • Carbon partitioning during growth explains variation in carbon content of ferrites in bainites. • Developed EBSD image processing tools can be applied to the microstructures of a variety of alloys. • EBSD-based segmentation procedure verified by correlative TEM results.

  13. Oriented Nucleation of both Ge-Fresnoite and Benitoite/BaGe4O9 during the Surface Crystallisation of Glass Studied by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Patschger, Marek; Murdzheva, Steliana; Thieme, Christian; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Two glasses of the compositions 2 BaO - TiO2 - 2.75 GeO2 and 2 BaO – TiO2 –3.67 GeO2 (also known as BTG55) are annealed at temperatures from 680 to 970 °C to induce surface crystallization. The resulting samples are analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) including electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Ge-Fresnoite (Ba2TiGe2O8, BTG) is observed at the immediate surface of all samples and oriented nucleation is proven in both compositions. After a very fast kinetic selection, the crystal growth of BTG into the bulk occurs via highly oriented dendrites where the c-axes are oriented perpendicular to the surface. The growth of this oriented layer is finally blocked by dendritc BTG originating from bulk nucleation. The secondary phases BaTiGe3O9 (benitoite) and BaGe4O9 are also identified near the surface by XRD and localized by EBSD which additionally indicates orientation preferences for these phases. This behaviour is in contrast with previous reports from the Ba2TiSi2O8 as well as the Sr2TiSi2O8 systems. PMID:26853738

  14. Experimental Observation of Generation of Superradiance Pulses in the Process of Backscattering of Pump Wave on the Intense Electron Bunch

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, N S; Denisov, G G; Rozental, R M; Sergeev, A; Zotova, I V

    2005-01-01

    Recently significant progress was archived in the generation of multimegawatt subnanosecond pulses in millimeter wave band utilizing the cyclotron and Cherenkov mechanisms of superradiance (SR) [1,2]. We study the novel mechanism of SR when the powerful pumping wave undergoes the stimulated back scattering on the intense electron bunch. Due to the Doppler up shift the radiation frequency can significantly exceed the frequency of the pumping wave. With the relativistic microwave generator as a pumping wave source such a mechanism can be used for generation of the powerful pulse radiation in the short millimeter and submillimeter wave bands. Experiments on the observation of the stimulated scattering in the superradiance regime were carried out at Institute of Electrophysics RAS with two synchronized accelerators. The 4 ns electron beam from the first accelerator is used for generation of the 38 GHz 100 MW pumping wave which subsequently scattered on the subnanosecond 250 keV 1 kA electron bunch produced by the...

  15. On the bulk degradation of yttria-stabilized nanocrystalline zirconia dental implant abutments : an electron backscatter diffraction study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Schepke, U.; Rasoul, H. Haji; Cune, M. S.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2017-01-01

    Degradation of yttria-stabilized zirconia dental implants abutments due to the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation was studied in detail by microstructural characterization using Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). The amount and distribution of the monoclinic phase, the grain-size d

  16. Effect of cold deformation on the recrystallization behavior of FePd alloy at the ordering temperature using electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hung-Pin; Chen, Yen-Chun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chen, Delphic [Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, National Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 70, Lienhai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Physical Properties and Microstructure of Metals, National Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 70, Lienhai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Jui-Chao, E-mail: jckuo@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the evolution of the recrystallization texture and microstructure was investigated after annealing of 50% and 90% cold-rolled FePd alloy at 530 °C. The FePd alloy was produced by vacuum arc melting in an atmosphere of 97% Ar and 3% H{sub 2}. The specimens were cold rolled to achieve 50% and 90% reduction in thickness. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements were performed on the rolling direction–normal direction section. With increased deformation from 50% to 90%, recrystallized texture transition occurs. For the 50% cold-rolled alloy, the preferred orientation is (0 1 0) [11 0 1], which is close to the cubic orientation after 400 h of annealing. For the 90% cold-rolled alloy, the orientation changes to (0 5 4) [22–4 5] after 16 h of annealing. - Highlights: • Texture and microstructure in cold-rolled FePd alloy was investigated during annealing using EBSD. • The recrystallized texture of 50% cold-rolled FePd is (0 1 0) [11 0 1] at 530 °C for 400 hours. • The recrystallized texture of 90% cold-rolled FePd is changed to (0 5 4) [22–4 5] at 530 °C after 16 hours.

  17. The aCORN backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M. T.; Bateman, F.; Collett, B.; Darius, G.; DeAngelis, C.; Dewey, M. S.; Jones, G. L.; Komives, A.; Laptev, A.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Nico, J. S.; Noid, G.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stern, I.; Trull, C.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    2017-09-01

    Backscatter of electrons from a beta detector, with incomplete energy deposition, can lead to undesirable effects in many types of experiments. We present and discuss the design and operation of a backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer that was developed as part of a program to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation coefficient in neutron beta decay (aCORN). An array of backscatter veto detectors surrounds a plastic scintillator beta energy detector. The spectrometer contains an axial magnetic field gradient, so electrons are efficiently admitted but have a low probability for escaping back through the entrance after backscattering. The design, construction, calibration, and performance of the spectrometer are discussed.

  18. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M., E-mail: mxu@fairfield.edu [Physics Department, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06824 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  19. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  20. Electron probe microanalysis of permanent human enamel and dentine. A methodological and quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Quevedo, M. C.; Nieto-Albano, O.H.; García, J. M.; Gómez de Ferraris, M. E.; Campos, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Sample preparation of dental tissues for quantitative electron microprobe analysis has not been critically examined because of the highly mineralized nature of these structures. The present study was designed to establish the most suitable method for the electron probe quantitative determination of calcium in human permanent enamel and dentine while preserving the morphological features. Comparisons of quantitative data obtained with air-drying and freeze-dryin...

  1. Towards a more comprehensive microstructural analysis of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubing using image analysis and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovington, P., E-mail: hovington.pierre@ireq.c [Materials Science, Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec, 1800 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Pinard, P.T. [Mining and Materials Engineering Department, McGill University, 3610 University St., Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2B2 (Canada); Lagace, M.; Rodrigue, L. [Materials Science, Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec, 1800 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Gauvin, R. [Mining and Materials Engineering Department, McGill University, 3610 University St., Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2B2 (Canada); Trudeau, M.L. [Materials Science, Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec, 1800 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes used in CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactors have a very complex microstructure, with two major crystallographic phases, {alpha} and {beta}. These phases include a fair amount of deformation from the extrusion process and the cold working ({approx}25%) performed at the end of the manufacturing process. This microstructure (texture, grain aspect ratio, etc.) changes along the tube's length and differs from tube to tube. In order to better understand the deformation mechanisms, these microstructural differences must be statistically characterized. Scanning electron microscopy combined with direct image analysis or with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) are good techniques for carrying out such a measurement. However it is not possible, using specimen preparation methods specific for each of these techniques, to reveal all of the grain and phase boundaries. We have thus developed post-treatment algorithms to be able to partially analyze the revealed Zr-2.5Nb microstructure. The first algorithm was used for image analysis treatments of micrographs taken at 5 kV on the radial-tangential plane of etched samples using a reactive ion etch (RIE, CF{sub 4} + O{sub 2}). The second was developed for EBSD grain mapping and can be used to characterize {alpha}-Zr grain shape and orientation. The two techniques are complementary: EBSD gives information about the micro-texture and the relationship between the microstructure and micro-texture while image analyses of SEM micrographs reveal the direction and distribution of the {alpha}-Zr lamellae more easily and over a greater sample area than EBSD. However, the SEM micrographs that were used did not reveal any grain boundary (only phase boundary). An analysis of EBSD grain maps reveals that the average {alpha}-Zr grain size, mainly in the elongated direction (tangential), is smaller than what is normally obtained from an image analysis of SEM micrographs. The grain size distribution of type

  2. Silicon location through backscattered electron imaging and X-ray microanalysis in leaves of Cyperus ligularis L. and Rhynchospora aberrans C. B. Clarke (Cyperaceae) Localização de sílica por elétrons retroespalhados em folhas de Cyperus ligularis L. and Rhynchospora aberrans C. B. Clarke (Cyperaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Emília Maranhão Estelita; Ana Claudia Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    (Silicon location through backscattered electron imaging and X-ray microanalysis in leaves of Cyperus ligularis L. and Rhynchospora aberrans C. B. Clarke (Cyperaceae)). The Cyperaceae show the ability to incorporate silicon by depositing colloidal silica, which is recorded by the occurrence of projections in the form of cones, in inner tangential walls of some epidermal cells or "silica cells". Leaves of C. ligularis and R. aberrans were analyzed through the technique of electron backscatter....

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Electron Beam Damage in Organic Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijten, Zino J W A; Keizer, Arthur D A; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner

    2017-05-18

    In transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the interaction of an electron beam with polymers such as P3HT:PCBM photovoltaic nanocomposites results in electron beam damage, which is the most important factor limiting acquisition of structural or chemical data at high spatial resolution. Beam effects can vary depending on parameters such as electron dose rate, temperature during imaging, and the presence of water and oxygen in the sample. Furthermore, beam damage will occur at different length scales. To assess beam damage at the angstrom scale, we followed the intensity of P3HT and PCBM diffraction rings as a function of accumulated electron dose by acquiring dose series and varying the electron dose rate, sample preparation, and the temperature during acquisition. From this, we calculated a critical dose for diffraction experiments. In imaging mode, thin film deformation was assessed using the normalized cross-correlation coefficient, while mass loss was determined via changes in average intensity and standard deviation, also varying electron dose rate, sample preparation, and temperature during acquisition. The understanding of beam damage and the determination of critical electron doses provides a framework for future experiments to maximize the information content during the acquisition of images and diffraction patterns with (cryogenic) transmission electron microscopy.

  4. The use of electron Rutherford backscattering to characterize novel electronic materials as illustrated by a case study of sputter-deposited NbO{sub x} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, M., E-mail: maarten.vos@anu.edu.au [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Liu, X. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Grande, P.L. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Nandi, S.K. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh); Venkatachalam, D.K.; Elliman, R.G. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    Electrons scattered over large angles at relatively high energies (40 keV) are used to study NbO{sub x} films. These films were deposited by reactive sputter deposition on a Si substrate using a Nb target and an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture. Energy spectra of electrons scattered from such samples exhibit elastic scattering peaks for each component due to the energy difference associated with scattering from different masses. The spectra provide in this way information about the film thickness as well as its stoichiometry. The stoichiometry and the deposition rate depends on the concentration of O{sub 2} in the mixture. For Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-like films the energy loss measurements also give an estimate of the band gap, but for Nb films with lower O concentration the band gap is not resolved. This work illustrates the possibility of characterizing modern transition metal oxide films in a fairly simple electron scattering experiment.

  5. Electronic Tongue for Quantitation of Contaminants in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Marlin; Kuhlman, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    An assembly of sensors, denoted an electronic tongue, is undergoing development as a prototype of compact devices for use in measuring concentrations of contaminants in water. Thus far, the electronic tongue has been tested on ions of Cu, Zn, Pb, and Fe and shown to respond to concentrations as low as about 10 parts per million. This electronic tongue is expected to be capable of measuring concentrations of other metal ions and organic compounds. Potential uses for electronic tongues include monitoring the chemical quality of water in a variety of natural, industrial, and laboratory settings; detecting micro-organisms indirectly by measuring microbially influenced corrosion; and characterizing compounds of interest to the pharmaceutical and food industries. This version of the electronic tongue includes a heater, a temperature sensor, an array of ion-specific electrodes, an oxidation/ reduction sensor pair, an electrical-conductivity sensor, and an array of galvanic cells, all on one compact ceramic substrate. Special-purpose electronic excitation and readout circuitry for the sensors has also been constructed. The main advantage of the electronic tongue, relative to electrodes of this type used traditionally to assess water quality, is extreme ruggedness. The types of measurements that can be performed by use of the sensors on the electronic tongue are quite varied. The best combination of types of measurements for a given application depends on the specific contaminants that one seeks to detect. Experimental studies to identify such combinations were in progress at the time of reporting the information for this article.

  6. Backscattered electron image of osmium-impregnated/macerated tissues as a novel technique for identifying the cis-face of the Golgi apparatus by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, D; Bochimoto, H; Watanabe, T; Ushiki, T

    2016-07-01

    The osmium maceration method with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) enabled to demonstrate directly the three-dimensional (3D) structure of membranous cell organelles. However, the polarity of the Golgi apparatus (that is, the cis-trans axis) can hardly be determined by SEM alone, because there is no appropriate immunocytochemical method for specific labelling of its cis- or trans-faces. In the present study, we used the osmium impregnation method, which forms deposits of reduced osmium exclusively in the cis-Golgi elements, for preparation of specimens for SEM. The newly developed procedure combining osmium impregnation with subsequent osmium maceration specifically visualised the cis-elements of the Golgi apparatus, with osmium deposits that were clearly detected by backscattered electron-mode SEM. Prolonged osmication by osmium impregnation (2% OsO4 solution at 40°C for 40 h) and osmium maceration (0.1% OsO4 solution at 20°C for 24 h) did not significantly impair the 3D ultrastructure of the membranous cell organelles, including the Golgi apparatus. This novel preparation method enabled us to determine the polarity of the Golgi apparatus with enough information about the surrounding 3D ultrastructure by SEM, and will contribute to our understanding of the global organisation of the entire Golgi apparatus in various differentiated cells.

  7. Quantitative high resolution electron microscopy of grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, G.H., King, W.E., Cohen, D., Carter, C.B.

    1996-12-12

    The {Sigma}11 (113)/[1{bar 1}0] symmetric tilt grain boundary has been characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The method by which the images are prepared for analysis is described. The statistics of the image data have been found to follow a normal distribution. The electron-optical imaging parameters used to acquire the image have been determined by nonlinear least-square image simulation optimization within the perfect crystal region of the micrograph. A similar image simulation optimization procedure is used to determine the atom positions which provide the best match between the experimental image and the image simulation.

  8. GLOBE backscatter - Climatologies and mission results. [Global Backscatter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) goals require intensive study of the global climatology of atmospheric aerosol backscatter at IR wavelengths. Airborne and ground-based lidars have been developed to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles at CO2 laser wavelengths. Descriptions of the calibration techniques and selected measurement results are presented.

  9. Some strategies for quantitative scanning Auger electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, R.; Peacock, D. C.; Prutton, M.

    1985-01-01

    The general applicability of power law forms of the background in electron spectra is pointed out and exploited for background removal from under Auger peaks. This form of B(E) is found to be extremely sensitive to instrumental alignment and to fault-free construction - an observation which can be used to set up analyser configurations in an accurate way. Also, differences between N(E) and B(E) can be used to derive a spectrometer transmission function T(E). The questions of information density in an energy-analysing spatially-resolving instrument are addressed after reliable instrumental characterization has been established. Strategies involving ratio histograms, showing the population distribution of the ratio of a pair of Auger peak heights, composition scatter diagrams and windowed imaging are discussed and illustrated.

  10. Some strategies for quantitative scanning Auger electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, R.; Peacock, D. C.; Prutton, M.

    1985-01-01

    The general applicability of power law forms of the background in electron spectra is pointed out and exploited for background removal from under Auger peaks. This form of B(E) is found to be extremely sensitive to instrumental alignment and to fault-free construction - an observation which can be used to set up analyser configurations in an accurate way. Also, differences between N(E) and B(E) can be used to derive a spectrometer transmission function T(E). The questions of information density in an energy-analysing spatially-resolving instrument are addressed after reliable instrumental characterization has been established. Strategies involving ratio histograms, showing the population distribution of the ratio of a pair of Auger peak heights, composition scatter diagrams and windowed imaging are discussed and illustrated.

  11. QEMSCAN° (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy): capability and application to fracture characterization in geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayling, B.; Rose, P. E.; Zemach, E.; Drakos, P. S.; Petty, S.

    2011-12-01

    Fractures are important conduits for fluids in geothermal systems, and the creation and maintenance of fracture permeability is a fundamental aspect of EGS (Engineered Geothermal System) development. Hydraulic or chemical stimulation techniques are often employed to achieve this. In the case of chemical stimulation, an understanding of the minerals present in the fractures themselves is desirable to better design a stimulation effort (i.e. which chemical to use and how much). Borehole televiewer surveys provide important information about regional and local stress regimes and fracture characteristics (e.g. fracture aperture), and XRD is useful for examining bulk rock mineralogy, but neither technique is able to quantify the distribution of these minerals in fractures. QEMSCAN° is a fully-automated micro-analysis system that enables quantitative chemical analysis of materials and generation of high-resolution mineral maps and images as well as porosity structure. It uses a scanning electron microscopy platform (SEM) with an electron beam source in combination with four energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometers (EDS). The measured backscattered electron and electron-induced secondary X-ray emission spectra are used to classify sample mineralogy. Initial applications of QEMSCAN° technology were predominantly in the minerals industry and application to geothermal problems has remained limited to date. In this pilot study, the potential application of QEMSCAN° technology to fracture characterization was evaluated using samples of representative mineralized fractures in two geothermal systems (Newberry Volcano, Oregon and Brady's geothermal field, Nevada). QEMSCAN° results were compared with XRD and petrographic techniques. Nine samples were analyzed from each field, collected from the drill core in the 1000-1500 m depth range in two shallow wells (GEO-N2 at Newberry Volcano and BCH-3 at Brady's). The samples were prepared as polished thin sections for QEMSCAN° analysis

  12. Strong Localization in Disordered Media: Analysis of the Backscattering Cone

    KAUST Repository

    Delgado, Edgar

    2012-06-01

    A very interesting effect in light propagation through a disordered system is Anderson localization of light, this phenomenon emerges as the result of multiple scattering of waves by electric inhomogeneities like spatial variations of index of refraction; as the amount of scattering is increased, light propagation is converted from quasi-diffusive to exponentially localized, with photons confined in a limited spatial region characterized by a fundamental quantity known as localization length. Light localization is strongly related to another interference phenomenon emerged from the multiple scattering effect: the coherent backscattering effect. In multiple scattering of waves, in fact, coherence is preserved in the backscattering direction and produces a reinforcement of the field flux originating an observable peak in the backscattered intensity, known as backscattering cone. The study of this peak provide quantitative information about the transport properties of light in the material. In this thesis we report a complete FDTD ab-initio study of light localization and coherent backscattering. In particular, we consider a supercontinuum pulse impinging on a sample composed of randomly positioned scatterers. We study coherent backscattering by averaging over several realizations of the sample properties. We study then the coherent backscattering cone properties as the relative permittivity of the sample is changed, relating the latter with the light localization inside the sample. We demonstrate important relationships between the width of the backscattering cone and the localization length, which shows a linear proportionality in the strong localization regime.

  13. THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

    2004-10-16

    Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

  14. Towards quantitative electrostatic potential mapping of working semiconductor devices using off-axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Beleggia, Marco;

    2015-01-01

    Pronounced improvements in the understanding of semiconductor device performance are expected if electrostatic potential distributions can be measured quantitatively and reliably under working conditions with sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we employ off-axis electron...... holography to characterize an electrically-biased Si p-. n junction by measuring its electrostatic potential, electric field and charge density distributions under working conditions. A comparison between experimental electron holographic phase images and images obtained using three-dimensional electrostatic...

  15. Computer simulation of backscattering spectra from paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M.; Silva, T. F.

    2017-09-01

    To study the role of lateral non-homogeneity on backscattering analysis of paintings, a simplified model of paint consisting of randomly distributed spherical pigment particles embedded in oil/binder has been developed. Backscattering spectra for lead white pigment particles in linseed oil have been calculated for 3 MeV H+ at a scattering angle of 165° for pigment volume concentrations ranging from 30 vol.% to 70 vol.% using the program STRUCTNRA. For identical pigment volume concentrations the heights and shapes of the backscattering spectra depend on the diameter of the pigment particles: This is a structural ambiguity for identical mean atomic concentrations but different lateral arrangement of materials. Only for very small pigment particles the resulting spectra are close to spectra calculated supposing atomic mixing and assuming identical concentrations of all elements. Generally, a good fit can be achieved when evaluating spectra from structured materials assuming atomic mixing of all elements and laterally homogeneous depth distributions. However, the derived depth profiles are inaccurate by a factor of up to 3. The depth range affected by this structural ambiguity ranges from the surface to a depth of roughly 0.5-1 pigment particle diameters. Accurate quantitative evaluation of backscattering spectra from paintings therefore requires taking the correct microstructure of the paint layer into account.

  16. SUePDF: a program to obtain quantitative pair distribution functions from electron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dung Trung; Svensson, Gunnar; Tai, Cheuk-Wai

    2017-01-01

    SUePDF is a graphical user interface program written in MATLAB to achieve quantitative pair distribution functions (PDFs) from electron diffraction data. The program facilitates structural studies of amorphous materials and small nanoparticles using electron diffraction data from transmission electron microscopes. It is based on the physics of electron scattering as well as the total scattering methodology. A method of background modeling is introduced to treat the intensity tail of the direct beam, inelastic scattering and incoherent multiple scattering. Kinematical electron scattering intensity is scaled using the electron scattering factors. The PDFs obtained after Fourier transforms are normalized with respect to number density, nanoparticle form factor and the non-negativity of probability density. SUePDF is distributed as free software for academic users. PMID:28190994

  17. A Quantitative Exploration of the Relationship between Patient Health and Electronic Personal Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Denise Williams

    2009-01-01

    The use of electronic personal health records is becoming increasingly more popular as healthcare providers, healthcare and government leaders, and patients are seeking ways to improve healthcare quality and to decrease costs (Abrahamsen, 2007). This quantitative, descriptive correlational study examined the relationship between the degree of…

  18. Twin domain imaging in topological insulator Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 epitaxial thin films by scanning X-ray nanobeam microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcuba, Petr; Veselý, Jozef; Lesnik, Andreas; Bauer, Guenther; Springholz, Gunther; Holý, Václav

    2017-01-01

    The twin distribution in topological insulators Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 was imaged by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXRM). The crystal orientation at the surface, determined by EBSD, is correlated with the surface topography, which shows triangular pyramidal features with edges oriented in two different orientations rotated in the surface plane by 60°. The bulk crystal orientation is mapped out using SXRM by measuring the diffracted X-ray intensity of an asymmetric Bragg peak using a nano-focused X-ray beam scanned over the sample. By comparing bulk- and surface-sensitive measurements of the same area, buried twin domains not visible on the surface are identified. The lateral twin domain size is found to increase with the film thickness.

  19. The quantitative relationship between metal radii, cationic radii and electronic configurations of elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾德生; 曾荣树; 叶大年

    1999-01-01

    A close relationship has been found between the metal radii, cationic radii and electronic configurations of elements. A unified formula for calculating metal radii is presented, whose paramatem are only related to the electronic configuration. Meanwhile theoretical relation between cationic radii and electronic configuration can be revealed by combining quantitative analysis with qualitative analysis. The calculated results and the charts of standard deviations are coincident with those given by reference books. Our work indicates that the metal radius and cationic radius of an element reflect in essence the element’s configuration.

  20. Quantitative Electron Probe Microanalysis Using a Scanning Electron Microscope and an X-Ray Energy Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    show the results obtained for the analyses of three different alloys. Table 1 shows the results obtained for NBS SRM 162a monel alloy. Table 2 shows the...pro- vided by Mr. D.O. Morehouse in preparing samples and operating the scanning electron microscope. TABLE 1 MONEL TYPE ALLOY - NBS SRM 162a NBS

  1. Towards quantitative electrostatic potential mapping of working semiconductor devices using off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdi, Sadegh, E-mail: sadegh.yazdi@cen.dtu.dk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Kasama, Takeshi; Beleggia, Marco; Samaie Yekta, Maryam [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); McComb, David W. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Twitchett-Harrison, Alison C. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Pronounced improvements in the understanding of semiconductor device performance are expected if electrostatic potential distributions can be measured quantitatively and reliably under working conditions with sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we employ off-axis electron holography to characterize an electrically-biased Si p–n junction by measuring its electrostatic potential, electric field and charge density distributions under working conditions. A comparison between experimental electron holographic phase images and images obtained using three-dimensional electrostatic potential simulations highlights several remaining challenges to quantitative analysis. Our results illustrate how the determination of reliable potential distributions from phase images of electrically biased devices requires electrostatic fringing fields, surface charges, specimen preparation damage and the effects of limited spatial resolution to be taken into account.

  2. Electron paramagnetic resonance and quantitative color investigations of various vacuum heat treated wood species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Kondratyeva, K.R. Safiullin, I.G. Motygullin, A.V. Klochkov, M.S. Tagirov, V.V. Kuzmin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the heat treatment duration on the electron paramagnetic resonance signal amplitude of free radicals for various wood species was observed. It was found that the amplitude of the electron paramagnetic resonance signal grows linearly with the vacuum heat treatment duration. The quantitative measurements of color changes for various wood species (pine, spruce, larch, birch and small-leaved lime were performed. It is found that results of EPR experiments and color measurements of heat treated samples correlate with each other.

  3. Helicity Parton Distributions at a Future Electron-Ion Collider: A Quantitative Appraisal

    CERN Document Server

    Aschenauer, Elke C; Stratmann, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantitative assessment of the impact a future electron-ion collider will have on determinations of helicity quark and gluon densities and their contributions to the proton spin. Our results are obtained by performing a series of global QCD analyses at next-to-leading order accuracy based on realistic sets of pseudo-data for the inclusive and semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons and protons at different, conceivable center-of-mass system energies.

  4. Backscatter imagery in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1x1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The backscatter values are in relative 8-bit (0 –...

  5. Collective stimulated Brillouin backscatter

    CERN Document Server

    Lushnikov, Pavel M

    2007-01-01

    We develop the statistical theory of the stimulated Brillouin backscatter (BSBS) instability of a spatially and temporally partially incoherent laser beam for laser fusion relevant plasma. We find a new regime of BSBS which has a much larger threshold than the classical threshold of a coherent beam in long-scale-length laser fusion plasma. Instability is collective because it does not depend on the dynamics of isolated speckles of laser intensity, but rather depends on averaged beam intensity. We identify convective and absolute instability regimes. Well above the incoherent threshold the coherent instability growth rate is recovered. The threshold of convective instability is inside the typical parameter region of National Ignition Facility (NIF) designs although current NIF bandwidth is not large enough to insure dominance of collective instability and suggests lower instability threshold due to speckle contribution. In contrast, we estimate that the bandwidth of KrF-laser-based fusion systems would be larg...

  6. Quantitative imaging of electron density and effective atomic number using phase contrast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen Guanghong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.ed [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53705 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Compared to single energy CT, which only provides information for x-ray linear attenuation coefficients, dual-energy CT is able to obtain both the electron density and effective atomic number for different materials in a quantitative way. In this study, as an alternative to dual-energy CT, a novel quantitative imaging method based on phase contrast CT is presented. Rather than requiring two projection data sets with different x-ray energy spectra, diffraction-grating-based phase contrast CT is capable of reconstructing images of both linear attenuation and refractive index decrement from the same projection data using a single x-ray energy spectra. From the two images, quantitative information of both the electron density and effective atomic number can be extracted. Two physical phantoms were constructed and used to validate the presented method. Experimental results demonstrate that (1) electron density can be accurately determined from refractive index decrement through a linear relationship, and (2) the effective atomic number can be explicitly derived from the ratio of the linear attenuation to refractive index decrement using a power function plus a constant. The presented method will provide insight into the technique of material separation and find its use in medical and industrial applications.

  7. Quantitative imaging of electron density and effective atomic number using phase contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2010-05-01

    Compared to single energy CT, which only provides information for x-ray linear attenuation coefficients, dual-energy CT is able to obtain both the electron density and effective atomic number for different materials in a quantitative way. In this study, as an alternative to dual-energy CT, a novel quantitative imaging method based on phase contrast CT is presented. Rather than requiring two projection data sets with different x-ray energy spectra, diffraction-grating-based phase contrast CT is capable of reconstructing images of both linear attenuation and refractive index decrement from the same projection data using a single x-ray energy spectra. From the two images, quantitative information of both the electron density and effective atomic number can be extracted. Two physical phantoms were constructed and used to validate the presented method. Experimental results demonstrate that (1) electron density can be accurately determined from refractive index decrement through a linear relationship, and (2) the effective atomic number can be explicitly derived from the ratio of the linear attenuation to refractive index decrement using a power function plus a constant. The presented method will provide insight into the technique of material separation and find its use in medical and industrial applications.

  8. Quantitative in situ magnetization reversal studies in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, L.A. [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig, B.P. 94347, F-31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Magén, C., E-mail: cmagend@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); Fundación ARAID, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C. [Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig, B.P. 94347, F-31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Marín, L. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Serrano-Ramón, L. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); and others

    2013-11-15

    A generalized procedure for the in situ application of magnetic fields by means of the excitation of the objective lens for magnetic imaging experiments in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography is quantitatively described. A protocol for applying magnetic fields with arbitrary in-plane magnitude and orientation is presented, and a freeware script for Digital Micrograph{sup ™} is provided to assist the operation of the microscope. Moreover, a method to accurately reconstruct hysteresis loops is detailed. We show that the out-of-plane component of the magnetic field cannot be always neglected when performing quantitative measurements of the local magnetization. Several examples are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and functionality of the methods. - Highlights: • Generalized procedure for application of magnetic fields with the TEM objective lens. • Arbitrary in-plane magnetic field magnitude and orientation can be applied. • Method to accurately reconstruct hysteresis loops by electron holography. • Out-of-plane field component should be considered in quantitative measurements. • Examples to illustrate the method in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography.

  9. Structural evolution of a Ta-filament during hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of Silicon investigated by electron backscatter diffraction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the structural changes of a burnt-out tantalum filament that was operated at typical hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon synthesis conditions in our hot-wire chemical vapour deposition chamber. Scanning electron...

  10. Electronic structure of some adenosine receptor antagonists. III. Quantitative investigation of the electronic absorption spectra of alkyl xanthines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, H.; Shalaby, Samia H.; El-sawy, K. M.; Hilal, Rifaat

    2002-07-01

    Quantitative and comparative investigation of the electronic absorption spectra of theophylline, caffeine and their derivatives is reported. The spectra of theophylline, caffeine and theobromine were compared to establish the predominant tautomeric species in solution. This comparison, analysis of solvent effects and assignments of the observed transitions via MO computations indicate the exits of only one tautomeric species in solution that is the N7 form. A low-lying triplet state was identified which corresponds to a HOMO-LUMO transition. This relatively long-lived T 1 state is always less polar than the ground state and may very well underlie the photochemical reactivity of alkyl xanthines. Substituents of different electron donating or withdrawing strengths and solvent effects are investigated and analyzed. The present analysis is facilitated via computer deconvolution of the observed spectra and MO computation.

  11. Visualization and quantitative analysis of nanoparticles in the respiratory tract by transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehr Peter

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanotechnology in its widest sense seeks to exploit the special biophysical and chemical properties of materials at the nanoscale. While the potential technological, diagnostic or therapeutic applications are promising there is a growing body of evidence that the special technological features of nanoparticulate material are associated with biological effects formerly not attributed to the same materials at a larger particle scale. Therefore, studies that address the potential hazards of nanoparticles on biological systems including human health are required. Due to its large surface area the lung is one of the major sites of interaction with inhaled nanoparticles. One of the great challenges of studying particle-lung interactions is the microscopic visualization of nanoparticles within tissues or single cells both in vivo and in vitro. Once a certain type of nanoparticle can be identified unambiguously using microscopic methods it is desirable to quantify the particle distribution within a cell, an organ or the whole organism. Transmission electron microscopy provides an ideal tool to perform qualitative and quantitative analyses of particle-related structural changes of the respiratory tract, to reveal the localization of nanoparticles within tissues and cells and to investigate the 3D nature of nanoparticle-lung interactions. This article provides information on the applicability, advantages and disadvantages of electron microscopic preparation techniques and several advanced transmission electron microscopic methods including conventional, immuno and energy-filtered electron microscopy as well as electron tomography for the visualization of both model nanoparticles (e.g. polystyrene and technologically relevant nanoparticles (e.g. titanium dioxide. Furthermore, we highlight possibilities to combine light and electron microscopic techniques in a correlative approach. Finally, we demonstrate a formal quantitative, i.e. stereological

  12. Heavy Element Staining of Sedimentary Organic Matter Functional Groups for Backscattered Electron Imaging Marquage par éléments lourds de la matière organique sédimentaire pour la microscopie électronique en électrons rétrodiffusés

    OpenAIRE

    Belin-Geindre S.; Chenu C.

    2006-01-01

    The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in backscattered electron mode (BSE), which imaging is based upon atomic number (Z) contrasts between constituents, allows to visualize the organic matter distribution within the sediment. However the precise identification of organic matter is not possible as all the organic matter appears black. The contrasts between the different types of organic matter were enhanced for the use of the SEM/BSE imaging by staining organic matter with high Z elements. E...

  13. Discrepancies in quantitative assessment of normal and regenerated peripheral nerve fibers between light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Giulia; Jager, Sara Buskbjerg; Vaegter, Christian Bjerggaard; Raimondo, Stefania; Giacobini-Robecchi, Maria Giuseppina; Geuna, Stefano

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative estimation of myelinated nerve fiber number, together with fiber size parameters, is one of the most important tools for nerve regeneration research. In this study we used a design-based stereological method to evaluate the regenerative process in two experimental paradigms: crush injury and autograft repair. Samples were embedded in resin and morphometric counting and measurements were performed using both light and electron microscopes. Results show a significant difference in myelinated fiber number estimation between light and electron microscopes, especially after autograft repair; light microscope significantly underestimates the number of fibers because of the large number of very small axons that can be detected only in electron microscope. The analysis of the size parameters also shows a higher number of small fibers in electron microscopic analysis, especially in regenerated nerves. This comparative study shows that the integration of data obtained in light microscope with those obtained in electron microscope is necessary in revealing very small myelinated fibers that cannot be detected otherwise. Moreover, the difference in the estimation of total number of myelinated fibers between light and electron microscopes must be considered in data analysis to ensure accurate interpretation of the results. © 2014 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  14. Theory of anomalous backscattering in second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu. [Ioffe Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya st., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    A quantitative model explaining generation of the anomalous backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) experiments at TEXTOR tokamak as a secondary nonlinear process which accompanies a primary low-threshold parametric decay instability (PDI) leading to excitation of two—upper hybrid (UH)—plasmons trapped in plasma is developed. The primary absolute PDI enhancing the UH wave fluctuations from the thermal noise level is supposed to be saturated due to a cascade of secondary low-threshold decays of the daughter UH wave leading to excitation of the secondary UH waves down-shifted in frequency and the ion Bernstein wave. A set of equations describing the cascade is derived and solved numerically. The results of numerical modelling are shown to be in agreement with the analytical estimations of the growth rate of the initial and secondary parametric decays and the saturation level. The generation of backscattering signal is explained by coupling of the daughter UH waves. The fine details of the frequency spectrum of the anomalously reflected extraordinary wave and the absolute value of the observed backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments at TEXTOR are reproduced.

  15. Theory of anomalous backscattering in second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    A quantitative model explaining generation of the anomalous backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) experiments at TEXTOR tokamak as a secondary nonlinear process which accompanies a primary low-threshold parametric decay instability (PDI) leading to excitation of two—upper hybrid (UH)—plasmons trapped in plasma is developed. The primary absolute PDI enhancing the UH wave fluctuations from the thermal noise level is supposed to be saturated due to a cascade of secondary low-threshold decays of the daughter UH wave leading to excitation of the secondary UH waves down-shifted in frequency and the ion Bernstein wave. A set of equations describing the cascade is derived and solved numerically. The results of numerical modelling are shown to be in agreement with the analytical estimations of the growth rate of the initial and secondary parametric decays and the saturation level. The generation of backscattering signal is explained by coupling of the daughter UH waves. The fine details of the frequency spectrum of the anomalously reflected extraordinary wave and the absolute value of the observed backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments at TEXTOR are reproduced.

  16. Multifunctional skin-like electronics for quantitative, clinical monitoring of cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Falgout, Leo; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung-Young; Poon, Emily; Lee, Jung Woo; Na, Ilyoun; Geisler, Amelia; Sadhwani, Divya; Zhang, Yihui; Su, Yewang; Wang, Xiaoqi; Liu, Zhuangjian; Xia, Jing; Cheng, Huanyu; Webb, R Chad; Bonifas, Andrew P; Won, Philip; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Jang, Kyung-In; Song, Young Min; Nardone, Beatrice; Nodzenski, Michael; Fan, Jonathan A; Huang, Yonggang; West, Dennis P; Paller, Amy S; Alam, Murad; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Rogers, John A

    2014-10-01

    Non-invasive, biomedical devices have the potential to provide important, quantitative data for the assessment of skin diseases and wound healing. Traditional methods either rely on qualitative visual and tactile judgments of a professional and/or data obtained using instrumentation with forms that do not readily allow intimate integration with sensitive skin near a wound site. Here, an electronic sensor platform that can softly and reversibly laminate perilesionally at wounds to provide highly accurate, quantitative data of relevance to the management of surgical wound healing is reported. Clinical studies on patients using thermal sensors and actuators in fractal layouts provide precise time-dependent mapping of temperature and thermal conductivity of the skin near the wounds. Analytical and simulation results establish the fundamentals of the sensing modalities, the mechanics of the system, and strategies for optimized design. The use of this type of "epidermal" electronics system in a realistic clinical setting with human subjects establishes a set of practical procedures in disinfection, reuse, and protocols for quantitative measurement. The results have the potential to address important unmet needs in chronic wound management.

  17. Imaging with low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy: A quantitative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felisari, L. [TASC, INFM-CNR, S.S. 14, km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Grillo, V., E-mail: vincenzo.grillo@unimore.it [Istituto Nanoscienze-S3 CNR, via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy); IMEM-CNR Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Jabeen, F.; Rubini, S. [TASC, INFM-CNR, S.S. 14, km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Menozzi, C. [Istituto Nanoscienze-S3 CNR, via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia Via G. Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy); Rossi, F. [IMEM-CNR Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Martelli, F. [TASC, INFM-CNR, S.S. 14, km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); IMM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2011-07-15

    A dedicated specimen holder has been designed to perform low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy in dark field mode. Different test samples, namely InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells, InGaAs nanowires and thick InGaAs layers, have been analysed to test the reliability of the model based on the proportionality to the specimen mass-thickness, generally used for image intensity interpretation of scattering contrast processes. We found that size of the probe, absorption and channelling must be taken into account to give a quantitative interpretation of image intensity. We develop a simple procedure to evaluate the probe-size effect and to obtain a quantitative indication of the absorption coefficient. Possible artefacts induced by channelling are pointed out. With the developed procedure, the low voltage approach can be successfully applied for quantitative compositional analysis. The method is then applied to the estimation of the In content in the core of InGaAs/GaAs core-shell nanowires. -- Highlights: {yields} Quantitative analysis of the composition by low-voltage STEM annular dark field. {yields} First evidence of channelling effects in low-voltage STEM in SEM. {yields} Comparison between low-voltage and high-voltage STEM. {yields} Evaluation of the absorption effects on the STEM intensity.

  18. Quantitative in situ magnetization reversal studies in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, L A; Magén, C; Snoeck, E; Gatel, C; Marín, L; Serrano-Ramón, L; Prieto, J L; Muñoz, M; Algarabel, P A; Morellon, L; De Teresa, J M; Ibarra, M R

    2013-11-01

    A generalized procedure for the in situ application of magnetic fields by means of the excitation of the objective lens for magnetic imaging experiments in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography is quantitatively described. A protocol for applying magnetic fields with arbitrary in-plane magnitude and orientation is presented, and a freeware script for Digital Micrograph(™) is provided to assist the operation of the microscope. Moreover, a method to accurately reconstruct hysteresis loops is detailed. We show that the out-of-plane component of the magnetic field cannot be always neglected when performing quantitative measurements of the local magnetization. Several examples are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and functionality of the methods. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sub-0.1 nm-resolution quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy without adjustable parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Maunders, C. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Zheng, C. L. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Weyland, M.; Etheridge, J. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Tiemeijer, P. C. [FEI Electron Optics, P.O. Box 80066, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-05-07

    Atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) constitutes a powerful tool for nanostructure characterization. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative interpretation of atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark-field (ADF) STEM images using an approach that does not rely on adjustable parameters. We measure independently the instrumental parameters that affect sub-0.1 nm-resolution ADF images, quantify their individual and collective contributions to the image intensity, and show that knowledge of these parameters enables a quantitative interpretation of the absolute intensity and contrast across all accessible spatial frequencies. The analysis also provides a method for the in-situ measurement of the STEM's effective source distribution.

  20. Compositional analysis of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures using quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauko, H.; Helvoort, A. T. J. van [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Zheng, C. L.; Glanvill, S. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Zhu, Y.; Etheridge, J., E-mail: joanne.etheridge@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Dwyer, C. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Munshi, A. M.; Fimland, B. O. [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)

    2013-12-02

    We demonstrate a method for compositional mapping of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}As heterostructures with high accuracy and unit cell spatial resolution using quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The method is low dose relative to spectroscopic methods and insensitive to the effective source size and higher order lens aberrations. We apply the method to study the spatial variation in Al concentration in cross-sectioned GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires and quantify the concentration in the Al-rich radial band and the AlGaAs shell segments.

  1. Quantitative electron holographic tomography for the 3D characterisation of semiconductor device structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twitchett-Harrison, Alison C. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.harrison@imperial.ac.uk; Yates, Timothy J.V.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Midgley, Paul A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    Electron tomography and electron holography experiments have been combined to investigate the 3D electrostatic potential distribution in semiconductor devices. The experimental procedure for the acquisition and data reconstruction of holographic tilt series of silicon p-n junction specimens is described. A quantitative analysis of the experimental results from specimens of two different thicknesses is presented, revealing the 3D electrostatic potential variations arising from the presence of surfaces and damage generated by focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation. Close to bulk-like properties are measured in the centre of the tomographic reconstruction of the specimen, revealing higher electrically active dopant concentrations compared to the measurements obtained at the specimen surfaces. A comparison of the experimental results from the different thickness specimens has revealed a 'critical' thickness for this specimen preparation method of 350 nm that is required for this device structure to retain 'bulk'-like properties in the centre of the membrane.

  2. Quantitative secondary electron imaging for work function extraction at atomic level and layer identification of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yangbo; Fox, Daniel S; Maguire, Pierce; O'Connell, Robert; Masters, Robert; Rodenburg, Cornelia; Wu, Hanchun; Dapor, Maurizio; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Hongzhou

    2016-02-16

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials usually have a layer-dependent work function, which require fast and accurate detection for the evaluation of their device performance. A detection technique with high throughput and high spatial resolution has not yet been explored. Using a scanning electron microscope, we have developed and implemented a quantitative analytical technique which allows effective extraction of the work function of graphene. This technique uses the secondary electron contrast and has nanometre-resolved layer information. The measurement of few-layer graphene flakes shows the variation of work function between graphene layers with a precision of less than 10 meV. It is expected that this technique will prove extremely useful for researchers in a broad range of fields due to its revolutionary throughput and accuracy.

  3. Improving Short Term Instability for Quantitative Analyses with Portable Electronic Noses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Macías Macías

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems when working with electronic noses is the lack of reproducibility or repeatability of the sensor response, so that, if this problem is not properly considered, electronic noses can be useless, especially for quantitative analyses. On the other hand, irreproducibility is increased with portable and low cost electronic noses where laboratory equipment like gas zero generators cannot be used. In this work, we study the reproducibility of two portable electronic noses, the PEN3 (commercial and CAPINose (a proprietary design by using synthetic wine samples. We show that in both cases short term instability associated to the sensors’ response to the same sample and under the same conditions represents a major problem and we propose an internal normalization technique that, in both cases, reduces the variability of the sensors’ response. Finally, we show that the normalization proposed seems to be more effective in the CAPINose case, reducing, for example, the variability associated to the TGS2602 sensor from 12.19% to 2.2%.

  4. A Quantitative Nanodiffraction System for Ultrahigh Vacuum Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembree, Gary G.; Koch, Christoph; Spence, John C. H.

    2003-10-01

    Of all the long-lived particles available as probes of condensed matter, and of all the signals available on a modern electron microscope, electron nanodiffraction patterns provide the strongest signal from the smallest volume. The technique is therefore perfectly suited to nanostructural investigations in inorganic chemistry and materials science. The Vacuum Generators HB501S, an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) variant of the HB501 scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), with side-entry double-tilt stage, specimen preparation and analysis chamber, three postspecimen lenses, and cold field-emission tip with integral magnetic gun lens, has therefore been modified to optimize nanodiffraction and quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction (QCBED) performance. A one-micrometer grain-size phosphor screen lying on a fiber-optic faceplate atop the instrument is fiber-optically coupled to a 2048 × 2048 charge-coupled device (CCD), 16-bit camera. This arrangement promises to provide much greater sensitivity, larger dynamic range, and a better modulation transfer function (MTF) than conventional single crystal scintillator (YAG) CCD systems, with noticeable absence of cross talk between pixels. The design of the nanodiffraction detector system is discussed, the gain of the detector is measured, the spherical aberration constant of the objective lens is measured by the Ronchigram method, and preliminary results from the modified instrument are shown.

  5. A New Q-Band EPR Probe for Quantitative Studies of Even Electron Metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petasis, D. T.; Hendrich, M. P.

    1999-02-01

    Existing Q-band (35 GHz) EPR spectrometers employ cylindrical cavities for more intense microwave magnetic fields B1, but are so constructed that only one orientation between the external field B and B1is allowed, namely the B ⊥ B1orientation, thus limiting the use of the spectrometer to measurements on Kramers spin systems (odd electron systems). We have designed and built a Q-band microwave probe to detect EPR signals in even electron systems, which operates in the range 2 K ≤ T ≤ 300 K for studies of metalloprotein samples. The cylindrical microwave cavity operates in the TE011mode with cylindrical wall coupling to the waveguide, thus allowing all orientations of the external magnetic field B relative to the microwave field B1. Such orientations allow observation of EPR transitions in non-Kramers ions (even electron) which are either forbidden or significantly weaker for B ⊥ B1. Rotation of the external magnetic field also permits easy differentiation between spin systems from even and odd electron oxidation states. The cavity consists of a metallic helix and thin metallic end walls mounted on epoxy supports, which allows efficient penetration of the modulation field. The first quantitative EPR measurements from a metalloprotein (Hemerythrin) at 35 GHz with B1‖ B are presented.

  6. The Evolution of Carbon Nanotube Network Structure in Unidirectional Nanocomposites Resolved by Quantitative Electron Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Bharath; Lachman, Noa; Lam, Thomas; Jacobs, Douglas; Long, Christian; Zhao, Minhua; Wardle, Brian L; Sharma, Renu; Liddle, J Alexander

    2015-06-23

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced polymers are next-generation, high-performance, multifunctional materials with a wide array of promising applications. The successful introduction of such materials is hampered by the lack of a quantitative understanding of process-structure-property relationships. These relationships can be developed only through the detailed characterization of the nanoscale reinforcement morphology within the embedding medium. Here, we reveal the three-dimensional (3D) nanoscale morphology of high volume fraction (V(f)) aligned CNT/epoxy-matrix nanocomposites using energy-filtered electron tomography. We present an automated phase-identification method for fast, accurate, representative rendering of the CNT spatial arrangement in these low-contrast bimaterial systems. The resulting nanometer-scale visualizations provide quantitative information on the evolution of CNT morphology and dispersion state with increasing V(f), including network structure, CNT alignment, bundling and waviness. The CNTs are observed to exhibit a nonlinear increase in bundling and alignment and a decrease in waviness as a function of increasing V(f). Our findings explain previously observed discrepancies between the modeled and measured trends in bulk mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. The techniques we have developed for morphological quantitation are applicable to many low-contrast material systems.

  7. Towards quantitative, atomic-resolution reconstruction of the electrostatic potential via differential phase contrast using electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, R.; Chen, Z. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Differential phase contrast images in scanning transmission electron microscopy can be directly and quantitatively related to the gradient of the projected specimen potential provided that (a) the specimen can be treated as a phase object and (b) full 2D diffraction patterns as a function of probe position can be obtained. Both are challenging to achieve in atomic resolution imaging. The former is fundamentally limited by probe spreading and dynamical electron scattering, and we explore its validity domain in the context of atomic resolution differential phase contrast imaging. The latter, for which proof-of-principle experimental data sets exist, is not yet routine. We explore the extent to which more established segmented detector geometries can instead be used to reconstruct a quantitatively good approximation to the projected specimen potential. - Highlights: • Atomic-resolution differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging explored via simulation. • Phase-object approximation limits quantification to specimens a few nanometers thick. • Segmented detectors give good estimates of the diffraction pattern's first moment.

  8. Ultrasonic backscatter from cancellous bone: the apparent backscatter transfer function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Mcpherson, Joseph A; Smathers, Morgan R; Spinolo, P Luke; Sellers, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques are being developed to detect changes in cancellous bone caused by osteoporosis. Many techniques are based on measurements of the apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF), which represents the backscattered power from bone corrected for the frequency response of the measurement system. The ABTF is determined from a portion of the backscatter signal selected by an analysis gate of width τw delayed by an amount τd from the start of the signal. The goal of this study was to characterize the ABTF for a wide range of gate delays (1 μs ≤ τd ≤ 6 μs) and gate widths (1 μs ≤ τw ≤ 6 μs). Measurements were performed on 29 specimens of human cancellous bone in the frequency range 1.5 to 6.0 MHz using a broadband 5-MHz transducer. The ABTF was found to be an approximately linear function of frequency for most choices of τd and τw. Changes in τd and τw caused the frequency-averaged ABTF [quantified by apparent integrated backscatter (AIB)] and the frequency dependence of the ABTF [quantified by frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB)] to change by as much as 24.6 dB and 6.7 dB/MHz, respectively. τd strongly influenced the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of AIB with bone density (-0.95 ≤ R ≤ +0.68). The correlation of FSAB with bone density was influenced less strongly by τd (-0.97 ≤ R ≤ -0.87). τw had a weaker influence than τd on the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of these parameters with bone density.

  9. Syringe Injectable Electronics: Precise Targeted Delivery with Quantitative Input/Output Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Fu, Tian-Ming; Zhou, Tao; Schuhmann, Thomas G; Huang, Jinlin; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-10-14

    Syringe-injectable mesh electronics with tissue-like mechanical properties and open macroporous structures is an emerging powerful paradigm for mapping and modulating brain activity. Indeed, the ultraflexible macroporous structure has exhibited unprecedented minimal/noninvasiveness and the promotion of attractive interactions with neurons in chronic studies. These same structural features also pose new challenges and opportunities for precise targeted delivery in specific brain regions and quantitative input/output (I/O) connectivity needed for reliable electrical measurements. Here, we describe new results that address in a flexible manner both of these points. First, we have developed a controlled injection approach that maintains the extended mesh structure during the "blind" injection process, while also achieving targeted delivery with ca. 20 μm spatial precision. Optical and microcomputed tomography results from injections into tissue-like hydrogel, ex vivo brain tissue, and in vivo brains validate our basic approach and demonstrate its generality. Second, we present a general strategy to achieve up to 100% multichannel I/O connectivity using an automated conductive ink printing methodology to connect the mesh electronics and a flexible flat cable, which serves as the standard "plug-in" interface to measurement electronics. Studies of resistance versus printed line width were used to identify optimal conditions, and moreover, frequency-dependent noise measurements show that the flexible printing process yields values comparable to commercial flip-chip bonding technology. Our results address two key challenges faced by syringe-injectable electronics and thereby pave the way for facile in vivo applications of injectable mesh electronics as a general and powerful tool for long-term mapping and modulation of brain activity in fundamental neuroscience through therapeutic biomedical studies.

  10. Modeling the Earth's radiation belts. A review of quantitative data based electron and proton models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vette, J. I.; Teague, M. J.; Sawyer, D. M.; Chan, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of quantitative models of the trapped radiation belts is traced to show how the knowledge of the various features has developed, or been clarified, by performing the required analysis and synthesis. The Starfish electron injection introduced problems in the time behavior of the inner zone, but this residue decayed away, and a good model of this depletion now exists. The outer zone electrons were handled statistically by a log normal distribution such that above 5 Earth radii there are no long term changes over the solar cycle. The transition region between the two zones presents the most difficulty, therefore the behavior of individual substorms as well as long term changes must be studied. The latest corrections to the electron environment based on new data are outlined. The proton models have evolved to the point where the solar cycle effect at low altitudes is included. Trends for new models are discussed; the feasibility of predicting substorm injections and solar wind high-speed streams make the modeling of individual events a topical activity.

  11. Modeling the Earth's radiation belts. A review of quantitative data based electron and proton models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vette, J. I.; Teague, M. J.; Sawyer, D. M.; Chan, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of quantitative models of the trapped radiation belts is traced to show how the knowledge of the various features has developed, or been clarified, by performing the required analysis and synthesis. The Starfish electron injection introduced problems in the time behavior of the inner zone, but this residue decayed away, and a good model of this depletion now exists. The outer zone electrons were handled statistically by a log normal distribution such that above 5 Earth radii there are no long term changes over the solar cycle. The transition region between the two zones presents the most difficulty, therefore the behavior of individual substorms as well as long term changes must be studied. The latest corrections to the electron environment based on new data are outlined. The proton models have evolved to the point where the solar cycle effect at low altitudes is included. Trends for new models are discussed; the feasibility of predicting substorm injections and solar wind high-speed streams make the modeling of individual events a topical activity.

  12. Deciphering igneous and metamorphic events in high-grade rocks of the Wilmington complex, Delaware: Morphology, cathodoluminescence and backscattered electron zoning, and SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology of zircon and monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Schenck, W.S.; Plank, M.O.; Srogi, L.A.; Fanning, C.M.; Kamo, S.L.; Bosbyshell, H.

    2006-01-01

    High-grade rocks of the Wilmington Complex, northern Delaware and adjacent Maryland and Pennsylvania, contain morphologically complex zircons that formed through both igneous and metamorphic processes during the development of an island-arc complex and suturing of the arc to Laurentia. The arc complex has been divided into several members, the protoliths of which include both intrusive and extrusive rocks. Metasedimentary rocks are interlayered with the complex and are believed to be the infrastructure upon which the arc was built. In the Wilmingto n Complex rocks, both igneous and metamorphic zircons occur as elongate and equant forms. Chemical zoning, shown by cathodoluminescence (CL), includes both concentric, oscillatory patterns, indicative of igneous origin, and patchwork and sector patterns, suggestive of metamorphic growth. Metamorphic monazites are chemically homogeneous, or show oscillatory or spotted chemical zoning in backscattered electron images. U-Pb geochronology by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) was used to date complexly zoned zircon and monazite. All but one member of the Wilmington Complex crystallized in the Ordovician between ca. 475 and 485 Ma; these rocks were intruded by a suite of gabbro-to-granite plutonic rocks at 434 ?? Ma. Detrital zircons in metavolcanic and metasedimentary units were derived predominantly from 0.9 to 1.4 Ga (Grenvillian) basement, presumably of Laurentian origin. Amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism of the Wilmington Complex, recorded by ages of metamorphic zircon (428 ?? 4 and 432 ?? 6 Ma) and monazite (429 ?? 2 and 426 ?? 3 Ma), occurred contemporaneously with emplacement of the younger plutonic rocks. On the basis of varying CL zoning patterns and external morphologies, metamorphic zircons formed by different processes (presumably controlled by rock chemistry) at slightly different times and temperatures during prograde metamorphism. In addition, at least three other thermal episodes are

  13. 3D Backscatter Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. Clark (Inventor); Whitaker, Ross (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for imaging an object using backscattered radiation are described. The imaging system comprises both a radiation source for irradiating an object that is rotationally movable about the object, and a detector for detecting backscattered radiation from the object that can be disposed on substantially the same side of the object as the source and which can be rotationally movable about the object. The detector can be separated into multiple detector segments with each segment having a single line of sight projection through the object and so detects radiation along that line of sight. Thus, each detector segment can isolate the desired component of the backscattered radiation. By moving independently of each other about the object, the source and detector can collect multiple images of the object at different angles of rotation and generate a three dimensional reconstruction of the object. Other embodiments are described.

  14. In vitro atherosclerotic plaque and calcium quantitation by intravascular ultrasound and electron-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutfinger, D E; Leung, C Y; Hiro, T; Maheswaran, B; Nakamura, S; Detrano, R; Kang, X; Tang, W; Tobis, J M

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the accuracy of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) in quantitating human atherosclerotic plaque and calcium. In experiment 1, 12 human atherosclerotic arterial segments were obtained at autopsy and imaged by using IVUS and EBCT. The plaque from each arterial segment was dissected and a volume measurement of the dissected plaque was obtained by water displacement. The plaque from each arterial segment was ashed at 700 degrees F, and the weight of the remaining ashes was used as an estimate of the calcium mass. In experiment II, 11 calcified arterial segments were obtained at autopsy and imaged by using IVUS at one site along the artery. A corresponding histologic cross section stained with Masson's trichrome was prepared. In experiment I, the mean plaque volume measured by water displacement was 165.3 +/- 118.4 microliters. The mean plaque volume calculated by IVUS was 166.1 +/- 114.4 microliters and correlated closely with that by water displacement (r = 0.98, p volume by IVUS was 18.6 +/- 11.2 microliters and correlated linearly with the calcium mass by ashing (r = 0.87, p volume as well as the cross-sectional area and volume of intralesional calcium, especially if the calcium is localized at the base of the plaque. IVUS underestimates the amount of calcium present because of signal drop-off when the calcium is too thick for the ultrasound to completely penetrate. In comparison, EBCT accurately quantitates calcium mass regardless of the intralesional calcium morphologic characteristics; however, EBCT does not accurately quantitate plaque volume and will miss noncalcified atherosclerotic lesions.

  15. Transmission electron microtomography without the 'missing wedge' for quantitative structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawase, Noboru [Research and Development Department, Nitto Analytical Techno-Center Co. Ltd., 1-1-2, Shimohozumi, Ibaraki-city, Osaka 567-8680 (Japan); Kato, Mitsuro [Research and Development Department, Nitto Analytical Techno-Center Co. Ltd., 1-1-2, Shimohozumi, Ibaraki-city, Osaka 567-8680 (Japan); Nishioka, Hideo [Joint Research Center for Project on Nanostructure Polymeric Materials, Japan Chemical Innovation Institute (JCII), Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Jinnai, Hiroshi [Department of Molecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)]. E-mail: hjinnai@kit.ac.jp

    2007-01-15

    A three-dimensional (3D) visualization and structural analysis of a rod-shaped specimen of a zirconia/polymer nanocomposite material were carried out by transmission electron microtomography (TEMT) with particular emphasis on complete rotation of the specimen (tilt angular range: {+-}90 deg.). In order to achieve such an ideal experimental condition for the TEMT, improvements in the specimen as well as the sample holder were made. A rod-shaped specimen was necessary in order to obtain a high transmission of the specimen upon tilting to large angles. The image resolution of the reconstructed tomogram was isotropic, in sharp contrast to the anisotropic image resolution of the conventional TEMT with a limited angular range (the 'missing wedge' problem). A volume fraction of zirconia, {phi}, evaluated from the 3D reconstruction was in quantitative agreement with the known composition of the nanocomposite. A series of 3D reconstructions was made from the tilt series with complete rotation by limiting the maximum tilt angle, {alpha}, from which a couple of structural parameters, the volume fraction and surface area per unit volume, {sigma}, of the zirconia, were evaluated as a function of {alpha}. It was confirmed from actual experimental data that both {phi} and {sigma} slightly decreased with the increasing {alpha} and reached constant values at around {alpha}=80 deg., suggesting that the specimen may have to be tilted to {+-}80 deg. for truly quantitative measurements.

  16. Backscatter coefficient estimation using tapers with gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchies, Adam C; Oelze, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    When using the backscatter coefficient (BSC) to estimate quantitative ultrasound parameters such as the effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and the effective acoustic concentration (EAC), it is necessary to assume that the interrogated medium contains diffuse scatterers. Structures that invalidate this assumption can affect the estimated BSC parameters in terms of increased bias and variance and decrease performance when classifying disease. In this work, a method was developed to mitigate the effects of echoes from structures that invalidate the assumption of diffuse scattering, while preserving as much signal as possible for obtaining diffuse scatterer property estimates. Backscattered signal sections that contained nondiffuse signals were identified and a windowing technique was used to provide BSC estimates for diffuse echoes only. Experiments from physical phantoms were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed BSC estimation methods. Tradeoffs associated with effective mitigation of specular scatterers and bias and variance introduced into the estimates were quantified. Analysis of the results suggested that discrete prolate spheroidal (PR) tapers with gaps provided the best performance for minimizing BSC error. Specifically, the mean square error for BSC between measured and theoretical had an average value of approximately 1.0 and 0.2 when using a Hanning taper and PR taper respectively, with six gaps. The BSC error due to amplitude bias was smallest for PR (Nω = 1) tapers. The BSC error due to shape bias was smallest for PR (Nω = 4) tapers. These results suggest using different taper types for estimating ESD versus EAC. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. QED v 1.0: a software package for quantitative electron diffraction data treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belletti, D; Calestani, G; Gemmi, M; Migliori, A

    2000-03-01

    A new software package for quantitative electron diffraction data treatment of unknown structures is described. No "a priori" information is required by the package which is able to perform in successive steps the 2-D indexing of digitised diffraction patterns, the extraction of the intensity of the collected reflections and the 3-D indexing of all recorded patterns, giving as results the lattice parameters of the investigated structure and a series of data files (one for each diffraction pattern) containing the measured intensities and the relative e.s.d.s of the 3-D indexed reflections. The software package is mainly conceived for the treatment of diffraction patterns taken with a Gatan CCD Slow-Scan Camera, but it can also deal with generic digitised plates. The program is designed to extract intensity data suitable for structure solution techniques in electron crystallography. The integration routine is optimised for a correct background evaluation, a necessary condition to deal with weak spots of irregular shape and an intensity just above the background.

  18. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  19. Fundamentals of Acoustic Backscatter Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    41 6.12 Geocoding ...47 7.6 Errors in Geocoding .............................................................................................................. 47...h = z - R cos6 (39a) and x = rt sin6. (39b) 6.12 Geocoding Acoustic backscatter imagery data are collected by recording the across-track signals

  20. Nodule bottom backscattering study using multibeam echosounder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Raju, Y.S.N.; Nair, R.R.

    A study is carried out to observe the angular dependence of backscattering strength at nodule area where grab sample and photographic data is available. Theoretical study along with the experimentally observed data shows that the backscattering...

  1. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  2. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  3. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  4. Backscatter C [7125]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  5. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  6. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  7. Backscatter D [Snippets]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  8. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  9. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  10. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  11. Backscatter E [Swath]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  12. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  13. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  14. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  15. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  16. Backscatter C [7125]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  17. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  18. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  19. Backscatter D [Snippets]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  20. A quantitative account of electron energy transport in an NSTX plasma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Dave

    2007-11-01

    Anomalous electron transport in magnetized plasmas can be a major obstacle in the way toward practical nuclear fusion power, and it has been an outstanding problem for almost half a century. Here we report the first successful quantitative accounting of the electron thermal conductivity χe in a tokamak experiment due to imperfect magnetic surfaces^1 caused by the microtearing instabilities. The unstable spectrum is calculated with the GS2 code for a well-behaved H-mode plasma in NSTX (R/a=0.85m/0.67m) with 6 MW deuterium neutral beam heating at Ip=0.75 MA, Bt=0.5 T. The application of existing nonlinear theory^2 showed that the unstable modes can produce overlapping resistive layers and stochastic magnetic fields. The calculated χe based on the theory^1 is in good agreement with the values from transport analysis of the experimental data over the entire region (0.4 magnetic shear and an L-mode edge, microtearing modes are found to be stable. The central electron temperature is 50% higher (2 keV vs 1.3 keV) than in the comparison shot with the microtearing instability and the same controlled tokamak parameters like plasma current, density, magnetic field, plasma shape, position and neutral beam heating power. This is a strong indication that this instability may be the dominant mechanism responsible for the electron transport in this type of plasma. Since the microtearing mode is difficult to stabilize with velocity shear, this instability is an important limit^3 on the electron temperature in spherical tokamak configurations where the usual long wavelength instabilities are not present. *This work is carried out in collaboration with Drs. S. Kaye, D. R. Mikkelsen, J. Krommes, K. Hill, R. Bell, and B. LeBlanc. It is supported by USDoE contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03073. ^1A. B. Rechester, M. N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 38 (1978). ^2J. F. Drake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 44, 994 (1980). ^3M. Kotschenreuther, W. Dorland et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 677 (2000).

  1. Laser light backscatter from intermediate and high Z plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R. L.; Constantin, C.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Niemann, C.

    2006-09-01

    In experiments at the Omega Laser Facility [J. M. Soures et al., Fusion Technol. 30, 492 (1996)], stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) from gasbags filled with krypton and xenon gases was ten times lower than from CO2-filled gasbags with similar electron densities. The SBS backscatter was a 1%-5% for both 527 and 351nm interaction beams at an intensity of ˜1015W /cm2. The SRS backscatter was less than 1%. The 351nm interaction beam is below the threshold for filamentation and the SBS occurs in the density plateau between the blast waves. Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the incident and SBS light account for the lower reflectivity from krypton than from CO2. The 527nm interaction beam filaments in the blowoff plasma before the beam propagates through the blast wave, where it is strongly absorbed. Thus, most of the 527nm SBS occurs in the flowing plasma outside the blast waves.

  2. Rapid quantitative prediction of ionization energies and electron affinities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modelli, Alberto [Dipartimento di Chimica ' G. Ciamician' , Universita di Bologna, via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca in Scienze Ambientali (CIRSA), Universita di Bologna, via S. Alberto 163, 48100 Ravenna (Italy)], E-mail: alberto.modelli@unibo.it; Mussoni, Laura [Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca in Scienze Ambientali (CIRSA), Universita di Bologna, via S. Alberto 163, 48100 Ravenna (Italy)

    2007-02-14

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) often employ rapid semiempirical calculations to evaluate ionization energy (IE) and electron affinity (EA) values, assuming they are equal (but of opposite sign) to the energies of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO), respectively. However, regardless of the assumption of validity of Koopmans' theorem, the reliability of this simple theoretical approach for reproducing the experimental IE and EA trends has not been tested, except for a few linear PAHs. Here the measured IEs and EAs of 17 PAHs are plotted vs. the HOMO and LUMO energies obtained with semiempirical AM1 calculations and, for comparison, HF/6-31G calculations. Good linear relationships are obtained with both methods, with correlation coefficients r > 0.98 for the IEs and r > 0.96 for the EAs. The IEs and EAs predicted by scaling the corresponding MO energies with the appropriate empirical linear equation are compared with experimental values available in the literature for PAHs (28 IEs and 22 EAs). The average (absolute) difference between evaluated and measured IEs is found to be 0.07 eV (s.d. = 0.05 eV), while for the EAs the average difference is slightly larger. The accuracy of both AM1 and HF/6-31G methods are essentially equal, the former having the significant advantage of being 60 times faster. The present study demonstrates the ability of rapid semiempirical calculations carried out on the neutral molecules to parallel the experimental IE and EA values of PAHs, and provides simple linear equations which can be routinely employed for their quantitative prediction in this class of compounds.

  3. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone–tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongbin; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi [Department of Sports Medicine, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Wu, Tianding; Cao, Yong [Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Zhou, Jingyong; Zheng, Cheng [Department of Sports Medicine, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Hu, Jianzhong, E-mail: jianzhonghu@hotmail.com [Department of Sports Medicine, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China)

    2015-09-01

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone–tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution–function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella–patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage

  4. Use of back-scatter electron signals to visualise cell/nanowires interactions in vitro and in vivo; frustrated phagocytosis of long fibres in macrophages and compartmentalisation in mesothelial cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schinwald Anja

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frustrated phagocytosis has been stated as an important factor in the initiation of an inflammatory response after fibre exposure. The length of fibrous structures has been linked to the potential of fibres to induce adverse health effects for at least 40 years. However, we only recently reported for the first time the threshold length for fibre-induced inflammation in the pleural space and we implicated frustrated phagocytosis in the pro-inflammatory effects of long fibres. This study extends the examination of the threshold value for frustrated phagocytosis using well-defined length classes of silver nanowires (AgNW ranging from 3–28 μm and describes in detail the morphology of frustrated phagocytosis using a novel technique and also describes compartmentalisation of fibres in the pleural space. Methods A novel technique, backscatter scanning electron microscopy (BSE was used to study frustrated phagocytosis since it provides high-contrast detection of nanowires, allowing clear discrimination between the nanofibres and other cellular features. A human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line THP-1 was used to investigate cell-nanowire interaction in vitro and the parietal pleura, the site of fibre retention after inhalation exposure was chosen to visualise the cell- fibre interaction in vivo after direct pleural installation of AgNWs. Results The length cut-off value for frustrated phagocytosis differs in vitro and in vivo. While in vitro frustrated phagocytosis could be observed with fibres ≥14 μm, in vivo studies showed incomplete uptake at a fibre length of ≥10 μm. Recently we showed that inflammation in the pleural space after intrapleural injection of the same nanofibre panel occurs at a length of ≥5 μm. This onset of inflammation does not correlate with the onset of frustrated phagocytosis as shown in this study, leading to the conclusion that intermediate length fibres fully enclosed within macrophages as

  5. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J D; Datte, P; Krauter, K; Bond, E; Michel, P A; Glenzer, S H; Divol, L; Niemann, C; Suter, L; Meezan, N; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, R; London, R; Kilkenny, J; Wallace, R; Kline, J L; Knittel, K; Frieders, G; Golick, B; Ross, G; Widmann, K; Jackson, J; Vernon, S; Clancy, T

    2010-10-01

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of ∼15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie.

  6. QUANTITATIVE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE - ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS ANALYSIS ANTIMUTAGENIC BENZALACETONE DERIVATIVES BY PRINCIPAL COMPONENT REGRESSION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliana Yuliana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative Electronic Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR analysis of a series of benzalacetones has been investigated based on semi empirical PM3 calculation data using Principal Components Regression (PCR. Investigation has been done based on antimutagen activity from benzalacetone compounds (presented by log 1/IC50 and was studied as linear correlation with latent variables (Tx resulted from transformation of atomic net charges using Principal Component Analysis (PCA. QSAR equation was determinated based on distribution of selected components and then was analysed with PCR. The result was described by the following QSAR equation : log 1/IC50 = 6.555 + (2.177.T1 + (2.284.T2 + (1.933.T3 The equation was significant on the 95% level with statistical parameters : n = 28 r = 0.766  SE  = 0.245  Fcalculation/Ftable = 3.780 and gave the PRESS result 0.002. It means that there were only a relatively few deviations between the experimental and theoretical data of antimutagenic activity.          New types of benzalacetone derivative compounds were designed  and their theoretical activity were predicted based on the best QSAR equation. It was found that compounds number 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 36, 37, 38, 40, 41, 42, 44, 47, 48, 49 and 50  have  a relatively high antimutagenic activity.   Keywords: QSAR; antimutagenic activity; benzalaceton; atomic net charge

  7. An electronic tongue for gliadins semi-quantitative detection in foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, António M; Dias, Luís G; Veloso, Ana C A; Meirinho, Sofia G; Morais, Jorge Sá; Machado, Adélio A S C

    2011-01-15

    An all-solid-state potentiometric electronic tongue with 36 polymeric membranes has been used for the first time to detect gliadins, which are primarily responsible for gluten intolerance in people suffering from celiac disease. A linear discriminant model, based on the signals of 11 polymeric membranes, selected from the 36 above using a stepwise procedure, was used to semi-quantitatively classify samples of a "Gluten-free" foodstuff (baby milked flour), previously contaminated with known amounts of gliadins (50mg/kg), as "Gluten-free", "Low-Gluten content" or "Gluten-containing". For this food matrix, the device had sensitivity towards gliadins of 1-2mg/kg and overall sensitivity and specificity of 77% and 78%, respectively. Moreover, the device never identified an ethanolic extract containing gliadins as "Gluten-free". Finally, the system also allowed distinguishing "Gluten-free" and "Gluten-containing" foodstuffs (15 foods, including breads, flours, baby milked flours, cookies and breakfast cereals) with an overall sensitivity and specificity greater than 83%, using the signals of only 4 selected polymeric membranes (selected using a stepwise procedure). Since only one "Gluten-containing" foodstuff was misclassified as "Gluten-free", the device could be used as a preliminary tool for quality control of foods for celiac patients.

  8. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy analysis of the nanocrystallization kinetics of soft magnetic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, R. V.; Zhang, Y. R.

    2006-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used for the first time to obtain quantitative values of the diffusional crystallization kinetics of initially amorphous Fe74.5Si13.5B9Nb3 , Fe76.5Si13.5B9Cu1 and Fe73.5Si13.5B9Nb3Cu1 and Fe77.5Si13.5Nb3Cu1 (Finemet) alloys. The role of Cu and Nb alloying additions was elucidated. Contrary to some models of the crystallization process, it is demonstrated that both Nb and Cu alloying additions can influence the nucleation and growth processes. Combined additions of both Cu and Nb induce drastic reduction in crystal size to about 10nm and 1000 times higher crystal number density. The high nucleation rate observed in the Fe-Si-B-Nb-Cu alloy was attributed to the formation of both Cu and Nb rich regions which provide a high number of heterogeneous nucleation sites, consistent with the Hampel and Pradell models, the low growth rate was consistent with the Hunziker model.

  9. Hanle effect in coherent backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Labeyrie, G; Müller, C A; Sigwarth, O; Delande, D; Kaiser, R

    2002-01-01

    We study the shape of the coherent backscattering (CBS) cone obtained when resonant light illuminates a thick cloud of laser-cooled rubidium atoms in presence of a homogenous magnetic field. We observe new magnetic field-dependent anisotropies in the CBS signal. We show that the observed behavior is due to the modification of the atomic radiation pattern by the magnetic field (Hanle effect in the excited state).

  10. Simulation of multistatic and backscattering cross sections for airborne radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Albert W.

    1986-07-01

    In order to determine susceptibilities of airborne radar to electronic countermeasures and electronic counter-countermeasures simulations of multistatic and backscattering cross sections were developed as digital modules in the form of algorithms. Cross section algorithms are described for prolate (cigar shape) and oblate (disk shape) spheroids. Backscattering cross section algorithms are also described for different categories of terrain. Backscattering cross section computer programs were written for terrain categorized as vegetation, sea ice, glacial ice, geological (rocks, sand, hills, etc.), oceans, man-made structures, and water bodies. PROGRAM SIGTERRA is a file for backscattering cross section modules of terrain (TERRA) such as vegetation (AGCROP), oceans (OCEAN), Arctic sea ice (SEAICE), glacial snow (GLASNO), geological structures (GEOL), man-made structures (MAMMAD), or water bodies (WATER). AGCROP describes agricultural crops, trees or forests, prairies or grassland, and shrubs or bush cover. OCEAN has the SLAR or SAR looking downwind, upwind, and crosswind at the ocean surface. SEAICE looks at winter ice and old or polar ice. GLASNO is divided into a glacial ice and snow or snowfields. MANMAD includes buildings, houses, roads, railroad tracks, airfields and hangars, telephone and power lines, barges, trucks, trains, and automobiles. WATER has lakes, rivers, canals, and swamps. PROGRAM SIGAIR is a similar file for airborne targets such as prolate and oblate spheroids.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of the oral biofilm-removing capacity of a dental water jet using an electron-probe microanalyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazuo; Tamura, Kiyomi; Nakagaki, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the oral biofilm-removing capacity of a dental water jet (DWJ) by measuring biofilm thickness using an electron-probe microanalyzer (EPMA). Thirty consenting subjects wore in situ plaque-generating devices, which consisted of a pair of 4mm(2) enamel slabs attached to the upper molars for 2 days. Each device removed from the mouth was clamped, and one of the slab surfaces was treated with the DWJ, irrigating it for 5s. The devices were randomly assigned to three different pressure settings of 707, 350 or 102kPa. Another slab with no treatment served as a control. Each slab was freeze-dried, sputter-coated with platinum, and examined using secondary-electron imaging. The slabs were then embedded in methacrylate and cross-sectioned in the centre. Their surfaces were polished, coated with carbon, and examined using backscattered electron compositional (COMPO) imaging. The area between the enamel and the outer biofilm surface, indicated by a thin platinum layer, was measured by COMPO imaging to calculate the average thickness of the biofilm on the specimen. The removal capacity of biofilm by irrigation was estimated using a reduced rate of biofilm thickness, which was calculated from the differences between a pair of treated and control slabs. The reduced rates were 85.5% at 707kPa, 85.1% at 350kPa and 63.4% at 102kPa, indicating that biofilm thickness was significantly reduced at every pressure setting. The results suggest that irrigation using a DWJ would be an effective means of plaque control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A quantitative method for assessment of prescribing patterns using electronic health records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukyong Yoon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most available quality indicators for hospitals are represented by simple ratios or proportions, and are limited to specific events. A generalized method that can be applied to diverse clinical events has not been developed. The aim of this study was to develop a simple method of evaluating physicians' prescription patterns for diverse events and their level of awareness of clinical practice guidelines. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We developed a quantitative method called Prescription pattern Around Clinical Event (PACE, which is applicable to electronic health records (EHRs. Three discrete prescription patterns (intervention, maintenance, and discontinuation were determined based on the prescription change index (PCI, which was calculated by means of the increase or decrease in the prescription rate after a clinical event. Hyperkalemia and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD were used as example cases. We calculated the PCIs of 10 drugs related to hyperkalemia, categorized them into prescription patterns, and then compared the resulting prescription patterns with the known standards for hyperkalemia treatment. The hyperkalemia knowledge of physicians was estimated using a questionnaire and compared to the prescription pattern. Prescriptions for CDAD were also determined and compared to clinical knowledge. Clinical data of 1698, 348, and 1288 patients were collected from EHR data. The physicians prescribing behaviors for hyperkalemia and CDAD were concordant with the standard knowledge. Prescription patterns were well correlated with individual physicians' knowledge of hyperkalemia (κ = 0.714. Prescribing behaviors according to event severity or clinical condition were plotted as a simple summary graph. CONCLUSION: The algorithm successfully assessed the prescribing patterns from the EHR data. The prescription patterns were well correlated with physicians' knowledge. We expect that this algorithm will enable quantification

  13. Analysis of electron beam damage of exfoliated MoS2 sheets and quantitative HAADF-STEM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.; Raya, A.M.; Mariscal, M.M.; Esparza, R.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S.I.; Scavello, G.; Galindo, P.L.; Jose-Yacaman, M.; Ponce, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we examined MoS2 sheets by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at three different energies: 80, 120 and 200 kV. Structural damage of the MoS2 sheets has been controlled at 80 kV according a theoretical calculation based on the inelastic scattering of the electrons involved in the interaction electron-matter. The threshold energy for the MoS2 material has been found and experimentally verified in the microscope. At energies higher than the energy threshold we show surface and edge defects produced by the electron beam irradiation. Quantitative analysis at atomic level in the images obtained at 80 kV has been performed using the experimental images and via STEM simulations using SICSTEM software to determine the exact number of MoS2 layers. PMID:24929924

  14. Oscillations in the spectrum of nonlinear Thomson-backscattered radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Brau

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available When an electron beam collides with a high-intensity laser beam, the spectrum of the nonlinear Thomson scattering in the backward direction shows strong oscillations like those in the spectrum of an optical klystron. Laser gain on the backward Thomson scattering is estimated using the Madey theorem, and the results suggest that Thomson-backscatter free-electron lasers are possible at wavelengths extending to the far uv using a terawatt laser beam from a chirped-pulse amplifier and a high-brightness electron beam from a needle cathode.

  15. A Backscatter-Suppressed Beta Spectrometer for Neutron Decay Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Wietfeldt, F E; Anderman, R; Bateman, F B; Dewey, M S; Komives, A; Thompson, A K; Balashov, S; Mostovoy, Y; Mostovoy, Yu.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a beta electron spectrometer for use in an upcoming experiment that will measure the beta-antineutrino correlation coefficient (a-coefficient) in neutron beta decay. Electron energy is measured by a thick plastic scintillator detector. A conical array of plastic scintillator veto detectors is used to suppress events where the electron backscattered. A Monte Carlo simulation of this device in the configuration of the a-coefficient experiment is presented. The design, construction, and testing of a full-scale prototype device is described. We discuss the performance of this spectrometer with respect to its suitability for the experiment.

  16. Quantitative analysis of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) using a potentiometric electronic tongue in a SIA flow system

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    An advanced potentiometric electronic tongue and Sequential Injection Analysis (SIA) measurement system was applied for the quantitative analysis of mixtures containing three active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs): acetaminophen, ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid, in the presence of various amounts of caffeine as interferent. The flow-through sensor array was composed of miniaturized classical ion-selective electrodes based on plasticized PVC membranes containing only ion exchangers. P...

  17. Quantitative characterization of the mesothelioma-inducing erionite series minerals by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Meral

    2012-01-01

    Air-collected erionite series minerals from Cappadocia region of Turkey were characterized quantitatively by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Field emission scanning electron microscopy aided identification of fibrous minerals. Quantitative characterization guidelines for positive identification of erionites proposed by Dogan and Dogan (2008) was applied and the modified balance error formula (E%mineral is erionite-K and a mean chemical formula is proposed based upon the TEM-EDS results. Among the 60 analyses, 11 passed E% test (18.3%), 33 passed Mg-content test (55.0%), and only 3 passed both E% and Mg-content tests (5.0%). This shows difficulty of quantitative characterization of the erionite series minerals. However, as erionite is the most carcinogenic mineral known and is classified by IARC as a Group-I (human) carcinogen, it requires special attention from the mineralogical community to help establish its true mineralogical properties. Quantitatively characterized erionite data are very scarce in literature. Correctly identified erionite mineral types will be useful to medical researchers in their search to find a possible cure for the deadly disease of mesothelioma. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  19. Dose limited reliability of quantitative annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy for nano-particle atom-counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; Martinez, G.T. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); MacArthur, K.E.; Jones, L. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, 16 Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Béché, A. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Nellist, P.D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, 16 Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    Quantitative annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) has become a powerful technique to characterise nano-particles on an atomic scale. Because of their limited size and beam sensitivity, the atomic structure of such particles may become extremely challenging to determine. Therefore keeping the incoming electron dose to a minimum is important. However, this may reduce the reliability of quantitative ADF STEM which will here be demonstrated for nano-particle atom-counting. Based on experimental ADF STEM images of a real industrial catalyst, we discuss the limits for counting the number of atoms in a projected atomic column with single atom sensitivity. We diagnose these limits by combining a thorough statistical method and detailed image simulations. - Highlights: • Limited size and beam sensitivity of nano-particles challenge their quantification. • Keeping the electron dose to a minimum is therefore important. • Reliability of quantitative ADF STEM for atom-counting is demonstrated. • Limits for single atom sensitivity are discussed. • Limits are diagnosed by combining simulations and a statistical method.

  20. Generation of attosecond x-ray and gamma-ray via Compton backscattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang-Young; Yoon, Moohyun; Kim, Dong Eon

    2009-05-11

    The generation of an isolated attosecond gamma-ray pulse utilizing Compton backscattering of a relativistic electron bunch has been investigated. The energy of the electron bunch is modulated while the electron bunch interacts with a co-propagating few-cycle CEP (carrier envelope phase)-locked laser in a single-period wiggler. The energy-modulated electron bunch interacts with a counter-propagating driver laser, producing Compton back-scattered radiation. The energy modulation of the electron bunch is duplicated to the temporal modulation of the photon energy of Compton back-scattered radiation. The spectral filtering using a crystal spectrometer allows one to obtain an isolated attosecond gamma-ray.

  1. Validation of automated supervised segmentation of multibeam backscatter data from the Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Jess I. T.; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Pallentin, Arne; Pecher, Ingo A.; Gorman, Andrew R.; Schneider von Deimling, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Using automated supervised segmentation of multibeam backscatter data to delineate seafloor substrates is a relatively novel technique. Low-frequency multibeam echosounders (MBES), such as the 12-kHz EM120, present particular difficulties since the signal can penetrate several metres into the seafloor, depending on substrate type. We present a case study illustrating how a non-targeted dataset may be used to derive information from multibeam backscatter data regarding distribution of substrate types. The results allow us to assess limitations associated with low frequency MBES where sub-bottom layering is present, and test the accuracy of automated supervised segmentation performed using SonarScope® software. This is done through comparison of predicted and observed substrate from backscatter facies-derived classes and substrate data, reinforced using quantitative statistical analysis based on a confusion matrix. We use sediment samples, video transects and sub-bottom profiles acquired on the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand. Inferences on the substrate types are made using the Generic Seafloor Acoustic Backscatter (GSAB) model, and the extents of the backscatter classes are delineated by automated supervised segmentation. Correlating substrate data to backscatter classes revealed that backscatter amplitude may correspond to lithologies up to 4 m below the seafloor. Our results emphasise several issues related to substrate characterisation using backscatter classification, primarily because the GSAB model does not only relate to grain size and roughness properties of substrate, but also accounts for other parameters that influence backscatter. Better understanding these limitations allows us to derive first-order interpretations of sediment properties from automated supervised segmentation.

  2. A study of the 42CrMo4 steel surface by quantitative XPS electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flori, M. [' Politehnica' University of Timisoara, Faculty of Engineering of Hunedoara, Str. Revolutiei, No. 5, 331128 Hunedoara (Romania)], E-mail: flori.mihaela@fih.upt.ro; Gruzza, B.; Bideux, L.; Monier, G.; Robert-Goumet, C. [LASMEA, UMR CNRS 6602, Blaise Pascal University, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2008-05-30

    Quantitative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the native oxide film formed on 42CrMo4 steel surface by air exposure in normal conditions. In order to determine the thickness and composition of the oxide layer we have used a stacking layer model together with experimental XPS sputtering depth profiling. At a nanoscale study, to obtain quantitative results one must take into account fundamental parameters like the attenuation depth of photoelectrons. We have found that both lepidocrocit ({gamma}-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) were present and the total thickness of the oxide layer was 16 monolayers.

  3. Quantitative analysis of reflection electron energy loss spectra to determine electronic and optical properties of Fe–Ni alloy thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, Dahlang, E-mail: dtahir@fmipa.unhas.ac.id [Department of Physics, Hasanuddin University, Makassar 90245 (Indonesia); Oh, Sukh Kun [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 362-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hee Jae, E-mail: hjkang@cbu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 362-763 (Korea, Republic of); Tougaard, Sven, E-mail: svt@sdu.dk [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense M, Odense DK-5230 (Denmark)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Electronic and optical properties of Fe-Ni alloy thin films grown on Si (1 0 0) were studied via quantitative analyses of reflection electron energy loss spectra (REELS). • The energy loss functions (ELF) are dominated by a plasmon peak at 23.6 eV for Fe and moves gradually to lower energies in Fe-Ni alloys towards the bulk plasmon energy of Ni at 20.5 eV. • Fe has a strong effect on the dielectric and optical properties of Fe-Ni alloy thin films even for an alloy with 72% Ni. Electronic and optical properties of Fe-Ni alloy thin films grown on Si (1 0 0) were studied via quantitative analyses of reflection electron energy loss spectra (REELS). - Abstract: Electronic and optical properties of Fe–Ni alloy thin films grown on Si (1 0 0) by ion beam sputter deposition were studied via quantitative analyses of reflection electron energy loss spectra (REELS). The analysis was carried out by using the QUASES-XS-REELS and QUEELS-ε(k,ω)-REELS softwares to determine the energy loss function (ELF) and the dielectric functions and optical properties by analyzing the experimental spectra. For Ni, the ELF shows peaks around 3.6, 7.5, 11.7, 20.5, 27.5, 67 and 78 eV. The peak positions of the ELF for Fe{sub 28}Ni{sub 72} are similar to those of Fe{sub 51}Ni{sub 49}, even though there is a small peak shift from 18.5 eV for Fe{sub 51}Ni{sub 49} to 18.7 eV for Fe{sub 28}Ni{sub 72}. A plot of n, k, ε{sub 1}, and ε{sub 2} shows that the QUEELS-ε(k,ω)-REELS software for analysis of REELS spectra is useful for the study of optical properties of transition metal alloys. For Fe–Ni alloy with high Ni concentration (Fe{sub 28}Ni{sub 72}), ε{sub 1}, and ε{sub 2} have strong similarities with those of Fe. This indicates that the presence of Fe in the Fe–Ni alloy thin films has a strong effect.

  4. Analysis of electron beam damage of exfoliated MoS{sub 2} sheets and quantitative HAADF-STEM imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Alejandra [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Raya, Andres M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales en Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Mariscal, Marcelo M. [INFIQC-CONICET, Departamento de Matemática y Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, XUA5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Esparza, Rodrigo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Herrera, Miriam; Molina, Sergio I. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales en Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Scavello, Giovanni; Galindo, Pedro L. [Departamento de Ingeniería Informática, CASEM, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus Río San Pedro, Puerto Real, 11510 Cádiz (Spain); Jose-Yacaman, Miguel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Ponce, Arturo, E-mail: arturo.ponce@utsa.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    In this work we examined MoS{sub 2} sheets by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at three different energies: 80, 120 and 200 kV. Structural damage of the MoS{sub 2} sheets has been controlled at 80 kV according a theoretical calculation based on the inelastic scattering of the electrons involved in the interaction electron–matter. The threshold energy for the MoS{sub 2} material has been found and experimentally verified in the microscope. At energies higher than the energy threshold we show surface and edge defects produced by the electron beam irradiation. Quantitative analysis at atomic level in the images obtained at 80 kV has been performed using the experimental images and via STEM simulations using SICSTEM software to determine the exact number of MoS{sub 2} layers. - Highlights: • MoS{sub 2} sheets were exfoliated by using hydrogen gas flow to separate the MoS{sub 2} layers. • The optimum energy to avoid structural damage was calculated. • Cs-corrected STEM imaging was used to obtain atomic resolution images. • Three energies were used in STEM imaging: 80, 120 and 200 kV. • A quantitative method for determining the number of layers has been applied.

  5. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, L.; Es, van P.; Petersen, W.; Leeuwen, van T.G.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.; Otto, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  6. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsuiker, L; VAN Es, P; Petersen, W; VAN Leeuwen, T G; Terstappen, L W M M; Otto, C

    2011-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample preparation protocol was developed to enable imaging of cells and gold nanoparticles with a conventional below lens scanning electron microscopes. The negative influence of 'charging' on the quality of scanning electron microscopes' images could be limited by deposition of biological cells on a conductive (gold) surface. The novel protocol enabled high-resolution scanning electron microscopes' imaging of small clusters and individual gold nanoparticles on uncoated cell surfaces. Gold nanoparticles could be counted on cancer cells with automated routines.

  7. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  8. Quantitative Detection of Trace Explosive Vapors by Programmed Temperature Desorption Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detector

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The direct liquid deposition of solution standards onto sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes is used for the quantitative analysis of trace explosive vapor samples. The direct liquid deposition method yields a higher fidelity between the analysis of vapor samples and the analysis of solution standards than using separate injection methods for vapors and solutions, i.e., samples collected on vapor collection tubes and standards prepared in solution vials. Additionally, the method can accoun...

  9. Quantitative comparison of electron temperature fluctuations to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Greenwald, M.; Holland, C.; Howard, N. T.; Churchill, R.; Theiler, C.

    2016-04-01

    Long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations (kyρs 0.8) of Ohmic L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [E. S. Marmar et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104014 (2009)] with a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. The relative amplitude and frequency spectrum of the fluctuations are compared quantitatively with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] in two different confinement regimes: linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) regime and saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regime. When comparing experiment with nonlinear simulations, it is found that local, electrostatic ion-scale simulations (kyρs ≲ 1.7) performed at r/a ˜ 0.85 reproduce the experimental ion heat flux levels, electron temperature fluctuation levels, and frequency spectra within experimental error bars. In contrast, the electron heat flux is robustly under-predicted and cannot be recovered by using scans of the simulation inputs within error bars or by using global simulations. If both the ion heat flux and the measured temperature fluctuations are attributed predominantly to long-wavelength turbulence, then under-prediction of electron heat flux strongly suggests that electron scale turbulence is important for transport in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges. In addition, no evidence is found from linear or nonlinear simulations for a clear transition from trapped electron mode to ion temperature gradient turbulence across the LOC/SOC transition, and also there is no evidence in these Ohmic L-mode plasmas of the "Transport Shortfall" [C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009)].

  10. Quantitative comparison of electron temperature fluctuations to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, C., E-mail: csung@physics.ucla.edu [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Mikkelsen, D. R.; Churchill, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Theiler, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, SPC, Lausanne 1015 (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations (k{sub y}ρ{sub s} < 0.3) are measured in the outer core region (r/a > 0.8) of Ohmic L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [E. S. Marmar et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104014 (2009)] with a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. The relative amplitude and frequency spectrum of the fluctuations are compared quantitatively with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] in two different confinement regimes: linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) regime and saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regime. When comparing experiment with nonlinear simulations, it is found that local, electrostatic ion-scale simulations (k{sub y}ρ{sub s} ≲ 1.7) performed at r/a ∼ 0.85 reproduce the experimental ion heat flux levels, electron temperature fluctuation levels, and frequency spectra within experimental error bars. In contrast, the electron heat flux is robustly under-predicted and cannot be recovered by using scans of the simulation inputs within error bars or by using global simulations. If both the ion heat flux and the measured temperature fluctuations are attributed predominantly to long-wavelength turbulence, then under-prediction of electron heat flux strongly suggests that electron scale turbulence is important for transport in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges. In addition, no evidence is found from linear or nonlinear simulations for a clear transition from trapped electron mode to ion temperature gradient turbulence across the LOC/SOC transition, and also there is no evidence in these Ohmic L-mode plasmas of the “Transport Shortfall” [C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009)].

  11. Quantitative Measurements of Electronically Excited CH Concentration in Normal Gravity and Microgravity Coflow Laminar Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassi, D.; Cao, S.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Smooke, M. D.; Long, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    With the conclusion of the SLICE campaign aboard the ISS in 2012, a large amount of data was made available for the analysis of the effect of microgravity on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Previous work focused on the study of sooty flames in microgravity as well as the ability of numerical models to predict its formation in a simplified buoyancy-free environment. The current work shifts the investigation to soot-free flames, putting an emphasis on the chemiluminescence emission from electronically excited CH (CH*). This radical species is of significant interest in combustion studies: it has been shown that the electronically excited CH spatial distribution is indicative of the flame front position and, given the relatively simple diagnostic involved with its measurement, several works have been done trying to understand the ability of electronically excited CH chemiluminescence to predict the total and local flame heat release rate. In this work, a subset of the SLICE nitrogen-diluted methane flames has been considered, and the effect of fuel and coflow velocity on electronically excited CH concentration is discussed and compared with both normal gravity results and numerical simulations. Experimentally, the spectral characterization of the DSLR color camera used to acquire the flame images allowed the signal collected by the blue channel to be considered representative of the electronically excited CH emission centered around 431 nm. Due to the axisymmetric flame structure, an Abel deconvolution of the line-of-sight chemiluminescence was used to obtain the radial intensity profile and, thanks to an absolute light intensity calibration, a quantification of the electronically excited CH concentration was possible. Results show that, in microgravity, the maximum flame electronically excited CH concentration increases with the coflow velocity, but it is weakly dependent on the fuel velocity; normal gravity flames, if not lifted, tend to follow the same trend

  12. Quantitative analysis of bidirectional electron fluxes within coronal mass ejections at 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    The solar wind electron heat flux is carried primarily by suprathermal halo'' electrons beamed antisunward along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), indicating magnetic connection to the Sun only in one direction. However, electron observations at 1 AU show that counterstreaming halo beams, suggesting closed magnetic structures, prevail within coronal mass ejections (CMEs). These structures might be magnetic tongues'', tied to the Sun at both ends, magnetically detached plasmoids, or complex flux rope structures. Here we present first results of analysis of ISEE-3 observations within 39 CMEs, including the asymmetry between the counterstreaming beams and its control by the IMF orientation, and the variation of the electron distributions as CMEs convect past the spacecraft. We find that some CMEs contain nearly symmetric electron beams, while others are strongly asymmetric, and that the antisunward beam is generally dominant. The more nearly radial the IMF, the greater is the asymmetry between outward and inward beams. We present an example of a distinctive strahl-on-strahl'' distribution, suggesting continued magnetic connection to the corona, in which a narrow antisunward beam is superimposed on a broader beam. Taken as a whole, our results appear to favor a tongue or flux rope scenario rather than a fully detached plasmoid. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Portable fluorescence meter with reference backscattering channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilin, Dmitriy V.; Grishanov, Vladimir N.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Burkov, Dmitriy S.

    2016-09-01

    Methods based on fluorescence and backscattering are intensively used for determination of the advanced glycation end products (AGE) concentration in the biological tissues. There are strong correlation between the AGE concentration and the severity of such diseases like diabetes, coronary heart disease and renal failure. This fact can be used for diagnostic purposes in medical applications. Only few investigations in this area can be useful for development of portable and affordable in vivo AGE meter because the most of them are oriented on using spectrometers. In this study we describe the design and the results of tests on volunteers of portable fluorescence meter based on two photodiodes. One channel of such fluorimeter is used for measurement of the autofluorescence (AF) intensity, another one - for the intensity of elastically scattered radiation, which can be used as a reference. This reference channel is proposed for normalization of the skin autofluorescence signal to the human skin photo type. The fluorimeter, that was developed is relatively compact and does not contain any expensive optical and electronic components. The experimental results prove that proposed tool can be used for the AGE estimation in human skin.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of magnetic flux density in a magnetic recording head and pseudo soft underlayer by electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Weixing; Hirata, Kei; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Ishida, Yoichi; Kasai, Hiroto; Yanagiuchi, Katsuaki; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic interaction between the pole tip of a single-pole head and a pseudo soft underlayer in perpendicular magnetic recording was observed by electron holography. The magnetic flux density inside the soft underlayer was quantitatively evaluated. The distribution of magnetic flux density was calculated using the finite element method, and the influences of the modulation of the reference wave and stray fields were investigated by comparison with experimental results. The flux density observed was found to be underestimated due to the modulation of the phase shift in reference wave. The magnetic flux measured experimentally was larger than that inside the specimen because of the relatively large stray fields above and below the specimen in the direction of the electron beam.

  15. Calibration-free quantitative surface topography reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, E.T.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Mansilla, C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new approach to obtain reliable surface topography reconstructions from 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. In this method a set of images taken at different tilt angles are compared by means of digital image correlation (DlC). It is argued that the strength of the met

  16. Coherent phonon dynamics in semiconducting carbon nanotubes: a quantitative study of electron-phonon coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüer, Larry; Gadermaier, Christoph; Crochet, Jared; Hertel, Tobias; Brida, Daniele; Lanzani, Guglielmo

    2009-03-27

    We excite and detect coherent phonons in semiconducting (6,5) carbon nanotubes via a sub-10-fs pump-probe technique. Simulation of the amplitude and phase profile via time-dependent wave packet theory yields excellent agreement with experimental results under the assumption of molecular excitonic states and allows determining the electron-phonon coupling strength for the two dominant vibrational modes.

  17. Quantitative characterization of agglomerates and aggregates of pyrogenic and precipitated amorphous silica nanomaterials by transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Temmerman Pieter-Jan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction of a nanomaterial (NM with a biological system depends not only on the size of its primary particles but also on the size, shape and surface topology of its aggregates and agglomerates. A method based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM, to visualize the NM and on image analysis, to measure detected features quantitatively, was assessed for its capacity to characterize the aggregates and agglomerates of precipitated and pyrogenic synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide (SAS, or silica, NM. Results Bright field (BF TEM combined with systematic random imaging and semi-automatic image analysis allows measuring the properties of SAS NM quantitatively. Automation allows measuring multiple and arithmetically complex parameters simultaneously on high numbers of detected particles. This reduces operator-induced bias and assures a statistically relevant number of measurements, avoiding the tedious repetitive task of manual measurements. Access to multiple parameters further allows selecting the optimal parameter in function of a specific purpose. Using principle component analysis (PCA, twenty-three measured parameters were classified into three classes containing measures for size, shape and surface topology of the NM. Conclusion The presented method allows a detailed quantitative characterization of NM, like dispersions of precipitated and pyrogenic SAS based on the number-based distributions of their mean diameter, sphericity and shape factor.

  18. Combined Pulsed-Q dissociation and electron transfer dissociation for identification and quantitation of iTRAQ–labeled phosphopeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feng; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Tolic, Nikola; Zhang, Qibin; Norbeck, Angela D.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Tang, Keqi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-05-15

    Multiplex isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) enable high-throughput quantification of peptides via reporter ion signals in the low mass range of tandem mass spectra. A challenging but highly promising application is to analyze iTRAQ-labeled peptides using a sensitive linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ-MS) and pulsed Q dissociation (PQD), a form of ion trap collision activated dissociation (CAD) designed to allow detection of low mass-to-charge fragment ions. Electron dissociation transfer (ETD), on the other hand, is complementary to PQD and is especially useful for sequencing peptides containing post-translational modifications (PTMs). Here, we developed an integrated workflow for robust and accurate quantitative identification of iTRAQ labeled phosphopeptides that integrates the PQD and ETD fragmentation methods together with PQD optimization, data management and bioinformatics tools. Analysis of the phosphoproteome of human fibroblast cells demonstrated that this hybrid mode is superior to either PQD or ETD alone for phosphopeptide identification and quantitation. The combined PQD/ETD approach can qualitatively identify additional phosphopeptides than ETD alone and PQD information can provide better quantitation of ETD identified iTRAQ-labeled phosphopeptides.

  19. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  20. Quantitating morphological changes in biological samples during scanning electron microscopy sample preparation with correlative super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Huang, Tao; Jorgens, Danielle M; Nickerson, Andrew; Lin, Li-Jung; Pelz, Joshua; Gray, Joe W; López, Claudia S; Nan, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Sample preparation is critical to biological electron microscopy (EM), and there have been continuous efforts on optimizing the procedures to best preserve structures of interest in the sample. However, a quantitative characterization of the morphological changes associated with each step in EM sample preparation is currently lacking. Using correlative EM and superresolution microscopy (SRM), we have examined the effects of different drying methods as well as osmium tetroxide (OsO4) post-fixation on cell morphology during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) sample preparation. Here, SRM images of the sample acquired under hydrated conditions were used as a baseline for evaluating morphological changes as the sample went through SEM sample processing. We found that both chemical drying and critical point drying lead to a mild cellular boundary retraction of ~60 nm. Post-fixation by OsO4 causes at least 40 nm additional boundary retraction. We also found that coating coverslips with adhesion molecules such as fibronectin prior to cell plating helps reduce cell distortion from OsO4 post-fixation. These quantitative measurements offer useful information for identifying causes of cell distortions in SEM sample preparation and improving current procedures.

  1. ILC beam energy measurement by means of laser Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchnoi, N. [Budker Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Schreiber, H.J.; Viti, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitive detectors operating in a large radiation environment. Several options for high spatial resolution detectors are discussed. Simulation studies support the use of an infrared or green laser and quartz fiber detectors to monitor the backscattered photons and edge electrons. Employing a cavity monitor, the beam particle position downstream of the magnet can be recorded with submicrometer precision. Such a scheme provides a feasible and promising method to access the incident beam energy with precisions of 10{sup -4} or better on a bunch-to-bunch basis while the electron and positron beams are in collision. (orig.)

  2. Towards a Quantitative Analysis of the Temperature Dependence of Electron Attachment Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-24

    chemical methods . All other molecular parameters needed in the modeling followed from quantum-chemical calculations done at the University of New Mexico ...of experimental observables such as pressure and temperature dependences of electron attachment rate constants and product branching ratios. Likewise... method for the treatment of such complicated kinetic processes was developed which will find application in many areas of chemical kinetics such as

  3. Spectral variability of the particulate backscattering ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, A. L.; Boss, E.; Cowles, T. J.; Pegau, W. S.

    2007-05-01

    The spectral dependency of the particulate backscattering ratio is relevant in the fields of ocean color inversion, light field modeling, and inferring particle properties from optical measurements. Aside from theoretical predictions for spherical, homogeneous particles, we have very limited knowledge of the actual in situ spectral variability of the particulate backscattering ratio. This work presents results from five research cruises that were conducted over a three-year period. Water column profiles of physical and optical properties were conducted across diverse aquatic environments that offered a wide range of particle populations. The main objective of this research was to examine the behavior of the spectral particulate backscattering ratio in situ, both in terms of its absolute magnitude and its variability across visible wavelengths, using over nine thousand 1-meter binned data points for each of five wavelengths of the spectral particulate backscattering ratio. Our analysis reveals no spectral dependence of the particulate backscattering ratio within our measurement certainty, and a geometric mean value of 0.013 for this dataset. This is lower than the commonly used value of 0.0183 from Petzold’s integrated volume scattering data. Within the first optical depth of the water column, the mean particulate backscattering ratio was 0.010.

  4. A quantitative electron microscopic analysis of the keratinizing epithelium of noral human hard palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M; Schroeder, H E

    1975-01-01

    The epithelium of normal human hard palate was subjected to sterologic analysis. Ten biosies were selected from a total of twenty specimens collected from 9 to 16 year old females, and processed for light- and electron microscopy. At two levels of magnification, electron micrographs were sampled from three strata (basale, spinosum, granulosum) in two locations (epithelial ridges and portions over connective tissue papillae). Stereologic point counting procedures were employed to analyse a total 1560 electron micrographs. In general, the thickness of the palate epithelium was 0.12 mm (over papillae) and 0.31 mm (in ridges), the epithelium is distinctly stratified, and homogeneously ortho-keratinized. From basal to granular layers, the composition of strata revealed decreasing densities of nuclei, mitochondria, membrane-bound organelles and aggregates of free ribosomes. Keratohyalin bodies and membrane coating granules increased, and cytoplasmic filaments with a constant diameter of about 85 A increased from 14 to 30% of cytoplasmic unit volume. The cytoplasmic ground substance occupied a stable 50% of the epithelial cytoplasm in all strata. The composition of basal layers in ridges differed from that over connective tissue papillae. The data are discussed in relation to the observations that (1) an increasing gradient of filament density is not the most characteristic feature of ortho-keratinizing oral epithelium and (2) differences in the degree of differentiation in cells of the stratum basale coincided with the comparable frequency distribution pattern of dividing cells.

  5. Quantitative electron microscopic analysis of the epithelium of normal human alveolar mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernimoulin, J P; Schroeder, H E

    1977-05-31

    The epithelium of normal human alveolar mucosa originating from the anterior vestibulum was subjected to stereologic analysis. Eight biopsies were collected half-way between the muco gingival junction and the vestibular fornix from 20 to 50 year-old females, and processed for light and electron microscopy. At two levels of magnification, electron micrographs were sampled from four artificially selected strata in regions of epithelial ridges. Stereologic point counting based on a computer-aided system for analyzing stratified epithelia served for examining a total of about 860 electron micrographs. The alveolar epithelium was 0.26 mm thick, occasionally interdigitated by short, slender connective tissue papillae, and consisted of (1) a narrow basal and suprabasal, and (2) a broad spinous and surface compartment. It displayed a differentiation pattern which, in most subjects studied, was similar to that of normal human buccal epithelium, however, on the average, produced less mature surface cells. This pattern was expressed mainly by a density increase of cytoplasmic filaments (98 A in diameter), a concomitant decrease of the cytoplasmic ground substance, the formation of dark-cored membrane coating granules, and invividually variable amounts of glycogen deposition. In some subjects, a mixed differentiation pattern was found. The structural organization of alveolar epithelium, in analogy to cheek epithelium, was compatible with the function of distensibility.

  6. Results from the Daresbury Compton backscattering X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laundy, D. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Priebe, G. [Max Born Institute, Max-Born-Strasse 2A, 12489 Berlin, DE (Germany); Jamison, S.P. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Graham, D.M. [The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Phillips, P.J. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Smith, S.L.; Saveliev, Y. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Vassilev, S. [The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Seddon, E.A., E-mail: elaine.seddon@stfc.ac.uk [The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-11

    The Daresbury Compton Backscattering X-ray Source uses a high power Ti Sapphire laser interacting in head on geometry with electron bunches in the ALICE energy recovery linear accelerator. X-ray photons with peak energy of 21 keV were generated with the accelerator operating at an energy of 29.6 MeV. The spatial profile of the X-rays emitted near the electron beam axis was measured. The characteristics of the X-ray yield measured as a function of relative timing between the laser pulse and the interacting electron bunch was found to be consistent with the modelled intensity behaviour using measured electron and laser beam parameters.

  7. A system for quantitative morphological measurement and electronic modelling of neurons: three-dimensional reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, E W; Cole, H M; Brown, A D; Wheal, H V

    1993-04-01

    A system for accurately reconstructing neurones from optical sections taken at high magnification is described. Cells are digitised on a 68000-based microcomputer to form a database consisting of a series of linked nodes each consisting of x, y, z coordinates and an estimate of dendritic diameter. This database is used to generate three-dimensional (3-D) displays of the neurone and allows quantitative analysis of the cell volume, surface area and dendritic length. Images of the cell can be manipulated locally or transferred to an IBM 3090 mainframe where a wireframe model can be displayed on an IBM 5080 graphics terminal and rotated interactively in real time, allowing visualisation of the cell from all angles. Space-filling models can also be produced. Reconstructions can also provide morphological data for passive electrical simulations of hippocampal pyramidal cells.

  8. The Quantitative Analysis to Inferior Oil with Electronic Nose Based on Adaptive Multilayer Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Men

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study makes the three acryl glycerin polymers, oxidation three acryl glycerins, and low carbon number fatty acid as inferior oil feature index. Using double steady state stochastic resonance signal-to-noise ratio analysis methods make the quantitative analysis to inferior oil. This paper analyzes the stochastic resonance. Introduces the principle detection system structure based on adaptive multilayer stochastic resonance algorithm in inferior oil quantitativeanalysis; and make adaptive double stochastic resonance model and inferior oil as example, give the simulation and numerical analysis of this model of the system. The results show that the system can obtain more accurate quality the proportion of the inferior oil information. At the same time, this method can effectively solve the semiconductor gas sensors of the baseline drift problem. The method of stochastic resonance has a lot of application prospect in improving the system performance.

  9. Quantitative comparison of electronic component/solder joint stress relief in encapsulated assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    A quantitative comparison was made of various stress relief bends with and without sleeving in three commonly used encapsulants. Silicone rubber and heat shrinkable polyolifin sleeving were used on right angle, full loop, and hump style lead bends. Small (from 254 ..mu..m to 762 ..mu..m diameter) and large (762 ..mu..m to 1.27 mm diameter) wires were used to simulate small and large component leads. The component leads were encapsulated in microballoon-filled epoxy, 128 kg/m/sup 3/ urethane foam, and 320 kg/m/sup 3/ urethane foam. Ten test samples were fabricated in each configuration; five were used for tensile loading, and five were used for compressive loading.

  10. Towards quantitative off-axis electron holographic mapping of the electric field around the tip of a sharp biased metallic needle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi; Larson, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    We apply off-axis electron holography and Lorentz microscopy in the transmission electron microscope to map the electric field generated by a sharp biased metallic tip. A combination of experimental data and modelling provides quantitative information about the potential and the field around the ...

  11. Accuracy of Image Analysis in Quantitative Study of Cement Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Shu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative study on cement paste especially blended cement paste has been a hot and difficult issue over the years, and the technique of backscattered electron image analysis showed unique advantages in this field. This paper compared the test results of cement hydration degree, Ca(OH2 content and pore size distribution in pure pastes by image analysis and other methods. Then the accuracy of qualitative study by image analysis was analyzed. The results showed that image analysis technique had displayed higher accuracy in quantifying cement hydration degree and Ca(OH2 content than non-evaporable water test and thermal analysis respectively.

  12. Validities of three multislice algorithms for quantitative low-energy transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, W Q; Chen, J H

    2013-11-01

    Three different types of multislice algorithms, namely the conventional multislice (CMS) algorithm, the propagator-corrected multislice (PCMS) algorithm and the fully-corrected multislice (FCMS) algorithm, have been evaluated in comparison with respect to the accelerating voltages in transmission electron microscopy. Detailed numerical calculations have been performed to test their validities. The results show that the three algorithms are equivalent for accelerating voltage above 100kV. However, below 100 kV, the CMS algorithm will introduce significant errors, not only for higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) reflections but also for zero-order Laue zone (ZOLZ) reflections. The differences between the PCMS and FCMS algorithms are negligible and mainly appear in HOLZ reflections. Nonetheless, when the accelerating voltage is further lowered to 20 kV or below, the PCMS algorithm will also yield results deviating from the FCMS results. The present study demonstrates that the propagation of the electron wave from one slice to the next slice is actually cross-correlated with the crystal potential in a complex manner, such that when the accelerating voltage is lowered to 10 kV, the accuracy of the algorithms is dependent of the scattering power of the specimen. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Computation of Nonlinear Backscattering Using a High-Order Numerical Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibich, G.; Ilan, B.; Tsynkov, S.

    2001-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) is the standard model for propagation of intense laser beams in Kerr media. The NLS is derived from the nonlinear Helmholtz equation (NLH) by employing the paraxial approximation and neglecting the backscattered waves. In this study we use a fourth-order finite-difference method supplemented by special two-way artificial boundary conditions (ABCs) to solve the NLH as a boundary value problem. Our numerical methodology allows for a direct comparison of the NLH and NLS models and for an accurate quantitative assessment of the backscattered signal.

  14. Three-dimensional imaging of hidden objects using positron emission backscatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dongwon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fenimore, Ed [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galassi, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Looker, Quinn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcneil, Wendy V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stonehill, Laura [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallace, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission backscatter imaging is a technique for interrogation and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of hidden objects when we only have access to the objects from one side. Using time-of-flight differences in detected direct and backscattered positron-emitted photons, we construct 3-D images of target objects. Recently at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a fully three-dimensional imaging system has been built and the experimental results are discussed in this paper. Quantitative analysis of images reconstructed in both two- and three-dimensions are also presented.

  15. Influence of single scattering and multiple scattering on backscattered Mueller matrix in turbid media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lanqing Xu; Hui Li; Yongping Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo algorithm and Stokes-Mueller formalism are used to simulate the propagation behavior of polarized light in turbid media. The influence of single scattering and multiple scattering on backscattered Mueller matrix in turbid media is discussed. Single and double scattering photons form the major part of backscattered polarization patterns, while multiple scattering photons present more likely as background. Further quantitative analyses show that single scattering approximation and double scattering approxima tion are quite accurate when discussing the polarization patterns near the incident point.

  16. A methodology for finding the optimal iteration number of the SIRT algorithm for quantitative Electron Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okariz, Ana; Guraya, Teresa; Iturrondobeitia, Maider; Ibarretxe, Julen

    2017-02-01

    The SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm is commonly used in Electron Tomography to calculate the original volume of the sample from noisy images, but the results provided by this iterative procedure are strongly dependent on the specific implementation of the algorithm, as well as on the number of iterations employed for the reconstruction. In this work, a methodology for selecting the iteration number of the SIRT reconstruction that provides the most accurate segmentation is proposed. The methodology is based on the statistical analysis of the intensity profiles at the edge of the objects in the reconstructed volume. A phantom which resembles a a carbon black aggregate has been created to validate the methodology and the SIRT implementations of two free software packages (TOMOJ and TOMO3D) have been used.

  17. MEMS Device for Quantitative In Situ Mechanical Testing in Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we designed a micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS device that allows simultaneous direct measurement of mechanical properties during deformation under external stress and characterization of the evolution of nanomaterial microstructure within a transmission electron microscope. This MEMS device makes it easy to establish the correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties of nanomaterials. The device uses piezoresistive sensors to measure the force and displacement of nanomaterials qualitatively, e.g., in wire and thin plate forms. The device has a theoretical displacement resolution of 0.19 nm and a force resolution of 2.1 μN. The device has a theoretical displacement range limit of 5.47 μm and a load range limit of 55.0 mN.

  18. A quantitative method to monitor reactive oxygen species production by electron paramagnetic resonance in physiological and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Gussoni, Maristella; Montorsi, Michela; Porcelli, Simone; Vezzoli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the assessment of oxidative stress in health and disease clashes with the lack of consensus on reliable quantitative noninvasive methods applicable. The study aimed at demonstrating that a recently developed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance microinvasive method provides direct evidence of the "instantaneous" presence of ROS returning absolute concentration levels that correlate with "a posteriori" assays of ROS-induced damage by means of biomarkers. The reliability of the choice to measure ROS production rate in human capillary blood rather than in plasma was tested (step I). A significant (P condition, were found significantly different (range 0.0001-0.05 P level). The comparison of the results with antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage biomarkers concentrations showed that all changes indicating increased oxidative stress are directly related to ROS production increase. Therefore, the adopted method may be an automated technique for a lot of routine in clinical trials.

  19. Quantitative Mobility Spectrum Analysis for Determination of Electron and Magneto Transport Properties of Te-Doped GaSb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Acar; M. Kasap; B. Y. Isik; S.(O)zcelik; N. Tugluoglu; S. Karadeniz

    2005-01-01

    @@ Resistivity, magnetoresistivity and Hall effect measurements in n-type Te-doped GaSb grown by the liquid encapsuled Czochralski technique are carried out as functions of temperature (35-350 K) and magnetic field (0-1.35 T).The power law model is used to explain the temperature-dependent resistivity. The magnetic-field-dependent data are analysed using the quantitative mobility spectrum analysis technique. The effect of individual band parameters (nL, nг, μL, μг, p and μp) on both the electron and magneto transports have been discussed. The EL -- Eг energy separation between the L and conduction band edges is also derived.

  20. Faults and foibles of quantitative scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2012-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a powerful and flexible elemental analysis method that can identify and quantify elements with atomic numbers > 4 (Be) present as major constituents (where the concentration C > 0.1 mass fraction, or 10 weight percent), minor (0.01history of more than 40 years, and the sophistication of modern analytical software, the method is vulnerable to serious shortcomings that can lead to incorrect elemental identifications and quantification errors that significantly exceed reasonable expectations. This paper will describe shortcomings in peak identification procedures, limitations on the accuracy of quantitative analysis due to specimen topography or failures in physical models for matrix corrections, and quantitative artifacts encountered in xray elemental mapping. Effective solutions to these problems are based on understanding the causes and then establishing appropriate measurement science protocols. NIST DTSA II and Lispix are open source analytical software available free at www.nist.gov that can aid the analyst in overcoming significant limitations to SEM/EDS.

  1. Predicting seabed properties from acoustic backscatter on the UK continental shelf (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, C.; Collier, J.

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between backscatter imagery, sediment grain size and measures of biological community diversity are investigated using a quantitative approach at an aggregate extraction site in the Southern North Sea, UK. Previous work conducted at Oban in Scotland (Collier and Brown, 2005) showed the potential for estimating sediment grain size from first order backscatter statistics. In particular this study reported r2 correlation values of 0.531 between mean backscatter and mean sediment grain size, with r2=0.351 between standard deviation backscatter and sediment grain size sorting (n=19). Here we test these simple linear relationships in a different environment where the sediments are coarser and the degree of sorting is lower. We present the analysis of a dataset collected in 2008 off the coast of East Anglia, UK. Beam-time series backscatter imagery was acquired from a 300 kHz source MBES (Kongsberg Simard EM3000D), and ground-truth data obtained from a series of 100 Hamon and 16 Clamshell grabs processed for particle size analysis. Pixels were extracted from 32-bit backscatter imagery at 50 m2 window based on the ground-truth data locations. So far 19 of the 100 Hamon samples have been processed. These show a significant correlation between mean backscatter intensity and mean sediment grain size (r2=0.427). The level of agreement between standard deviation backscatter and grain size distribution however, was lower at r2=0.078. Correlation of univariate measures of biological diversity and mean backscatter were low for the 19 samples; the maximum observed value was r2=0.074 (Fisher’s diversity index). Relative to the standard deviation backscatter, the strongest correlation was r2=0.192 (Brillion’s). The analysis of the Clamshell samples is completed. In this case, the MBES backscatter imagery established a stronger positive correlation (r2=0.628) between the means. The level of agreement observed between the standard deviation of the backscatter and

  2. Electronic cigarette, effective or harmful for quitting smoking and respiratory health: A quantitative review papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Heydari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, electronic cigarettes (ECs have been heavily advertised as an alternative smoking device as well as a possible cessation method. We aimed to review all published scientific literature pertaining to ECs and to present a simple conclusion about their effects for quitting smoking and respiratory health. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study with a search of PubMed, limited to English publications upto September 2014. The total number of papers which had ECs in its title and their conclusions positive or negative regarding ECs effects were computed. The number of negative papers was subtracted from the number of positive ones to make a score. Results: Of the 149 articles, 137 (91.9% were accessible, of which 68 did not have inclusion criteria. In the 69 remaining articles, 24 studies supported ECs and 45 considered these to be harmful. Finally, based on this evidence, the score of ECs (computed result with positive minus negative was −21. Conclusion: Evidence to suggest that ECs may be effective and advisable for quitting smoking or a safe alternative for smoking is lacking and may instead harm the respiratory system. However, further studies are needed.

  3. Electronic cigarette, effective or harmful for quitting smoking and respiratory health: A quantitative review papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Gholamreza; Ahmady, Arezoo Ebn; Chamyani, Fahimeh; Masjedi, Mohammadreza; Fadaizadeh, Lida

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, electronic cigarettes (ECs) have been heavily advertised as an alternative smoking device as well as a possible cessation method. We aimed to review all published scientific literature pertaining to ECs and to present a simple conclusion about their effects for quitting smoking and respiratory health. This was a cross-sectional study with a search of PubMed, limited to English publications upto September 2014. The total number of papers which had ECs in its title and their conclusions positive or negative regarding ECs effects were computed. The number of negative papers was subtracted from the number of positive ones to make a score. Of the 149 articles, 137 (91.9%) were accessible, of which 68 did not have inclusion criteria. In the 69 remaining articles, 24 studies supported ECs and 45 considered these to be harmful. Finally, based on this evidence, the score of ECs (computed result with positive minus negative) was -21. Evidence to suggest that ECs may be effective and advisable for quitting smoking or a safe alternative for smoking is lacking and may instead harm the respiratory system. However, further studies are needed.

  4. Sensor fusion of electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetorelaxometry data for quantitative magnetic nanoparticle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coene, A.; Leliaert, J.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetorelaxometry (MRX) imaging and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) are two non-invasive techniques capable of recovering the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) distribution. Both techniques solve an ill-posed inverse problem in order to find the spatial MNP distribution. A lot of research has been done on increasing the stability of these inverse problems with the main objective to improve the quality of MNP imaging. In this paper a proof of concept is presented in which the sensor data of both techniques is fused into EPR–MRX, with the intention to stabilize the inverse problem. First, both techniques are compared by reconstructing several phantoms with different sizes for various noise levels and calculating stability, sensitivity and reconstruction quality parameters for these cases. This study reveals that both techniques are sensitive to different information from the MNP distributions and generate complementary measurement data. As such, their merging might stabilize the inverse problem. In a next step we investigated how both techniques need to be combined to reduce their respective drawbacks, such as a high number of required measurements and reduced stability, and to improve MNP reconstructions. We were able to stabilize both techniques, increase reconstruction quality by an average of 5% and reduce measurement times by 88%. These improvements could make EPR–MRX a valuable and accurate technique in a clinical environment.

  5. Quantitative ethnographic study of physician workflow and interactions with electronic health record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Onur; Chiou, Erin; Montague, Enid

    2015-09-01

    This study explores the relationship between primary care physicians' interactions with health information technology and primary care workflow. Clinical encounters were recorded with high-resolution video cameras to capture physicians' workflow and interaction with two objects of interest, the electronic health record (EHR) system, and their patient. To analyze the data, a coding scheme was developed based on a validated list of primary care tasks to define the presence or absence of a task, the time spent on each task, and the sequence of tasks. Results revealed divergent workflows and significant differences between physicians' EHR use surrounding common workflow tasks: gathering information, documenting information, and recommend/discuss treatment options. These differences suggest impacts of EHR use on primary care workflow, and capture types of workflows that can be used to inform future studies with larger sample sizes for more effective designs of EHR systems in primary care clinics. Future research on this topic and design strategies for effective health information technology in primary care are discussed.

  6. Performance of low-power RFID tags based on modulated backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhanna, Zeinab; Sibille, Alain; Contreras, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Ultra Wideband (UWB) modulated backscattering (MBS) passive Radio-Frequency IDentification (RFID) systems provide a promising solution to overcome many limitations of current narrowband RFID devices. This work addresses the performance of such systems from the point of view of the radio channel between the readers and the tags. Such systems will likely combine several readers, in order to provide both the detection and localization of tags operating in MBS. Two successive measurements campaigns have been carried out in an indoor reference scenario environment. The first is intended to verify the methods and serves as a way to validate the RFID backscattering measurement setup. The second represents a real use case for RFID application and allows one to quantitatively analyze the path loss of the backscattering propagation channel. xml:lang="fr"

  7. ESTUDIO DEL DESGASTE EROSIVO POR CAVITACIÓN DE UN ACERO AUSTENÍTICO DE ALTO NITRÓGENO APOYADO EN EL USO DE LA DIFRACCIÓN DE ELECTRONES RETROPROYECTADOS-EBSD ASSESSMENT OF CAVITATION-EROSION WEAR OF A HIGH NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL FROM ELECTRON BACKSCATTERING DIFFRACTION-EBSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dairo Hernán Mesa Grajales

    2010-08-01

    S31803. The samples were characterized by electron backscattering diffraction, EBSD to obtain the crystalline orientation of individual grains. In addition, mass loss measurements were obtained and surface damage evolution was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM at different times of the test. These results were analyzed as a function of the prior crystallographic characterization. For comparison, a conventional austenitic stainless steel, UNS S30403, was also investigated. It was observed that both the nucleation and the growth of damage are heterogeneous at the grain-size scale due to mesoscale plasticity anisotropy, induced during the CE tests. The heterogeneous character of the cavitation damage is related to both the grain boundary character and the microtexture inside the grains.

  8. Mitochondrial morphology, topology, and membrane interactions in skeletal muscle: a quantitative three-dimensional electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; White, Kathryn; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2013-01-15

    Dynamic remodeling of mitochondrial morphology through membrane dynamics are linked to changes in mitochondrial and cellular function. Although mitochondrial membrane fusion/fission events are frequent in cell culture models, whether mitochondrial membranes dynamically interact in postmitotic muscle fibers in vivo remains unclear. Furthermore, a quantitative assessment of mitochondrial morphology in intact muscle is lacking. Here, using electron microscopy (EM), we provide evidence of interacting membranes from adjacent mitochondria in intact mouse skeletal muscle. Electron-dense mitochondrial contact sites consistent with events of outer mitochondrial membrane tethering are also described. These data suggest that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo among mitochondria, possibly to induce morphology transitions, for kiss-and-run behavior, or other processes involving contact between mitochondrial membranes. Furthermore, a combination of freeze-fracture scanning EM and transmission EM in orthogonal planes was used to characterize and quantify mitochondrial morphology. Two subpopulations of mitochondria were studied: subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF), which exhibited significant differences in morphological descriptors, including form factor (means ± SD for SS: 1.41 ± 0.45 vs. IMF: 2.89 ± 1.76, P mitochondrial size and morphological parameters were highly skewed, suggesting the presence of mechanisms to influence mitochondrial size and shape. In addition, physical continuities between SS and IMF mitochondria indicated mixing of both subpopulations. These data provide evidence that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo in mouse skeletal muscle and that factors may be involved in regulating skeletal muscle mitochondrial morphology.

  9. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Although the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  10. Kinematics of Compton backscattering x-ray source for angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of X-Ray production rates, energy spread, and spectrum of Compton-backscattered photons from a Free Electron Laser on an electron beam in a low energy (136-MeV) compact (8.5-m circumference) storage ring indicate that an X-Ray intensity of 34.6 10{sup 7} X-Ray photons per 0.5-mm {times} 0.5-mm pixel for Coronary Angiography near the 33.169-keV iodine K-absorption edge can be achieved in a 4-msec pulse within a scattering cone of 1-mrad half angle. This intensity, at 10-m from the photon-electron interaction point to the patient is about a factor of 10 larger than presently achieved from a 4.5-T superconducting wiggler source in the NSLS 2.5-GeV storage ring and over an area about 5 times larger. The 2.2-keV energy spread of the Compton-backscattered beam is, however, much larger than the 70-eV spread presently attained form the wiggler source and use of a monochromator. The beam spot at the 10-m interaction point-to-patient distance is 20-mm diameter; larger spots are attainable at larger distances but with a corresponding reduction in X-Ray flux. Such a facility could be an inexpensive clinical alternative to present methods of non-invasive Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), small enough to be deployed in an urban medical center, and could have other medical, industrial and aerospace applications. Problems with the Compton backscattering source include laser beam heating of the mirror in the FEL oscillator optical cavity, achieving a large enough X-Ray beam spot at the patient, and obtaining radiation damping of the transverse oscillations and longitudinal emittance dilution of the storage ring electron beam resulting from photon-electron collisions without going to higher electron energy where the X-Ray energy spread becomes excessive for DSA. 38 refs.

  11. Quantitative nanoscale water mapping in frozen-hydrated skin by low-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovlev, Sergey [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Misra, Manoj; Shi, Shanling [Unilever Research and Development, Trumbull, CT 06611 (United States); Firlar, Emre [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Libera, Matthew, E-mail: mlibera@stevens.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Spatially resolved low-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a powerful method to quantitatively determine the water distribution in frozen-hydrated biological materials at high spatial resolution. However, hydrated tissue, particularly its hydrophilic protein-rich component, is very sensitive to electron radiation. This sensitivity has traditionally limited the achievable spatial resolution because of the relatively high noise associated with low-dose data acquisition. We show that the damage caused by high-dose data acquisition affects the accuracy of a multiple-least-squares (MLS) compositional analysis because of inaccuracies in the reference spectrum used to represent the protein. Higher spatial resolution combined with more accurate compositional analysis can be achieved if a reference spectrum is used that better represents the electron-beam-damaged protein component under frozen-hydrated conditions rather than one separately collected from dry protein under low-dose conditions. We thus introduce a method to extract the best-fitting protein reference spectrum from an experimental spectrum dataset. This method can be used when the MLS-fitting problem is sufficiently constrained so that the only unknown is the reference spectrum for the protein component. We apply this approach to map the distribution of water in cryo-sections obtained from frozen-hydrated tissue of porcine skin. The raw spectral data were collected at doses up to 10{sup 5} e/nm{sup 2} despite the fact that observable damage begins at doses as low as 10{sup 3} e/nm{sup 2}. The resulting spatial resolution of 10 nm is 5-10 times better than that in previous studies of frozen-hydrated tissue and is sufficient to resolve sub-cellular water fluctuations as well as the inter-cellular lipid-rich regions of skin where water-mediated processes are believed to play a significant role in the phenotype of keratinocytes in the stratum corneum.

  12. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  13. Quantitative Agreement between Electron-Optical Phase Images of WSe2 and Simulations Based on Electrostatic Potentials that Include Bonding Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghardt, S.; Winkler, F.; Zanolli, Z.; Verstraete, M. J.; Barthel, J.; Tavabi, A. H.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Kardynal, B. E.

    2017-02-01

    The quantitative analysis of electron-optical phase images recorded using off-axis electron holography often relies on the use of computer simulations of electron propagation through a sample. However, simulations that make use of the independent atom approximation are known to overestimate experimental phase shifts by approximately 10%, as they neglect bonding effects. Here, we compare experimental and simulated phase images for few-layer WSe2 . We show that a combination of pseudopotentials and all-electron density functional theory calculations can be used to obtain accurate mean electron phases, as well as improved atomic-resolution spatial distribution of the electron phase. The comparison demonstrates a perfect contrast match between experimental and simulated atomic-resolution phase images for a sample of precisely known thickness. The low computational cost of this approach makes it suitable for the analysis of large electronic systems, including defects, substitutional atoms, and material interfaces.

  14. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  15. Backscatter nephelometer to calibrate scanning lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyle E. Wold; Vladmir A. Kovalev; Wei Min Hao

    2008-01-01

    The general concept of an open-path backscatter nephelometer, its design, principles of calibration and the operational use are discussed. The research-grade instrument, which operates at the wavelength 355 nm, will be co-located with a scanning-lidar at measurement sites near wildfires, and used for the lidar calibration. Such a near-end calibration has significant...

  16. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  17. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  19. Preliminary backscatter results from the hydrosweep multibeam system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hagen, R.A.; Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.

    of Oceanography to convert the measured electrical energy into acoustic backscatter energy. This conversion includes corrections for the position, slope, and area of the scattering surface. In this paper we present backscatter data from several areas surveyed...

  20. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  1. Backscatter C [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  2. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  3. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  4. BackscatterB [EM300]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  5. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  6. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  7. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  8. BackscatterB [EM300]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  9. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. Backscatter C [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  11. Backscatter D [USGS]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  12. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  14. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  15. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  16. BackscatterA [SWATH]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  17. Backscatter A [8101]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  18. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  19. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Half Moon Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two...

  20. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  1. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  2. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  3. Backscatter D [7125]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  4. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  5. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  6. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  7. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  8. Backscatter B [Swath]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  9. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  10. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  11. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  12. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  14. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  15. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  16. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  17. Backscatter C [7125]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  18. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  19. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  1. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore Half Moon Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two...

  2. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  3. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  4. BackscatterA [SWATH]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  5. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  6. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  7. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  8. Backscatter A [8101]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  9. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. Backscatter C [7125]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  11. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  12. User expectations for multibeam echo sounders backscatter strength data-looking back into the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucieer, Vanessa; Roche, Marc; Degrendele, Koen; Malik, Mashkoor; Dolan, Margaret; Lamarche, Geoffroy

    2017-05-01

    With the ability of multibeam echo sounders (MBES) to measure backscatter strength (BS) as a function of true angle of insonification across the seafloor, came a new recognition of the potential of backscatter measurements to remotely characterize the properties of the seafloor. Advances in transducer design, digital electronics, signal processing capabilities, navigation, and graphic display devices, have improved the resolution and particularly the dynamic range available to sonar and processing software manufacturers. Alongside these improvements the expectations of what the data can deliver has also grown. In this paper, we identify these user-expectations and explore how MBES backscatter is utilized by different communities involved in marine seabed research at present, and the aspirations that these communities have for the data in the future. The results presented here are based on a user survey conducted by the GeoHab (Marine Geological and Biological Habitat Mapping) association. This paper summarises the different processing procedures employed to extract useful information from MBES backscatter data and the various intentions for which the user community collect the data. We show how a range of backscatter output products are generated from the different processing procedures, and how these results are taken up by different scientific disciplines, and also identify common constraints in handling MBES BS data. Finally, we outline our expectations for the future of this unique and important data source for seafloor mapping and characterisation.

  13. Evaluation of the viability of cultured corneal endothelial cells by quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaminos, M; Sanchez-Quevedo, M C; Muñoz-Avila, J I; García, J M; Crespo, P V; González-Andrades, M; Campos, A

    2007-06-01

    Construction of artificial organs and tissues by tissue engineering is strongly dependent on the availability of viable cells. For that reason, the viability and the physiological status of cells kept in culture must be evaluated before the cells can be used for clinical purposes. In this work, we determined the viability of isolated rabbit corneal endothelial cells by trypan blue staining and quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Our results showed that the ionic content of potassium in cultured corneal endothelial cells tended to rise initially, but significantly decreased in cells in the fifth (and final) subculture, especially in comparison to cells in the fourth subculture (P subculture than in the fourth subculture (P subculture (P = 0.031). These data imply a remarkable decrease in the K/Na ratio from the fourth to the fifth subculture. Our microanalytical results, along with the morphological differences between cells in the last two subcultures, are compatible with an early phase of the preapoptotic process in the fifth subculture, and suggest that cells of the first four subcultures would be better candidates for tissue engineering.

  14. Generation of domestic waste electrical and electronic equipment on Fernando de Noronha Island: qualitative and quantitative aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Dhiego Raphael Rodrigues; de Oliveira, José Diego; Selva, Vanice Fragoso; Silva, Maisa Mendonça; Santos, Simone Machado

    2017-07-06

    The accelerated growth trajectory of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is a matter of concern for governments worldwide. In developing countries, the problem is more complex because municipal waste management is still a challenge for municipalities. Fernando de Noronha Island, an environmentally protected area, has a transfer station for solid waste before it is sent to the final destination abroad, which is different waste management model to most urban areas. In order to check the specifics of management of WEEE, this study aimed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the generation of this type of waste on the main island of Fernando de Noronha, taking into consideration aspects related to consumption habits and handling of waste. During the in situ research, a questionnaire was applied to a sample of 83 households. The results provide a picture of the generation of WEEE for a period of 1 year, when a production of 1.3 tons of WEEE was estimated. Relationships between education level and monthly income and between education level and number of plasma/LCD TVs and washing machines were confirmed. Another important result is that only two socioeconomic variables (monthly income and education level) are related to two recycling behavior variables. In addition, the population and government treat WEEE as ordinary waste, ignoring its contaminant potential. Despite the existence of relevant legislation concerning the treatment and disposal of WEEE, additional efforts will be required by the government in order to properly manage this type of waste on the island.

  15. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  16. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II:Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢涛; William Perrie; 赵尚卓; 方贺; 于文金; 何宜军

    2016-01-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface.

  17. Cell viability evaluation of transdifferentiated endothelial-like cells by quantitative electron-probe X-ray microanalysis for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico, Manuel; Rodríguez-Morata, Alejandro; Garzón, Ingrid; Campos, Fernando; Jaimes-Parra, Boris; Pérez-Köhler, Barbara; Buján, Julia; Alaminos, Miguel; Sánchez-Quevedo, M Carmen

    2015-11-01

    Development of an efficient vascular substitute by tissue engineering is strongly dependent on endothelial cell viability. The aim of this study was to evaluate cell viability of transdifferentiated endothelial-like cells (Tr-ELC) by using for the first time electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPXMA), not only to accurately analyze cell viability by quantifying the intracellular ionic concentrations, but also to establish their possible use in vascular tissue engineering protocols. Human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells (HWJSC) and endothelial cells from the human umbilical vein (HUVEC) were isolated and cultured. Transdifferentiation from HWJSC to the endothelial phenotype was induced. EPXMA was carried out to analyze HUVEC, HWJSC and Tr-ELC cells by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an EDAX DX-4 microanalytical system and a solid-state backscattered electron detector. To determine total ion content, the peak-to-local-background (P/B) ratio method was used with reference to standards composed of dextran containing known amounts of inorganic salts. Our results revealed a high K/Na ratio in Tr-ELC (9.41), in association with the maintenance of the intracellular levels of chlorine, phosphorous and magnesium and an increase of calcium (p=0.031) and sulfur (p=0.022) as compared to HWJSC. Calcium levels were similar for HUVEC and Tr-ELC. These results ensure that transdifferentiated cells are highly viable and resemble the phenotypic and microanalytical profile of endothelial cells. Tr-ELC induced from HWJSC may fulfill the requirements for use in tissue engineering protocols applied to the vascular system at the viability and microanalytical levels.

  18. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  19. Radar Backscatter Study of Sea Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    in controlling the "state" of the ice ( temperatura and salinity) are shown in Figure 4.3-79. The salinity profile is a typical irregular c-shaped...the University of Kansas to provide well- controlled systematic studies to relate radar backscatter return to sea ice and to pin down some of the...34..,. : . - " ... ,. -.. .... .. .. ... ,,, ... ... _ ., ’.. . . , 72. Profiles of the parameters most important in controlling the "state" of the ice (temperature and salinity

  20. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, K; Pao, H

    2007-01-16

    Low-frequency electromagnetic scattering from one or more tunnels in a lossy dielectric half-space is considered. The tunnel radii are assumed small compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the surrounding medium; a tunnel can thus be modeled as a thin scatterer, described by an equivalent impedance per unit length. We examine the normalized backscattering width for cases in which the air-ground interface is either smooth or rough.

  1. Quantitative determination of the mineral distribution in different collagen zones of calcifying tendon using high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, B. F.; Song, M. J.; Landis, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    High voltage electron microscopic tomography was used to make the first quantitative determination of the distribution of mineral between different regions of collagen fibrils undergoing early calcification in normal leg tendons of the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. The tomographic 3-D reconstruction was computed from a tilt series of 61 different views spanning an angular range of +/- 60 degrees in 2 degrees intervals. Successive applications of an interactive computer operation were used to mask the collagen banding pattern of either hole or overlap zones into separate versions of the reconstruction. In such 3-D volumes, regions specified by the mask retained their original image density while the remaining volume was set to background levels. This approach was also applied to the mineral crystals present in the same volumes to yield versions of the 3-D reconstructions that were masked for both the crystal mass and the respective collagen zones. Density profiles from these volumes contained a distinct peak corresponding only to the crystal mass. A comparison of the integrated density of this peak from each profile established that 64% of the crystals observed were located in the collagen hole zones and 36% were found in the overlap zones. If no changes in crystal stability occur once crystals are formed, this result suggests the possibilities that nucleation of mineral is preferentially and initially associated with the hole zones, nucleation occurs more frequently in the hole zones, the rate of crystal growth is more rapid in the hole zones, or a combination of these alternatives. All lead to the conclusion that the overall accumulation of mineral mass is predominant in the collagen hole zones compared to overlap zones during early collagen fibril calcification.

  2. Note: Alignment/focus dependent core-line sensitivity for quantitative chemical analysis in hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using a hemispherical electron analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, Conan; Browning, Raymond; Karlin, Barry A.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Woicik, Joseph C. [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is an established technique for quantitative chemical analysis requiring accurate peak intensity analysis. We present evidence of focus/alignment dependence of relative peak intensities for peaks over a broad kinetic energy range with a hemispherical electron analyzer operated in a position imaging mode. A decrease of over 50% in the Ag 2p{sub 3/2} to Ag 3d ratio is observed in a Ag specimen. No focus/alignment dependence is observed when using an angular imaging mode, necessitating the use of angular mode for quantitative chemical analysis.

  3. Recommendations for processing atmospheric attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotthaus, Simone; O'Connor, Ewan; Münkel, Christoph; Charlton-Perez, Cristina; Haeffelin, Martial; Gabey, Andrew M.; Grimmond, C. Sue B.

    2016-08-01

    Ceilometer lidars are used for cloud base height detection, to probe aerosol layers in the atmosphere (e.g. detection of elevated layers of Saharan dust or volcanic ash), and to examine boundary layer dynamics. Sensor optics and acquisition algorithms can strongly influence the observed attenuated backscatter profiles; therefore, physical interpretation of the profiles requires careful application of corrections. This study addresses the widely deployed Vaisala CL31 ceilometer. Attenuated backscatter profiles are studied to evaluate the impact of both the hardware generation and firmware version. In response to this work and discussion within the CL31/TOPROF user community (TOPROF, European COST Action aiming to harmonise ground-based remote sensing networks across Europe), Vaisala released new firmware (versions 1.72 and 2.03) for the CL31 sensors. These firmware versions are tested against previous versions, showing that several artificial features introduced by the data processing have been removed. Hence, it is recommended to use this recent firmware for analysing attenuated backscatter profiles. To allow for consistent processing of historic data, correction procedures have been developed that account for artefacts detected in data collected with older firmware. Furthermore, a procedure is proposed to determine and account for the instrument-related background signal from electronic and optical components. This is necessary for using attenuated backscatter observations from any CL31 ceilometer. Recommendations are made for the processing of attenuated backscatter observed with Vaisala CL31 sensors, including the estimation of noise which is not provided in the standard CL31 output. After taking these aspects into account, attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers are considered capable of providing valuable information for a range of applications including atmospheric boundary layer studies, detection of elevated aerosol layers, and model

  4. Retrieval of aerosol backscatter and extinction from airborne coherent Doppler wind lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chouza

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for calibration and quantitative aerosol optical properties retrieval from Doppler wind lidars (DWL is presented in this work. Due to the strong wavelength dependence of the atmospheric molecular backscatter and the low sensitivity of the coherent detection to spectrally broad signals, calibration methods for aerosol lidars cannot be applied to a coherent DWLs usually operating at wavelengths between 1.5–2 μm. Instead, concurrent measurements of an airborne DWL at 2 μm and the POLIS ground-based aerosol lidar at 532 nm are used in this work, in combination with sun photometer measurements, for the calibration and retrieval of aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles. The proposed method was applied to measurements from the SALTRACE experiment in June–July 2013, which aimed at quantifying the aerosol transport and change in aerosol properties from the Sahara desert to the Caribbean. The retrieved backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles from the airborne DWL are within 20% of POLIS aerosol lidar and CALIPSO satellite measurements. Thus the proposed method extends the capabilities of coherent DWL to measure profiles of the horizontal and vertical wind towards aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles, which is of high benefit for aerosol transport studies.

  5. Processing ultrasound backscatter to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczkowski, Peter J.; Anand, Ajay; Bailey, Michael R.

    2005-09-01

    The development of new noninvasive surgical methods such as HIFU for the treatment of cancer and internal bleeding requires simultaneous development of new sensing approaches to guide, monitor, and assess the therapy. Ultrasound imaging using echo amplitude has long been used to map tissue morphology for diagnostic interpretation by the clinician. New quantitative ultrasonic methods that rely on amplitude and phase processing for tissue characterization are being developed for monitoring of ablative therapy. We have been developing the use of full wave ultrasound backscattering for real-time temperature estimation, and to image changes in tissue backscatter spectrum as therapy progresses. Both approaches rely on differential processing of the backscatter signal in time, and precise measurement of phase differences. Noise and artifacts from motion and nonstationary speckle statistics are addressed by constraining inversions for tissue parameters with physical models. We present results of HIFU experiments with static point and scanned HIFU exposures in which temperature rise can be accurately mapped using a new heat transfer equation (HTE) model-constrained inverse approach. We also present results of a recently developed spectral imaging method that elucidates microbubble-mediated nonlinearity not visible as a change in backscatter amplitude. [Work supported by Army MRMC.

  6. Backscattering analysis of high frequency ultrasonic imaging for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Thomas; Akiyama, Takahiro; Lee, Changyang; Martin, Sue E.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2017-03-01

    A new ultrasound-guided breast biopsy technique is proposed. The technique utilizes conventional ultrasound guidance coupled with a high frequency embedded ultrasound array located within the biopsy needle to improve the accuracy in breast cancer diagnosis.1 The array within the needle is intended to be used to detect micro- calcifications indicative of early breast cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Backscattering analysis has the potential to characterize tissues to improve localization of lesions. This paper describes initial results of the application of backscattering analysis of breast biopsy tissue specimens and shows the usefulness of high frequency ultrasound for the new biopsy related technique. Ultrasound echoes of ex-vivo breast biopsy tissue specimens were acquired by using a single-element transducer with a bandwidth from 41 MHz to 88 MHz utilizing a UBM methodology, and the backscattering coefficients were calculated. These values as well as B-mode image data were mapped in 2D and matched with each pathology image for the identification of tissue type for the comparison to the pathology images corresponding to each plane. Microcalcifications were significantly distinguished from normal tissue. Adenocarcinoma was also successfully differentiated from adipose tissue. These results indicate that backscattering analysis is able to quantitatively distinguish tissues into normal and abnormal, which should help radiologists locate abnormal areas during the proposed ultrasound-guided breast biopsy with high frequency ultrasound.

  7. Polarized Rayleigh back-scattering from individual semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Duming; Wu Jian; Lu Qiujie; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Eklund, Peter C, E-mail: hur3@psu.edu [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-08-06

    A complete understanding of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is required in order to further develop a new generation of opto-electronic and photonic devices based on these nanosystems. The reduced dimensionality and high aspect ratio of nanofilaments can induce strong polarization dependence of the light absorption, emission and scattering, leading in some cases to the observation of optical antenna effects. In this work we present the first systematic study of polarized Rayleigh back-scattering from individual crystalline semiconductor NWs with known crystalline structure, orientation and diameters. To explain our experimental Rayleigh polar patterns, we propose a simple theory that relies on a secondary calculation of the volume-averaged internal electromagnetic fields inside the NW. These results revealed that the internal and emitted field can be enhanced depending on the polarization with respect to the NW axis; we also show that this effect strongly depends on the NW diameter.

  8. Spectral characteristics of Compton backscattering sources. Linear and nonlinear modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potylitsyn, A.P., E-mail: potylitsyn@tpu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kolchuzhkin, A.M. [Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, 127994 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Compton backscattering (CBS) of laser photons by relativistic electrons is widely used to design X-ray and gamma sources with a bandwidth better than 1% using a tight collimation. In order to obtain a reasonable intensity of the resulting beam one has to increase power of a laser pulse simultaneously with narrowing of the waist in the interaction point. It can lead to nonlinearity of CBS process which is affected on spectral characteristics of the collimated gamma beam (so-called “red-shift” of the spectral line, emission of “soft” photons with energy much less than the spectral line energy). In this paper we have analyzed such an influence using Monte-Carlo technique and have shown that even weak nonlinearity should be taken into account if the gamma beam is formed by a narrow aperture.

  9. An Ultrasonic Backscatter Instrument for Cancellous Bone Evaluation in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic backscatter technique has shown promise as a noninvasive cancellous bone assessment tool. A novel ultrasonic backscatter bone diagnostic (UBBD instrument and an in vivo application for neonatal bone evaluation are introduced in this study. The UBBD provides several advantages, including noninvasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, portability, and simplicity. In this study, the backscatter signal could be measured within 5 s using the UBBD. Ultrasonic backscatter measurements were performed on 467 neonates (268 males and 199 females at the left calcaneus. The backscatter signal was measured at a central frequency of 3.5 MHz. The delay (T1 and duration (T2 of the backscatter signal of interest (SOI were varied, and the apparent integrated backscatter (AIB, frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB, zero frequency intercept of apparent backscatter (FIAB, and spectral centroid shift (SCS were calculated. The results showed that the SOI selection had a direct influence on cancellous bone evaluation. The AIB and FIAB were positively correlated with the gestational age (|R| up to 0.45, P10 µs. Moderate positive correlations (|R| up to 0.45, P10 µs. The T2 mainly introduced fluctuations in the observed correlation coefficients. The moderate correlations observed with UBBD demonstrate the feasibility of using the backscatter signal to evaluate neonatal bone status. This study also proposes an explicit standard for in vivo SOI selection and neonatal cancellous bone assessment.

  10. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis for single-particle analysis and its application for characterizing atmospheric aerosol particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shila Maskey; Chul-Un Ro

    2011-02-01

    An energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA) technique using an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, designated as low-Z particle EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such as C, N and O, as well as higher-Z elements that can be analysed by conventional ED-EPMA. The quantitative determination of low-Z elements (using full Monte Carlo simulations, from the electron impact to the X-ray detection) in individual particles has improved the applicability of single-particle analysis, especially in atmospheric environmental aerosol research; many environmentally important atmospheric particles, e.g. sulphates, nitrates, ammonium and carbonaceous particles, contain low-Z elements. To demonstrate its practical applicability, the application of the low-Z particle EPMA for the characterization of Asian Dust, urban and subway aerosol particles is shown herein. In addition, it is demonstrated that the Monte Carlo calculation can also be applied in a quantitative single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), showing that the technique is useful and reliable for the characterization of submicron aerosol particles

  11. Elementary polarization properties in the backscattering configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Oriol; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2014-10-15

    In the normal incidence backscattering configuration, a polarimetric measurement always preserves the reciprocal symmetry. For a reciprocal Jones matrix, the number of elementary polarization properties is reduced from six to four. In this work, the physical interpretation of these properties is examined and they are compared with the equivalent polarization properties in transmission. It is found that, with the exception of natural optical activity, a polarimetric backreflection experiment can essentially provide the same type of information about the anisotropy of a medium as a transmission analysis, although transmission and backreflection information comes in a completely different form. Experimental examples are provided to illustrate the discussion.

  12. Backscattering Differential Ghost Imaging in Turbid Media

    CERN Document Server

    Bina, M; Molteni, M; Gatti, A; Lugiato, L A; Ferri, F

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we present experimental results concerning the retrieval of images of absorbing objects immersed in turbid media via differential ghost imaging (DGI) in a backscattering configuration. The method has been applied, for the first time to our knowledge, to the imaging of small thin black objects located at different depths inside a turbid solution of polystyrene nanospheres and its performances assessed via comparison with standard imaging techniques. A simple theoretical model capable of describing the basic optics of DGI in turbid media is proposed.

  13. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Stage, Bjarne; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fis to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fis species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments...... is 10 MHz and the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at the focus point is 0.54 mm in the lateral direction. The transducer model in Field II was calibrated using a wire phantom to validate the simulated point spread function. The inputs to the simulation were the CT image data of the fis converted...

  14. Bulk elastic waves with unidirectional backscattering-immune topological states in a time-dependent superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinteck, N., E-mail: swinteck@email.arizona.edu; Matsuo, S.; Runge, K.; Lucas, P.; Deymier, P. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Vasseur, J. O. [Institut d' Electronique, de Micro-électronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, Cité Scientifique, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2015-08-14

    Recent progress in electronic and electromagnetic topological insulators has led to the demonstration of one way propagation of electron and photon edge states and the possibility of immunity to backscattering by edge defects. Unfortunately, such topologically protected propagation of waves in the bulk of a material has not been observed. We show, in the case of sound/elastic waves, that bulk waves with unidirectional backscattering-immune topological states can be observed in a time-dependent elastic superlattice. The superlattice is realized via spatial and temporal modulation of the stiffness of an elastic material. Bulk elastic waves in this superlattice are supported by a manifold in momentum space with the topology of a single twist Möbius strip. Our results demonstrate the possibility of attaining one way transport and immunity to scattering of bulk elastic waves.

  15. Demonstration of zero optical backscattering from single nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Person, Steven; Lapin, Zachary; Saenz, Juan Jose; Wicks, Gary; Novotny, Lukas

    2012-01-01

    We present the first experimental demonstration of zero backscattering from nanoparticles at op- tical frequencies as originally discussed by Kerker et. al. [M. Kerker, D. Wang, and C. Giles, J. Opt. Soc. A 73, 765 (1983)]. GaAs pillars were fabricated on a fused silica substrate and the spectrum of the backscattered radiation was measured in the wavelength range 600-1000 nm. Suppression of backscattering occurred at ~725 nm, agreeing with calculations based on the discrete dipole approximation. Particles with zero backscattering provide new functionality for metamaterials and optical antennas.

  16. CRED Acoustic Backscatter Guam 2003, Imagery Extracted from Gridded Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter extracted from gridded bathymetry of the banktops and shelf environments of Guam, of the Mariana Islands Archipelago.

  17. Sea Floor Analyses Based On Multibeam Backscatter Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.

    Measurements of acoustic backscatter strength can be applied to analyse sea floor coverage on a spatial extent. They provide consistent coverage compared to analy- ses based on only a few surface samples. In particular the spatial validity of surface samples can be determined by analyses based on acoustic backscatter strength and sampling locations representative for the surrounding area can be determined. Dur- ing the cruise ANTXVII/4 of the German RV "Polarstern", a high precision swath bathymetry survey was performed along the European continental margin in the Por- cupine Seabight off southwest Ireland. Within the Porcupine Seabight a number of mound structures have been discovered earlier, most of them being carbonate mounds. The structure and genesis of these mounds are the main objective of recent investiga- tions. The cruise and the subsequent investigations are part of the EU project GEO- MOUND. They focus on the Belgica mound province. Besides the depth measure- ments, the acoustic intensities of the received echos have been recorded. Taking into account the transmitted and received sound level, acoustic beam patterns, and acous- tic attenuation in the water column, the backscatter strength of the ensonified area was calculated. This backscatter information is used to analyse the sea floor cover- age. Based on the data of the systematic survey the spatial variation of the backscatter strength was derived. Regions of equal backscatter characteristic can be combined and functions showing the dependency between backscatter strength and incidence angle of the acoustic wave can be determined. These functions help interpreting sea floor coverage. The mapping of the backscatter strength of the mound area indicates clear changes in backscatter strength. Small and shallow channels show a lower backscat- ter strength than their surroundings. That means the surface coverage of the channels is smooth with respect to the surroundings. One interpretation of this

  18. Backscattered Electron Microscopy as an Advanced Technique in Petrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsley, David Henry; Manley, Curtis Robert

    1989-01-01

    Three uses of this method with sandstone, desert varnish, and granite weathering are described. Background information on this technique is provided. Advantages of this type of microscopy are stressed. (CW)

  19. Ion beam polishing for three-dimensional electron backscattered diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Ubhi, H.S.;

    2013-01-01

    averaging and/or poor 3D-EBSD data quality. In this work a low kV focused ion beam was successfully implemented to automatically polish surfaces during 3D-EBSD of La- and Nb-doped strontium titanate of volume 12.6 × 12.6 × 3.0 μm. The key to achieving this technique is the combination of a defocused low k...

  20. Automated determination of crystal orientations from electron backscattering patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Niels Christian Krieger

    1994-01-01

    determination of crystallographic orientations from EBSPs is accurate knowledge of three calibration parameters which describe the position of the point from which the patterns are emitted relative to the phosphor screen on which they are recorded. This thesis will describe a novel method by which...... of the position of the bands or the zone axes of EBSPs have existed for several years now. Until recently, however, the localization of either the bands or the zone axes of EBSPs has required the valuable time and attention of a human operator, thus obviously limiting the amounts of orientation data that can...... these calibration parameters can be estimated with high precision. The quality of EBSPs provides important information about the reliability of the measured crystal orientations and about the perfection of the lattice in which the pattern is generated. A measure which allows the quality of EBSPs to be evaluated...

  1. Radar backscatter properties of milo and soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.; Metzler, T.

    1975-01-01

    The radar backscatter from fields of milo and soybeans was measured with a ground based radar as a function of frequency (8-18 GHz), polarization (HH and VV) and angle of incidence (0 deg-70 deg) during the summer of 1974. Supporting ground truth was gathered contemporaneously with the backscatter data. At nadir sigma deg of milo correlated highly, r = 0.96, with soil moisture in the milo field at 8.6 GHz but decreased to a value of r = 0.78 at a frequency of 17.0 GHz. Correlation studies of the variations of sigma deg with soil moisture in the soybean fields were not possible due to a lack of a meaningful soil moisture dynamic range. At the larger angles of incidence, however, sigma deg of soybeans did appear to be dependent on precipitation. It is suggested this phenomenon was caused by the rain altering plant geometry. In general sigma deg of both milo and soybeans had a relatively small dynamic range at the higher angles of incidence and showed no significant dependence on the measured crop parameters.

  2. Phase analysis in duplex stainless steel: comparison of EBSD and quantitative metallography methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, J.; Chmiela, B.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the research was to work out the qualitative and quantitative analysis of phases in DSS in as-received state and after thermal aging. For quantitative purposes, SEM observations, EDS analyses and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) methods were employed. Qualitative analysis of phases was performed by two methods: EBSD and classical quantitative metallography. A juxtaposition of different etchants for the revealing of microstructure and brief review of sample preparation methods for EBSD studies were presented. Different ways of sample preparation were tested and based on these results a detailed methodology of DSS phase analysis was developed including: surface finishing, selective etching methods and image acquisition. The advantages and disadvantages of applied methods were pointed out and compared the accuracy of the analysis phase performed by both methods.

  3. The Impact of Electronic Educational Technology on Ninth Grade At-Risk Reading Students: A Quantitative Investigation of Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Darcel

    2010-01-01

    Over 50% of American public school students read below average literacy levels. Recent research suggests that oral and print-based high school curriculum instruction require an infusion of electronic educational technology (EET), such as computer programs, online instruction, electronic thesaurus, and other devices, to better serve student need…

  4. Heavy Element Staining of Sedimentary Organic Matter Functional Groups for Backscattered Electron Imaging Marquage par éléments lourds de la matière organique sédimentaire pour la microscopie électronique en électrons rétrodiffusés

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belin-Geindre S.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The scanning electron microscopy (SEM in backscattered electron mode (BSE, which imaging is based upon atomic number (Z contrasts between constituents, allows to visualize the organic matter distribution within the sediment. However the precise identification of organic matter is not possible as all the organic matter appears black. The contrasts between the different types of organic matter were enhanced for the use of the SEM/BSE imaging by staining organic matter with high Z elements. Experimental procedure was tested in terms of faisability, selectivity and specificity on polymers containing functional groups likely to occur in sedimentary organic matter. Then staining was applied to sedimentary organic matter, i. e. to purely organic sediments (algal mats, kukersite and coal and to clayey sediments (Kimmeridge Clay Formation. The chosen staining solutions comprised : ruthenium tetroxide, osmium tetroxide, phosphotungstic acid (PTA and silver methenamine. Samples were immersed in staining solutions for 24 hours, rinsed and observed with SEM/BSE. The penetration depth ranges between 20 and 150 µm. Other complementary tests with ruthenium tetroxide and mercury acetate were also performed on polymers. Tests with PTA, silver methenamine and osmium tetroxide were satisfying and presented a more or less broad specificity. Osmium allows the distinction of each algal laminite of the algal mat. The different parts of the kukersite react specifically with osmium, PTA and silver. The coal constituents display a specific staining with silver methenamine. Osmium and PTA allow in the Kimmeridge Clay sample (a to differenciate several types of organic particles according to their chemical composition; (b to locate the organic matter finely dispersed within the mineral, clayey matrix. La microscopie électronique à balayage (MEB en mode électrons rétrodiffusés (ER permet de visualiser la répartition de toute la matière organique d'un sédiment (Belin

  5. Scattering From the Finite-Length, Dielectric Circular Cylinder. Part 2 - On the Validity of an Analytical Solution for Characterizing Backscattering from Tree Trunks at P-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    flared base is expected to provide a closer emulation of trunk geometries encountered in nature. Only the 3-dB error lines for the analytical solution...On the Validity of an Analytical Solution for Characterizing Backscattering from Tree Trunks at P-Band by DaHan Liao...Validity of an Analytical Solution for Characterizing Backscattering from Tree Trunks at P-Band by DaHan Liao Sensors and Electron Devices

  6. An Analysis of Selected Quantitative Methods to Air Force Communications Command Electronics Installation Workload Assignment and Scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    schedule workload assigned to the Air Force Comunications omand Engineering and Installations Activities. Each model applies mission nd unit unique...Anderson, David R., Dennis J. Sweeney, and Thomas A. Williams. An Introduction to Management Science, Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making. St Paul MN

  7. Quantitative electron probe microanalysis in the system Fe-Sn-C using the Claisse-Quintin relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredriksz, W.; Koster, H.; Kolster, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative interpretation of EPMA measurements was required for the construction of the Fe-Sn-C phase diagram. This involved the conversion of measured x-ray intensities into concentrations, which is difficult for a light element (such as C) being present among heavier elements (Fe and Sn). To mee

  8. Use of near infrared correlation spectroscopy for quantitation of surface iron, absorbed water and stored electronic energy in a suite of Mars soil analog materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Lelia M.; Banin, Amos; Carle, Glenn; Orenberg, James; Scattergood, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A number of questions concerning the surface mineralogy and the history of water on Mars remain unresolved using the Viking analyses and Earth-based telescopic data. Identification and quantitation of iron-bearing clays on Mars would elucidate these outstanding issues. Near infrared correlation analysis, a method typically applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of individual constituents of multicomponent mixtures, is adapted here to selection of distinctive features of a small, highly homologous series of Fe/Ca-exchanged montmorillonites and several kalinites. Independently determined measures of surface iron, relative humidity and stored electronic energy were used as constituent data for linear regression of the constituent vs. reflectance data throughout the spectral region 0.68 to 2.5 micrometers. High correlations were found in appropriate regions for all three constituents, though that with stored energy is still considered tenuous. Quantitation was improved using 1st and 2nd derivative spectra. High resolution data over a broad spectral range would be required to quantitatively identify iron-bearing clays by remotely sensed reflectance.

  9. Rutherford backscattering analysis of contaminants in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, D. E.; Pfeffer, R. L.; Sadler, G. D.

    1997-05-01

    Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to understand the sorption and desorption of organic contaminants in the polymer Poly(ethylene terephthalate), or PET. Samples were exposed to a range of organics to simulate contamination of PET that can take place in the post-consumer waste stream. From RBS analysis, concentration depth profiles were shown to vary from a monolayer regime surface layer to a saturation level, depending on the contaminant. Heat treatments were also applied to contaminated polymer to simulate thermal processing steps in the recycling of PET. Heating caused a dramatic decrease in contaminants and in some cases a complete removal of contamination was achieved to the limit of RBS detectability.

  10. Coherent Backscattering of Ultra-cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Jendrzejewski, Fred; Richard, Jérémie; Date, Aditya; Plisson, Thomas; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain; Josse, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We report on the direct observation of coherent backscattering (CBS) of ultra-cold atoms, in a quasi two dimensional configuration. Launching atoms with a well defined momentum in a laser speckle disordered potential, we follow the progressive build up of the momentum scattering pattern, consisting of a ring associated with multiple elastic scattering, and the CBS peak in the backward direction. Monitoring the depletion of the initial momentum component and the formation of the angular ring profile allow us to determine microscopic transport quantities. The time resolved evolution of the CBS peak is studied and is found a fair agreement with predictions, at long times as well as at short times. The observation of CBS can be considered a direct signature of coherence in quantum transport of particles in disordered media. It is responsible for the so called weak localization phenomenon, which is the precursor of Anderson localization.

  11. CHANGES OF BACKSCATTERING PARAMETERS DURING CHILLING INJURY IN BANANAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NORHASHILA HASHIM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The change in backscattering parameters during the appearance of chilling injury in bananas was investigated. Bananas were stored at a chilling temperature for two days and the degrees of the chilling injuries that appeared were measured before, during and after storage using backscattering imaging and visual assessment. Laser lights at 660 nm and 785 nm wavelengths were shot consecutively onto the samples in a dark room and a camera was used to capture the backscattered lights that appeared on the samples. The captured images were analysed and the changes of intensity against pixel count were plotted into graphs. The plotted graph provides useful information of backscattering parameters such as inflection point (IP, slope after inflection point (SA, and full width at half maximum (FWHM and saturation radius (RSAT. Results of statistical analysis indicated that there were significant changes of these backscattering parameters as chilling injury developed.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of backscattering process in dislocation-containing SrTiO{sub 3} single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwik, P., E-mail: przemyslaw.jozwik@itme.edu.pl [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Sathish, N. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland); Nowicki, L. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Jagielski, J.; Turos, A. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Kovarik, L.; Arey, B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Studies of defects formation in crystals are of obvious importance in electronics, nuclear engineering and other disciplines where materials are exposed to different forms of irradiation. Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling (RBS/C) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are the most convenient tool for this purpose, as they allow one to determine several features of lattice defects: their type, concentration and damage accumulation kinetic. On the other hand various irradiation conditions can be efficiently modeled by ion irradiation method without leading to the radioactivity of the sample. Combination of ion irradiation with channeling experiment and MC simulations appears thus as a most versatile method in studies of radiation damage in materials. The paper presents the results on such a study performed on SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) single crystals irradiated with 320 keV Ar ions. The samples were analyzed also by using HRTEM as a complementary method which enables the measurement of geometrical parameters of crystal lattice deformation in the vicinity of dislocations. Once the parameters and their variations within the distance of several lattice constants from the dislocation core are known, they may be used in MC simulations for the quantitative determination of dislocation depth distribution profiles. The final outcome of the deconvolution procedure are cross-sections values calculated for two types of defects observed (RDA and dislocations)

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of backscattering process in dislocation-containing SrTiO3 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwik, P.; Sathish, N.; Nowicki, L.; Jagielski, J.; Turos, A.; Kovarik, L.; Arey, B.

    2014-05-01

    Studies of defects formation in crystals are of obvious importance in electronics, nuclear engineering and other disciplines where materials are exposed to different forms of irradiation. Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling (RBS/C) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are the most convenient tool for this purpose, as they allow one to determine several features of lattice defects: their type, concentration and damage accumulation kinetic. On the other hand various irradiation conditions can be efficiently modeled by ion irradiation method without leading to the radioactivity of the sample. Combination of ion irradiation with channeling experiment and MC simulations appears thus as a most versatile method in studies of radiation damage in materials. The paper presents the results on such a study performed on SrTiO3 (STO) single crystals irradiated with 320 keV Ar ions. The samples were analyzed also by using HRTEM as a complementary method which enables the measurement of geometrical parameters of crystal lattice deformation in the vicinity of dislocations. Once the parameters and their variations within the distance of several lattice constants from the dislocation core are known, they may be used in MC simulations for the quantitative determination of dislocation depth distribution profiles. The final outcome of the deconvolution procedure are cross-sections values calculated for two types of defects observed (RDA and dislocations).

  14. A classification of spectral populations observed in HF radar backscatter from the E region auroral electrojets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of HF radar backscatter from the auroral electrojet E region indicate the presence of five major spectral populations, as opposed to the two predominant spectral populations, types I and II, observed in the VHF regime. The Doppler shift, spectral width, backscatter power, and flow angle dependencies of these five populations are investigated and described. Two of these populations are identified with type I and type II spectral classes, and hence, are thought to be generated by the two-stream and gradient drift instabilities, respectively. The remaining three populations occur over a range of velocities which can greatly exceed the ion acoustic speed, the usual limiting velocity in VHF radar observations of the E region. The generation of these spectral populations is discussed in terms of electron density gradients in the electrojet region and recent non-linear theories of E region irregularity generation.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities

  15. Towards quantitative off-axis electron holographic mapping of the electric field around the tip of a sharp biased metallic needle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beleggia, M. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Berlin (Germany); Kasama, T. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Larson, D. J.; Kelly, T. F. [CAMECA Instruments, Inc., Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungzentrum Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Pozzi, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-07-14

    We apply off-axis electron holography and Lorentz microscopy in the transmission electron microscope to map the electric field generated by a sharp biased metallic tip. A combination of experimental data and modelling provides quantitative information about the potential and the field around the tip. Close to the tip apex, we measure a maximum field intensity of 82 MV/m, corresponding to a field k factor of 2.5, in excellent agreement with theory. In order to verify the validity of the measurements, we use the inferred charge density distribution in the tip region to generate simulated phase maps and Fresnel (out-of-focus) images for comparison with experimental measurements. While the overall agreement is excellent, the simulations also highlight the presence of an unexpected astigmatic contribution to the intensity in a highly defocused Fresnel image, which is thought to result from the geometry of the applied field.

  16. Resistivity of thin gold films on mica induced by electron-surface scattering: Application of quantitative scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, Marcelo E. [Departamento de Ciencias de la Construccion, FCCyOT, Universidad Tecnologica Metropolitana, Dieciocho 390, Santiago 8330526 (Chile); Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio A.; Henriquez, Ricardo [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Casilla 487-3, Santiago 8370449 (Chile); Kremer, German [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago 7800024 (Chile); Moraga, Luis; Oyarzun, Simon; Suarez, Marco Antonio; Flores, Marcos [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Casilla 487-3, Santiago 8370449 (Chile); Munoz, Raul C., E-mail: ramunoz@ing.uchile.cl [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Casilla 487-3, Santiago 8370449 (Chile)

    2012-02-01

    We report a comparison between the resistivity measured on thin gold films deposited on mica, with predictions based upon classical theories of size effects (Drude's, Sondheimer's and Calecki's), as well as predictions based upon quantum theories of electron-surface scattering (the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, the theory of Tesanovic, Jaric and Maekawa, and that of Trivedi and Aschroft). From topographic images of the surface recorded with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, we determined the rms roughness amplitude, {delta} and the lateral correlation length, {xi} corresponding to a Gaussian representation of the average height-height autocorrelation function, describing the roughness of each sample in the scale of length set by the Fermi wave length. Using ({delta}, {xi}) as input data, we present a rigorous comparison between resistivity data and predictions based upon the theory of Calecki as well as quantum theoretical predictions without adjustable parameters. The resistivity was measured on gold films of different thickness evaporated onto mica substrates, between 4 K and 300 K. The resistivity data covers the range 0.1 < x(T) < 6.8, for 4 K < T < 300 K, where x(T) is the ratio between film thickness and electron mean free path in the bulk at temperature T. We experimentally identify electron-surface and electron-phonon scattering as the microscopic electron scattering mechanisms giving rise to the macroscopic resistivity. The different theories are all capable of estimating the thin film resistivity to an accuracy better than 10%; however the mean free path and the resistivity characterizing the bulk turn out to depend on film thickness. Surprisingly, only the Sondheimer theory and its quantum version, the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, predict and increase in resistivity induced by size effects that seems consistent with published galvanomagnetic phenomena also arising from electron-surface scattering measured at low

  17. Quantitative correlation between air induced changes of electronic parameters and morphological features of copper phthalocyanine thin film surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grządziel, L., E-mail: Lucyna.Grzadziel@polsl.pl; Krzywiecki, M.

    2015-01-15

    In this work, utilizing fine-resolved photoemission yield spectroscopy (PYS) method, the set of electronic parameters of the space charge layer of 16 nm-copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) thin films deposited on n-type Si(111) substrate covered with modified SiO{sub 2} was determined after long term air exposure. The PYS investigation revealed that work function and surface band bending increased upon gas adsorption by 0.64 eV and 0.32 eV respectively for organic layer and surface dipole effect appeared as the shift in electron affinity of 0.32 eV. Obtained results were compared with photoemission data received for corresponding CuPc films on different types of silicon Si(111) substrate. Collected parameters were correlated with the morphological features of the CuPc's surfaces measured applying atomic force microscopy (AFM) ability. Results of compiled PYS and AFM studies indicated particular electronic tendency for oxidation processes for certain shapes of phthalocyanine crystallites. It may suggest that by manipulation of the initial films' morphology it would be possible to control the air stability of the CuPc-based electronic devices and their vulnerability to degradation processes. - Highlights: • PYS study of 16 nm-CuPc/RCA-SiO{sub 2}/n-Si(111) electronic properties after air exposure. • eV{sub s}, χ{sub s}, φ changes due to oxidation process compared to the other CuPc results. • Electronic parameters shift correlated with morphological features obtained by AFM.

  18. Evaluation of Electrospray as a Sample Preparation Tool for Electron Microscopic Investigations: Toward Quantitative Evaluation of Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Johannes; Dohányosová, Pavla; Müller, Philipp; López-Vidal, Silvia; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan

    2017-02-01

    The potential of electrospray deposition, for the controlled preparation of particles for imaging in electron microscopes, is evaluated on various materials: from mono-modal suspensions of spherical particles to multimodal suspensions and to real-world industrial materials. It is shown that agglomeration is reduced substantially on the sample carrier, compared with conventional sample preparation techniques. For the first time, it is possible to assess the number concentration of a tri-modal polystyrene suspension by electron microscopy, due to the high deposition efficiency of the electrospray. We discovered that some suspension stabilizing surfactants form artifact particles during electrospraying. These can be avoided by optimizing the sprayed suspension.

  19. Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head‑to‑head domain walls using off‑axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, F; Klaui, M; Backes, D

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a complete three-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based on vortex cores in disks and in wires. Using electron holography to examine vortices in patterned Permalloy devices we have quantitativ......In this paper, we present a complete three-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based on vortex cores in disks and in wires. Using electron holography to examine vortices in patterned Permalloy devices we have...

  20. Quantitative investigation of precipitate growth during ageing of Al-(Mg,Si) alloys by energy-filtered electron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollgarten, M.; Chang, C. S. T.; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard

    2011-01-01

    LIBRA 200 operated at 200 kV using the in-column omega filter for zero-loss filtered electron diffraction. Recording was on imaging plates (made by Fuji company) which were read out in a scanner of type Ditabis Micron. Scanning resolution was about 7·10-3 nm-1/pixel. Suitable parts of the recorded...

  1. Quantitative comparisons of radar image, scatterometer, and surface roughness data from Pisgah Crater, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.; Engheta, N.

    1983-01-01

    The relationships between radar image brightness and backscatter coefficient, between the backscatter coefficient and surface roughness, and between surface roughness and geology, must be established in order to satisfy criteria for the quantitative use of radar images. Attention is presently given to the merits of calibrated radar images and scatterometers as sources of the backscatter coefficient, theories that yield the coefficient on the basis of known surface roughness (and vice versa), and the geologic interpretation of surface roughness and backscatter signatures. These considerations are discussed in the case of the Pisgah Crater and lava field in the Mojave Desert of California.

  2. Comparing surficial sediments maps interpreted by experts with dual-frequency acoustic backscatter on the Scotian Shelf, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Andrew; Anderson, John T.; Devillers, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    Understanding seabed properties is increasingly important to support policy in the marine environment. Such knowledge can be gained from diverse methods, ranging from more traditional expert-interpretations of acoustic and ground-truth data, to maps resulting from fully quantitative analyses of acoustic data. This study directly compares surficial geology maps created through expert-interpretations to near-nadir acoustic backscatter data from two frequencies (38 kHz and 120 kHz) collected using single beam echosounders (SBES) for two 5×1 km study areas on the Scotian Shelf, Canada. Statistical methods were used to analyze and classify both single and dual-frequency acoustic backscatter for comparisons. In particular, spatial scaling of acoustic backscatter responses and acoustic classes created using acoustic seabed classification (ASC) is compared between frequencies and to interpreted sediment units (ISUs) which make up surficial geology maps produced by experts. Seabed morphology layers were included in an ASC approach to reflect the morphological components included in the interpreted geological maps. Results confirmed that higher frequencies and coarser grain sizes generally produced higher backscatter, while more heterogeneous and rougher seabeds produced variable backscatter. Differing acoustic responses within similar substrate units suggest fundamental seabed variations not reflected in the geological interpretations. Spatial scaling of sand and gravel substrates from 38 kHz frequency were closer than the 120 kHz frequency to the spatial scaling of the interpreted geological map. Variable grain size in the sediment volume and surface morphology are both presented as possible reasons for frequency differences. While both frequencies had similar general responses, differences in frequency responses of backscatter occurred at scales of tens to hundreds of meters. Results presented here emphasize the importance of multi-scale seabed mapping and additional

  3. Rigorous quantitative elemental microanalysis by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) with spectrum processing by NIST DTSA-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative electron-excited x-ray microanalysis by scanning electron microscopy/silicon drift detector energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/SDD-EDS) is capable of achieving high accuracy and high precision equivalent to that of the high spectral resolution wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer even when severe peak interference occurs. The throughput of the SDD-EDS enables high count spectra to be measured that are stable in calibration and resolution (peak shape) across the full deadtime range. With this high spectral stability, multiple linear least squares peak fitting is successful for separating overlapping peaks and spectral background. Careful specimen preparation is necessary to remove topography on unknowns and standards. The standards-based matrix correction procedure embedded in the NIST DTSA-II software engine returns quantitative results supported by a complete error budget, including estimates of the uncertainties from measurement statistics and from the physical basis of the matrix corrections. NIST DTSA-II is available free for Java-platforms at: http://www.cstl.nist.gov/div837/837.02/epq/dtsa2/index.html).

  4. Quantitative image analysis of WE43-T6 cracking behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A.; Yahya, Z.

    2013-06-01

    Environment-assisted cracking of WE43 cast magnesium (4.2 wt.% Yt, 2.3 wt.% Nd, 0.7% Zr, 0.8% HRE) in the T6 peak-aged condition was induced in ambient air in notched specimens. The mechanism of fracture was studied using electron backscatter diffraction, serial sectioning and in situ observations of crack propagation. The intermetallic (rare earthed-enriched divorced intermetallic retained at grain boundaries and predominantly at triple points) material was found to play a significant role in initiating cracks which leads to failure of this material. Quantitative measurements were required for this project. The populations of the intermetallic and clusters of intermetallic particles were analyzed using image analysis of metallographic images. This is part of the work to generate a theoretical model of the effect of notch geometry on the static fatigue strength of this material.

  5. Photon spectrum and polarization for high conversion coefficient in the Compton backscattering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potylitsyn, A. P.; Kolchuzhkin, A. M.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Strokov, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    This study looks to simulate the nonlinear Compton backscattering (CBS) process based on the Monte Carlo technique for the conversion coefficient Kc ⩾ 1 , which can be considered as the average number of photons emitted by each electron. The characteristics of the nonlinear CBS process simulated in this work are as follows: the number of absorbed photons of a laser, the distance in the laser pulse in which the electron passes between two collisions, the energy and the polarization of the emitted photon in each collision, and the polarization of the electron before and after collision. The developed approach allows us to find the spectra and polarization characteristics of the final electrons and photons. When Kc > 1 , the spin-flip processes need to be considered for a correct simulation of the polarization of the final photons and electrons for energies typical of a γ- γ collider.

  6. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  7. Physical Principles of the Ultrasonic Attenuation and Backscatter of Soft Tissues: Dependence on the Angle of Propagation and the Physiologic State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottley, Jack Grigsby

    Quantitative measurements of the interactions of ultrasound with inhomogeneous media serve the dual purposes of elucidating the physics of such interactions and making possible the noninvasive assessment of the state or quality of those materials. One objective of the research presented in this thesis was to provide a physical basis for the application of quantitative techniques to measurements of interactions of ultrasound with an intrinsically interesting inhomogeneous material, soft tissue. A survey of theoretical techniques relevant to the investigation of ultrasonic propagation in inhomogeneous media with both symmetric and non-symmetric inhomogeneities is presented, and the results of calculations based on these theories are compared to experimental measurements. Interactions of ultrasound with several types of soft tissues were investigated under a variety of conditions. Canine myocardium was studied in the normal state, during ischemic insult, after prolonged ischemia, and during reperfusion following transient ischemia. In addition, isolated bullfrog gastrocnemius muscle was studied during relaxation and tetany. The ultrasonic attenuation and backscatter of soft tissues were found to be dependent upon several physiologic and morphologic parameters. In tissues which exhibit regular organization into longitudinal fibers, such as muscles, the attenuation and backscatter were found to be dependent on the direction of propagation relative to the direction of the dominant orientation of the fibers. Specifically, the attenuation was greatest for propagation parallel to the dominant fiber direction, while backscatter was maximum for propagation perpendicular to the fibers. In contrast, these parameters were found to be independent of the angle of insonification in liver, a soft tissue that does not contain regularly oriented fibers. The attenuation and backscatter were affected by the state of contraction of skeletal muscle, with both attenuation and backscatter

  8. Fluctuations in near-surface backscattering to a descending CW radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klibansky, Ben-Tsiyon

    1989-05-01

    The operation of a radar-activated proximity fuse in an artillery shell or mortar bomb depends on the Doppler modification of the echo as the projectile approaches the surface. Explosion at the correct height depends on the return signal amplitude, which strongly depends on the surface characteristics. Periodic modulations have been detected in the backscattering amplitude, as the projectile falls. Earth backscatter models were constructed as a basis for designing a fuse with improved distance measurement accuracy. For mortar bombs, most of the land models fit the data recorded, indicating that the sum of the returns from many scatterers creates the observed oscillation pattern. The return amplitude builds up very rapidly as the fuse approaches the earth. For flat trajectory projectiles, there is high frequency modulation of the return, which is attributed to the relatively high horizontal velocity component. Several models were found to fit the recorded surface backscatter data. The relationship between the return signal spectrum and the elevation angle suggests a possibility for improving the design and performance of the fuse electronic processor.

  9. Quantitative measurements and modeling of electronic and atomic surface structure in epitaxial LaNiO3 thin films by ARPES, LEED-I(V), and DFT +DMFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Jacob; Nowadnick, Elizabeth; Park, Hyowon; King, Philip; Millis, Andrew; Schlom, Darrell; Shen, Kyle

    Careful exploration of the phase space available for artificially engineering emergent electronic properties in epitaxial thin films and superlattices of transition-metal oxides requires close feedback between materials synthesis, experimental characterization of both electronic and atomic structures, and modeling based on advanced computational methods. Here we apply this general strategy to the perovskite rare-earth nickelate LaNiO3, using molecular-beam epitaxy to synthesize thin films, performing in situangle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements, and comparing our results with the predictions of density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT +DMFT). Our study establishes LaNiO3 as a moderately correlated metal in which the quasiparticle mass enhancement can be modeled with quantitative accuracy by DFT +DMFT. Finally, in view of efforts to produce eg orbital polarization in nickelate heterostructures as a means of mimicking single-band cuprate-like physics, we discuss the extent to which our ARPES and LEED results suggest that such effects are intrinsically present at film surfaces due to the existence of polar distortions, as reported by coherent Bragg rod analysis of surface x-ray diffraction.

  10. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  11. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  12. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore Ventura map area, California. The raster data...

  13. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  14. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  15. Detection of buried landmine with X-ray backscatter technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuk, Sunwoo [Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: sunwoo@korea.ac.kr; Kim, Kwang Hyun [Chosun University, 375, Seosuk-Dong, Dong-Gu, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Yun [Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-30

    We describe a continuously operating scanning X-ray imaging system developed for landmine detection based on a backscatter X-ray principle, thus detection is done from the same side as the source. The source operates at 120 kV p and 3 mA. To study the physics of Compton X-ray backscattering, the photon transport factor, backscatter factor (BSF) and backscatter probability (BSP) were simulated using Monte-Carlo calculations using the generalized particle transport program MCNP. Based on the Monte-Carlo analyses results, a mine detecting system has been designed. It potentially has a low false alarm rate and a high detection probability, and a direct imaging facility.

  16. An algorithm to determine backscattering ratio and single scattering albedo

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Nayak, S.R.; Naik, P.

    Algorithms to determine the inherent optical properties of water, backscattering probability and single scattering albedo at 490 and 676 nm from the apparent optical property, remote sensing reflectance are presented here. The measured scattering...

  17. Reson 8101 Backscatter imagery of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters....

  18. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  19. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  20. LIDAR for atmospheric backscatter and temperature measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this effort are to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles and temperature using a zenith looking lidar, designed for a small lander.The lidar...

  1. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  2. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  3. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore Ventura map area, California. The raster data...

  4. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  5. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  6. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  7. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore of Ventura map area, California. The raster...

  8. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  9. Impact of carrier heating on backscattering in inversion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, R.; Palestri, P.; Selmi, L.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, Monte Carlo simulations and analytical modeling are used to investigate quasi-ballistic transport in nanometric metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). In particular, we examine how the thermal nature of the distribution functions, which is implicitly assumed in the most common expression for the backscattering coefficient, leads to an underestimation of the backscattering coefficient in high field conditions and erroneous velocity distribution along the channel. An improved analytical model is proposed, which better captures the nonequilibrium nature of the distribution function and its impact on backscattering and by allowing velocity profiles to exceed the thermal limit. The improved model provides additional insights on the impact of several assumptions on backscattering and could serve as the basis for the development of physically based compact models of quasi-ballistic MOSFETs.

  10. Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data from Galvez Bank.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the Mariana archipelago between the U.S. Territory of Guam and Farallon De Pajaros Island in the...

  11. Moessbauer backscatter spectrometer with full data processing capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, T.; Hartzell, R.; Liebermann, M.

    1976-01-01

    The design and operation of a Moessbauer backscatter spectrometer with full data processing capability is described, and the investigation of the applicability of this technique to a variety of practical metallurgical problems is discussed. (WHK)

  12. Backscatter--Offshore of Refugio Beach Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3319 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3319) of Offshore Refugio Beach map area, California. The raster data...

  13. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  14. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  15. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  16. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  17. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  18. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  19. Optimal Time Allocation in Backscatter Assisted Wireless Powered Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Bin; Yang, Zhen; Gui, Guan; Sari, Hikmet

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a wireless powered communication network (WPCN) assisted by backscatter communication (BackCom). This model consists of a power station, an information receiver and multiple users that can work in either BackCom mode or harvest-then-transmit (HTT) mode. The time block is mainly divided into two parts corresponding to the data backscattering and transmission periods, respectively. The users first backscatter data to the information receiver in time division multiple access (TDMA) during the data backscattering period. When one user works in the BackCom mode, the other users harvest energy from the power station. During the data transmission period, two schemes, i.e., non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and TDMA, are considered. To maximize the system throughput, the optimal time allocation policies are obtained. Simulation results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed model. PMID:28587171

  20. Aerosol Lidar for the Relative Backscatter Amplification Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razenkov, Igor A.; Banakh, Victor A.; Nadeev, Alexander I.

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter amplification presents only in a turbulent atmosphere, when the laser beam is propagates twice through the same inhomogeneities. We proposed technical solution to detect backscatter amplification. An aerosol micro pulse lidar with a beam expansion via receiving telescope was built to study this effect. Our system allows simultaneous detection of two returns from the same scattering volume: exactly on the axis of the laser beam and off the axis.

  1. A Laboratory Investigation into Microwave Backscattering from Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    froze to form saline slush ice. Continued freezing of * the salty water directly beneath the slush ice led to the formation of columnar-textured...significant influence on backscatter from extremely smooth saline ice at C band. We determined that backscatter at C band from moderately smooth desalinated ...that volume scatter from desalinated ice is important at X band and that it is dominant at Ku band at angles of 100 or more from nadir Conclusions

  2. Analysis of forest backscattering characteristics based on polarization coherence tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to make an inventory of vertical profiles of forest structure parameters in field measurements.However,analysis and understanding of forest backscattering characteristics contribute to estimation and detection of forest vertical structure because of the close relationships between backscattering characteristics and structure parameters.The vertical structure function in the complex interferometric coherence definition,which represents the vertical variation of microwave scattering with the penetration depth at a point in the 2-D radar image and can be used to analyze the forest backscattering characteristics,can be reconstructed from polarization coherence tomography(PCT).Based on PCT,the paper analyzes the forest backscattering characteristics and explores the inherent relationship between the result of PCT and the forest structure parameters from numerical simulation of Random Volume over Ground model(RVoG),Polarimetric SAR interferometry(PolInSAR)simulation of forest scene and PolInSAR data at L-band of the test site Traunstein.Firstly,the effects of the extinction coefficient and surface-to-volume scattering ratio in RVoG model on vertical backscattering characteristics are analyzed by means of numerical simulation.Secondly,by applying PCT to L-band POLInSAR simulations of forest scene,different variations of vertical backscattering due to different extinction coefficients and the ratios of surface-to-volume scattering resulting from different polarizations,forest types and densities are displayed and analyzed.Then a concept of relative average backscattering intensity is presented,and the factors which affect its vertical distribution are also discussed.Preliminary results show that there is high sensitivity of the vertical distribution of forest relative average backscattering intensity to the polarization,forest type and density.Finally,based on repeat pass DLR E-SAR L-band airborne POLInSAR data,the capability of PCT technology for detection

  3. Evaluation of image-based multibeam sonar backscatter classification for benthic habitat discrimination and mapping at Stanton Banks, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, Chris; Brown, Craig; Quinn, Rory; Grabowski, Jonathan

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, efforts have increased to develop quantitative, computer-directed methods for segmentation of multibeam (MBES) backscatter data. This study utilises MBES backscatter data acquired at Stanton Banks (UK) and subsequently processed through the QTC-Multiview software environment in a bid to evaluate the program's ability to perform unsupervised classification. Statistical comparison with ground-truth data (grab, stills and video) enabled cross validation of acoustic segmentation and biological assemblages observed at the site. 132 unspecified variables were extracted from user-specified rectangular patches of the backscatter image, reduced to three vectors by PCA, then clustered and classified by the software. Multivariate analyses of ground-truth data were conducted on 75 stills images and 51 grab samples. Video footage coincident with the stills was divided into 30 s segments and coded by dominant substrate and species. Cross tabulation determined the interrelationship between software classifications, multivariate analysis of the biological assemblages and coded video segments. Multiview optimally identified 19 classes using the automated clustering engine. These were revised to 6 habitats a posteriori, using combined analysis of ground-truth data and Multiview data products. These habitats broadly correspond to major physiographic provinces within the region. Multivariate statistical analysis reveals low levels of assemblage similarity (MBES backscatter imagery into acoustic provinces; however a degree of caution is required prior to ascribing ecological significance to these classifications.

  4. Silicon location through backscattered electron imaging and X-ray microanalysis in leaves of Cyperus ligularis L. and Rhynchospora aberrans C. B. Clarke (Cyperaceae Localização de sílica por elétrons retroespalhados em folhas de Cyperus ligularis L. and Rhynchospora aberrans C. B. Clarke (Cyperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Emília Maranhão Estelita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Cyperaceae show the ability to incorporate silicon by depositing colloidal silica, which is recorded by the occurrence of projections in the form of cones, in inner tangential walls of some epidermal cells or "silica cells". Leaves of C. ligularis and R. aberrans were analyzed through the technique of electron backscatter. Cyperus ligularis accumulates silica, in addition to "silica cells", in some stomata, trichomes and the cell walls that surround the cavities of the aerenchyma. The silica in the latter occurs in various forms; however, the cells located near the vascular bundles have conical projections, similar to those of the epidermis. Rhynchospora aberrans presents "silica cells" whose projections have tapered "satellites". In this species, silica also occurs in stomata and certain epidermal cells adjacent to them. It appears that the silicon deposition occurs in combination with the wall (with no apparent structural changes, and structures of secretion, or projections of the wall. These structural changes in the species, and location, are probably related to functional and environmental factors, especially the soil, in addition to relation with taxonomic groups.As Cyperaceae têm a capacidade de incorporação do ácido silícico mediante depósito de sílica coloidal, que é registrada pela ocorrência de projeções sob a forma de cones, nas paredes tangenciais internas de determinadas células epidérmicas ou "células de sílica". Folhas de C. ligularis e R. aberrans foram analisadas pela técnica de elétrons retroespalhados. C. ligularis além de acumular sílica nas "células de sílica", acumula também em alguns estômatos, nos tricomas e nas paredes das células que contornam as cavidades do aerênquima. Este último apresenta formas diversas, entretanto, as células que se localizam junto aos feixes vasculares mostram projeções cônicas, semelhantes àquelas da epiderme. R. aberrans contém "células de silica" cujas

  5. High resolution energy-angle correlation measurement of hard x rays from laser-Thomson backscattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, A; Irman, A; Bussmann, M; Couperus, J P; Cowan, T E; Debus, A D; Kuntzsch, M; Ledingham, K W D; Lehnert, U; Sauerbrey, R; Schlenvoigt, H P; Seipt, D; Stöhlker, Th; Thorn, D B; Trotsenko, S; Wagner, A; Schramm, U

    2013-09-13

    Thomson backscattering of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons not only allows for the generation of bright x-ray pulses but also for the investigation of the complex particle dynamics at the interaction point. For this purpose a complete spectral characterization of a Thomson source powered by a compact linear electron accelerator is performed with unprecedented angular and energy resolution. A rigorous statistical analysis comparing experimental data to 3D simulations enables, e.g., the extraction of the angular distribution of electrons with 1.5% accuracy and, in total, provides predictive capability for the future high brightness hard x-ray source PHOENIX (photon electron collider for narrow bandwidth intense x rays) and potential gamma-ray sources.

  6. TCR backscattering characterization for microwave remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Gennarelli, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    A Trihedral Corner Reflector (TCR) is formed by three mutually orthogonal metal plates of various shapes and is a very important scattering structure since it exhibits a high monostatic Radar Cross Section (RCS) over a wide angular range. Moreover it is a handy passive device with low manufacturing costs and robust geometric construction, the maintenance of its efficiency is not difficult and expensive, and it can be used in all weather conditions (i.e., fog, rain, smoke, and dusty environment). These characteristics make it suitable as reference target and radar enhancement device for satellite- and ground-based microwave remote sensing techniques. For instance, TCRs have been recently employed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the backscattered signal in the case of urban ground deformation monitoring [1] and dynamic survey of civil infrastructures without natural corners as the Musmeci bridge in Basilicata, Italy [2]. The region of interest for the calculation of TCR's monostatic RCS is here confined to the first quadrant containing the boresight direction. The backscattering term is presented in closed form by evaluating the far-field scattering integral involving the contributions related to the direct illumination and the internal bouncing mechanisms. The Geometrical Optics (GO) laws allow one to determine the field incident on each TCR plate and the patch (integration domain) illuminated by it, thus enabling the use of a Physical Optics (PO) approximation for the corresponding surface current densities to consider for integration on each patch. Accordingly, five contributions are associated to each TCR plate: one contribution is due to the direct illumination of the whole internal surface; two contributions originate by the impinging rays that are simply reflected by the other two internal surfaces; and two contributions are related to the impinging rays that undergo two internal reflections. It is useful to note that the six contributions due to the

  7. Direct demonstration of insulin receptor internalization. A quantitative electron microscopic study of covalently bound /sup 125/I-photoreactive insulin incubated with isolated hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorden, P.; Carpentier, J.L.; Moule, M.L.; Yip, C.C.; Orci, L.

    1982-07-01

    When /sup 125/I-insulin is incubated with isolated rodent hepatocytes at 37 degrees C, the ligand initially binds to the plasma membrane of the cell and is subsequently internalized by adsorptive endocytosis. To confirm directly that the insulin receptor is internalized with the ligand, we covalently linked photoreactive /sup 125/I-N sigma B29 (azidobenzoyl) insulin to its specific hepatocyte receptor and followed its fate by quantitative electron microscopic autoradiography. We found that the covalently linked photoreactive insulin is internalized by the cell in fashion analogous to the internalization of ordinary /sup 125/I-insulin, indicating that, at least under these conditions, the insulin receptor is internalized with the ligand.

  8. Quantitative measurement of the vibrational amplitude and phase in photorefractive time-average interferometry: A comparison with electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohleder, Henrik; Petersen, Paul Michael; Marrakchi, A.

    1994-01-01

    Time-average interferometry is dealt with using four-wave mixing in photorefractive Bi12SiO20. By introducing a proper sinusoidal phase shift in the forward pump beam it is possible to measure the amplitude and phase everywhere on a vibrating object. Quantitative measurements of the phase...... and amplitude of the vibrating structure are demonstrated in photorefractive time average interferometry. The photorefractive interferometer is compared with the performance of a commercial electronic speckle pattern interferometer (ESPI). It is shown that the dynamic photorefractive holographic interferometer...... improves the image quality considerably and is able to extend the measurable range for the acoustic vibration amplitude and frequency compared to what is obtainable with the ESPI equipment. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  9. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  10. Quantitative analysis of nanoscale intranuclear structural alterations in hippocampal cells in chronic alcoholism via transmission electron microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Ghimire, Hemendra M.; Almabadi, Huda M.; Tripathi, Vibha; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Rao, Radhakrishna; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2017-04-01

    Chronic alcoholism is known to alter the morphology of the hippocampus, an important region of cognitive function in the brain. Therefore, to understand the effect of chronic alcoholism on hippocampal neural cells, we employed a mouse model of chronic alcoholism and quantified intranuclear nanoscale structural alterations in these cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of hippocampal neurons were obtained, and the degree of structural alteration in terms of mass density fluctuation was determined using the light-localization properties of optical media generated from TEM imaging. The results, which were obtained at length scales ranging from ~30 to 200 nm, show that 10–12 week-old mice fed a Lieber–DeCarli liquid (alcoholic) diet had a higher degree of structural alteration than control mice fed a normal diet without alcohol. The degree of structural alteration became significantly distinguishable at a sample length of ~100 nm, which is the typical length scale of the building blocks of cells, such as DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids. Interestingly, different degrees of structural alteration at such length scales suggest possible structural rearrangement of chromatin inside the nuclei in chronic alcoholism.

  11. Quantitative description of short-range order and its influence on the electronic structure in Ag-Pd alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M.; Marmodoro, A.; Ernst, A.; Hergert, W.; Dahl, J.; Lång, J.; Laukkanen, P.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Kokko, K.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of short-range order (SRO) on the electronic structure in alloys from the theoretical point of view using density of states (DOS) data. In particular, the interaction between the atoms at different lattice sites is affected by chemical disorder, which in turn is reflected in the fine structure of the DOS and, hence, in the outcome of spectroscopic measurements. We aim at quantifying the degree of potential SRO with a proper parameter. The theoretical modeling is done with the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green’s function method. Therein, the extended multi-sublattice non-local coherent potential approximation is used to include SRO. As a model system, we use the binary solid solution Ag c Pd1-c at three representative concentrations c  =  0.25, 0.5 and 0.75. The degree of SRO is varied from local ordering to local segregation through an intermediate completely uncorrelated state. We observe some pronounced features, which change over the whole energy range of the valence bands as a function of SRO in the alloy. These spectral variations should be traceable in modern photoemission experiments.

  12. Mechanism of synchronized change in ultrasonic integrated backscatter across human heart wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobinai, Yumi; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasonic integrated backscatter (IB) from the heart wall, which has been employed for quantitative tissue characterization of the myocardium, is known to have cyclic variation-a decrease in systole and an increase in diastole. In the present study, by tracking the measurement position of the myocardium and compensating for the movement due to the heartbeat, IB and its temporal variation were obtained from the same site with a high temporal resolution of 1.73 ms. In an in vivo study on a healthy subject, the temporal variation of IB values homogeneously changed across the heart wall, especially during the slow filling and the atrial systole phases. This new finding shows that the IB value reflects a small movement of the myocardium of about 5 mm/s. Thus, the proposed measurement has a potential for quantitative and accurate evaluation of the contraction and relaxation of the myocardium.

  13. The Readability of Electronic Cigarette Health Information and Advice: A Quantitative Analysis of Web-Based Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu-Hong; Conway, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Background The popularity and use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) has increased across all demographic groups in recent years. However, little is currently known about the readability of health information and advice aimed at the general public regarding the use of e-cigarettes. Objective The objective of our study was to examine the readability of publicly available health information as well as advice on e-cigarettes. We compared information and advice available from US government agencies, nongovernment organizations, English speaking government agencies outside the United States, and for-profit entities. Methods A systematic search for health information and advice on e-cigarettes was conducted using search engines. We manually verified search results and converted to plain text for analysis. We then assessed readability of the collected documents using 4 readability metrics followed by pairwise comparisons of groups with adjustment for multiple comparisons. Results A total of 54 documents were collected for this study. All 4 readability metrics indicate that all information and advice on e-cigarette use is written at a level higher than that recommended for the general public by National Institutes of Health (NIH) communication guidelines. However, health information and advice written by for-profit entities, many of which were promoting e-cigarettes, were significantly easier to read. Conclusions A substantial proportion of potential and current e-cigarette users are likely to have difficulty in fully comprehending Web-based health information regarding e-cigarettes, potentially hindering effective health-seeking behaviors. To comply with NIH communication guidelines, government entities and nongovernment organizations would benefit from improving the readability of e-cigarettes information and advice. PMID:28062390

  14. Contribution of stimulations for the optimization of quantitative electron probe micro analysis of heterogeneous catalysts; Apport de la simulation dans l'optimisation de l'analyse quantitative par microsonde electronique de catalyseurs heterogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorbier, L.

    2001-11-01

    Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) is frequently used to measure the local concentration of active elements in heterogeneous catalysts. However, when classical procedures are used, a significant deficit is observed both in local total concentration and mean total concentrations. A Monte Carlo program simulating measured intensities (characteristic lines and continuous background) has been written using PENELOPE routines. We have included in this program models taking into account the different physical phenomena likely to lead to the observed signal loss (insulating properties, roughness, porosity, energy loss at interfaces). Simulation results have shown that an important roughness (Ra>200 nm) was the only parameter apt to lead to a significant total signal loss. This led us to inquire into another origin to explain the signal loss observed on meso-porous samples. Measurements conducted on a meso-porous alumina confirmed that measuring aluminum, oxygen and carbon leads to a correct total of concentrations. Signal loss is thus explained by the contamination of the sample during its preparation, the components of the embedding resin diffusing into the porosity and reacting with the reactive surface of the catalyst support. In the case of macroporous catalysts, local roughness effect is very important. The simulations have shown the efficiency of the Peak to Background method to correct these local roughness effects. Measurements conducted on reforming and hydro-treating catalysts have led to a correct total concentration and confirmed the contribution of the Peak to Background method to achieve local quantitative measurement. (author)

  15. Effect of intervening tissues on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of bone: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Spinolo, P Luke; Sellers, Mark E; Marshall, Peyton L; Viano, Ann M; Lee, Sang-Rok

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques are being developed to diagnose osteoporosis. Tissues that lie between the transducer and the ultrasonically interrogated region of bone may produce errors in backscatter measurements. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of intervening tissues on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of bone. Measurements were performed on 24 cube shaped specimens of human cancellous bone using a 5 MHz transducer. Measurements were repeated after adding a 1 mm thick plate of cortical bone to simulate the bone cortex and a 3 cm thick phantom to simulate soft tissue at the hip. Signals were analyzed to determine three apparent backscatter parameters (apparent integrated backscatter, frequency slope of apparent backscatter, and frequency intercept of apparent backscatter) and three backscatter difference parameters [normalized mean backscatter difference (nMBD), normalized slope of the backscatter difference, and normalized intercept of the backscatter difference]. The apparent backscatter parameters were impacted significantly by the presence of intervening tissues. In contrast, the backscatter difference parameters were not affected by intervening tissues. However, only one backscatter difference parameter, nMBD, demonstrated a strong correlation with bone mineral density. Thus, among the six parameters tested, nMBD may be the best choice for in vivo backscatter measurements of bone when intervening tissues are present.

  16. Reducing the V2O3(0001) surface through electron bombardment--a quantitative structure determination with I/V-LEED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiten, Felix E; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-28

    The (0001) surface of vanadium sesquioxide, V2O3, is terminated by vanadyl groups under standard ultra high vacuum preparation conditions. Reduction with electrons results in a chemically highly active surface with a well-defined LEED pattern indicating a high degree of order. In this work we report the first quantitative structure determination of a reduced V2O3(0001) surface. We identify two distinct surface phases by STM, one well ordered and one less well ordered. I/V-LEED shows the ordered phase to be terminated by a single vanadium atom per surface unit cell on a quasi-hexagonal oxygen layer with three atoms per two-dimensional unit cell. Furthermore we compare the method of surface reduction via electron bombardment with the deposition of V onto a vanadyl terminated film. The latter procedure was previously proposed to result in a structure with three surface vanadium atoms in the 2D unit cell and we confirm this with simulated STM images.

  17. Criteria of backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Optical isolators are important devices in photonic circuits. To reduce the unwanted reflection in a robust manner, several setups have been realized using nonreciprocal schemes. In this study, we show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral photonic crystal (no breaking of the reciprocity) are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many types of scatters. Without the protection from the nonreciprocity, the backscattering occurs under certain circumstances. We present a perturbative method to calculate the backscattering of chiral photonic crystals in the presence of chiral/achiral scatters. The model is, essentially, a simplified analogy to the first-order Born approximation. Under reasonable assumptions based on the behaviors of chiral photonic modes, we obtained the expression of reflection coefficients which provides criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. Numerical examinations using the finite-element method were also performed and the results agree well with the theoretical prediction. From both our theory and numerical calculations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatter cross sections. Strong reflection takes place when the azimuthal Fourier components of scatter cross sections have an order l of 2. Chiral scatters without these Fourier components would not efficiently reflect the chiral photonic modes. In addition, for these chiral propagating modes, disturbances at the most significant parts of field profiles do not necessarily result in the most effective backscattering. The observation also reveals what types of scatters or defects should be avoided in one-way applications of chiral structures in order to minimize the backscattering.

  18. Comparison of Ultrasound Attenuation and Backscatter Estimates in Layered Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms among Three Clinical Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kibo; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Ghoshal, Goutam; Pawlicki, Alexander D.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Lavarello, Roberto J.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zagzebski, James A.; O’Brien, William D.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Backscatter and attenuation coefficient estimates are needed in many quantitative ultrasound strategies. In clinical applications, these parameters may not be easily obtained because of variations in scattering by tissues overlying a region of interest (ROI). The goal of this study is to assess the accuracy of backscatter and attenuation estimates for regions distal to nonuniform layers of tissue-mimicking materials. In addition, this work compares results of these estimates for “layered” phantoms scanned using different clinical ultrasound machines. Two tissue-mimicking phantoms were constructed, each exhibiting depth-dependent variations in attenuation or backscatter. The phantoms were scanned with three ultrasound imaging systems, acquiring radio frequency echo data for offline analysis. The attenuation coefficient and the backscatter coefficient (BSC) for sections of the phantoms were estimated using the reference phantom method. Properties of each layer were also measured with laboratory techniques on test samples manufactured during the construction of the phantom. Estimates of the attenuation coefficient versus frequency slope, α0, using backscatter data from the different systems agreed to within 0.24 dB/cm-MHz. Bias in the α0 estimates varied with the location of the ROI. BSC estimates for phantom sections whose locations ranged from 0 to 7 cm from the transducer agreed among the different systems and with theoretical predictions, with a mean bias error of 1.01 dB over the used bandwidths. This study demonstrates that attenuation and BSCs can be accurately estimated in layered inhomogeneous media using pulse-echo data from clinical imaging systems. PMID:23160474

  19. Effects of coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion on cardiac cycle-dependent variation of myocardial ultrasonic backscatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glueck, R.M.; Mottley, J.G.; Miller, J.G.; Sobel, B.E.; Perez, J.E.

    1985-05-01

    We have recently reported a systematic variation in integrated ultrasonic backscatter throughout the cardiac cycle in canine hearts. This study was performed to determine whether the pattern of such variation is modified systematically by ischemia. Measurements of integrated ultrasonic backscatter in selected regions of normal, ischemic, and reperfused hearts were compared in view of known differences in systolic function of myocardium in each of these regions. Integrated ultrasonic backscatter (3-7 MHz) gated to the first derivative of left ventricular pressure was measured at the apex, midwall, and base in 10 dogs and at the apex before and during transient ischemia and reperfusion in four dogs. Quantitative integrated ultrasonic backscatter was referenced to a steel reflector. Cyclic variation of integrated ultrasonic backscatter was greatest at the apex (peak to trough variation 5.5 +/- 0.9 dB (mean +/- SE)) with the maximum near end diastole (-52.9 +/- 0.9 dB) and minimum near end systole (-58.4 +/- 1.0 dB). Variation at the apex (5.5 +/- 0.9 dB) and the midwall (4.3 +/- 0.8 dB) was greater than at the base (0.5 +/- 1.0 dB) (P less than 0.01 for either region compared with base). Left anterior descending coronary occlusion for 10 minutes in four of 10 dogs reduced variation at the apex to 0.4 +/- 1.5 dB (P less than 0.02 compared with preocclusion). Reperfusion for 2 hours restored apical cyclic variation to 3.9 +/- 1.7 dB, i.e., to values not significantly different from those before occlusion.

  20. Transmutation of nuclear wastes using photonuclear reactions triggered by Compton backscattering photons at the Shanghai laser electrongamma source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jin-Gen; YUAN Ren-Yong; XU Jia-Qiang; YAN Zhe; FAN Gong-Tao; SHEN Wen-Qing; XU Wang; WANG Hong-Wei; GUO Wei; MA Yu-Gang; CAI Xiang-Zhou; LU Guang-Cheng; XU Yi; PAN Qiang-Yan

    2008-01-01

    Based on the facility of the Shanghai Laser Electron Gamma Source (SLEGS),the transmutation for nuclear wastes such as 137Cs and 129I is investigated.It is found that nuclear waste can be transmuted efficiently via photonuclear reaction triggered by gamma photons generated from Compton backscattering between CO2 laser photons and 3.5 GeV electrons.The nuclear activities of 137Cs and 129I are evaluated and compared with the results of transmutation triggered by bremsstrahlung gamma photons driven by ultra intense laser.Due to the better character of gamma photon spectrum as well as the high brightness of gamma photons,the transmutation rate of Compton backscattering method is much higher than that of the bremsstrahlung method.

  1. High-energy gamma-ray beams from Compton-backscattered laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

    1983-01-01

    Collisions of light photons with relativistic electrons have previously been used to produce polarized ..gamma..-ray beams with modest (-10%) resolution but relatively low intensity. In contrast, the LEGS project (Laser + Electron Gamma Source) at Brookhaven will produce a very high flux (>2 x 10/sup 7/ s/sup -1/) of background-free polarized ..gamma.. rays whose energy will be determined to a high accuracy (..delta..E = 2.3 MeV). Initially, 300(420)-MeV ..gamma.. rays will be produced by backscattering uv light from the new 2.5(3.0)-GeV X-ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The LEGS facility will operate as one of many passive users of the NSLS. In a later stage of the project, a Free Electron Laser is expectred to extend the ..gamma..-ray energy up to 700 MeV.

  2. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Altinbas, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Bruno, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Binello, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Costanzo, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Drees, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Gassner, D. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hock, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hock, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Harvey, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Mi, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Michnoff, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Miller, T. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Pikin, A. I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Samms, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Shrey, T. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tan, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Thieberger, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; White, S. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  3. Modeling multi-frequency diurnal backscatter from a walnut orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Dobson, Myron C.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1991-01-01

    The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering Model (MIMICS) is used to model scatterometer data that were obtained during the August 1987 EOS (Earth Observing System) synergism study. During this experiment, truck-based scatterometers were used to measure radar backscatter from a walnut orchard in Fresno County, California. Multipolarized L- and X-band data were recorded for orchard plots for which dielectric and evapotranspiration characteristics were monitored. MIMICS is used to model a multiangle data set in which a single orchard plot was observed at varying impedance angles and a series of diurnal measurements in which backscatter from this same plot was measured continuously over several 24-h periods. MIMICS accounts for variations in canopy backscatter driven by changes in canopy state that occur diurnally as well as on longer time scales. L-band backscatter is dependent not only on properties of the vegetation but also on properties of the underlying soil surface. The behavior of the X-band backscatter is dominated by properties of the tree crowns.

  4. Measurement of backscatter factor for diagnostic radiology: methodology and uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, P.H.G.; Nogueira, M.D.S.; Squair, P.L.; Da Silva, T.A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnoogia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN) 30123-970, Minas Gerais (Brazil)]. e-mail: phgr@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Backscatter factors were experimentally determined for the diagnostic X-ray qualities recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for primary beams (RQR). Harshaw LiF-1 100H thermoluminescent dosemeters used for determining the backscatter were calibrated against an ionization chamber traceable to the National Metrology Laboratory. A 300mm x 300mm x 150mm PMMA slab phantom was used for deep-doses measurements. To perform the in-phantom measurements, the dosemeters were placed in the central axis of the x-ray beam at five different depths d in the phantom (5, 10, 15, 25 and 35 mm) upstream the beam direction. The typical combined standard uncertainty of the backscatter factor value was 6%. The main sources of uncertainties were the calibration procedure, the TLD dosimetry and the use of deep-dose curves. (Author)

  5. Backscatter signatures of biological aerosols in the infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, Evan; Salciccioli, Nicolas; Brown, David M; Siegrist, Karen; Brown, Andrea M; Thomas, Michael E; Boggs, Nathan; Carter, Christopher C

    2012-04-20

    To develop a deeper understanding of the optical signatures of both biological aerosols and potential interferents, we made field measurements of optical cross sections and compared them to model-based predictions. We measured aerosol cross sections by conducting a hard-target calibration of a light detection and ranging system (LIDAR) based on the Frequency Agile Laser (FAL). The elastic backscatter cross sections are estimated at 19 long-wave infrared (LWIR) wavelengths spanning the range from 9.23 to 10.696 μm. The theoretical modeling of the elastic backscatter cross sections is based on the measured refractive index and size distribution of the aerosols, which are used as inputs into Mie calculations. Both model calculations and experimental measurements show good agreement and also indicate the presence of spectral features based on single particle absorption in the backscatter cross sections that can be used as a basis for discrimination for both standoff and point sensors.

  6. Effects of optical backscattering on silicon photonic hybrid laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacradouni, V.; Klein, J.; Pond, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present numerical results on the effect of backscattering at the junctions of double bus ring resonators in a Vernier ring hybrid laser design. The structure is comprised off a pair of III-V gain media evanescently coupled to a silicon on insulator racetrack comprised of a pair of double bus ring resonators coupled together through straight and flared waveguide sections. We show how the small backscattering at the ring resonator junctions has the effect of splitting and shifting the resonances off the clockwise and counter clockwise propagating modes thereby modifying the feedback spectrum from the ideal case. We then simulate results such as light current (LI) curves, relative intensity noise (RIN) and laser spectrum, and compare the laser performance including backscattering effects with the ideal case.

  7. Bruce Thompson: Adventures and advances in ultrasonic backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetan, Frank J.

    2012-05-01

    Over the course of his professional career Dr. R. Bruce Thompson published several hundred articles on non-destructive evaluation, the majority dealing with topics in ultrasonics. One longtime research interest of Dr. Thompson, with applications both to microstructure characterization and defect detection, was backscattered grain noise in metals. Over a 20 year period he led a revolving team of staff members and graduate students investigating various aspects of ultrasonic backscatter. As a member of that team I had the privilege of working along side Dr. Thompson for many years, serving as a sort of Dr. Watson to Bruce's Sherlock Holmes. This article discusses Dr. Thompson's general approaches to modeling backscatter, the research topics he chose to explore to systematically elucidate a better understanding of the phenomena, and the many contributions to the field achieved under his leadership. The backscatter work began in earnest around 1990, motivated by a need to improve inspections of aircraft engine components. At that time Dr. Thompson launched two research efforts. The first led to the heuristic Independent Scatterer Model which could be used to estimate the average grain noise level that would be seen in any given ultrasonic inspection. There the contribution from the microstructure was contained in a measureable parameter known as the Figure-of-Merit or FOM. The second research effort, spearheaded by Dr. Jim Rose, led to a formal relationship between FOM and details of the metal microstructure. The combination of the Independent Scattering Model and Rose's formalism provided a powerful tool for investigating backscatter in metals. In this article model developments are briefly reviewed and several illustrative applications are discussed. These include: the determination of grain size and shape from ultrasonic backscatter; grain noise variability in engine-titanium billets and forgings; and the design of ultrasonic inspection systems to improve defect

  8. Recovering an electromagnetic obstacle by a few phaseless backscattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu; Wang, Yuliang

    2017-03-01

    We consider the electromagnetic scattering from a convex polyhedral PEC or PMC obstacle due to a time-harmonic incident plane wave. It is shown that the modulus of the far-field pattern in the backscattering aperture possesses a certain local maximum behavior. Using the local maximum indicating phenomena, one can determine the exterior unit normal directions, as well as the face areas, of the front faces of the obstacle. Then we propose a recovery scheme of reconstructing the obstacle by phaseless backscattering measurements. This work significantly extends our recent study in Li and Liu (2014 preprint) from two dimensions and acoustic scattering to the more challenging three dimensions and electromagnetic scattering.

  9. Concept and realization of the A4 Compton backscattering polarimeter at MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Han

    2008-12-15

    The main concern of the A4 parity violation experiment at the Mainzer Microtron accelerator facility is to study the electric and magnetic contributions of strange quarks to the charge and magnetism of the nucleons at the low momentum transfer region. More precisely, the A4 collaboration investigates the strange quarks' contribution to the electric and magnetic vector form factors of the nucleons. Thus, it is important that the A4 experiment uses an adequate and precise non-destructive online monitoring tool for the electron beam polarization when measuring single spin asymmetries in elastic scattering of polarized electrons from unpolarized nucleons. As a consequence, the A4 Compton backscattering polarimeter was designed and installed such that we can take the absolute measurement of the electron beam polarization without interruption to the parity violation experiment. The present study shows the development of an electron beam line that is called the chicane for the A4 Compton backscattering polarimeter. The chicane is an electron beam transport line and provides an interaction region where the electron beam and the laser beam overlap. After studying the properties of beam line components carefully, we developed an electron beam control system that makes a beam overlap between the electron beam and the laser beam. Using the system, we can easily achieve the beam overlap in a short time. The electron control system, of which the performance is outstanding, is being used in production beam times. And the study presents the development of a scintillating fiber electron detector that reduces the statistical error in the electron polarization measurement. We totally redesigned the scintillating fiber detector. The data that were taken during a 2008 beam time shows a huge background suppression, approximately 80 percent, while leaving the Compton spectra almost unchanged when a coincidence between the fiber detector and the photon detector is used. Thus, the

  10. A quantitative description of the ground-state wave function of Cu(A) by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: comparison to plastocyanin and relevance to electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBeer George, S; Metz, M; Szilagyi, R K; Wang, H; Cramer, S P; Lu, Y; Tolman, W B; Hedman, B; Hodgson, K O; Solomon, E I

    2001-06-20

    To evaluate the importance of the electronic structure of Cu(A) to its electron-transfer (ET) function, a quantitative description of the ground-state wave function of the mixed-valence (MV) binuclear Cu(A) center engineered into Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin has been developed, using a combination of S K-edge and Cu L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopies (XAS). Parallel descriptions have been developed for a binuclear thiolate-bridged MV reference model complex ([(L(i)(PrdacoS)Cu)(2)](+)) and a homovalent (II,II) analogue ([L(i)(Pr2tacnS)Cu)(2)](2+), where L(i)(PrdacoS) and L(i)(Pr2tacnS) are macrocyclic ligands with attached thiolates that bridge the Cu ions. Previous studies have qualitatively defined the ground-state wave function of Cu(A) in terms of ligand field effects on the orbital orientation and the presence of a metal--metal bond. The studies presented here provide further evidence for a direct Cu--Cu interaction and, importantly, experimentally quantify the covalency of the ground-state wave function. The experimental results are further supported by DFT calculations. The nature of the ground-state wave function of Cu(A) is compared to that of the well-defined blue copper site in plastocyanin, and the importance of this wave function to the lower reorganization energy and ET function of Cu(A) is discussed. This wave function incorporates anisotropic covalency into the intra- and intermolecular ET pathways in cytochrome c oxidase. Thus, the high covalency of the Cys--Cu bond allows a path through this ligand to become competitive with a shorter His path in the intramolecular ET from Cu(A) to heme a and is particularly important for activating the intermolecular ET path from heme c to Cu(A).

  11. Optical backscattering properties of the "clearest" natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Twardowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available During the BIOSOPE field campaign October–December 2004, measurements of inherent optical properties from the surface to 500 m depth were made with a ship profiler at stations covering over ~8000 km through the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Data from a ~3000 km section containing the very clearest waters in the central gyre are reported here. The total volume scattering function at 117°, βt(117°, was measured with a WET Labs ECO-BB3 sensor at 462, 532, and 650 nm with estimated uncertainties of 2×10−5, 5×10−6, and 2×10−6 m−1 sr−1, respectively. These values were approximately 6%, 3%, and 3% of the scattering by pure seawater at their respective wavelengths. From a methodological perspective, there were several results:

    bbp distributions were resolvable even though some of the values from the central gyre were an order of magnitude lower than the lowest previous measurements in the literature;
    – Direct in-situ measurements of instrument dark offsets were necessary to accurately resolve backscattering at these low levels;
    – accurate pure seawater backscattering values are critical in determining particulate backscattering coefficients in the open ocean (not only in these very clear waters; the pure water scattering values determined by Buiteveld et al. (1994 with a [1 + 0.3S/37] adjustment for salinity based on Morel (1974 appear to be the most accurate estimates, with aggregate accuracies as low as a few percent; and
    – closure was demonstrated with subsurface reflectance measurements reported by Morel et al. (2007 within instrument precisions, a useful factor in validating the backscattering measurements.

    This methodology enabled several observations with respect to the hydrography and the use of backscattering as a biogeochemical proxy:

    – The clearest waters sampled were found at

  12. Optical backscattering properties of the "clearest" natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Twardowski

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During the BIOSOPE field campaign October–December 2004, measurements of inherent optical properties from the surface to 500 m depth were made with a ship profiler at stations covering over 8000 km through the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Data from a ~3000 km section containing the very clearest waters in the central gyre are reported here. The total volume scattering function at 117°, βt(117°, was measured with a WET Labs ECO-BB3 sensor at 462, 532, and 650 nm with estimated uncertainties of 2×10-5, 5×10-6, and 2×10-6 m−1 sr−1, respectively. These values were approximately 6%, 3%, and 3% of the volume scattering by pure seawater at their respective wavelengths. From a methodological perspective, there were several results:

    – distributions were resolvable even though some of the values from the central gyre were an order of magnitude lower than the lowest previous measurements in the literature;
    – Direct in-situ measurements of instrument dark offsets were necessary to accurately resolve backscattering at these low levels;
    – accurate pure seawater backscattering values are critical in determining particulate backscattering coefficients in the open ocean (not only in these very clear waters; the pure water scattering values determined by Buiteveld et al. (1994 with a [1+0.3S/37] adjustment for salinity based on Morel (1974 appear to be the most accurate estimates, with aggregate accuracies as low as a few percent; and
    – closure was demonstrated with subsurface reflectance measurements reported by Morel et al. (2007 within instrument precisions, a useful factor in validating the backscattering measurements.

    This methodology enabled several observations with respect to the hydrography and the use of backscattering as a biogeochemical proxy:

    –The clearest waters sampled were found at depths between 300 and 350 m, from 23.5° S

  13. A model for quantitative correction of coronary calcium scores on multidetector, dual source, and electron beam computed tomography for influences of linear motion, calcification density, and temporal resolution : A cardiac phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuter, M. J. W.; Groen, J. M.; Nicolai, L. J.; Dijkstra, H.; Oudkerk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to quantify the influence of linear motion, calcification density, and temporal resolution on coronary calcium determination using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), dual source CT (DSCT), and electron beam tomography (EBT) and to find a quantitative me

  14. Rate-determining electron-transfer reactions in highly aqueous alcohol-water mixtures. A quantitative analysis of solvent effects on the oxidation of 4-methoxyphenylacetate by potassium 12-tungstocobaltate(III)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bietti, M.; Baciocchi, E.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1996-01-01

    Kinetic solvent effects on the rate-determining outer-sphere electron-transfer reaction between 4-methoxy-phenylacetate and potassium 12-tungstocobaltate(III) in highly aqueous alcohol-water mixtures are quantitatively analysed in terms of pairwise Gibbs energy parameters for interaction of the init

  15. Influence of Contractility on Myocardial Ultrasonic Integrated Backscatter and Cyclic Variation in Integrated Backscatter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕小军; 邓又斌; 潘敏; 杨好意; 向慧娟; 常青; 黎春雷

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To evaluate the effects of left ventricular contractility on the changes of average image intensity (AII) of the myocardial integrated backscatter (IB) and cyclic variation in IB (CVIB), 7 adult mongrel dogs were studied. The magnitude of AII and CVIB were measured from myocardial IB carves before and after dobutamine or propranolol infusion. Dobutamine or propranolol did not affect the magnitude of AII (13.8±0. 7 vs 14.7±0. 5, P>0. 05 or 14.3±0.5 vs 14.2±0. 4, P>0. 05). However, dobutamine produced a significant increase in the magnitude of CVIB (6.8±0.3 vs 9.5 ± 0. 6, P<0. 001) and propranolol induced significant decrease in the magnitude of CVIB (7.1±0. 2 vs 5.2±0. 3, P<0. 001). The changes of the magnitude of AII and CVIB in the myocardium have been demonstrated to reflect different myocardial physiological and pathological changes respectively. The alteration of contractility did not affect the magnitude of AII but induced significant change in CVIB. The increase of left ventricular contractility resulted in a significant rise of the magnitude of CVIB and the decrease of left ventricular contractility resulted in a significant fall of the magnitude of CVIB.

  16. A Micropulse eye-safe all-fiber molecular backscatter coherent temperature lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abari Cyrus F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze the performance of an all-fiber, micropulse, 1.5 μm coherent lidar for remote sensing of atmospheric temperature. The proposed system benefits from the recent advances in optics/electronics technology, especially an all-fiber image-reject homodyne receiver, where a high resolution spectrum in the baseband can be acquired. Due to the presence of a structured spectra resulting from the spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouine scattering, associated with the relevant operating regimes, an accurate estimation of the temperature can be carried out. One of the main advantages of this system is the removal of the contaminating Mie backscatter signal by electronic filters at the baseband (before signal conditioning and amplification. The paper presents the basic concepts as well as a Monte-Carlo system simulation as the proof of concept.

  17. Simultaneous observation of sporadic E with a rapid-run ionosonde and VHF coherent backscatter radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maruyama

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available During the SEEK 2 rocket campaign, ionograms were recorded every minute at the Yamagawa Radio Observatory at about 90km west of the region monitored by a VHF (very high frequency coherent backscatter radar. Sporadic E-layer parameters, which include the critical (foEs and blanketing (fbEs frequencies, the layer height (h'Es, and the width of the range spread of sporadic E-traces, were compared with RTI (range-time-intensity plots of VHF quasi-periodic (QP and continuous coherent backscatter echoes. A close relationship was found between the appearance of QP echoes in the RTI plots and the level of spatial inhomogeneity in sporadic E plasma, signified here by the difference between foEs and fbEs. During QP echo events, foEs increased while fbEs decreased, so that the difference foEs-fbEs was enhanced, indicating the development of strong spatial structuring in electron density within a sporadic E-layer. On the other hand, increases in sporadic E range spreading also correlated with the occurrence of QP echoes but the degree of correlation varied from event to event. Continuous radar echoes were observed in association with low altitude sporadic E-layers, located well below 100 km and at times as low as 90 km. During the continuous echo events, both foEs and fbEs were less variable, and the difference foEs-fbEs was small and not as dynamic as in the QP echoes. On the other hand, the Es-layer spread intensified during continuous echoes, which means that some patchiness or corrugation in those low altitude layers is also necessary for the continuous backscatter echoes to take place.

  18. A laser driven pulsed X-ray backscatter technique for enhanced penetrative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deas, R M; Wilson, L A; Rusby, D; Alejo, A; Allott, R; Black, P P; Black, S E; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C M; Bryant, J; Clarke, R J; Collier, J C; Edwards, B; Foster, P; Greenhalgh, J; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Kar, S; Lockley, D; Moss, R M; Najmudin, Z; Pattathil, R; Symes, D; Whittle, M D; Wood, J C; McKenna, P; Neely, D

    2015-01-01

    X-ray backscatter imaging can be used for a wide range of imaging applications, in particular for industrial inspection and portal security. Currently, the application of this imaging technique to the detection of landmines is limited due to the surrounding sand or soil strongly attenuating the 10s to 100s of keV X-rays required for backscatter imaging. Here, we introduce a new approach involving a 140 MeV short-pulse (laser wakefield acceleration to probe the sample, which produces Bremsstrahlung X-rays within the sample enabling greater depths to be imaged. A variety of detector and scintillator configurations are examined, with the best time response seen from an absorptive coated BaF2 scintillator with a bandpass filter to remove the slow scintillation emission components. An X-ray backscatter image of an array of different density and atomic number items is demonstrated. The use of a compact laser wakefield accelerator to generate the electron source, combined with the rapid development of more compact, efficient and higher repetition rate high power laser systems will make this system feasible for applications in the field. Content includes material subject to Dstl (c) Crown copyright (2014). Licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@ nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

  19. On the maximum backscattering cross section of passive linear arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solymar, L.; Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1974-01-01

    The maximum backscattering cross section of an equispaced linear array connected to a reactive network and consisting of isotropic radiators is calculated forn = 2, 3, and 4 elements as a function of the incident angle and of the distance between the elements. On the basis of the results obtained...

  20. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  1. Backscatter C [Fugro]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  2. Using Back-Scattering to Enhance Efficiency in Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kittelmann, Thomas; Cai, Xiao Xiao; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P; Hall-Wilton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The principle of using strongly scattering materials to recover efficiency in neutron detectors, via back-scattering of unconverted thermal neutrons, is discussed in general. Feasibility of the method is illustrated through Geant4-based simulations of a specific setup involving a moderator-like material placed behind a single layered boron-10 thin film gaseous detector.

  3. Backscatter C [Fugro]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  4. The Growth and Decay of Equatorial Backscatter Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    spatially connected to bottomside backscatter, a feature noted in Jica - marca radar observations that led Woodman and La Hoz (1976) to speculate that...described in Section Ill-B, this pattern of plume growth resembles the "C-shaped" and "fishtail" patterns found in Jica - marca radar RTI displays of 50-MHz

  5. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  6. Radar Backscatter Across the Gulf Stream Sea Surface Temperature Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Walsh, E. J.; Lou, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean backscatter signatures were measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne NUSCAT K(sub u)-band scatterometer across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front. The measurements were made during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991.

  7. Backscatter gauge description for inspection of neutron absorber content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewberry, R. A.; Gibbs, K. M.; Couture, A. H.

    2013-01-19

    This paper describes design, calibration, and testing of a dual He-3 detector neutron backscatter gauge for use in the Savannah River Site Mixed Oxide Fuel project. The gauge is demonstrated to measure boron content and uniformity in concrete slabs used in the facility construction.

  8. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  9. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore of Ventura map area, California. The raster data...

  10. Transport properties and superconductivity in presence of backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Mattis, D. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Physics); Rudin, S. (Army Electronics Technology and Devices Lab., Fort Monmouth, NJ (United States))

    1992-04-20

    In this paper, the authors achieve an exact evaluation of the Kubo formula for electrical resistivity, with a model in which random impurity scattering is parametrized by random back-scattering matrix elements. If the alloy is a superconductor, our theory allows us to correlate T{sub c} with the normal-phase resistivity. The results are in nice agreement with experiment.

  11. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    , significantly lower mean frequency of ultrasound backscattered from cirrhotic, compared to normal, liver tissue was noted, Studies of benign and malignant liver tumors (hemangiomas and metastases, respectively) indicated differences in frequency content of these tumors, compared to the adjacent normal liver...

  12. Tracking California seafloor seeps with bathymetry, backscatter and ROVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, Daniel L.; Yun, Janet; Maher, Norman; Barry, James; Greene, Gary

    2002-11-01

    The California (USA) margin includes two different tectonic regimes: subduction north of the Mendocino Triple Junction and translation south. Both margins include seeps, and their distribution can be inferred using seafloor bathymetry and backscatter as well as subsurface seismic data. Anomalous bathymetric and backscatter features related to fluid expulsion include headless submarine canyons, fault zones, anticlines, pockmarks, and mud volcanoes. Anomalous backscatter may be caused by authigenic carbonate (related to the bacterial oxidation of methane) or cold seep clams—both have an impedance and roughness that may be higher than the surrounding seafloor. Remote-operated vehicle (ROV) dives to such suspect seep sites document the presence of extensive authigenic carbonate, areally restricted cold seep communities, carpets of chemoautotrophic bacteria, and bubbling gas. Our operations in the Monterey Bay, on the translational California margin, and the Eel River basin, on the convergent margin, indicate that bathymetric and backscatter maps of the seafloor, if sufficiently high resolution, can be used to map seep sites, and that the distribution of such seeps can be used to constrain subsurface conduits of fluid flow. ROVs, due to their combination of visualization, propulsion, manipulation, sonar, and navigation, provide an excellent platform for ground-truthing, mapping, and sampling seafloor seeps.

  13. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  14. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  15. Characterizing Indian Ocean manganese nodule-bearing seafloor using multi-beam angular backscatter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Kodagali, V.N.

    backscattering in delineating seafloor parameters characteristic of nodule-rich sediments. In this paper, processed Hydrosweep multi-beam backscatter data from 45 spot locations in the CIOB (where nodule samples are available) were analysed to estimate seafloor...

  16. BackscatterA [8210]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  17. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  19. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...