WorldWideScience

Sample records for pyrometers

  1. Emissivity independent optical pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; Kisner, Roger A.

    2017-04-04

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for determining the temperature of an object using an optical pyrometer. Certain embodiments of the disclosed technology allow for making optical temperature measurements that are independent of the surface emissivity of the object being sensed. In one of the exemplary embodiments disclosed herein, a plurality of spectral radiance measurements at a plurality of wavelengths is received from a surface of an object being measured. The plurality of the spectral radiance measurements is fit to a scaled version of a black body curve, the fitting comprising determining a temperature of the scaled version of the black body curve. The temperature is then output. The present disclosure is not to be construed as limiting and is instead directed toward all novel and nonobvious features and aspects of the various disclosed embodiments, alone or in various combinations and subcombinations with one another.

  2. Emissivity independent optical pyrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; Kisner, Roger A.

    2017-04-04

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for determining the temperature of an object using an optical pyrometer. Certain embodiments of the disclosed technology allow for making optical temperature measurements that are independent of the surface emissivity of the object being sensed. In one of the exemplary embodiments disclosed herein, a plurality of spectral radiance measurements at a plurality of wavelengths is received from a surface of an object being measured. The plurality of the spectral radiance measurements is fit to a scaled version of a black body curve, the fitting comprising determining a temperature of the scaled version of the black body curve. The temperature is then output. The present disclosure is not to be construed as limiting and is instead directed toward all novel and nonobvious features and aspects of the various disclosed embodiments, alone or in various combinations and subcombinations with one another.

  3. The application analyses for primary spectrum pyrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU; TaiRan

    2007-01-01

    In the applications of primary spectrum pyrometry, based on the dynamic range and the minimum sensibility of the sensor, the application issues, such as the measurement range and the measurement partition, were investigated through theoretical analyses. For a developed primary spectrum pyrometer, the theoretical predictions of measurement range and the distributions of measurement partition were presented through numerical simulations. And the measurement experiments of high-temperature blackbody and standard temperature lamp were processed to further verify the above theoretical analyses and numerical results. Therefore the research in the paper provides the helpful supports for the applications of primary spectrum pyrometer and other radiation pyrometers.……

  4. New Pyrometer with Double X—type Optical Fibers①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIWeidong; LIZhiquantffu

    1997-01-01

    A new pyrometer,which can solve the affection of emissivity change in temperature measuring,has been developed by double Y-type optical fibers.The mathematical model of the new pyrometer is presented and the errors of the new pyrometer are analyzed.

  5. A Plenoptic Multi-Color Imaging Pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Hutchins, William D.; Fahringer, Timothy; Thurow, Brian S.

    2017-01-01

    A three-color pyrometer has been developed based on plenoptic imaging technology. Three bandpass filters placed in front of a camera lens allow separate 2D images to be obtained on a single image sensor at three different and adjustable wavelengths selected by the user. Images were obtained of different black- or grey-bodies including a calibration furnace, a radiation heater, and a luminous sulfur match flame. The images obtained of the calibration furnace and radiation heater were processed to determine 2D temperature distributions. Calibration results in the furnace showed that the instrument can measure temperature with an accuracy and precision of 10 Kelvins between 1100 and 1350 K. Time-resolved 2D temperature measurements of the radiation heater are shown.

  6. PYROLASER - PYROLASER OPTICAL PYROMETER OPERATING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, F. E.

    1994-01-01

    The PYROLASER package is an operating system for the Pyrometer Instrument Company's Pyrolaser. There are 6 individual programs in the PYROLASER package: two main programs, two lower level subprograms, and two programs which, although independent, function predominantly as macros. The package provides a quick and easy way to setup, control, and program a standard Pyrolaser. Temperature and emissivity measurements may be either collected as if the Pyrolaser were in the manual operations mode, or displayed on real time strip charts and stored in standard spreadsheet format for post-test analysis. A shell is supplied to allow macros, which are test-specific, to be easily added to the system. The Pyrolaser Simple Operation program provides full on-screen remote operation capabilities, thus allowing the user to operate the Pyrolaser from the computer just as it would be operated manually. The Pyrolaser Simple Operation program also allows the use of "quick starts". Quick starts provide an easy way to permit routines to be used as setup macros for specific applications or tests. The specific procedures required for a test may be ordered in a sequence structure and then the sequence structure can be started with a simple button in the cluster structure provided. One quick start macro is provided for continuous Pyrolaser operation. A subprogram, Display Continuous Pyr Data, is used to display and store the resulting data output. Using this macro, the system is set up for continuous operation and the subprogram is called to display the data in real time on strip charts. The data is simultaneously stored in a spreadsheet format. The resulting spreadsheet file can be opened in any one of a number of commercially available spreadsheet programs. The Read Continuous Pyrometer program is provided as a continuously run subprogram for incorporation of the Pyrolaser software into a process control or feedback control scheme in a multi-component system. The program requires the

  7. PYROLASER - PYROLASER OPTICAL PYROMETER OPERATING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, F. E.

    1994-01-01

    The PYROLASER package is an operating system for the Pyrometer Instrument Company's Pyrolaser. There are 6 individual programs in the PYROLASER package: two main programs, two lower level subprograms, and two programs which, although independent, function predominantly as macros. The package provides a quick and easy way to setup, control, and program a standard Pyrolaser. Temperature and emissivity measurements may be either collected as if the Pyrolaser were in the manual operations mode, or displayed on real time strip charts and stored in standard spreadsheet format for post-test analysis. A shell is supplied to allow macros, which are test-specific, to be easily added to the system. The Pyrolaser Simple Operation program provides full on-screen remote operation capabilities, thus allowing the user to operate the Pyrolaser from the computer just as it would be operated manually. The Pyrolaser Simple Operation program also allows the use of "quick starts". Quick starts provide an easy way to permit routines to be used as setup macros for specific applications or tests. The specific procedures required for a test may be ordered in a sequence structure and then the sequence structure can be started with a simple button in the cluster structure provided. One quick start macro is provided for continuous Pyrolaser operation. A subprogram, Display Continuous Pyr Data, is used to display and store the resulting data output. Using this macro, the system is set up for continuous operation and the subprogram is called to display the data in real time on strip charts. The data is simultaneously stored in a spreadsheet format. The resulting spreadsheet file can be opened in any one of a number of commercially available spreadsheet programs. The Read Continuous Pyrometer program is provided as a continuously run subprogram for incorporation of the Pyrolaser software into a process control or feedback control scheme in a multi-component system. The program requires the

  8. Temperature Measurement in WTE Boilers Using Suction Pyrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Rinaldi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of the flue-gas in the post combustion zone of a waste to energy (WTE plant has to be maintained within a fairly narrow range of values, the minimum of which is prescribed by the European Waste Directive 2000/76/CE, whereas the maximum value must be such as to ensure the preservation of the materials and the energy efficiency of the plant. A high degree of accuracy in measuring and controlling the aforementioned temperature is therefore required. In almost the totality of WTE plants this measurement process is carried out by using practical industrial thermometers, such as bare thermocouples and infrared radiation (IR pyrometers, even if affected by different physical contributions which can make the gas temperature measurements incorrect. The objective of this paper is to analyze errors and uncertainties that can arise when using a bare thermocouple or an IR pyrometer in a WTE plant and to provide a method for the in situ calibration of these industrial sensors through the use of suction pyrometers. The paper describes principle of operation, design, and uncertainty contributions of suction pyrometers, it also provides the best estimation of the flue-gas temperature in the post combustion zone of a WTE plant and the estimation of its expanded uncertainty.

  9. A Sensor Fusion Algorithm for Filtering Pyrometer Measurement Noise in the Czochralski Crystallization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Komperød

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Czochralski (CZ crystallization process is used to produce monocrystalline silicon for solar cell wafers and electronics. Tight temperature control of the molten silicon is most important for achieving high crystal quality. SINTEF Materials and Chemistry operates a CZ process. During one CZ batch, two pyrometers were used for temperature measurement. The silicon pyrometer measures the temperature of the molten silicon. This pyrometer is assumed to be accurate, but has much high-frequency measurement noise. The graphite pyrometer measures the temperature of a graphite material. This pyrometer has little measurement noise. There is quite a good correlation between the two pyrometer measurements. This paper presents a sensor fusion algorithm that merges the two pyrometer signals for producing a temperature estimate with little measurement noise, while having significantly less phase lag than traditional lowpass- filtering of the silicon pyrometer. The algorithm consists of two sub-algorithms: (i A dynamic model is used to estimate the silicon temperature based on the graphite pyrometer, and (ii a lowpass filter and a highpass filter designed as complementary filters. The complementary filters are used to lowpass-filter the silicon pyrometer, highpass-filter the dynamic model output, and merge these filtered signals. Hence, the lowpass filter attenuates noise from the silicon pyrometer, while the graphite pyrometer and the dynamic model estimate those frequency components of the silicon temperature that are lost when lowpass-filtering the silicon pyrometer. The algorithm works well within a limited temperature range. To handle a larger temperature range, more research must be done to understand the process' nonlinear dynamics, and build this into the dynamic model.

  10. Self-calibrated active pyrometer for furnace temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The pyrometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave receiver including a millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. In an alternative embodiment, a translatable base plate and a visible laser beam allow slow mapping out of interference patterns and obtaining peak values therefor. The invention also includes a waveguide having a replaceable end portion, an insulating refractory sleeve and/or a source of inert gas flow. The pyrometer may be used in conjunction with a waveguide to form a system for temperature measurements in a furnace. The system may employ a chopper or alternatively, be constructed without a chopper. The system may also include an auxiliary reflector for surface emissivity measurements.

  11. Low temperature fiber optic pyrometer for fast time resolved temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsch, M.; Bosselmann, T.; Gaenshirt, D.; Kaiser, J.; Villnow, M.; Banda, M.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature Pyrometry at temperatures beyond 150°C is limited in the measurement speed due to slow pyroelectric detectors. To detect the circumferential temperature distribution of fast rotating machines a novel Fiber Optical Pyrometer Type is presented here.

  12. Multiwavelength Pyrometer Developed for Use at Elevated Temperatures in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel L.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a unique multiwavelength pyrometer for aerospace applications. It has been shown to be a useful and versatile instrument for measuring the surface temperatures of ceramic zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and alumina, even when their emissivity is unknown. The introduction of fiber optics into the pyrometer has greatly increased the ease of using this instrument. Direct comparison of measurements obtained using the pyrometer and thin film thermocouples on a sample provided independent verification of pyrometry temperature measurement. Application of the pyrometer has also included simultaneous surface and bulk temperature measurement in a transparent material, the measurement of combustion gas temperatures in the flames of an atmospheric burner, the measurement of the temperature distribution appearing on a large surface from the recording of just a single radiation spectrum emitted from this nonuniform temperature surface, and the measurement of some optical properties for special aeronautical materials-such as nanostructured layers. The multiwavelength pyrometer temperature is obtained from a radiation spectrum recorded over a broad wavelength region by transforming it into a straight line segment(s) in part or all of the spectral region. The intercept of the line segment(s) with the vertical axis at zero wavelength gives the inverse of the temperature. In a two-color pyrometer, the two data points are also amenable to this analysis to determine the unknown temperature. Implicit in a two-color pyrometer is the assumption of wavelength-independent emissivity. Its two (and minimum) pieces of data are sufficient to determine this straight line. However, a multiwavelength pyrometer not only has improved accuracy but also confirms that the wavelength-independent emissivity assumption is valid when a multitude of data points are shown to lie on a simple straight line.

  13. Thermal management in pyrometer modules for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liess, Martin; Hausner, Martin; Ernst, Henrik; Karagözoglu, Hermann; Schilz, Jürgen

    2006-04-01

    Thermopile pyrometer modules are the state of the art for contactless temperature measurement in automotive applications. Here sensors have to operate precisely in a challenging thermal environment. While the compensation of the steady state ambient temperature is a well known technique in thermopile radiation temperature sensors, transient thermal effects are still an issue. The change of the ambient temperature as well as temperature flow through the sensor can lead to substantial errors due to unwanted thermal gradients within the device. In the thermopile chip they leads to an error signal since the measurement principle is based on quantifying thermal gradients of the chip that result from the detected IR-radiation. Thermal gradients in the cap and between cap and thermopile chip lead to an exchange of heat radiation between thermopile chip and cap that is erroneously detected and thus also leads to errors. Different methods were developed that separately or in combination allow for a significant improvement of the accuracy and signal stability. The methods are based on the reduction of thermal gradients within the thermopile chip and the entire sensor device (isothermal, high thermal mass cap), reduction of radiation exchange between the sensor chip and the housing (low emissive inner cap surface) and prediction and software compensation of the error signal.

  14. High-speed two-camera imaging pyrometer for mapping fireball temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, John M; Homan, Barrie E; Biss, Matthew M; McNesby, Kevin L

    2011-11-20

    A high-speed imaging pyrometer was developed to investigate the behavior of flames and explosive events. The instrument consists of two monochrome high-speed Phantom v7.3 m cameras made by Vision Research Inc. arranged so that one lens assembly collects light for both cameras. The cameras are filtered at 700 or 900 nm with a 10 nm bandpass. The high irradiance produced by blackbody emission combined with variable shutter time and f-stop produces properly exposed images. The wavelengths were chosen with the expected temperatures in mind, and also to avoid any molecular or atomic gas phase emission. Temperatures measured using this pyrometer of exploded TNT charges are presented.

  15. 32-channel pyrometer with high dynamic range for studies of shocked nanothermites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    A 32-channel optical pyrometer has been developed for studying temperature dynamics of shock-initiated reactive materials with one nanosecond time resolution and high dynamic range. The pyrometer consists of a prism spectrograph which directs the spectrally-resolved emission to 32 fiber optics and 32 photomultiplier tubes and digitizers. Preliminary results show shock-initiated reactions of a nanothermite composite, nano CuO/Al in nitrocellulose binder, consists of three stages. The first stage occurred at 30 ns, right after the shock unloaded, the second stage at 100 ns and the third at 1 μs, and the temperatures ranged from 2100K to 3000K. Time-resolved emission spectra suggest hot spots formed during shock unloading, which initiated the bulk thermite/nitrocellulose reaction.

  16. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: A Pyrometer for Measuring Ground Temperature on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS), an instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor’s main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight cal...

  17. Two-Step Calibration of a Multiwavelength Pyrometer for High Temperature Measurement Using a Quartz Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    There is no theoretical upper temperature limit for pyrometer application in temperature measurements. NASA Glenn's multiwavelength pyrometer can make measurements over wide temperature ranges. However, the radiation spectral response of the pyrometer's detector must be calibrated before any temperature measurement is attempted, and it is recommended that calibration be done at temperatures close to those for which measurements will be made. Calibration is a determination of the constants of proportionality at all wavelengths between the detector's output (voltage) and its input signals (usually from a blackbody radiation source) in order to convert detector output into radiation intensity. To measure high temperatures, the detectors are chosen to be sensitive in the spectral range from 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers. A blackbody furnace equilibrated at around 1000 C is often used for this calibration. Though the detector may respond sensitively to short wavelengths radiation, a blackbody furnace at 1000 C emits only feebly at very short wavelengths. As a consequence, the calibration constants that result may not be the most accurate. For pyrometry calibration, a radiation source emitting strongly at the short wavelengths is preferred. We have chosen a quartz halogen lamp for this purpose.

  18. Direct emissivity measurements on liquids and corrections to multi-color pyrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Optical pyrometry provides a means for non-contact temperature measurements whose accuracy depends on the accuracy with which specimen emittance is known. Two methods for obtaining the required emittance data are discussed in which the emittance is determined from measurements of the wavelength or polarization dependence of light emitted by the specimen. The spectral technique, multi-color pyrometry, yields apparent values for specimen emittance and temperature from emitted intensity measurements at two or more wavelengths. Emittance corrections cannot be eliminated by increasing the number of spectral intensity measurements required by an n-color pyrometer. Even if this were possible, the accuracy of temperature measurements by n-color pyrometry decreases with n such that pyrometers that require four intensity measurements would be impractical. In contrast, emittance values and corrections for one-color pyrometers can be accurately measured by the polarized light technique. The polarized light technique involves measurement of the degree of polarization for light emitted at an angle of 45 deg to the specimen normal. The reflectivities (r) for light polarized parallel (p) and normal (n) to the plane of emission are related by r(p) = r(n) squared. This leads to a simple relation between the intensity ratio for light emitted in the two polarized states and the emittance, i.e., e(n) = 2 - I(p)/I(n). The true specimen temperature is also obtained if absolute intensities are measured. Delvelopment of the polarized light technique in combination with one-color optical pyrometry is recommended to achieve accurate non-contact temperature measurements on liquids.

  19. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: A Pyrometer for Measuring Ground Temperature on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ramos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS, an instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor’s main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment.

  20. Upgrades to the VISAR-streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) system on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, A. M.; Millot, M.; Seppala, L. G.; Frieders, G.; Zeid, Z.; Christensen, K.; Celliers, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) is a critical diagnostic in Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density research as it has the ability to track shock fronts or interfaces moving 0.1-100 km/s with great accuracy. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the VISAR has recently been used successfully for implosion tuning and equation of state measurements. However, the initial design of the companion Streaked Optical Pyrometer (SOP) to measure spectral radiance - hence shock temperature - suffers from large background levels and poor spatial resolution. We report on an upgrade to improve the spatial resolution in the 560-640nm band by using custom lenses and replacing the Dove prism with a K-mirror and implementing a gating-circuit for the streak camera to reduce background signal. We envision that upgraded SOP will provide high quality data collection matching NIF VISAR's standards.

  1. [Development of multi-target multi-spectral high-speed pyrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Peng; Dai, Jing-Min; Wang, Qing-Wei

    2008-11-01

    The plume temperature of a solid propellant rocket engine (SPRE) is a fundamental parameter in denoting combustion status. It is necessary to measure the temperature along both the axis and the radius of the engine. In order to measure the plume temperature distribution of a solid propellant rocket engine, the multi-spectral thermometry has been approved. Previously the pyrometer was developed in the Harbin Institute of Technology of China in 1999, which completed the measurement of SPRE plume temperature and its distribution with multi-spectral technique in aerospace model development for the first time. Following this experience, a new type of multi-target multi-spectral high-speed pyrometer used in the ground experiments of SPRE plume temperature measurement was developed. The main features of the instrument include the use of a dispersing prism and a photo-diode array to cover the entire spectral band of 0.4 to 1.1 microm. The optic fibers are used in order to collect and transmit the thermal radiation fluxes. The instrument can measure simultaneously the temperature and emissivity of eight spectra for six uniformly distributed points on the target surface, which are well defined by the hole on the field stop lens. A specially designed S/H (Sample/Hold) circuit, with 48 sample and hold units that were triggered with a signal, measures the multi-spectral and multi-target outputs. It can sample 48 signals with a less than 10ns time difference which is most important for the temperature calculation.

  2. A high spatio-temporal resolution optical pyrometer at the ORION laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Emma; Gumbrell, Edward T.; Fyrth, Jim; Luis, James D.; Skidmore, Jonathan W.; Patankar, Siddharth; Giltrap, Samuel; Smith, Roland

    2016-11-01

    A streaked pyrometer has been designed to measure the temperature of ≈100 μm diameter heated targets in the warm dense matter region. The diagnostic has picosecond time resolution. Spatial resolution is limited by the streak camera to 4 μm in one dimension; the imaging system has superior resolution of 1 μm. High light collection efficiency means that the diagnostic can transmit a measurable quantity of thermal emission at temperatures as low as 1 eV to the detector. This is achieved through the use of an f/1.4 objective, and a minimum number of reflecting and refracting surfaces to relay the image over 8 m with no vignetting over a 0.4 mm field of view with 12.5× magnification. All the system optics are highly corrected, to allow imaging with minimal aberrations over a broad spectral range. The detector is a highly sensitive Axis Photonique streak camera with a P820PSU streak tube. For the first time, two of these cameras have been absolutely calibrated at 1 ns and 2 ns sweep speeds under full operational conditions and over 8 spectral bands between 425 nm and 650 nm using a high-stability picosecond white light source. Over this range the cameras had a response which varied between 47 ± 8 and 14 ± 4 photons/count. The calibration of the optical imaging system makes absolute temperature measurements possible. Color temperature measurements are also possible due to the wide spectral range over which the system is calibrated; two different spectral bands can be imaged onto different parts of the photocathode of the same streak camera.

  3. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fat’yanov, O. V., E-mail: fatyan1@gps.caltech.edu; Asimow, P. D., E-mail: asimow@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences 252-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  4. DESIGN, FABRICATION, ASSEMBLY AND BENCH TESTING OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Leininger

    2001-03-31

    Reliable measurement of gasifier reaction chamber temperature is important for the proper operation of slagging, entrained-flow gasification processes. Historically, thermocouples have been used as the main measurement technique, with the temperature inferred from syngas methane concentration being used as a backup measurement. While these have been sufficient for plant operation in many cases, both techniques suffer from limitations. The response time of methane measurements is too slow to detect rapid upset conditions, and thermocouples are subject to long-term drift, as well as slag attack, which eventually leads to failure of the thermocouple. Texaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) has developed an infrared ratio pyrometer system for measuring gasifier reaction chamber temperature. This system has a faster response time than both methane and thermocouples, and has been demonstrated to provide reliable temperature measurements for longer periods of time when compared to thermocouples installed in the same MTC gasifier. In addition, the system can be applied to commercial gasifiers without any significant scale-up issues. The major equipment items, the purge system, and the safety shutdown system in a commercial plant are essentially identical to the prototypes at MTC. The desired result of this DOE program is ''a bench-scale prototype, either assembled or with critical components (laboratory) tested in a convincing manner.'' The prototype of the pyrometer system (including gasifier optical access port) that was designed, assembled and tested for this program, has had previous prototypes that have been built and successfully tested under actual coal and coke gasification conditions in three pilot units at MTC. It was the intent of the work performed under the auspices of this program to review and update the existing design, and to fabricate and bench test an updated system that can be field tested in one or more commercial gasifiers

  5. A multi-wavelength streak-optical-pyrometer for warm-dense matter experiments at NDCX-I and NDCX-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, P. A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multi-wavelength streak-optical-pyrometer (SOP) developed the for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments at the existing NDCX-I facility and the NDCX-II facility currently being commissioned at LBNL. The SOP served as the primary temperature diagnostic in the recent NDCX-I experiments, in which an intense K+ beam was used to heat different metal samples into WDM states. The SOP consists of a spectral grating (visible and near-infrared spectral range) and a fast, high-dynamic-range optical streak camera. The instrument is calibrated absolutely with a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp and can itself be considered as an absolutely calibrated, time-resolving spectrometer. The sample temperature is determined from fitting the recorded thermal spectrum into the Planck formula multiplied by a model of emissivity.

  6. A multi-wavelength streak-optical-pyrometer for warm-dense matter experiments at NDCX-I and NDCX-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, P.A., E-mail: pani@lbl.gov; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multi-wavelength streak-optical-pyrometer (SOP) developed the for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments at the existing NDCX-I facility and the NDCX-II facility currently being commissioned at LBNL. The SOP served as the primary temperature diagnostic in the recent NDCX-I experiments, in which an intense K{sup +} beam was used to heat different metal samples into WDM states. The SOP consists of a spectral grating (visible and near-infrared spectral range) and a fast, high-dynamic-range optical streak camera. The instrument is calibrated absolutely with a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp and can itself be considered as an absolutely calibrated, time-resolving spectrometer. The sample temperature is determined from fitting the recorded thermal spectrum into the Planck formula multiplied by a model of emissivity.

  7. HEAVY ION FUSION SCIENCE VIRTUAL NATIONAL LABORATORY2nd QUARTER 2010 MILESTONE REPORTDevelop the theory connecting pyrometer and streak camera spectrometer data to the material properties of beam heatedtargets and compare to the data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.; Barnard, J. J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.

    2010-04-01

    This milestone has been accomplished. We have extended the theory that connects pyrometer and streak spectrometer data to material temperature on several fronts and have compared theory to NDCX-I experiments. For the case of NDCX-I, the data suggests that as the metallic foils are heated they break into droplets (cf. HIFS VNL Milestone Report FY 2009 Q4). Evaporation of the metallic surface will occur, but optical emission should be directly observable from the solid or liquid surface of the foil or from droplets. However, the emissivity of hot material may be changed from the cold material and interference effects will alter the spectrum emitted from small droplets. These effects have been incorporated into a theory of emission from droplets. We have measured emission using streaked spectrometry and together with theory of emission from heated droplets have inferred the temperature of a gold foil heated by the NDCX-I experiment. The intensity measured by the spectrometer is proportional to the emissivity times the blackbody intensity at the temperature of the foil or droplets. Traditionally, a functional form for the emissivity as a function of wavelength (such as a quadratic) is assumed and the three unknown emissivity parameters (for the case of a quadratic) and the temperature are obtained by minimizing the deviations from the fit. In the case of the NDCX-I experiment, two minima were obtained: at 7200 K and 2400 K. The best fit was at 7200 K. However, when the actual measured emissivity of gold was used and when the theoretical corrections for droplet interference effects were made for emission from droplets having radii in the range 0.2 to 2.0 microns, the corrected emissivity was consistent with the 2400 K value, whereas the fit emissivity at 7200 K shows no similarity to the corrected emissivity curves. Further, an estimate of the temperature obtained from beam heating is consistent with the lower value. This exercise proved to be a warning to be skeptical

  8. Fiber-Optic Pyrometer for Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Surface temperatures in atmospheric reentry simulations range from 1500-2300 K, while stagnation temperature on the leading edge of a Mach 6 flight vehicle at 25 km...

  9. 75 FR 42330 - Elemental Mercury Used in Flow Meters, Natural Gas Manometers, and Pyrometers; Significant New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-21

    ... (NAICS) code 334513). This listing is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a guide for... have been identified in humans and in animal studies. Most extensive are the data on neurotoxicity... additional detailed background information (e.g., chemistry, environmental fate, exposure pathways,...

  10. Using optical pyrometer in gas assisted laser cutting of steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The use of optical methods of nondestructive testing can permit the real time control of gas assisted laser cutting, which is especially important in cutting metal sheets of large thickness and in other cases when the specified laser power is limited by laser operation modes[1,2].

  11. Using optical pyrometer in gas assisted laser cutting of steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grishaev; R.; V.; Dubrov; V.; D.; Dubrovin; N.; G.; Zavalov; Yu.; N.

    2005-01-01

    The use of optical methods of nondestructive testing can permit the real time control of gas assisted laser cutting, which is especially important in cutting metal sheets of large thickness and in other cases when the specified laser power is limited by laser operation modes[1,2].……

  12. A study of the application of photoelectric pyrometer thermometry to a double glow plasma surface alloying process%光电高温计在双辉等离子渗金属测温中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    池成忠; 贺志勇; 徐重

    2003-01-01

    为准确测量双辉等离子渗金属中的工件温度,借助自行研制的一套热电偶测温实验装置,采用比对实验的手段,得出了在碳钢表面常规双辉等离子渗金属过程中,准确选定光电高温计的材料发射率修正系数的方法.

  13. Influence of Participating Media on the Radiation Thermometry for Surface Temperature Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuying LIU; Xinxin ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    A temperature measurement model of radiation thermometry for the surface covered by participating media was developed. The model was based on the radiation heat transfer of participating media and principles of radiation pyrometers, and solved by integral formulation of discrete ordinate method on spectral waveband. The influence of water mist on the indicated temperature of Raytek MR1SB one/two color pyrometer was discussed. Mie theory was used to calculate the radiative properties of water mist. In order to verify the model, a laboratory temperature measurement experiment was executed. The result shows that temperature of radiation thermometry is sensitive to the spectral response wavelength of pyrometer, and the simulated temperature of pyrometer agrees well with the experimental measurements on a suitable wavelength. The simulated temperature was lower than the real temperature of surface for one-color pyrometer, and it could be higher or lower than the real one for two-color pyrometer with the influence of participating media.

  14. Work function determination of promising material for thermionic converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, M. H.; Jacobson, D.

    1980-01-01

    The work done to fabricate Marchuk plasma discharge tubes for measurement of the cesiated emission of lanthanum hexaboride and thoriated tungsten electrodes is described. A photon counting pyrometer was completed and is to be calibrated with a gold standard.

  15. Inverse analysis of non-uniform temperature distributions using multispectral pyrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tairan; Duan, Minghao; Tian, Jibin; Shi, Congling

    2016-05-01

    Optical diagnostics can be used to obtain sub-pixel temperature information in remote sensing. A multispectral pyrometry method was developed using multiple spectral radiation intensities to deduce the temperature area distribution in the measurement region. The method transforms a spot multispectral pyrometer with a fixed field of view into a pyrometer with enhanced spatial resolution that can give sub-pixel temperature information from a "one pixel" measurement region. A temperature area fraction function was defined to represent the spatial temperature distribution in the measurement region. The method is illustrated by simulations of a multispectral pyrometer with a spectral range of 8.0-13.0 μm measuring a non-isothermal region with a temperature range of 500-800 K in the spot pyrometer field of view. The inverse algorithm for the sub-pixel temperature distribution (temperature area fractions) in the "one pixel" verifies this multispectral pyrometry method. The results show that an improved Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is effective for this ill-posed inverse problem with relative errors in the temperature area fractions of (-3%, 3%) for most of the temperatures. The analysis provides a valuable reference for the use of spot multispectral pyrometers for sub-pixel temperature distributions in remote sensing measurements.

  16. On-Line, Real-Time Diagnostics of a Single Fluid Atomization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelshadKhatibi, P.; Ilbagi, A.; Henein, H.

    2012-01-01

    A drop tube-Impulse Atomization technique was used to produce copper droplets. In this method, energy is transferred to a liquid by plunger movement resulting in spherical droplets emanating from orifices. A mathematical model of the evolution of droplet velocity and temperature at various heights for different sized droplets was developed. A two-color pyrometer, DPV-2000, and a shadowgraph were used to measure droplets radiant energy, diameter and velocity. The temperature values from the model were used to assess the two color pyrometer assumption over the temperature range of measurement. The DVP 2000 measurements were found to be dependent of droplet size wavelength and position of droplets below the atomizing nozzle. By calibrating the instrument for effective emissivity over the range of measurements, the thermal history of droplets may be recorded using a single color pyrometer approach.

  17. Calculating the reflected radiation error between turbine blades and vanes based on double contour integral method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chi; Li, Dong; Gao, Shan; Daniel, Ketui

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a CFD (Computation Fluid Dynamic) simulation and experimental results for the reflected radiation error from turbine vanes when measuring turbine blade's temperature using a pyrometer. In the paper, an accurate reflection model based on discrete irregular surfaces is established. Double contour integral method is used to calculate view factor between the irregular surfaces. Calculated reflected radiation error was found to change with relative position between blades and vanes as temperature distribution of vanes and blades was simulated using CFD. Simulation results indicated that when the vanes suction surface temperature ranged from 860 K to 1060 K and the blades pressure surface average temperature is 805 K, pyrometer measurement error can reach up to 6.35%. Experimental results show that the maximum pyrometer absolute error of three different targets on the blade decreases from 6.52%, 4.15% and 1.35% to 0.89%, 0.82% and 0.69% respectively after error correction.

  18. The measurement of capillary waves on a weldpool formed by a Nd:YAG laser

    CERN Document Server

    Deam, R T; Harris, J

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed using an on-line pyrometer to measure the capillary waves on a weldpool formed by a Nd: YAG laser. The surface temperature measurements taken from the weldpool revealed strong temporal fluctuations. Fourier transform of the pyrometer data revealed distinct peaks, consistent with calculated resonant frequencies for capillary surface waves on the weldpool formed by the laser. The possibility of using on-line measurement of surface temperature fluctuations to control weldpool depth in laser welds is discussed. The work forms part of an on-going programme to develop closed loop control for laser processing at Swinburne University

  19. Determination of emissivity coefficient of heat-resistant super alloys and cemented carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieruj Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of emissivity engineering materials according to temperature. Experiment is concerned on difficult to machine materials, which may be turned with laser assisting. Cylindrical samples made of nickel-based alloys Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Waspaloy and tungsten-carbides based on cobalt matrix were analyzed. The samples’ temperature in contact method was compared to the temperature measured by non-contact pyrometers. Based on this relative, the value of the emissivity coefficient was adjusted to the right indication of pyrometers.

  20. Determination of emissivity coefficient of heat-resistant super alloys and cemented carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieruj, Piotr; Przestacki, Damian; Chwalczuk, Tadeusz

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the analysis of emissivity engineering materials according to temperature. Experiment is concerned on difficult to machine materials, which may be turned with laser assisting. Cylindrical samples made of nickel-based alloys Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Waspaloy and tungsten-carbides based on cobalt matrix were analyzed. The samples' temperature in contact method was compared to the temperature measured by non-contact pyrometers. Based on this relative, the value of the emissivity coefficient was adjusted to the right indication of pyrometers.

  1. Pyrometric temperature measurements in the solar furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, H.-R; Mueller, Ch.

    2000-07-01

    Surface temperatures are key parameters in many applications of concentrated solar radiation. Pyrometric temperature determination is here hampered by the reflected solar radiation. Two approaches to solve this problem were experimentally tested with the TREMPER reactor in the solar furnace at PSI: the flash assisted multiwavelength pyrometry (FAMP) developed at PSI and a so called 'solar-blind' pyrometer developed by IMPAC Electronic GmbH in Frankfurt, Germany, in collaboration with PSI. Performance, advantages and disadvantages of the two different pyrometers are reported and discussed. (authors)

  2. Method for changing brightness temperature into true temperature based on twice recognition method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Song; Xiaogang Sun; Hong Tang

    2007-01-01

    The channel output of a multi-wavelength pyrometer is the brightness temperature rather than the true temperature. Twice recognition method is put forward to change the brightness temperatures of a multiwavelength pyrometer into the true temperatures of targets. Using the data offered by Dr. F. Righini,the experimental results show that the difference between the calculated true temperature based on twice recognition method and the real true temperature is within ±20 K. The method presented in this paper is feasible and effective for the true temperature measurement of targets.

  3. 金属熔炼

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An infrared microprocessor pyrometer with diaphragmatic optics ,Development of Melting Technology for Volume Reduction of Radioactive Scrap Metals,Higher efficiency industrial furnaces, The electrode metal melting aad transfer at the coated electrodes arc welding (review),The electrode metal melting and transfer at the coated electrodes arc welding (review).

  4. Observation of Curie transition during spark plasma sintering of ferromagnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar Mani, Mahesh [Wolfson Centre for Magnetics, Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Viola, Giuseppe [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom); Nanoforce Technology Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Hall, Jeremy P. [Wolfson Centre for Magnetics, Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Grasso, Salvatore; Reece, Mike J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom); Nanoforce Technology Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    The possibility of employing the ferromagnetic–paramagnetic phase transitions of magnetic materials to calibrate temperature during spark plasma sintering (SPS) was investigated using pure Fe and Fe–50Co alloy. A sharp and repeatable change was observed in the electrical current profile at the Curie temperature (T{sub c}) during both sintering and reheating of the sintered samples. Under a pulsed DC current, an abrupt change in the electrical resistance was observed at T{sub c} due to the sudden changes in the permeability and in turn, the skin depth during heating and cooling. These effects can be used to obtain a more accurate in-situ measurement of the sample temperature than the one provided by the pyrometers that are normally used for SPS processing. The temperature measured using a pyrometer was found to be significantly lower (up to 70 °C) than the actual temperature of the specimen. - Highlights: • Calibration of temperature during spark plasma sintering (SPS) remains a big challenge. • Temperature measured by non-contact pyrometers in SPS is not accurate. • Ferromagnetic materials exhibit abrupt change in permeability at Curie temperature (T{sub c}). • Iron and Fe–Co alloy showed sharp and reproducible changes in SPS electric current profiles at T{sub c}. • Ferromagnetic materials can be successfully used to calibrate pyrometers in SPS.

  5. Determination of the Tribological Fundamentals of Solid Lubricated Ceramics. Volume 1. Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    elucidate the thermochemistry and detailed mechanistic steps involved in surface reactions of such systems; " to use the energy surfaces for clusters to... teach us how to use this pyrometer and obtain output. We were also supplied with a barium sulfate emissivity standard and a serial printer to

  6. Transverse Uniaxial Composite Thermal Properties Data Base of Thermally Conductive Graphite Fibers with and without Contiguous Grown Graphite Fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    43 FG4, Opened Reactor Chamber Door...unlimited.      Figure FG3, Optical Pyrometer Location And Read Out Figure FG4, Opened Reactor Chamber Door Figure FG5, Heater Stage, Inserted...in each hole. A perpendicular hole was drilled halfway through the rod into the each fiber bundle hole and threaded for nylon set screws . The

  7. Gas Temperature and Radiative Heat Transfer in Oxy-fuel Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäckström, Daniel; Johansson, Robert; Andersson, Klas

    temperature than the suction pyrometer in the low velocity regions of the furnace, a difference which is likely to be an effect of the purge gas added in the optical probe. The measured temperature fluctuations were evaluated by modeling of the gas radiation. The influence from the measured fluctuations...

  8. Infrared Thermometer (IRT) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VR Morris

    2006-10-30

    The Infrared Thermometer (IRT) is a ground-based radiation pyrometer that provides measurements of the equivalent blackbody brightness temperature of the scene in its field of view. The downwelling version has a narrow field of view for measuring sky temperature and for detecting clouds. The upwelling version has a wide field of view for measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface.

  9. Data indicating temperature response of Ti–6Al–4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett J. Marshall

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™ 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti–6Al–4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials.

  10. Measurement and thermal modeling of sapphire substrate temperature at III-Nitride MOVPE conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, J. Randall; Coltrin, Michael E.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.

    2017-04-01

    Growth rates and alloy composition of AlGaN grown by MOVPE is often very temperature dependent due to the presence of gas-phase parasitic chemical processes. These processes make wafer temperature measurement highly important, but in fact such measurements are very difficult because of substrate transparency in the near-IR ( 900 nm) where conventional pyrometers detect radiation. The transparency problem can be solved by using a mid-IR pyrometer operating at a wavelength ( 7500 nm) where sapphire is opaque. We employ a mid-IR pyrometer to measure the sapphire wafer temperature and simultaneously a near-IR pyrometer to measure wafer pocket temperature, while varying reactor pressure in both a N2 and H2 ambient. Near 1300 °C, as the reactor pressure is lowered from 300 Torr to 10 Torr the wafer temperature drops dramatically, and the ∆T between the pocket and wafer increases from 20 °C to 250 °C. Without the mid-IR pyrometer the large wafer temperature change with pressure would not have been noted. In order to explain this behavior we have developed a quasi-2D thermal model that includes a proper accounting of the pressure-dependent thermal contact resistance, and also accounts for sapphire optical transmission. The model and experimental results demonstrate that at most growth conditions the majority of the heat is transported from the wafer pocket to the wafer via gas conduction, in the free molecular flow limit. In this limit gas conductivity is independent of gap size but first order in pressure, and can quantitatively explain results from 20 to 300 Torr. Further analysis yields a measure of the thermal accommodation coefficients; α(H2) =0.23, α(N2) =0.50, which are in the range typically measured.

  11. Temperature Measurements On Semi-Permanent Mold Surfaces Using Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Ronald G.

    1983-03-01

    Die surface temperature and internal die thermal balance are critical to the quality of semi-permanent mold die castings. Measurements of the surface temperature are currently made using either hand-held contact temperature probes or optical pyrometers. Neither measurement technique provides a thermal map of the entire die surface. This paper discusses the use of infrared thermography for die surface temperature measurement. Using infrared thermographic techniques, scans were made over the surface of an experimental 302 CID semi-permanent mold cylinder head die during several casting cycles. The results obtained were in reasonable agreement with the temperature measurements made using optical pyrometers and the contact probes. In addition, using gray-level conversion the IR technique provided a measure of the temperature gradient over the surface of the die. Such thermal mapping has not been practical using optical or contact temperature probes.

  12. The definition analyses of radiation temperature measurement area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Tairan; Cheng Xiaofang; Zhong Maohua

    2008-01-01

    In the research of primary spectrum pyrometry, this paper discussed the definition problem of radiation tem-perature measurement area based on the measurement coordinates. For the linear spectrum emissivity model and im-proved monotonic spectrum emissivity model, the characteristics of radiation temperature measurement area restricted by the measurement coordinates were theoretically analyzed, through the investigations of the temperature and emissivity co-ordinate axes. Choosing the specific primary spectrum pyrometer as an example in applications, the theoretical area of radiation temperature measurement of this pyrometer was given and it was verified through blackbody experiments. The discussions of this paper will provide the necessary foundation for the theory research development of primary spectrum pyrometry and the realization of technical applications.

  13. Thermal Conductivity at the Interface of CHBr3/NaC1 under Shock Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨嘉陵; 胡金彪; 谭华; 刘吉平

    2001-01-01

    A special experiment system has been proposed for studying the thermal physical property under shock compression. The optical radiation was recorded by a high time-resolution pyrometer. The ratio α of sample and window materials under shock compression was studied by using this experimental technique. The thermal conductivity of CHBr3 calculated from α under shock compression is about 103 times larger than that under normal conditions.

  14. Analysis of multi-band pyrometry for emissivity and temperature measurements of gray surfaces at ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, António

    2016-05-01

    A multi-band pyrometry model is developed to evaluate the potential of measuring temperature and emissivity of assumably gray target surfaces at 300 K. Twelve wavelength bands between 2 and 60 μm are selected to define the spectral characteristics of the pyrometers. The pyrometers are surrounded by an enclosure with known background temperature. Multi-band pyrometry modeling results in an overdetermined system of equations, in which the solution for temperature and emissivity is obtained through an optimization procedure that minimizes the sum of the squared residuals of each system equation. The Monte Carlo technique is applied to estimate the uncertainties of temperature and emissivity, resulting from the propagation of the uncertainties of the pyrometers. Maximum reduction in temperature uncertainty is obtained from dual-band to tri-band systems, a small reduction is obtained from tri-band to quad-band, with a negligible reduction above quad-band systems (a reduction between 6.5% and 12.9% is obtained from dual-band to quad-band systems). However, increasing the number of bands does not always reduce uncertainty, and uncertainty reduction depends on the specific band arrangement, indicating the importance of choosing the most appropriate multi-band spectral arrangement if uncertainty is to be reduced. A reduction in emissivity uncertainty is achieved when the number of spectral bands is increased (a reduction between 6.3% and 12.1% is obtained from dual-band to penta-band systems). Besides, emissivity uncertainty increases for pyrometers with high wavelength spectral arrangements. Temperature and emissivity uncertainties are strongly dependent on the difference between target and background temperatures: uncertainties are low when the background temperature is far from the target temperature, tending to very high values as the background temperature approaches the target temperature.

  15. Infrared Emitters and Photodetectors with InAsSb Bulk Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    pyrometer previously calibrated using references such as the III to V enriched surface reconstruction transition, oxide desorption and melting point of InS...electroluminescence. The optical power was measured using calibrated lnSb and HgCdTe photodetectors and an integrating sphere. The electroluminescence spectra...transport and recombination properties for MWIR and LWIR pbotodetectors", Infrared l!’recbn·oi.OJIY and Applications, XXXVIII, ed. by B. J. Andresen, G. F

  16. Noncontacting measurement technologies for space propulsion condition monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, M. R.; Barkhoudarian, S.; Collins, J. J.; Schwartzbart, A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes four noncontacting measurement technologies that can be used in a turbopump condition monitoring system. The isotope wear analyzer, fiberoptic deflectometer, brushless torque-meter, and fiberoptic pyrometer can be used to monitor component wear, bearing degradation, instantaneous shaft torque, and turbine blade cracking, respectively. A complete turbopump condition monitoring system including these four technologies could predict remaining component life, thus reducing engine operating costs and increasing reliability.

  17. Surface temperature measurements of diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ) and the waist position (z0) 3. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS There are many methods to measure the temperature of a body. Here we used a thermocou- ple and a pyrometer, while future plans involve emission spectroscopy. A thermocouple is a temperature... sensor that consists of two wires con- nected together made from different metals, which produces an electrical voltage that is dependant on tem- perature. A Newport electronic thermocou- ple was used to meas- ured temperature. It can measure...

  18. Calibration d'une lampe \\`a ruban de tungst\\`ene

    CERN Document Server

    De Izarra, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the work presented is the calibration of a lamp filament of tungsten was from electrical measurements that are simple and precise, and for determining the temperature of tungsten against the current intensity value crossing the lamp.These data are then used to calibrate the lamp in terms of luminance directly used to calibrate sensors such as optical pyrometers or other photometric sensor.

  19. Diagnostics for heavy ion beam driven Warm dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Pavel; Bieniosek, Frank; Lidia, Steve; Seidl, Peter; Waldron, Will

    2009-11-01

    A set of diagnostic has been developed for the WDM experiments at Berkeley. The diagnostics are aimed at the in-situ measurement of temperature, expansion velocity and pressure of a WDM sample.A specially developed two-channel pyrometer probes color temperatures at 750 nm,1000 nm and 1400 nm, with 75 ps temporal resolution. The system has a broad dynamic range with a lower limit ˜2000 K and upper limit ˜100000 K. The pyrometer design is based on custom spectrally selective beam splitters and can be upgraded up to seven channels. Continuous target emission from 450 nm to 850 nm is recorder by a custom spectrometer, consisting of a high dynamic range Hamamatsu streak camera and a holographic grating. The system is calibrated absolutely with a tungsten ribbon lamp (NIST traceable). The various sweeping times of the streak unit allows for temporal resolution varying from 1 ps to 1 us. The spectrometer has a lower sensitivity than the pyrometer and applied in experiments with higher temperatures. Hydrodynamic expansion velocity of a target's free surface is measured by a commercially available all- fiber Doppler shift laser interferometer (VISAR). The installed delay etalon allows for velocity detection with 2 m/s precision and 0.5 ns resolution.

  20. Optical technology applied to jet engine; Jet engine seigyo eno hikari gijutsu no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, T.; Ebina, K.; Endo, M. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Pyrometer that can be mounted on an aircraft engine is developed for measuring engine turbine blade temperatures. Energy radiated from the blade surface is collected by a lens and then forwarded to a photoelectric conversion photodiode through a heat-resistant optical fiber. A cleaning/purging mechanism is provided in case the lens collects dirt that will attenuate the signal for the indication of a temperature that is lower than the true temperature (in a cold shift phenomenon). The pyrometer is tested on an engine, when a measurement accuracy of {+-}10degC is attained without cold shift taking place. It responds to changes more swiftly than conventional types, which justifies its application to the control of engines. Since it works effectively to connect a bunch of optical fibers, rather than conventional electric wires, to the printed circuit board for guiding optical signals to a printed circuit board in a digital control unit, an optical backplane structure is developed. This structure is designed to be an optical waveguide type which can incorporate into itself some mechanisms of synthesizer, optical waveguide coupler, and light filter, in case of need for handling multiple transmission. The pyrometer is tested on an aircraft engine in operation at high and low temperatures, and demonstrates satisfying light-receiving and light-emitting properties. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Long wavelength infrared radiation thermometry for non-contact temperature measurements in gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, J.; Zipf, M.; Stark, T.; Arduini, M.; Ebert, H.-P.; Tutschke, A.; Hallam, A.; Hanspal, J.; Langley, M.; Hodge, D.; Hartmann, J.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the EU project "Sensors Towards Advanced Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Engines (acronym STARGATE)" is the development of a suite of advanced sensors, instrumentation and related systems in order to contribute to the developing of the next generation of green and efficient gas turbine engines. One work package of the project deals with the design and development of a long wavelength infrared (LWIR) radiation thermometer for the non-contact measurement of the surface temperature of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during the operation of gas turbine engines. For opaque surfaces (e.g. metals or superalloys) radiation thermometers which are sensitive in the near or short wavelength infrared are used as state-of-the-art method for non-contact temperature measurements. But this is not suitable for oxide ceramic based TBCs (e.g. partially yttria stabilized zirconia) as oxide ceramics are semi-transparent in the near and short wavelength infrared spectral region. Fortunately the applied ceramic materials are non-transparent in the long wavelength infrared and additionally exhibit a high emittance in this wavelength region. Therefore, a LWIR pyrometer can be used for non-contact temperature measurements of the surfaces of TBCs as such pyrometers overcome the described limitation of existing techniques. For performing non-contact temperature measurements in gas turbines one has to know the infrared-optical properties of the applied TBCs as well as of the hot combustion gas in order to properly analyse the measurement data. For reaching a low uncertainty on the one hand the emittance of the TBC should be high (>0.9) in order to reduce reflections from the hot surrounding and on the other hand the absorbance of the hot combustion gas should be low (<0.1) in order to decrease the influence of the gas on the measured signal. This paper presents the results of the work performed by the authors with focus on the implementation of the LWIR pyrometer and the

  2. Optimisation of the outburning of ash in grate-fired boilers by means of IR-sensors. Demonstration of the applicability of the method; Optimering av askutbraenning vid rosteldade anlaeggningar med hjaelp av IR-sensorer. Demonstration av teknikens tillaempbarhet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudling, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1999-11-01

    The objective of the project was to demonstrate if it is possible by means of a continuous measurement of the fuel-bed temperature along the grate with infrared pyrometers, to optimise the burnout of the ash on the grate by controlling the air-supply. The tests were carried out at a refuse-fuel grate-fired boiler at Hoegdalen, Stockholm. To monitor the temperature of the fuel-bed, 5 pyrometers were installed. The signals from the pyrometers were connected to a PLC, by which the air dampers for the air-supply of the grate could be controlled. To avoiding 'long fire' with bad burnout the distribution of the air was changed when an increase in temperature was detected in the final burnout zone of the grate Results: * By using a slim encapsulation of the infrared sensor, it was possible to obtain such small dimensions of the pyrometer that it could be installed in the fin-wall between the water tubes., * By choosing a suitable installation point for the pyrometer and a good control of the flow and quality of the rinsing air it was possible to obtain a high availability for the pyrometers., * When an increase of the bed-temperature in the last roller zone, from the 500-600 deg C to the 600-700 deg C was detected, the amount of unburned residue in the ash increased from 2-5 % to 5-10 %. By monitoring the temperature of the fuel-bed in the burnout zone of the grate by means of IR-pyrometry, it was possible to indicate operation conditions with a poor burnout. Tests carried out with automatic control of the air supply to the burnout zone based on measured bed temperatures by IR-pyrometry were carried out. The distribution of the burnout air was performed in a manner that when an increase in bed temperature in the burnout zone was detected the amount of air to the last zone was increased and vice versa. During these tests the amount of unburned matter in the ash removed from the grate was 3.5 %, which shall be compared to 4.3 % which was obtained with manual

  3. A Study on Usage of on-site Multi-monitoring System in Laser Processing of Paper Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piili, Heidi

    Laser technology provides advantages for paper material processing as it is non-contact method and provides freedom of geometry and reliable technology for non-stop production. Reason for low utilization of lasers in paper manufacturing is lack of published research. This is main reason to study utilization of on-site multi-monitoring system (MMS) in characterization of interaction between laser beam and paper materials. Target of MMS is to be able to control processing of paper, but also to get better understanding of basic phenomena. Laser equipment used was TRUMPF TLF 2700 CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 μm) with power range of 190-2500 W. MMS consisted of spectrometer, pyrometer and active illumination imaging system. This on-site study was carried out by treating dried kraft pulp (grammage of 67 g m-2) with different laser power levels, focal plane position settings and interaction times. It was concluded that spectrometer and pyrometer are best devices in MMS; set-up of them to laser process is easy, they detect data fast enough and analysis of data is easy afterwards. Active illumination imaging system is capable for capturing images of different phases of interaction but analysis of images is time-consuming. When active illumination imaging system is combined with spectrometer and pyrometer i.e. using of MMS, it reveals basic phenomena occurring during interaction. For example, it was noticed that holes created after laser exposure are formed gradually. Firstly, small hole is formed to interaction area and after that hole expands, until interaction is ended.

  4. Atmospheric Monitoring at the Site of the MAGIC Telescopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Martin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The MAGIC telescopes in La Palma, Canary Islands, measure the Cherenkov light emitted by gamma ray-induced extended air showers in the atmosphere. The good knowledge of the atmospheric parameters is important, both for the correct and safe operations of the telescopes, but also for subsequent data analysis. A weather station measures the state variables of the atmosphere, temperature, humidity and wind, an elastic Lidar system and an infrared pyrometer determine the optical transmission of the atmosphere. Using an AllSky camera, the cloud cover can be estimated. The measured values are completed by data from global atmospheric models based on numeric weather forecasts.

  5. Planning Thermal Radiation Experiments at High Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-27

    than 800 feet or ground distances beyond those to which 6 psi overpressure extend. The manuals do not provide bases for predicting other than the...rtIClt »000)1 Inf ay «acuv* filters RCLATTVC COST OF cowoem. rwrt LOW (tntrMKoy#t«t) LOW CCMP—tt > * tci -)iɛ(f Mrttcl« IKI. iiaoe and count 9f...MEASUREMENT TIME FRAME RECORDING MEANS Insolation Calorimeters, Thermocouples, and Soil Sur- face Tempera - ture (pyrometer) Mass Loss, Filter

  6. Capacitive tool standoff sensor for dismantlement tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liu, J.C. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A capacitive sensing technology has been applied to develop a Standoff Sensor System for control of robotically deployed tools utilized in Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) activities. The system combines four individual sensor elements to provide non-contact, multiple degree-of-freedom control of tools at distances up to five inches from a surface. The Standoff Sensor has been successfully integrated to a metal cutting router and a pyrometer, and utilized for real-time control of each of these tools. Experiments demonstrate that the system can locate stationary surfaces with a repeatability of 0.034 millimeters.

  7. Temperature Measurements of Condensed Gaseous Hydrogen-Helium Mixtures under Multi-Shock Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Yun-Jun; CHEN Qi-Feng; CAI Ling-Cang; CHEN Zhi-Yun; ZHENG Jun

    2009-01-01

    Temperatures of multi-shock compressed gaseous hydrogen-helium mixtures with a mole component H2 :He=l:1.21 up to 7100 K are measured at pressures up to 10 G Pa by means of an instantaneous optical pyrometer. The gas mixtures are shocked from environmental temperature at the initial pressure 20 MPa. The measured second-shock temperature differs from the predictions of the non-dissociation modei by up to 40% and is in good agreement with that of the dissociation model, indicating that a considerable amount of molecular dissociation occurs.

  8. Methods of data processing in multi-wavelength thermometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-gang; ZHAO Wei; YUAN Gui-bin; DAI Jing-min

    2006-01-01

    Three kinds of methods for processing the data of the multi-wavelength pyrometer are presented in this paper and are named curve auto-search method, curve auto-regression method and neural network method.The experimental results indicate that the calculated temperature and the spectral emissivity compared with the true target temperature and spectral emissivity have significant deviation using the curve auto-search and the curve auto-regression methods. However, the calculated temperature and the spectral emissivity with higher accuracy can be obtained using the neural network method.

  9. Containerless laser-induced flourescence study of vaporization and optical properties for sapphire and alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Evaporation of aluminum oxide was studied from 1800 to 2327 K by laser-induced flourescence (LIF) detection of Al atom vapor over sapphire and alumina spheres that were levitated in an argon gas jet and heated with a continuous wave CO2 laser. Optical properties were determined from apparent specimen temperatures measured with an optical pyrometer and true temperatures deduced from the LIF intensity versus temperature measurements using the known temperature dependence of the Al atom vapor concentration in equilibrium with Al2O3. The effects of impurities and dissolved oxygen on the high-temperature optical properties of aluminum oxide were discussed.

  10. EBSD analysis of tungsten-filament carburization during the hot-wire CVD of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available -scale synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes ~MWCNTs! using HWCVD ~Dillon et al., 2003!. Despite the efforts to reduce filament aging, the fila- ment alloying process is still being investigated. Previous studies have focused primarily on linking microscopy, X... pyrometer. At Received August 23, 2013; accepted November 26, 2013 *Corresponding author. E-mail: coliphant@nmisa.org Microsc. Microanal. Page 1 of 10 doi:10.1017/S1431927613014001 MicroscopyAND Microanalysis © MICROSCOPY SOCIETY OF AMERICA 2013 each...

  11. Contactless Calorimetry for Levitated Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Dokko, W.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and specific heat of hot sample measured with pyrometer in proposed experimental technique. Technique intended expecially for contactless calorimetry of such materials as undercooled molten alloys, samples of which must be levitated to prevent contamination and premature crystallization. Contactless calorimetry technique enables data to be taken over entire undercooling temperature range with only one sample. Technique proves valuable in study of undercooling because difference in specific heat between undercooled-liquid and crystalline phases at same temperature provides driving force to convert metastable undercooled phase to stable crystalline phase.

  12. Three-Dimensional Heat Transfer Modeling of a Moving Plate in Forming Process Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavella, Mario; Maizza, Giovanni; Borgna, Massimo; Firrao, Donato

    2004-06-01

    A three-dimensional heat transfer model of glass plates heating and cooling has been developed to study their thermal tempering. The furnace being modeled is of a tunnel type, in which the glass plate alternates translational motions with back and forth mouvements with a specified law. An appropriate implementation of a moving (transient) convection/radiation boundary condition has been proposed to describe the heat transfer exchanged between the glass surfaces and the furnace environment. The model results have been experimentally validated by a scanning pyrometer which detects the pointwise temperature of the upper surface of the plate at the exit of the furnace.

  13. Measurement of thermal expansion coefficient of nonuniform temperature specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingmin Dai; Chunsuo Kin; Xiaowa He

    2008-01-01

    A new technique is developed to measure the longitudinal thermal expansion coefficient of C/C composite material at high temperature. The measuring principle and components of the apparatus are described in detail. The calculation method is derived from the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient. The apparatus mainly consists of a high temperature environmental chamber, a power circuit of heating, two high-speed pyrometers, and a laser scanning system. A long solid specimen is resistively heated to a steady high-temperature state by a steady electrical current. The temperature profile of the specimen surface is not uniform because of the thermal conduction and radiation. The temperature profile and the total expansion are measured with a high-speed scanning pyrometer and a laser slit scanning measuring system, respectively. The thermal expansion coefficient in a wide temperature range (1000 - 3800 K) of the specimen can therefore be obtained. The perfect consistency between the present and previous results justifies the validity of this technique.

  14. Field temperature measurements at Erta'Ale Lava Lake, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgi, Pierre-Yves; Caillet, Marc; Haefeli, Steven

    2002-06-01

    The shield volcano Erta'Ale, situated in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia, is known for its active lava lake. In February 2001, our team visited this lake, located inside an 80-m-deep pit, to perform field temperature measurements. The distribution and variation of temperature inside the lake were obtained on the basis of infrared radiation measurements performed from the rim of the pit and from the lake shores. The crust temperature was also determined from the lake shores with a thermocouple to calibrate the pyrometer. We estimated an emissivity of the basalt of 0.74 from this experiment. Through the application of the Stefan-Boltzmann law, we then obtained an estimate of the total radiative heat flux, constrained by pyrometer measurements of the pit, and visual observations of the lake activity. Taking into account the atmospheric convective heat flux, the convected magma mass flux needed to balance the energy budget was subsequently derived and found to represent between 510 and 580 kg s-1. The surface circulation of this mass flux was also analyzed through motion processing techniques applied to video images of the lake. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00445-002-0224-3.

  15. Measurement of Monochromatic Emissivity of Cement Clinker with Various Fe2O3 Content at High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.J.Ye; C.F.Ma; 等

    1996-01-01

    An applicatiopn of the optical pyrometer is studied for measuring monochromatic emissivities of cement clinker with various Fe2O3 contnet.The idsa of using “brightness temperature” is introduced into the eimssivity measurement.In this method,there is no need for measuring an actual temperature of sample surfaces,only with determining both brightness temperatures of a sample and a blackbody can the required emissivity be evaluated according to Wien's radiation law.In practice,the cement clinker is regarded as a greybody,the monochromatic emissivity is approximately equal to the total emissivity,so a single-colour optical pyrometer is applied for this purpose,Test measurements are carried out on 10 kinds of cement clinkers,Experimental data are treated by the least square method.As a result ,the emissivity variation with temperature at a certain Fe2O3 content is quite well represented by εn=a+bT.Furthermore,this work first reported that the eimissivities of cement clinker change consierably with Fe2O3 contents.In multiple cement production this conclusion is very important.

  16. Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries. Final project report, 1 September 1989--28 February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.; Metghalchi, H.; Cumper, J.; Atal, A.; Estrada, K.R.; Murphy, B.; Steciak, J.; Hottel, H.C.; Simons, G.

    1993-07-01

    To conduct studies on the combustion of coal water fuels (CWFs) an appropriate facility was designed and constructed. The main components were (1) a high-temperature isothermal laminar flow furnace that facilitates observation of combustion events in its interior. The design of this system and its characterization are described in Chapter 1. (2) Apparatus for slurry droplet/agglomerate particle generation and introduction in the furnace. These devices are described in Chapters 1 and 3 and other attached publications. (3) An electronic optical pyrometer whose design, construction theory of operation, calibration and performance are presented in Chapter 2. (4) A multitude of other accessories, such as particle fluidization devices, a suction thermometer, a velocimeter, high speed photographic equipment, calibration devices for the pyrometer, etc., are described throughout this report. Results on the combustion of CWF droplets and CWF agglomerates made from micronized coal are described in Chapter 3. In the same chapter the combustion of CWF containing dissolved calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) axe described. The combustion behavior of pre-dried CWF agglomerates of pulverized grain coal is contrasted to that of agglomerates of micronized coal in Chapter 4. In the same chapter the combustion of agglomerates of carbon black and diesel soot is discussed as well. The effect of CMA on the combustion of the above materials is also discussed. Finally, the sulfur capture capability of CMA impregnated micronized and pulverized bituminous coals is examined in Chapter 5.

  17. Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Kramlich, J.; Koppang, R.

    1991-05-01

    This project was initiated to fill a need in the glass industry for a non-contact temperature sensor for glass melts. At present, the glass forming industry (e.g., bottle manufacture) consumes significant amounts of energy. Careful control of temperature at the point the bottle is molded is necessary to prevent the bottle from being rejected as out-of-specification. In general, the entire glass melting and conditioning process is designed to minimize this rejection rate, maximize throughput and thus control energy and production costs. This program focuses on the design, development and testing of an advanced optically based pyrometer for glass melts. The pyrometer operates simultaneously at four wavelengths; through analytical treatment of the signals, internal temperature profiles within the glass melt can be resolved. A novel multiplexer alloys optical signals from a large number of fiber-optic sensors to be collected and resolved by a single detector at a location remote from the process. This results in a significant cost savings on a per measurement point basis. The development program is divided into two phases. Phase 1 involves the construction of a breadboard version on the instrument and its testing on a pilot-scale furnace. In Phase 2, a prototype analyzer will be constructed and tested on a commercial forehearth. This report covers the Phase 1 activities.

  18. low-Cost, High-Performance Alternatives for Target Temperature Monitoring Using the Near-Infrared Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgo, Mathew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, Kevin J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-02-01

    A process is being developed for commercial production of the medical isotope Mo-99 through a photo-nuclear reaction on a Mo-100 target using a highpower electron accelerator. This process requires temperature monitoring of the window through which a high-current electron beam is transmitted to the target. For this purpose, we evaluated two near infrared technologies: the OMEGA Engineering iR2 pyrometer and the Ocean Optics Maya2000 spectrometer with infrared-enhanced charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor. Measuring in the near infrared spectrum, in contrast to the long-wavelength infrared spectrum, offers a few immediate advantages: (1) ordinary glass or quartz optical elements can be used; (2) alignment can be performed without heating the target; and (3) emissivity corrections to temperature are typically less than 10%. If spatial resolution is not required, the infrared pyrometer is attractive because of its accuracy, low cost, and simplicity. If spatial resolution is required, we make recommendations for near-infrared imaging based on our data augmented by calculations

  19. Optical monitoring of high power direct diode laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Farahmand, Parisa; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-12-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most advanced surface modification techniques which can be used to build and repair high-value components. High power direct diode laser (HPDDL) offers unique quality and cost advantages over other lasers (CO2, Nd:YAG). Especially its rectangular laser beam with top-hat intensity distribution makes HPDDL an ideal tool for large area cladding. In order to utilize this technique successfully, the development of on-line monitoring and process control is necessary. In this study, an optical monitoring system consisting of a high-speed CCD camera, a pyrometer, and an infrared camera was used to analyze the mass- and heat-transfer in the cladding process. The particle transport in flight was viewed by a high-speed CCD camera; the interaction between powder flow and laser beam was observed by an infrared camera; and the thermal behavior of the molten pool was recorded by the pyrometer and the infrared camera. The effects of the processing parameters on the laser attenuation, particle heating and clad properties were investigated based on the obtained signals. The optical monitoring method improved the understanding about mutual interrelated phenomena in the cladding process.

  20. Temperature measurement of cathodes used in microwave vacuum electron devices%微波电真空器件用热阴极的温度测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕文; 陆玉新; 田宏; 朱虹; 孟鸣凤; 谷兵

    2016-01-01

    Microwave vacuum devices are used in a wide variety of areas,such as radar,space technology,electron accelera-tors,free electron lasers.The cathodes,i.e.the electron sources,are the cores of high-power microwave sources.Their per-formances directly determine the output power,lifetime and other properties of the microwave sources.It is necessary to know the actual temperature of a thermionic cathode.The temperatures of an impregnated cathode,a coated cathode and a cathode side (molybdenum tube)have been tested by infrared thermometer,optical pyrometer and thermocouple thermometer (platinum and rhodium-platinum).The results show that the temperature of an impregnated cathode tested by infrared thermometer and optical pyrometer is similar to that by thermocouple thermometer,so the temperatures of impregnated cathode tested by infrared ther-mometer and optical pyrometer are very close to the actual temperature by thermocouple thermometer.The temperatures of coa-ted cathode tested by infrared thermometer and optical pyrometer are lower than the actual temperature of the cathode tested by thermocouple thermometer about 50 ℃.The temperatures of the cathode side (molybdenum tube)tested by infrared thermometer and optical pyrometer are lower than the actual temperature of the cathode by thermocouple thermometer about 60 ℃.Since the physical and chemical changes arise on the cathode surface,the temperatures of the cathode surface tested by infrared thermome-ter and optical pyrometer increase about 30 ℃ heated at about 1150 ℃ within 100 min.These results will be affected by the mo-lybdenum processing technology on the surface of the material,coating material,thickness of the film,the film density and other factors.Infrared thermometer and optical pyrometer are strongly dependent on the thermal radiation coefficient of the test sur-face,and it is very difficult to accurately obtain the thermal radiation coefficient of some materials.%利用红外测温仪、光学测

  1. Energy saving by enhanced temperature measurement of stock materials of heat- and heat treatment process. Final report; Energieeinsparung durch verbesserte Nutzguttemperaturbestimmung bei Waerm- und Waermebehandlungsprozessen. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, I.; Klima, R.

    1999-06-01

    The essential source of errors for stock temperature measurement in industrial furnaces is the not well enough known emissivity and the reflected radiation. The examined pyrometers turned out to be not precise enough especially in case of reflected radiation. Measures trying to compensate the reflected radiation by measuring it separately or shielding the pyrometer from reflected radiation did not show satisfactory results. The most important result of the project was the development and operational test of a thermoelectric measurement by a so-called thermocouple probe. This probe measures by a thermocouple which is positioned to have a very intensive radiation exchange with the surface of the stock. Thus it can measure the surface temperature almost independently from emissivity. The advantages of the thermocouple probe where shown by installations at a heat treating and a reheating furnace. Because of the continuous measurement the furnaces could be optimised for energy saving or better product quality. The thermocouple probe enables strict optimisation of model aided furnace control and leads to improved quality and energy savings. (orig.) [German] Die wesentlichen Fehlerquellen bei der Messung der Nutzgutoberflaechentemperatur sind der haeufig nicht genau genug bekannte Nutzgut-Emissionsgrad und die an der Nutzgutoberflaeche reflektierte Fremdstrahlung. Die untersuchten auf dem Markt befindlichen Pyrometer erwiesen sich bei vorhandener Fremdstrahlung in Oefen als nicht genau und verlaesslich genug. Sowohl Versuche zur Abschirmung der Fremdstrahlung wie auch zur separaten Messung und Beruecksichtigung der Fremdstrahlung liefern bei wechselnden Prozesszustaenden jedoch keine befriedigenden Ergebnisse. In dieser Arbeit wurde als wichtigstes Ergebnis ein thermoelektrisches Temperaturmessverfahren mittels einer sogenannten Thermoelementsonde entwickelt und betrieblich erprobt. Mit der Thermoelementsonde wird die Nutzgutoberflaechentemperatur mittels eines

  2. Solid rocket motor fire tests: Phases 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yale; Hunter, Lawrence W.; Han, David K.; Thomas, Michael E.; Cain, Russell P.; Lennon, Andrew M.

    2002-01-01

    JHU/APL conducted a series of open-air burns of small blocks (3 to 10 kg) of solid rocket motor (SRM) propellant at the Thiokol Elkton MD facility to elucidate the thermal environment under burning propellant. The propellant was TP-H-3340A for the STAR 48 motor, with a weight ratio of 71/18/11 for the ammonium perchlorate, aluminum, and HTPB binder. Combustion inhibitor applied on the blocks allowed burning on the bottom and/or sides only. Burns were conducted on sand and concrete to simulate near-launch pad surfaces, and on graphite to simulate a low-recession surface. Unique test fixturing allowed propellant self-levitation while constraining lateral motion. Optics instrumentation consisted of a longwave infrared imaging pyrometer, a midwave spectroradiometer, and a UV/visible spectroradiometer. In-situ instrumentation consisted of rod calorimeters, Gardon gauges, elevated thermocouples, flush thermocouples, a two-color pyrometer, and Knudsen cells. Witness materials consisted of yttria, ceria, alumina, tungsten, iridium, and platinum/rhodium. Objectives of the tests were to determine propellant burn characteristics such as burn rate and self-levitation, to determine heat fluxes and temperatures, and to carry out materials analyses. A summary of qualitative results: alumina coated almost all surfaces, the concrete spalled, sand moisture content matters, the propellant self-levitated, the test fixtures worked as designed, and bottom-burning propellant does not self-extinguish. A summary of quantitative results: burn rate averaged 1.15 mm/s, thermocouples peaked at 2070 C, pyrometer readings matched MWIR data at about 2400 C, the volume-averaged plume temperatures were 2300-2400 C with peaks of 2400-2600 C, and the heat fluxes peaked at 125 W/cm2. These results are higher than other researchers' measurements of top-burning propellant in chimneys, and will be used, along with Phase 3 test results, to analyze hardware response to these environments, including General

  3. Upgrade of the infrared camera diagnostics for the JET ITER-like wall divertor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa, I; Arnoux, G; Eich, T; Sieglin, B; Devaux, S; Zeidner, W; Morlock, C; Kruezi, U; Sergienko, G; Kinna, D; Thomas, P D; Rack, M

    2012-10-01

    For the new ITER-like wall at JET, two new infrared diagnostics (KL9B, KL3B) have been installed. These diagnostics can operate between 3.5 and 5 μm and up to sampling frequencies of ∼20 kHz. KL9B and KL3B image the horizontal and vertical tiles of the divertor. The divertor tiles are tungsten coated carbon fiber composite except the central tile which is bulk tungsten and consists of lamella segments. The thermal emission between lamellae affects the surface temperature measurement and therefore KL9A has been upgraded to achieve a higher spatial resolution (by a factor of 2). A technical description of KL9A, KL9B, and KL3B and cross correlation with a near infrared camera and a two-color pyrometer is presented.

  4. Fission Enhanced diffusion of uranium in zirconia

    CERN Document Server

    Bérerd, N; Moncoffre, N; Sainsot, P; Faust, H; Catalette, H

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison between thermal and Fission Enhanced Diffusion (FED) of uranium into zirconia, representative of the inner face of cladding tubes. The experiments under irradiation are performed at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble using the Lohengrin spectrometer. A thin $^{235}UO\\_2$ layer in direct contact with an oxidized zirconium foil is irradiated in the ILL high flux reactor. The fission product flux is about 10$^{11}$ ions cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and the target temperature is measured by an IR pyrometer. A model is proposed to deduce an apparent uranium diffusion coefficient in zirconia from the energy distribution broadening of two selected fission products. It is found to be equal to 10$^{-15}$ cm$^2$ s$^{-1}$ at 480$\\circ$C and compared to uranium thermal diffusion data in ZrO$\\_2$ in the same pressure and temperature conditions. The FED results are analysed in comparison with literature data.

  5. Recent DIII-D neutral beam calibration results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, J.; Hong, R.M.; Phillips, J.

    1991-10-01

    Injected DIII-D neutral beam power is estimated based on three principle quantities: the fraction of ion beam that is neutralized in the neutralizer gas cell, the beamline transmission efficiency, and the fraction of beam reionized in the drift duct. System changes in the past few years have included a new gradient grid voltage operating point, ion source arc regulation, routine deuterium operations and new neutralizer gas flow controllers. Additionally, beam diagnostics have been improved and better calibrated. To properly characterize the beams the principle quantities have been re-measured. Two diagnostics are primarily used to measure the quantities. The beamline waterflow calorimetry system measures the neutralization efficiency and the beamline transmission efficiency, and the target tile thermocouples measure the reionization loss. An additional diagnostic, the target tile pyrometer, confirmed the reionization loss measurement. Descriptions and results of these measurements will be presented. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of uranium dioxide by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.

    1981-11-01

    Safety analyses of nuclear reactors require knowledge of the evaporation behavior of UO/sub 2/ at temperatures well above the melting point of 3140 K. In this study, rapid transient heating of a small spot on a UO/sub 2/ specimen was accomplished by a laser pulse, which generates a surface temperature excursion. This in turn vaporizes the target surface and the gas expands into vacuum. The surface temperature transient was monitored by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The maximum surface temperatures investigated range from approx. 3700 K to approx. 4300 K. A computer program was developed to simulate the laser heating process and calculate the surface temperature evolution. The effect of the uncertainties of the high temperature material properties on the calculation was included in a sensitivity study for UO/sub 2/ vaporization. The measured surface temperatures were in satisfactory agreements.

  7. Image analysis of speckle patterns as a probe of melting transitions in laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ran; Matityahu, Shlomi; Melchior, Aviva; Nikolaevsky, Mark; Noked, Ori; Sterer, Eran

    2015-09-01

    The precision of melting curve measurements using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) is largely limited by the correct and reliable determination of the onset of melting. We present a novel image analysis of speckle interference patterns in the LHDAC as a way to define quantitative measures which enable an objective determination of the melting transition. Combined with our low-temperature customized IR pyrometer, designed for measurements down to 500 K, our setup allows studying the melting curve of materials with low melting temperatures, with relatively high precision. As an application, the melting curve of Te was measured up to 35 GPa. The results are found to be in good agreement with previous data obtained at pressures up to 10 GPa.

  8. More than Meets the Eye - Infrared Cameras in Open-Ended University Thermodynamics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melander, Emil; Haglund, Jesper; Weiszflog, Matthias; Andersson, Staffan

    2016-12-01

    Educational research has found that students have challenges understanding thermal science. Undergraduate physics students have difficulties differentiating basic thermal concepts, such as heat, temperature, and internal energy. Engineering students have been found to have difficulties grasping surface emissivity as a thermal material property. One potential source of students' challenges with thermal science is the lack of opportunity to visualize energy transfer in intuitive ways with traditional measurement equipment. Thermodynamics laboratories have typically depended on point measures of temperature by use of thermometers (detecting heat conduction) or pyrometers (detecting heat radiation). In contrast, thermal imaging by means of an infrared (IR) camera provides a real-time, holistic image. Here we provide some background on IR cameras and their uses in education, and summarize five qualitative investigations that we have used in our courses.

  9. Development of advanced Czochralski growth process to produce low cost 150 kg silicon ingots from a single crucible for technology readiness. [crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Six growth runs used the Kayex-Hameo Automatic Games Logic (AGILE) computer based system for growth from larger melts in the Mod CG2000. The implementation of the melt pyrometer sensor allowed for dip temperature monitoring and usage by the operator/AGILE system. Use of AGILE during recharge operations was successfully evaluated. The tendency of crystals to lose cylindrical shape (spiraling) continued to be a problem. The hygrometer was added to the Furnace Gas Analysis System and used on several growth runs. The gas chromatograph, including the integrator, was also used for more accurate carbon monoxide concentration measurements. Efforts continued for completing the automation of the total Gas Analysis System. An economic analysis, based on revised achievable straight growth rate, is presented.

  10. Tungsten chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kiichi; Takeda, Nobuo.

    1993-07-13

    A tungsten chemical vapor deposition method is described, comprising: a first step of selectively growing a first thin tungsten film of a predetermined thickness in a desired region on the surface of a silicon substrate by reduction of a WF[sub 6] gas introduced into an atmosphere of a predetermined temperature containing said silicon substrate; and a second step of selectively growing a second tungsten film of a predetermined thickness on said first thin tungsten film by reduction of said WF[sub 6] with a silane gas further introduced into said atmosphere, wherein the surface state of said substrate is monitored by a pyrometer and the switching from said first step to said second step is performed when the emissivity of infrared light from the substrate surfaces reaches a predetermined value.

  11. Flash characteristics of plasma induced by hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Long, Renrong; Zhang, Qingming; Xue, Yijiang; Ju, Yuanyuan

    2016-08-01

    Using a two-stage light gas gun, a series of hypervelocity impact experiments was conducted in which 6.4-mm-diameter spherical 2024-aluminum projectiles impact 23-mm-thick targets made of the same material at velocities of 5.0, 5.6, and 6.3 km/s. Both an optical pyrometer composed of six photomultiplier tubes and a spectrograph were used to measure the flash of the plasma during hypervelocity impact. Experimental results show that, at a projectile velocity of 6.3 km/s, the strong flash lasted about 10 μs and reached a temperature of 4300 K. Based on the known emission lines of AL I, spectral methods can provide the plasma electron temperature. An electron-temperature comparison between experiment and theoretical calculation indicates that single ionization and secondary ionization are the two main ionizing modes at velocities 5.0-6.3 km/s.

  12. Laser-induced damage threshold of silicon under combined millisecond and nanosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xueming; Pan, Yunxiang; Jia, Zhichao; Li, Zewen; Zhang, Hongchao; Ni, Xiaowu

    2017-03-01

    The laser-silicon interaction process was investigated with the superposed radiation of two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. A pulse duration of 1 millisecond (ms) was superposed by 7 nanosecond (ns) pulses, creating a combined pulse laser (CPL). The time-resolved surface temperature of silicon was measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer. The melting thresholds of silicon were attained for a single ms laser and a CPL by infrared radiometry and time-resolved reflectance. The concept of threshold boundary was proposed, and a fitted curve of threshold boundary was obtained. An axisymmetric model was established for laser heating of silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained for single ms laser and CPL irradiation using finite element analysis. The numerical results were validated experimentally, and an obvious decrease in melting threshold was found under CPL irradiation. That is attributed to pre-heating by the ms laser and the surface damage caused by the ns laser.

  13. Fiber optic and laser sensors VIII; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Jose, CA, Sept. 17-19, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This issue presents topics on the advances in fiber-optic sensor technology, fiber-optic gyroscope, fiber-optic position and pressure sensors, fiber-optic magnetic and temperature sensors, and generic fiber-optic sensors. Papers included are on a novel analog phase tracker for interferometric fiber-optic sensor applications, recent development status of fiber-optic sensors in China, the magnetic-field sensitivity of depolarized fiber-optic gyros, a depolarized fiber-optic gyro for future tactical applications, fiber-optic position transducers for aircraft controls, and a metal embedded optical-fiber pressure sensor. Attention is also given to a fiber-optic magnetic field sensor using spectral modulation encoding, a bare-fiber temperature sensor, an interferometric fiber-optic accelerometer, improvement of specular reflection pyrometer, a theoretical analysis of two-mode elliptical-core optical fiber sensors, and a fiber probe for ring pattern.

  14. Glass Melt Emissivity, Viscosity, and Foaming Monitoring with Millimeter-Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woskov, Paul P.; Sundaram, S.K.; Daniel, William E.; Hadidi, Kamal; Bromberg, Leslie; Miller, Don; Rogers, L.A.

    2003-09-10

    Nuclear waste glass processing efficiencies, improved melter control to anomalies such as foaming, and environmental compliance would be facilitated by the availability of on-line monitoring technologies. It has been shown that the millimeter-wave (MMW) range of the electromagnetic spectrum (0.3-10 mm) is ideally suited to hot melter environments by having wavelengths long enough to penetrate optically obscure views yet short enough to provide spatial resolution with reliable refractory quasi-optical components. A thermal return reflection (TRR) method has been developed that allows a millimeter-wave pyrometer to determine emissivity by returning a portion of the thermal emission as a probe. Melt glass viscosities in the range 20 -2000 Poise and specific gravities have been measured by rates of flow and displacements inside hollow MMW ceramic waveguides immersed into the melts. Glass foaming has been observed by detecting the melt surface swelling followed by the increase in surface emissivity after gases break the surface.

  15. Thermophysical properties of the Ni-based alloy Nimonic 80A up to 2400 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. Wilthan; R. Tanzer; W. Schiitzenh(o)fer; G. Pottlacher

    2006-01-01

    Nimonic 80A is a nickel-chromium alloy which is strengthened by additions of titanium and aluminium. The alloy is used for high temperature, high strength applications. Wire shaped Nimonic 80A samples are resistively volume heated as part of a fast capacitor discharge circuit. Time resolved measurements with sub-μs resolution of current through the specimen are performed with a Pearson probe, voltage drop across the specimen is measured with knife-edge contacts and ohmic voltage dividers and the radiance temperature of the sample with a pyrometer. These measurements allow to determine heat of fusion as well as heat capacity and electrical resistivity at initial geometry of Nimonic 80A as a function of temperature in the solid and in the liquid phase up to 2400 K.

  16. Modeling of thermal processes in waveguide tracts induction soldering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murygin, A. V.; Tynchenko, V. S.; Laptenok, V. D.; Emilova, O. A.; Seregin, Yu N.

    2017-02-01

    The problem solving of the induction heating models development, which describe the heating of the separate structural assembly components of the waveguide path and product generally, is presented in this paper. Proposed mathematical models are based on the thermodynamics equation and on the heat balance law. The system of the heating process mathematical models, such as surge tube and flange heating, and the mathematical model of the energy distribution are presented. During the modeling process with Matlab system by using mathematical models graphs of the tube, flange and coupling heating were obtained. These design charts are confirmed by the results of the experimental study. During the experimental studies pyrometers for temperature control and a video camera for visual control of the process parameters were used. On the basis of obtained models the induction soldering process features analysis is carried out and the need of its automation by the using of the information control systems for thermal management between the connection elements is revealed.

  17. Containerless laser-induced fluorescence study of vaporization and optical properties for sapphire and alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordine, P.C.; Schiffman, R.A. (Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, MO (USA) Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA))

    1988-09-01

    Evaporation of aluminum oxide was studied from 1,800 to 2,327 K by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of Al atom vapor over sapphire and alumina spheres that were levitated in an argon gas jet and heated with a continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser. Optical properties were determined from apparent specimen temperatures measured with an optical pyrometer and true temperatures deduced from the LIF intensity versus temperature measurements using the known temperature dependence of the Al atom vapor concentration in equilibrium with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The effects of impurities and dissolved oxygen on the high-temperature optical properties of aluminum oxide were discussed.

  18. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  19. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experimentsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K+ beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  20. Ion-beam-driven warm dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.

    2010-08-01

    As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition to a relatively large sample. The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating and diagnosing warm dense matter (WDM) targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and a suite of target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments heat targets by both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam, and explore measurement of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters. Continued improvements in beam tuning, bunch compression, and other upgrades are expected to yield higher temperature and pressure in the WDM targets. Future experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  1. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics, 2455 Hayward Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Bingham, D.; Goh, J. [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada); Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2} to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code.

  2. Multi-Wavelength Optical Pyrometry Investigation for Turbine Engine Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevadeordal, Jordi; Nirmalan, Nirm; Wang, Guanghua; Thermal Systems Team

    2011-11-01

    An investigation of optical Pyrometry using multiple wavelengths and its application to turbine engine is presented. Current turbine engine Pyrometers are typically broadband Si-detector line-of-sight (LOS) systems. They identify hot spots and spall areas in blades and bucket passages by detection of bursts of higher voltage signals. However, the single color signal can be misleading for estimating temperature and emissivity variations in these bursts. Results of the radiant temperature, multi-color temperature and apparent emissivity are presented for turbine engine applications. For example, the results indicate that spall regions can be characterized using multi-wavelength techniques by showing that the temperature typically drops and the emissivity increases and that differentiates from the emissivity of the normal regions. Burst signals are analyzed with multicolor algorithms and changes in the LOS hot-gas-path properties and in the suction side, trailing edge, pressure side, fillet and platform surfaces characterized.

  3. Monitoring of temperature profiles and surface morphologies during laser sintering of alumina ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Qian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing of alumina by laser is a delicate process and small changes of processing parameters might cause less controlled and understood consequences. The real-time monitoring of temperature profiles, spectrum profiles and surface morphologies were evaluated in off-axial set-up for controlling the laser sintering of alumina ceramics. The real-time spectrometer and pyrometer were used for rapid monitoring of the thermal stability during the laser sintering process. An active illumination imaging system successfully recorded the high temperature melt pool and surrounding area simultaneously. The captured images also showed how the defects form and progress during the laser sintering process. All of these real-time monitoring methods have shown a great potential for on-line quality control during laser sintering of ceramics.

  4. Temperature-controlled electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry using a pyrometric feedback system in conjunction with a background monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deijck, W.; Roelofsen, A. M.; Pieters, H. J.; Herber, R. F. M.

    The construction of a temperature-controlled feedback system for electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) using an optical pyrometer applied to the atomization stage is described. The system was used in conjunction with a fast-response background monitoring device. The heating rate of the furnace amounted to 1400° s -1 with a reproducibility better than 1%. The precision of the temperature control at a steady state temperature of 2000°C was 0.1%. The analytical improvements offered by the present system have been demonstrated by the determination of cadmium and lead in blood and finally by the determination of lead in serum. Both the sensitivity and the precision of the method have been improved. The accuracy of the method was checked by determining the lead content for a number of scrum samples both by ETA-AAS and differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry (DPASV) and proved to be satisfactory.

  5. Measurement of single moving particle temperatures with an FT-IR spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik; Sørensen, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    A conventional scanning FT-IR spectrometer is used to measure the blackbody radiation through a rapidly moving pinhole in an experiment simulating a dying hot particle. The effects and errors from source movements are analyzed and verified through experiments. The importance of the scanning...... velocity, phase-correction method, and temperature variations during scanning is investigated. It is shown that a calibration of the system at one temperature is sufficient for accurate spectral radiance and temperature measurements throughout a broad temperature range. The temperature errors are reduced...... by a factor of 2-10 compared with results from a typical two-color pyrometer. A novel method is presented for measuring emission spectra from single moving particles passing the field of view of the spectrometer in a random manner....

  6. Reusable rocket engine turbopump condition monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, M. E.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1985-01-01

    Significant improvements in engine readiness with attendant reductions in maintenance costs and turnaround times can be achieved with an engine condition monitoring system (CMS). The CMS provides real time health status of critical engine components, without disassembly, through component monitoring with advanced sensor technologies. Three technologies were selected to monitor the rotor bearings and turbine blades: the isotope wear detector and fiber optic deflectometer (bearings), and the fiber optic pyrometer (blades). Signal processing algorithms were evaluated and ranked for their utility in providing useful component health data to unskilled maintenance personnel. Design modifications to current configuration Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure turbopumps and the MK48-F turbopump were developed to incorporate the sensors.

  7. Pyrolaser Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Floyd E., III

    1994-01-01

    Software provides for control and acquisition of data from optical pyrometer. There are six individual programs in PYROLASER package. Provides quick and easy way to set up, control, and program standard Pyrolaser. Temperature and emisivity measurements either collected as if Pyrolaser in manual operating mode or displayed on real-time strip charts and stored in standard spreadsheet format for posttest analysis. Shell supplied to allow macros, which are test-specific, added to system easily. Written using Labview software for use on Macintosh-series computers running System 6.0.3 or later, Sun Sparc-series computers running Open-Windows 3.0 or MIT's X Window System (X11R4 or X11R5), and IBM PC or compatible computers running Microsoft Windows 3.1 or later.

  8. Coiling Temperature Control in Hot Strip Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanari, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Hiroaki

    Coiling temperature is one of the most significant factors in products of hot strip mill to determine material properties such as strength, toughness of steel, so it is very important to achieve accurate coiling temperature control (CTC). Usually there are a few pyrometers on the run out table in hot strip mill, therefore temperature model and its adapting system have large influences on the accuracy of CTC. Also unscheduled change of rolling speed has a bad effect to keep coiling temperature as its target. Newly developed CTC system is able to get very accurate coiling temperature against uncertain factors and disturbances by adopting easily identified temperature model, learning method and dynamic set up function. The features of the CTC system are discussed with actual data, and the effectiveness of the system is shown by actual control results.

  9. Measuring normal spectral emissivities of niobium by a pulse-heating technique: 1000 K to the melting point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingwei Wang; Peng Xiao; Jintao Yu; Jingmin Dai

    2006-01-01

    The normal spectral emissivity of niobium strip specimen is measured using a new pulse-heating reflectometric technique. The hemispherical spectral reflectivity of the surface of a strip tangent to an integrating sphere is determined by a high-speed lock-in technique. At the same time, the radiance temperature of the strip is measured by the multi-wavelength high-speed pyrometer from approximately 1000K to the melting point. Details of the measurement method and of the related calibration techniques are reported. Results of the normal spectral emissivity of niobium at 633, 753, 827, and 905 nm from room temperature to its melting point are presented. The accuracy of spectral emissivities is estimated better than 5%.

  10. Agglomeration Evolution of Nano-Particles Aluminium in Normal Incident Shock Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zheng-Xin; WU Jing-He; HU Dong; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2006-01-01

    Agglomeration behaviour of nano-particle aluminium (nano-Al) in normal incident shock waves is investigated by our devised shock tube technology. The morphology, particle size, agglomeration process of nano-Al studied in normal incident shock waves are comprehensible evaluated by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The above-mentioned techniques show that the high strength and temperature of incident shock wave give a chance for activity of nano-Al in the reactions and decrease the agglomeration, and the morphology of agglomeration is affected by the temperature of nano-Al reaction region. The dynamic temperature of reaction region determined by the intensity ratio of two AlO bands is 2602K, which is closer to nano-Al actual reacted temperature than the determined temperature of ordinary methods (i.e. six channel instantaneous optical pyrometer; plank black body radiation law, etc.)

  11. Static and dynamic thermal infrared signatures measured during the FESTER experiment: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, W. H.; February, F.; Seiffer, D. P.; Eisele, C.

    2016-10-01

    The First European South African Experiment (FESTER) was conducted over about a 10 month period at the Institute of Maritime Technology (IMT) in False Bay, South Africa. One of the principal goals was recording of static and dynamic thermal infrared signatures under different environmental conditions for both validations of existing thermal equilibrium signature prediction codes, but also to aid development of dynamic thermal signature models. A small scientific work boat (called Sea Lab) was used as the principal target and sensor platform. Painted metal plates of different thicknesses were also used as infrared targets on-board Sea Lab to study static/dynamic thermal signatures and were also fitted with pyrgeometers, pyrometers and iButton temperature sensors/loggers. First results focused on the variable of thermal signatures as function of environmental conditions and the accuracy of calculated source temperatures (from measured radiometric temperatures) compared to the physical temperature measurements of the plates.

  12. Polymorphic transition of tin under shock wave compression: Experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinatti F.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the β-bct polymorphic transition in tin is investigated by means of plate impact experiments. The Sn target surface is observed in a partially released state obtained thanks to a transparent lithium fluoride (LiF anvil. We report both measurements of interface velocity and temperature obtained using Photon Doppler Velocimetry and IR optical pyrometer on shock-loaded tin from 8 to 16 GPa. We show that the Mabire Model EOS associated to the SCG plasticity model provides an overall good estimate of the velocity profiles. However, depnding on the shock amplitude, its prediction of the temperature profile may be less satisfactory, hence underlining the need for future improvements in terms of phase transition kinetics description.

  13. Pyrolaser Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Floyd E., III

    1994-01-01

    Software provides for control and acquisition of data from optical pyrometer. There are six individual programs in PYROLASER package. Provides quick and easy way to set up, control, and program standard Pyrolaser. Temperature and emisivity measurements either collected as if Pyrolaser in manual operating mode or displayed on real-time strip charts and stored in standard spreadsheet format for posttest analysis. Shell supplied to allow macros, which are test-specific, added to system easily. Written using Labview software for use on Macintosh-series computers running System 6.0.3 or later, Sun Sparc-series computers running Open-Windows 3.0 or MIT's X Window System (X11R4 or X11R5), and IBM PC or compatible computers running Microsoft Windows 3.1 or later.

  14. Application of schlieren interferometry to temperature measurements during laser welding of high-density polyethylene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, João M P; Abreu, Manuel A; Rodrigues, F Carvalho

    2003-11-01

    Schlieren interferometry is found to be an alternative tool for temperature measurement during thermoplastic laser welding with regard to methods based on thermocouples or optical pyrometers. In fact, these techniques are not easily applied when materials to be processed have reduced thickness, negligible heat conduction, and low emissivity, as is the case of welding high-density polyethylene films with 10.6-microm CO2 laser radiation, even if the method reaches its applicability limit after approximately 1 s of the interaction process. The schlieren method provides the means and the results to probe the thermal variations of the laser-thermoplastic interaction on both the surface and the interface between the sample material and the air.

  15. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory 4th Quarter 2009 Milestone Report: Measure and simulate target temperature and dynamic response in optimized NDCX-I configurations with initial diagnostics suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Henestroza, E.; Logan, B.G.; Lidia, S.; More, R.M.; Ni, P.A.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Grote, D.; Friedman, A.

    2009-09-30

    This milestone has been met. The effort contains two main components: (1) Experimental results of warm dense matter target experiments on optimized NDCX-I configurations that include measurements of target temperature and transient target behavior. (2) A theoretical model of the target response to beam heating that includes an equilibrium heating model of the target foil and a model for droplet formation in the target for comparison with experimental results. The experiments on ion-beam target heating use a 300-350-keV K{sup +} pulsed beam from the Neutralized Compression Drift Experiment (NDCX-I) accelerator at LBNL. The NDCX-I accelerator delivers an uncompressed pulse beam of several microseconds with a typical power density of >100 kW/cm{sup 2} over a final focus spot size of about 1 mm. An induction bunching module the NDCX-I compresses a portion of the beam pulse to reach a much higher power density over 2 nanoseconds. Under these conditions the free-standing foil targets are rapidly heated to temperatures to over 4000 K. We model the target thermal dynamics using the equation of heat conduction for the temperature T(x,t) as a function of time (t) and spatial dimension along the beam direction (x). The competing cooling processes release energy from the surface of the foil due to evaporation, radiation, and thermionic (Richardson) emission. A description of the experimental configuration of the target chamber and results from initial beam-target experiments are reported in our FY08 4th Quarter and FY09 2nd Quarter Milestone Reports. The WDM target diagnostics include a high-speed multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. The fast optical pyrometer is a unique and significant new diagnostic which provides valuable information on the temperature evolution of the heated target.

  16. ESTADIUS: A High Motion "One Arcsec" Daytime Attitude Estimation System for Stratospheric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montel, J.; Andre, Y.; Mirc, F.; Etcheto, P.; Evrard, J.; Bray, N.; Saccoccio, M.; Tomasini, L.; Perot, E.

    2015-09-01

    ESTADIUS is an autonomous, accurate and daytime attitude estimation system, for stratospheric balloons that require a high level of attitude measurement and stability. The system has been developed by CNES. ESTADIUS is based on star sensor an pyrometer data fusion within an extended Kalman filter. The star sensor is composed of a 16 MPixels visible-CCD camera and a large aperture camera lens (focal length of 135mm, aperture f/1.8, 10ºx15º field of view or FOV) which provides very accurate stars measurements due to very low pixel angular size. This also allows detecting stars against a bright sky background. The pyrometer is a 0.01º/h performance class Fiber Optic Gyroscope (FOG). The system is adapted to work down to an altitude of ~25km, even under high cinematic conditions. Key elements of ESTADIUS are: daytime conditions use (as well as night time), autonomy (automatic recognition of constellations), high angular rate robustness (a few deg/s thanks to the high performance of attitude propagation), stray-light robustness (thanks to a high performance baffle), high accuracy (<1", 1σ). Four stratospheric qualification flights were very successfully performed in 2010/2011 and 2013/2014 in Kiruna (Sweden) and Timmins (Canada). ESTADIUS will allow long stratospheric flights with a unique attitude estimation system avoiding the restriction of night/day conditions at launch. The first operational flight of ESTADIUS will be in 2015 for the PILOT scientific missions (led by IRAP and CNES in France). Further balloon missions such as CIDRE will use the system ESTADIUS is probably the first autonomous, large FOV, daytime stellar attitude measurement system. This paper details the technical features and in-flight results.

  17. The NIST eutectic project: construction of Co C, Pt C and Re C fixed-point cells and their comparison with the NMIJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, N.; Yoon, H. W.; Gibson, C. E.; Khromchenko, V.; Sakuma, F.; Yamada, Y.

    2006-04-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has initiated a project on novel high-temperature fixed-points by use of metal (carbide)-carbon eutectics to lower uncertainties in thermodynamic temperature measurement. As the first stage of the NIST eutectic project, a comparison of Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C eutectic fixed-point cells was conducted between the NIST and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) at the NIST to verify the quality of the NIST eutectic cells in addition to checking for possible furnace and radiation thermometer effects on the eutectic fixed-point realizations. In the comparison, two high-temperature furnaces, two radiation thermometers and one gold-point blackbody were used. A Nagano M furnace and a Linear Pyrometer 3 radiation thermometer were transferred from NMIJ and were used in conjunction with a Thermo Gauge furnace and an Absolute Pyrometer 1 radiation thermometer of NIST to check the dependence on the measurement equipment. The results showed that Co-C cells agreed to 73 mK. The melting temperature of the NIST Pt-C cell was approximately 270 mK lower than that of the NMIJ cell, with a comparison uncertainty of roughly 110 mK (k = 2), due to the poor purity of Pt powder. Although the Re-C comparison showed instability of the comparison system, they agreed within 100 mK. Though further improvement is necessary for the Pt-C cell, such as the use of higher purity Pt, the filling and measuring technique has been established at the NIST.

  18. Détermination de l'émissivite à haute température à l'aide de systemes à ribres optiques équipes d'hémispheres réflecteurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, D.; Ciaurriz, C.; Olalde, G.

    1991-09-01

    A device and a direct method for measuring directional emissivity within a spectral bandpass Δλ are presented. The method applies to opaque and diffuse surfaces at high temperatures. When the selected spectral bandpass is large, the measured emissivity gets closer to the total one and conversely, it tends to approach the spectral one when a pseudo-monochromatic bandpass is chosen. Radiances are on one hand experimentally measured with a radiometer and on the other hand calculated from the sample temperature. The original point of the method lies in the sample temperature measurement, which is performed with a photonic two-colour pyrometer. The pyrometer probe consists of a unique SiO2/SiO2 optical fibre associated with a reflecting hemisphere. The samples are heated with concentrated solar radiation. Nous présentons un dispositif et une méthode directe adaptée à la mesure de l'émissivité directionnelle dans une bande spectrale Δλ, pour des corps opaques et diffusants à haute température. La bande spectrale peut être sélectionnée pour un large domaine, l'émissivité mesurée se rapproche alors de l'émissivité totale ou bien sur un domaine pseudo-monochromatique, l'émissivité correspond dans ce cas à une émissivité spectrale. Les flux radiatifs sont déterminés expérimentalement par un radiomètre et calculés à partir de la mesure de la température de l'échantillon. La mesure de la température, point original de la méthodologie, est réalisée à l'aide d'un pyromètre photonique bicolore muni d'une sonde à fibre optique toute silice associée à un hémisphère réflecteur. Les échantillons sont chauffés par rayonnement solaire concentré.

  19. Climatology of clouds and precipitation over East Antarctica using ground-based remote sensing at the Princess Elizabeth station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souverijns, Niels; Gossart, Alexandra; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Lhermitte, Stef; Van Tricht, Kristof; Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet is highly dependent on the interaction between clouds and precipitation. Our understanding of these processes is challenged by the limited availability of observations over the area and problems in Antarctic climate simulations by state-of-the-art climate models. Improvements are needed in this field, as the Antarctic ice sheet is expected to become a dominant contributor to sea level rise in the 21st century. In 2010, an observational site was established at the Princess Elisabeth (PE) Antarctic station. PE is located in the escarpment area of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (72°S, 23°E). The instruments consist of several ground-based remote sensing instruments: a ceilometer (measuring cloud-base height and vertical structure), a 24-GHz Micro Rain Radar (MRR; providing vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (measuring effective cloud base temperature). An automatic weather station provides info on boundary-layer meteorology (temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, pressure), as well as broadband radiative fluxes and snow height changes. This set of instruments can be used to infer the role of clouds in the Antarctic climate system, their interaction with radiation and their impact on precipitation. Cloud and precipitation characteristics are derived from 5-year-long measurement series, which is unprecedented for the Antarctic region. Here, we present an overview of the cloud and precipitation climatology. Statistics on cloud occurrence are calculated on annual / seasonal basis and a distinction between liquid / mixed phase and ice clouds is made. One can discriminate between liquid-bearing and ice-only clouds by investigating the ceilometer attenuated backscatter, since liquid phase clouds have a much higher signal. Furthermore, by using pyrometer measurements, we are able to identify the range of temperatures at which liquid / ice clouds are

  20. Microwave brightness temperature and thermal inertia - towards synergistic method of high-resolution soil moisture retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowski, Mateusz; Usowicz, Boguslaw; Sagan, Joanna; Szlazak, Radoslaw; Gluba, Lukasz; Rojek, Edyta

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter in many environmental studies, as it influences the exchange of water and energy at the interface between the land surface and the atmosphere. Accurate assessment of the soil moisture spatial and temporal variations is crucial for numerous studies; starting from a small scale of single field, then catchment, mesoscale basin, ocean conglomeration, finally ending at the global water cycle. Despite numerous advantages, such as fine accuracy (undisturbed by clouds or daytime conditions) and good temporal resolution, passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture, e.g. SMOS and SMAP, are not applicable to a small scale - simply because of too coarse spatial resolution. On the contrary, thermal infrared-based methods of soil moisture retrieval have a good spatial resolution, but are often disturbed by clouds and vegetation interferences or night effects. The methods that base on point measurements, collected in situ by monitoring stations or during field campaigns, are sometimes called "ground truth" and may serve as a reference for remote sensing, of course after some up-scaling and approximation procedures that are, unfortunately, potential source of error. Presented research concern attempt to synergistic approach that join two remote sensing methods: passive microwave and thermal infrared, supported by in situ measurements. Microwave brightness temperature of soil was measured by ELBARA, the radiometer at 1.4 GHz frequency, installed at 6 meters high tower at Bubnow test site in Poland. Thermal inertia around the tower was modelled using the statistical-physical model whose inputs were: soil physical properties, its water content, albedo and surface temperatures measured by an infrared pyrometer, directed at the same footprint as ELBARA. The results coming from this method were compared to in situ data obtained during several field campaigns and by the stationary agrometeorological stations. The approach seems to be

  1. Melting behavior of mixed U-Pu oxides under oxidizing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strach, Michal; Manara, Dario; Belin, Renaud C.; Rogez, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    In order to use mixed U-Pu oxide ceramics in present and future nuclear reactors, their physical and chemical properties need to be well determined. The behavior of stoichiometric (U,Pu)O2 compounds is relatively well understood, but the effects of oxygen stoichiometry on the fuel performance and stability are often still obscure. In the present work, a series of laser melting experiments were carried out to determine the impact of an oxidizing atmosphere, and in consequence the departure from a stoichiometric composition on the melting behavior of six mixed uranium plutonium oxides with Pu content ranging from 14 to 62 wt%. The starting materials were disks cut from sintered stoichiometric pellets. For each composition we have performed two laser melting experiments in pressurized air, each consisting of four shots of different duration and intensity. During the experiments we recorded the temperature at the surface of the sample with a pyrometer. Phase transitions were qualitatively identified with the help of a reflected blue laser. The observed phase transitions occur at a systematically lower temperature, the lower the Pu content of the studied sample. It is consistent with the fact that uranium dioxide is easily oxidized at elevated temperatures, forming chemical species rich in oxygen, which melt at a lower temperature and are more volatile. To our knowledge this campaign is a first attempt to quantitatively determine the effect of O/M on the melting temperature of MOX.

  2. Melting behavior of mixed U–Pu oxides under oxidizing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strach, Michal [CEA, DEN, DTEC, SECA, LCC, Cadarache F-13108, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334 – Aix Marseille University, Case 251, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Manara, Dario [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Belin, Renaud C. [CEA, DEN, DTEC, SECA, LCC, Cadarache F-13108, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Rogez, Jacques [IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334 – Aix Marseille University, Case 251, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2016-05-01

    In order to use mixed U–Pu oxide ceramics in present and future nuclear reactors, their physical and chemical properties need to be well determined. The behavior of stoichiometric (U,Pu)O{sub 2} compounds is relatively well understood, but the effects of oxygen stoichiometry on the fuel performance and stability are often still obscure. In the present work, a series of laser melting experiments were carried out to determine the impact of an oxidizing atmosphere, and in consequence the departure from a stoichiometric composition on the melting behavior of six mixed uranium plutonium oxides with Pu content ranging from 14 to 62 wt%. The starting materials were disks cut from sintered stoichiometric pellets. For each composition we have performed two laser melting experiments in pressurized air, each consisting of four shots of different duration and intensity. During the experiments we recorded the temperature at the surface of the sample with a pyrometer. Phase transitions were qualitatively identified with the help of a reflected blue laser. The observed phase transitions occur at a systematically lower temperature, the lower the Pu content of the studied sample. It is consistent with the fact that uranium dioxide is easily oxidized at elevated temperatures, forming chemical species rich in oxygen, which melt at a lower temperature and are more volatile. To our knowledge this campaign is a first attempt to quantitatively determine the effect of O/M on the melting temperature of MOX.

  3. A protection system for the JET ITER-like wall based on imaging diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, G; Devaux, S; Alves, D; Balboa, I; Balorin, C; Balshaw, N; Beldishevski, M; Carvalho, P; Clever, M; Cramp, S; de Pablos, J-L; de la Cal, E; Falie, D; Garcia-Sanchez, P; Felton, R; Gervaise, V; Goodyear, A; Horton, A; Jachmich, S; Huber, A; Jouve, M; Kinna, D; Kruezi, U; Manzanares, A; Martin, V; McCullen, P; Moncada, V; Obrejan, K; Patel, K; Lomas, P J; Neto, A; Rimini, F; Ruset, C; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Sieglin, B; Soleto, A; Stamp, M; Stephen, A; Thomas, P D; Valcárcel, D F; Williams, J; Wilson, J; Zastrow, K-D

    2012-10-01

    The new JET ITER-like wall (made of beryllium and tungsten) is more fragile than the former carbon fiber composite wall and requires active protection to prevent excessive heat loads on the plasma facing components (PFC). Analog CCD cameras operating in the near infrared wavelength are used to measure surface temperature of the PFCs. Region of interest (ROI) analysis is performed in real time and the maximum temperature measured in each ROI is sent to the vessel thermal map. The protection of the ITER-like wall system started in October 2011 and has already successfully led to a safe landing of the plasma when hot spots were observed on the Be main chamber PFCs. Divertor protection is more of a challenge due to dust deposits that often generate false hot spots. In this contribution we describe the camera, data capture and real time processing systems. We discuss the calibration strategy for the temperature measurements with cross validation with thermal IR cameras and bi-color pyrometers. Most importantly, we demonstrate that a protection system based on CCD cameras can work and show examples of hot spot detections that stop the plasma pulse. The limits of such a design and the associated constraints on the operations are also presented.

  4. Gap-bridging During Quasi-simultaneous Laser Transmission Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmailzl, Anton; Hierl, Stefan; Schmidt, Michael

    Tightness is often the main requirement for quasi-simultaneous laser transmission welds. However, remaining gaps cannot be detected by the used set-path monitoring. By using a pyrometer in combination with a 3D-scanner, weld seam interruptions can be localized precisely while welding, due to temperature deviations along the weld contour. To analyze the temperature signal in correlation to the progress of gap-bridging, T-joint samples with predefined gaps are welded. The set-path is measured synchronously. Additionally, the temperature distribution and the influence of the thermal expansion of the polymers are studied by a thermo-mechanical FEM-process simulation. On top of that, the melt blow-out of the welded samples is analyzed using μCT-measurements. The experiments have shown that closing of a gap can be identified reliably by the temperature signal and that the squeezed melt flow into the gap and the thermal expansion in the gap zone accelerates gap-bridging. Furthermore the inserted heat can be adapted in the fault zone, in order to avoid thermal damage.

  5. Determination of laser-evaporated uranium dioxide by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, R.

    1987-05-01

    Safety analyses of nuclear reactors require information about the loss of fuel which may occur at high temperatures. In this study, the surface of a uranium dioxide target was heated rapidly by a laser. The uranium surface was vaporized into a vacuum. The uranium bearing species condensed on a graphite disk placed in the pathway of the expanding uranium vapor. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray analysis showed very little droplet ejection directly from the laser target surface. Neutron activation analysis was used to measure the amount of uranium deposited. The surface temperature was measured by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The maximum surface temperature ranged from 2400 to 3700/sup 0/K. The Hertz-Langmuir formula, in conjunction with the measured surface temperature transient, was used to calculate the theoretical amount of uranium deposited. There was good agreement between theory and experiment above the melting point of 3120/sup 0/K. Below the melting point much more uranium was collected than was expected theoretically. This was attributed to oxidation of the surface. 29 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G.

    2013-09-01

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (ɛeff) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ɛeff values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ɛeff values selected. The best fit ɛeff values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

  7. 用于高温测量的红外热成像技术%The IR thermography technique for high temperature measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓建平; 王国林; 黄沛然

    2001-01-01

    用于高焓风洞实验中模型表面温度测量的CCD红外热成像系统,测温范围1000~3500K。笔者介绍系统原理和标定过程,并给出了初步风洞实验结果。通过与红外高温计测量结果的比较分析,验证了该系统的可靠性和实用性。系统的研制成功为地面防热/热结构实验中模型表面温度测量提供了先进的手段。%A CCD IR thermography system can be used to measure the model surface tempe~ratures up to 3500K.In this paper,the system calibration test and dynamical compare test are introduced.The surface temperatures distribution of the hemispherical and small blunt model in high enthalpy facility are measured by the CCD IR thermography system. The results are compared with that obtained by an infrared pyrometer.It indicats that the developed system is successful and it will play an important role in high enthalpy wind tunnel experiment.

  8. Determination of char combustion kinetics parameters: Comparison of point detector and imaging-based particle-sizing pyrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiemann, Martin; Geier, Manfred; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Vorobiev, Nikita; Scherer, Viktor

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the char burnout characteristics of two German coals (a lignite and a high-volatile bituminous coal) were investigated using two different experimental configurations and optical techniques in two distinct laboratories for measurement of temperature and size of burning particles. The optical diagnostic hardware is quite different in the two systems, but both perform two-color pyrometry and optical sizing measurements on individual particles burning in isolation from each other in high-temperature laminar flows to characterize the char consumption kinetics. The performance of the specialized systems is compared for two different combustion atmospheres (with 6.6 and 12 vol.% O2) and gas temperatures between 1700 and 1800 K. The measured particle temperatures and diameters are converted to char burning rate parameters for several residence times during the course of the particles' burnout. The results confirm that comparable results are obtained with the two configurations, although higher levels of variability in the measured data were observed in the imaging-based pyrometer setup. Corresponding uncertainties in kinetics parameters were larger, and appear to be more sensitive to systematic measurement errors when lower oxygen contents are used in the experiments. Consequently, burnout experiments in environments with sufficiently high O2 contents may be used to measure reliable char burning kinetics rates. Based on simulation results for the two coals, O2 concentrations in the range 10%-30% are recommended for kinetic rate measurements on 100 μm particles.

  9. Monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion processes via ultrasound. [Ultrasonic thermometry proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C.; Mulcahey, T. P.

    1980-02-01

    A study of the state-of-the-art of instrumentation for monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion systems has been carried out. The instrumentation types studied include Thermocouples, Radiation Pyrometers, and Acoustical Thermometers. The capabilities and limitations of each type are reviewed. The study determined that ultrasonic thermometry has the potential of providing viable instrumentation. Consequently, a feasibility study of the ultrasonic thermometry was undertaken. A mathematical model of a pulse-echo ultrasonic temperature measurement system is developed using linear system theory. The mathematical model lends itself to the adaptation of generalized correlation techniques for the estimation of propagation delays. Computer simulations are made to test the efficacy of the signal processing techniques for noise-free as well as noisy signals. Based on the theoretical study, acoustic techniques to measure temperature in reactors and combustors are feasible. To experimentally verify the technique it is needed (a) to test the available sensor materials at high temperatures under erosive and corrosive conditions and (b) upon the selection of the appropriate sensor material to validate the proposed signal processing technique. The base for the applicability of this technique will be the frequency of operation, which will determine the length of the sensor and the noise background at the frequency of interest. It is, however, believed that the proposed technique will provide reliable estimates under the noise background.

  10. Electrochemical Discharge Machining Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali V. Kulkarni

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical discharge machining process is evolving as a promising micromachiningprocess. The experimental investigations in the present work substantiate this trend. In the presentwork, in situ, synchronised, transient temperature and current measurements have been carriedout. The need for the transient measurements arose due to the time-varying nature of the dischargeformation and time varying circuit current. Synchronised and transient measurements revealedthe discrete nature of the process. It also helped in formulating the basic mechanism for thedischarge formation and the material removal in the process. Temperature profile on workpieceand in electrochemical discharge machining cell is experimentally measured using pyrometer,and two varieties of K-type thermocouples. Surface topography of the discharge-affected zoneson the workpiece has been carried out using scanning electron microscope. Measurements andsurface topographical studies reveal the potential use of this process for machining in micronregime. With careful experimental set-up design, suitable supply voltage and its polarity, theprocess can be applied for both micromachining and micro-deposition. It can be extended formachining and or deposition of wide range of materials.

  11. Integrated Behavior of Carbon and Copper Alloy Heat Sink Under Different Heat Loads and Cooling Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hua; Li Jiangang; Chen Junling; Hu Jiansheng

    2005-01-01

    An actively water-cooled limiter has been designed for the long pulse operation of an HT-7 device, by adopting an integrated structure-doped graphite and a copper alloy heat sink with a super carbon sheet serving as a compliant layer between them. The behaviors of the integrated structure were evaluated in an electron beam facility under different heat loads and cooling conditions. The surface temperature and bulk temperature distribution were carefully measured by optical pyrometers and thermocouples under a steady state heat flux of 1 to 5 MW/m2 and a water flow rate of 3 m3/h, 4.5 m3/h and 6 m3/h, respectively. It was found that the surface temperature increased rapidly with the heat flux rising, but decreased only slightly with the water flow rate rising. The surface temperature reached approximately 1200℃ at 5 MW/m2 of heat flux and 6 ms/h of water flow. The primary experimental results indicate that the integrated design meets the requirements for the heat expelling capacity of the HT-7 device. A set of numerical simulations was also completed, whose outcome was in good accord with the experimental results.

  12. Development Of An Acoustice Sensor For On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement In Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Ariessohn; Hans Hornung

    2006-10-01

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2 - Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. The objective of this project was to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project was organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consisted of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles and gas properties on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that could be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consisted of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the laboratory, and developing a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor. The third phase consisted of designing and fabricating the field prototype, and testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier to demonstrate the ability to obtain accurate measurements of gas temperature in an operating gasifier. This report describes all of the activities conducted during the project and

  13. Features of SOI substrates heating in MBE growth process obtained by low-coherence tandem interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, P. V.; Goryunov, A.. V.; Lobanov, D. N.; Luk'yanov, A. Yu.; Novikov, A. V.; Tertyshnik, A. D.; Shaleev, M. V.; Yurasov, D. V.

    2016-08-01

    Differences in heating of silicon and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates in molecular beam epitaxy were revealed by low-coherence tandem interferometry. Using this technique the interference effects which impede the correct evaluation of SOI substrate temperature by infrared pyrometers can be eliminated and so the reliable temperature readout can be achieved. It was shown that at the same thermocouple and heater power settings the real temperature of SOI substrates is higher than of silicon ones and the difference may be as high as 40-50 °C at temperatures close to 600 °C. It is supposed that such effect is caused by the additional absorption of heater radiation by the buried oxide layer in the mid-infrared range. Independent proof of this effect was obtained by growing on both types of substrates a series of structures with self-assembled Ge nanoislands whose parameters are known to be very temperature sensitive. The proposed low-coherence interferometry technique provides precise real-time control of the growth temperature and so allows formation of SiGe nanostructures with desired parameters.

  14. An advanced electric propulsion diagnostic (AEPD) platform for in-situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundesmann, Carsten; Eichhorn, Christoph; Scholze, Frank; Spemann, Daniel; Neumann, Horst; Pagano, Damiano; Scaranzin, Simone; Scortecci, Fabrizio; Leiter, Hans J.; Gauter, Sven; Wiese, Ruben; Kersten, Holger; Holste, Kristof; Köhler, Peter; Klar, Peter J.; Mazouffre, Stéphane; Blott, Richard; Bulit, Alexandra; Dannenmayer, Käthe

    2016-10-01

    Experimental characterization is an essential task in development, qualification and optimization process of electric propulsion thrusters or ion beam sources for material processing, because it can verify that the thruster or ion beam source fulfills the requested mission or application requirements, and it can provide parameters for thruster and plasma modeling. Moreover, there is a need for standardizing electric propulsion thruster diagnostics in order to make characterization results of different thrusters and also from measurements performed in different vacuum facilities reliable and comparable. Therefore, we have developed an advanced electric propulsion diagnostic (AEPD) platform, which allows a comprehensive in-situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters (or ion beam sources) and could serve as a standard on-ground tool in the future. The AEPD platform uses a five-axis positioning system and provides the option to use diagnostic tools for beam characterization (Faraday probe, retarding potential analyzer, ExB probe, active thermal probe), for optical inspection (telemicroscope, triangular laser head), and for thermal characterization (pyrometer, thermocamera). Here we describe the capabilities of the diagnostic platform and provide first experimental results of the characterization of a gridded ion thruster RIT- μX.

  15. A 2-D FINITE ELEMENT MODEL SIMULATION OF THE MELTING PROCESS OF Al-Ti ALLOY IN VACUUM INDUCTION FURNACE WITH COLD CRUCIBLE (VIFCC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.C. Chu; S.S. Lian; F.K. Chen

    2004-01-01

    The development of a numerical model for the melting process of Al-Ti alloy target material in vacuum induction furnace with cold crucible (VIFCC) was described. It is a two-dimensional computational methodology to calculate electromagnetic field, heat transfer field and fluid flow field . Based on the aid of the finite element method with the commercial software-ANSYS, a superimposition method of a layer of copper and a slit to simulate the VIFCC melting process was used. The method was effective to save large quantity of memory and computing time. Meanwhile, a temperature distribution profile during the melting process was obtained. Validity of the model was confirmed by comparison between the result from calculation and those from direct measurement by optical pyrometer and indirect investigation by ingot macrostructure.A relatively good agreement was found. Further, a nearly directional solidification structure was obtained under properly controlling the cooling rate and heating power.Therefore, such model developed in this article is feasible.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of reactions by nanoferrites Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} combustion; Sintese por reacao de combustao e caracterizacao de nanoparticulas de Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, P.T.A.; Dantas, B.B.; Costa, A.C.F.M.; Araujo, P.M.A.G., E-mail: polyanaquimica@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2012-07-01

    In this work CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} of magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by combustion reaction and the structural and morphological characteristics of the synthesized samples as well as the parameters of synthesis temperature and reaction time were investigated in order to assess the reproducibility of the synthesis. The maximum temperature and time of the combustion flame were obtained with pyrometer coupled to a computer with online measurement and a stopwatch. The resulting samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The maximum temperature achieved during synthesis for all reactions ranged from 623 deg C and 755 deg C. The combustion flame time varied between 18 and 23 seconds. The XRD showed the formation of only CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} inverse spinel phase, with crystallite size 28 nm and crystallinity 78%, with typical morphology of the formation of agglomerates of uniform size, brittle and comprising nanoparticles together by weak forces. (author)

  17. A versatile elevated-pressure reactor combined with an ultrahigh vacuum surface setup for efficient testing of model and powder catalysts under clean gas-phase conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfin, Franck; Piccolo, Laurent [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256 CNRS and Université Lyon 1, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, F-69626 Villeurbanne (France)

    2013-09-15

    A small-volume reaction cell for catalytic or photocatalytic testing of solid materials at pressures up to 1000 Torr has been coupled to a surface-science setup used for standard sample preparation and characterization under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The reactor and sample holder designs allow easy sample transfer from/to the UHV chamber, and investigation of both planar and small amounts of powder catalysts under the same conditions. The sample is heated with an infrared laser beam and its temperature is measured with a compact pyrometer. Combined in a regulation loop, this system ensures fast and accurate temperature control as well as clean heating. The reaction products are automatically sampled and analyzed by mass spectrometry and/or gas chromatography (GC). Unlike previous systems, our GC apparatus does not use a recirculation loop and allows working in clean conditions at pressures as low as 1 Torr while detecting partial pressures smaller than 10{sup −4} Torr. The efficiency and versatility of the reactor are demonstrated in the study of two catalytic systems: butadiene hydrogenation on Pd(100) and CO oxidation over an AuRh/TiO{sub 2} powder catalyst.

  18. A New Method to Measure Temperature and Burner Pattern Factor Sensing for Active Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The determination of the temperatures of extended surfaces which exhibit non-uniform temperature variation is very important for a number of applications including the "Burner Pattern Factor" (BPF) of turbine engines. Exploratory work has shown that use of BPF to control engine functions can result in many benefits, among them reduction in engine weight, reduction in operating cost, increase in engine life, while attaining maximum engine efficiency. Advanced engines are expected to operate at very high temperature to achieve high efficiency. Brief exposure of engine components to higher than design temperatures due to non-uniformity in engine burner pattern can reduce engine life. The engine BPF is a measure of engine temperature uniformity. Attainment of maximum temperature uniformity and high temperatures is key to maximum efficiency and long life. A new approach to determine through the measurement of just one radiation spectrum by a multiwavelength pyrometer is possible. This paper discusses a new temperature sensing approach and its application to determine the BPF.

  19. An improved approach for process monitoring in laser material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Hans-Georg; Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Process monitoring is used in many different laser material processes due to the demand for reliable and stable processes. Among different methods, on-axis process monitoring offers multiple advantages. To observe a laser material process it is unavoidable to choose a wavelength for observation that is different to the one used for material processing, otherwise the light of the processing laser would outshine the picture of the process. By choosing a different wavelength, lateral chromatic aberration occurs in not chromatically corrected optical systems with optical scanning units and f-Theta lenses. These aberrations lead to a truncated image of the process on the camera or the pyrometer, respectively. This is the reason for adulterated measurements and non-satisfying images of the process. A new approach for solving the problem of field dependent lateral chromatic aberration in process monitoring is presented. Therefore, the scanner-based optical system is reproduced in a simulation environment, to predict the occurring lateral chromatic aberrations. In addition, a second deflecting system is integrated into the system. By using simulation, a predictive control is designed that uses the additional deflecting system to introduce reverse lateral deviations in order to compensate the lateral effect of chromatic aberration. This paper illustrates the concept and the implementation of the predictive control, which is used to eliminate lateral chromatic aberrations in process monitoring, the simulation on which the system is based the optical system as well as the control concept.

  20. Part height control of laser metal additive manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu-Herng

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has been used to not only make but also repair damaged parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. Parts made in this manner may produce less waste than those made through conventional machining processes. However, a common issue of LMD involves controlling the deposition's layer thickness. Accuracy is important, and as it increases, both the time required to produce the part and the material wasted during the material removal process (e.g., milling, lathe) decrease. The deposition rate is affected by multiple parameters, such as the powder feed rate, laser input power, axis feed rate, material type, and part design, the values of each of which may change during the LMD process. Using a mathematical model to build a generic equation that predicts the deposition's layer thickness is difficult due to these complex parameters. In this thesis, we propose a simple method that utilizes a single device. This device uses a pyrometer to monitor the current build height, thereby allowing the layer thickness to be controlled during the LMD process. This method also helps the LMD system to build parts even with complex parameters and to increase material efficiency.

  1. Thermophysical Properties of Manganin (Cu86Mn12Ni2) in the Solid and Liquid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmon, A.; Aziz, K.; Luckabauer, M.; Pottlacher, G.

    2015-07-01

    Manganin is the trademark name of the alloy Cu86Mn12Ni2. Despite its frequent usage in manufacturing processes, literature data are scarce particularly at higher temperatures. This work presents a set of thermophysical data of this alloy in a temperature range above its classic area of application up to the end of its liquid phase. For investigating the alloy, four examination setups were employed. Using differential thermal analysis, solidus and liquidus temperatures were obtained. In the solid phase, the electrical resistivity as a function of temperature was determined by a four-point probe positioned in a furnace. Thermal expansion was measured with a high-resolution two-beam laser dilatometer based on Michelson-interferometry and thereby density was calculated. The liquid state was investigated using a s-ohmic-pulse-heating setup. Wire-shaped specimens were resistively volume heated as part of an electrical discharge circuit. Measured quantities were the current through the specimen, the voltage drop along the specimen, the surface radiance by a pyrometer, and the thermal expansion with an adapted CCD camera system. On the basis of these measurements, temperature-dependent thermophysical properties of enthalpy, isobaric heat capacity, electrical resistivity, and density are obtained. Additionally the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are estimated in the high-temperature range applying the Wiedemann-Franz law.

  2. 超高速碰撞实验中跟进气体对等离子体信号的影响%Influence of the Sequela Gas Accompanied with the Plasma Generated by Hypervelocity Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张东江; 张庆明; 甘云丹; 李一磊

    2011-01-01

    针对二级轻气炮加载铝弹丸超高速碰撞靶板产生等离子体的过程中,弹丸后面跟进气体有可能对等离子体信号造成影响的问题,利用三探针、磁线圈、高温计等实验设备分别对有铝弹丸和无弹丸两发实验进行了诊断测量,得出了相应的电子温度、磁感应强度、物质温度变化曲线.比较实验结果得出:弹丸超高速碰撞靶板产生等离子体的过程中跟进气体信号幅值较小,不会对实验结果造成明显影响.%During the measurement of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact in the two-stage gas gun, the gas following the projectile might disturb the physical measurement of plasma signal. The triple probe, coil and pyrometer were used to detect how much the influence of the sequela gas. By comparison, the results show that the signal value of the sequela gas is relatively small and could not produce obvious influence to the measurement of plasma parameter.

  3. Thermocouple and Infrared Sensor-Based Measurement of Temperature Distribution in Metal Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdil Kus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining.

  4. Evaluation of candidate Stirling engine heater tube alloys after 3500 hours exposure to high pressure doped hydrogen or helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misencik, J. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The heater head tubes of current prototype automotive Stirling engines are fabricated from alloy N-155, an alloy which contains 20 percent cobalt. Because the United States imports over 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country and resource supplies could not meet the demand imposed by automotive applications of cobalt in the heater head (tubes plus cylinders and regenerator housings), it is imperative that substitute alloys free of cobalt be identified. The research described herein focused on the heater head tubes. Sixteen alloys (15 potential substitutes plus the 20 percent Co N-155 alloy) were evaluated in the form of thin wall tubing in the NASA Lewis Research Center Stirling simulator materials diesel fuel fired test rigs. Tubes filled with either hydrogen doped with 1 percent CO2 or with helium at a gas pressure of 15 MPa and a temperature of 820 C were cyclic endurance tested for times up to 3500 hr. Results showed that two iron-nickel base superalloys, CG-27 and Pyromet 901 survived the 3500 hr endurance test. The remaining alloys failed by creep-rupture at times less than 3000 hr, however, several other alloys had superior lives to N-155. Results further showed that doping the hydrogen working fluid with 1 vol % CO2 is an effective means of reducing hydrogen permeability through all the alloy tubes investigated.

  5. Experimental determination of the emissivity coefficient of selected materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idzkowski, Adam; Walendziuk, Wojciech; Sawicki, Aleksander

    2016-09-01

    This paper concerns the experimental determination of the emissivity of selected materials (metals and alloys). In the first chapter the theoretical aspects are presented. Then ISO 18434-1:2008 norm, as the standard regulating all issues related to the emissivity and the way of its determination, is described. The aim of work was to modernize the laboratory stand for non-contact temperature measurements. The modernized laboratory stand was equipped with the modern data acquisition module (National Instruments NI 9203). It enabled to present temperature measurement data and to save it on the PC. As a result, students will be able to conduct more measurements and to make more conclusions about the emissivity of materials and its influence on a temperature result. Sample measurements and calculations were presented. The final element of study was to determine emissivity for each plate. It was made by calculations basing on the values: reference temperature (from Pt100 sensor) and non-contact temperature (from pyrometer). The emissivity values determined from these calculations were compared with the values obtained through published tables in the literature and with the values received by means of NEC Avio G100 thermographic camera. The expanded uncertainty of determined emissivity coefficient was also estimated.

  6. Influence of radiation-crosslinking on flame retarded polymer materials-How crosslinking disrupts the barrier effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnier, Rodolphe; Caro-Bretelle, Anne-Sophie; Dumazert, Loïc; Longerey, Marc; Otazaghine, Belkacem

    2015-01-01

    Fire behavior of flame retardant-free and flame retarded PP/PA6 blends was studied using pyrolysis-combustion flow calorimeter, cone calorimeter and epiradiator equipped with infrared camera and pyrometer. Blends were previously γ-irradiated in presence of crosslinking agents at various doses (up to 100 kGy) in order to assess the influence of irradiation crosslinking on flame retardancy. Crosslinked specimens exhibit a solid-like behavior under high temperature gradient in cone calorimeter and then distort considerably. The influence of such a behavior depends on the material properties. When the flame retardancy is provided by heat shielding effect, heat distortion disrupts the top protective layer leading to a substantial increase of peak of heat release rate (pHRR). The barrier layer is no longer able to prevent the heat transfer to the underlying condensed phase. In other cases (flame retardant-free blends or flame retardancy provided by other effects than heat shielding), heat distortion has negligible influence on heat release rate curves in cone calorimeter tests.

  7. Integrated analysis of millisecond laser irradiation of steel by comprehensive optical diagnostics and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubenskaia, M.; Smurov, I.; Nagulin, K. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Complimentary optical diagnostic tools are applied to provide comprehensive analysis of thermal phenomena in millisecond Nd:YAG laser irradiation of steel substrates. The following optical devices are employed: (a) infrared camera FLIR Phoenix RDASTM equipped by InSb sensor with 3 to 5 µm band pass arranged on 320 × 256 pixels array, (b) ultra-rapid camera Phantom V7.1 with SR-CMOS monochrome sensor in the visible spectral range, up to 105 frames per second for 64 × 88 pixels array, (c) original multi-wavelength pyrometer in the near-infrared range (1.370-1.531 µm). The following laser radiation parameters are applied: variation of energy per pulse in the range 15-30 J at a constant pulse duration of 10 ms with and without application of protective gas (Ar). The evolution of true temperature is restored based on the method of multi-colour pyrometry; by this way, melting/solidification dynamics is analysed. Emissivity variation with temperature is studied, and hysteresis type functional dependence is found. Variation of intensity of surface evaporation visualised by the camera Phantom V7.1 is registered and linked with the surface temperature evolution, different surface roughness and influence of protective gas atmosphere. Determination of the vapour plume temperature based on relatively intensities of spectral lines is done. The numerical simulation is carried out applying the thermal model with phase transitions taken into account.

  8. A new device for XAFS data collection up to 2000 K (or 3700 K under vacuum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, F.; Itié, J.-P.; Fiquet, G.; Andrault, D.

    1995-08-01

    A new device to collect high- to ultra high temperature X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) data is presented. The experimental XAFS data is collected in the energy-dispersive mode using the heating wire technique. The X-ray beam is focused on a 500 μm ⊘ hole (drilled within a Pt 90Rh 10 heating wire) that contains the sample (100-300 μm thickness). The wire is heated by the Joule effect. The actual temperature is measured using an optical pyrometer and an electrical power-temperature calibration, based on 10 model compound melting points ( T is ± 20 K on the average). The maximum possible temperature is that of the wire melting point (˜ 2000 K for the Pt 90Rh 10 alloy). However, much higher temperatures can be achieved by the use of Ir, W, Ta (etc.) wires under inert atmosphere (to prevent the wire from oxidation by air). Data collection at all temperatures is rather fast (3 s/spectrum for a 3-13 Å -1k-domain used) and can be performed every 20 K. Therefore, in situ, high temperature kinetics can also be studied as a function of time such as phase transitions, oxidation reactions or melting phenomena. The study of GeO 2 polymorphs as a function of temperature will be shown to give an example of the possibilities offered by this technique.

  9. Thermocouple and infrared sensor-based measurement of temperature distribution in metal cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-12

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining.

  10. Construction and Characterization of Mini-ruthenium-Carbon Eutectic Cells for Industrial Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diril, A.; Bourson, F.; Parga, C.; Sadli, M.

    2015-12-01

    High-temperature eutectic fixed points have proved to be convenient tools for temperature scale dissemination and thermometer calibrations/checks at temperatures above 1100°C. In order to investigate the feasibility of metal-carbon eutectic cells in industrial applications as a means for assessing the traceability of non-contact thermometers, a batch of cells was constructed at LNE-Cnam, NPL, and TUBITAK UME. Compared to the usual dimensions of high-temperature fixed point cells (45 mm in length × 24 mm in diameter), a new cell design was created to fit with industrial applications. TUBITAK UME constructed and characterized five ruthenium-carbon (Ru-C) eutectic cells of dimensions 24 mm in length × 24 mm in diameter. One of these cells has been selected and characterized at CEA premises. Ru-C eutectic cells have been evaluated in terms of short-term repeatability, reproducibility, furnace effect, sharp temperature ramps, and the effect of cell location. Measurements at TÜBİTAK UME have been performed with a transfer standard pyrometer calibrated at the copper point and a BB3500pg high-temperature blackbody furnace was used for construction and measurement. For the measurements at CEA, a Land Standard—HIMERT S1 radiation thermometer and a VITI induction furnace were used. In this article results of the measurements at TÜBİTAK UME and CEA will be presented. The possible use of these mini-eutectic cells as industrial temperature standards will be discussed.

  11. Transient, three-dimensional heat transfer model for the laser assisted machining of silicon nitride: 1. Comparison of predictions with measured surface temperature histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozzi, J.C.; Pfefferkorn, F.E.; Shin, Y.C. [Purdue University, (United States). Laser Assisted Materials Processing Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering; Incropera, F.P. [University of Notre Dame, (United States). Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department

    2000-04-01

    Laser assisted machining (LAM), in which the material is locally heated by an intense laser source prior to material removal, provides an alternative machining process with the potential to yield higher material removal rates, as well as improved control of workpiece properties and geometry, for difficult-to-machine materials such as structural ceramics. To assess the feasibility of the LAM process and to obtain an improved understanding of governing physical phenomena, experiments have been performed to determine the thermal response of a rotating silicon nitride workpiece undergoing heating by a translating CO{sub 2} laser and material removal by a cutting tool. Using a focused laser pyrometer, surface temperature histories were measured to determine the effect of the rotational and translational speeds, the depth of cut, the laser-tool lead distance, and the laser beam diameter and power on thermal conditions. The measurements are in excellent agreement with predictions based on a transient, three-dimensional numerical solution of the heating and material removal processes. The temperature distribution within the unmachined workpiece is most strongly influenced by the laser power and laser-tool lead distance, as well as by the laser/tool translational velocity. A minimum allowable operating temperature in the material removal region corresponds to the YSiAlON glass transition temperature, below which tool fracture may occur. In a companion paper, the numerical model is used to further elucidate thermal conditions associated with laser assisted machining. (author)

  12. Design, calibration and error analysis of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Tree, D. R.; Dewitt, D. P.; Wahiduzzaman, S. A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the methodology and uncertainty analyses of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines. Results are presented for determining the local wall heat flux in an internal combustion engine (using a surface thermocouple-type heat flux gage) and the apparent flame-temperature and soot volume fraction path length product in a diesel engine (using two-color pyrometry). It is shown that a surface thermocouple heat transfer gage suitably constructed and calibrated will have an accuracy of 5 to 10 percent. It is also shown that, when applying two-color pyrometry to measure the apparent flame temperature and soot volume fraction-path length, it is important to choose at least one of the two wavelengths to lie in the range of 1.3 to 2.3 micrometers. Carefully calibrated two-color pyrometer can ensure that random errors in the apparent flame temperature and in the soot volume fraction path length will remain small (within about 1 percent and 10-percent, respectively).

  13. Tritium Removal by Laser Heating and Its Application to Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; G. Guttadora; A. Carpe; S. Langish; K.M. Young; M. Nishi; W. Shu

    2001-11-16

    A novel laser heating technique has recently been applied to removing tritium from carbon tiles that had been exposed to deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR). A continuous wave neodymium laser, of power up to 300 watts, was used to heat the surface of the tiles. The beam was focused to an intensity, typically 8 kW/cm{sup 2}, and rapidly scanned over the tile surface by galvanometer-driven scanning mirrors. Under the laser irradiation, the surface temperature increased dramatically, and temperatures up to 2,300 degrees C were recorded by an optical pyrometer. Tritium was released and circulated in a closed-loop system to an ionization chamber that measured the tritium concentration. Most of the tritium (up to 84%) could be released by the laser scan. This technique appears promising for tritium removal in a next-step DT device as it avoids oxidation, the associated deconditioning of the plasma facing surfaces, and the expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide. Some engineering aspects of the implementation of this method in a next-step fusion device will be discussed.

  14. Study of laser - matter interaction applied to the decontamination of paints; Etude de l'interaction laser - matiere appliquee a la decontamination de peintures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brygo, F

    2005-12-15

    In nuclear industry, the paint layer on the walls must be removed during dismantling or maintenance operation. Laser ablation of the paint layer allows to reduce the generated waste volume, compared to the current techniques. Paints consist of a polymeric base in which fillers and pigments are included. The energy deposition of the laser beam in this scattering medium is studied using a multiple scattering model, and measurements of reflection / transmission of beam through thin layers. The paint ablation is studied with several Nd: YAG lasers and a TEA-CO{sub 2} laser, allowing to modify the fluence, the wavelength, the pulse duration, the repetition rate and the number of shots. Optical benches were carried out, and the parametric tests allow to define the optimal ablation parameters, in term of ablation efficiency. Ablation at high repetition rate is studied using an optical pyrometer and a specifically developed thermal model. Measurements and modelling highlight the heat accumulation that appears at high repetition rate. This accumulation allows to reduce the ablation threshold fluence and to increase the ablation efficiency. Analyses of the interaction and ablation regimes are proposed on the basis of the experimental results and models, and allow to optimise the decontamination process. (author)

  15. NCTM of liquids at high temperatures using polarization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shankar; Weber, J. K. Richard; Nordine, Paul C.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    Temperature measurement and control is extremely important in any materials processing application. However, conventional techniques for non-contact temperature measurement (mainly optical pyrometry) are very uncertain because of unknown or varying surface emittance. Optical properties like other properties change during processing. A dynamic, in-situ measurement of optical properties including the emittance is required. Intersonics is developing new technologies using polarized laser light scattering to determine surface emittance of freely radiating bodies concurrent with conventional optical pyrometry. These are sufficient to determine the true surface temperature of the target. Intersonics is currently developing a system called DAPP, the Division of Amplitude Polarimetric Pyrometer, that uses polarization information to measure the true thermodynamic temperature of freely radiating objects. This instrument has potential use in materials processing applications in ground and space based equipment. Results of thermophysical and thermodynamic measurements using laser reflection as a temperature measuring tool are presented. The impact of these techniques on thermophysical property measurements at high temperature is discussed.

  16. Ion Beam Driven Warm Dense Matter Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Barnard, J. J.

    2008-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a 1-mm beam spot size, and 2-ns pulse length. As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense ion beams can deliver precise and uniform beam energy deposition, in a relatively large sample size, and can heat any solid-phase target material. The range of the beams in solid targets is less than 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using reduced density porous targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial experiments will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  17. Warm Dense Matter Experiments Driven by Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.

    2009-11-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. We present results from warm dense matter (WDM) experiments at NDCX-I. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K^+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to a spot size ˜ 1 mm, and compressed pulse length ˜ 2 ns. The uncompressed beam flux is >=500 kW/cm^2, and the compressed pulse flux is > 5 MW/cm^2. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. Future plans include construction of the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-4 MeV lithium ion beam. We have developed a target chamber and target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, and high-speed gated cameras. We compare measurements of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters with model predictions. Continued improvements in beam tuning, bunch compression, and other upgrades are expected to yield higher flux on target.

  18. Optical diagnostic of warm dense matter at NDCXI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Pavel; Bieniosek, Frank; Barnard, John; Henestroza, Enrique; Lidia, Steve; More, Dick

    2010-11-01

    This work is related to recently warm dense matter experiments at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) accelerator, which delivers a 30-mA, 350-keV K^+ ion beam. Using the recently-developed technique of neutralized drift compression, the beam is simultaneously compressed longitudinally by a factor of 50, and focused transversely down to a 1 mm spot. The beam pulse is used to pulse heat various target materials, including Al, W, C, Pt and Si, above 3000 K driving samples into two-phase, liquid-vapor states. The next generation accelerator, NDCX-II, is being built and scheduled to be accomplished in 2012. This new machine will, utilize 2 MeV Li+ ions, to heat 2 micrometer thick metal targets up to 1,5 eV in 0.5 ns. This will allow us investigate near critical points properties of matter. The talk will focus on diagnostics aspects of WDM at NDCX. The fielded diagnostics include a specially developed three-channel optical pyrometer which probes color temperatures of the target at 750 nm, 1000 nm and 1500 nm, with 75 ps temporal resolution. Continuous target emission from 450 nm to 850 nm is recorded by a custom spectrometer, consisting of a high dynamic range Hamamatsu streak camera and a holographic grating. Free expansion of the sample is measured by a VISAR. Future diagnostics for the NDX-II user facility will be also discussed.

  19. Extreme temperature robust optical sensor designs and fault-tolerant signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

    2012-01-17

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) probe designs for extreme temperature and pressure sensing uses a single crystal SiC optical chip encased in a sintered SiC material probe. The SiC chip may be protected for high temperature only use or exposed for both temperature and pressure sensing. Hybrid signal processing techniques allow fault-tolerant extreme temperature sensing. Wavelength peak-to-peak (or null-to-null) collective spectrum spread measurement to detect wavelength peak/null shift measurement forms a coarse-fine temperature measurement using broadband spectrum monitoring. The SiC probe frontend acts as a stable emissivity Black-body radiator and monitoring the shift in radiation spectrum enables a pyrometer. This application combines all-SiC pyrometry with thick SiC etalon laser interferometry within a free-spectral range to form a coarse-fine temperature measurement sensor. RF notch filtering techniques improve the sensitivity of the temperature measurement where fine spectral shift or spectrum measurements are needed to deduce temperature.

  20. Research methods of plasma stream interaction with heat-resistant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Sargsyan, M. A.; Chinnov, V. F.; Demirov, N. A.; Kavyrshin, D. I.; Ageev, A. G.; Khromov, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    An experimental automated system was designed and constructed for studying the parameters and characteristics of non-stationary interacting system high-enthalpy-plasma stream-investigated sample: enthalpy of plasma in the incident stream; speed and temperature of plasma stream; temperature of electrons and heavy particles, ionic composition and their spatial distribution; heat flux incident on the sample (kW/cm2); surface temperature of the sample; ablation of the sample material, and others. Measurements of achievable plasma heat flux levels are carried out by calorimetry of plasma streams incident on the surface of multisection copper calorimeter. Determination of acceleration characteristics for profiled plasma torch nozzle, as well as the gas flow rate is produced by measuring the total pressure using the Pitot tube. Video visualization of interacting system is carried out using synchronized high-speed cameras. Micropyrometry of the selected zone on the sample surface is carried out by high-speed, three-wavelength pyrometer. To measure the rate of mass loss of the sample, in addition to the weighing method of evaluation the methods of laser knife and two-position stereoscopy are used. Plasma and sample emission characteristics are performed with two separate spectrometers.

  1. Multichannel emission spectrometer for high dynamic range optical pyrometry of shock-driven materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2016-10-01

    An emission spectrometer (450-850 nm) using a high-throughput, high numerical aperture (N.A. = 0.3) prism spectrograph with stepped fiberoptic coupling, 32 fast photomultipliers and thirty-two 1.25 GHz digitizers is described. The spectrometer can capture single-shot events with a high dynamic range in amplitude and time (nanoseconds to milliseconds or longer). Methods to calibrate the spectrometer and verify its performance and accuracy are described. When a reference thermal source is used for calibration, the spectrometer can function as a fast optical pyrometer. Applications of the spectrometer are illustrated by using it to capture single-shot emission transients from energetic materials or reactive materials initiated by kmṡs-1 impacts with laser-driven flyer plates. A log (time) data analysis method is used to visualize multiple kinetic processes resulting from impact initiation of HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) or a Zr/CuO nanolaminate thermite. Using a gray body algorithm to interpret the spectral radiance from shocked HMX, a time history of temperature and emissivity was obtained, which could be used to investigate HMX hot spot dynamics. Finally, two examples are presented showing how the spectrometer can avoid temperature determination errors in systems where thermal emission is accompanied by atomic or molecular emission lines.

  2. Mexican national pyronometer network calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAldes, M.; Villarreal, L.; Estevez, H.; Riveros, D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to take advantage of the solar radiation as an alternate energy source it is necessary to evaluate the spatial and temporal availability. The Mexican National Meterological Service (SMN) has a network with 136 meteorological stations, each coupled with a pyronometer for measuring the global solar radiation. Some of these stations had not been calibrated in several years. The Mexican Department of Energy (SENER) in order to count on a reliable evaluation of the solar resource funded this project to calibrate the SMN pyrometer network and validate the data. The calibration of the 136 pyronometers by the intercomparison method recommended by the World Meterological Organization (WMO) requires lengthy observations and specific environmental conditions such as clear skies and a stable atmosphere, circumstances that determine the site and season of the calibration. The Solar Radiation Section of the Instituto de Geofísica of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México is a Regional Center of the WMO and is certified to carry out the calibration procedures and emit certificates. We are responsible for the recalibration of the pyronometer network of the SMN. A continuous emission solar simulator with exposed areas with 30cm diameters was acquired to reduce the calibration time and not depend on atmospheric conditions. We present the results of the calibration of 10 thermopile pyronometers and one photovoltaic cell by the intercomparison method with more than 10000 observations each and those obtained with the solar simulator.

  3. Electrical conductivity and Equation of State from Measurements of a Tamped Electrically Exploded Foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruden, Edward; Amdahl, David; Cooksey, Rufus; Domonkos, Matthew; Robinson, Paul; Analla, Francis; Brown, Darwin; Kostora, Mark; Camacho, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Results are presented for an experiment that produces and diagnoses dynamic surface conditions of homogeneous warm dense matter (WDM) to infer intrinsic bulk properties such as density, pressure, temperature, specific energy, electrical conductivity, and emissivity in the ranges of up to few eV and down to 0.1 solid density-typical of those encountered in single shot pulsed power device electrodes. The goal is to validate ab initio models of matter encountered for predictive modeling of such devices. In the test whose results are presented here, the WDM is produced by Ohmically heating and exploding an 80 μm Al foil placed between two fused quartz tampers by the discharge of a 36 μF capacitor bank charged to 30.1 kV and discharged in 2.55 μs to a peak load current of 460 kA. Measurements are presented from two division of amplitude polarimeters which operate at 532 nm and 1064 nm, a complementary pyrometer which measures the spectral radiance ratio at those wavelengths, a long-range 660 nm photonic Doppler velocimeter, and a B-dot probe array from which the aforementioned intrinsic properties may be inferred. Available results are compared to a 3-D MHD ALEGRA simulation of the full dynamic load and return conductor geometry with a two-loop external coupled circuit.

  4. Equation of state of fluid helium at high temperatures and densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI; Lingcang; CHEN; Qifeng; GU; Yunjun; ZHANG; Ying; ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Hugoniot curves and shock temperatures of gas helium with initial temperature 293 K and three initial pressures 0.6, 1.2, and 5.0 Mpa were measured up to 15000 K using a two-stage light-gas gun and transient radiation pyrometer. It was found that the calculated Hugoniot EOS of gas helium at the same initial pressure using Saha equation with Debye-Hückel correction was in good agreement with the experimental data. The curve of the calculated shock wave velocity with the particle velocity of gas helium which is shocked from the initial pressure 5 Mpa and temperature 293 K, I.e., the D~u relation, D = C0+λu (u < 10 km/s, λ = 1.32) in a low pressure region, is approximately parallel with the fitted D~u (λ = 1.36) of liquid helium from the experimental data of Nellis et al. Our calculations show that the Hugoniot parameterλis independent of the initial density ρ0. The D~u curves of gas helium will transfer to another one and approach a limiting value of compression when their temperature elevates to about 18000 K and the ionization degree of the shocked gas helium reaches 10-3.

  5. Advanced bearing materials for cryogenic aerospace engine turbopump requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, G.; Bhat, B. N.

    1986-01-01

    The properties of eleven alloys were investigated to select an improved bearing material for the High Pressure Oxygen Turbo Pump which delivers liquid oxygen to the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The alloys, selected through detailed literature analysis, X 405, MRC-2001, T440V, 14-4/6V, D-5, V-M Pyromet 350, Stellite 3, FerroTic CS-40, Tribaloy 800, WD-65, and CBS-600. The alloys were tested in hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness tests, and their performance was compared with the baseline 440C test alloy. As a result, five alloys were eliminated, leaving the remaining six (X 405, MRC-2001, T440V, 14-4/6V, D-5, and WD-65 to be evaluated in the next phase of NASA tests which will include fracture toughness, rolling contact fatigue, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance. From these, three alloys will be selected, which will be made into ninety bearings for subsequent testing.

  6. Thermophysical Properties of Five Industrial Steels in the Solid and Liquid Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilthan, B.; Schützenhöfer, W.; Pottlacher, G.

    2017-07-01

    The need for characterization of thermophysical properties of steel was addressed in the FFG-Bridge Project 810999 in cooperation with our partner from industry, Böhler Edelstahl GmbH & Co KG. To optimize numerical simulations of production processes such as plastic deformation or remelting, additional and more accurate thermophysical property data were necessary for the group of steels under investigation. With the fast ohmic pulse heating circuit system and a commercial high-temperature Differential Scanning Calorimeter at Graz University of Technology, we were able to measure the temperature-dependent specific electrical resistivity and specific enthalpy for a set of five high alloyed steels: E105, M314, M315, P800, and V320 from room temperature up into the liquid phase. The mechanical properties of those steels make sample preparation an additional challenge. The described experimental approach typically uses electrically conducting wire-shaped specimen with a melting point high enough for the implemented pyrometric temperature measurement. The samples investigated here are too brittle to be drawn as wires and could only be cut into rectangular specimen by Electrical Discharge Machining. Even for those samples all electrical signals and the temperature signal can be recorded with proper alignment of the pyrometer. For each material under investigation, a set of data including chemical composition, solidus and liquidus temperature, enthalpy, electrical resistivity, and thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature will be reported.

  7. First experiment on LMJ facility: pointing and synchronisation qualification, sequences qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Olivier; Bretheau, Dominique; Luttmann, Michel; Graillot, Herve; Ferri, Michel; Seguineau, Frederic; Bar, Emmanuel; Patissou, Loic; Canal, Phillipe; Sautarel, Françoise; Tranquille Marques, Yves; Raffestin, Didier

    2016-10-01

    The LMJ (Laser mega Joule) facility at the CESTA site (Aquitaine, France) is a tool designed to deliver up to 1.2 MJ at 351 nm for plasma experiments. The experiment system will include 11 diagnostics: UV and X energy balances, imagers (Streak and stripe camera, CCD), spectrometers, and a Visar/pyrometer. The facility must be able to deliver, within the hour following the shot, all the results of the plasma diagnostics, alignment images and laser diagnostic measurements. These results have to be guaranteed in terms of conformity to the request and quality of measurement. The end of 2014 was devoted to the qualification of system pointing on target and synchronization within and between beams. The shots made with one chain (divided in 2 quads - 8 laser beams) have achieved 50 µm of misalignment accuracy (chain and quad channel) and a synchronization accuracy in the order of 50 ps. The performances achieved for plasma diagnostic (in the order of less 100 µm of alignment and timing accuracy less than 150 ps) comply with expectations. At the same time the first automatic sequences were tested. They allowed a shot on target every 6h:30 and in some case twice a day by reducing preparation actions, leading to a sequence of 4h:00. These shooting sequences are managed by an operating team of 7 people helped by 3 people for security aspects.

  8. Color camera pyrometry for high explosive detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, John; Biss, Matthew; Homan, Barrie; McNesby, Kevin

    2011-06-01

    Temperature measurements of high-explosive and combustion processes are difficult because of the speed and environment of the events. We have characterized and calibrated a digital high-speed color camera that may be used as an optical pyrometer to overcome these challenges. The camera provides both high temporal and spatial resolution. The color filter array of the sensor uses three color filters to measure the spectral distribution of the imaged light. A two-color ratio method is used to calculate a temperature using the color filter array raw image data and a gray-body assumption. If the raw image data is not available, temperatures may be calculated from processed images or movies depending on proper analysis of the digital color imaging pipeline. We analyze three transformations within the pipeline (demosaicing, white balance, and gamma-correction) to determine their effect on the calculated temperature. Using this technique with a Vision Research Phantom color camera, we have measured the temperature of exploded C-4 charges. The surface temperature of the resulting fireball rapidly increases after detonation and then decayed to a constant value of approximately 1980 K. Processed images indicates that the temperature remains constant until the light intensity decreased below the background value.

  9. Thermal Diffusivity of Sintered Steels with Flash Method at Ambient Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchini, G. F.; Bovesecchi, G.; Coppa, P.; Corasaniti, S.; Montanari, R.; Varone, A.

    2016-04-01

    Due to lack of reliable thermal diffusivity data of sintered steels in literature, experimental investigations were conducted on samples made of different powder types (based on prealloyed, or diffusion-bonded, or admixed powders) and under different process conditions. So the influence of pressing pressure and sintering temperature on thermal diffusivity was established. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the "flash method": a sample in the shape of a slab is irradiated with a light pulse on one of the two surfaces, and temperature of the other surface is detected by an ambient temperature pyrometer. The value of the thermal diffusivity is obtained by a least squares regression on the entire trend of the temperature vs. time using the analytical solution of the heat conduction as regression model. Results show the increase of the thermal diffusivity with increasing density. This outcome can be explained from the mutual effect of thermal conductivity and density on thermal diffusivity in porous media. The experimental results have also permitted to verify the influence of the composition of the sintered materials and carbon contents on thermal diffusivity.

  10. Dew condensation on desert beetle skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadarrama-Cetina, J; Mongruel, A; Medici, M-G; Baquero, E; Parker, A R; Milimouk-Melnytchuk, I; González-Viñas, W; Beysens, D

    2014-11-01

    Some tenebrionind beetles inhabiting the Namib desert are known for using their body to collect water droplets from wind-blown fogs. We aim to determine whether dew water collection is also possible for desert insects. For this purpose, we investigated the infra-red emissivity, and the wetting and structural properties, of the surface of the elytra of a preserved specimen of Physasterna cribripes (Tenebrionidæ) beetle, where the macro-structure appears as a series of "bumps", with "valleys" between them. Dew formation experiments were carried out in a condensation chamber. The surface properties (infra-red emissivity, wetting properties) were dominated by the wax at the elytra surface and, to a lower extent, its micro-structure. We performed scanning electron microscope on histological sections and determined the infra-red emissivity using a scanning pyrometer. The emissivity measured (0.95±0.07 between 8-14 μm) was close to the black body value. Dew formation occurred on the insect's elytra, which can be explained by these surface properties. From the surface coverage of the condensed drops it was found that dew forms primarily in the valleys between the bumps. The difference in droplet nucleation rate between bumps and valleys can be attributed to the hexagonal microstructure on the surface of the valleys, whereas the surface of the bumps is smooth. The drops can slide when they reach a critical size, and be collected at the insect's mouth.

  11. Test and Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2017-01-01

    Asbestos free solid motor internal insulation samples were tested at the MSFC Hyperthermal Facility. Objectives of the test were to gather data for analog characterization of ablative and in-depth thermal performance of rubber materials subject to high enthalpy/pressure flow conditions. Tests were conducted over a range of convective heat fluxes for both inert and chemically reactive sub-sonic free stream gas flow. Instrumentation included use of total calorimeters, thermocouples, and a surface pyrometer for surface temperature measurement. Post-test sample forensics involved measurement of eroded depth, charred depth, total sample weight loss, and documentation of the general condition of the eroded profile. A complete Charring Material Ablator (CMA) style aero-thermal analysis was conducted for the test matrix and results compared to the measured data. In general, comparisons were possible for a number of the cases and the results show a limited predictive ability to model accurately both the ablative response and the in-depth temperature profiles. Lessons learned and modeling recommendations are made regarding future testing and modeling improvements that will increase understanding of the basic chemistry/physics associated with the complicated material ablation process of rubber materials.

  12. Arc Jet Test and Analysis of Asbestos Free Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Dome Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2017-01-01

    Asbestos free solid motor internal insulation samples were recently tested at the MSFC Hyperthermal Arc Jet Facility. Objectives of the test were to gather data for solid rocket motor analog characterization of ablative and in-depth thermal performance of rubber materials subject to high enthalpy/pressure flow conditions. Tests were conducted over a range of convective heat fluxes for both inert and chemically reactive sub-sonic free stream gas flow. Active instrumentation included use of total calorimeters, in-depth thermocouples, and a surface pyrometer for in-situ surface temperature measurement. Post-test sample forensics involved determination of eroded depth, charred depth, total sample weight loss, and documentation of the general condition of the eroded profile. A complete Charring Material Ablator (CMA) style aero thermal analysis was conducted for the test matrix and results compared to the measured data. In general, comparisons were possible for a number of the cases and the results show a limited predictive ability to model accurately both the ablative response and the in-depth temperature profiles. Lessons learned and modeling recommendations are made regarding future testing and modeling improvements that will increase understanding of the basic chemistry/physics associated with the complicated material ablation process of rubber materials.

  13. A Comparative CFD Study on Simulating Flameless Oxy-Fuel Combustion in a Pilot-Scale Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mersedeh Ghadamgahi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study presents a method to model the flameless oxy-fuel system, with a comparative approach, as well as validation of the predictions. The validation has been done by comparing the predicted results with previously published experimental results from a 200 kW pilot furnace. A suction pyrometer has been used to measure the local temperature and concentrations of CO, CO2, and O2 at 24 different locations. A three-dimensional CFD model was developed and the validity of using different submodels describing turbulence and chemical reactions was evaluated. The standard k-ε model was compared with the realizable k-ε model for turbulence, while Probability Density Function (PDF with either chemical equilibrium or the Steady Laminar Flamelet Model (SLFM was evaluated for combustion. Radiation was described using a Discrete Ordinates Model (DOM with weighted-sum-of-grey-gases model (WSGGM. The smallest deviation between predictions and experiments for temperature (1.2% was found using the realizable k-ε model and the SLFM. This improvement affects the prediction of gaseous species as well since the deviation between predictions and experiments for CO2 volume percentages decreased from 6% to 1.5%. This provides a recommendation for model selections in further studies on flameless oxy-fuel combustion.

  14. Strategies for in situ laser heating in the diamond anvil cell at an X-ray diffraction beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitgirard, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.petitgirard@uni-bayreuth.de [ID27, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bayerisches GeoInstitut (BGI), University of Bayreuth, 95444 Bayreuth (Germany); Salamat, Ashkan, E-mail: sylvain.petitgirard@uni-bayreuth.de [ID27, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Beck, Pierre [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d’Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), 414 rue de la Piscine, 38000 Grenoble (France); Weck, Gunnar [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), DPTA, 91680 Bruyères le Châtel (France); Bouvier, Pierre [Laboratoire des Materiaux et du Genie Physique, CNRS, Grenoble Institute of Technology, 3 parvis Louis Neel, F-38016 Grenoble (France)

    2013-11-08

    An overview of several innovations regarding in situ laser-heating techniques in the diamond anvil cell at the high-pressure beamline ID27 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility is presented. An overview of several innovations regarding in situ laser-heating techniques in the diamond anvil cell at the high-pressure beamline ID27 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility is presented. Pyrometry measurements have been adapted to allow simultaneous double-sided temperature measurements with the installation of two additional online laser systems: a CO{sub 2} and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. This reiteration of laser-heating advancements at ID27 is designed to pave the way for a new generation of state-of-the-art experiments that demand the need for synchrotron diffraction techniques. Experimental examples are provided for each major development. The capabilities of the double pyrometer have been tested with the Nd:YAG continuous-wave lasers but also in a time-resolved configuration using the nanosecond-pulsed Nd:YAG laser on a Fe sample up to 180 GPa and 2900 K. The combination of time-resolved X-ray diffraction with in situ CO{sub 2} laser heating is shown with the crystallization of a high-pressure phase of the naturally found pyrite mineral MnS{sub 2} (11 GPa, 1100–1650 K)

  15. Flexibility of a 300 MW Arch Firing Boiler Burning Low Quality Coals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Experimental investigations on the flexibility of a 300 MW Arch Firing (AF) coal-fired boiler when burning low quality coals is reported.Measurements of gas temperature and species concentration and char sampling using a water-cooled suction pyrometer were carried out along the furnace elevation.The carbon content and the size distributions of the char samples were obtained.The char morphology was examined using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM).The char sampling was performed on this type of boiler for the first time.The results indicate that the flexibility of this boiler burning low quality coals under a moderate boiler load is better than its flexibility under a high boiler load.Because of the insufficient capacity of the coal pulverizers used, in case of low coal quality the pulverized coal fineness will drastically decrease under high boiler loads.This causes an increase in the loss due to incomplete mechanical and chemical combustion.This is the main cause of a low burnout degree of the pulverized coal and the decrease of the flexibility of this AF boiler under a high boiler load.

  16. Design, calibration and error analysis of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Tree, D. R.; Dewitt, D. P.; Wahiduzzaman, S. A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the methodology and uncertainty analyses of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines. Results are presented for determining the local wall heat flux in an internal combustion engine (using a surface thermocouple-type heat flux gage) and the apparent flame-temperature and soot volume fraction path length product in a diesel engine (using two-color pyrometry). It is shown that a surface thermocouple heat transfer gage suitably constructed and calibrated will have an accuracy of 5 to 10 percent. It is also shown that, when applying two-color pyrometry to measure the apparent flame temperature and soot volume fraction-path length, it is important to choose at least one of the two wavelengths to lie in the range of 1.3 to 2.3 micrometers. Carefully calibrated two-color pyrometer can ensure that random errors in the apparent flame temperature and in the soot volume fraction path length will remain small (within about 1 percent and 10-percent, respectively).

  17. Directional spectral emissivity measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, Nesim (Inventor); Pandey, Dhirendra K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus and process for determining the emissivity of a test specimen including an integrated sphere having two concentric walls with a coolant circulating therebetween, and disposed within a chamber which may be under ambient, vacuum or inert gas conditions. A reference sample is disposed within the sphere with a monochromatic light source in optical alignment therewith. A pyrometer is in optical alignment with the test sample for obtaining continuous test sample temperature measurements during a test. An arcuate slit port is provided through the spaced concentric walls of the integrating sphere with a movable monochromatic light source extending through and movable along the arcuate slit port. A detector system extends through the integrating sphere for continuously detecting an integrated signal indicative of all radiation within its field of view, as a function of the emissivity of the test specimen at various temperatures and various angle position of the monochromatic light source. A furnace for heating the test sample to approximately 3000 K. and control mechanism for transferring the heated sample from the furnace to the test sample port in the integrating sphere is also contained within the chamber.

  18. Thermodynamic Modeling of Ag-Ni System Combining Experiments and Molecular Dynamic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, V. B.; Chen, Sinn-wen

    2017-04-01

    Ag-Ni is a simple and important system with immiscible liquids and (Ag,Ni) phases. Previously, this system has been thermodynamically modeled utilizing certain thermochemical and phase equilibria information based on conjecture. An attempt is made in this study to determine the missing information which are difficult to measure experimentally. The boundaries of the liquid miscibility gap at high temperatures are determined using a pyrometer. The temperature of the liquid ⇌ (Ag) + (Ni) eutectic reaction is measured using differential thermal analysis. Tie-lines of the Ag-Ni system at 1023 K and 1473 K are measured using a conventional metallurgical method. The enthalpy of mixing of the liquid at 1773 K and the (Ag,Ni) at 973 K is calculated by molecular dynamics simulation using a large-scale atomic/molecular massively parallel simulator. These results along with literature information are used to model the Gibbs energy of the liquid and (Ag,Ni) by a calculation of phase diagrams approach, and the Ag-Ni phase diagram is then calculated.

  19. Vessel thermal map real-time system for the JET tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Alves

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The installation of international thermonuclear experimental reactor-relevant materials for the plasma facing components (PFCs in the Joint European Torus (JET is expected to have a strong impact on the operation and protection of the experiment. In particular, the use of all-beryllium tiles, which deteriorate at a substantially lower temperature than the formerly installed carbon fiber composite tiles, imposes strict thermal restrictions on the PFCs during operation. Prompt and precise responses are therefore required whenever anomalous temperatures are detected. The new vessel thermal map real-time application collects the temperature measurements provided by dedicated pyrometers and infrared cameras, groups them according to spatial location and probable offending heat source, and raises alarms that will trigger appropriate protective responses. In the context of the JET global scheme for the protection of the new wall, the system is required to run on a 10 ms cycle communicating with other systems through the real-time data network. In order to meet these requirements a commercial off-the-shelf solution has been adopted based on standard x86 multicore technology. Linux and the multithreaded application real-time executor (MARTe software framework were respectively the operating system of choice and the real-time framework used to build the application. This paper presents an overview of the system with particular technical focus on the configuration of its real-time capability and the benefits of the modular development approach and advanced tools provided by the MARTe framework.

  20. A study of SiC decomposition under laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelmann, B.; Hellmann, R.

    2017-06-01

    In this experimental study we investigate the laser induced thermal decomposition of 4H-Sic under ambient conditions using fiber laser. Using a unique two-color pyrometer setup, we measure the temporal evolution of the temperature in the irradiated zone and determine the decomposition rate for various laser power levels. We find that the temporal evolution of the temperature in the irradiated area exhibits an initial heating phase up to about 1300 K, being characterized by an unaffected SiC surface. Upon an expeditious temperature increase, a decomposition phase follows with temperatures above 1700 K, being accompanied by carbonization of the SiC surface. The decomposed volume depends linearly on the duration of the decomposition phase and increases linearly with laser power. The temperature evaluation of the decomposition speed reveals an Arrhenius-type behavior allowing the calculation of the activation energy for the decomposition under ambient conditions to 613 kJ/mol in the temperature range between 2140 and 2420 K.

  1. Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablators (PICA) as Thermal Protection Systems for Discovery Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huy K.; Johnson, Christine E.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Hui, Frank C. L.; Hsu, Ming-Ta; Chen, Timothy; Chen, Y. K.; Paragas, Daniel; Kobayashi, Loreen

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the development of the light weight Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablators (PICA) and its thermal performance in a simulated heating environment for planetary entry vehicles. The PICA material was developed as a member of the Light Weight Ceramic Ablators (LCA's), and the manufacturing process of this material has since been significantly improved. The density of PICA material ranges from 14 to 20 lbm/ft(exp 3), having uniform resin distribution with and without a densified top surface. The thermal performance of PICA was evaluated in the Ames arc-jet facility at cold wall heat fluxes from 375 to 2,960 BtU/ft(exp 2)-s and surface pressures of 0.1 to 0.43 atm. Heat loads used in these tests varied from 5,500 to 29,600 BtU/ft(exp 2) and are representative of the entry conditions of the proposed Discovery Class Missions. Surface and in-depth temperatures were measured using optical pyrometers and thermocouples. Surface recession was also measured by using a template and a height gage. The ablation characteristics and efficiency of PICA are quantified by using the effective heat of ablation, and the thermal penetration response is evaluated from the thermal soak data. In addition, a comparison of thermal performance of standard and surface densified PICA is also discussed.

  2. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. K. R.; Tamalonis, A.; Benmore, C. J.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Sendelbach, S.; Hebden, A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.

  3. Online temperature measurement and flow analysis of hot dross in a steel plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Helmut; Sidla, Oliver

    2005-11-01

    Continuous monitoring and control of process temperature(s) is one of the cornerstones in high quality steel making. Given the very high temperatures in the liquid phase of the steel and the slag on top of the steel (approx. 1500 °C...1800 °C) and the particularly harsh environment at the manufacturing plant, only very few temperature sensors are able to cope with the process requirements, in particular a wide variety of thermocouple probes and pyrometers are commonly used. More recently thermography infrared cameras have begun to enter the scenario but are often discarded as an option mainly because of their high cost. In the high temperature range as described above a dual wavelength camera solution working in the visible part of the spectrum offers a viable alternative1. At a fraction of the cost such a system can deliver images of high spatial resolution while at the same time measuring temperature with an accuracy of better than 5 °C. The thermal camera approach is particularly beneficial in the present case where important process information can be deducted from quantitative observation of the flow patterns of the molten material which could until now only be estimated by a trained operator with all the drawbacks inherent to such an approach. The thermal camera solution thus offers a clear technological advantage for the steel manufacturer.

  4. Measurements of the equations of state and spectrum of nonideal xenon plasma under shock compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Z Y; Chen, Q F

    2010-08-01

    Experimental equations of state on generation of nonideal xenon plasma by intense shock wave compression was presented in the ranges of pressure of 2-16 GPa and temperature of 31-50 kK, and the xenon plasma with the nonideal coupling parameter Γ range from 0.6-2.1 was generated. The shock wave was produced using the flyer plate impact and accelerated up to ∼6 km/s with a two-stage light gas gun. Gaseous specimens were shocked from two initial pressures of 0.80 and 4.72 MPa at room temperature. Time-resolved spectral radiation histories were recorded by using a multiwavelength channel pyrometer. The transient spectra with the wavelength range of 460-700 nm were recorded by using a spectrometer to evaluate the shock temperature. Shock velocity was measured and particle velocity was determined by the impedance matching methods. The equations of state of xenon plasma and ionization degree have been discussed in terms of the self-consistent fluid variational theory.

  5. Shockwave compression of Ar gas at several initial densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Garcia, Daniel B.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Lang, John M.; Aslam, Tariq D.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Gibson, Lloyd L.; Morris, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental data of the principal Hugoniot locus of variable density gas-phase noble and molecular gases are rare. The majority of shock Hugoniot data is either from shock tube experiments on low-pressure gases or from plate impact experiments on cryogenic, liquefied gases. In both cases, physics regarding shock compressibility, thresholds for the on-set of shock-driven ionization, and even dissociation chemistry are difficult to infer for gases at intermediate densities. We have developed an experimental target design for gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on noble gases at initial pressures between 200-1000 psi. Using optical velocimetry, we are able to directly determine both the shock and particle velocities of the gas on the principal Hugoniot locus, as well as clearly differentiate ionization thresholds. The target design also results in multiply shocking the gas in a quasi-isentropic fashion yielding off-Hugoniot compression data. We describe the results of a series of plate impact experiments on Ar with starting densities between 0.02-0.05 g/cm3 at room temperature. Furthermore, by coupling optical fibers to the targets, we have measured the time-resolved optical emission from the shocked gas using a spectrometer coupled to an optical streak camera to spectrally-resolve the emission, and with a 5-color optical pyrometer for temperature determination.

  6. Plasma deposition of microcrystalline silicon solar cells. Looking beyond the glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donker, M.N. van den

    2006-07-01

    Microcrystalline silicon emerged in the past decade as highly interesting material for application in efficient and stable thin film silicon solar cells. It consists of nanometer-sized crystallites embedded in a micrometer-sized columnar structure, which gradually evolves during the SiH{sub 4} based deposition process starting from an amorphous incubation layer. Understanding of and control over this transient and multi-scale growth process is essential in the route towards low-cost microcrystalline silicon solar cells. This thesis presents an experimental study on the technologically relevant high rate (5-10 Aa s{sup -1}) parallel plate plasma deposition process of state-of-the-art microcrystalline silicon solar cells. The objective of the work was to explore and understand the physical limits of the plasma deposition process as well as to develop diagnostics suitable for process control in eventual solar cell production. Among the developed non-invasive process diagnostics were a pyrometer, an optical spectrometer, a mass spectrometer and a voltage probe. Complete thin film silicon solar cells and modules were deposited and characterized. (orig.)

  7. Distillation of carbonaceous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainscow, J.W.H.

    1936-10-03

    To recover hydrocarbon products by distillation of carbonaceous material in a plurality of horizontal zones maintained at different temperatures, a retort has a plurality of superimposed (3) retort chambers, the uppermost being in communication at one end with a hopper and at the other end through coupled junction not shown with one end of the next lower chamber, whose opposite end communicates with lowermost chamber, the other end of which has a sealed discharge passage, tank, and conveyor not shown. Each retort chamber has stirring and conveying means consisting of helical blades (2) attached to radial arms on shaft mounted in water cooled bearings and driven through suitably mounted sprocket wheels and chains not shown. Each retort chamber has a gas dome, with pyrometer tube, and off-take connected to a common main opening into a dust eliminator which in turn connects with a plurality of vertical condensation towers of known construction, maintained at different temperatures by means of steam from a superheater not shown situated in one retort chamber. The retort heating gases pass from the furnace via zig-zag, (three) baffles under and around each retort chamber to a flue not shown.

  8. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR. PART 10 - PRESENTATION OF THE DECOMMISSIONING DEVICE OPERATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin D. STANESCU,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a solution proposed by the authors in order to achieve of a cutting and extracting device operating panel for the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED is fully automated, connected by wires to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC and controlled from a Human Machine Interface (HMI. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED performs the dismantling, cutting and extraction of the fuel channel components, moving with variable speed, temperature monitoring and video surveillance inside the pipe, unblock and extract the channel closure plug (from End Fitting - EF, unblock and extract the channel shield plug (from Lattice Tube - LT, block and cut the middle of the pressure tube, block and cut the end of the pressure tube, block and extract the half of pressure tube. All operations can be monitored and controlled from a operating panel. The PLC fully command the device in automatic or manually mode, to control the internal sensors, transducers, electrical motors, video surveillance and pyrometers for monitoring cutting place temperature. The device controller has direct access to the measured values with these sensors, interprets and processes them, preparing the next actionafter confirming the action in progress. The design of the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED shall be achieved according to the particular features of the fuel channel components to be dismantled and to ensure radiation protection of workers.

  9. Internal and Surface Phenomena in Heterogenous Metal Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    The phenomenon of gas dissolution in burning metals was observed in recent metal combustion studies, but it could not be adequately explained by the traditional metal combustion models. The research reported here addresses heterogeneous metal combustion with emphasis on the processes of oxygen penetration inside burning metal and its influence on the metal combustion rate, temperature history, and disruptive burning. The unique feature of this work is the combination of the microgravity environment with a novel micro-arc generator of monodispersed metal droplets, ensuring repeatable formation and ignition of uniform metal droplets with a controllable initial temperature and velocity. Burning droplet temperature is measured in real time with a three wavelength pyrometer. In addition, particles are rapidly quenched at different combustion times, cross-sectioned, and examined using SEM-based techniques to retrieve the internal composition history of burning metal particles. When the initial velocity of a spherical particle is nearly zero, the microgravity environment makes it possible to study the flame structure, the development of flame nonsymmetry, and correlation of the flame shape with the heterogeneous combustion processes.

  10. Thermodynamic properties of heavy ion heated refractory metals; Thermodynamische Eigenschaften von schwerionengeheizten hochschmelzenden Metallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, Alexander

    2011-05-04

    Knowledge of basic physical properties of matter in high-energy-density (HED) states such as the equation-of-state (EOS) is of fundamental importance for various branches of basic and applied physics. However, such matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure - also called ''warm dense matter'' (WDM) - can only be generated in dynamic experiments employing the most powerful drivers. At the high temperature experimental area HHT of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany), intense beams of energetic heavy ions are used for this purpose. The aim of this work is to study thermophysical properties of refractory metals in hot solid and liquid states by precise temperature measurements. In order to identify the melting plateau and to limit the maximum target temperature to the region of interest, relatively long (one microsecond) bunches of uranium and xenon ions have been used to heat initially solid samples. The intense ion beams were focused on a millimetre spot at the target in order to achieve uniform conditions. The temperature on the target surface was determined by analysing thermal radiation emitted from a 0.03 mm{sup 2} area at five different wavelengths. In order to obtain the physical temperature, one has to measure not only the thermal radiation but also the emissivity, ε(T,λ) of the target surface which is not known ab initio. For this purpose, a set-up for direct target reflection measurement was designed and embedded into the fast multichannel pyrometer system. The reflection signal provides the necessary information about modifications of the target surface properties during the interaction with the ion beam. Beside the pyrometric and reflection measurement set-ups, various hardware and software components of the data acquisition system for the heavy-ion beam driven experiments were substantially enhanced. The emissivity was also obtained by identifying the melting plateau and using the

  11. Temperature measurements according to directive given by EU regarding combustion of waste. Investigated measurements of temperature and simulations; Maetningar av temperaturer enligt EU:s direktiv om foerbranning av avfall. Undersoekande temperaturmaetningar och simuleringar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Elisabet [AaF-Energi och Miljoe, Stockholm (Sweden); Gaardhagen, Roland; Haegglund, Jonas; Lindqvist, Hans; Wahlstroem, Krister; Loyd, Dan [Linkoepings Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-05-01

    The directive regarding combustion of waste (directive 2000/76/EG 4 of December 2000 about combustion of waste) contains new conditions and enhanced demands on pollution to the air and water from the combustion. To be able to follow the directive, it is of most importance to show that the combustion gases stay at a temperature of 850 deg C during at least 2 seconds. The purpose of this project is to examine whether conventional measurement equipment like thermocouple and suction pyrometer are suitable to examine if the boiler fulfills the demands of the directive. Modeling and simulation of the thermocouple have been done with the program FemLab. An analytical model has been implemented in the program Matlab and the purpose of that is to be able to see if an improved version can be used in automatic control system. The models in their present state will show a certain measurement error at a certain gas temperature, which unfortunately is not the case in the real situation. This is due to circumstances in the boiler that varies with time and place. Measurement has been carried out in two kinds of boilers, fluidized bed and grate boiler. The reason for that is to be able to examine if the measurement error varies in different boilers and to find out if a general method can be used for the error calculations. The measurements indicate difficulties to reach the directive set by EU about combustion of waste; these are due to the nature of the measurement error that arises when measuring with thermocouple. It has been shown that the error varies despite constant gas temperature and that it can vary up to 80 deg C. This variation depends to some extent of the emissivity of the gas because the emissivity varies with the composition of gas and disturbances in the boiler. The conclusions are that the heat flow from the gas to the thermocouple is different even though the temperature in the boiler is constant. The measurements indicate that the error is lesser at lower

  12. Driving Down HB-LED Costs. Implementation of Process Simulation Tools and Temperature Control Methods of High Yield MOCVD Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, William [Veeco Process Equipment, Inc., Plainview, NY (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The overall objective of this multi-faceted program is to develop epitaxial growth systems that meet a goal of 75% (4X) cost reduction in the epitaxy phase of HB-LED manufacture. A 75% reduction in yielded epitaxy cost is necessary in order to achieve the cost goals for widespread penetration of HB-LED's into back-lighting units (BLU) for LCD panels and ultimately for solid-state lighting (SSL). To do this, the program will address significant improvements in overall equipment Cost of Ownership, or CoO. CoO is a model that includes all costs associated with the epitaxy portion of production. These aspects include cost of yield, capital cost, operational costs, and maintenance costs. We divide the program into three phases where later phases will incorporate the gains of prior phases. Phase one activities are enabling technologies. In collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories we develop a Fluent-compatible chemistry predictive model and a set of mid-infrared and near-ultraviolet pyrometer monitoring tools. Where previously the modeling of the reactor dynamics were studied within FLUENT alone, here, FLUENT and Chemkin are integrated into a comprehensive model of fluid dynamics and the most advanced transport equations developed for Chemkin. Specifically, the Chemkin model offered the key reaction terms for gas-phase nucleation, a key consideration in the optimization of the MOCVD process. This new predictive model is used to design new MOCVD reactors with optimized growth conditions and the newly developed pyrometers are used monitor and control the MOCVD process temperature to within 0.5°C run-to-run and within each wafer. This portion of the grant is in collaboration with partners at Sandia National Laboratories. Phase two activities are continuous improvement projects which extend the current reactor platform along the lines of improved operational efficiency, improved systems control for throughput, and carrier modifications for increased yield

  13. Plasma diagnosis as a tool for the determination of the parameters of electron beam evaporation and sources of ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Jaya; Dileep Kumar, V.; Yadav, S. P.; Barnwal, Tripti A.; Dikshit, Biswaranjan

    2016-07-01

    The atomic vapor generated by electron beam heating is partially ionized due to atom-atom collisions (Saha ionization) and electron impact ionization, which depend upon the source temperature and area of evaporation as compared to the area of electron beam bombardment on the target. When electron beam evaporation is carried out by inserting the target inside an insulating liner to reduce conductive heat loss, it is expected that the area of evaporation becomes significantly more than the area of electron beam bombardment on the target, resulting in reduced electron impact ionization. To assess this effect and to quantify the parameters of evaporation, such as temperature and area of evaporation, we have carried out experiments using zirconium, tin and aluminum as a target. By measuring the ion content using a Langmuir probe, in addition to measuring the atomic vapor flux at a specific height, and by combining the experimental data with theoretical expressions, we have established a method for simultaneously inferring the source temperature, evaporation area and ion fraction. This assumes significance because the temperature cannot be reliably measured by an optical pyrometer due to the wavelength dependent source emissivity and reflectivity of thin film mirrors. In addition, it also cannot be inferred from only the atomic flux data at a certain height as the area of evaporation is unknown (it can be much more than the area of electron bombardment, especially when the target is placed in a liner). Finally, the reason for the lower observed electron temperatures of the plasma for all the three cases is found to be the energy loss due to electron impact excitation of the atomic vapor during its expansion from the source.

  14. Particle behavior and char burnout mechanisms under pressurized combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C.M.; Spliethoff, H.; Hein, K.R.G.

    1999-07-01

    Combined cycle systems with coal-fired gas turbines promise highest cycle efficiencies for this fuel. Pressurized pulverized coal combustion, in particular, yields high cycle efficiencies due to the high flue gas temperatures possible. The main problem, however, is to ensure a flue gas clean enough to meet the high gas turbine standards with a dirty fuel like coal. On the one hand, a profound knowledge of the basic chemical and physical processes during fuel conversion under elevated pressures is required whereas on the other hand suitable hot gas cleaning systems need to be developed. The objective of this work was to provide experimental data to enable a detailed description of pressurized coal combustion processes. A series of experiments were performed with two German hvb coals, Ensdorf and Goettelborn, and one German brown coal, Garzweiler, using a semi-technical scale pressurized entrained flow reactor. The parameters varied in the experiments were pressure, gas temperature and bulk gas oxygen concentration. A two-color pyrometer was used for in-situ determination of particle surface temperatures and particle sizes. Flue gas composition was measured and solid residue samples taken and subsequently analyzed. The char burnout reaction rates were determinated varying the parameters pressure, gas temperature and initial oxygen concentration. Variation of residence time was achieved by taking the samples at different points along the reaction zone. The most influential parameters on char burnout reaction rates were found to be oxygen partial pressure and fuel volatile content. With increasing pressure the burn-out reactions are accelerated and are mostly controlled by product desorption and pore diffusion being the limiting processes. The char burnout process is enhanced by a higher fuel volatile content.

  15. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THECANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR. PART 11 - PRESENTATION OF THE CUTTING AND EXTRACTING DEVICE OPERATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin D. STANESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a constructive solution proposed by the authors in order to achieve of a cutting and extracting device for the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED performs the dismantling, cutting and extraction of the fuel channel components. It's a flexible and modular device, which is designed to work inside the fuel channel and has the following functions: moving with variable speed, temperature monitoring and video surveillance inside the pipe, unblock and extract the channel closure plug (from End Fitting - EF, unblock and extract the channel shield plug (from Lattice Tube - LT, block and cut the middle of the pressure tube, block and cut the end of the pressure tube, block and extract the half of pressure tube. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED consists of following modules: guiding-fixing module, traction modules, cutting module, guiding-extracting module and flexible elements for modules connecting. The guiding-fixing module is equipped with elastic guiding rollers and fixing claws in working position, the traction modules are provided with variable pitch rollers for allowing variable travel speed through the fuel channel. The cutting module is positioned in the middle of the device and it is equipped with three knife rolls for pressure tube cutting, using a system for cutting place video surveillance and pyrometers for monitoring cutting place temperature. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED is fully automated, connected by wires to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC and controlled from a Human Machine Interface (HMI. The design of the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED shall be achieved according to the particular features of the fuel channel components to be dismantled and to ensure radiation protection of workers.

  16. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THECANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR. PART 8 - PRESENTATION OF THE CUTTING AND EXTRACTING DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin POPESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper present a constructive solution proposed by the authors in order to achieve of a cutting and extracting device for the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. One of the most important part of the decommissioning device is the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED which perform the dismantling, cutting and extraction of the fuel channel components. This flexible and modular device is designed to work inside the fuel channel. The main operations performed by the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED are dismantling and extraction of the channel closure plug and shield plug, cutting and extraction of the pressure tube. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED consists of following modules: guiding-fixing module, traction modules, cutting module, guiding-extracting module and articulated elements for modules connecting. The guiding-fixing module is equipped with elastic guiding rollers and fixing claws in working position, the traction modules are provided with variable pitch rollers for allowing travel speed change through the fuel channel. The cutting module is positioned in the middle of the device and it is equipped with three roll knives for pressure tube cutting, having a system for cutting place video surveillance and pyrometers for cutting place monitoring temperature. The operations performed by the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED of fuel channel are as follows: unblock and extract the channel closure plug, unblock and extract the channel shield plug, block and cut the middle of the pressure tube, block and cut the end of the pressure tube, block and extract the half of pressure tube. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED is fully automated, connected by wires to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC and controlled from a Human Machine Interface (HMI. The design of the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED shall be achieved according to the particular features of the fuel channel components to be

  17. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR. PART 9 - CUTTING AND EXTRACTING DEVICE FUNCTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin POPESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a constructive solution proposed by the authors in order to achieve of a cutting and extracting device for the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED performs the dismantling, cutting and extraction of the fuel channel components. It's a flexible and modular device, which is designed to work inside the fuel channel and has the following functions: moving with variable speed, temperature monitoring and video surveillance inside the pipe, unblock and extract the channel closure plug (from End Fitting - EF, unblock and extract the channel shield plug (from Lattice Tube - LT, block and cut the middle of the pressure tube, block and cut the end of the pressure tube, block and extract the half of pressure tube. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED consists of following modules: guiding-fixing module, traction modules, cutting module, guiding-extracting module and flexible elements for modules connecting. The guiding-fixing module is equipped with elastic guiding rollers and fixing claws in working position, the traction modules are provided with variable pitch rollers for allowing variable travel speed through the fuel channel. The cutting module is positioned in the middle of the device and it is equipped with three knife rolls for pressure tube cutting, using a system for cutting place video surveillance and pyrometers for monitoring cutting place temperature. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED is fully automated, connected by wires to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC and controlled from a Human Machine Interface (HMI. The design of the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED shall be achieved according to the particular features of the fuel channel components to be dismantled and to ensure radiation protection of workers.

  18. Attachment of Free Filament Thermocouples for Temperature Measurements on CMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Cuy, Michael D.; Wnuk, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) are being developed for use as enabling materials for advanced aeropropulsion engine and high speed civil transport applications. The characterization and testing of these advanced materials in hostile, high-temperature environments require accurate measurement of the material temperatures. Commonly used wire Thermo-Couples (TC) can not be attached to this ceramic based material via conventional spot-welding techniques. Attachment of wire TC's with commercially available ceramic cements fail to provide sufficient adhesion at high temperatures. While advanced thin film TC technology provides minimally intrusive surface temperature measurement and has good adhesion on the CMC, its fabrication requires sophisticated and expensive facilities and is very time consuming. In addition, the durability of lead wire attachments to both thin film TC's and the substrate materials requires further improvement. This paper presents a newly developed attachment technique for installation of free filament wire TC's with a unique convoluted design on ceramic based materials such as CMC's. Three CMC's (SiC/SiC CMC and alumina/alumina CMC) instrumented with type IC, R or S wire TC's were tested in a Mach 0.3 burner rig. The CMC temperatures measured from these wire TC's were compared to that from the facility pyrometer and thin film TC's. There was no sign of TC delamination even after several hours exposure to 1200 C. The test results proved that this new technique can successfully attach wire TC's on CMC's and provide temperature data in hostile environments. The sensor fabrication process is less expensive and requires very little time compared to that of the thin film TC's. The same installation technique/process can also be applied to attach lead wires for thin film sensor systems.

  19. Temperature monitored control system for high-frequency welded pipe and analysis of its influencing factors%高频焊管温度监控系统及其影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何世权; 徐德怀; 樊丁; 徐德茹; 田禾

    2011-01-01

    针对高频焊管生产测量环境恶劣以及依靠经验观察来控制焊接温度的特点,提出高频焊管温度监控系统.该系统利用抗干扰强、测量精度高的比色测温仪采集焊接温度,通过LabVIEW控制高频电源的输出功率,实现温度调整,通过PID控制实现闭环控制.实验证明,监控系统能够准确检测高频焊管的焊接温度,并有效地提高温度的稳定性.最后提出影响高频焊管温度监控系统的因素.%Aimed at the poor measurement and production environment and dependence on empirical observation and control of welding temperature in the production of high-frequency welded pipe, a high-frequency welded pipe temperature monitored control system was proposed. In this system, a colorimetric pyrometer with strong anti-jamming and high measurement precision was used. By using software IabVIEW, the high-frequency power output was controlled to achieve temperature adjustment and closed-loop control. It was verified by test that the system could accurately detect the high-frequency welded pipe temperature, and effectively improve the temperature stability. Finally, the factors that influence the monitore control system of temperature of high-frequency welded pipe were suggested.

  20. Water heat pipe blackbody as a reference spectral radiance source between 50°C and 250°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorma, M.; Mekhontsev, S.; Khromchenko, V.; Litorja, M.; Cagran, C.; Zeng, J.; Hanssen, L.

    2006-04-01

    Realization of a radiometric temperature scale for near ambient temperatures with accuracy at the 20 to 50 mK level is crucial for a number of demanding military and commercial applications. In support of such measurements, radiation sources with high stability and spatial uniformity must be developed as reference and working standards. Traditionally, the temperature scale, maintained at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), relies on water bath and oil bath blackbodies in this temperature range. Recently, a water heat pipe blackbody was used at NIST as a spectral radiance source in a spectral emissivity measurement facility. Now a new, more versatile high emissivity water heat pipe blackbody was designed and characterized to be used as a reference radiance source for the radiometric temperature scale realization between 50 °C and 250 °C. Furthermore, it will serve as a reference source for the infrared spectral radiance measurements between 2.5 μm and 20 μm. The calculated spectral emissivity of the painted copper alloy cavity was verified by reflectance measurements using a CO II laser at 10.6 μm wavelength. The spatial thermal uniformity and stability of the blackbody were characterized. Two independent realizations of the radiometric temperature scale were compared in order to verify the accuracy of the scale. Radiance temperature, calculated from the cavity temperature measured with a calibrated PRT contact thermometer and from the emissivity of the cavity, was compared to the radiance temperature, directly measured with a reference pyrometer, which was calibrated with a set of fixed point blackbodies. The difference was found to be within measurement uncertainties.

  1. Evaporation and Vapor Shielding of CFC Targets Exposed to Plasma Heat Fluxes Relevant to ITER ELMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, TRINITI, Kostromskaya, 12A, 79, RU-142092 Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Landman, I. [FZK-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association Euratom-FZK, Technik und Umwelt, Postfach 3640, D-7602l Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) is foreseen presently as armour material for the divertor target in ITER. During the transient processes such as instabilities of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) the target as anticipated will be exposed to the plasma heat loads of a few MJ/m{sup 2} on the time scale of a fraction of ms, which causes an intense evaporation at the target surface and contaminates tokamak plasma by evaporated carbon. The ITER transient loads are not achievable at existing tokamaks therefore for testing divertor armour materials other facilities, in particular plasma guns are employed. In the present work the CFC targets have been tested for ITER at the plasma gun facility MK- 200 UG in Troitsk by ELM relevant heat fluxes. The targets in the applied magnetic field up to 2 T were irradiated by hydrogen plasma streams of diameter 6 - 8 cm, impact ion energy 2 - 3 keV, pulse duration 0.05 ms and energy density varying in the range 0.05 - 1 MJ/m{sup 2}. Primary attention has been focused on the measurement of evaporation threshold and investigation of carbon vapor properties. Fast infrared pyrometer, optical and VUV spectrometers, framing cameras and plasma calorimeters were applied as diagnostics. The paper reports the results obtained on the evaporation threshold of CFC, the evaporation rate of the carbon fibers oriented parallel and perpendicular to the exposed target surface, the velocity of carbon vapor motion along and across the magnetic field lines, and the parameters of carbon plasma such as temperature, density and ionization state measured up to the distance 15 cm at varying plasma load. First experimental results on investigation of the vapor shield onset conditions are presented also. (authors)

  2. Analysis regarding steam generator furnace's incident heat, temperature and composition of combustion gases; Analisis de calor incidente, temperatura y composicion de gases de combustion en hornos de generadores de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diego Marin, Antonio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    In order to obtain more precise evaluations of the combustion process in the furnace of a steam generator a suction pyrometer has been integrated to measure the temperature of the combustion gases; an ellipsoidal radiometer to measure the incident heat by thermal radiation in the water walls; a water cooled probe to determine the particle concentration, as well as a water cooled probe to determine the composition of the combustion gases present. This document clarifies the form of use of these instruments and their engineering specifications, simultaneously presenting an analysis that considers, unlike others, the internal conditions of the furnace to obtain a more precise evaluation of the efficiency that the combustion process presents and bases for the taking of preventive actions in specific zones of the furnace. Thus, the present work exhibits instruments and techniques of analysis to study the phenomena occurring within a steam generator. [Spanish] Con el fin de obtener evaluaciones mas precisas del proceso de combustion en el horno de un generador de vapor, se ha integrado un pirometro de succion para medir la temperatura de los gases de combustion; un radiometro elipsoidal para medir el calor incidente por radiacion termica en las paredes del agua; una sonda enfriada con agua para determinar la concentracion de particulas, asi como una sonda refrigerada con agua para determinar la composicion de los gases de combustion presentes. Este documento aclara la forma de uso de estos instrumentos y sus especificaciones tecnicas, a la vez que presenta un analisis que considera, a diferencia de otros, las condiciones internas del horno para obtener una evaluacion mas precisa sobre la eficiencia del proceso de combustion y bases para la toma de acciones preventivas en zonas especificas del horno. Asi, el presente trabajo exhibe instrumentos y tecnicas de analisis para estudiar los fenomenos que ocurren dentro de un generador de vapor.

  3. Validation of the Suomi NPP VIIRS Ice Surface Temperature Environmental Data Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghui Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of the surface temperature is critical to understanding and forecasting Arctic climate change; as surface temperature integrates changes in the surface energy budget. The sea-ice surface temperature (IST has been measured with optical and thermal infrared sensors for many years. With the IST Environmental Data Record (EDR available from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP and future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS satellites; we can continue to monitor and investigate Arctic climate change. This work examines the quality of the VIIRS IST EDR. Validation is performed through comparisons with multiple datasets; including NASA IceBridge measurements; air temperature from Arctic drifting ice buoys; Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS IST; MODIS IST simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO; and surface air temperature from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Results show biases of −0.34; −0.12; 0.16; −3.20; and −3.41 K compared to an aircraft-mounted downward-looking pyrometer; MODIS; MODIS SNO; drifting buoy; and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis; respectively; root-mean-square errors of 0.98; 1.02; 0.95; 4.89; and 6.94 K; and root-mean-square errors with the bias removed of 0.92; 1.01; 0.94; 3.70; and 6.04 K. Based on the IceBridge and MODIS results; the VIIRS IST uncertainty (RMSE meets or exceeds the JPSS system requirement of 1.0 K. The product can therefore be considered useful for meteorological and climatological applications.

  4. Laser annealing of textured thin film cathode material for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, R.; Bruns, M.; Smyrek, P.; Ulrich, S.; Przybylski, M.; Pfleging, W.

    2010-02-01

    The material development for advanced lithium ion batteries plays an important role in future mobile applications and energy storage systems. It is assumed that electrode materials made of nano-composited materials will improve battery lifetime and will lead to an enhancement of lithium diffusion and thus improve battery capacity and cyclability. Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) is commonly used as a cathode material. Thin films of this electrode material were synthesized by non-reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering of LiCoO2 targets on silicon or stainless steel substrates. For the formation of the high temperature phase of LiCoO2 (HT-LiCoO2), which exhibits good electrochemical performance with a specific capacity of 140 mAh/g and high capacity retention, a subsequent annealing treatment is necessary. For this purpose laser annealing of thin film LiCoO2 was investigated in detail and compared to conventional furnace annealing. A high power diode laser system operating at a wavelength of 940 nm with an integrated pyrometer for temperature control was used. Different temperatures (between 200°C and 700°C) for the laser structured and unstructured thin films were applied. The effects of laser treatment on the LiCoO2 thin films studied with Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to determine their stoichiometry and crystallinity. The development of HT-LiCoO2 and also the formation of a Co3O4 phase were discussed. The electrochemical properties of the manufactured films were investigated via electrochemical cycling against a lithium anode.

  5. Pressurised coal combustion in a pilot scale facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Prassas, I.; Taylor, A.M.K.P.; Whitelaw, J.H. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1998-12-31

    Flux, velocity and the temperature characteristics of burning coal particles were measured simultaneously in the primary combustion zone of the swirl-stabilised burner of the pilot-scale furnace constructed at Imperial College. The furnace was designed to operate at pressures up to 5 bar and at thermal loadings up to 150 kW, and provision was made for optical access in the near-burner region of the combustor. The combined instrument used a novel technique for the simultaneous measurement of velocity and size, as well as the angle between the trajectory of the particle and an axis of reference, of particles of arbitrary shape, the so-called Shadow Doppler Velocimeter; and a two-colour pyrometer, for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, size and temperature of burning pulverised coal particles. The experiments performed consisted of: measurement of the gaseous phase as a function of the swirl number; measurement of the size, velocity, and temperature of burning coal particles as a function of the swirl number; and measurement of the size and velocity of burning coal particles inside the pressurised coal combustor at atmospheric pressure. The experiments were to evaluate and improve and further develop existing instrumentation with potential to be used in pressurised combustors; provide a database of accurate measurements for the needs of numerical models; and improve the understanding of the fluid mechanics and combustion processes at atmospheric pressures. Results obtained using the optical instrumentation showed that in an open flame, evidence of particle centrifuging existed downstream of the quarl entry. The temperature of volatile flames was about 2250 K and that of the char below 2000 K. Measurements along radial profiles inside the coal combustor showed that the axial and tangential velocity of the particles was almost independent of size. 19 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Thermophysical Properties of a Chromium Nickel Molybdenum Steel in the Solid and Liquid Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilthan, B.; Reschab, H.; Tanzer, R.; Schützenhöfer, W.; Pottlacher, Gernot

    2008-02-01

    Numerical simulation of vacuum arc re-melting, pressurized or protective electro-slag re-melting, and ingot casting have become quite important in the metal industry. However, a major drawback of these simulation techniques is the lack of accurate thermophysical properties for temperatures above 1,500 K. Heat capacity, heat of fusion, density, and thermal conductivity are important input parameters for the heat transfer equation. Since, direct measurements of thermal conductivity of alloys in the liquid state are almost impossible, its estimation from electrical conductivity using the Wiedemann Franz law is very useful. The afore-mentioned thermophysical properties of several steels are investigated within the context of an ongoing project. Here, we present a full set of thermophysical data for the chromium nickel molybdenum steel meeting the standard DIN 1.4435 (X2CrNiMo18-14-3); these values will be used by our partner to simulate various re-melting and solidification processes. Wire-shaped samples of the steel are resistively volume-heated, as part of a fast capacitor discharge circuit. Time-resolved measurements with sub-μs resolution of current through the specimen are performed with a Pearson probe. The voltage drop across the specimen is measured with knife-edge contacts and ohmic voltage dividers, the temperature of the sample with a pyrometer, and the volumetric expansion of the wire with a fast acting CCD camera. These measurements enable the heat of fusion, the heat capacity, and the electrical resistivity to be determined as a function of temperature in the solid and liquid phases. The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are estimated via the Wiedemann Franz law.

  7. Local heat treatment of high strength steels with zoom-optics and 10kW-diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Markus; Krause, Volker; Bergweiler, Georg; Flaischerowitz, Martin; Banik, Janko

    2012-03-01

    High strength steels enable new solutions for weight optimized car bodies without sacrificing crash safety. However, cold forming of these steels is limited due to the need of high press capacity, increased tool wear, and limitations in possible geometries. One can compensate for these drawbacks by local heat treatment of the blanks. In high-deformation areas the strength of the material is reduced and the plasticity is increased by diode laser irradiation. Local heat treatment with diode laser radiation could also yield key benefits for the applicability of press hardened parts. High strength is not desired all over the part. Joint areas or deformation zones for requested crash properties require locally reduced strength. In the research project "LOKWAB" funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), heat treatment of high strength steels was investigated in cooperation with Audi, BMW, Daimler, ThyssenKrupp, Fraunhofer- ILT, -IWU and others. A diode laser with an output power of 10 kW was set up to achieve acceptable process speed. Furthermore a homogenizing zoom-optics was developed, providing a rectangular focus with homogeneous power density. The spot size in x- and y-direction can be changed independently during operation. With pyrometer controlled laser power the surface temperature is kept constant, thus the laser treated zone can be flexibly adapted to the needs. Deep-drawing experiments show significant improvement in formability. With this technique, parts can be manufactured, which can conventionally only be made of steel with lower strength. Locally reduced strength of press hardened serial parts was demonstrated.

  8. In-line process control for laser welding of titanium by high dynamic range ratio pyrometry and plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Baselt, T.; Rudek, F.; Maschke, R.; Basan, F.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    The production of complex titanium components for various industries using laser welding processes has received growing attention in recent years. It is important to know whether the result of the cohesive joint meets the quality requirements of standardization and ultimately the customer requirements. Erroneous weld seams can have fatal consequences especially in the field of car manufacturing and medicine technology. To meet these requirements, a real-time process control system has been developed which determines the welding quality through a locally resolved temperature profile. By analyzing the resulting weld plasma received data is used to verify the stability of the laser welding process. The determination of the temperature profile is done by the detection of the emitted electromagnetic radiation from the material in a range of 500 nm to 1100 nm. As detectors, special high dynamic range CMOS cameras are used. As the emissivity of titanium depends on the wavelength, the surface and the angle of radiation, measuring the temperature is a problem. To solve these a special pyrometer setting with two cameras is used. That enables the compensation of these effects by calculating the difference between the respective pixels on simultaneously recorded images. Two spectral regions with the same emissivity are detected. Therefore the degree of emission and surface effects are compensated and canceled out of the calculation. Using the spatially resolved temperature distribution the weld geometry can be determined and the laser process can be controlled. The active readjustment of parameters such as laser power, feed rate and inert gas injection increases the quality of the welding process and decreases the number of defective goods.

  9. Development of Zn50 Brazing Alloy for Joining Mild Steel to Mild Steel (SAE1018

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Nwigbo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work has developed new brazing alloys for joining mild steel to mild steel (SAE1018 at a lower temperature. The alloys blends and error analysis were done by experimental design software (Design Expert 8.0.7.1. Design of experiments was done by Scheffe quadratic mixture method. The liquidus temperatures were predicted by calculation of phase diagrams of the alloying metals. The brazing alloys were produced by gravity technique and melted using silicon carbide graphite crucible. The quality of the brazing alloys was analyzed by optical microscopy (OM, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. Brazed joints were produced by torch method with a commercial flux. Brazing temperatures (liquidus were tracked by a digital infrared/laser pyrometer. Some mechanical properties studied were tensile strength and hardness. Finally, brazed joints produced from the developed brazing alloys were compared to that produced from muntz brass. Six (6 brazing alloys were successfully developed. Zinc and manganese were the main components, to which were added; 3 to 4 %wt silver and 11 to15 %wt modifying element. The microstructure showed a typical eutectic structure with zinc-rich phase distributed uniformly in the matrix with a combination of different sizes of dendrite, rounded blocks of compounds and hypoeutectic structures. AAS results indicated minimal out-gassing of zinc and FT-IR results indicated very low presence of atmospheric gas. The range of brazing temperature for best results was recorded from 690.90 to 735.10 0C. The joints produced from the developed brazing alloys had acceptable strengths with improved stress-strain behaviour compared to muntz brass.

  10. Online monitoring of thermo-cycles and its correlation with microstructure in laser cladding of nickel based super alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muvvala, Gopinath; Patra Karmakar, Debapriya; Nath, Ashish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding, basically a weld deposition technique, is finding applications in many areas including surface coatings, refurbishment of worn out components and generation of functionally graded components owing to its various advantages over conventional methods like TIG, PTA etc. One of the essential requirements to adopt this technique in industrial manufacturing is to fulfil the increasing demand on product quality which could be controlled through online process monitoring and correlating the signals with the mechanical and metallurgical properties. Rapid thermo-cycle i.e. the fast heating and cooling rates involved in this process affect above properties of the deposited layer to a great extent. Therefore, the current study aims to monitor the thermo-cycles online, understand its variation with process parameters and its effect on different quality aspects of the clad layer, like microstructure, elemental segregations and mechanical properties. The effect of process parameters on clad track geometry is also studied which helps in their judicious selection to deposit a predefined thickness of coating. In this study Inconel 718, a nickel based super alloy is used as a clad material and AISI 304 austenitic steel as a substrate material. The thermo-cycles during the cladding process were recorded using a single spot monochromatic pyrometer. The heating and cooling rates were estimated from the recorded thermo-cycles and its effects on microstructures were characterised using SEM and XRD analyses. Slow thermo-cycles resulted in severe elemental segregations favouring Laves phase formation and increased γ matrix size which is found to be detrimental to the mechanical properties. Slow cooling also resulted in termination of epitaxial growth, forming equiaxed grains near the surface, which is not preferred for single crystal growth. Heat treatment is carried out and the effect of slow cooling and the increased γ matrix size on dissolution of segregated elements in

  11. French investigations of high burnup effect on LOCA thermomecanical behavior. Part two. Oxidation and quenching experiments under simulated LOCA conditions with high burnup clad material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GrandJean, C. [IPSN, Cadarache (France); Cauvin, R.; Lebuffe, C. [EDF/SCMI, Chinon (France)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of the high burnup fuel studies to support a possible extension of the current discharge burnup limit, experimental programs have been undertaken, jointly by EDF and IPSN in order to study the thermal-shock behavior of high burnup fuel claddings under typical LOCA conditions. The TAGUS program used unirradiated cladding samples, bare or bearing a pre-corrosion state simulating the end-of-life state of high burnup fuel claddings: the TAGCIR program used actually irradiated cladding samples taken from high burnup rods irradiated over 5 cycles in a commercial EDF PWR and having reached a rod burnup close to 60 GWd/tU. The thermal-shock failure tests consisted in oxidizing the cladding samples under steam flow, on both inner and outer faces or on the outer face alone, and subjecting them to a final water quench. The heating was provided by an inductive furnace the power of which being regulated through monitoring of the sample surface temperature with use of a single-wave optical pyrometer. Analysis of the irradiated tests (TAGCIR series) evidenced an increased oxidation rate as compared to similar tests on unirradiated samples. Results of the quenching tests series on unirradiated and irradiated samples are plotted under the usual presentation of failure maps relative to the oxidation parameters ECR (equivalent cladding reacted) or e{sub {beta}} (thickness of the remaining beta phase layer) as a function of the oxidation temperature. Comparison of the failure limits for irradiated specimens to those for unirradiated specimens indicates a lower brittleness under two side oxidation and possibly the opposite under one-side oxidation. The tentative analysis of the oxidation and quenching tests results on irradiated samples reveals the important role played by the hydrogen charged during in-reactor corrosion on the oxidation kinetics and the failure bearing capability of the cladding under LOCA transient conditions.

  12. Microwave measurements of temperature profiles, integrated water vapour, and liquid water path at Thule Air Base, Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Giandomenico; Di Iorio, Tatiana; di Sarra, Alcide; Iaccarino, Antonio; Meloni, Daniela; Mevi, Gabriele; Muscari, Giovanni; Cacciani, Marco

    2017-04-01

    A RPG Humidity And Temperature PROfiler (HATPRO-G2 ) radiometer was installed at Thule Air Base (76.5° N, 68.8° W), Greenland, in June 2016 in the framework of the Study of the water VApour in the polar AtmosPhere (SVAAP) project. The Danish Meteorological Institute started measurements of atmospheric properties at Thule Air Base in early '90s. The Thule High Arctic Atmospheric Observatory (THAAO) has grown in size and observing capabilities during the last three decades through the international effort of United States (NCAR and University of Alaska Fairbanks) and Italian (ENEA, INGV, University of Roma and Firenze) institutions (http://www.thuleatmos-it.it). Within this context, the intensive field campaign of the SVAAP project was aimed at the investigation of the surface radiation budget and took place from 5 to 28 July, 2016. After the summer campaign the HATPRO has continued to operate in order to monitor the annual variability of the temperature profile and integrated water vapour as well as the presence and characteristics of liquid clouds in the Artic environment. The combined use of the HATPRO together with other automatic instruments, such as a new microwave spectrometer (the water Vapour Emission Spectrometer for Polar Atmosphere VESPA-22), upward- and downward-looking pyranometers and pyrgeometers, a zenith-looking pyrometer operating in the 9.6-11.5 µm spectral range, an all sky camera, and a meteorological station, allows to investigate the clouds' physical and optical properties, as well as their impact on the surface radiation budget. This study will present and discuss the first few months of HATPRO observations; the effectiveness of the statistical retrieval used to derive the physical parameters from the HATPRO brightness temperatures will also be investigated through the comparison of the temperature and humidity profiles, and integrated water vapour, with data from radiosondes launched during the summer campaign and in winter time.

  13. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  14. Development of an optical thermal history coating sensor based on the oxidation of a divalent rare earth ion phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-González, Álvaro; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; van Wachem, Berend; Skinner, Stephen; Beyrau, Frank; Heyes, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    The measurement of temperatures in gas turbines, boilers, heat exchangers and other components exposed to hot gases is essential to design energy efficient systems and improve maintenance procedures. When on-line measurements, such as those performed with thermocouples and pyrometers, are not possible or inconvenient, the maximum temperatures of operation can be recorded and measured off-line after operation. Although thermal paints have been used for many years for this purpose, a novel technique based on irreversible changes in the optical properties of thermographic phosphors, can overcome some of the disadvantages of previous methods. In particular, oxidation of the divalent rare earth ion phosphor BaMgAl10O17:Eu (BAM:Eu) has shown great potential for temperature sensing between 700 °C and 1200 °C. The emission spectra of this phosphor change with temperature, which permits to define an intensity ratio between different lines in the spectra that can be used as a measurand of the temperature. In this paper, the study of the sensing capabilities of a sensor coating based on BAM:Eu phosphor material is addressed for the first time. The sensitivity of the intensity ratio is investigated in the temperature range from 800 °C to 1100 °C, and is proved to be affected by ionic diffusion of transition metals from the substrate. The use of an interlayer made of zirconia proves efficient in reducing ionic diffusion and coatings with this diffusion barrier present sensitivity comparable to that of the powder material.

  15. Parametric modeling and optimization of laser scanning parameters during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, K.; Ramanujam, R.; Kuppan, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parametric effect, microstructure, micro-hardness and optimization of laser scanning parameters (LSP) on heating experiments during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718 alloy. The laser source used for experiments is a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser with maximum power of 2 kW. The experimental parameters in the present study are cutting speed in the range of 50-100 m/min, feed rate of 0.05-0.1 mm/rev, laser power of 1.25-1.75 kW and approach angle of 60-90°of laser beam axis to tool. The plan of experiments are based on central composite rotatable design L31 (43) orthogonal array. The surface temperature is measured via on-line measurement using infrared pyrometer. Parametric significance on surface temperature is analysed using response surface methodology (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 3D surface graphs. The structural change of the material surface is observed using optical microscope and quantitative measurement of heat affected depth that are analysed by Vicker's hardness test. The results indicate that the laser power and approach angle are the most significant parameters to affect the surface temperature. The optimum ranges of laser power and approach angle was identified as 1.25-1.5 kW and 60-65° using overlaid contour plot. The developed second order regression model is found to be in good agreement with experimental values with R2 values of 0.96 and 0.94 respectively for surface temperature and heat affected depth.

  16. Measurement of skin temperature after infrared laser stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandri, M; Saturno, M; Spadavecchia, L; Iannetti, G D; Cruccu, G; Truini, A

    2006-01-01

    Several types of lasers are available for eliciting laser evoked responses (LEPs). In order to understand advantages and drawbacks of each one, and to use it properly, it is important that the pattern of skin heating is known and duly considered. This study was aimed at assessing the skin temperature during and immediately after irradiation with pulses by Nd:YAP and CO(2) lasers. The back of the non-dominant hand was irradiated in 8 subjects. Temperatures were measured by a fast analogical pyrometer (5 ms response time). Stimuli were tested on natural colour (white) and blackened skin. Nd:YAP pulses yielded temperatures that were correlated with pulse energy, but not with pulse duration; much higher temperatures were obtained irradiating blackened skin than white skin (ranges 100-194 degrees C vs 35-46 degrees C). Temperature decay was extremely slow in white skin, reaching its basal value in more than 30 s. CO(2) pulses delivered with power of 3W and 6W yielded temperatures of 69-87 degrees C on white skin, and 138-226 degrees C on blackened skin. Temperature decay was very fast (4-8 ms). Differences in peak temperatures and decay times between lasers and tested conditions depend on energy and volume of heated skin. The highest temperatures are reached with lesser degree of penetration, as in the case of CO(2) laser and blackened skin. Taking into account the temperature decay time of the skin, the minimum interstimulus interval to get reliable LEPs should be no less than 10 s for Nd:YAP and 100 ms for CO(2) laser. Another important practical consequence of the heating pattern is that the Nd:YAP pulses will activate warmth receptors more easily than CO(2).

  17. High temperature radiance spectroscopy measurements of solid and liquid uranium and plutonium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, D.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Tougait, O.; Eloirdi, R.; Malki, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this work, an experimental study of the radiance of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides at wavelengths 550 nm ⩽ λ ⩽ 920 nm is reported. A fast multi-channel spectro-pyrometer has been employed for the radiance measurements of samples heated up to and beyond their melting point by laser irradiation. The melting temperature of uranium monocarbide, soundly established at 2780 K, has been taken as a radiance reference. Based on it, a wavelength-dependence has been obtained for the high-temperature spectral emissivity of some uranium carbides (1 ⩽ C/U ⩽ 2). Similarly, the peritectic temperature of plutonium monocarbide (1900 K) has been used as a reference for plutonium monocarbide and sesquicarbide. The present spectral emissivities of solid uranium and plutonium carbides are close to 0.5 at 650 nm, in agreement with previous literature values. However, their high temperature behaviour, values in the liquid, and carbon-content and wavelength dependencies in the visible-near infrared range have been determined here for the first time. Liquid uranium carbide seems to interact with electromagnetic radiation in a more metallic way than does the solid, whereas a similar effect has not been observed for plutonium carbides. The current emissivity values have also been used to convert the measured radiance spectra into real temperature, and thus perform a thermal analysis of the laser heated samples. Some high-temperature phase boundaries in the systems U-C and Pu-C are shortly discussed on the basis of the current results.

  18. Double modulation pyrometry: A radiometric method to measure surface temperatures of directly irradiated samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamias, Dimitrios; Alxneit, Ivo; Wokaun, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The design, implementation, calibration, and assessment of double modulation pyrometry to measure surface temperatures of radiatively heated samples in our 1 kW imaging furnace is presented. The method requires that the intensity of the external radiation can be modulated. This was achieved by a rotating blade mounted parallel to the optical axis of the imaging furnace. Double modulation pyrometry independently measures the external radiation reflected by the sample as well as the sum of thermal and reflected radiation and extracts the thermal emission as the difference of these signals. Thus a two-step calibration is required: First, the relative gains of the measured signals are equalized and then a temperature calibration is performed. For the latter, we transfer the calibration from a calibrated solar blind pyrometer that operates at a different wavelength. We demonstrate that the worst case systematic error associated with this procedure is about 300 K but becomes negligible if a reasonable estimate of the sample's emissivity is used. An analysis of the influence of the uncertainties in the calibration coefficients reveals that one (out of the five) coefficient contributes almost 50% to the final temperature error. On a low emission sample like platinum, the lower detection limit is around 1700 K and the accuracy typically about 20 K. Note that these moderate specifications are specific for the use of double modulation pyrometry at the imaging furnace. It is mainly caused by the difficulty to achieve and maintain good overlap of the hot zone with a diameter of about 3 mm Full Width at Half Height and the measurement spot both of which are of similar size.

  19. A Theory of Interaction Mechanism between Laser Beam and Paper Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piili, Heidi

    Paper making and converting industry in Europe is suffering from transfer of basic manufacturing to fast-growing economies, such as China and Brazil. Pulp and paper production volume in Finland, Sweden and France was the same in 2011 as it was in 2000. Meanwhile China has tripled its volume and Brazil doubled. This is a situation where innovative solutions for papermaking and converting industry are needed. Laser can be solution for this, as it is fast, flexible, accurate and reliable. Before industrial application, characteristics of laser beam and paper material interaction has to be understood. When this fundamental knowledge is known, new innovations can be created. Fulfilling the lack of information on interaction phenomena can assist in the way of lasers for wider use of technology in paper making and converting industry. This study was executed by treating dried kraft pulp (grammage 67 g m-2) with different laser power levels, focal point settings and interaction time. Laser equipment was TRUMPF TLF HQ2700 CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 μm). Interaction between laser beam and dried kraft pulp was detected with multi-monitoring system (MMS), which consisted of spectrometer, pyrometer and active illumination imaging system. There is two different dominating mechanisms in interaction between laser beam and paper material. Furthermore, it was noticed that there is different interaction phases within these two interaction mechanisms. These interaction phases appear as function of time and as function of peak intensity of laser beam. Limit peak intensity divides interaction mechanism from one-phase interaction into dual-phase interaction.

  20. Development of an Acoustic Sensor On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement in Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Ariessohn

    2008-06-30

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2 - Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. The objective of this project was to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project was organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consisted of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles and gas properties on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that could be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consisted of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the laboratory, and developing a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor. The third phase consisted of designing and fabricating the field prototype, and testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier to demonstrate the ability to obtain accurate measurements of gas temperature in an operating gasifier. Following the completion of the initial 3 year project, several continuations

  1. Study on a transient optical fiber high temperature measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lulu; Liu, Yusha; Wang, Yutian

    2009-07-01

    High temperature is one of the most important parameters in the fields of scientific research and industrial production. At present, thermocouple, thermo resistive and radiance thermometer are already technologically mature which can be adopted to measure the general temperature, but when it comes to the transient high temperature that changes pretty quickly in wretched conditions, those traditional pyrometers can not meet the requirements any more. In this paper, we designed a transient optical high temperature measurement system. First, design of the temperature measurement probe. The system took blackbody cavity sensor together with optical fiber to receive the measured signal, here, the integrated emissivity model of the blackbody cavity was established and the optimum structure parameters were confirmed. Secondly, design of the entire temperature measurement system. A contact-noncontact measurement method was applied, which is to make the blackbody cavity and the measured high-temperature source contact, the fiber probe and the blackbody cavity noncontact, as a result, the error caused by contact measurement is overcame and the precision is guaranteed at the same time. In addition, a fiber grating was introduced as the wavelength filter device which can realize the dynamic filter of narrow-band signals and reduce the impact of background light. Thirdly, signal processing. In this part, we applied labVIEW software and wavelet analysis method. All of the signal acquisition and processing were realized in the labVIEW environment. Through calling matlab in labVIEW, the signals from optical fiber detector were wavelet denoised and decomposed, thus the temperature information was extracted, and the temperature value was obtained. On basis of wavelet transformation, the paper adopted the 4dB wavelet with horizontal scale of 5 to realize the feature extraction and noise removal, parts of the signals before and after the wavelet noise removal were given and analyzed

  2. Experimental And Numerical Study Of CMC Leading Edges In Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Markus; Esser, Burkard; Gulhan, Ali; Dalenbring, Mats; Cavagna, Luca

    2011-05-01

    Future transportation concepts aim at high supersonic or hypersonic speeds, where the formerly sharp boundaries between aeronautic and aerospace applications become blurred. One of the major issues involved to high speed flight are extremely high aerothermal loads, which especially appear at the leading edges of the plane’s wings and at sharp edged air intake components of the propulsion system. As classical materials like metals or simple ceramics would thermally and structurally fail here, new materials have to be applied. In this context, lightweight ceramic matrix composites (CMC) seem to be prospective candidates as they are high-temperature resistant and offer low thermal expansion along with high specific strength at elevated temperature levels. A generic leading edge model with a ceramic wing assembly with a sweep back angle of 53° was designed, which allowed for easy leading edge sample integration of different CMC materials. The samples consisted of the materials C/C-SiC (non-oxide), OXIPOL and WHIPOX (both oxide) with a nose radius of 2 mm. In addition, a sharp edged C/C-SiC sample was prepared to investigate the nose radius influence. Overall, 13 thermocouples were installed inside the entire model to measure the temperature evolution at specific locations, whereby 5 thermocouples were placed inside the leading edge sample itself. In addition, non-intrusive techniques were applied for surface temperature measurements: An infrared camera was used to measure the surface temperature distribution and at specific spots, the surface temperature was also measured by pyrometers. Following, the model was investigated in DLR’s arc-heated facility L3K at a total enthalpy of 8.5 MJ/kg, Mach number of 7.8, different angles of attack and varying wing inclination angles. These experiments provide a sound basis for the simulation of aerothermally loaded CMC leading edge structures. Such fluid-structure coupled approaches have been performed by FOI, basing on a

  3. Measurements and modeling of pulverized fuel char in an entrained flow reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebria, Mazdak

    In recent years, the combustion zone of utility boilers were modified for NOx control and this made the task of maintaining low residual carbon levels in boiler fly ash much more difficult. To predict the relationships between boiler operating conditions and residual carbon-in-ash, there is a need for improvements in determining the appropriate char reactivity to use in simulating coal-fired combustors and in relating this reactivity to unburned coal characteristics. To aid in this effort, a tubular, downward-fired, refractory-lined, laminar entrained flow reactor (EFR) was built to provide a pilot scale environment with 2 seconds residence time for studying coal combustion. Using a commercial CFD code (FLUENT), a three dimensional numerical model of coal burning in the EFR was created to evaluate common char burnout kinetic modeling approaches. EFR experimental data was obtained for operating conditions adjusted to reproduce particle Lagrangian temperature and oxygen concentration time histories typically found in coal-fired utility boilers. The radial temperature profiles were measured at different axial locations in the EFR with a suction pyrometer and thermocouples. The temperature distribution in the reactor agreed well with the simulations. A gas analyzer with a quenching probe was used to measure the oxygen distribution to similarly confirm oxygen distribution in the EFR. A semi-isokinetic particulate sampling probe was used to extract ash samples at different heights in the reactor to measure the evolution of loss on ignition (LOI). Measured LOI values were used to validate the model against predicted values. Reaction kinetics rates in the model were adjusted to bring agreement between calculated LOI and the measured values from the experimental results. The LOI predictions by kinetic-diffusion and CBK model are very similar at the late stage of char burnout. The results indicate that we can achieve sufficient accuracy for the prediction of final carbon

  4. B4C增强铝基复合材料钻削温度的非接触测量和多目标分析%Non-contact measurement and multi-objective analysis of drilling temperature when drilling B4C reinforced aluminum composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A TASKESEN; K KUTUKDE

    2015-01-01

    Non-contact measurements of machining temperatures were performed with optical pyrometer when drilling particle (B4C) reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) with different drills. The effect of particle content, cutting speed, feed rate and tool material on the maximum drilling temperature was investigated. The drilling parameters were optimized based on multiple performance characteristics in terms of the maximum cutting temperature and tool wear. According to the results, the most influential control factors on the cutting temperatures are found to be particle fraction, feed rate and interaction between the cutting speed and particle content, respectively. The influences of the cutting speed and drill material on the drilling temperature are found to be relatively lower for the used range of parameters. Minimum cutting temperatures are obtained with lower particle fraction and cutting speed, with relatively higher feed rates and carbide tools. The results reveal that optimal combination of the drilling parameters can be used to obtain both minimum cutting temperature and tool wear.%采用光学高温计对在不同钻削条件下的B4C金属基复合材料的钻削温度进行非接触测量。研究了颗粒含量、切削速度、进给速率和刀具材料对最高钻削温度的影响。基于最高切削温度和刀具磨损对钻削参数进行优化。结果表明:对最高切削温度影响最大的因素主要为颗粒含量、进给速率以及切削速率与颗粒含量间的相互作用。切削速率与切削材料对最高切削温度的影响相对较小。当颗粒含量较小,切削速度较低,进给速率较高,利用硬质合金刀具时,切削温度较低。采用优化后的钻削参数可以获得较低的切削温度和较小的刀具磨损。

  5. Characterization of Fram Strait Sea Ice Conditions Using the NASA SIERRA Unmanned Aircraft System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Crocker, R. I.; Wegrzyn, K.; Fowler, C.; Herzfeld, U. C.; Long, D.; Kwok, R.; Fladeland, M. M.; Bui, P.

    2009-12-01

    . Instrumentation carried on the SIERRA for each mission included digital cameras and video, a LIDAR surface topography profiler, a synthetic aperture radar, and non-imaging pyrometers, radiometers and spectrometers. When combined with a variety of near coincident satellite products including MODIS, QuikSCAT, Envisat SAR and AMSR-E passive microwave imagery, the data reveal a range of ice conditions, including variable patterns of melt pond coverage, floe shape and size, and differences in surface topography. This presentation summarizes CASIE and describes work underway to determine whether consistent physical patterns are present that can be linked to variations in ice age, roughness, and life cycle.

  6. Aerosol and CCN properties at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica: seasonality, new particle formation events and properties around precipitation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; De Backer, Hugo; Herenz, Paul; Wex, Heike; Gossart, Alexandra; Souverijns, Niels; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, several complementary ground-based instruments for measuring the aerosol composition of the Antarctic atmosphere have been operated at the Belgian Antarctic research station Princess Elisabeth, in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (71.95° S, 23.35° E, 1390 m asl.). In addition, three ground-based remote sensing instruments for cloud and precipitation observations have been installed for continuous operation, including a ceilometer (cloud base height, type, vertical extent), a 24 Ghz micro-rain radar (vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (cloud base temperature). The station is inhabited from November to end of February and operates under remote control during the other months. In this contribution, the general aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties will be described with a special focus on new particle formation events and around precipitation events. New particle formation events are important for the atmospheric aerosol budget and they also show that aerosols are not only transported to Antarctica but are also produced there, also inland. Aerosols are essential for cloud formation and therefore also for precipitation, which is the only source for mass gain of the Antarctic ice sheet. Measured aerosol properties comprise size distribution, total number, total mass concentration, mass concentration of light-absorbing aerosol and absorption coefficient and total scattering coefficient. In addition, a CCN counter has been operated during austral summers 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16. The baseline total number concentration N-total was around some hundreds of particles/cm3. During new particle formation events N-total increased to some thousands of particles/cm3. Simultaneous measurements of N-total, size distribution and CCN number revealed that mostly the number of particles smaller than 100 nm increased and that the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei increased only very

  7. 振镜扫描激光透射连接PET薄膜与316L不锈钢薄板%Galvanometer Scanning Laser Transmission Joining between PET Films and 316L Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜敏凤; 宋新华; 王凯; 张成; 张虎; 刘会霞

    2011-01-01

    laser transmission joining of dissimilar and biocompatible materials has potential application in biomedical implants and their encapsulation process. In this research, 0.1 nun PET films and 0.1mm 316L stainless steel are joint using galvanometer scanning laser transmission joining system. The effect of temperature on joint quality is investigated by using open-loop control and closed -loop control, the profiles of the joints were observed by optical microscopy. The process parameters windows of the laser transmission joining are obtained through open-loop control, the temperature range of getting better joint quality is analyzed by pyrometer. Using closed-loop control based on the temperature range of open-loop control, the better results can be obtained in closed-loop control of galvanometer scanning laser transmission joining system.%激光透射连接异种生物相容性材料在生物医学植入体中具有良好的应用前景.本文采用振镜扫描激光连接系统进行了0.1 mm聚对苯二甲酸乙二酯(PET)薄膜与0.1 mm 316L不锈钢薄板之间的激光透射连接试验.采用开环控制和闭环控制分析温度对连接质量的影响,使用光学显微镜对接头形貌进行观测.开环控制得到了激光透射连接过程的工艺参数窗口,并通过高温计分析出获得较好连接质量时的温度范围;在开环控制得到温度基础上采用闭环控制,所得的试验结果证明振镜扫描系统中闭环控制在激光透射连接过程中能得到更好的连接质量,更具有优势.

  8. Temperature, velocity and species profile measurements for reburning in a pulverized, entrained flow, coal combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tree, D.R.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrogen oxide emissions from pulverized coal combustion have been and will continue to be a regulated pollutant for electric utility boilers burning pulverized coal. Full scale combustion models can help in the design of new boilers and boiler retrofits which meet emissions standards, but these models require validation before they can be used with confidence. The objective of this work was to obtain detailed combustion measurements of pulverized coal flames which implement two NO reduction strategies, namely reburning and advanced reburning, to provide data for model validation. The data were also compared to an existing comprehensive pulverized coal combustion model with a reduced mechanism for NO reduction under reburning and advanced reburning conditions. The data were obtained in a 0.2 MW, cylindrical, down-fired, variable swirl, pulverized coal reactor. The reactor had a diameter of 0.76 m and a length of 2.4 m with access ports along the axial length. A Wyodak, sub-bituminous coal was used in all of the measurements. The burner had a centrally located primary fuel and air tube surrounded by heated and variably swirled secondary air. Species of NO, NO{sub x}, CO, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were measured continuously. Aqueous sampling was used to measure HCN and NH{sub 3} at specific reactor locations. Samples were drawn from the reactor using water quenched suction probes. Velocity measurements were obtained using two component laser doppler anemometry in back-scatter mode. Temperature measurements were obtained using a shielded suction pyrometer. A series of six or more radial measurements at six or more axial locations within the reactor provided a map of species, temperature, and velocity measurements. In total, seven reactor maps were obtained. Three maps were obtained at baseline conditions of 0, 0.5 and 1.5 swirl and 10% excess air. Two maps were obtained under reburning conditions of 0.78 stoichiometric ratio and 1.5 swirl and 0.9 stoichiometric ratio and

  9. Incomplete reactions in nanothermite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Rohit J.; Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L.; Overdeep, Kyle R.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2017-02-01

    Exothermic reactions between oxophilic metals and transition/post transition metal-oxides have been well documented owing to their fast reaction time scales (≈10 μs). This article examines the extent of the reaction in nano-aluminum based thermite systems through a forensic inspection of the products formed during reaction. Three nanothermite systems (Al/CuO, Al/Bi2O3, and Al/WO3) were selected owing to their diverse combustion characteristics, thereby providing sufficient generality and breadth to the analysis. Microgram quantities of the sample were coated onto a fine platinum wire, which was resistively heated at high heating rates (≈105 K/s) to ignite the sample. The subsequent products were captured/quenched very rapidly (≈500 μs) in order to preserve the chemistry/morphology during initiation and subsequent reaction and were quantitatively analyzed using electron microscopy and focused ion beam cross-sectioning followed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Elemental examination of the cross-section of the quenched particles shows that oxygen is predominantly localized in the regions containing aluminum, implying the occurrence of the redox reaction. The Al/CuO system, which has simultaneous gaseous oxygen release and ignition (TIgnition ≈ TOxygen Release), shows a substantially lower oxygen content within the product particles as opposed to Al/Bi2O3 and Al/WO3 thermites, which are postulated to undergo a condensed phase reaction (TIgnition ≪ TOxygen Release). An effective Al:O composition for the interior section was obtained for all the mixtures, with the smaller particles generally showing a higher oxygen content than the larger ones. The observed results were further corroborated with the reaction temperature, obtained using a high-speed spectro-pyrometer, and bomb calorimetry conducted on larger samples (≈15 mg). The results suggest that thermites that produce sufficient amounts of gaseous products generate smaller product particles and

  10. Cloud and precipitation properties from ground-based remote sensing instruments in East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Gorodetskaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A new comprehensive cloud-precipitation-meteorological observatory has been established at Princess Elisabeth base, located in the escarpment zone of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. The observatory consists of a set of ground-based remote sensing instruments (ceilometer, infrared pyrometer and vertically profiling precipitation radar combined with automatic weather station measurements of near-surface meteorology, radiative fluxes, and snow accumulation. In this paper, the observatory is presented and the potential for studying the evolution of clouds and precipitating systems is illustrated by case studies. It is shown that the synergetic use of the set of instruments allows for distinguishing ice, mixed-phase and precipitating clouds, including some information on their vertical extent. In addition, wind-driven blowing snow events can be distinguished from deeper precipitating systems. Cloud properties largely affect the surface radiative fluxes, with liquid-containing clouds dominating the radiative impact. A statistical analysis of all measurements (in total 14 months mainly occurring in summer/autumn indicates that these liquid-containing clouds occur during as much as 20% of the cloudy periods. The cloud occurrence shows a strong bimodal distribution with clear sky conditions 51% of the time and complete overcast conditions 35% of the time. Snowfall occurred 17% of the cloudy periods with a predominance of light precipitation and only rare events with snowfall > 1 mm h−1 water equivalent (w.e.. Three of such intensive snowfall events occurred during 2011 contributing to anomalously large annual snow accumulation. This is the first deployment of a precipitation radar in Antarctica allowing to assess the contribution of the snowfall to the local surface mass balance. It is shown that on the one hand large accumulation events (>10 mm w.e. day−1 during the measurement period of 26 months were always associated with snowfall, but that

  11. PICA Forebody Heatshield Qualification for the Stardust Discovery Class Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huy K.; Johnson, Christine E.; Hsu, Ming-Ta; Smith, Marnell; Dill, Harry; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the qualification of the light weight Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablators (PICA) as the forebody heatshield for the Stardust Discovery Class Mission. The Stardust spacecraft will be launched in early 1999 and fly by Comet Wild-2 to collect cometary and interstellar dust and return them back to earth in the Sample Return Capsule (SRC). This earth re-entry will be the fastest to date, at 12.6 km/s, and therefore requires a heatshield that can withstand very high heating rates and stagnation pressures, as well as provide the necessary insulation to the vehicle structure. The PICA material was developed as part of the Lightweight Ceramic Ablators program at NASA Ames Research Center, and was baselined as the forebody heatshield because of its low density and superior ablation and thermal performance at severe aerothermodynamic conditions. Under a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program with NASA Ames, Fiber Materials, Inc. developed a process to manufacture a single-piece PICA heatshield for the forebody of the SRC, along with witness material for the fabrication of the test models. The test models were fabricated and instrumented by the staff of Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver, Colorado. Full body preliminary aerothermal CFD calculations were performed at NASA Ames to determine the heating and stagnation pressure conditions. The Heat shield sizing was also performed at NASA Ames by using a new material response code that accounts for the highly porous characteristics of the PICA material. The ablation and thermal performance of PICA was qualified in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Arc Jet Facility. A total of 24 models and four test conditions were used to qualify PICA at the predicted peak heat flux, heat load, shear, and stagnation pressure conditions. Surface and in-depth temperatures were measured using optical pyrometers and thermocouples. Surface recession was measured by using a template and a height gage. Several models

  12. RELAX Update: Recent Developments in the Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Johnston, W. A.; Lyon, I. C.; Turner, G.

    1993-07-01

    stability and reproducibility of its temperature control. It is hoped to obtain an optical pyrometer in the near future to allow temperature measurements to be made during sample release. References: [1] Gilmour J. D. et al. (submitted) G Rev. Sci. Inst.

  13. SINGLE-CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Wang; G. Pickrell; R. May

    2002-09-10

    Accurate measurement of temperature is essential for the safe and efficient operation and control of a wide range of industrial processes. Appropriate techniques and instrumentation are needed depending on the temperature measurement requirements in different industrial processes and working environments. Harsh environments are common in many industrial applications. These harsh environments may involve extreme physical conditions, such as high-temperature, high-pressure, corrosive agents, toxicity, strong electromagnetic interference, and high-energy radiation exposure. Due to these severe environmental conditions, conventional temperature sensors are often difficult to apply. This situation has opened a new but challenging opportunity for the sensor society to provide robust, high-performance, and cost-effective temperature sensors capable of operating in those harsh environments. The focus of this research program has been to develop a temperature measurement system for temperature measurements in the primary and secondary stages of slagging gasifiers. For this application the temperature measurement system must be able to withstand the extremely harsh environment posed by the high temperatures and corrosive agents present in these systems. Real-time, accurate and reliable monitoring of temperature for the coal gasification process is important to realize the full economic potential of these gasification systems. Long life and stability of operation in the high temperature environment is essential for the temperature measurement system to ensure the continuous running of the coal gasification system over the long term. In this high temperature and chemically corrosive environment, rather limited high temperature measurement techniques such as high temperature thermocouples and optical/acoustic pyrometers are available, each with their own limitations. In this research program, five different temperature sensing schemes based on the single crystal sapphire

  14. Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2005-12-01

    The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas

  15. Instrumental system for the quick relief of surface temperatures in fumaroles fields and steam heated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diliberto, Iole; Cappuzzo, Santo; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Cosenza, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    We present an instrumental system to measure and to map the space variation of the surface temperature in volcanic fields. The system is called Pirogips, its essential components are a Pyrometer and a Global Position System but also other devices useful to obtain a good performance of the operating system have been included. In the framework of investigation to define and interpret volcanic scenarios, the long-term monitoring of gas geochemistry can improve the resolution of the scientific approaches by other specific disciplines. Indeed the fluid phase is released on a continuous mode from any natural system which produces energy in excess respect to its geological boundaries. This is the case of seismic or magmatic active areas where the long-term geochemical monitoring is able to highlight, and to follow in real time, changes in the rate of energy release and/or in the feeding sources of fluids, thus contributing to define the actual behaviour of the investigated systems (e.g. Paonita el al., 2013; 2002; Taran, 2011; Zettwood and Tazieff, 1973). The demand of pirogips starts from the personal experience in long term monitoring of gas geochemistry (e.g. Diliberto I.S, 2013; 2011; et al., 2002; Inguaggiato et al.,2012a, 2012b). Both space and time variation of surface temperature highlight change of energy and mass release from the deep active system, they reveal the upraise of deep and hot fluid and can be easily detected. Moreover a detailed map of surface temperature can be very useful for establishing a network of sampling points or installing a new site for geochemical monitoring. Water is commonly the main component of magmatic or hydrothermal fluid release and it can reach the ground surface in the form of steam, as in the high and low temperature fumaroles fields, or it can even condense just below the ground surface. In this second case the water disperses in pores or circulates in the permeable layers while the un-condensable gases reach the surface (e

  16. Advanced process control for solid fuel boilers. Phase 2; Avancerad processtyrning av fastbraensleeldade rostpannor. Etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehleskog, Rickard; Lundborg, Rickard; Schuster, Robert; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    temperature is too low to manage a load increase the thermocouples in the brickwork will warn the system (and thereby be superior the pressure of the dome in that case). The result will be a slower load increase or support from oil alternatively gas burners. Continuous monitoring of moisture content in fuel can also have an influence on the air distribution. If the fuel is wet, more primary air is needed in the drying zone. Indication and adjustment of flame front with IR-pyrometers by changing primary and over fire air. O{sub 2}-cells, mounted hanging in the boiler ceiling, could be used to adjust concentration gradients in upper furnace by individual control of air throttles. As a next step a separate combined measuring and verifying project is proposed, where the suggested measures in this project will be verified.

  17. 氟化锂和蓝宝石单晶冲击消光及其对辐射测温的影响%Shock-induced optical extinction in LiF and sapphire crystals and its significance in the radiant temperature determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周显明; 操秀霞; 李俊; 李加波; 卢铁城

    2012-01-01

    Shock-induced optical extinction in LiF and sapphire single crystals had been studied using a time-resolved multi-wavelength pyrometry measurements incorporated with a dynamically generated in-situ light source. Shock pressure in the samples covers a 50~183 GPa range and the central wavelength in the pyrometer ranges from 254 nm to 800 nm. Our results demonstrate that the measured transmit-tance in the LiF samples under investigation varies little which has a negligible influence on the fitted in-terfacial temperature with an apparent emissivity decreased a little. When the pressure in the sapphire sample is less than 90 GPa, the fitted results show similar behavior as it does in the LiF window. As the shock pressure is over 99 GPa, the sapphire samples show remarkable extinction decay of light radiation. The measured optical extinction coefficient increases with the increasing pressure, and decreases with the wavelength, which is in consistent with the 255 GPa high-pressure results in the literature. We also find that the optical extinction behavior in shocked sapphire under high-pressures has an essential influence on the interfacial temperature measurements, and resulted in a lower fitted temperature. Thepresent study may have some reference value for developing technique of shock temperature measurement for opaque materials.%采用冲击波压缩原位光源技术结合时间分辨多波长高温计测量,研究了氟化锂和蓝宝石单晶样品的冲击消光现象,实验压力范围50~183了GPa,中心波长覆盖254~800 nm.结果表明,氟化锂单晶样品在实验压力下透过率变化不大,对界面温度的拟合值影响不明显,只是使表观发射率略有下降;当压力低于90GPa时,蓝宝石的消光情况同氟化锂接近,对界面温度的拟合影响也不明显;而当压力高于99 GPa时,蓝宝石呈现明显的消光衰减现象,实验测定的消光系数随压力增加而增加,与波长间呈反比关系,与文献报道250 0

  18. PLD-grown thin film saturable absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellkamp, Friedjof

    2012-11-01

    increasing oscillator strength against thinner films was assumed to be due to confining. The grown thin films were structurally investigated with Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED). It could be observed that the applied cubic systems like Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, or YAG kept the orientation of the substrate, thus they are said to grow in an epitaxial way. Considering thin films of Cr:Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}, one could observe epitaxial Frank-van der Merwe growth (layer-by-layer) even after the growth of films with thicknesses in a macroscopic scale. The appearance of particulates is a major drawback when preparing thin films by pulsed laser deposition. Within this thesis, the deposition process could considerably be improved by the implementation of a velocity filter. Despite the filter's installation one could still make use of the measurement equipment like pyrometer, reflectometer, and the RHEED system. Furthermore, the existing facility was improved in such a way that the growth of multilayered systems was possible with only little effort which significantly simplified the growth of the mentioned quantum well structures. (orig.)

  19. Investigating Vaporization of Silica through Laser Driven Shock Wave Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, R. G.; Swift, D. C.; Stewart, S. T.; Smith, R.; Bolme, C. A.; Spaulding, D. K.; Hicks, D.; Eggert, J.; Collins, G.

    2010-12-01

    Giant impacts melt and vaporize a significant amount of the bolide and target body. However, our ability to determine how much melt or vapor a given impact creates depends strongly on our understanding of the liquid-vapor phase boundary of geologic materials. Our current knowledge of the liquid-vapor equilibrium for one of the most important minerals, SiO2, is rather limited due to the difficulty of performing experiments in this area of phase space. In this study, we investigate the liquid-vapor coexistence region by shocking quartz into a supercritical fluid state and allowing it to adiabatically expand to a state on the liquid-vapor phase boundary. Although shock compression and release has been used to study the liquid-vapor equilibrium of metals [1], few attempts have been made at studying geologic materials by this method [2]. Shock waves were produced by direct ablation of the quartz sample using the Jupiter Laser Facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Steady shock pressures of 120-360 GPa were produced in the quartz samples: high enough to force the quartz into a supercritical fluid state. As the shock wave propagates through the sample, we measure the shock velocity using a line imaging velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) and shock temperature using a streaked optical pyrometer (SOP). When the shock wave reaches the free surface of the sample, the material adiabatically expands. Upon breakout of the shock at the free surface, the SOP records a distinct drop in radiance due to the lower temperature of the expanded material. For a subset of experiments, a LiF window is positioned downrange of the expanding silica. When the expanding silica impacts the LiF window, the velocity at the interface between the expanding silica and LiF window is measured using the VISAR. From the shock velocity measurements, we accurately determine the shocked state in the quartz. The post-shock radiance measurements are used to constrain the

  20. Combustion behaviour of pulverised wood - Numerical and experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lixin Tao [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2002-05-01

    This report presents the experimental results achieved in an on-going project financed by STEM (Energimyndigheten) within the research program 'Gasification and combustion of solid fuels', during the first phase of the project (2001-03-05 to 2002-03-05). The project is a collaboration project between LTH and TPS on combined numerical modelling/experimental investigation on combustion of pulverised wood. Particularly TPS carry out the experimental investigation in a laboratory vertical furnace. During the project, the experimental rig has been developed. The experimental furnace has an inner diameter of 0.25 m and a height of 4 m. A pulverised wood flame is established using an axial burner that is installed on the top of the furnace. Experimental study on a selected pulverised wood with determined size distribution and anisotropy character has been carried out in this furnace. During the experiment, the wall temperatures of the furnace were continuously measured using 8 thermocouples of type K that are installed on the wall with a spacing about 0.5 m. The gas temperatures in the furnace were monitored using 5 fixed suction pyrometers that are placed along the centre of the furnace. At the bottom of the furnace, a fixed gas-sampling probe was installed. The flue gas concentrations were continuously monitored with on-line gas analysers. The extent of combustion was measured through the analysis of sampled gaseous products and condensable solid products. A movable liquid quench probe was used to carry out the gas and solid sampling through a number of sampling holes that are opened along the furnace wall. The quench liquor used is an alkaline water solution containing a small amount of a detergent to dissolve HCN and tar. The quench liquor and solid samples were separated and collected in a knockout pot. The gas was filtered and passed through two bubblers with acidic solution to collect NH{sub 3}. The gas concentrations were then analysed with on-line gas

  1. Plasma-Surface Interactions in Hollow Cathode Discharges for Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Angela Maria

    surface state cannot be obtained because of the cathode geometry and high particles fluxes, measurements of the emitter temperature using a two-color pyrometer were used to determine the oxygen surface coverage and characterize the rate processes that occur during poisoning. A model describing the material transport in the plasma discharge was developed and is used to predict the barium and oxygen fluxes to the emitter surface during cathode operation by solving the species continuity and momentum equations. The dominant ionization process for molecular oxygen in the plasma gas is resonant charge exchange with xenon ions. Barium is effectively recycled in the plasma; however, BaO and O2 are not. The model shows that the oxygen flux to the surface is not diffusion limited. Experimental results indicate that the oxygen poisoning rate is slow and that the oxygen poisoning coverage on the emitter surface is less than 3%. A time-dependent model of the reaction kinetics of oxygen and barium at the tungsten surface was developed using the experimental results. The experiments and kinetics model indicate that the dominant processes at the emitter surface are dissociative adsorption of O2, sputtering of the O2 precursor, and desorption of O. Ion sputtering of the weakly bound O2 precursor state limits the poisoning rate and yields low oxygen coverage. Removal of chemisorbed atomic oxygen is dominated by thermal processes. Based on the low oxygen coverage and long poisoning transients, plasma cathodes appear to be able to withstand higher oxygen concentrations than vacuum cathodes.

  2. Sensitive Detection: Photoacoustics, Thermography, and Optical Radiation Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, Gerald J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2017-04-21

    Research during the granting period has been carried out in several areas concerned with sensitive detection. An infrared pyrometer based on the photoacoustic effect has been developed. The sensitivity of this instrument to temperature differentials has been shown to be 50 mK. An investigation of transients that accompany photoacoustic waves generated by pulsed lasers has been carried out. Experiments have shown the existence of the transients, and a theory based on rapid heat diffusion has been developed. The photoacoustic effect in one dimension is known to increase without bound (in the linear acoustics regime) when an optical beam moves in a fluid at the sound speed. A solution to the wave equation for pressure has been found that describes the photoacoustic effect in a cell where an infrared optical grating moves at the sound speed. It was shown that the amplification effect exists along with a cavity resonance that can be used to great advantage in trace gas detection. The theory of the photoacoustic effect in a structure where the acoustic properties periodically vary in a one-dimensional based has been formulated based on solutions to a Mathieu equation. It was found that it is possible to excite photoacoustic waves within the band gaps to produce large amplitude acoustic waves. The idea of self-oscillation in a photoacoustic cell using a continuous laser has been investigated. A theory has been completed showing that in a compressive wave, the absorption increases as a result of the density increase leading to further absorption and hence an increased amplitude photoacoustic effect with the result that in a resonator, self-oscillation can place. Experiments have been carried out where irradiation of a suspension of absorbing carbon particles with a high power laser has been shown to result in cavitation luminescence. That is, following generation of CO and H2 from the carbon particles through the carbon-steam reaction, an expanding gas bubble is

  3. DRUCKFLAMM - Investigation on combustion and hot gas cleanup in pulverized coal combustion systems. Final report; DRUCKFLAMM - Untersuchungen zur Verbrennung und Heissgasreinigung bei der Druckkohlenstaubfeuerung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, K.R.G.; Benoehr, A.; Schuermann, H.; Stroehle, J.; Klaiber, C.; Kuhn, R.; Maier, J.; Schnell, U.; Unterberger, S.

    2001-07-01

    facility of the Technical University of Aachen. (orig.) [German] Die Bestrebungen einer effizienten und schadstoffarmen Energieversorgung fuehrten bei der Kohleverbrennung zur Entwicklung von kohlebasierten Kombikraftwerken, die im Vergleich zum konventionellen Kondensationskraftwerk eine deutliche Anhebung des Nettowirkungsgrades erlauben. Eines der Kombikraftwerkskonzepte auf Kohlebasis stellt die Druckkohlenstaubfeuerung dar, die gegenueber den anderen Konzepten das hoechste Wirkungsgradpotential aufweist. Das Ziel dieses Forschungsvorhabens war die Gewinnung gesicherter Erkenntnisse hinsichtlich des Feuerungsverhaltens von Kohle in einer Druckkohlenstaubfeuerung. Es wurden an einem Druckflugstromreaktor detaillierte Untersuchungen zur Brennstoffumsetzung und zum Partikelverhalten, zur Schadstoffbildung und zum Werkstoffverhalten unter Bedingungen der Druckkohlenstaubfeuerung durchgefuehrt. Im Laufe des Forschungsvorhabens wurden einige neue Messtechniken eingesetzt und teilweise auch angeschafft, wie zum Beispiel ein Zwei- Farb-Pyrometer zur simultanen Erfassung von Partikeloberflaechentemperatur und Partikeldurchmesser von brennenden Brennstoffpartikeln. Parallel zu den experimentellen Untersuchungen wurde an der Erarbeitung neuer Berechnungsmodelle gearbeitet, um eine spaetere Feuerraumsimulation fuer ein verbessertes Scale-Up zu ermoeglichen. Die am Druckflugstromreaktor gewonnenen Ergebnisse zeigen, dass der erhoehte Systemdruck sich auf sehr viele Verbrennungsmechanismen stark auswirkt, so konnte eine schnellere Brennstoffumsetzung und gleichzeitig verminderte Stickoxid- und Alkaligasemission nachgewiesen werden. Die Werkstoffuntersuchungen zeigten, dass die aufgrund der sehr hohen Verbrennungstemperaturen benoetigten Keramikwerkstoffe sehr empfindlich gegenueber Verschlackung und schnellen Temperaturwechseln sind, weshalb hinsichtlich der benoetigten Standzeiten in einer zu realisierenden Druckbrennkammer noch erheblicher Entwicklungsbedarf besteht. Hinsichtlich

  4. Multilayer Steel Materials Deformation Resistance and Roll Force Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Kolesnikov

    2014-01-01

    press screws of the mill. The oven thermocouple controlled a rolling temperature, and two pyrometers Optris CTlaser 3MH3 at the input and output parts of the mill made records.Comparison of the rolling forces of the multilayer composition U8+08H18N10, which were received during experiment, with the calculated values, shows that with accumulative nature of deformations the real forces of rolling 1.5 – 2 times exceed the calculated values. The analysis of experimental data showed illegality of using the averagely proportional value of the flow limit to calculate the rolling forces of compositions with the large number of the alternating thin layers of various steels. For calculations of the rolling forces of such super-multilayer materials, a deformation resistance of each composition ought to be determined using the experimental data.

  5. Synthesis of thin films in boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary system by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Ratandeep Singh

    deposition chamber. Hexagonal -- BN thin films are successfully deposited using Diborane (B2H6) (5% in H2), Ammonia (NH3) and H2 as precursor gases in the conventional MPECVD mode with and without the negative DC bias. The quality of h-BN in the films improved with pressure and when NH3 used as the first precursor gas in the deposition chamber. c-BN thin films are successfully deposited using Boron-Trifluoride (BF3) (10% in Argon (Ar)), N2, H2, Ar and Helium (He) gases in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) mode of the MPECVD system with negative DC bias. Up-to 66% c-BN in the films is achieved under deposition conditions of lower gas flow rates and higher deposition pressures than that reported in the literature for film deposited by ECR-MPECVD. It is shown that the percentage c-BN in the films correlates with the deposition pressure, BF3/H2 ratio and, negative DC bias during nucleation and growth. Diamond thin films are deposited using 60%Ar, 39% H2 and, 1%CH4 at 600°C, 700°C and 800°C substrate temperatures, measured by an IR pyrometer, on Si substrates pre-treated with 3-6nm diamond sol and 20-40mum diamond slurry. Raman spectroscopy, FTIR, X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and, photo-thermal reflectivity methods are used to characterize the thin films. Residual stresses observed for the diamond thin films deposited in this study are tensile in nature and increased with deposition temperature. Better quality diamond films with lower residual stresses are obtained for films deposited on Si substrate pre-treated with 3-6nm diamond sol. Preliminary results on thermal conductivity, k, suggest that k is directly dependent on the deposition temperature and independent of substrate pre-treatment signifying that the nano-seeding technique can be used to replace conventional surface activation technique for diamond seeding where needed.

  6. Glass Furnace Combustion and Melting Research Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connors, John J. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); McConnell, John F. (JFM Consulting, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Henry, Vincent I. (Henry Technology Solutions, LLC, Ann Arbor, MI); MacDonald, Blake A.; Gallagher, Robert J.; Field, William B. (Lilja Corp., Livermore, CA); Walsh, Peter M.; Simmons, Michael C. (Lilja Corp., Livermore, CA); Adams, Michael E. (Lilja Corp., Rochester, NY); Leadbetter, James M. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Tomasewski, Jack W. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Operacz, Walter J. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Houf, William G.; Davis, James W. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Marvin, Bart G. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Gunner, Bruce E. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Farrell, Rick G. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Bivins, David P. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Curtis, Warren (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Harris, James E. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA)

    2004-08-01

    instrumented with standard measuring equipment, such as flow meters, thermocouples, continuous gas composition analyzers, optical pyrometers, and a video camera. The output from the instruments is to be continuously recorded and simultaneously made available to other researchers via the Internet. A unique aspect of the research facility would be its access to the expertise in optical measurements in flames and high temperature reacting flows residing in the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Development of new techniques for monitoring and control of glass melting would be a major focus of the work. The lab would be equipped with conventional and laser light sources and detectors for optical measurements of gas temperature, velocity, and gaseous species and, using new techniques to be developed in the Research Facility itself, glass temperature and glass composition.

  7. Quality Evaluations and Comparisons of Radiation Data at Lin'an and Longfengshan Stations%临安与龙凤山辐射数据质量及初步结果比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋建洋; 郑向东; 程兴宏; 马千里; 俞向明; 代鑫; 于大江

    2013-01-01

    2AP (2 axis position) in tracking sun-disk is the main cause for those direct and diffuse radiation data failing to meet the conditions of quality test, and the scenario is more frequent at the high SZA (solar zenith angle). Compared to the rate evaluated by the prevalent limit of global radiation error, the BSRN third step makes the rate of validated solar radiation data be reduced by 0. 9% and 1. 6% at Lin'an and Longfengshan, respectively. The thermal offset of CM21 pyrometer is from —5 W · m~2 to —2 W · m~2. With the compensation of thermal offset, the rate of radiation data meeting requirements of the BSRN quality test is obviously improved. It is well known that the most important factor affecting the surface solar radiation includes cloud, water vapor and aerosol. Therefore, variations of solar radiation with changes of SZA are analyzed with removal of cloud effect. It is identified that the global and direct radiation irradiances at Lin'an are obviously lower than those at Longfengshan with the same SZA, while the diffuse radiation is opposite. The cause for these phenomena is due to the lower atmospheric transparency and higher atmospheric turbidity at Lin'an. The annual averages of solar radiation and DLR at the sites are calculated. The annual averaged daily integrated global solar radiation and global solar radiation under clear condition at Lin'an are 12. 4 ± 7. 2, 16.5 + 5. 0 MJ · m~2, while the coincident average radiations at Longfengshan are 13. 5 ± 7. 2, 15.5 ± 6. 2 MJ · m-2. Annual average DLR at Lin'an is 363. 7 ± 59. 3 W · m-2, obviously higher than that at Longfengshan (274. 9 ± 77. 6 W · m-2). There is an obvious decreasing trend of DLR at Lin'an, and global solar radiation takes on an increasing trend at Longfengshan under clear sky.

  8. Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous LWR MOX fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, D.; Barker, M.

    2013-11-01

    view of the location where the thermograms are recorded: the temperature transients on the rear face of the samples are measured with a pyrometer and the system is provided with a lens assembly which enables a 1 mm diameter spot of the sample surface to be focused onto the signal collecting fibre. The thermograms are therefore averaged over a 1 mm diameter surface, which is much larger than the size of the heterogeneities (Pu rich agglomerates with a size of less than 200 μm).The impact of sample thickness on the measured thermal diffusivity was experimentally investigated for the MIMAS MOX with 7.0 wt.% Pu. For this purpose, discs of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mm thickness were cut and the thermal diffusivity was measured. The same investigation was done for standard UO2, in order to verify the accuracy of the inverse technique used for the identification of the thermal diffusivity from the thermograms. The inverse technique [39] explicitly takes into account the sample thickness in the calculation of the heat losses. The results for UO2 (Fig. 6) show that the measured thermal diffusivity does not depend on sample thickness, and is in good agreement with the recommendation of Fink [16]. The results for the heterogeneous MOX (Fig. 7) also show no dependence on sample thickness.