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Sample records for pyritic ash-flow tuff

  1. Pyritic ash-flow tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada -- A discussion

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    Weiss, S.I.; Larson, L.T.; Noble, D.C. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Textural and mineralogic evidence exists for at least one episode of widespread hydrothermal alteration of volcanic rocks deep in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Despite this evidence, Castor et al. infer that most of the pyrite found in tuffs at Yucca Mountain was introduced as ejecta (lithic fragments) incorporated during the eruptions of the tuffs, rather than by in-situ hydrothermal activity. Their conclusions appear to be based on their observation that most of the pyrite resides in unaltered to variably altered and veined lithic fragments, whereas pyrite-bearing veins are absent in the tuff matrix, titanomagnetite and mafic phenocrysts in the matrix are generally not replaced by pyrite, and feldspar phenocrysts in the pyritic tuff matrix are generally unaltered. Castor et al. dismiss the much smaller quantities of pyrite disseminated in the tuff matrix, including relatively rare pyritized hornblende and biotite grains, as xenolithic as well. The pyritic tuffs belong to large-volume, subalkaline rhyolite ash-flow units (ca. > 150 to 250 km{sup 3} each). The interpretation of Castor et al. has broad implications for the temperature, fO{sub 2} and fS{sub 2} of major ash flow eruptions. Pyrite origin also bears on the nature of past fluid flow and water-rock reactions at Yucca Mountain, which in turn are important factors in assessing the potential for currently undiscovered mineral resources in the area of the proposed nuclear waste repository. We have studied core and cuttings from the same drill holes studied by Castor et al., as well as other drill holes. It is our contention that the inconsistent lateral and stratigraphic distribution of the pyrite, textural features of the pyrite, and phase stability considerations are incompatible with the {open_quotes}lithic{close_quotes} origin of Castor et al., and are more reasonably explained by in-situ formation from hydrothermal fluids containing low, but geochemically significant, concentrations of reduced sulfur.

  2. Physical properties of ash flow tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

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    Nelson, Philip H.; Anderson, Lennart A.

    1992-05-01

    The density and porosity of 198 samples of ash flow tuffs from three boreholes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are measured and determined. The electrical properties, velocity, and permeability of many of these samples are also determined. Zeolites and clays are found to reduce the grain density, increase the electrical conductivity, reduce the compressional velocity, and reduce the permeability.

  3. Ash-flow tuffs of the Galiuro Volcanics in the northern Galiuro Mountains, Pinal County, Arizona

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    Krieger, Medora Louise Hooper

    1979-01-01

    The upper Oligocene and lower Miocene Galiuro Volcanics in the northern part of the Galiuro Mountains contains two distinctive major ash-flow tuff sheets, the Holy Joe and Aravaipa Members. These major ash-flows illustrate many features of ash-flow geology not generally exposed so completely. The Holy Joe Member, composed of a series of densely welded flows of quartz latite composition that make up a simple cooling unit. is a rare example of a cooling unit that has a vitrophyre at the top as well as at the base. The upper vitrophyre does not represent a cooling break. The Aravaipa Member. a rhyolite, is completely exposed in Aravaipa and other canyons and on Table Mountain. Remarkable exposures along Whitewash Canyon exhibit the complete change from a typical stacked-up interior zonation of an ash flow to a non welded distal margin. Vertical and horizontal changes in welding, crystallization, specific gravity, and lithology are exposed. The ash flow can be divided into six lithologic zones. The Holy Joe and Aravaipa Members of the Galiuro Volcanics are so well exposed and so clearly show characteristic features of ash-flow tuffs that they could be a valuable teaching aid and a source of theses for geology students.

  4. Comenditic and pantelleritic ash-flow tuffs from Volcan Las Navajas, Nayarit, Mexico

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    Nelson, S.A.; Hebre, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two distinctive ash-flow tuffs occur around the base of Volcan Las Navajas, a Pleistocene trachyte - peralkaline rhyolite center located in the northwestern segment of the Mexican Volcanic belt. The lower ash-flow unit is locally up to 65 m thick, is lithic rich and contains pumice blocks of comenditic rhyolite. The unit is not extensively exposed, and thus its areal extent and volume cannot be determined. Its chemical characteristics and stratigraphic relationship to other products erupted from Las Navajas suggest that it is related to the formation of the older of the two calderas which occur on Las Navajas. Unconformably overlying this unwelded ash-flow is a pantelleritic airfall pumice unit which is locally welded. This airfall unit is conformably overlain by a welded as-flow tuff that contains fiamme of pantelleritic composition (72 %SiO/sub 2/, 8% FeO*, 900 ppm Zr, agpaitic index of 1.7) as well as pumice blocks that show evidence of various degrees of mixing between pantellerite and trachyte. This suggests eruption from a chemically zoned magma chamber. This unit is locally up to 20 m thick, although its top has been removed by erosion. It is found on all sides of Las Navajas except on the south where it may be covered by Volcan Sanganguey, a Pleistocene to Recent calc-alkaline volcano. The welded ash-flow has been dated by K - Ar at 0.2+/-0.1 m.y. Stratigraphically and chemically this ash-flow appears to be related to the formation of younger of the two calderas.

  5. High-temperature, large-volume, lavalike ash-flow tuffs without calderas in southwestern Idaho

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    Ekren, E.B.; McIntyre, David H.; Bennett, Earl H.

    1984-01-01

    Rhyolitic rocks were erupted from vents in and adjacent to the Owyhee Mountains and Owyhee Plateau of southwestern Idaho from 16 m.y. ago to about 10 m.y. ago. They were deposited on a highly irregular surface developed on a variety of basement rocks that include granitic rocks of Cretaceous age, quartz latite and rhyodacite tuffs and lava flows of Eocene age, andesitic and basaltic lava flows of Oligocene age, and latitic and basaltic lava flows of early Miocene age. The rhyolitic rocks are principally welded tuffs that, regardless of their source, have one feature in common-namely internal characteristics indicating en-masse, viscous lavalike flowage. The flowage features commonly include considerable thicknesses of flow breccia at the bases of various cooling units. On the basis of the tabular nature of the rhyolitic deposits, their broad areal extents, and the local preservation of pyroclastic textures at the bases, tops, and distal ends of some of the deposits, we have concluded that the rocks were emplaced as ash flows at extremely high temperatures and that they coalesced to liquids before final emplacement and cooling. Temperatures of l090?C and higher are indicated by iron-titanium oxide compositions. Rhyolites that are about 16 m.y. old are preserved mostly in the downdropped eastern and western flanks of the Silver City Range and they are inferred to have been erupted from the Silver City Range. They rarely contain more than about 2 percent phenocrysts that consist of quartz and subequal amounts of plagioclase and alkali feldspar; commonly, they contain biotite, and they are the only rhyolitic rocks in the area to do so. The several rhyolitic units that are 14 m.y. to about 10 m.y. old contain only pyroxene-principally ferriferous and intermediate pigeonites-as mafic constituents. The rhyolites of the Silver City Range comprise many cooling units, none of which can be traced for great distances. Rocks erupted from the Owyhee Plateau include two sequences

  6. Magnetism and magnetic mineralogy of ash flow tuffs from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

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    Schlinger, Charles M.; Veblen, David R.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.

    1991-04-01

    The magnetic susceptibility (χ) and remanent magnetization of an ash flow sheet are profoundly influenced by cooling history after emplacement. Spatial variations in these properties, therefore, provide a potentially useful tool for geological studies. Maxima and minima in χ measured along profiles at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, identify persistent magnetic marker horizons within vitric portions of the Tiva Canyon and underlying Topopah Spring Members of the Paintbrush Tuff. The correlatable variations of χ with vertical position in these units exist over the 8 km of strike examined. The observed stratigraphic changes in magnetic properties reflect variations in amounts and mineralogy of Fe-Ti oxide phenocrysts, and the presence, shape, size, and mineralogy of magnetic Fe-oxide microcrystals that precipitated at high temperature after emplacement of each sheet. Vitrophyre near the top of the Topopah Spring Member has a distinctive maximum in χ, due to titanomagnetite phenocrysts. Susceptibility in the lower portion of the overlying Tiva Canyon Member reaches maximum values of about 1.3×10-2 (SI) near the base of the member, beneath the columnarly jointed vitrophyre, due to the presence of abundant superparamagnetic cubic Fe-oxide. These elongate microcrystals are several tens of nm long, and are typically deformed and tapered. Up section in the Tiva Canyon Member, the susceptibility decreases, going to a minimum within the columnar vitrophyre. At this stratigraphic level the precipitated Fe-oxides are larger and carry intense NRM of up to 30 A/m; χ is only 3×10-3. The whisker-like microcrystals of Fe-oxide, which typically nucleated on what appears to be chain silicate, grew as needles up to 25 μm in length. The size variations of the precipitated Fe-oxides, which were established using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and petrographic observation, are consistent both with variations in magnetic susceptibility measured at the outcrop and with variations

  7. Magnetic, structural and geochronologic evidence bearing on volcanic sources and Oligocene Deformation of Ash Flow Tuffs, northeast Nevada

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    Palmer, H. C.; MacDonald, W. D.; Hayatsu, A.

    1991-02-01

    Magnetic properties of mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks west of Jiggs in northeast Nevada were investigated for the purposes of interpreting igneous, structural, and tectonic processes in this part of the Basin and Range province. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) patterns reflect flow fabrics and suggest previously unknown sources for these ash flow tuffs. Paleomagnetic and structural evidence suggest counterclockwise relative rotation of the southern part of the area with respect to the north. New stratigraphic, chemical and K-Ar isotopic data support these interpretations. Dacite to rhyolite ash flow tuffs of the Indian Well Formation were subdivided into two main units: the lower and predominant tuff of Jiggs (35.8-37.0 Ma) and the unconformably overlying but areally restricted tuff of Hackwood (30.8 Ma). The Jiggs unit has two polarities whereas the Hackwood has only a reversed polarity remanence. Together these units with tilt correction define a pole (92°E, 87°N, dp = 6°, dm = 8°) for approximately 30-37 Ma. This pole is concordant with coeval North American reference poles, indicating that this zone of approximately 30 km NS extent has not undergone significant vertical axis rotation relative to the North American reference. Andesite lavas of normal magnetic polarity and of 32.5-Ma age characterize the Diamond Hills immediately to the south. We interpret this region, from both structural evidence and discordant paleomagnetic direction, to have rotated approximately 25° counterclockwise relative to the Indian Well volcanic units to the north. The apparent rotation of the Diamond Hills is possibly the result of drag on the left-lateral Garcia fault which limits the Diamond Hills on the southwest. Analysis of AMS data suggests, by patterns of the K1 axes, two distinct sources for the Jiggs unit: a northern buried source and a central partially buried source. Lithologic evidence consistent with proximal vent facies is found near the latter source. An

  8. Comagmatic granophyric granite in the Fish Canyon Tuff, Colorado: Implications for magma-chamber processes during a large ash-flow eruption

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    Lipman, P.; Dungan, M.; Bachmann, Olivier

    1997-01-01

    The 27.8 Ma Fish Canyon Tuff, a vast ash-flow sheet (??5000 km3) of uniform phenocryst-rich dacite, is representative of "monotonous intermediate" eruptions from a magma chamber that lacked compositional gradients. Sparse small fragments of comagmatic granophyre in late-erupted tuff and postcaldera lava, having mineral compositions indistinguishable from phenocrysts in the tuff and precaldera lava-like rocks, record complex events in the Fish Canyon chamber just prior to eruption. Sanidine phenocrysts in the granophyre preserve zoning evidence of mingling with andesitic magma, then shattering by decompression and volatile loss accompanying early Fish Canyon eruptions before overgrowth by granophyre. The textural and chemical disequilibria indicate that the eruption resulted from batholith-scale remobilization of a shallow subvolcanic chamber, contrary to previous interpretations of magma storage and phenocryst growth in the lower crust.

  9. The Effects of Variable Welding and Devitrification on the Magnetic Fabric of Ash Flow Tuffs: An AMS and AARM Study of the Oligocene Carpenter Ridge Tuff, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

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    Mason, S. N.; Geissman, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data have been shown to be a powerful means of estimating the transport direction, and thus inferred source region, for several large volume, regionally extensive ash-flow tuffs (ignimbrites). Anisotropy of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (AARM) data have, on the other hand, corroborated inferred controls by different assemblages of magnetic particles on magnetic fabrics. For ash-flow tuffs, the effects of variable degrees of welding and subsequent devitrification on the magnetic fabric of these pyroclastic deposits are not well understood. We have collected magnetic fabric data from a continuously exposed sequence of outflow facies of the ca. 27.55 Ma Carpenter Ridge Tuff (CRT), one of the major large volume ash-flow tuffs of the Southern Rocky Mountain Volcanic Field, southwest Colorado, about 3 km east of Buffalo Pass on Colorado Highway 114. The CRT, a compound cooling unit, is of reverse polarity (although there is considerable internal variability in direction through the section) and was sourced from the Bachelor Caldera, southwest of the sample locality. Some 21 total independently oriented samples, as very large oriented blocks, were collected in traverse fashion through most of the lowermost cooling unit of the tuff, and an additional ten block samples were collected from the moderately welded and completely devitrified third cooling unit. At least ten and often 20 to 30 discrete specimens were prepared for analyses from each block. Orientation of AMS principal axes are internally consistent at the oriented sample level and, overall, throughout the section sampled, and imply a west to east transport orientation in this area, consistent with several other sampling sites in the CRT in the northeast part of the Southern Rocky Mountain Volcanic Field. AARM data at the block sample level are usually more dispersed. All of the samples have positive T values, implying strong foliations. The degree of anisotropy (P

  10. Origin of silicic volcanic rocks in Central Costa Rica: a study of a chemically variable ash-flow sheet in the Tiribí Tuff

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    Hannah, Rachel; Vogel, Thomas; Patino, Lina; Alvarado, Guillermo; Pérez, Wendy; Smith, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Chemical heterogeneities of pumice clasts in an ash-flow sheet can be used to determine processes that occur in the magma chamber because they represent samples of magma that were erupted at the same time. The dominant ash-flow sheet in the Tiribí Tuff contains pumice clasts that range in composition from 55.1 to 69.2 wt% SiO2. It covers about 820 km2 and has a volume of about 25 km3 dense-rock equivalent (DRE). Based on pumice clast compositions, the sheet can be divided into three distinct chemical groupings: a low-silica group (55.1-65.6 wt% SiO2), a silicic group (66.2-69.2 wt% SiO2), and a mingled group (58.6-67.7 wt% SiO2; all compositions calculated 100% anhydrous). Major and trace element modeling indicates that the low-silica magma represents a mantle melt that has undergone fractional crystallization, creating a continuous range of silica content from 55.1-65.6 wt% SiO2. Eu/Eu*, MREE, and HREE differences between the two groups are not consistent with crystal fractionation of the low-silica magma to produce the silicic magma. The low-silica group and the silicic group represent two distinct magmas, which did not evolve in the same magma chamber. We suggest that the silicic melts resulted from partial melting of relatively hot, evolved calc-alkaline rocks that were previously emplaced and ponded at the base of an over-thickened basaltic crust. The mingled group represents mingling of the two magmas shortly before eruption. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00445-001-0188-8.

  11. Magnetic properties in an ash flow tuff with continuous grain size variation: a natural reference for magnetic particle granulometry

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    Till, J.L.; Jackson, M.J.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Solheid, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Tiva Canyon Tuff contains dispersed nanoscale Fe-Ti-oxide grains with a narrow magnetic grain size distribution, making it an ideal material in which to identify and study grain-size-sensitive magnetic behavior in rocks. A detailed magnetic characterization was performed on samples from the basal 5 m of the tuff. The magnetic materials in this basal section consist primarily of (low-impurity) magnetite in the form of elongated submicron grains exsolved from volcanic glass. Magnetic properties studied include bulk magnetic susceptibility, frequency-dependent and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanence acquisition, and hysteresis properties. The combined data constitute a distinct magnetic signature at each stratigraphic level in the section corresponding to different grain size distributions. The inferred magnetic domain state changes progressively upward from superparamagnetic grains near the base to particles with pseudo-single-domain or metastable single-domain characteristics near the top of the sampled section. Direct observations of magnetic grain size confirm that distinct transitions in room temperature magnetic susceptibility and remanence probably denote the limits of stable single-domain behavior in the section. These results provide a unique example of grain-size-dependent magnetic properties in noninteracting particle assemblages over three decades of grain size, including close approximations of ideal Stoner-Wohlfarth assemblages, and may be considered a useful reference for future rock magnetic studies involving grain-size-sensitive properties.

  12. Voluminous lava-like precursor to a major ash-flow tuff: Low-column pyroclastic eruption of the Pagosa Peak Dacite, San Juan volcanic field, Colorado

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    Bachmann, Olivier; Dungan, M.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Pagosa Peak Dacite is an unusual pyroclastic deposit that immediately predated eruption of the enormous Fish Canyon Tuff (~5000 km3) from the La Garita caldera at 28 Ma. The Pagosa Peak Dacite is thick (to 1 km), voluminous (>200 km3), and has a high aspect ratio (1:50) similar to those of silicic lava flows. It contains a high proportion (40-60%) of juvenile clasts (to 3-4 m) emplaced as viscous magma that was less vesiculated than typical pumice. Accidental lithic fragments are absent above the basal 5-10% of the unit. Thick densely welded proximal deposits flowed rheomorphically due to gravitational spreading, despite the very high viscosity of the crystal-rich magma, resulting in a macroscopic appearance similar to flow-layered silicic lava. Although it is a separate depositional unit, the Pagosa Peak Dacite is indistinguishable from the overlying Fish Canyon Tuff in bulk-rock chemistry, phenocryst compositions, and 40Ar/39Ar age. The unusual characteristics of this deposit are interpreted as consequences of eruption by low-column pyroclastic fountaining and lateral transport as dense, poorly inflated pyroclastic flows. The inferred eruptive style may be in part related to synchronous disruption of the southern margin of the Fish Canyon magma chamber by block faulting. The Pagosa Peak eruptive sources are apparently buried in the southern La Garita caldera, where northerly extensions of observed syneruptive faults served as fissure vents. Cumulative vent cross-sections were large, leading to relatively low emission velocities for a given discharge rate. Many successive pyroclastic flows accumulated sufficiently rapidly to weld densely as a cooling unit up to 1000 m thick and to retain heat adequately to permit rheomorphic flow. Explosive potential of the magma may have been reduced by degassing during ascent through fissure conduits, leading to fracture-dominated magma fragmentation at low vesicularity. Subsequent collapse of the 75 x 35 km2 La Garita

  13. A high-pyrite semianthracite of Late Permian age in the Songzao Coalfield, southwestern China: Mineralogical and geochemical relations with underlying mafic tuffs

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    Dai, Shifeng; Wang, Xibo; Chen, Wenmei [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083, (China); Li, Dahua [Research Center of State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, Chongqing 400042, (China); Chou, Chen-Lin [Illinois State Geological Survey (Emeritus), 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, (United States); Zhou, Yiping [Yunnan Institute of Coal Geology Prospection, Kunming 650218, (China); Zhu, Changsheng; Li, Hang [Research Center of State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, Chongqing 400042, (China); Zhu, Xingwei; Xing, Yunwei; Zhang, Weiguo; Zou, Jianhua [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083, (China)

    2010-09-01

    The No. 12 Coal (Late Permian) in the Songzao Coalfield, Chongqing, southwestern China, is characteristically high in pyrite and some trace elements. It is uniquely deposited directly above mafic tuff beds. Samples of coal and tuffs have been studied for their mineralogy and geochemistry using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, plasma low-temperature ashing plus powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The results show that the minerals of the No. 12 Coal are mainly composed of pyrite, clay minerals (kaolinite, chamosite, and illite), ankerite, calcite, and trace amounts of quartz and boehmite. Kaolinite and boehmite were mainly derived from sediment source region of mafic tuffs. Chamosite was formed by the reaction of kaolinite with Fe-Mg-rich fluids during early diagenesis. The high pyrite (S{sub p,d} 8.83%) in the coal was related to marine transgression over peat deposits and abundant Fe derived from the underlying mafic tuff bed. Ankerite and calcite were precipitated from epigenetic fluids. Chemical compositions of incompatible elements indicate that the tuffs were derived from enriched mantle and the source magmas had an alkali-basalt character. Compared to other coals from the Songzao Coalfield and common Chinese coals, the No. 12 Coal has a lower SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1.13) but a higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}O (80.1) value and is significantly enriched in trace elements including Sc (13.5 {mu}g/g), V (121 {mu}g/g), Cr (33.6 {mu}g/g), Co (27.2 {mu}g/g), Ni (83.5 {mu}g/g), Cu (48.5 {mu}g/g), Ga (17.3 {mu}g/g), Y (68.3 {mu}g/g), Zr (444 {mu}g/g), Nb (23.8 {mu}g/g), and REE (392 {mu}g/g on average). Above mineralogical compositions, as well as similar ratios of selected elements (e.g., SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}O) and similar distribution patterns of incompatible elements (e.g., the mantle-normalized diagram for

  14. A high-pyrite semianthracite of Late Permian age in the Songzao Coalfield, southwestern China: Mineralogical and geochemical relations with underlying mafic tuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Wang, X.; Chen, W.; Li, D.; Chou, C.-L.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, Chen; Li, H.; Zhu, Xudong; Xing, Y.; Zhang, W.; Zou, J.

    2010-01-01

    The No. 12 Coal (Late Permian) in the Songzao Coalfield, Chongqing, southwestern China, is characteristically high in pyrite and some trace elements. It is uniquely deposited directly above mafic tuff beds. Samples of coal and tuffs have been studied for their mineralogy and geochemistry using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, plasma low-temperature ashing plus powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis.The results show that the minerals of the No. 12 Coal are mainly composed of pyrite, clay minerals (kaolinite, chamosite, and illite), ankerite, calcite, and trace amounts of quartz and boehmite. Kaolinite and boehmite were mainly derived from sediment source region of mafic tuffs. Chamosite was formed by the reaction of kaolinite with Fe-Mg-rich fluids during early diagenesis. The high pyrite (Sp,d=8.83%) in the coal was related to marine transgression over peat deposits and abundant Fe derived from the underlying mafic tuff bed. Ankerite and calcite were precipitated from epigenetic fluids.Chemical compositions of incompatible elements indicate that the tuffs were derived from enriched mantle and the source magmas had an alkali-basalt character. Compared to other coals from the Songzao Coalfield and common Chinese coals, the No. 12 Coal has a lower SiO2/Al2O3 (1.13) but a higher Al2O3/Na2O (80.1) value and is significantly enriched in trace elements including Sc (13.5??g/g), V (121??g/g), Cr (33.6??g/g), Co (27.2??g/g), Ni (83.5??g/g), Cu (48.5??g/g), Ga (17.3??g/g), Y (68.3??g/g), Zr (444??g/g), Nb (23.8??g/g), and REE (392??g/g on average). Above mineralogical compositions, as well as similar ratios of selected elements (e.g., SiO2/Al2O3 and Al2O3/Na2O) and similar distribution patterns of incompatible elements (e.g., the mantle-normalized diagram for incompatible elements and chondrite-normalized diagram for rare earth elements) of coal and tuff, indicated that

  15. Mineral and chemical variations within an ash-flow sheet from Aso caldera, Southwestern Japan

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    Lipman, P.W.

    1967-01-01

    Although products of individual volcanic eruptions, especially voluminous ash-flow eruptions, have been considered among the best available samples of natural magmas, detailed petrographic and chemical study indicates that bulk compositions of unaltered Pleistocene ash-flow tuffs from Aso caldera, Japan, deviate significantly from original magmatic compositions. The last major ash-flow sheet from Aso caldera is as much as 150 meters thick and shows a general vertical compositional change from phenocryst-poor rhyodacite upward into phenocryst-rich trachyandesite; this change apparently reflects in inverse order a compositionally zoned magma chamber in which more silicic magma overlay more mafic magma. Details of these magmatic variations were obscured, however, by: (1) mixing of compositionally distinct batches of magma during upwelling in the vent, as indicated by layering and other heterogeneities within single pumice lumps; (2) mixing of particulate fragments-pumice lumps, ash, and phenocrysts-of varied compositions during emplacement, with the result that separate pumice lenses from a single small outcrop may have a compositional range nearly as great as the bulk-rook variation of the entire sheet; (3) density sorting of phenocrysts and ash during eruption and emplacement, resulting in systematic modal variations with distance from the caldera; (4) addition of xenocrysts, resulting in significant contamination and modification of proportions of crystals in the tuffs; and (5) ground-water leaching of glassy fractions during hydration after cooling. Similar complexities characterize ash-flow tuffs under study in southwestern Nevada and in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, and probably are widespread in other ash-flow fields as well. Caution and careful planning are required in study of the magmatic chemistry and phenocryst mineralogy of these rocks. ?? 1967 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Subsidence of ash-flow calderas: Relation to caldera size and magma-chamber geometry

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    Lipman, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Diverse subsidence geometries and collapse processes for ash-flow calderas are inferred to reflect varying sizes, roof geometries, and depths of the source magma chambers, in combination with prior volcanic and regional tectonic influences. Based largely on a review of features at eroded pre-Quaternary calderas, a continuum of geometries and subsidence styles is inferred to exist, in both island-arc and continental settings, between small funnel calderas and larger plate (piston) subsidences bounded by arcuate faults. Within most ring-fault calderas, the subsided block is variably disrupted, due to differential movement during ash-flow eruptions and postcollapse magmatism, but highly chaotic piecemeal subsidence appears to be uncommon for large-diameter calderas. Small-scale downsag structures and accompanying extensional fractures develop along margins of most calderas during early stages of subsidence, but downsag is dominant only at calderas that have not subsided deeply. Calderas that are loci for multicyclic ash-flow eruption and subsidence cycles have the most complex internal structures. Large calderas have flared inner topographic walls due to landsliding of unstable slopes, and the resulting slide debris can constitute large proportions of caldera fill. Because the slide debris is concentrated near caldera walls, models from geophysical data can suggest a funnel geometry, even for large plate-subsidence calderas bounded by ring faults. Simple geometric models indicate that many large calderas have subsided 3-5 km, greater than the depth of most naturally exposed sections of intracaldera deposits. Many ring-fault platesubsidence calderas and intrusive ring complexes have been recognized in the western U.S., Japan, and elsewhere, but no well-documented examples of exposed eroded calderas have large-scale funnel geometry or chaotically disrupted caldera floors. Reported ignimbrite "shields" in the central Andes, where large-volume ash-flows are inferred to

  17. Revised ages for tuffs of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field: Assignment of the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff to a new geomagnetic polarity event

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    Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Christiansen, R.L.; Izett, G.A.; Obradovich, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages were determined on the three major ash-flow tuffs of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field in the region of Yellowstone National Park in order to improve the precision of previously determined ages. Total-fusion and incremental-heating ages of sanidine yielded the following mean ages: Huckleberry Ridge Tuff-2.059 ?? 0.004 Ma; Mesa Falls Tuff-1.285 ?? 0.004 Ma; and Lava Creek Tuff-0.639 ?? 0.002 Ma. The Huckleberry Ridge Tuff has a transitional magnetic direction and has previously been related to the Reunion Normal-Polarity Subchron. Dating of the Reunion event has been reviewed and its ages have been normalized to a common value for mineral standards. The age of the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff is significantly younger than lava flows of the Reunion event on Re??union Island, supporting other evidence for a normal-polarity event younger than the Reunion event.

  18. Carpenter Ridge Tuff, CO

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    Bachmann, Olivier; Deering, Chad D.; Lipman, Peter W.; Plummer, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The ~1,000 km3 Carpenter Ridge Tuff (CRT), erupted at 27.55 Ma during the mid-tertiary ignimbrite flare-up in the western USA, is among the largest known strongly zoned ash-flow tuffs. It consists primarily of densely welded crystal-poor rhyolite with a pronounced, highly evolved chemical signature (high Rb/Sr, low Ba, Zr, Eu), but thickly ponded intracaldera CRT is capped by a more crystal-rich, less silicic facies. In the outflow ignimbrite, this upper zone is defined mainly by densely welded crystal-rich juvenile clasts of trachydacite composition, with higher Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, and is characterized by extremely high Ba (to 7,500 ppm), Zr, Sr, and positive Eu anomalies. Rare mafic clasts (51-53 wt% SiO2) with Ba contents to 4,000-5,000 ppm and positive Eu anomalies are also present. Much of the major and trace-element variations in the CRT juvenile clasts can be reproduced via in situ differentiation by interstitial melt extraction from a crystal-rich, upper-crustal mush zone, with the trachydacite, crystal-rich clasts representing the remobilized crystal cumulate left behind by the melt extraction process. Late recharge events, represented by the rare mafic clasts and high-Al amphiboles in some samples, mixed in with parts of the crystal cumulate and generated additional scatter in the whole-rock data. Recharge was important in thermally remobilizing the silicic crystal cumulate by partially melting the near-solidus phases, as supported by: (1) ubiquitous wormy/sieve textures and reverse zoning patterns in feldspars and biotites, (2) absence of quartz in this very silicic unit stored at depths of >4-5 km, and (3) heterogeneous melt compositions in the trachydacite fiamme and mafic clasts, particularly in Ba, indicating local enrichment of this element due mostly to sanidine and biotite melting. The injection of hot, juvenile magma into the upper-crustal cumulate also imparted the observed thermal gradient to the deposits and the mixing overprint that

  19. Age and petrology of the Late-Pleistocene brown tuffs on Lipari, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisci, G. M.; Delibrias, G.; de Rosa, R.; Mazzuoli, R.; Sheridan, M. F.

    1983-12-01

    Late-Pleistocene volcanic products on Lipari consist mainly of pyroclastic surge deposits (Monte Guardia sequence) and fine-grained brown tuffs. Radiometric age determination on carbon from thin soils at the top of the tuffs indicate that they have several ages of emplacement ranging from more than 35,000 to 16,800 years ago. Chemical and microprobe data on glass and mineral fragments from these tuffs show that they belong to a shoshonite or high-K series. This composition is compatible with an origin related to the magma system of Vulcano, but not with the magma system on Lipari. These tuffs have a widespread distribution on several of the Aeolian islands as well as on the northern part of Sicily. They have features typical of ash-flow tuffs of hydromagmatic origin. We propose that they originated from submarine eruptions from the Vulcanello vent before this volcano emerged above sea level.

  20. Hourglass inclusions: Theory and application to the Bishop rhyolitic tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A.T. Jr. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    Hourglass inclusions are bodies of bubble-bearing glass in volcanic phenocrysts that extend to the crystal rim through a narrow neck. Compared to enclosed inclusions, hourglass inclusions are less devitrified, contain more gas, but contain less dissolved H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and Cl. A quantitative model of rhyolitic hourglass emptying is developed and applied to Bishop Tuff hourglass inclusions. Those in plinian pumice suggest rapid ascent at 10 m/s consistent with theoretical eruption models. Hourglass inclusions from the Mono ash-flow lobe of the Bishop Tuff suggest (1) initial crystallization of quartz, formation of some enclosed and some hourglass inclusions at approximately 2,400 bars; (2) magma decompression to approximately 1,100 bars for at least a week (duration of eruption for the Bishop Tuff ) while hourglass inclusions further evolved and bubbles of gas attained a 50{mu}m diameter; (3) magma ascent from 1,100 to approximately 700 bars at approximately 1 m/s, consistent with theory for ash-flow-producing (collapsing) eruption columns; (4) entrainment of some crystals that had decompressed to a pressure of 400 bars for several weeks; (5) thermal quenching of hourglass evolution as magmatic foam disrupted into fast-moving spray, erupted, and entrained cold air. Uncertainties are large but can be reduced by future studies of postdepositional cooling, hourglass volatile compositions, temperature, and viscosity to obtain estimates of eruptive and preeruptive magma movement and crystallization rate.

  1. The Hydrogeologic Character of the Lower Tuff Confining Unit and the Oak Springs Butte Confining Unit in the Tuff Pile Area of Central Yucca Flat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drellack, Jr., Sigmund L.; Prothro, Lance B.; Gonzales, Jose L.; Mercadante, Jennifer M.

    2010-07-30

    , 2006). • No welded-tuff (or lava-flow aquifers), referred to as low-porosity, high-permeability zones in Boryta et al. (in review), are present within the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area. • Fractures within the LTCU are poorly developed, a characteristic of zeolitic tuffs; and fracture distributions are independent of stratigraphic and lithologic units (Prothro, 2008). • Groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will not be affected by laterally extensive zones of significantly higher permeability within the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area. Although not the primary focus of this report, the hydrogeologic character of the Oak Spring Butte confining unit (OSBCU), located directly below the LTCU, is also discussed. The OSBCU is lithologically more diverse, and does include nonwelded to partially welded ash-flow tuffs. However, these older ash-flow tuffs are poorly welded and altered (zeolitic to quartzofeldspathic), and consequently, would tend to have properties similar to a tuff confining unit rather than a welded-tuff aquifer.

  2. Explosive Origins of Welded Block and Ash Flow Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, G. D.; Michol, K.; Russell, K.

    2007-12-01

    The 2360 years B. P. eruption of Mount Meager, British Columbia, Canada, produced a succession of rarely- observed, welded block and ash flow deposits and non-welded equivalents, the Pebble Creek Formation. The welded block and ash flow deposits result from accumulation in a narrow, confined river valley; the accumulation was sufficiently rapid to keep the deposits above their glass transition temperature thereby allowing the succession to weld as a single cooling unit. The average integrated strain for vertical sections of the deposit is 31% implying > 50 m shortening of the thickest deposit (from 162 m to the current 112 m). Observations made in the field were supplemented by textural studies with the SEM and microscope, before being quantified by image analysis software. These data were then added to with measurements of connected and isolated porosity from the He-pycnometer at UBC. Only through the integration of these related data sets were we able to explore two significant findings: (1) Unconsolidated deposits have an average matrix porosity of ~41% and clasts have an average porosity of ~32%. Isolated porosity is pervasive (< 8%) in juvenile clasts, but is near absent in samples of matrix (< 1%). Welding and compaction cause a reduction in both connected and isolated porosity, where, equivalent amounts of strain (~38%) are recorded in matrix and clasts. Thus, both matrix and clasts are fully coupled during the welding and compaction process; in contrast, reports from pumiceous ignimbrites suggest that pumice clasts deform faster than the corresponding matrix. We present a series of strain evolution pathways that predict the theoretical welding trajectories for different pyroclastic deposits through porosity space. In this conceptual environment, coupled clast-matrix welding plots along the 1:1 diagonal. (2) The nature and distribution of isolated porosity in the juvenile clasts of rhyodacite (< 8%) suggests an explosive (rather than effusive) origin for

  3. Geologic character of tuffs in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.B.; Spengler, R.W.; Diehl, S.; Lappin, A.R.; Chornack, M.P.

    1982-12-31

    At Yucca Mountain, a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, evaluation of the geologic setting and rock physical properties, along with previous regional hydrologic studies, has provided background that can be used for construction of a preliminary conceptual hydrologic model of the unsaturated zone. The 500-m-thick unsaturated portion of Yucca Mountain consists of alternating layers of two contrasting types of tuff. One type consists of highly fractured, densely welded, relatively nonporous but highly transmissive ash-flow tuffs. The other type consists of relatively unfractured, nonwelded, highly porous but relatively nontransmissive, argillic and zeolitic bedded tuffs and ash-flow tuffs. The contrast between these two sets of distinctive physical properties results in a stratified sequence best described as "physical-property stratigraphy" as opposed to traditional petrologic stratigraphy of volcanic rocks. The vast majority of recharge through the unsaturated zone is assumed to be vertical; the dominant migration may occur in fractures of densely welded tuffs and in the matrix of nonwelded tuff, but the mode of fluid flow in these unsaturated systems is undetermined. Limited lateral flow of recharge may occur at horizons where local perched water tables may exist above relatively nontransmissive zeolitized nonwelded tuffs. The pervasive north-northwest-striking fractures may control the direction of lateral flow of recharge, if any, in the unsaturated zone, and certainly that direction coincides closely with the observed southeasterly flow direction in the saturated zone under Yucca Mountain. Empirical evaluation of this conceptual hydrologic model has begun. 41 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Geologic character of tuffs in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.B.; Spengler, R.W.; Diehl, S.; Lappin, A.R.; Chornack, M.P.

    1982-12-31

    At Yucca Mountain, a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, evaluation of the geologic setting and rock physical properties, along with previous regional hydrologic studies, has provided background that can be used for construction of a preliminary conceptual hydrologic model of the unsaturated zone. The 500-m-thick unsaturated portion of Yucca Mountain consists of alternating layers of two contrasting types of tuff. One type consists of highly fractured, densely welded, relatively nonporous but highly transmissive ash-flow tuffs. The other type consists of relatively unfractured, nonwelded, highly porous but relatively nontransmissive, argillic and zeolitic bedded tuffs and ash-flow tuffs. The contrast between these two sets of distinctive physical properties results in a stratified sequence best described as "physical-property stratigraphy" as opposed to traditional petrologic stratigraphy of volcanic rocks. The vast majority of recharge through the unsaturated zone is assumed to be vertical; the dominant migration may occur in fractures of densely welded tuffs and in the matrix of nonwelded tuff, but the mode of fluid flow in these unsaturated systems is undetermined. Limited lateral flow of recharge may occur at horizons where local perched water tables may exist above relatively nontransmissive zeolitized nonwelded tuffs. The pervasive north-northwest-striking fractures may control the direction of lateral flow of recharge, if any, in the unsaturated zone, and certainly that direction coincides closely with the observed southeasterly flow direction in the saturated zone under Yucca Mountain. Empirical evaluation of this conceptual hydrologic model has begun. 41 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Rheomorphism of welded tuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, J. A.; Wright, J. V.

    1981-05-01

    Peralkaline welded tuffs from the islands of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, and Pantelleria, Italy, show abundant evidence for post-depositional flow. It is demonstrated that rheomorphism, or secondary mass flowage, can occur in welded tuffs of ignimbrite and air-fall origin. The presence of a linear fabric is taken as the diagnostic criterion for the recognition of the process. Deposition on a slope is an essential condition for the development of rheomorphism after compaction and welding. Internal structures produced during rheomorphic flow can be studied by the methods of structural geology and show similar dispositions to comparable features in sedimentary slump sheets. It is shown that secondary flowage can occur in welded tuffs emplaced on gentle slopes, provided that the apparent viscosity of the magma is sufficiently low. Compositional factors favor the development of rheomorphism in densely welded tuffs of peralkaline type.

  6. Characterization of liquid-water percolation in tuffs in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, J.; Rousseau, J.P.

    1989-12-31

    A surface-based borehole investigation currently (1989) is being done to characterize liquid-water percolation in tuffs of Miocene age in the unsaturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Active in-situ testing and passive in-situ monitoring will be used in this investigation to estimate the present-day liquid-water percolation (flux). The unsaturated zone consists of a gently dipping sequence of fine-grained, densely fractured, and mostly welded ash-flow tuffs that are interbedded with fine-grained, slightly fractured, non-welded ash-flow and ash-fall tuffs that are partly vitric and zeolitized near the water table. Primary study objectives are to define the water potential field within the unsaturated zone and to determine the in-situ bulk permeability and bulk hydrologic properties of the unsaturated tuffs. Borehole testing will be done to determine the magnitude and spatial distribution of physical and hydrologic properties of the geohydrologic units, and of their water potential fields. The study area of this investigation is restricted to that part of Yucca Mountain that immediately overlies and is within the boundaries of the perimeter drift of a US Department of Energy proposed mined, geologic, high-level radioactive-waste repository. Vertically, the study area extends from near the surface of Yucca Mountain to the underlying water table, about 500 to 750 meters below the ground surface. The average distance between the proposed repository and the underlying water table is about 205 meters.

  7. Preliminary survey of tuff distribution in Esmeralda, Nye, and Lincoln Counties, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, G.V.; Pink, T.S.; Lawrence, J.R.; Woodward, L.A.; Keil, K.; Lappin, A.R.

    1981-02-01

    This report inventories the surface distribution of silicic tuffs in Nye, Esmeralda, and Lincoln Counties, NV, based on a review of available literature. The inventory was taken to provide a data base in evaluating tuff sites for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Silicic ash-flow tuffs that are about 11 to 34 million years (my) old are widespread in these counties. These rocks are locally deformed by right-lateral movement along Walker Lane and the Las Vegas Shear Zone, and left-lateral movement along a zone from near the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the Utah border, and are commonly offset by steeply dipping normal faults. The normal faults that bound horsts, grabens, and tilted-fault blocks of the Basin-and-Range Province began to form 30 my ago; some are still active. Tuff distribution is discussed on a regional basis. Tuff thicknesses and alterations, structural complexity, and proximity to recent faulting, recent volcanism, and mineral resources are discussed for each area. Although the literature on which it is based is often incomplete and sketchy, this report is intended to serve as a basis for future, more detailed work that includes initial field inspection, detailed field and laboratory studies, and extrapolations to the subsurface.

  8. Seismicity of block-and-ash flows occurring during the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRoin, Nicole; McNutt, Stephen R.; Sentman, Davis D.; Reyes, Celso

    2012-02-01

    In January 2006, Augustine Volcano began erupting following an increase in seismicity that was first noted in late April 2005. Thirteen large explosive eruptions of Augustine occurred from January 11 to 28, 2006, followed by a continuously erupting phase and then by a dome growth phase in which numerous pyroclastic flows and block-and-ash flows occurred. As a new steep-sided and unstable dome grew in spring 2006, rockfalls and related events, likely block-and-ash flows, dominated the seismic record. Relative amplitudes at pairs of seismic stations for 68 block-and-ash flow events were examined to constrain locations of the flow-events. Higher amplitudes were associated with events closer to a given station. These relations were confirmed by images collected on a low-light camera. Captured images show a correlation between flow direction and seismic amplitude ratios from nearby stations AUE and AUW. Seismic amplitudes and energies of the flow signals, measured in several different ways, were found to correlate with the surface areas and run-out distances of the flows. The ML range of rockfalls was 0.1 to 1.1, and seismic efficiencies were estimated to be much less than 1%. Particle motion analyses showed that the seismic waves contained both body waves and surface waves and demonstrate that the flows were acting as moving sources with velocities of 30-93 m/s.

  9. The enormous Chillos Valley Lahar: An ash-flow-generated debris flow from Cotopaxi Volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, P.A.; Hall, M.L.; Janda, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Chillos Valley Lahar (CVL), the largest Holocene debris flow in area and volume as yet recognized in the northern Andes, formed on Cotopaxi volcano's north and northeast slopes and descended river systems that took it 326 km north-northwest to the Pacific Ocean and 130+ km east into the Amazon basin. In the Chillos Valley, 40 km downstream from the volcano, depths of 80-160 m and valley cross sections up to 337000m2 are observed, implying peak flow discharges of 2.6-6.0 million m3/s. The overall volume of the CVL is estimated to be ???3.8 km3. The CVL was generated approximately 4500 years BP by a rhyolitic ash flow that followed a small sector collapse on the north and northeast sides of Cotopaxi, which melted part of the volcano's icecap and transformed rapidly into the debris flow. The ash flow and resulting CVL have identical components, except for foreign fragments picked up along the flow path. Juvenile materials, including vitric ash, crystals, and pumice, comprise 80-90% of the lahar's deposit, whereas rhyolitic, dacitic, and andesitic lithics make up the remainder. The sand-size fraction and the 2- to 10-mm fraction together dominate the deposit, constituting ???63 and ???15 wt.% of the matrix, respectively, whereas the silt-size fraction averages less than ???10 wt.% and the clay-size fraction less than 0.5 wt.%. Along the 326-km runout, these particle-size fractions vary little, as does the sorting coefficient (average = 2.6). There is no tendency toward grading or improved sorting. Limited bulking is recognized. The CVL was an enormous non-cohesive debris flow, notable for its ash-flow origin and immense volume and peak discharge which gave it characteristics and a behavior akin to large cohesive mudflows. Significantly, then, ash-flow-generated debris flows can also achieve large volumes and cover great areas; thus, they can conceivably affect large populated regions far from their source. Especially dangerous, therefore, are snowclad volcanoes

  10. 2.8-Ma ash-flow caldera at Chegem River in the northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), contemporaneous granites, and associated ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P.W.; Bogatikov, O.A.; Tsvetkov, A.A.; Gazis, C.; Gurbanov, A.G.; Hon, K.; Koronovsky, N.V.; Kovalenko, V.I.; Marchev, P.

    1993-01-01

    Diverse latest Pliocene volcanic and plutonic rocks in the north-central Caucasus Mountains of southern Russia are newly interpreted as components of a large caldera system that erupted a compositionally zoned rhyolite-dacite ash-flow sheet at 2.83 ?? 0.02 Ma (sanidine and biotite 40Ar/39Ar). Despite its location within a cratonic collision zone, the Chegem system is structurally and petrologically similar to typical calderas of continental-margin volcanic arcs. Erosional remnants of the outflow Chegem Tuff sheet extend at least 50 km north from the source caldera in the upper Chegem River. These outflow remnants were previously interpreted by others as erupted from several local vents, but petrologic similarities indicate a common origin and correlation with thick intracaldera Chegem Tuff. The 11 ?? 15 km caldera and associated intrusions are superbly exposed over a vertical range of 2,300 m in deep canyons above treeline (elev. to 3,800 m). Densely welded intracaldera Chegem Tuff, previously described by others as a rhyolite lava plateau, forms a single cooling unit, is > 2 km thick, and contains large slide blocks from the caldera walls. Caldera subsidence was accommodated along several concentric ring fractures. No prevolcanic floor is exposed within the central core of the caldera. The caldera-filling tuff is overlain by andesitic lavas and cut by a 2.84 ?? 0.03-Ma porphyritic granodiorite intrusion that has a cooling age analytically indistinguishable from that of the tuffs. The Eldjurta Granite, a pluton exposed low in the next large canyon (Baksan River) 10 km to the northwest of the caldera, yields variable K-feldspar and biotite ages (2.8 to 1.0 Ma) through a 5-km vertical range in surface and drill-hole samples. These variable dates appear to record a prolonged complex cooling history within upper parts of another caldera-related pluton. Major W-Mo ore deposits at the Tirniauz mine are hosted in skarns and hornfels along the roof of the Eldjurta Granite

  11. Pyrite oxidation by thermophilic archaebacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, L.; Olsson, G.; Holst, O.; Karlsson, H.T. (Lund Univ. (Sweden))

    1990-03-01

    Three species of thermophilic archaebacteria of the genera Sulfolobus (Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and S. solfataricus) and Acidianus (Acidianus brierleyi) were tested for their ability to oxidize pyrite and to grow autotropbically on pyrite, to explore their potential for use in coal desulfurization. Only A. brierleyi was able to oxidize and grow autotrophically on pyrite. Jarosite was formed during the pyrite oxidation, resulting in the precipitation of sulfate and iron. The medium composition affected the extent of jarosite formation.

  12. Geohydrology of Bandelier Tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeele, M.V.; Wheeler, M.L.; Burton, B.W.

    1981-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has been disposing of radioactive wastes since 1944. Environmental studies and monitoring for radioactive contamination started concurrently. In this report, only two mechanisms and rates by which the radionuclides can enter the environment are studied in detail: subsurface transport of radionuclides by migrating water, and diffusion of tritiated water (HTO) in the vapor phase. The report also includes a section concerning the influence of moisture on shear strength and possible resulting subsidences occurring in the pit overburdens. Because subsurface transport of radionuclides is influenced by the hydraulic conductivity and this in turn is regulated by the moisture content of any given material, a study was also undertaken involving precipitation, the most important climatic element influencing the geohydrology of any given area. Further work is in progress to correlate HTO emanation to atmospheric and pedological properties, especially including thermal characteristics of the tuff.

  13. Origin, Age, and Geochemistry of the Tuff of Saguache Creek, Southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. J.; Young, M. D.; Wendlandt, R. F.

    2003-12-01

    A crystal-poor, rhyolitic, ash-flow tuff in the Eastern San Juan Volcanic Field currently known as the tuff of Saguache Creek (TSC) was reinterpreted by Simon and Wendlandt (1999) as not being distal Sapinero Mesa Tuff. Currently there is no source caldera established for this tuff thereby leaving uncertainties in the volcanic history. Regional mapping of the TSC has subsequently been completed to constrain a possible source caldera. Petrographic studies, and EPMA and LA-ICPMS analyses of the mineral assemblage have been performed to characterize further the tuff, enable correlation of mapped TSC, and constrain petrogenetic models. Petrographic and chemical identification of the TSC builds on characteristics set forth by Simon (2000). These characteristics include abundant feldspar clusters, alkali feldspar mantled plagioclase, no modal quartz, Fe-Ti oxides (often with apatites and zircons), and sparse biotite and pyroxene. Pyroxenes show curiously high MnO (avg 2.70 wt%) and Mg# (avg 79.2) and might be xenocrystic. In comparison, biotites have much lower MnO (avg 0.82 wt%). Average sanidine (Or50) and plagioclase (Ab71) compositions fall within the documented range (Simon, 2000) and show little trace element substitution including Eu Conejos age volcanic deposits. Similarly, an andesitic topographic high just west of Trickle Mtn has TSC vitrophyre on the east-facing slope suggesting strong north-south channeling of the flow unit by paleo-topographic lows. Outcrop elevations also decrease from north to south supporting a possible source caldera to the north. This source could be explained by a distinct circular gravity low on the southeastern slope of the Continental Divide. The low is bordered to the north by a circular arrangement of peaks as well as debris breccias, andesitic flow breccias, and lahars.

  14. Pyrite oxidation by microbial consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, B. C.; Revill, K. L.; Doyle, C.; Kendelewicz, T.; Brown, G. E.; Spormann, A. M.; Fendorf, S.

    2003-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is formed through pyrite oxidation, which produces acidity and releases toxic metals associated with pyrite and other sulfide minerals. Microbes accelerate pyrite oxidation markedly, thereby playing a major role in the production of AMD. Here, we probe pyrite oxidation by consortia of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and thiooxidans using surface-sensitive photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy and compare them with surfaces oxidized through chemical and single species cultures. Microbial oxidation resulted in the formation of distinct oxidized surface species distributed non-uniformly over the pyrite surface; consortia produced a surface both more heterogeneous and more oxidized. In contrast, chemical oxidation proceeds without the build-up of passivating oxidation products. Surface morphology was not correlated with sites of nucleation or oxidation in any obvious manner. These results demonstrate that microbial oxidation occurs through a similar mechanism to chemical oxidation, but that the presence of complex microbial communities may impact the manner by which pyrite oxidation proceeds.

  15. Pyritization in the Gaojiashan Biota

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI YaoPing; HUA Hong

    2007-01-01

    The Late Sinian (Ediacaran) Gaojiashan Biota was a soft-bodied fossil-Lagerst(a)tte dominated by substantial pyritized, three-dimensionally preserved tubular and conotubular fossils. Soft-tissue pyritization is extremely scarce in the fossil records, especially in the Precambrian, therefore it has very important and unique significance for the study of pyritization in the Gaojiashan Biota. Early pyritization played a pivotal role in the fossil preservation and two main factors ensured the successful pyritization of the fossils, namely rapid burial and permineralization. The former was controlled by secular storm deposition, and the latter was achieved by sufficient supply of available iron from sediments. SEM data of Conotubus demonstrate two types of preservation of the tubes (defined as type A and type B, respectively). In type A, pyritization took place relatively earlier and completely preserved both tube wall and coelom, but no detailed structure. While in type B, pyritization took place somewhat later and preserved the integrated tube wall, but partially the coelom. The size frequency distribution of the pyrite framboids suggests that pyritization took place in two different environments with entire different oxygen content.

  16. Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Tuff in Zhongliangshan Mine, Chongqing, Southwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Coal-bearing strata that host rare metal deposits are currently a hot issue in the field of coal geology. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the mineralogy, geochemistry, and potential economic significance of rare metals in the late Permian tuff in Zhongliangshan mine, Chongqing, southwestern China. The methods applied in this study are X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF, inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD plus Siroquant, and scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX. The results indicate that some trace elements including Li, Be, Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Zr, Nb, Cd, Sb, REE, Hf, Ta, Re, Th, and U are enriched in the tuff from Zhongliangshan mine. The minerals in the tuff mainly include kaolinite, illite, pyrite, anatase, calcite, gypsum, quartz, and traces of minerals such as zircon, florencite, jarosite, and barite. The tuff is of mafic volcanic origin with features of alkali basalt. Some minerals including florencite, gypsum, barite and a portion of anatase and zircon have been derived from hydrothermal solutions. It is suggested that Zhongliangshan tuff is a potential polymetallic ore and the recovery of these valuable elements needs to be further investigated.

  17. Reconnaissance geochronology of tuffs in the Miocene Barstow Formation: implications for basin evolution and tectonics in the central Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D.M.; Leslie, S.R.; Hillhouse, J.W.; Wooden, J.L.; Vazquez, J.A.; Reynolds, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    Early to middle Miocene lacustrine strata of the Barstow Formation are well dated in just a few places, limiting our ability to infer basin evolution and regional tectonics. At the type section in the Mud Hills, previous studies have shown that the lacustrine interval of the Barstow Formation is between ~16.3 Ma and ~13.4 Ma. Elsewhere, lake beds of the Barstow Formation have yielded vertebrate fossils showing the Hemingfordian/Bartovian transition at ~16 Ma but are otherwise poorly dated. In an attempt to clarify the age and depositional environments of the lake deposits, we are mapping the Barstow Formation and dating zircons from interbedded tuffs, as well as testing ash-flow tuffs for the distinctive remanent magnetization direction of the widespread Peach Spring Tuff. Thus far, our new U-Pb zircon ages inficate that the Barstow lake beds contain tuff beds as old as 19.1 Ma and as young as 15.3 Ma. At Harvard Hill, Barstow lake beds contain a thick tuff dated at 18.7 Ma. On the basis of zircon ages, mineralogy, zircon chemistry, and paleomagnetic results, we consider the thick tuff to be a lacustrine facies of the Peach Spring Tuff. We have identified the Peach Spring Tuff by similar methods at eight localities over a broad area, providing a timeline for several fluvial and lacustrine sections. The new dates indicate that long-lived lacustrine systems originated before 19 Ma and persisted to at least 15 Ma. The onset of lacustrine conditions predates the Peach Spring Tuff in most Barstow Formation sections and may be older than 19.5 Ma in some places. The new data indicate that the central Mojave Desert contained narrow to broad lake basins during and after extension, and that Barstow lacustrine deposits did not exclusively postdate extensional tectonics. At present, it is unclear whether several separate, small lake basins coexisted during the early to middle Miocene, or if instead several small early Miocene basins gradually coalesced over about 6 millions

  18. Pyrite oxidation by sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobita, M.; Yokozeki, M.; Nishikawa, N.; Kawakami, Y. (Institute of Research and Innovation, Kashiwa (Japan). Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1994-04-01

    Two strains of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a thermoacidophilic archaebacterium, were examined for their pyrite-oxidizing ability. S. acidocaldarius ATCC 33909 was shown to possess iron-oxidizing activity by ferrous sulfate oxidizing experiments, but S. acidocaldarius No. 7 did not have it. Pyrite-oxidizing rate of S. acidocaldarius ATCC 33909 was 1.6-fold higher than that of strain 7 though they had a similar level of self-oxidizing ability. These results show that the iron-oxidizing activity accelerates pyrite oxidation.

  19. Stratigraphy, correlation, depositional setting, and geophysical characteristics of the Oligocene Snowshoe Mountain Tuff and Creede Formation in two cored boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Daniel; Nelson, Philip H.

    2000-01-01

    Core descriptions and geophysical logs from two boreholes (CCM-1 and CCM-2) in the Oligocene Snowshoe Mountain Tuff and Creede Formation, south-central Colorado, are used to interpret sedimentary and volcanic facies associations and their physical properties. The seven facies association include a mixed sequence of intracaldera ash-flow tuffs and breccias, alluvial and lake margin deposits, and tuffaceous lake beds. These deposits represent volcanic units related to caldera collapse and emplacement of the Snowshoe Mountain Tuff, and sediments and pyroclastic material deposited in the newly formed caldera basin, Early sedimentation is interpreted to have been rapid, and to have occurred in volcaniclastic fan environments at CCM-1 and in a variery of volcaniclastic fan, braided stream shallow lacustrine, and mudflat environments at CCM-2. After an initial period of lake-level rise, suspension settling, turbidite, and debris-flow sedimentation occurred in lacustrine slope and basin environments below wave base. Carbonate sedimentation was initially sporadic, but more continuous in the latter part of the recorded lake history (after the H fallout tuff). Sublacustrine-fan deposition occurred at CCM-1 after a pronounced lake-level fall and subsequent rise that preceded the H tuff. Variations in density, neutron, gamma-ray, sonic, and electrical properties of deposits penetrated oin the two holes reflect variations in lithology, porosity, and alteration. Trends in the geophysical properties of the lacustrine strata are linked to downhole changes in authigenic mineralology and a decrease in porosity interpreted to have resulted primarily from diagenesis. Lithological and geophysical characteristics provide a basis for correlation of the cores; however, mineralogical methods of correlation are hampered by the degree of diagenesis and alteration.

  20. Holocene block-and-ash flows from summit dome activity of Citlaltépetl volcano, Eastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo

    1999-01-01

    A major eruption produced several block-and-ash flows about 4,100 years B.P. at Citlaltépetl volcano (Pico de Orizaba), an ice-capped, 5670-m-high, andesitic, active stratovolcano located at the eastern end of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Repetitive gravitational collapse of a dacitic dome at the summit crater produced a series of block-and-ash flows, lahars, and floods, which were channeled through two main river-valleys on the west and south flanks of the volcano. The total erupted volume is estimated to be at least 0.27 km 3. The deposits in both areas are similar in composition, and size, but they differ in the area covered, distribution, and structure. The western deposits form a large fan, cover a larger area, and include numerous laharic and fluviatile deposits. In contrast, the southern deposits form prominent terraces where confined in narrow channels, and have associated laharic units in distal areas, where the flows reach a maximum distance of 30 km from the vent. Directed disruptions of a central summit dome occurred, possibly first to the west and then to the southeast, perhaps due to minor modifications of the summit dome morphology, producing the voluminous block-and-ash flow deposits documented here. The flows were strongly controlled by topography, influencing the deposition of the moving particles. Grain-size variations along the flow paths are hardly detectable suggesting no evident lateral downstream transformations. Because sudden changes in dome morphology may cause significant variations in the direction of future dome collapse, specific areas of potential affectation cannot be predicted. Therefore, about 350,000 inhabitants living within a radius of 35-km from the vent could be potentially impacted if catastrophic block-and-ash flows were to recur in the future from similar summit dome activity. Recognition of these deposits is therefore important for hazard assessment because some seemingly safe areas may be at high risk.

  1. Oxidation of pyrite: Consequences and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Mile D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the most important studies on the oxidation of pyrite particularly in aqueous solutions. The consequences of pyrite oxidation was examined, as well as its importance, from both the technical-technological and environmental points of view. The oxidation of pyrite was considered in two parts. The spontaneous oxidation of pyrite in nature was described in the first part, with this part comprising pyrite oxidation in deposits depots and mines. It is explained how way natural electrochemical processes lead to the decomposition of pyrite and other minerals associated with pyrite. The oxidation of pyrite occurring during technological processes such as grinding, flotation and leaching, was shown in the second part. Particular emphasis was placed on the oxidation of pyrite during leaching. This part includes the leaching of sulphide and oxide ores, the leaching of pyrite coal and the leaching of refractory gold-bearing ores (pressure oxidation, bacterial oxidation, oxidation by means of strong oxidants and the electrolysis of pyrite suspensions. Various mechanisms of pyrite oxidation and of the galvanic interaction of pyrite with other sulphide minerals are shown.

  2. Pyrite synthesis via polysulfide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, George W., III

    1991-10-01

    The reactions of Fe(II) and Fe(III) solutions with polysulfide solutions prepared from freshly synthesized Na 2S x ( x = 2, 4, 5) were studied at 25 and 100°C over the pH range 5.5 to 8. Direct and instantaneous pyrite formation was not observed in any reaction. High temperature reactions are nearly quantitative over periods of four hours with Fe(II) and polysulfide solutions. The rate of reaction at room temperature is comparable to that found by RICKARD (1975), and the observations reported here are in agreement with his mechanism of pyrite formation. Based on the polarographic results of these reactions and previous work, a refinement of the mechanism which includes dissolved iron sulfide complexes is proposed. Every reaction of equimolar amounts of polysulfide and Fe(II) gave the kinetic product "FeS" (an example of the Ostwald step rule). Polarographic results demonstrate that the "FeS" initially formed consists of (1) a complex of the form Fe(SH) + and (2) solid FeS. When excess polysulfide is present, a complex of form [Fe(SH) S x] - is present. This complex should readily allow for (1) the reduction of polysulfide by sulfide which produces S 22- in unprotonated form, and (2) the change of Fe(II) from high spin to low spin during the formation of pyrite. The reduction of polysulfide by sulfide was proposed by RICKARD (1975), but at the pH of the solutions studied herein, S 22- in solution should be protonated. The 22- ion is critical in the formation and structure of pyrite ( TOSSEL et al., 1981). The proposed complex allows for a cyclic intermediate which cleaves the reacting polysulfide to form S 22- unprotonated. As this process occurs, there is a change in the spin state of the Fe(II) from the high spin t 2g4e g2 to the low spin t 2g6 state which is an electron configuration exhibiting kinetic inertness. On change of the Fe(II) spin state, the complex irreversibly decomposes to form pyrite. The complex may be a cluster complex containing two or more

  3. Effect of moisture on tuff stone degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.; Nijland, T.G.

    2016-01-01

    Tuff stone elements with a large length/width ratio often suffer damage in the form of cracks parallel to the surface and spalling of the outer layer. The response of tuff to moisture might be a reason for this behaviour. This research aimed at verifying if differential dilation between parts with d

  4. Pyritized ooids from the Arabian Sea basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.; Rao, Ch.M.; Reddy, N.P.C.

    . Occurrence of pyrite at turbidite intervals suggests that pyritization in high organic carbon and H2S abundant environments was mainly controlled by the supply of reactive iron. From the distribution of pyrite in the core it is inferred that reactive iron...

  5. Preliminary thermal expansion screening data for tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappin, A.R.

    1980-03-01

    A major variable in evaluating the potential of silicic tuffs for use in geologic disposal of heat-producing nuclear wastes is thermal expansion. Results of ambient-pressure linear expansion measurements on a group of tuffs that vary treatly in porosity and mineralogy are presente here. Thermal expansion of devitrified welded tuffs is generally linear with increasing temperature and independent of both porosity and heating rate. Mineralogic factors affecting behavior of these tuffs are limited to the presence or absence of cristobalite and altered biotite. The presence of cristobalite results in markedly nonlinear expansion above 200{sup 0}C. If biotite in biotite-hearing rocks alters even slightly to expandable clays, the behavior of these tuffs near the boiling point of water can be dominated by contraction of the expandable phase. Expansion of both high- and low-porosity tuffs containing hydrated silicic glass and/or expandable clays is complex. The behavior of these rocks appears to be completely dominated by dehydration of hydrous phases and, hence, should be critically dependent on fluid pressure. Valid extrapolation of the ambient-pressure results presented here to depths of interest for construction of a nuclear-waste repository will depend on a good understanding of the interaction of dehydration rates and fluid pressures, and of the effects of both micro- and macrofractures on the response of tuff masss.

  6. Bioflotation of pyrite with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaoxian Song; Yimin Zhang; Shouci Lu

    2004-01-01

    Bioflotation of pyrite with bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in the presence or absence of potassium ethyl xanthate was studied on a pure pyrite through microflotation and electrophoretic light scattering measurements. The experimental results showed that in the absence of xanthate, pyrite flotation is slightly enhanced by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, with xanthate as a collector, pyrite flotation is strongly depressed after being exposed to the bacteria. The longer is the time when the pyrite is exposed to the bacteria, the stronger the depression is. The mechanism of the depression might be due to the formation of the biofilms of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans on pyrite surfaces, preventing the adsorption of xanthate on pyrite surfaces in the form of dixanthogen or xanthate ions.

  7. Correlation of the Miocene Peach Spring Tuff with the geomagnetic polarity time scale and new constraints on tectonic rotations in the Mojave Desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, John W.; Miller, David M.; Turrin, Brent D.; Reynolds, Robert E.; Miller, David M.

    2010-01-01

    We report new paleomagnetic results and 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Peach Spring Tuff (PST), a key marker bed that occurs in the desert region between Barstow, California, and Peach Springs, Arizona. The 40Ar/39Ar ages were determined using individual hand-picked sanidine crystals from ash-flow specimens used in previous paleomagnetic studies at eight sites correlated by mineralogy, stratigraphic position, and magnetic inclination. Site-mean ages, which range from 18.43 Ma to 18.78 Ma with analytical precision (1 s.d.) typically 0.04 Ma, were obtained from areas near Fort Rock, AZ; McCullough Mts, NV; Cima Dome, Parker Dam, Danby, Ludlow, Kane Walsh, and Stoddard Wash, CA. The regional mean age determination is 18.71 ± 0.13 Ma, after the data were selected for sanidine crystals that yielded greater than 90% radiogenic argon (N=40). This age determination is compatible with previous 40Ar/39Ar dating of the PST after taking various neutron-flux monitor calibrations into account. We report paleomagnetic results from eight new sites that bear on reconstructions of the Miocene basins associated with the Hector Formation, Barstow Formation, and similar fine-grained sedimentary deposits in the Barstow region. Key findings of the new paleomagnetic study pertain to age control of the Hector Formation and clockwise rotation of the Northeast Mojave Domain. Our study of a rhyolitic ash flow at Baxter Wash, northern Cady Mountains, confirms the correlation of the PST within the Hector Formation and prompts reinterpretation of the previously determined magnetostratigraphy. Our model correlates the PST to the normal-polarity zone just below the C6-C5E boundary (18.748 Ma) of the astronomically tuned Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale. After emplacement of the Peach Spring Tuff at Alvord Mountain and the Cady Mountains, the southern part of the Northeast Mojave Domain (between Cady and Coyote Lake faults) underwent clockwise rotation of 30°–55°. Clockwise rotations increase with

  8. Mechanical excavator performance in Yucca Mountain tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdemir, L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (USA); Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)

    1991-01-01

    A research effort of four phases is in progress at the Colorado School of Mines. The overall program will evaluate the cutability of welded tuff and other lithologies likely to be excavated at Yucca Mountain in the site characterization process. Several mechanical systems are considered with emphasis given to the tunnel boring machine. The research comprises laboratory testing, linear drag bit and disc cutter tests and potentially large-scale laboratory demonstrations to support potential use of a tunnel boring machine in welded tuff. Preliminary estimates of mechanical excavator performance in Yucca Mountain tuff are presented here. As phases of the research project are completed, well quantified estimates will be made of performance of mechanical excavators in the Yucca Mountain tuffs. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Development of waste packages for tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, A.J.

    1982-09-20

    The objective of this program is to develop nuclear waste packages that meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s requirements for a licensed repository in tuff at the Nevada Test Site. Selected accomplishments for FY82 are: (1) Selection, collection of rock, and characterization of suitable outcrops (for lab experiments); (2) Rock-water interactions (Bullfrog Tuff); (3) Corrosion tests of ferrous metals; (4) Thermal modeling of waste package in host rock; (5) Preliminary fabrication tests of alternate backfills (crushed tuff); (6) Reviewed Westinghouse conceptual waste package designs for tuff and began modification for unsaturated zone; and (7) Waste Package Codes (BARIER and WAPPA) now running on our computer. Brief discussions are presented for rock-water interactions, corrosion tests of ferrous metals, and thermal and radionuclide migration modelling.

  10. Formation of a Hydrothermal Kaolinite Deposit from Rhyolitic Tuff in Jiangxi, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Yuan; Guanghai Shi; Mengchu Yang; Yinuo Wu; Zhaochong Zhang; Anjie Huang; Jiajing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The Longmen kaolinite deposit is one of the largest hydrothermal clay deposits of Ganxi volcanic basin (northern Wuyi Mountain area, China). The pristine host rocks are rhyolitic crystal-vitric tuff and minor lapilli tuff from the Late Jurassic Ehuling Formation. The ore consists of kaolin-group minerals (kaolinite, dickite), pyrophyllite with minor quartz, sericite, pyrite, etc.. From the host rocks to the transition zones (altered rocks) then to the vein ores, contents of SiO2 and TFe2O3 decrease, whereas Al2O3 and LOI increase, consistent with the contents increase of kaolin minerals and pyrophyllite in the samples. The total REE abundances of the ores are much lower than that of the host and altered rocks, Rb, Nb, Nd, Zr, Ti and Y are significantly depleted. Apparent zoning features of bulk geochemistry and mineral component reflect that the kaolinite deposit occurred at the expense of the host rock by ascending hydrothermal fluids with distinct removal of SiO2, TFe2O3, Na2O, K2O. According to the mineral assemblage, the formation temperature of this deposit falls within the range of 270-350 ℃. With regard to the industrial applications, the kaolinized ores are suitable for use in ceramics and gemologic materials crafted for seal stones. Moreover, in mineralogical terms, this deposit is also proved to be an excellent example for studying channeled hydrothermal alterations of rhyolitic tuff.

  11. Major element and oxygen isotope geochemistry of vapour-phase garnet from the Topopah Spring Tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscati, Richard J.; Johnson, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Twenty vapour-phase garnets were studied in two samples of the Topopah Spring Tuff of the Paintbrush Group from Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada. The Miocene-age Topopah Spring Tuff is a 350 m thick, devitrified, moderately to densely welded ash-flow tuff that is zoned compositionally from high-silica rhyolite to latite. During cooling of the tuff, escaping vapour produced lithophysae (former gas cavities) lined with an assemblage of tridymite (commonly inverted to cristobalite or quartz), sanidine and locally, hematite and/or garnet. Vapour-phase topaz and economic deposits associated commonly with topaz-bearing rhyolites (characteristically enriched in F) were not found in the Topopah Spring Tuff at Yucca Mountain. Based on their occurrence only in lithophysae, the garnets are not primary igneous phenocrysts, but rather crystals that grew from a F-poor magma-derived vapour trapped during and after emplacement of the tuff. The garnets are euhedral, vitreous, reddish brown, trapezohedral, as large as 2 mm in diameter and fractured. The garnets also contain inclusions of tridymite. Electron microprobe analyses of the garnets reveal that they are almandine-spessartine (48.0 and 47.9 mol.%, respectively), have an average composition of (Fe1.46Mn1.45Mg0.03Ca0.10)(Al1.93Ti0.02)Si3.01O12 and are comparatively homogeneous in Fe and Mn concentrations from core to rim. Composited garnets from each sample site have δ18O values of 7.2 and 7.4‰. The associated quartz (after tridymite) has δ18O values of 17.4 and 17.6‰, values indicative of reaction with later, low-temperature water. Unaltered tridymite from higher in the stratigraphic section has a δ18O of 11.1‰ which, when coupled with the garnet δ18O values in a quartz-garnet fractionation equation, indicates isotopic equilibration (vapour-phase crystallization) at temperatures of ~600°C. This high-temperature mineralization, formed during cooling of the tuffs, is distinct from the later and commonly recognized

  12. Depressing effect of hydroxamic polyacrylamide on pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张剑锋; 胡岳华; 王淀佐; 徐竞

    2004-01-01

    The performance of hydroxamic polyacrylamide(HPAM) in mineral flotation was tested on the samples of calcite, diaspore and pyrite. It is found that HPAM expresses intensive depression on pyrite and can be used as effective depressants for pyrite. The depression mechanism of HPAM to pyrite was investigated by the determination of contact angle, zeta potential, adsorptive capacity for collectors and infrared spectrum. A lower contact angle,more negative zeta potential, less xanthate adsorptive capacity, and the formation of chemical bonding were determined, which reveals that the strong chemical interactions exist between HPAM and pyrite surface. The group electronegativity of HPAM was calculated to explain the differences of interaction between reagent and minerals.

  13. Anisotropy of the Topopah Spring Member Tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Haupt, R.W. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Mechanical properties of the tuffaceous rocks within Yucca Mountain are needed for near and far-field modeling of the potential nuclear waste repository. If the mechanical properties are significantly anisotropic (i.e., direction-dependent), a more complex model is required. Relevant data from tuffs tested in earlier studies indicate that elastic and strength properties are anisotropic. This scoping study confirms the elastic anisotropy and concludes some tuffs are transversely isotropic. An approach for sampling and testing the rock to determine the magnitude of the anisotropy is proposed.

  14. Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh [times] 0, 200 mesh [times] 0, and 325 mesh [times] 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

  15. Interaction between pyrite and cysteine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-she; WANG Zhao-hui; LI Bang-mei; ZHANG Yan-hua

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption mechanism of cysteine on pyrite was studied by amounts adsorbed, FTIR and XRD measurements. The results obtained by adsorption experiment suggest that as the mass ratio of mineral to cysteine mp/mc is greater than 5, the amounts adsorbed on mineral is stable after adsorption for 15 min and cysteine adsorbing with mp/mc shows the same tendency. It can be inferred by its Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm that chemical interaction governs the entire adsorption process. The results from FTIR and XRD prove that the functional groups of cysteine appear with blue shift of their characteristic adsorption peak in FTIR spectrum; meanwhile, the lattice constant obviously decreases and the widening of crystal planes such as (210), (220) and (211) is found after cysteine adsorbing on mineral.

  16. Properties of Tuffs, Grout and Other Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Samples of tuff as-received have been wrapped in foil and sealed in beeswax in the field. Density and moisture content were determined from small pieces...received" density was deter- mined by weighing the chipped-off test specimen, coating it with wax, and measuring its volume using mercury displacement

  17. Evaluation of some Italian tuffs as compatible replacement stone for Römer tuff in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2007-01-01

    Rhenish tuffs from the volcanic Eifel region, Germany, are amongst the most prominent and voluminous natural stones in Dutch monuments. In particular, tuffs from the 11,900 bp Laacher See eruption have been used since Roman times, - hence the name Römer tuff-, and were widely used again in romanesqu

  18. Sorption of lanthanum ions by natural clinoptilolite tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampilova, B. V.; Zonkhoeva, E. L.

    2013-08-01

    The equilibrium and kinetics of sorption of lanthanum ions on natural clinoptilolite tuff are studied. It is demonstrated that sorption of lanthanum ions from diluted solutions occurs in micropores of clinoptilolite, and from concentrated solutions in the mesoporous structure of tuff. The main capacity of zeolite tuff is found in the secondary porous structure. The sorption of lanthanum ions is limited by diffusion in tuff grains. Lanthanum ions are regularly distributed in the tuff phase and interact with the Brønsted centers of large clinoptilolite cavities.

  19. The Influence Of Calcite On The Ash Flow Temperature For Semi-Anthracite Coal From Donbas District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čarnogurská Mária

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research focused on the lowering of ash flow temperature at semianthracite coal from Donbas district by means of additive (calcite dosing. Ash fusion temperatures were set for two coal samples (A, B and for five various states (samples of ash without any additives, with 1%, with 3%, with 5% and with 7% of the additive in total. The macroscopicphotographic method was used for identifying all specific temperatures. Obtained outputs prove that A type coal has a lower value of sphere temperature than B type coal in the whole scope of percentage representation of the additive. The flow temperature dropped in total from 1489 °C to 1280 °C, i.e. by 14% during the test of coal of type A with 7% of the additive; while it was near 10% for coal of type B (from 1450 °C to 1308 °C. Numerical simulations of the process showed that it is not effective to add an additive with a grain size lower than 280 μm by means of wastevapour burners.

  20. Pyrite Stability Under Venus Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, E.; Craig, P.; Port, S.; Chevrier, V.; Johnson, N.

    2015-12-01

    Radar mapping of the surface of Venus shows areas of high reflectivity in the Venusian highlands, increasing to 0.35 ± 0.04 to 0.43 ± 0.05 in the highlands from the planetary average of 0.14 ± 0.03. Iron sulfides, specifically pyrite (FeS2), can explain the observed high reflectivity. However, several studies suggest that pyrite is not stable under Venusian conditions and is destroyed on geologic timescales. To test the stability of pyrite on the Venusian surface, pyrite was heated in the Venus simulation chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to average Venusian surface conditions, and separately to highland conditions under an atmosphere of pure CO2 and separately under an atmosphere of 96.5% CO2, 3.5% N2 and 150 ppm SO2. After each run, the samples were weighed and analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) to identify possible phase changes and determine the stability of pyrite under Venusian surface conditions. Under a pure CO2 atmosphere, the Fe in pyrite oxidizes to form hematite which is more stable at higher temperatures corresponding to the Venusian lowlands. Magnetite is the primary iron oxide that forms at lower temperatures corresponding to the radar-bright highlands. Our experiments also showed that the presence of atmospheric SO2 inhibits the oxidation of pyrite, increasing its stability under Venusian conditions, especially those corresponding to the highlands. This indicates that the relatively high level of SO2 in the Venusian atmosphere is key to the stability of pyrite, making it a possible candidate for the bright radar signal in the Venusian highlands.

  1. Hydraulic characterization of hydrothermally altered Nopal tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.T.; Meyer-James, K.A. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Rice, G. [George Rice and Associates, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Understanding the mechanics of variably saturated flow in fractured-porous media is of fundamental importance to evaluating the isolation performance of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository for the Yucca Mountain site. Developing that understanding must be founded on the analysis and interpretation of laboratory and field data. This report presents an analysis of the unsaturated hydraulic properties of tuff cores from the Pena Blanca natural analog site in Mexico. The basic intent of the analysis was to examine possible trends and relationships between the hydraulic properties and the degree of hydrothermal alteration exhibited by the tuff samples. These data were used in flow simulations to evaluate the significance of a particular conceptual (composite) model and of distinct hydraulic properties on the rate and nature of water flow.

  2. Infiltration and Seepage Through Fractured Welded Tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.A. Ghezzehei; P.F. Dobson; J.A. Rodriguez; P.J. Cook

    2006-06-20

    The Nopal I mine in Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico, contains a uranium ore deposit within fractured tuff. Previous mining activities exposed a level ground surface 8 m above an excavated mining adit. In this paper, we report results of ongoing research to understand and model percolation through the fractured tuff and seepage into a mined adit both of which are important processes for the performance of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Travel of water plumes was modeled using one-dimensional numerical and analytical approaches. Most of the hydrologic properly estimates were calculated from mean fracture apertures and fracture density. Based on the modeling results, we presented constraints for the arrival time and temporal pattern of seepage at the adit.

  3. Structure of metal matrix composites with an addition of tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Łach

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents preliminary results of tests of metal matrix composites structure which was modified by an addition of powderedvolcanic tuff. Distribution and shape of ceramic particles as well as the quality of the bonding along the tuff- metal matrix interface werestudied. Depth of tuff element diffusion in the matrix as well as diffusion in tuff particles were checked. Micro-hardness and porosity of the composites were also tested. The tuff from Filipowice near the town of Krzeszowice was used for the tests. Powder metallurgy wasapplied to obtain the composites and the matrix materials were copper and 316L steel powders. The tuff was introduced in 2, 5 and 10 %by weight. To remove water from the channels of aluminosilicates, the tuff was baked at 850 oC for 4 hours and then cooled together withthe oven. The tests revealed good quality of the bonding of the tuff particles and the matrix and their even distribution. The addition of tuff improved the hardness of the composites and reduced their porosity which has great significance because of possible applications of this kind of materials in general and copper composites in particular. This gives grounds for further studies on volcanic tuff use in metal composites

  4. Influence of deterministic geologic trends on spatial variability of hydrologic properties in volcanic tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, A.L. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States); Chornack, M.P. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Istok, J.D. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Fling, L.E. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Mercury, NV (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Hydrologic properties have been measured on outcrop samples taken from a detailed, two-dimension grid covering a 1.4 km outcrop exposure of the 10-m thick non-welded-to-welded, shardy base microstratigraphic unit of the Tiva Canyon Member of the Miocene Paintbrush Tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These data allow quantification of spatial trends in rock matrix properties that exist in this important hydrologic unit. Geologic investigation, combined with statistical and geostatistical analyses of the numerical data, indicates that spatial variability of matrix properties is related to deterministic geologic processes that operated throughout the region. Linear vertical trends in hydrologic properties are strongly developed in the shardy base microstratigraphic unit, and they are more accurately modeled using the concept of a thickness-normalized stratigraphic elevation within the unit, rather than absolute elevation. Hydrologic properties appear to be correlated over distances of 0.25 to 0.3 of the unit thickness after removing the deterministic vertical trend. The use of stratigraphic elevation allows scaling of identified trends by unit thickness which may be of particular importance in a basal, topography-blanketing unit such as this one. Horizontal changes in hydrologic properties do not appear to form obvious trends within the limited lateral geographic extent of the ash-flow environment that was examined. Matrix properties appear to be correlated horizontally over distances between 100 and 400 m. The existence and quantitative description of these trends and patterns of vertical spatial continuity should increase confidence in models of hydrologic properties and groundwater flow in this area that may be constructed to support the design of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

  5. THE DEPRESSION OF PYRITE FLOTATION BY THIOBACILLUS FERROOXIDANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The experimental studies on the microbial flotation of a pure pyrite sample using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was conducted in the laboratory. The results indicate that Thiobacillus ferrooaidans has strong depression effect on the flotation of pyrite. Thiobacillus f errooxidans can adsorb on the surface of pyrite in a very short time (a few min. ), changing the surface from hydrophobic into hydrophilic and making the pyrite particles to lose their floatability. Therefore, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is an effective microbial depressant of pyrite. It has also been pointed out that the depression of pyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is caused by the adsorption of the microbial colloids, but not by the oxidation effect.

  6. Distribution of arsenic, selenium, and other trace elements in high pyrite Appalachian coals: evidence for multiple episodes of pyrite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, S.F.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Koenig, A.E.; Lowers, H.A.; Ruppert, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    Pennsylvanian coals in the Appalachian Basin host pyrite that is locally enriched in potentially toxic trace elements such as As, Se, Hg, Pb, and Ni. A comparison of pyrite-rich coals from northwestern Alabama, eastern Kentucky, and West Virginia reveals differences in concentrations and mode of occurrence of trace elements in pyrite. Pyrite occurs as framboids, dendrites, or in massive crystalline form in cell lumens or crosscutting veins. Metal concentrations in pyrite vary over all scales, from microscopic to mine to regional, because trace elements are inhomogeneously distributed in the different morphological forms of pyrite, and in the multiple generations of sulfide mineral precipitates. Early diagenetic framboidal pyrite is usually depleted in As, Se, and Hg, and enriched in Pb and Ni, compared to other pyrite forms. In dendritic pyrite, maps of As distribution show a chemical gradient from As-rich centers to As-poor distal branches, whereas Se concentrations are highest at the distal edges of the branches. Massive crystalline pyrite that fills veins is composed of several generations of sulfide minerals. Pyrite in late-stage veins commonly exhibits As-rich growth zones, indicating a probable epigenetic hydrothermal origin. Selenium is concentrated at the distal edges of veins. A positive correlation of As and Se in pyrite veins from Kentucky coals, and of As and Hg in pyrite-filled veins from Alabama coals, suggests coprecipitation of these elements from the same fluid. In the Kentucky coal samples (n = 18), As and Se contents in pyrite-filled veins average 4200 ppm and 200 ppm, respectively. In Alabama coal samples, As in pyrite-filled veins averages 2700 ppm (n = 34), whereas As in pyrite-filled cellular structures averages 6470 ppm (n = 35). In these same Alabama samples, Se averages 80 ppm in pyrite-filled veins, but was below the detection limit in cell structures. In samples of West Virginia massive pyrite, As averages 1700 ppm, and Se averages 270

  7. Catalytic activity of pyrite for coal liquefaction reaction; Tennen pyrite no shokubai seino ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, K.; Kozu, M.; Okada, T.; Kobayashi, M. [Nippon Coal Oil Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Since natural pyrite is easy to obtain and cheap as coal liquefaction catalyst, it is to be used for the 150 t/d scale NEDOL process bituminous coal liquefaction pilot plant. NEDO and NCOL have investigated the improvement of catalytic activity of pulverized natural pyrite for enhancing performance and economy of the NEDOL process. In this study, coal liquefaction tests were conducted using natural pyrite catalyst pulverized by dry-type bowl mill under nitrogen atmosphere. Mechanism of catalytic reaction of the natural pyrite was discussed from relations between properties of the catalyst and liquefaction product. The natural pyrite provided an activity to transfer gaseous hydrogen into the liquefaction product. It was considered that pulverized pyrite promotes the hydrogenation reaction of asphaltene because pulverization increases its contact rate with reactant and the amount of active points on its surface. It was inferred that catalytic activity of pyrite is affected greatly by the chemical state of Fe and S on its surface. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Preferential Flow in Fractured Welded Tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salve, Rohit

    2004-08-15

    To better understand preferential flow in fractured rock, we carried out an in situ field experiment in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This experiment involved the release of {approx} 22 m3 of ponded water (at a pressure head of {approx} 0.04 m) over a period of 7 months, directly onto a 12 m2 infiltration plot located on a fractured welded tuff surface. As water was released, changes in moisture content were monitored along horizontal boreholes located in the formation {approx} 19-22 m below. Distinct flow zones, varying in flow velocity, wetted cross-sectional area, and extent of lateral movement, intercepted the monitoring boreholes. There was also evidence of water being diverted above the ceiling of a cavity in the immediate vicinity of the monitoring boreholes. Observations from this field experiment suggest that isolated conduits, each encompassing a large number of fractures, develop within the fractured rock formation to form preferential flow paths that persist if there is a continuous supply of water. In addition, in fractured welded tuffs the propensity for fracture-matrix interactions is significantly greater than that suggested by existing conceptual models,in which flow occurs along a section of fracture surfaces. An overriding conclusion is that field investigations at spatial scales of tens of meters provide data critical to the fundamental understanding of flow in fractured rock.

  9. Pyrite Oxidation Related to Pyritic Minesite Spoils and Its Controls:A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑作平; H.H.GERKE; 等

    1998-01-01

    Pyrite oxidation is considered to be a main contribution to the acidification of minesite spoils and the generation of the Acid Mine Drainage(AMD) which has become the greatest threat to the ecological environment,In this paper,pyrite oxidation and its controls are reviewed with respect to the latest literature,conceptual Model and empirical rate law model with reference to indoor experiments are classified and presented to describe pyrite oxidation in heterogeneous minesite spoil piles.The influences of Thiobacillus(T) ferrooxidans on pyrite oxidation are simply summarized.In order to prevent the generation of the AMD,three approaches including the addition of alkali to minesite spoil,use of dry covers,and coating on the minesite spilk surface,are discussed.

  10. Nucleic acid interactions with pyrite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo-Martí, E.; Briones, C.; Rogero, C.; Gomez-Navarro, C.; Methivier, Ch.; Pradier, C. M.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2008-09-01

    The study of the interaction of nucleic acid molecules with mineral surfaces is a field of growing interest in organic chemistry, origin of life, material science and biotechnology. We have characterized the adsorption of single-stranded peptide nucleic acid (ssPNA) on a natural pyrite surface, as well as the further adsorption of ssDNA on a PNA-modified pyrite surface. The characterization has been performed by means of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The N(1s) and S(2p) XPS core level peaks of PNA and PNA + DNA have been decomposed in curve-components that we have assigned to different chemical species. RAIRS spectra recorded for different concentrations show the presence of positive and negative adsorption bands, related to the semiconducting nature of the surface. The combination of the information gathered by these techniques confirms that PNA adsorbs on pyrite surface, interacting through nitrogen-containing groups of the nucleobases and the iron atoms of the surface, instead of the thiol group of the molecule. The strong PNA/pyrite interaction inhibits further hybridization of PNA with complementary ssDNA, contrary to the behavior reported on gold surfaces.

  11. Mineralization and trace element distribution in pyrite using EMPA in exploration drill holes from Cheshmeh Zard gold district, Khorasan Razavi Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alaminia

    2015-10-01

    systems were recognized east of Arghash. The estimated resources are about 2 million metric tons of potential ore with an average of 1.9 g/t Au (Samadi, 2001;Ashrafpour et al., 2012. Multiple intrusive events are recognized in the region including Precambrian to post-Oligocene-Miocene igneous rocks (Alaminia et al., 2013a. This includes the Arghash diorite pluton, upper Cretaceous granitoids (minor diorite, mainly quartz monzodiorite and granodiorite, early Eocene granite and several lamprophyre and small intrusions of quartz monzodiorite porphyries. Volcanicsinclude andesite, dacite, pillow basalt and tuffs. Sedimentary rocks are conglomerate and minor limestone. Gold veins are hosted by intermediate to silicic volcanic rocks, tuffs, granite, granodiorite, and conglomerate. Veins consist of calcite and quartz. The main alteration zones mapped at the surface and underground are sericite-quartz-pyrite-calcite, withsilicified, propylitic, argillic, and carbonate zones. The mineralization associated with sericiticalteration and silicificationoccurs asveinlets and disseminated in the propylitic zone. Gangue minerals are quartz, chalcedony, calcite, adularia, illite, and kaolinite. Mineralization occurs as veinlets, breccia filling and disseminated. The veinlets are comprised of pyrite, arsenopyrite, minor chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, magnetite and hematite. Pyrite is the main sulfide mineral in the hypogene ore. Samples were collected with the objective of studying the pyrite in the Au (III vein systems. All samples were therefore pyrite rich. The paragenesiswas determined to show four stages of mineralization based on the following microscopic observations: 1. an initial pyrite veinlet stage with associated quartz, chlorite, epidote. Pyrite is fine to medium grained, anhedral and gold-poor. 2. a second pyritic stage (polymetallic sulfide stage contains pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite, quartz and chalcedony, minor adularia and arsenopyrite. 3. An As

  12. Analysis of Conservative Tracer Tests in the Bullfrog, Tram, and Prow Pass Tuffs, 1996 to 1998, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, Amjad; Fahy, Michael F.; Earle, John D.; Tucci, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the potential for transport of radionuclides in ground water from the proposed high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, conservative (nonsorbing) tracer tests were conducted among three boreholes, known as the C-hole Complex, and values for transport (or flow) porosity, storage (or matrix) porosity, longitudinal dispersivity, and the extent of matrix diffusion were obtained. The C-holes are completed in a sequence of Miocene tuffaceous rock, consisting of nonwelded to densely welded ash-flow tuff with intervals of ash-fall tuff and volcaniclastic rocks, covered by Quaternary alluvium. The lower part of the tuffaceous-rock sequence includes the Prow Pass, Bullfrog, and Tram Tuffs of the Crater Flat Group. The rocks are pervaded by tectonic and cooling fractures. Paleozoic limestone and dolomite underlie the tuffaceous rocks. Four radially convergent and one partially recirculating conservative (nonsorbing) tracer tests were conducted at the C-hole Complex from 1996 to 1998 to establish values for flow porosity, storage porosity, longitudinal dispersivity, and extent of matrix diffusion in the Bullfrog and Tram Tuffs and the Prow Pass Tuff. Tracer tests included (1) injection of iodide into the combined Bullfrog-Tram interval; (2) injection of 2,6 difluorobenzoic acid into the Lower Bullfrog interval; (3) injection of 3-carbamoyl-2-pyridone into the Lower Bullfrog interval; and (4) injection of iodide and 2,4,5 trifluorobenzoic acid, followed by 2,3,4,5 tetrafluorobenzoic acid, into the Prow Pass Tuff. All tracer tests were analyzed by the Moench single- and dual-porosity analytical solutions to the advection-dispersion equation or by superposition of these solutions. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to corroborate tracer solution results, to obtain optimal parameter values from the solutions, and to quantify parameter uncertainty resulting from analyzing two of the three radially convergent conservative tracer tests

  13. Analysis of the 2006 block-and-ash flow deposits of Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia, using high-spatial resolution IKONOS images and complementary ground based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouret, Jean-Claude; Gupta, Avijit; Liew, Soo Chin; Lube, Gert; Cronin, Shane J.; Surono, Dr

    2010-05-01

    On 16 June 2006 an overpass of IKONOS coincided with the emplacement of an active block-and-ash flow fed by a lava dome collapse event at Merapi Volcano (Java, Indonesia). This was the first satellite image recorded for a moving pyroclastic flow. The very high-spatial resolution data displayed the extent and impact of the pyroclastic deposits emplaced during and prior to, the day of image acquisition. This allowed a number of features associated with high-hazard block-and-ash flows emplaced in narrow, deep gorges to be mapped, interpreted and understood. The block-and-ash flow and surge deposits recognized in the Ikonos images include: (1) several channel-confined flow lobes and tongues in the box-shaped valley; (2) thin ash-cloud surge deposit and knocked-down trees in constricted areas on both slopes of the gorge; (3) fan-like over bank deposits on the Gendol-Tlogo interfluves from which flows were re-routed in the Tlogo secondary valley; (4) massive over bank lobes on the right bank from which flows devastated the village of Kaliadem 0.5 km from the main channel, a small part of this flow being re-channeled in the Opak secondary valley. The high-resolution IKONOS images also helped us to identify geomorphic obstacles that enabled flows to ramp and spill out from the sinuous channel, a process called flow avulsion. Importantly, the avulsion redirected flows to unexpected areas away from the main channel. In the case of Merapi we see that the presence of valley fill by previous deposits, bends and man-made dams influence the otherwise valley-guided course of the flows. Sadly, Sabo dams (built to ameliorate the effect of high sediment load streams) can actually cause block-and-ash flows to jump out of their containing channel and advance into sensitive areas. Very-high-spatial resolution satellite images are very useful for mapping and interpreting the distribution of freshly erupted volcanic deposits. IKONOS-type images with 1-m resolution provide opportunities to

  14. Degraded dryland rehabilitation: boosting seedling survival using zeolitic tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhamad, Mohammad Noor; Alrbabah, Mohammad; Athamneh, Hana

    2016-04-01

    More than 90% of Jordan is broadly defined as rangelands. Most rangelands are located within the arid zone of the country. Extensive grazing occurs across much of the natural pastures resulting in serious environmental degradation of natural resources in these rangelands. Several programs were carried out for rangeland conservation and rehabilitation in the country. However, these programs face a major challenge of the low survival rate of transplanted shrub seedlings. Seeking innovative approaches to assure healthy establishment of seedling is a big challenge to achieve successful rehabilitation programs. Drought is considered one of the major problems in rehabilitation. Promoting survival and growth, using zeolitic tuff added to planting holes is suggested to be a possible solution. The experiment was conducted on a factorial arrangement within RCBD design. Two shrub species (Atriplex halimus, Atriplex nummularia) were transplanted into holes prepared with three levels of tuff treatments (mulching, mixing and control) under rainfed condition. The result showed insignificant effect of tuff on seedling survival percentage, when mixing tuff with plantation soil or adding tuff as mulch. Also, the two species showed similar survival percentages over two measured dates. However, mixing tuff with soil during hole preparation significantly enhanced seedling heights. Furthers, The Australian atriplex (Atriplex nummularia) species significantly grow higher than Atriplex halimus. The study results suggested that mixing zeoltic tuff with soil during transplantation of seedling is promising in improving the success of rangeland rehabilitation in dry areas in Jordan.

  15. Pyrite oxidation by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Dragiša S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic model of pyrite particle dissolution by the action of bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in a shaken Erlenmeyer flask was presented. The model agreed well with the experimental data for the extracted iron and the number of cells in the liquid phase. The specific growth rate of the adsorbed cells was evaluated (μA = 1,6 d-1 by fitting the experimental data to the model curve. Also, the relevance of the two proposed mechanisms for the bacterial dissolution of sulphide (direct and indirect was discussed, indicating that the indirect one was dominant. The adsorption process of A. ferrooxidans to the pyrite surface was well correlated by a Langmuir type isotherm.

  16. The Adsorption of Cu Species onto Pyrite Surface and Its Effect on Pyrite Flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Cu species onto pyrite surface and its effect on flotation were investigated by using microflotation tests, first-principle calculations, and XPS surface analysis. The results indicated that the flotation of pyrite appears to be activated with CuSO4 only at alkaline pH, while being depressed at acidic and neutral pH. The adsorption of copper ions on pyrite surface was pH-dependent, and the adsorption magnitude of copper ions at alkaline pH is higher than that at acidic and neutral pH due to a strong interaction between O atom in Cu(OH2 and surface Fe atom except for the interaction between Cu atom and surface S atom. At acidic and neutral pH, there is only an interaction between Cu atom and surface S atom. The adsorption was relatively weak, and more copper ions in solution precipitated the collector and depressed the flotation of pyrite. XPS analysis confirmed that more copper ionic species (Cu(I and Cu(II are adsorbed on the pyrite surface at alkaline pH than that at acidic and neutral pH.

  17. Utilization of coal-derived pyrite by electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Deng-xin; M.Makino; GAO Jin-sheng; MENG Fan-l ing

    2001-01-01

    The utilization of coal-derived pyrite by electrolysis was studie d. It is obvious that the sulfur and Fe in pyrite can be electrolyzed into Fe 3+ and SO2-4, and the no pollutant is drained off. In this paper, the infl uence of conditions, including electrolysis potential, time, temperature, the acidity of electrolysis solutions, the concentration of adding agent, the concentration of pyrite, and the rate of conversion of pyrite (Cr) was investigated. Cr increase s with the rise of potential, time, temperature, acidity and the concentration o f additive agent, but decreases with the rise of concentration of pyrite. At th e certain conditions (at the potential of 3.0 V, temperature of 298 K, time of 12 h , the concentration of MnSO4 of 6%, concentration of pyrite of 4%, and concent ra tion of acid of 10%), Cr is high to 93%. In the same time, the mechanism of elec trolysis of pyrite was provided. The electrolysis of pyrite is actually the r ecycle of Mn ion between anodic surface and pyrite. At last, the production of F eSO4*7H2O through electrolysis of pyrite was introduced.

  18. Utilization of coal-derived pyrite by electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李登新; M.Makinot; 高晋生; 孟繁玲

    2001-01-01

    The utilization of coal-derived pyrite by electrolysis was studied. It is obvious that the sulfur and Fe in pyrite can be electrolyzed into Fe3+ and SO2-4, and the no pollutant is drained off. In this paper, the influence of conditions, including electrolysis potential, time, temperature, the acidity of electrolysis solutions, the concentration of adding agent, the concentration of pyrite, and the rate of conversion of pyrite (Cr) was investigated. Cr increases with the rise of potential, time, temperature, acidity and the concentration of additive agent, but decreases, with the rise of concentration of pyrite. At the certain conditions (at the potential of 3.0 V, temperature of 298 K, time of 12 h, the concentration of MnSO4 of 6%, concentration of pyrite of 4%, and concentration of acid of 10%), Cr is high to 93%. In the same time, the mechanism of electrolysis of pyrite was provided. The electrolysis of pyrite is actually the recycle of Mn ion between anodic surface and pyrite. At last, the production of FeSO4·7H2O through electrolysis of pyrite was introduced.

  19. Effects of pyrite on the spontaneous combustion of coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Deng; Xiaofeng Ma; Yutao Zhang; Yaqing Li; Wenwen Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite has a significant effect on the spontaneous combustion of coal. The presence of pyrite can change the propensity of coal towards spontaneous combustion. The influences of various pyrite contents on the parameters of spontaneous combustion, such as index gases, temperature and released heat etc., were investigated in this study. Coal samples with different pyrite contents (0%, 3%, 5%, 7%and 9%) were made by mixing coal and pyrite. The oxidation experiments under temperature-programmed condition were carried out to test the release rate of gaseous oxidation products at different temperatures. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was employed to measure the intensity of heat release during coal oxidation for various pyrite contents. The results indicate that pyrite can nonlinearly accelerate the process of spontaneous combustion. The coal sample with a pyrite content of 5% has the largest CO release rate and oxygen adsorption as well. However, the coal sample with a pyrite content of 7% has the largest rate of heat flow according to the results from the DSC tests. Pyrite contents of 5%–7% in coal has the most significant effects on spontaneous combustion within the range of this study. The conclusions are conducive to the evaluation and control for the spontaneous combustion of coal.

  20. Oxygen isotopes and trace elements in the Tiva Canyon Tuff, Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, B.D.; Kyser, T.K.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1996-12-31

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for an underground repository for high-level radioactive waste. Because Yucca Mountain is located in a resource-rich geologic setting, one aspect of the site characterization studies is an evaluation of the resource potential at Yucca Mountain. The Tiva Canyon Tuff (TCT) is a widespread felsic ash-flow sheet that is well exposed in the Yucca Mountain area. Samples of the upper part of the TCT were selected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposits within the Miocene volcanic section. These samples of the upper cliff and caprock subunits have been analyzed for oxygen isotopes and a large suite of elements. Oxygen isotope compositions ({delta}{sup 18}O) of the TCT are typical of felsic igneous rocks but range from 6.9 to 11.8 permil, indicating some post-depositional alteration. There is no evidence of the low {delta}{sup 18}O values (less than 6 permil) that are typical of epithermal precious-metal deposits in the region. The variation in oxygen isotope ratios is probably the result of deuteric alteration during late-stage crystallization of silica and low-temperature hydration of glassy horizons; these processes are also recorded by the chemical compositions of the rocks. However, most elemental contents in the TCT reflect igneous processes, and the effects of alteration are observed only in some of the more mobile elements. These studies indicate that the TCT at Yucca Mountain has not been affected by large-scale meteoric-water hydrothermal circulation. The chemical compositions of the TCT, especially the low concentrations of most trace elements including typical pathfinder elements, show no evidence for epithermal metal deposits. Together, these data indicate that the potential for economic mineralization in this part of the volcanic section at Yucca Mountain is small.

  1. Interfacial interaction of bio-leaching of pyrite mineral

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Guo-hua; WANG nui; SUO Jun; QIU Guan-zhou; HAO Ye

    2008-01-01

    Electrokinetic and contact angle measurements were used to discuss the interracial interaction on bio-leaching of pyrite mineral. Surface energy parameters of pyrite mineral and thiobaeillus ferrooxidans were Gbtained by calculating according to formula of Young's equation and contact angle measurements. The results show that surface energy of thiobacillus ferrooxidans is much higher than that of pyrite mineral, and the reaction of pyrite mineral with thiobacillus ferrooxidans causes the reduction of the pyrite surface energy. The interfacial interaction energies between pyrite mineral and thiobacillus ferrooxidans were also obtained based onpolar interfacial interaction theory and electrokinetic and contact angle measurements. The thermodynamics approach only considering Lifshitz-van der Waals and Lewis acid-base interaction fails to explain the adhesion behavior of the bacteria, but theextended Derjaguin-Landan-Verwey-Overbeek theory concerning Lifshitz-van der Waals and Lewis acid-base and the electrostatic can exactly predict interracial interaction.

  2. Evaluation of three Italian tuffs (Neapolitan Yellow Tuf, Tufo Romano and Tufo Etrusco) as compatible replacement stone for Römer tuff in Dutch built cultural heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Bolondi, L.

    2010-01-01

    Rhenish tuffs from the volcanic Eifel region in Germany, in particular the so-called Römer tuff, are among the most prominent and voluminous natural stones in Dutch monuments. The Römer tuff has been used since Roman times, and was widely used again in Romanesque (and to a lesser extent Romano-Gothi

  3. Evaluation of three Italian tuffs (Neapolitan Yellow Tuf, Tufo Romano and Tufo Etrusco) as compatible replacement stone for Römer tuff in Dutch built cultural heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Bolondi, L.

    2010-01-01

    Rhenish tuffs from the volcanic Eifel region in Germany, in particular the so-called Römer tuff, are among the most prominent and voluminous natural stones in Dutch monuments. The Römer tuff has been used since Roman times, and was widely used again in Romanesque (and to a lesser extent

  4. Photon Shielding Features of Quarry Tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega-Carrillo Hector Rene

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cantera is a quarry tuff widely used in the building industry; in this work the shielding features of cantera were determined. The shielding characteristics were calculated using XCOM and MCNP5 codes for 0.03, 0.07, 0.1, 0.3, 0.662, 1, 2, and 3 MeV photons. With XCOM the mass interaction coefficients, and the total mass attenuation coefficients, were calculated. With the MCNP5 code a transmission experiment was modelled using a point-like source located 42 cm apart from a point-like detector. Between the source and the detector, cantera pieces with different thickness, ranging from 0 to 40 cm were included. The collided and uncollided photon fluence, the Kerma in air and the Ambient dose equivalent were estimated. With the uncollided fluence the linear attenuation coefficients were determined and compared with those calculated with XCOM. The linear attenuation coefficient for 0.662 MeV photons was compared with the coefficient measured with a NaI(Tl-based γ-ray spectrometer and a 137Cs source.

  5. Photon Shielding Features of Quarry Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Hernandez-Adame, Luis; Guzman-Garcia, Karen Arlete; Ortiz-Hernandez, Arturo Agustin; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Juarez-Alvarado, Cesar Antonio

    2017-09-01

    Cantera is a quarry tuff widely used in the building industry; in this work the shielding features of cantera were determined. The shielding characteristics were calculated using XCOM and MCNP5 codes for 0.03, 0.07, 0.1, 0.3, 0.662, 1, 2, and 3 MeV photons. With XCOM the mass interaction coefficients, and the total mass attenuation coefficients, were calculated. With the MCNP5 code a transmission experiment was modelled using a point-like source located 42 cm apart from a point-like detector. Between the source and the detector, cantera pieces with different thickness, ranging from 0 to 40 cm were included. The collided and uncollided photon fluence, the Kerma in air and the Ambient dose equivalent were estimated. With the uncollided fluence the linear attenuation coefficients were determined and compared with those calculated with XCOM. The linear attenuation coefficient for 0.662 MeV photons was compared with the coefficient measured with a NaI(Tl)-based γ-ray spectrometer and a 137Cs source.

  6. Transport properties of Topopah Spring tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.; Daily, W.

    1984-10-01

    Electrical resistivity, ultrasonic P-waves velocity, and water permeability were measured simultaneously on both intact and fractured Topopah Spring tuff samples at a confining pressure of 5.0 MPa, pore pressures to 2.5 MPa, and temperatures to 140{sup 0}C. The tested samples were subjected to three dehydration and rehydration cycles. The dehydrations were accomplished at a temperature of 140{sup 0}C, and the rehydrations were accomplished at various combinations of temperature and pore pressures so that the wetting fluid was either liquid water, steam or both. The electrical resistivity measurements indicate that for the intact sample, the drying and resaturation took place fairly uniformly throughout the sample. On the other hand, for the fractured sample, the drying and resaturation was spatially quite nonuniform. When samples had been subjected to 5 MPa of confining pressure and 140{sup 0}C for several weeks, a gradual monotonic drift in resistivity was measured (decreasing resistivity when dry; increasing resistivity when wet). This may be the result of either minerological changes or grain boundary movement. In any case, the phenomenon may have important consequences on long term repository performance, and should be studied further. The permeability of the intact sample was independent of temperature, dehydration and rehydration cycles, and time. The permeability of the fractured sample, initially dominated by the fracture, decreased by about one order of magnitude after each dehydration and rehydration cycle. 11 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Thermoacidophilic archaea for pyrite oxidation in coal desulphurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Liselotte

    1995-10-01

    The desulfurization of low-sulfur coals has been demonstrated with the thermoacidophilic archaeon Acidianus brierleyi. A. brierleyi facilitates the removal of inorganic sulfur from coal and oxidizes mineral pyrite. The results imply that the mechanism behind microbial coal desulfurization and pyrite oxidation is a combination of biotic and abiotic leaching of pyrite. The extent of sulfur removal is dependent on the type of coal and is closely related to he amount of pyritic sulfur in the coal. Studies have shown that neither ash content nor heating value were dramatically affected by the microbial treatment. The use of the archaea Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus solfataricus, as well as the mesophilic bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and several Pseudomonas species, has also been studied for coal desulfurization and mineral pyrite oxidation. The archaea and Pseudomonas species did not grow autotrophically on mineral pyrite neither did they oxidize pyrite in coal. The oxidation rate was, however, 5-10 times less than with A. brierleyi on mineral pyrite. The rate of sulfur removal from coal was in the same range as for A. brierleyi which indicates that different reactions are rate limiting in coal depyritization than in mineral pyrite oxidation. 133 refs, 18 figs, 3 tabs

  8. Compositional zoning of the bishop tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, W.; Wilson, C.J.N.

    2007-01-01

    Compositional data for >400 pumice clasts, organized according to eruptive sequence, crystal content, and texture, provide new perspectives on eruption and pre-eruptive evolution of the >4600 km3 of zoned rhyolitic magma ejected as the BishopTuff during formation of Long Valley caldera. Proportions and compositions of different pumice types are given for each ignimbrite package and for the intercalated plinian pumice-fall layers that erupted synchronously. Although withdrawal of the zoned magma was less systematic than previously realized, the overall sequence displays trends toward greater proportions of less evolved pumice, more crystals (0-5 24 wt %), and higher FeTi-oxide temperatures (714-818??C). No significant hiatus took place during the 6 day eruption of the BishopTuff, nearly all of which issued from an integrated, zoned, unitary reservoir. Shortly before eruption, however, the zoned melt-dominant portion of the chamber was invaded by batches of disparate lower-silica rhyolite magma, poorer in crystals than most of the resident magma but slightly hotter and richer in Ba, Sr, andTi. Interaction with resident magma at the deepest levels tapped promoted growth ofTi-rich rims on quartz, Ba-rich rims on sanidine, and entrapment of near-rim melt inclusions relatively enriched in Ba and CO2.Varied amounts of mingling, even in higher parts of the chamber, led to the dark gray and swirly crystal-poor pumices sparsely present in all ashflow packages. As shown by FeTi-oxide geothermometry, the zoned rhyolitic chamber was hottest where crystal-richest, rendering any model of solidification fronts at the walls or roof unlikely.The main compositional gradient (75-195 ppm Rb; 0.8-2.2 ppm Ta; 71-154 ppm Zr; 0.40-1.73% FeO*) existed in the melt, prior to crystallization of the phenocryst suite observed, which included zircon as much as 100 kyr older than the eruption.The compositions of crystals, though themselves largely unzoned, generally reflect magma temperature and

  9. Pyrite Surface after Thiobacillus ferrooxidans Leaching at 30℃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans on the oxidation of pyrite, two parallel experiments, which employed H2SO4 solutions and acidic solutions inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, were designed and carried out at 30℃. The initial pH of the two solutions was adjusted to 2.5 by dropwise addition of concentrated sulphuric acid. The surfaces of pyrite before exposure to leaching solutions and after exposure to the H2SO4 solutions and acidic solutions inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). There were a variety of erosion patterns by Thiobacillusferrooxidans on the bio-leached pyrite surfaces. A conclusion can be drawn that the oxidation of pyrite might have been caused by erosion of the surfaces.Attachment of the bacteria to pyrite surfaces resulted in erosion pits, leading to the oxidation of pyrite.It is possible that the direct mechanism plays the most important role in the oxidation of pyrite. The changes in iron ion concentrations of both the experimental solutions with time suggest that Thiobacillus ferrooxidans can enhance greatly the oxidation of pyrite.

  10. Selective separation of pyrite and chalcopyrite by biomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandraprabha, M N; Natarajan, K A; Modak, Jayant M

    2004-09-01

    Selective separation of pyrite from other associated ferrous sulphides at acidic and neutral pH has been a challenging problem. This paper discusses the utility of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans for the selective flotation of chalcopyrite from pyrite. Consequent to interaction with bacterial cells, pyrite remained depressed even in the presence of potassium isopropyl xanthate collector while chalcopyrite exhibited significant flotability. However, when the minerals were conditioned together, the selectivity achieved was poor due to the activation of pyrite surface by the copper ions in solution. The selectivity was improved when the sequence of conditioning with bacterial cells and collector was reversed, since the bacterial cells were able to depress collector interacted pyrite effectively, while having negligible effect on chalcopyrite. The observed behaviour is analysed and discussed in detail. The separation obtained was significant both at acidic and alkaline pH. This selectivity achieved was retained when the minerals were interacted with both bacterial cells and collector simultaneously.

  11. Mobility of Metal Tracers in Unsaturated Tuffs of Busted Butte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groffman, A. R.

    2001-12-01

    A complex tracer mixture was injected continuously for over two years into a 10 m x 10 m x 7 m block of unsaturated tuff as part of the Busted Butte unsaturated-zone tracer test at Yucca Mountain. The test was designed to measure tracer transport within the Topopah Springs and Calico Hills tuffs, units that occur between the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and the water table below. The mixture included nonreactive (Br, I, and fluorinated benzoic acids (FBAs)) and reactive tracers (Li, Ce, Sm, Ni, Co, and Mn). Bromide, I, FBAs, and Li were detected during the test on absorbent pads emplaced in a series of solute collection boreholes located beneath the injectors but the more strongly sorbing metals did not reach the collection boreholes during this period. To determine the distribution and mobility of these metals, tracer constituents were extracted from tuff samples collected during overcoring and mineback of the test block. Tracers were extracted from the tuff samples by leaching with a 5% nitric acid solution for metals and a bicarbonate-carbonate buffer for anions. Results from the overcore sample suite show that metals have migrated through the tuff in the region adjacent to and immediately below the tracer injectors. Consistent with laboratory sorption measurements and observed breakthrough in the collection boreholes, rock analyses showed that Li is the most mobile of the metals. Co and Ni behave similarly, traveling tens of cm from the injection sites, while Sm and Ce moved far less, possibly due to precipitation reactions in addition to sorption. Determination of Mn transport is complicated by high background concentrations in the tuff; additional background samples are currently being evaluated. As expected, our rock analyses show that the nonreactive tracers Br and FBAs have moved beyond the overcore region, corroborating results from collection boreholes.

  12. An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Natella; Kamyshny, Alexey; Halevy, Itay

    2014-05-01

    An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies Natella Mirzoyan1, Alexey Kamyshny Jr.2, Itay Halevy1 1Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel 2Geological and Environmental Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel Pyrite is one of the most abundant and widespread of the sulfide minerals with a central role in biogeochemical cycles of iron and sulfur. Due to its diverse roles in the natural and anthropogenic sulfur cycle, pyrite has been extensively studied in various experimental investigations of the kinetics of its dissolution and oxidation, the isotopic fractionations associated with these reactions, and the microbiological processes involved. Pretreatment of pyrite for removal of oxidation impurities to prevent experimental artifacts and inaccuracies is often practiced. While numerous pyrite-cleaning methods have been used in experiments, a common pyrite pretreatment method, often used to investigate pyrite chemistry by the isotopic fractionations associated with it, includes several rinses by HCl, acetone and deionized water. Elemental sulfur (S0) is a common product of incomplete pyrite oxidation. Removal of S0 is desirable to avoid experimental biases associated with its participation in pyrite transformations, but is more complicated than the removal of sulfate. Although rinsing with an organic solvent is in part aimed at removing S0, to the best of our knowledge, the extraction efficiency of S0 in existing protocols has not been assessed. We have developed and tested a new protocol for elemental sulfur removal from the surface of pyrite by ultrasonication with warm acetone. Our data demonstrate the presence of large fractions of S0 on untreated pyrite particle surfaces, of which only approximately 60% was removed by the commonly used pretreatment method. The new protocol described here was found to be more efficient at S0 removal than the commonly used method

  13. Biogas cleaning and upgrading with natural zeolites from tuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, Valerio; Petracchini, Francesco; Guerriero, Ettore; Bencini, Alessandro; Drigo, Serena

    2016-01-01

    CO2 adsorption on synthetic zeolites has become a consolidated approach for biogas upgrading to biomethane. As an alternative to synthetic zeolites, tuff waste from building industry was investigated in this study: indeed, this material is available at a low price and contains a high fraction of natural zeolites. A selective adsorption of CO2 and H2S towards CH4 was confirmed, allowing to obtain a high-purity biomethane (CO2 zeolites from tuffs may successfully be used in a pressure/vacuum swing adsorption process.

  14. Uniaxial strength testing of Calico Hills tuff, Yucca Mountain: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qizhi; Schultz, R.A. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A detailed investigation of the strength properties of Calico Hills tuff was undertaken to further characterize the behavior of this unit. Uniaxial compression test on 47 samples of massive and reworked tuff show a dependence of peak strength and Young`s modulus on the total porosity, and thus on the geologic history of the Calico Hills tuff. Controlled deformation of test specimens documents axial splitting and faulting as failure mechanisms in the post-peak region of these brittle tuffs.

  15. Greigite: a true intermediate on the polysulfide pathway to pyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benning Liane G

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The formation of pyrite (FeS2 from iron monosulfide precursors in anoxic sediments has been suggested to proceed via mackinawite (FeS and greigite (Fe3S4. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms of pyrite formation are not sufficiently understood because solid and dissolved intermediates are oxygen-sensitive and poorly crystalline and therefore notoriously difficult to characterize and quantify. In this study, hydrothermal synchrotron-based energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (ED-XRD methods were used to investigate in situ and in real-time the transformation of mackinawite to greigite and pyrite via the polysulfide pathway. The rate of formation and disappearance of specific Bragg peaks during the reaction and the changes in morphology of the solid phases as observed with high resolution microscopy were used to derive kinetic parameters and to determine the mechanisms of the reaction from mackinawite to greigite and pyrite. The results clearly show that greigite is formed as an intermediate on the pathway from mackinawite to pyrite. The kinetics of the transformation of mackinawite to greigite and pyrite follow a zero-order rate law indicating a solid-state mechanism. The morphology of greigite and pyrite crystals formed under hydrothermal conditions supports this conclusion and furthermore implies growth of greigite and pyrite by oriented aggregation of nanoparticulate mackinawite and greigite, respectively. The activation enthalpies and entropies of the transformation of mackinawite to greigite, and of greigite to pyrite were determined from the temperature dependence of the rate constants according to the Eyring equation. Although the activation enthalpies are uncharacteristic of a solid-state mechanism, the activation entropies indicate a large increase of order in the transition state, commensurate with a solid-state mechanism.

  16. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiang-Huai.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The products as well as their structure, the mechanisms and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc. on thereof, are directed at identifying the causes and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.

  17. The effect of quartz on the flotation of pyrite depressed by serpentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of quartz particles on the flotation of pyrite depressed by serpentine has been investigated through flotation tests, adsorption tests, zeta potential measurements and DLVO calculation. The results show that the presence of hydrophilic serpentine slimes on pyrite surface reduces collector adsorption and results in lower recovery of pyrite. The finer the serpentine slime is, the lower the pyrite recovery will be. Quartz particles do not interfere with pyrite flotation. However, the addition of quartz particles increases the adsorption of collector on pyrite surface and limits the detrimental effect of serpentine on pyrite flotation. The fine-grained quartz is more effective. Zeta potential measurements and DLVO calculation illustrate that the zeta potential of quartz is more negative than that of pyrite and the attraction force between serpentine and quartz is stronger than force between serpentine and pyrite, thus some serpentine slimes were transferred from pyrite surface to quartz in the process of attrition.

  18. Electrodeposition of dixanthogen(TETD) on pyrite surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-zhong; QIN Wen-qing; SUN Wei; QIU Guan-zhou

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction of xanthate on the surface of pyrite was studied using cyclic voltammogrametry, chronopotentiometry and rotating-disc electrode measurements. Experimental results demonstrate that the first step in the reaction is electrochemical adsorption of xanthate ion, and then the adsorbed ion associates with a xanthate ion from the solution and forms a dixanthogen on the pyrite electrode surface. The diffusion coefficient of butyl xanthate on pyrite electrode surface can be determined to be about 1.09×10-6 cm2/s. Using the galvanostatic technique, the kinetic parameters of oxidation of the butyl xanthate ion on the pyrite surface are calculated as Ja=200 μA/cm2, β= 0.203 and J0=27.1 μA/cm2.

  19. Magnetic properties related to thermal treatment of pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Detailed rock magnetic experiments were conducted on high-purity natural crystalline pyrite and its products of thermal treatments in both argon and air atmospheres. In argon atmosphere (reducing environment), the pyrite is altered by heating to magnetite and pyrrhotite; the latter is stable in argon atmosphere, and has coercive force and coercivity of remanence of ~20 and ~30 mT, respectively. Whereas in air, the pyrite is ultimately oxidized to hematite. First order reversal curve (FORC) diagram of the end product shows that the remanence coercivity of hematite is up to ~1400 mT. The corresponding thermal transformation process of pyrite in air can be simply summarized as pyrite→ pyrrhotite→magnetite→hematite. These results are helpful for understanding of sedimentary magnetism, secondary chemical remanence and meteorolite magnetic properties.

  20. Magnetic properties related to thermal treatment of pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; PAN YongXin; LI JinHua; QIN HuaFeng

    2008-01-01

    Detailed rock magnetic experiments were conducted on high-purity natural crystalline pyrite and its products of thermal treatments in both argon and air atmospheres. In argon atmosphere (reducing environment), the pyrite is altered by heating to magnetite and pyrrhotite; the latter is stable in argon atmosphere, and has coercive force and coercivity of remanence of ~20 and ~30 mT, respectively.Whereas in air, the pyrite is ultimately oxidized to hematite. First order reversal curve (FORC) diagram of the end product shows that the remanence coercivity of hematite is up to ~1400 mT. The corresponding thermal transformation process of pyrite in air can be simply summarized as pyrite→pyrrhotite→magnetite→hematite. These results are helpful for understanding of sedimentary magnetism, secondary chemical remanence and meteorolite magnetic properties.

  1. Nannobacteria and the formation of framboidal pyrite: Textural evidence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Robert L Folk

    2005-06-01

    Study of sedimentary pyrite in the form of framboids, euhedral crystals or metasomatic masses has revealed that their surfaces are commonly covered with spheroids of about 50 nm. This applies to all the examples studied, from modern to Proterozoic. These spheroids are interpreted as the pyritized corpses of nannobacterial cells; if correct, this indicates that precipitation of iron sulfide was performed by these dwarf forms of bacteria, often associated with decaying organic matter.

  2. Rapid method to determine proximate analysis and pyritic sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.W.; Hyman, M.

    1985-05-01

    The use of thermomagnetogravimetry has been proposed as an alternative to the ASTM methods for measuring the pyritic sulphur content of coal and for proximate analysis. This paper presents a comparison of the results of thermogravimetry for proximate analysis and thermomagnetometry for pyritic sulphur with ASTM values on the same samples. The thermomagnetogravimetric technique is quicker and easier than the ASTM methods, and of comparable accuracy.

  3. Enabling iron pyrite (FeS2) and related ternary pyrite compounds for high-performance solar energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caban Acevedo, Miguel

    The success of solar energy technologies depends not only on highly efficient solar-to-electrical energy conversion, charge storage or chemical fuel production, but also on dramatically reduced cost, to meet the future terawatt energy challenges we face. The enormous scale involved in the development of impactful solar energy technologies demand abundant and inexpensive materials, as well as energy-efficient and cost-effective processes. As a result, the investigation of semiconductor, catalyst and electrode materials made of earth-abundant and sustainable elements may prove to be of significant importance for the long-term adaptation of solar energy technologies on a larger scale. Among earth-abundant semiconductors, iron pyrite (cubic FeS2) has been considered the most promising solar energy absorber with the potential to achieve terawatt energy-scale deployment. Despite extensive synthetic progress and device efforts, the solar conversion efficiency of iron pyrite has remained below 3% since the 1990s, primarily due to a low open circuit voltage (V oc). The low photovoltage (Voc) of iron pyrite has puzzled scientists for decades and limited the development of cost-effective solar energy technologies based on this otherwise promising semiconductor. Here I report a comprehensive investigation of the syntheses and properties of iron pyrite materials, which reveals that the Voc of iron pyrite is limited by the ionization of a high density of intrinsic bulk defect states despite high density surface states and strong surface Fermi level pinning. Contrary to popular belief, bulk defects most-likely caused by intrinsic sulfur vacancies in iron pyrite must be controlled in order to enable this earth-abundant semiconductor for cost-effective and sustainable solar energy conversion. Lastly, the investigation of iron pyrite presented here lead to the discovery of ternary pyrite-type cobalt phosphosulfide (CoPS) as a highly-efficient earth-abundant catalyst material for

  4. Pyrite and pyritic mill tailing as a source of iron in a calcareous iron-deficient soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrau, E.M.; Berg, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    Mill wastes from ore processing, particularly acid-forming pyrites, often pose disposal problems. This greenhouse study evaluated pyrite and a pyritic mill tailing as Fe sources on an Fe-deficient calcareous soil. Pyrite and tailing <0.1 mm in diameter were applied at rates of 45 and 135 metric ton/ha. Controls, 200 and 600 ppM Fe as Fe/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ and 5 and 15 ppM Fe as FeEDDHA, were used as standards. The treatments were seeded with sudangrass (Sorghum vulgare sudanense) and six successive crops were harvested. Sudangrass yields increased 160 to 200% with pyrite and tailing treatments; these yields were significantly greater than the control and were comparable to yields from the other Fe sources. The 5 ppM FeEDDHA treatment, however, increased yield for only the first two crops. Plant-available soil Fe measured by DTPA extraction increased with all Fe treatments, while the levels of DTPA-extractable Zn and Mn remained the same or increased slightly. DTPA-extractable Cu doubled with the high rate of pyrite addition. The concentration of Fe in the plants remained the same or increased slightly with the Fe treatments, while concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Mn all decreased.

  5. Clinoptilolite zeolitized tuff from Central Alborz Range, North Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Batoul

    2010-05-01

    Zeolites are hydrated alumino-silicates of the alkaline and alkaline earth cations, principally sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium (Iijima 1980; Hay 1981). Zeolites occur principally in unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks and are particularly widespread in volcani-clastic strata (Hay, 1978). Clinoptilolite is a natural zeolite of the heulandite group with the simplified formula of (Na, K)6 Si30 Al6 O72 .nH2. It is the most common natural zeolite found mainly in sedimentary rocks of volcanic origin. Alborz zone is one of the important geological divisions in Iran. This zone is restricted to Kopeh dagh zone in North & Central Iranian zone in South and is a region of active deformation within the broad Arabian-Eurasia collision zone (Allen et al. 2003). The zeolitized green tuff belt from Central Alborz which introduce here are made of volcanoclastic sequence of Karaj Formation. This belt is about 40 km long along Alborz Range and is Eocene in age. Zeolites and associated minerals of this altered vitric tuff studied. Zeolitization took place in some beds of Karaj Formations, with average range of 3 to 300 meters thickness. There are several gypsum lenses which interbed with a widespread green tuff succession in the studied area. On the basis of chemical composition these tuffs are in the range of acid to intermediate volcanic rocks. Also magmatic affinity is calc-alkaline and geological setting of the area belongs to volcanic arc granitoid. Petrographic data has shown that various shape and size of shard glass are the main component of tuffs. Based on the field studies, detail microscopy, XRD and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), the following main minerals are determined: Clinoptilolite+montmorillonite+crystobalite. Clinoptilolite and smectite are predominant minerals in all altered samples. Concerning the Si/Al ratio of 40 point analyses of glass shards the Alborz tuff has clinoptilolite composition. Otherwise the chemical composition of altered shard glass

  6. Geochemical characteristics of pyrite in Duolanasayi gold deposit, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guodong; XIAO Huiliang; WANG Henian; ZHOU Jiyuan

    2005-01-01

    The Duolanasayi gold deposit, 60 km NW of Habahe County, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, is a mid-large-scale gold deposit controlled by brittle-ductile shearing, and superimposed by albitite veins and late-stage magma hydrothermal solutions. There are four types of pyrite, which are contained in the light metamorphosed rocks (limestone, siltstone), altered-mineralized rocks (chlorite-schist, altered albite-granite, mineralized phyllite), quartz veins and carbonatite veinlets. The pyrite is the most common ore mineral. The Au-barren pyrite is present mainly in a simple form and gold-bearing pyrite is present mainly in a composite form. From the top downwards, the pyrite varies in crystal form from {100} and {210}+{100} to {210}+{100}+{111} to {100}+{111}. Geochemical studies indicate that the molecular contents of pyrite range from Fe1.057S2 to Fe0.941S2. Gold positively correlates with Mn, Sr, Zn, Te, Pb, Ba and Ag. There are four groups of trace elements: Fe-Cu-Sr-Ag, Au-Te-Co, As-Pb-Zn and Mn-V-Ti-Ba-Ni-Cr in pyrite. The REE characteristics show that the total amount of REE (ΣREE) ranges from 32.35×10 -6 to 132.18×10 -6; LREE/HREE, 4.466-9.142; (La/Yb)N, 3.719-11.133; (Eu/Sm)N, 0.553-1.656; (Sm/Nd)N, 0.602-0.717; La/Yb, 6.26-18.75; δEu, 0.628-2.309; δCe, 0.308-0.816. Sulfur isotopic compositions (δ 34S=-2.46‰--7.02‰) suggest that the sulfur associated with gold mineralization was derived from the upper mantle or lower crust.

  7. Repository site data report for unsaturated tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tien, P.L.; Updegraff, C.D.; Siegel, M.D.; Wahi, K.K.; Guzowski, R.V.

    1985-11-01

    The US Department of Energy is currently considering the thick sequences of unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, on the southwestern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, as a possible candidate host rock for a nuclear-waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in one of the most arid areas in the United States. The site is within the south-central part of the Great Basin section of the Basin and Range physiographic province and is located near a number of silicic calderas of Tertiary age. Although localized zones of seismic activity are common throughout the province, and faults are present at Yucca Mountain, the site itself is basically aseismic. No data are available on the composition of ground water in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. It has been suggested that the composition is bounded by the compositions of water from wells USW-H3, UE25p-1, J-13, and snow or rain. There are relatively few data available from Yucca Mountain on the moisture content and saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and characteristic curves of the unsaturated zone. The available literature on thermomechanical properties of tuff does not always distinguish between data from the saturated zone and data from the unsaturated zone. Geochemical, hydrologic, and thermomechanical data available on the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain are tabulated in this report. Where the data are very sparse, they have been supplemented by data from the saturated zone or from areas other than Yucca Mountain. 316 refs., 58 figs., 37 tabs.

  8. Selenite transport in unsaturated tuff from Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conca, J.L. [WSU Tri-Cities, Richland, WA (United States); Triay, I.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Direct measurements of unsaturated selenite retardation coefficients and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity were obtained on two tuff samples from Yucca Mountain using the UFA{trademark} technology. The retardation factor for the selenite species was only 2.5 in both Yucca Mountain vitric member at 62.6% saturation and zeolitized nonwelded tuff from G-tunnel at 52.8% saturation with respect to J-13 well water from the Nevada Test Site contaminated with selenium at 1.31 mg/l (ppm). In batch tests on the same material using 1.2 mg/l (ppm), the average K{sub d} was determined to be 13, giving retardation factors higher than the UFA column breakthrough tests by an order of magnitude. The difference could result from preferential flow paths in the UFA column as might occur in the field or differences in residence times between the two types of tests. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivities during the experiments were 2.49 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s for the Yucca Mountain vitric member and 1.16 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s for the zeolited nonwelded tuff.

  9. Arsenic incorporation into authigenic pyrite, Bengal Basin sediment, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowers, H.A.; Breit, G.N.; Foster, A.L.; Whitney, J.; Yount, J.; Uddin, Md. N.; Muneem, Ad. A.

    2007-01-01

    Sediment from two deep boreholes (???400 m) approximately 90 km apart in southern Bangladesh was analyzed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), total chemical analyses, chemical extractions, and electron probe microanalysis to establish the importance of authigenic pyrite as a sink for arsenic in the Bengal Basin. Authigenic framboidal and massive pyrite (median values 1500 and 3200 ppm As, respectively), is the principal arsenic residence in sediment from both boreholes. Although pyrite is dominant, ferric oxyhydroxides and secondary iron phases contain a large fraction of the sediment-bound arsenic between approximately 20 and 100 m, which is the depth range of wells containing the greatest amount of dissolved arsenic. The lack of pyrite in this interval is attributed to rapid sediment deposition and a low sulfur flux from riverine and atmospheric sources. The ability of deeper aquifers (>150 m) to produce ground water with low dissolved arsenic in southern Bangladesh reflects adequate sulfur supplies and sufficient time to redistribute the arsenic into pyrite during diagenesis.

  10. Pyrite oxidation under simulated acid rain weathering conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Li, Heping; Wang, Luying; Wen, Xiaoying; Liu, Qingyou

    2017-07-31

    We investigated the electrochemical corrosion behavior of pyrite in simulated acid rain with different acidities and at different temperatures. The cyclic voltammetry, polarization curve, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that pyrite has the same electrochemical interaction mechanism under different simulated acid rain conditions, regardless of acidity or environmental temperature. Either stronger acid rain acidity or higher environmental temperature can accelerate pyrite corrosion. Compared with acid rain having a pH of 5.6 at 25 °C, the prompt efficiency of pyrite weathering reached 104.29% as the acid rain pH decreased to 3.6, and it reached 125.31% as environmental temperature increased to 45 °C. Increasing acidity dramatically decreases the charge transfer resistance, and increasing temperature dramatically decreases the passivation film resistance, when other conditions are held constant. Acid rain always causes lower acidity mine drainage, and stronger acidity or high environmental temperatures cause serious acid drainage. The natural parameters of latitude, elevation, and season have considerable influence on pyrite weathering, because temperature is an important influencing factor. These experimental results are of direct significance for the assessment and management of sulfide mineral acid drainage in regions receiving acid rain.

  11. Hydrogeologic and environmental impact of amjhore pyrite mines, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Vishnu D.; Rawat, Rajendra K.

    1991-01-01

    Drainage from active and inactive pyrite mines has produced chemical and physical pollution of both ground- and surface water in Amjhore region. In the present case, chemical pollution is caused by exposing pyrite minerals to oxidation or leaching, resulting in undesirable concentrations of dissolved materials. Pyrite mining suddenly exposed large quantities of sulfides to direct contact with oxygen, and oxidation proceeds rapidly, resulting in acidity and release of metal (Fe) and sulfates to the water system, eventually resulting in water pollution in the region. The magnitude and impact of the problem is just being recognized and, as the present and the future projected demand for clean water is of top priority, the present studies were undertaken. Mine drainage includes water flowing from the surface and underground mines and runoff or seepage from the pyrite mines. This article describes the various hydrologic factors that control acid water formation and its transport. The mine drainage is obviously a continuing source of pollution and, therefore, remedial measures mainly consisting of a double-stage limestone-lime treatment technique have been suggested. The present results will be used to develop an alternative and more effective abatement technology to mitigate acid production at the source, namely, the technique of revegetation of the soil cover applied to the waste mine dump material. Water quality change is discussed in detail, with emphasis on acidity formed from exposed pyrite material and on increase in dissolved solids. Preventive and treatment measures are recommended.

  12. Hydrogeological and environmental impact of Amjhore pyrite mines, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, V.D.; Rawat, R.K. (Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India))

    Drainage from active and inactive pyrite mines has produced chemical and physical pollution of both ground and surface water in Amjhore region. In the present case, chemical pollution is caused by exposing pyrite minerals to oxidation or leaching, resulting in undesirable concentrations of dissolved materials. Pyrite mining suddenly exposed large quantities of sulfides to direct contact with oxygen, and oxidation proceeds rapidly, resulting in acidity and release of metal (Fe) and sulfates to the water system, eventually resulting in water pollution in the region. The magnitude and impact of the problem is just being recognized and, as the present and the future projected demand for problem demand for clean water is of top priority, the present studies were undertaken. Mine drainage includes water flowing from the surface and underground mines and runoff or seepage from the pyrite mines. This article describes the various hydrologic factors that control acid water formation and its transport. The mine drainage is obviously a continuing source of pollution and, therefore, remedial measures mainly consisting of a double-stage limestone-lime treatment technique have been suggested. The present results will be used to develop an alternative and more effective abatement technology to mitigate acid production at the source, namely, the technique of revegetation of the soil cover applied to the waste mine dump material. Water quality change is discussed in detail, with emphasis on acidity formed from exposed pyrite material and on increase in dissolved solids. Preventive and treatment measures are recommended.

  13. The behaviour of consolidated volcanic tuffs: weathering mechanisms under simulated laboratory conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Stück, H.; Forgó, L. Z.; Rüdrich, J.; S. Siegesmund; Török, Á.

    2008-01-01

    Five volcanic tuffs ranging from dacitic tuffs of Hungary to rhyolite, phonolite and basaltic tuffs of Germany were consolidated under laboratory conditions. Prior to consolidation an anti-hygro, a hydrous consolidant, which reduces the swelling ability of clay minerals, was applied. The three consolidants, a silicic acid ester (SAE), an elastic silicic acid ester (eSAE) and an acrylate resin (PMMA) were applied on test specimens under vacuum. Petrographic characterisation (polarizing microsc...

  14. A study of the interfacial chemistry of pyrite and coal in fine coal cleaning using flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Chengliang [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Surface oxidation, surface charge, and flotation properties have been systematically studied for coal, coal-pyrite and ore-pyrite. Electrochemical studies show that coal-pyrite exhibits much higher and more complex surface oxidation than ore-pyrite and its oxidation rate depends strongly on the carbon/coal content. Flotation studies indicate that pyrites have no self-induced floatability. Fuel oil significantly improves the floatability of coal and induces considerable flotation for coal-pyrite due to the hydrophobic interaction of fuel oil with the carbon/coal inclusions on the pyrite surface. Xanthate is a good collector for ore-pyrite but a poor collector for coal and coal-pyrite. The results from thermodynamic calculations, flotation and zeta potential measurements show that iron ions greatly affect the flotation of pyrite with xanthate and fuel oil. Various organic and inorganic chemicals have been examined for depressing coal-pyrite. It was found, for the first time, that sodium pyrophosphate is an effective depressant for coal-pyrite. Solution chemistry shows that pyrophosphate reacts with iron ions to form stable iron pyrophosphate complexes. Using pyrophosphate, the complete separation of pyrite from coal can be realized over a wide pH range at relatively low dosage.

  15. Biogenic syngenetic pyrite from tuffaceous sedimentary RF3-V rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreva, Irina; Nikulova, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic framboidal pyrite was found in intraformational tuffaceous sedimentary gravelites, within basic volcanites (RF3-V) in Subpolar Urals (Sablya Ridge). Pyrite grains (Fe 44.07-44,33, S 50.22-53.31 wt. %) are composed of ball-like microconcretions, sometimes intergrown with crystals of pentagondodecahedron and cubic habit. The microconcretions (20 to 40 mcm) are roundish and composed of microcrystals, which end faces form spherical surface. The nuclei of the microconcretions are represented by frambohedrons 4-5 mcm in size, which are pyritized cells of sulphate-reducing colonial coccoid microfossils. The formation of the frambohedrons occurred synchronously to sedimentation in stagnant reducing environment at interaction of biogenic hydrogen sulphide with water-dissolved iron. The biogenic hydrogen sulphide is reduced by microorganisms in the conditions of free and unrestricted access of dissolved sulphate ions sourced from sulphur of fumarole gases. Iron came from washed-out basic volcanites. The growth of outer radial parts of microconcretions occurred during compaction of sediments in diagenetic stage. The quantity of dissolved sulphate and iron during pyrite formation exceeded possibilitites of bacterial "starters" which resulted in the formation of pyrites of other morphological varieties. This is confirmed by the accretion of concentric rays of the concretions and cubic microcrystals of pyrite in the aggregate grains. The formation of tuffaceous sediments occurred during temporary decrease of volcanic activity in a continuous linear water flow with stagnant areas composed of water-displaced pebbles from underlying metaterrigenous rocks (RF 1-2), which were exposed beyond the development area of volcanic strata, unchanged clasts of recent and synchronously formed basic and medium volcanites with participation of air-driven ashes and influence of volcanic gases in the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria. The work is financially supported by the Program

  16. Mechanism of separating pyrite and dolomite by flotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anping Liu; Wen Ni; Wei Wu

    2007-01-01

    To study the mechanism of separating pyrite and dolomite by flotation, the acting mechanisms of WHL depressor and both the minerals were studied by means of thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), Fourier transform infrareddiffuse reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-DRS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that WHL formed metal salts with metal ions dissolved in water from dolomite and pyrite, which then deposited on their surfaces. Both of the minerals could be depressed by WHL. In the process of flotation, sulfur was created besides the WHL being absorbed on the surface of the sulfur concentrate, and its recovery rate was slightly affected.

  17. Origins of Carbonaceous Matter, Hematite, and Pyrite in the 3.46Ga Marble Bar Chert/Jasper/Basalt Formation, Pilbara, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmoto, H.; Bevacqua, D. C.; Watanabe, Y.; Otake, T.

    2004-12-01

    The 3.46 Ga Marble Bar Chert/Jasper unit in the Pilbara district, W.A. was probably deposited in a deep (>500 m) ocean during the accumulation of a thick (>5 km) submarine basalt. Debate focuses on whether organic matter in pre-2.0 Ga cherts is a remnant of marine organisms or the product of abiotic synthesis in hydrothermal systems, whether the hematite crystals in jaspers were primary or products of modern oxidation of siderite and pyrite, and whether the pyrite crystals formed by sulfate-reducing bacteria, hydrothermal fluids, or atmospheric sulfur. At the drilling site, the Marble bar Chert/Jasper is over turned diping about 80 degrees. A continuous 264 m- long core, drilled at 50 degrees, was recovered. The major chert/jasper unit, comprising alternating beds (0.1 - 5 cm thick) of white/green/gray/black/red chert, is 105 m thick. The abundance of red jasper beds increases down hole, indicating that the hematite crystals were not produced by subaerial oxidation of ferrous minerals. Petrological, mineralogical, and geochemical investigations of the core samples, especially using an X-ray chemical microscope, have revealed that the dominant Fe-bearing minerals are siderite, magnetite, and hematite, in the green, gray-black, and red cherts, respectively. These Fe-bearing minerals and disseminated pyrite crystals (ubiquitous in all cherts) are typically very fine grained (less than 10 microns). The basalts (pillows and tuffs), which occur below, above, and interbedded with the chert/jasper unit, are in places heavily hematitized with various characteristics of submarine hydrothermal alteration, such as chloritization, silicification, pyritization, large variations in the contents of Fe, Mg, Ba, and depletions in Ca, Sr, and Na. Veinles containing quartz and pyrite are abundant in the chert/jaster beds and also in the heavily hematitized basalts. These data suggest the hematite, magnetie, siderite, pyrite and silica in the chert/jasper unit, basalt tuffs, and pillow

  18. SEM and AFM images of pyrite surfaces after bioleaching by the indigenous Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H-L; Chen, B-Y; Lan, Y-W; Cheng, Y-C

    2003-09-01

    The bioleaching mechanism of pyrite by the indigenous Thiobacillus thiooxidans was examined with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the pyrite surface. The presence of pyrite eliminated the lag phase during growth of this microorganism. This was due to the stimulatory effect on cell growth of the slight amount of Cu2+ that had leached from the pyrite. Zn2+ was found to be much more readily solubilized than Cu2+. The efficiency of bioleaching was four times higher than that of chemical leaching. SEM images provided evidence of direct cell attachment onto the pyrite surface, thereby enhancing the bioleaching rate. Furthermore, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) were found on the pyrite surface after 4 days of oxidation. AFM images showed that the pyrite surface area positively correlated with the oxidation rate. A combination of direct and indirect mechanism is probably responsible for the oxidation of pyrite by T. thiooxidans.

  19. Study of possibilities of pyrite content reduction in black coals from the Mecsek Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petho, S.; Bokanyi, L.

    1985-01-01

    Certain parts of the pyrite content of coals can be removed by physical methods in inorganic form. The pyrite content of the Hungarian black coals as well as the pyrite distribution, as a function of density and grain size, are discussed. Based on literature data and laboratory experiments the pyrite content reduction by means of flotation, magnetic and gravitation enrichment is dealt with. Conclusions are drawn on how to apply these different procedures in black coal processing in Hungary.

  20. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

  1. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite. Final technical report, September 1990--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, D.

    1996-01-01

    This project is concerned with the physiochemical processes occuring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, desulfurization, and acid mine drainage. The use of synthetic particles of pyrite as model electrodes to investigate the semiconductor electrochemistry of pyrite is employed.

  2. Galvanic interaction between galena and pyrite in an open system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li; LI Heping; XU Liping

    2006-01-01

    Galvanic interactions between sulfide minerals have very important influences on hydrometallurgical processes, the supergene enrichment of sulfides and the formation of acid mine drainage. By changing the concentrations of Fe3 + , the pH values, status of the flowing of the solution and the solution salinity ( e. g. the concentrations of Na2 SO4 ) and monitoring the galvanic currents and potentials, studies were conducted in this work on the galvanic interaction between pyrite acting as the anode and galena acting as the cathode. The results indicated that the concentrations of Fe3 + , pH values and the flowing of the solution exhibit a great effect on the galvanic interaction of galena-pyrite couple, while the salinity of the solution has only a slight influence on the interaction. The experiments also revealed that in case cracks exist on the surface of pyrite electrode, the potential of pyrite will decrease so sharply as to be lower than that of galena under the same experimental condition. The experimental results were explained in terms of the Butler-Volume equation and the theory of mixed potential.

  3. Contribution of microorganisms to the oxidation of pyrite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkesteyn, G.J.M.W.

    1980-01-01

    Optimum conditions for the accumulation of substantial amounts of pyrite (FeS 2 ) in the sediment are found in estuarine areas, especially in the tropics. In such areas anaerobic conditions prevail owing to continuous saturation with water. There is an abundant supply of organic matter, i

  4. Characterization and separation of pyrite from Abu Tartur black shale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim S.S.; El Kammar A.M.; Guda A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed for pyrite separation from Abu Tartur black shale as a source of sulfur to be an added economic value of Abu Tartur area. The considered samples in the present work were collected from a core drilled in Abu Tartur plateau representing the pyrite-rich black shale of the U. Cretaceous age. Sample characterization was carried out using petrographic microscope, XRD, DTA/DTG, C/S and XRF techniques. Clay minerals, silt-sized quartz, calcite, and hematite were the main minerals associating pyr-ite (5.34%). Liberation behavior of the sample was about 80%below 5 lm. Sample processing was achieved through one-day soaking followed by classification using 1 inch Mozley hydro-cyclone where about 35.5% by weight went to underflow and 64.5% went to overflow. The underflow product was subjected to an advanced gravity separation process using SB-40 Falcon Concentrator through a CCD statistical design prepared by Design-Expert 6.0 software proposed to opti-mize the separation process through a study for the effects of frequency (Hz) and water pressure (Psi) on both assay and recovery of the sulfur-rich heavy fraction. A heavy concentrate weighed 10.90%with inorganic sulfur content reached 11.37%(21.24%pyrite) with overall recovery (50.01%) was obtained after two cleaning at the optimum conditions.

  5. Investigation of pyrite surface state by DFT and AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    先永骏; 聂琪; 文书明; 刘建; 邓久帅

    2015-01-01

    The surface states of pyrite (FeS2) were theoretically investigated using first principle calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT). The results indicate that both the (200) and (311) surfaces of pyrite undergo significant surface atom relaxation after geometry optimization, which results in a considerable distortion of the surface region. In the normal direction, i.e., perpendicular to the surface, S atoms in the first surface layer move outward from the bulk, while Fe atoms move toward the bulk, forming an S-rich surface. The surface relaxation processes are driven by electrostatic interaction, which is evidenced by a relative decrease in the surface energy after surface relaxation. Such a relaxation process is visually interpreted through the qualitative analysis of molecular mechanics. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis reveals that only sulfur atom is visible on the pyrite surface. This result is consistent with the DFT data. Such S-rich surface has important influence on the flotation properties of pyrite.

  6. The mechanisms of pyrite oxidation and leaching: A fundamental perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, A. P.; Gerson, A. R.

    2010-09-01

    Pyrite is the earth's most abundant sulfide mineral. Its frequent undesirable association with minerals of economic value such as sphalerite, chalcopyrite and galena, and precious metals such as gold necessitates costly separation processes such as leaching and flotation. Additionally pyrite oxidation is a major contributor to the environmental problem of acid rock drainage. The surface oxidation reactions of pyrite are therefore important both economically and environmentally. Significant variations in electrical properties resulting from lattice substitution of minor and trace elements into the lattice structure exist between pyrite from different geographical locations. Furthermore the presence of low coordination surface sites as a result of conchoidal fracture causes a reduction in the band gap at the surface compared to the bulk thus adding further electrochemical variability. Given the now general acceptance after decades of research that electrochemistry dominates the oxidation process, the geographical location, elemental composition and semi-conductor type (n or p) of pyrite are important considerations. Aqueous pyrite oxidation results in the production of sulfate and ferrous iron. However other products such as elemental sulfur, polysulfides, hydrogen sulfide, ferric hydroxide, iron oxide and iron(III) oxyhydroxide may also form. Intermediate species such as thiosulfate, sulfite and polythionates are also proposed to occur. Oxidation and leach rates are generally influenced by solution Eh, pH, oxidant type and concentration, hydrodynamics, grain size and surface area in relation to solution volume, temperature and pressure. Of these, solution Eh is most critical as expected for an electrochemically controlled process, and directly correlates with surface area normalised rates. Studies using mixed mineral systems further indicate the importance of electrochemical processes during the oxidation process. Spatially resolved surface characterisation of fresh

  7. Pyrite sulfur isotopes reveal glacial-interglacial environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Virgil; Sansjofre, Pierre; Rabineau, Marina; Revillon, Sidonie; Houghton, Jennifer; Fike, David A.

    2017-06-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle plays a key role in regulating Earth’s surface redox through diverse abiotic and biological reactions that have distinctive stable isotopic fractionations. As such, variations in the sulfur isotopic composition (δ34S) of sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases over Earth history can be used to infer substantive changes to the Earth’s surface environment, including the rise of atmospheric oxygen. Such inferences assume that individual δ34S records reflect temporal changes in the global sulfur cycle; this assumption may be well grounded for sulfate-bearing minerals but is less well established for pyrite-based records. Here, we investigate alternative controls on the sedimentary sulfur isotopic composition of marine pyrite by examining a 300-m drill core of Mediterranean sediments deposited over the past 500,000 y and spanning the last five glacial-interglacial periods. Because this interval is far shorter than the residence time of marine sulfate, any change in the sulfur isotopic record preserved in pyrite (δ34Spyr) necessarily corresponds to local environmental changes. The stratigraphic variations (>76‰) in the isotopic data reported here are among the largest ever observed in pyrite, and are in phase with glacial-interglacial sea level and temperature changes. In this case, the dominant control appears to be glacial-interglacial variations in sedimentation rates. These results suggest that there exist important but previously overlooked depositional controls on sedimentary sulfur isotope records, especially associated with intervals of substantial sea level change. This work provides an important perspective on the origin of variability in such records and suggests meaningful paleoenvironmental information can be derived from pyrite δ34S records.

  8. Laboratory determined suction potential of Topopah Spring tuff at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, W.; Lin, Wunan

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to experimentally determine the capillary suction potential of Topopah Spring tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. This data can be used to help characterize the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the densely welded tuff at this site. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The unsaturated hydraulic characteristics of the Bandelier Tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, D.B.; Gallaher, B.M.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the physical and, unsaturated hydraulic properties of the Bandelier Tuff determined from laboratory measurements made on core samples collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We fit new van Genuchten-type moisture retention curves to this data, which was categorized according to member of the Bandelier Tuff and subunit of the Tshirege Member. Reasonable consistency was observed for hydraulic properties and retention curves within lithologic units, while distinct differences were observed for those properties between units. With the moisture retention data, we constructed vertical profiles of in situ matric suction and hydraulic head. These profiles give an indication of the likely direction of liquid water movement within the unsaturated zone and allow comparison of core-scale and field-scale estimates of water flow and solute transport parameters. Our core-derived transport velocities are much smaller than values estimated from tritium, Cl, and NO{sub 3} contamination found recently in boreholes. The contaminant tracer-derived transport velocities from Los Alamos Canyon are greater than corederived values found for the Otowi Member, and for Mortandad Canyon, greater than core-derived values for that borehole. The significant difference found for Mortandad Canyon suggests that fracture or other fast-path transport may be important there. The relatively small difference between observed and predicted velocities at Los Alamos Canyon may mean that vadose zone transport there occurs by unsaturated matrix flow.

  10. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Plutonium in Fractured Volcanic Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, A. B.; Zhao, P.; Walensky, J. R.; Roberts, S. K.; Johnson, M. R.; Zavarin, M.; Ramon, E. C.

    2004-12-01

    The transport of low-solubility radionuclides in a colloidal- or colloidal bound state is frequently suspected or observed. Groundwater contaminated with radionuclides associated with underground nuclear tests was collected from several different well locations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In each case, the low-levels of plutonium detected in the groundwater were overwhelmingly (>95percent) associated with the colloidal and not the dissolved fraction of the groundwater. The colloidal fractions consisted of secondary minerals such as clays and zeolites. To better understand the mechanisms controlling the potential colloidal transport of plutonium, colloid-facilitated fracture flow laboratory experiments are being conducted. Pseudocolloids consisting of Pu(IV) sorbed to clinoptilolite were combined with a radionuclide solution cocktail consisting of Np, U, Cs, Sr, Sm and 3H and Re (analog to Tc) tracers in NTS-type synthetic groundwater (4.5mM NaHCO3-). The cocktail was injected into a smooth fracture in a volcanic tuff rock core from the NTS and the effluent analyzed. Autoradiography and secondary ion mass spectrometry will be used to understand the mineral -colloid-radionuclide interactions in the fracture volcanic tuff.

  11. Computerized tomographic analysis of fluid flow in fractured tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felice, C.W.; Sharer, J.C. (Terra Tek, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Springer, E.P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this summary is to demonstrate the usefulness of X-ray computerized tomography to observe fluid flow down a fracture and rock matrix imbibition in a sample of Bandelier tuff. This was accomplished by using a tuff sample 152.4 mm long and 50.8 mm in diameter. A longitudinal fracture was created by cutting the core with a wire saw. The fractured piece was then coupled to its adjacent section to that the fracture was not expected. Water was injected into a dry sample at five flow rates and CT scanning performed at set intervals during the flow. Cross sectional images and longitudinal reconstructions were built and saturation profiles calculated for the sample at each time interval at each flow rate. The results showed that for the test conditions, the fracture was not a primary pathway of fluid flow down the sample. At a slow fluid injection rate into the dry sample, the fluid was imbibed into the rock uniformly down the length of the core. With increasing injection rates, the flow remained uniform over the core cross section through complete saturation.

  12. Environmental effects on corrosion in the Tuff repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G. [Cortest Columbus, Inc., OH (USA)

    1990-02-01

    Cortest Columbus is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level waste packages as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. The scope of work consists of employing short-term techniques, to examine a wide range of possible failure modes. Long-term tests are being used to verify and further examine specific failure modes identified as important by the short-term studies. The original focus of the program was on the salt repository but the emphasis was shifted to the Tuff repository. This report summarizes the results of a literature survey performed under Task 1 of the program. The survey focuses on the influence of environmental variables on the corrosion behavior of candidate container materials for the Tuff repository. Environmental variables considered include: radiation, thermal and microbial effects. 80 refs., 44 figs., 44 tabs.

  13. Investigation of Using Waste Welded Tuff Material as Mineral Filler in Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebnem KARAHANCER

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the welded tuff waste- known as koyke in Isparta region - was used in the hot mix asphalt (HMA as mineral filler for reduction of the moisture susceptibility of HMA. Optimum binder content was assessed with Marshall Design Method. First of all, welded tuff was substituted as filler with limestone filler in proportion of 50% and 100%. After that Marshall Stability test was performed on specimens. The results showed that the 50% substitution was more effective than the 100% substitution. Therefore, welded tuff was substituted with limestone filler in proportion of 25%, 50%, 65% and 75%. Next, Indirect Tensile Strength test was practiced on the fabricated specimens and the results were assessed. According to the Indirect Tensile Strength results, welded tuff with 65% was given higher strength than the limestone filler. As a result, it has come up that welded tuff can be used as mineral filler in the hot mix asphalt.

  14. Bio-leaching effects of Leptospirillum ferriphilum on the surface chemical properties of pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Leptospirillum ferriphilum cultured using different energy sources(either soluble ferrous ion or pyrite) changed the surface properties of pyrite.Cell adsorption,zeta-potential,hydrophobicty,FT-IR spectra and surface morphology were investigated.Adhesion of bacterial cells to the pyrite surface is a fast process.Furthermore,the adsorption of cells grown in pyrite is greater than of cells grown in soluble ferrous ion.The Iso-Electric Point(IEP) of pyrite treated with L.ferriphilum approaches that of the cell...

  15. Surface electrochemical control for fine coal and pyrite separation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, M.E.; Bodily, D.M.; Hu, Weibai; Chen, Wanxiong; Huang, Qinping; Liang, Jun; Riley, A.M.; Li, Jun; Wann, Jyi-Perng; Zhong, Tingke; Zhu, Ximeng

    1993-01-20

    Laboratory flotation tests were carried out on three coals and on coal pyrite. Floatability measurements included natural floatability, flotation with a xanthate collector and salt flotation. The ranking of the floatability of the three coals were: Upper Freeport > Pittsburgh > Illinois. The floatability of mineral pyrite and coal pyrite increased markedly with xanthate concentration, but decreased with increased pH. In general, coal pyrite was more difficult to float than mineral pyrite. This was attributed to the presence of surface carbonaceous and mineral matter, since floatability of coal pyrite improved by acid pretreatment. Flotation tests demonstrated that the floatability of coal and mineral pyrite was greatly enhanced by the presence of an electrolyte. Flotation was also enhanced by the addition of modifiers such as CuSO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2} and EDTA. Lime additions markedly reduced the floatability of coal pyrite. Enhanced floatability of coal pyrite resulted when the pyrite was anodically oxidized in a specially constructed electrochemical flotation cell Pretreatment in potential ranges previously observed for polysulfide and sulfur film formation resulted in the enhanced floatability. While interesting trends and influences, both chemical and electrochemical, markedly improved the floatability of coal, there is little hope for reverse flotation as an effective technology for coal/coal-pyrite separations. The effects of poor liberation and entrainment appear overriding.

  16. Trace metal pyritization variability in response to mangrove soil aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, W; Borrelli, N L; Ferreira, T O; Marques, A G B; Osterrieth, M; Guizan, C

    2014-02-15

    The degree of iron pyritization (DOP) and degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) were evaluated in mangrove soil profiles from an estuarine area located in Rio de Janeiro (SE Brazil). The soil pH was negatively correlated with redox potential (Eh) and positively correlated with DOP and DTMP of some elements (Mn, Cu and Pb), suggesting that pyrite oxidation generated acidity and can affect the importance of pyrite as a trace metal-binding phase, mainly in response to spatial variability in tidal flooding. Besides these aerobic oxidation effects, results from a sequential extraction analyses of reactive phases evidenced that Mn oxidized phase consumption in reaction with pyrite can be also important to determine the pyritization of trace elements. Cumulative effects of these aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes were evidenced as factors affecting the capacity of mangrove soils to act as a sink for trace metals through pyritization processes.

  17. Comparative Mössbauer study of the oxidation of pyrite under different conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, M.; Gancedo, J. R.; Martínez-Alonso, A.; Tascón, J. M. D.

    1990-07-01

    Samples of pyrite-rich brown coal from As Pontes and Meirama coalfields (Spain) were oxidized either by air at atmospheric pressure or by a cool oxygen plasma generated by radiofrequency activation. Despite the very different nature and characteristics of the oxidizing media, in both cases the RT Mössbauer spectra were easily fitted to two doublets, whose parameters matched those of pyrite and jarosite (hydrated iron (III) sulphate). The extent of pyrite oxidation to jarosite was monitored by the relative spectral areas of pyrite and jarosite doublets. Both, air and plasma, oxidized pyrite to the same extent and in a similar way, in contrast to coal organic matter, which was scarcely modified by air but completely oxidized by the plasma at the same temperature (ca. 423 K). The incomplete oxidation of pyrite by plasma is attributed to the action of a thin calcium sulphate layer which hinders the access of activated oxygen to small pyrite crystals.

  18. Comparative Moessbauer study of the oxidation of pyrite under different conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracia, M.; Gancedo, J.R.; Martinez-Alonso, A.; Tascon, J.M.D. (Instituto de Quimica Fisica ' Rocasolano' , Madrid (Spain))

    1990-07-01

    Samples of pyrite-rich brown coal from As Pontes and Meirama coalfields (Spain) were oxidized either by air at atmospheric pressure or by a cool oxygen plasma generated by radiofrequency activation. Despite the very different nature and characteristics of the oxidizing media, in both cases the RT Moessbauer spectra were easily fitted to two doublets, whose parameters matched those of pyrite and jarosite (hydrated iron (III) sulphate). The extent of pyrite oxidation to jarosite was monitored by the relative spectral areas of pyrite and jarosite doublets. Both, air and plasma, oxidized pyrite to the same extent and in a similar way, in contrast to coal organic matter, which was scarcely modified by air but completely oxidized by the plasma at the same temperature (ca. 423 K). The incomplete oxidation of pyrite by plasma is attributed to the action of a thin calcium sulphate layer which hinders the access of activated oxygen to small pyrite crystals. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  19. Source of arsenic-bearing pyrite in southwestern Vermont, USA: Sulfur isotope evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, Helen, E-mail: helen.mango@castleton.edu [Department of Natural Sciences, Castleton State College, 233 South Street, Castleton, VT 05735 (United States); Ryan, Peter, E-mail: pryan@middlebury.edu [Department of Geology, Middlebury College, 276 Bicentennial Way, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Arsenic-bearing pyrite is the source of arsenic in groundwater produced in late Cambrian and Ordovician gray and black slates and phyllites in the Taconic region of southwestern Vermont, USA. The aim of this study is to analyze the sulfur isotopic composition of this pyrite and determine if a relationship exists between pyrite δ{sup 34}S and arsenic content. Pyrite occurs in both sedimentary/diagenetic (bedding-parallel layers and framboids) and low-grade metamorphic (porphyroblast) forms, and contains up to > 2000 ppm As. The sulfur isotopic composition of arsenic-bearing pyrite ranges from − 5.2‰ to 63‰. In the marine environment, the sulfur in sedimentary pyrite becomes increasingly enriched in {sup 34}S as the geochemical environment becomes increasingly anoxic. There is a positive correlation between δ{sup 34}S and arsenic content in the Taconic pyrite, suggesting that uptake of arsenic by pyrite increased as the environment became more reducing. This increased anoxia may have been due to a rise in sea level and/or tectonic activity during the late Cambrian and Ordovician. Low-grade metamorphism appears to have little effect on sulfur isotope composition, but does correlate with lower arsenic content in pyrite. New groundwater wells drilled in this region should therefore avoid gray and black slates and phyllites that contain sedimentary/diagenetic pyrite with heavy δ{sup 34}S values. - Highlights: • Pyrite is the source of arsenic in groundwater in the Taconic region of Vermont, USA. • As-bearing pyrite δ{sup 34}S = – 5.2 to 63‰ with higher {sup 34}S as environment becomes more anoxic. • High sea level, tectonic activity create anoxia, with incorporation of As into pyrite. • New wells should avoid slate/phyllite containing sedimentary pyrite with heavy δ{sup 34}S.

  20. A proposed new type of arsenian pyrite: Composition, nanostructure and geological significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deditius, Artur P.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Renock, Devon; Ewing, Rodney C.; Ramana, Chintalapalle V.; Becker, Udo; Kesler, Stephen E.

    2008-06-01

    This report describes a new form of arsenian pyrite, called As3+-pyrite, in which As substitutes for Fe [(Fe,As)S2], in contrast to the more common form of arsenian pyrite, As1--pyrite, in which As1- substitutes for S [Fe(As,S)2]. As3+-pyrite has been observed as colloformic overgrowths on As-free pyrite in a hydrothermal gold deposit at Yanacocha, Peru. XPS analyses of the As3+-pyrite confirm that As is present largely as As3+. EMPA analyses show that As3+-pyrite incorporates up to 3.05 at % of As and 0.53 at. %, 0.1 at. %, 0.27 at. %, 0.22 at. %, 0.08 at. % and 0.04 at. % of Pb, Au, Cu, Zn, Ni, and Co, respectively. Incorporation of As3+ in the pyrite could be written like: As+yAu+1-y(□)⇔2Fe; where Au+ and vacancy (□) help to maintain the excess charge. HRTEM observations reveal a sharp boundary between As-free pyrite and the first overgrowth of As3+-pyrite (20-40 nm thick) and co-linear lattice fringes indicating epitaxial growth of As3+-pyrite on As-free pyrite. Overgrowths of As3+-pyrite onto As-free pyrite can be divided into three groups on the basis of crystal size, 8-20 nm, 100-300 nm and 400-900 nm, and the smaller the crystal size the higher the concentration of toxic arsenic and trace metals. The Yanacocha deposit, in which As3+-pyrite was found, formed under relatively oxidizing conditions in which the dominant form of dissolved As in the stability field of pyrite is As3+; in contrast, reducing conditions are typical of most environments that host As1--pyrite. As3+-pyrite will likely be found in other oxidizing hydrothermal and diagenetic environments, including high-sulfidation epithermal deposits and shallow groundwater systems, where probably kinetically controlled formation of nanoscale crystals such as observed here would be a major control on incorporation and release of As3+ and toxic heavy metals in oxidizing natural systems.

  1. Magnetic fabric and welding processes in high-grade tuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioli, L.; Ort, M.; Lanza, R.; Rosi, M.

    2003-04-01

    The welding fabric of tuffs is generally quantified through two main parameters: porosity and fiamme aspect ratio. However, these parameters are not useful for high-grade ignimbrites that display features indicating extensive rheomorphic flow, partial to complete obliteration of primary vitroclastic textures, and syn-depositional welding rather than load-related compaction. In this case, a 3D-microstructural characterization of the rock fabric is a fundamental proxy for the assessment of the dynamics and duration of welding processes. We have investigated the relations between magnetic fabric and welding textures in a rhyolitic, high-grade ignimbrite from the Sulcis volcanic District (SW Sardinia, Italy). The ignimbrite is characterized by dense welding throughout its preserved thickness and by regular lateral and vertical variations of welding, devitrification and vesiculation facies. Field and structural data indicate that syn-depositional welding and non-particulate (NP) flow were extensive and continuous during the emplacement of the ignimbrite. Paleomagnetic measurements of AMS, NRM, and AIRM of samples from the tuff indicate that the magnetic fabric is strain-sensitive and it is not significantly affected by post-depositional, static processes such as devitrification and vapor-phase alteration; in particular, magnetic susceptibility of the rock and the welding texture correlate well in terms of shape and orientation of the anisotropy ellipsoid. The direction of the K1 axis is indicative of the flow direction in the site of measurement. The anisotropy degree (P) increases with increasing welding and foliation (F) and lineation (L) are directly related to the strain facies. Onset of welding increased the degree of anisotropy and foliation; a non particulate, laminar flow stage further deformed the fabric stretching it along the flow direction and thus increasing L. The intensity of L is strictly related to the duration and the effect of simple shear (laminar

  2. Arsenogoyazite in Cenozoic volcanic tuff at Tabalaopa Basin, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, M.; Rodriguez, A.; Goodell, P.

    2012-12-01

    Arsenogoyazite has been identified in Cenozoic volcanic tuff at Tabalaopa Basin, Chihuahua, Mexico. Tabalaopa Basin contains volcanic strata and the unconsolidated Quaternary deposit. Cenozoic volcanic tuff forms the low hill terrene in this area. It is a major reservoir for the City of Chihuahua groundwater. Arsenic anomaly (more than 20 ppb) has been observed at El Mimbre, northeast of the city. The exposed reddish color volcanic rocks are felsic welded tuff and rhyolite. Sanidine, quartz, and biotite phenocrysts show linear distribution within the fine grain matrix. The rocks contain large amount of vesicles which are lineated with the welding bends. White and colorless microsize crystals formed on the well of the cavities and the majority of them are K-feldspar. Quartz, Ti-magnetite, and arsenogoyazite are coexisting with feldspars. The sizes of the crystals in the cavities are 10 to several 10s of micrometers. The arsenic x-ray maps have been collected for the rock sections to locate the arsenic minerals. The crystals in cavities show euhedral shape. Most arsenic containing crystals have a near cubic form with triangle surfaces at some corners. The high resolution field-emission SEM images have been collected to study the symmetry of the crystals. EDS spectra for the high arsenic phases show three major elements As-Al-Sr and also minor amount of P-S-REE-Ca-Fe-Si. Since the arsenic minerals are growing on the wall of the vesicle, it is difficult to perform good electron microprobe analysis. Some primary microprobe data give following results in weight percent: SrO 11.8-13.1, CaO 0.2-0.3, FeO 0.3-0.5, Al2O3 28.6-30.9, La2O3 2.4-2.5, Ce2O3 2.3-.24, SiO2 1.1-3.6, As2O5 32.4-35.2, P2O5 1.7-1.9, SO3 0.8-1.4. This chemistry is similar to the reported arsenogoyazite chemical data. So this high arsenic phase is identified as arsenogoyazite. The arsenic anomaly in groundwater at El Mimbre, Chihuahua should be contributed from this arsenic mineral phase in the strata.

  3. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. First annual report, September 1, 1990--August 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiang-Huai

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The products as well as their structure, the mechanisms and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc. on thereof, are directed at identifying the causes and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.

  4. Protein footprinting by pyrite shrink-wrap laminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, Micheal; Pegan, Jonathan; El Makkaoui, Mohammed; Schlatterer, Joerg C; Khine, Michelle; Law, Matt; Brenowitz, Michael

    2015-04-07

    The structure of macromolecules and their complexes dictate their biological function. In "footprinting", the solvent accessibility of the residues that constitute proteins, DNA and RNA can be determined from their reactivity to an exogenous reagent such as the hydroxyl radical (·OH). While ·OH generation for protein footprinting is achieved by radiolysis, photolysis and electrochemistry, we present a simpler solution. A thin film of pyrite (cubic FeS2) nanocrystals deposited onto a shape memory polymer (commodity shrink-wrap film) generates sufficient ·OH via Fenton chemistry for oxidative footprinting analysis of proteins. We demonstrate that varying either time or H2O2 concentration yields the required ·OH dose-oxidation response relationship. A simple and scalable sample handling protocol is enabled by thermoforming the "pyrite shrink-wrap laminate" into a standard microtiter plate format. The low cost and malleability of the laminate facilitates its integration into high throughput screening and microfluidic devices.

  5. Neutron and gamma (density) logging in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W

    1998-09-12

    This Technical Implementation Procedure (TIP) describes the field operation, and the management of data records pertaining to neutron logging and density logging in welded tuff. This procedure applies to all borehole surveys performed in support of Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (EBSFT), including the Earge Block Tests (LBT) and Initial Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (IEBSFT) - WBS 1.2.3.12.4. The purpose of this TIP is to provide guidelines so that other equally trained and qualified personnel can understand how the work is performed or how to repeat the work if needed. The work will be documented by the use of Scientific Notebooks (SNs) as discussed in 033-YMP-QP 3.4. The TIP will provide a set of guidelines which the scientists will take into account in conducting the mea- surements. The use of this TIP does not imply that this is repetitive work that does not require profes- sional judgment.

  6. Neutron and gamma (density) logging in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W

    1998-09-12

    This Technical Implementation Procedure (TIP) describes the field operation, and the management of data records pertaining to neutron logging and density logging in welded tuff. This procedure applies to all borehole surveys performed in support of Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (EBSFT), including the Earge Block Tests (LBT) and Initial Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (IEBSFT) - WBS 1.2.3.12.4. The purpose of this TIP is to provide guidelines so that other equally trained and qualified personnel can understand how the work is performed or how to repeat the work if needed. The work will be documented by the use of Scientific Notebooks (SNs) as discussed in 033-YMP-QP 3.4. The TIP will provide a set of guidelines which the scientists will take into account in conducting the mea- surements. The use of this TIP does not imply that this is repetitive work that does not require profes- sional judgment.

  7. Heterocoagulation of chalcopyrite and pyrite minerals in flotation separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Timothy K; Nguyen, Anh V; Evans, Geoffrey M

    2005-06-30

    Heterocoagulation between various fine mineral particles contained within a mineral suspension with different structural and surface chemistry can interfere with the ability of the flotation processes to selectively separate the minerals involved. This paper examines the interactions between chalcopyrite (a copper mineral) and pyrite (an iron mineral often bearing gold) as they approach each other in suspensions with added chemicals, and relates the results to the experimental data for the flotation recovery and selectivity. The heterocoagulation was experimentally studied using the electrophoretic light scattering (ELS) technique and was modelled by incorporating colloidal forces, including the van der Waals, electrostatic double layer and hydrophobic forces. The ELS results indicated that pyrite has a positive zeta potential (zeta) up to its isoelectric point (IEP) at approximately pH 2.2, while chalcopyrite has a positive zeta up to its IEP at approximately pH 5.5. This produces heterocoagulation of chalcopyrite with pyrite between pH 2.2 and pH 5.5. The heterocoagulation was confirmed by the ELS spectra measured with a ZetaPlus instrument from Brookhaven and by small-scale flotation experiments.

  8. Effect of processing history of pyrite on its leaching kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵中伟; 李洪桂; 孙培梅; 李运姣; 霍广生

    2003-01-01

    Different researchers often attained scattered kinetic results for the same leaching process. Usually, the difference is ascribed to the variation in mineral resource, chemical composition and, accuracy of experimental methods, while less attention is paid to the sample processing history. The present study shows that processing history of pyrite sample can cause great changes in its physico-chemical properties. Crushing, grinding and milling lead to an increase of the leachability of pyrite and the leaching becomes less temperature dependence owing to the decreasing of apparent activation energy of the reaction. The activation energy for its leaching in H2SO4-HNO3 solution is depressed from 73.9 to 47.5kJ/mol after being activated through vibrating milling for 40min. On the contrary, aging causes the reverse change owing to the release of extra inner energy stored during mechanical treatments. Thus activity of pyrite will decrease towards its original value. Surely the processing history of concentrate sample should be taken into consideration when studying the kinetics of leaching reaction.

  9. U-Pb Geochronology of VMS mineralization in the Iberian Pyrite Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Tucker C.; Amelin, Yuri; Pascual, Emilio

    2002-10-01

    A geochronology study using U-Pb isotope dilution TIMS analyses of zircon has been conducted to determine the ages of volcanic-associated massive sulfide (VMS) deposits in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB), the world's most prolific VMS province. Ages have been determined for host rocks to four VMS systems that span the IPB: the giant Rio Tinto and Aljustrel districts in the central region, Lagoa Salgada to the west, and Las Cruces to the east. A sample of chloritized quartz porphyritic dacite/rhyolite in the footwall of the San Dionisio massive sulfide deposit of the Rio Tinto district is 349.76±0.90 Ma. This is taken as the best age estimate of the mineralization in the Rio Tinto district, probably the world's largest volcanogenic massive sulfide system. Two xenocrystic zircons from the same sample yielded 207Pb/206Pb ages of 414 and 416 Ma, which provide a minimum estimate for the age of the inherited component. A biotite tonalite from the Campofrio area, 3.5 km north of the center of the Rio Tinto district, is chemically similar to the felsic host rock protolith at Rio Tinto. The Campofrio sample has an age of 346.26±0.81 Ma, slightly younger and outside of the 2σ error for the Rio Tinto age; therefore, this phase of this intrusion was not a heat source for the hydrothermal system that formed the deposits of the Rio Tinto district. The Campofrio sample also has three zircon analyses with 207Pb/206Pb minimum ages of 534, 536, and 985 Ma, indicating inheritance from Ordovician and Neoproterozoic sources. In the Aljustrel VMS district, a U-Pb zircon age of 352.9±1.9 Ma characterizes the altered Green Tuff host rock of the Algares deposit, which is slightly older than the Rio Tinto age. Two zircons with 207Pb/206Pb ages of 531 and 571 Ma from this sample indicate inheritance from a Cambrian or older source. The age of mineralization at Lagoa Salgada is given by essentially identical ages of 356.21±0.73 and 356.4±0.8 Ma, for footwall and hanging wall samples

  10. Source of arsenic-bearing pyrite in southwestern Vermont, USA: sulfur isotope evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Helen; Ryan, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Arsenic-bearing pyrite is the source of arsenic in groundwater produced in late Cambrian and Ordovician gray and black slates and phyllites in the Taconic region of southwestern Vermont, USA. The aim of this study is to analyze the sulfur isotopic composition of this pyrite and determine if a relationship exists between pyrite δ(34)S and arsenic content. Pyrite occurs in both sedimentary/diagenetic (bedding-parallel layers and framboids) and low-grade metamorphic (porphyroblast) forms, and contains up to >2000 ppm As. The sulfur isotopic composition of arsenic-bearing pyrite ranges from -5.2‰ to 63‰. In the marine environment, the sulfur in sedimentary pyrite becomes increasingly enriched in (34)S as the geochemical environment becomes increasingly anoxic. There is a positive correlation between δ(34)S and arsenic content in the Taconic pyrite, suggesting that uptake of arsenic by pyrite increased as the environment became more reducing. This increased anoxia may have been due to a rise in sea level and/or tectonic activity during the late Cambrian and Ordovician. Low-grade metamorphism appears to have little effect on sulfur isotope composition, but does correlate with lower arsenic content in pyrite. New groundwater wells drilled in this region should therefore avoid gray and black slates and phyllites that contain sedimentary/diagenetic pyrite with heavy δ(34)S values.

  11. Welded tuff infilling a volcanic vent at Weolseong, Republic of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedman, Antony John; Park, Ki Hwa; Merriman, Richard James; Kim, Seon Eok

    1987-06-01

    A plug of parataxitically welded tuff, with an elliptical (700 × 400 m) cross section, crops out in Weolseong district, Republic of Korea. It intrudes late Cretaceous granodiorite and extrusive tuffs of the Chisulryoung Volcanic Formation and displays a steeply inclined welding foliation, concordant with the intrusive contacts, and a subvertical stretching lineation. These fabrics are interpreted as resulting from laminar shearing in a boundary layer during deposition of the tuff by agglutination along the walls of a vent which served as a feeder for extrusive ignimbrites.

  12. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in welded tuffs: application to a welded-tuff dyke in the tertiary Trans-Pecos Texas volcanic province, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, John A.; Ellwood, Brooks B.; Sachs, Scott D.

    1989-06-01

    Consideration of published anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies on welded ignimbrites suggests that AMS fabrics are controlled by groundmass microlites distributed within the existing tuff fabric, the sum result of directional fabrics imposed by primary flow lineation, welding, and (if relevant) rheomorphism. AMS is a more sensitive indicator of fabric elements within welded tuffs than conventional methods, and usually yields primary flow azimuth estimates. Detailed study of a single densely welded tuff sample demonstrates that the overall AMS fabric is insensitive to the relative abundances of fiamme, matrix and lithics within individual drilled cores. AMS determinations on a welded-tuff dyke occurring in a choked vent in the Trans-Pecos Texas volcanic field reveals a consistent fabric with a prolate element imbricated with respect to one wall of the dyke, while total magnetic susceptibility and density exhibit axially symmetric variations across the dyke width. The dyke is interpreted to have formed as a result of agglutination of the erupting mixture on a portion of the conduit wall as it failed and slid into the conduit, followed by residual squeezing between the failed block and in situ wallrock. Irrespective of the precise mechanism, widespread occurrence of both welded-tuff dykes and point-welded, aggregate pumices in pyroclastic deposits may imply that lining of conduit walls by agglutionation during explosive volcanic eruptions is a common process.

  13. Interfacial electrokinetic characteristics before and after bioleaching microorganism adhesion to pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-she; WANG Zhao-hui; CHEN Hong; ZHANG Yan-hua

    2006-01-01

    Zeta potentials of pyrite and Acidithiobacillusferrooxidans cultured by sulfur in different levels of ionic strength and pH values were measured by Coulter Delsa 440SX zeta potential determinator. Meanwhile, the effects of bacterial adhesion and bacterial concentration on zeta potential of pyrite after adsorption were investigated. The results show that with the increase of ionic strength,zeta potentials of pyrite decrease in the range of pH 2.5-10.5 and the isoelectric point(IEP) of mineral shifts to the left. It is also found that the specific adsorption on pyrite of chloride ion can affect zeta potentials of pyrite sharply. As bacterial adsorption occurs,IEP of pyrite shifts towards that of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans; as bacterial concentration is increscent, this tendency is even larger and more obvious. Finally, a reasonable explanation for above-mentioned experimental phenomena was given by electrical double layer model and surface ionization model.

  14. Speciation of arsenic in pyrite by micro-X-ray absorption fine- structure spectroscopy (XAFS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paktunc, D. (CCM)

    2008-09-30

    Pyrite (FeS2) often contains variable levels of arsenic, regardless of the environment of formation. Arsenian pyrite has been reported in coals, sediments and ore deposits. Arsenian pyrite having As concentrations of up to 10 wt % in sedimentary rocks (Kolker et al. 1997), about 10 wt% in gold deposits (Fleet et al. 1993), 12 wt % in a refractory gold ore (Paktunc et al. 2006) and 20 wt % in a Carlin-type gold deposit in Nevada (Reich et al. 2005) have been reported. Arsenian pyrite is the carrier of gold in hydrothermal Carlin-type gold deposits, and gold concentrations of up to 0.9 wt % have been reported (Reich et al. 2005; Paktunc et al. 2006). In general, high Au concentrations correlate with As-rich zones in pyrite (Paktunc et al. 2006). Pyrite often ends up in mining and metallurgical wastes as an unwanted mineral and consititutes one of the primary sources of As in the wastes. Arsenic can be readily released to the environment due to rapid oxidative dissolution of host pyrite under atmospheric conditions. Pyrite is also the primary source of arsenic in emissions and dust resulting from combustion of bituminous coals. Despite the importance of arsenian pyrite as a primary source of anthropogenic arsenic in the environment and its economic significance as the primary carrier of gold in Carlin-type gold deposits, our understanding of the nature of arsenic in pyrite is limited. There are few papers dealing with the mode of occurrence of arsenic by bulk XAFS in a limited number of pyrite-bearing samples. The present study documents the analysis of pyrite particles displaying different morphologies and a range of arsenic and gold concentrations to determine the nature and speciation of arsenic.

  15. Pyritization of the Coastal Sediments in the Kelantan Plains in the Malay Peninsula during the Holocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S.K. Enio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: For a number of geological reasons a proportion of the present coastal plains in the Malay Peninsula were inundated by seawater in the past when pyrite in some of the soils is believed to have been mineralized. Random survey of these sites showed a unique distribution and depth of pyritic layer in the soils along the coastal plains. A study was conducted in order to explain the mechanism of pyritization in the sediments of the present day coastal plains in Kelantan, Peninsular Malaysia. Approach: Soil surveys were conducted and soils were sampled and analyzed. Spatial distribution of the pyritic soils was used to construct an imaginary line to indicate the probable position of the shoreline when the sea level was at its highest. Results: Results of the study showed that soils containing pyrite occur sporadically in the plains. This pyrite occurs in the soils at varying depth; some soils have pyritic layer below 2 m from the surface (northern region, while others have pyrite in the surface horizon (southern region. Pyrite was formed by the reaction of ferrous and sulfide ions which were respectively reduced from ferric ions (sediments and sulfate (seawater ions, respectively. In the middle of the study area, pyritic layer overlain by peaty materials were observed. Conclusion: The presence of pyrite in the soils can be used as an evidence for sea level rise in the area during the Holocene. This pyrite is assumed to have been formed about 6,000 years BP when the sea level rose 3-5 m above the present. Its oxidation has caused untold damage to the productivity of the paddy soils in the area.

  16. Iron Phosphate Coating:A Novel Approach to Controlling Pyrite Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGXIAO; V.P.EVANGELOU

    1997-01-01

    A novel coating technique was develped for controlling pyrite oxidation .The technique involved leaching pyrite particles with a solution containing low concentrations of phosphate and hydrogen peroxide.During the leaching rpocess,the iron released from pyrite by hydrogen proxide was precipitated by phosphate as a ferric phosphate coating .This coating was shown to be able to effectively prevent pyirte from oxidation and it could be established at the expense of only surface portions of pyrite.The emergence of this technique could provide a unique potential route for abating acid mine draingage and reclaiming sulfide-containing degraded mining land.

  17. Paleoredoc and pyritization of soft-bodied fossils in the Ordovician Frankfort Shale of New York

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, Una C.; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Hammarlund, Emma U.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple beds in the Frankfort Shale (Upper Ordovician, New York State), including the original "Beecher's Trilobite Bed," yield fossils with pyritized soft-tissues. A bed-by-bed geochemical and sedimentological analysis was carried out to test previous models of soft-tissue pyritization by inves......Multiple beds in the Frankfort Shale (Upper Ordovician, New York State), including the original "Beecher's Trilobite Bed," yield fossils with pyritized soft-tissues. A bed-by-bed geochemical and sedimentological analysis was carried out to test previous models of soft-tissue pyritization...

  18. Spectroscopic study of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface: From vacuum to solution conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Mateo-Marti, E., E-mail: mateome@cab.inta-csic.es

    2015-09-08

    Highlights: • Successful adsorption of cystine on pyrite surface under several conditions. • Detailed XPS spectroscopic characterization of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface. • Spectroscopy evidence, oxidation and anoxic conditions adjust molecular adsorption. • Molecular chemistry on pyrite is driven depending on the surrounding conditions. • The cystine/pyrite(100) model is in good agreement with Wächtershäuser’s theory. - Abstract: We characterized the adsorption of cystine molecules on pyrite surface via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Anoxic conditions were simulated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. In contrast, to simulate oxidation conditions, the molecules were adsorbed on pyrite surface from solution. A novel comparative analysis revealed remarkable differences with respect to molecular adsorption and surface chemistry induced by environmental conditions. Molecular adsorption under anoxic conditions was observed to be more favorable, concentrating a large number of molecules on the surface and two different chemical species. In contrast, the presence of oxygen induced an autocatalytic oxidation process on the pyrite surface, which facilitated water binding on pyrite surface and partially blocked molecular adsorption. Pyrite is a highly reactive surface and contains two crucial types of surface functional groups that drive molecular chemistry on the surface depending on the surrounding conditions. Therefore, the system explored in this study holds interesting implications for supporting catalyzed prebiotic chemistry reactions.

  19. Hot-Water Deposition of Pyritic Stromatolite and Its Relation to Biomineralization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Pyritic stromatolite, a rich pyrite ore, is scattered as reef masses in sedex deposits of the Proterozoic Yanshan rift trough. The pyritic stromatolite consists of a core and alternating concentric rims of light colloidal pyrite and dark organic materials. The concentric rims are cemented together by trichomes highly similar to the trichomic microorganisms inhabiting substantively around the black chimneys on the current sea beds while the core is composed chiefly of groups of thermophilous sulphur bacteria. Biomarkers for the molecules of pyritic stromatolite include pristane, phytane, regular isoprenoids paraffin, methyl-heptadecyl, and so on. This study reveals the existence of methane-yielding bacteria in the pyritic stromatolite and reflects the evolution of thermophilous thallophyta.Long pulsation of mineralizing thermal solutions venting up along contemporaneous faults in rift troughs contributed greatly not just to the reproduction of thermophilous organisms living around the vents, but to their adsorption of Fe2+ from the solutions in a reducing environment. Pyritic stromatolite constantly took shape through metabolism and reduction of these organisms. Owing to the uneven development of the organic communities close to the vents or the hydrothermal plumes, pyritic stromatolite occurred eventually as scattered reef masses. This mineralizing mechanism may be summarized as the following procedure: flowing of hydrothermal fluids associated with submarine exhalation(r) adsorption and metabolism of thermophilous micro-organisms(r) reduction of organic materials(r) formation of deposits of pyritic stromatolite.

  20. Laboratory investigation of constitutive property up-scaling in volcanic tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.

    1996-08-01

    One of the critical issues facing the Yucca Mountain site characterization and performance assessment programs is the manner in which property up-scaling is addressed. Property up-scaling becomes an issue whenever heterogeneous media properties are measured at one scale but applied at another. A research program has been established to challenge current understanding of property up-scaling with the aim of developing and testing improved models that describe up-scaling behavior in a quantitative manner. Up-scaling of constitutive rock properties is investigated through physical experimentation involving the collection of suites of gas-permeability data measured over a range of discrete scales. To date, up-scaling studies have been performed on a series of tuff and sandstone (used as experimental controls) blocks. Samples include a welded, anisotropic tuff (Tiva Canyon Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, upper cliff microstratigraphic unit), and a moderately welded tuff (Tiva Canyon Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, Caprock microstratigraphic unit). A massive fluvial sandstone (Berea Sandstone) was also investigated as a means of evaluating the experimental program and to provide a point of comparison for the tuff data. Because unsaturated flow is of prime interest to the Yucca Mountain Program, scoping studies aimed at investigating the up-scaling of hydraulic properties under various saturated conditions were performed to compliment these studies of intrinsic permeability. These studies focused on matrix sorptivity, a constitutive property quantifying the capillarity of a porous medium. 113 refs.

  1. Isotopic studies of authigenic sulfides, silicates and carbonates, and calcite and pyrite veinlets in the Creede Formation, San Juan Mountains, Southwest Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, Philip M.; Rye, Robert O.; Finkelstein, David B.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfur isotope analysis of authigenic pyrite in the Creede Formation documents its precipitation by the reaction between iron in the volcaniclastic sediments and H2S formed through bacteriogenic reduction of sulfate added to the lake during and immediately following repeated volcanic eruptions during sedimentation. Pyrite veinlets in the underlying Snowshoe Mountain Tuff were formed by the percolation of H2S-bearing pore waters into fractures in the tuff. Conventional analyses of bulk samples of authigenic pyrite range from -20.4% to 34.5% essentially equivalent to the range of -30% to 40% determined using SHRIMP microprobe techniques. Conventional analyses of bulk samples of pyrite from veinlets in the Snowshow Mountain Tiff range from -3.5% to 17.6% much more limited than the ranges of -23% to 111% and -15.6% to 67.0% determined by SHRIMP and laser ablation microbeam techniques, respectively. The extreme range of δ34S for the veinlets is interpreted to be the result of continued fractionation of the already 34S-depleted pore water. Oxygen isotope analysis of authigenic smectite, kaolinite, and K-feldspar together with fluid-inclusion temperatures and oxygen isotope analysis of calcite coexisting with kaolinite indicate that the smectites formed early during burial diagenesis, in accord with petrographic observations. The 40Ar/39Ar dating of K-feldspar, concorfance of K-feldspar, kaolinite, and calcite δ18O values, and fluid-inclusion temperatures in calcite, indicate that the sediments at core hole CCM-1 were subjected to a hydrothermal event at 17.6 Ma. The minerals formed oxygen-shifted meteoric waters with δ18O values of ~-9% Smecities at CCM-1 at least partially exchanged with these waters. Carbon and oxygen isotope analysis of authigenic calcites in the Creede Formation show that they formed over a wide range of temperatures from fluids having a wide range of isotopic composition, presumably over an extended period time. Some of the cements apparently

  2. Study of initial stage of mechanochemical transformation in pyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paneva D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial stage of transformation of pyrite to Fe(II-sulfate as a result of mechanical milling is studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS, Infrared (IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS techniques. A degree of conversion of 0.071 is achieved in the time interval of 0 36 min. The kinetic data satisfy the equation of a shrinking core reaction 1-(1-α1/3=kt. The reaction is of the first order. The calculated rate constant is k=6.434.10-4 min-1. .

  3. Molecular Ink Processed Iron Pyrite Thin Films for Photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Amanda Sue

    2015-01-01

    Thin-film photovoltaics (PV) have the potential to supply our future energy needs, but the dominant commercial thin film technologies rely on rare or toxic elements that may limit their capacity to scale to the terawatt levels of electricity generation needed to impact global energy demand. Iron pyrite (FeS2) is a promising, earth-abundant material that has a suitable band gap of 0.95 eV, a large optical absorption coefficient, and adequate carrier diffusion lengths for use in PV. Unfortunate...

  4. Geophysical tomography for imaging water movement in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1986-09-01

    Alterant tomography has been evaluated for its ability to delineate in-situ water flow paths in a fractured welded-tuff rock mass. The evaluation involved a field experiment in which tomographs of electromagnetic attenuation factor (or attenuation rate) at 300 MHz were made before, during, and after the introduction to the rock of two different water-based tracers: a plain water and dye solution, and salt water and dye. Alterant tomographs were constructed by subtracting, cell by cell, the attenuation factors derived from measurements before each tracer was added to the rock mass from the attenuation factors derived after each tracer was added. The alterant tomographs were compared with other evidence of water movement in the rock: borescope logs of fractures, and post experiment cores used to locate the dye tracer on the fractured surfaces. These comparisons indicate that alterant tomography is suitable for mapping water flow through fractures and that it may be useful in inferring which of the fractures are hydrologically connected in the image plane. The technique appears to be sensitive enough to delineate flow through a single fracture and to define fractures with a spatial resolution of about 10 cm on an imaging scale of a few meters. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Surface complexation modeling of americium sorption onto volcanic tuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M; Kelkar, S; Meijer, A

    2014-10-01

    Results of a surface complexation model (SCM) for americium sorption on volcanic rocks (devitrified and zeolitic tuff) are presented. The model was developed using PHREEQC and based on laboratory data for americium sorption on quartz. Available data for sorption of americium on quartz as a function of pH in dilute groundwater can be modeled with two surface reactions involving an americium sulfate and an americium carbonate complex. It was assumed in applying the model to volcanic rocks from Yucca Mountain, that the surface properties of volcanic rocks can be represented by a quartz surface. Using groundwaters compositionally representative of Yucca Mountain, americium sorption distribution coefficient (Kd, L/Kg) values were calculated as function of pH. These Kd values are close to the experimentally determined Kd values for americium sorption on volcanic rocks, decreasing with increasing pH in the pH range from 7 to 9. The surface complexation constants, derived in this study, allow prediction of sorption of americium in a natural complex system, taking into account the inherent uncertainty associated with geochemical conditions that occur along transport pathways.

  6. Manipulation of pyrite colonization and leaching by iron-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellenberg, Sören; Barthen, Robert; Boretska, Mariia; Zhang, Ruiyong; Sand, Wolfgang; Vera, Mario

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the process of pyrite colonization and leaching by three iron-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species was investigated by fluorescence microscopy, bacterial attachment, and leaching assays. Within the first 4-5 days, only the biofilm subpopulation was responsible for pyrite dissolution. Pyrite-grown cells, in contrast to iron-grown cells, were able to oxidize iron(II) ions or pyrite after 24 h iron starvation and incubation with 1 mM H₂O₂, indicating that these cells were adapted to the presence of enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are generated on metal sulfide surfaces. Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans SS3 and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans R1 showed enhanced pyrite colonization and biofilm formation compared to A. ferrooxidans (T). A broad range of factors influencing the biofilm formation on pyrite were also identified, some of them were strain-specific. Cultivation at non-optimum growth temperatures or increased ionic strength led to a decreased colonization of pyrite. The presence of iron(III) ions increased pyrite colonization, especially when pyrite-grown cells were used, while the addition of 20 mM copper(II) ions resulted in reduced biofilm formation on pyrite. This observation correlated with a different extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) composition of copper-exposed cells. Interestingly, the addition of 1 mM sodium glucuronate in combination with iron(III) ions led to a 5-fold and 7-fold increased cell attachment after 1 and 8 days of incubation, respectively, in A. ferrooxidans (T). In addition, sodium glucuronate addition enhanced pyrite dissolution by 25%.

  7. Microbial acceleration of aerobic pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percak-Dennett, E; He, S; Converse, B; Konishi, H; Xu, H; Corcoran, A; Noguera, D; Chan, C; Bhattacharyya, A; Borch, T; Boyd, E; Roden, E E

    2017-09-01

    Pyrite (FeS2 ) is the most abundant sulfide mineral on Earth and represents a significant reservoir of reduced iron and sulfur both today and in the geologic past. In modern environments, oxidative transformations of pyrite and other metal sulfides play a key role in terrestrial element partitioning with broad impacts to contaminant mobility and the formation of acid mine drainage systems. Although the role of aerobic micro-organisms in pyrite oxidation under acidic-pH conditions is well known, to date there is very little known about the capacity for aerobic micro-organisms to oxidize pyrite at circumneutral pH. Here, we describe two enrichment cultures, obtained from pyrite-bearing subsurface sediments, that were capable of sustained cell growth linked to pyrite oxidation and sulfate generation at neutral pH. The cultures were dominated by two Rhizobiales species (Bradyrhizobium sp. and Mesorhizobium sp.) and a Ralstonia species. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing and genome reconstruction indicated the presence of Fe and S oxidation pathways in these organisms, and the presence of a complete Calvin-Benson-Bassham CO2 fixation system in the Bradyrhizobium sp. Oxidation of pyrite resulted in thin (30-50 nm) coatings of amorphous Fe(III) oxide on the pyrite surface, with no other secondary Fe or S phases detected by electron microscopy or X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Rates of microbial pyrite oxidation were approximately one order of magnitude higher than abiotic rates. These results demonstrate the ability of aerobic microbial activity to accelerate pyrite oxidation and expand the potential contribution of micro-organisms to continental sulfide mineral weathering around the time of the Great Oxidation Event to include neutral-pH environments. In addition, our findings have direct implications for the geochemistry of modern sedimentary environments, including stimulation of the early stages of acid mine drainage formation and mobilization of pyrite-associated metals

  8. Leaching of pyrite by acidophilic heterotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria in pure and mixed cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacelar-Nicolau, P.; Johnson, D.B. [Univ. of Wales, Bangor (United Kingdom). School of Biological Sciences

    1999-02-01

    Seven strains of heterotrophic iron-oxidizing acidophilic bacteria were examined to determine their abilities to promote oxidative dissolution of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) when they were grown in pure cultures and in mixed cultures with sulfur-oxidizing Thiobacillus spp. Only one of the isolates (strain T-24) oxidized pyrite when it was grown in pyrite-basal salts medium. However, when pyrite-containing cultures were supplemented with 0.02% (wt/vol) yeast extract, most of the isolates oxidized pyrite, and one (strain T-24) promoted rates of mineral dissolution similar to the rates observed with the iron-oxidizing autotroph Thiobacillus ferroxidans. Pyrite oxidation by another isolate (strain T-21) occurred in cultures containing between 0.005 and 0.05% (wt/vol) yeast extract but was completely inhibited in cultures containing 0.5% yeast extract. Ferrous iron was also needed for mineral dissolution by the iron-oxidizing heterotrophs, indicating that these organisms oxidize pyrite via the indirect mechanism. Mixed cultures of three isolates (strains T-21, T-232, and T-24) and the sulfur-oxidizing autotroph Thiobacillus thiooxidans promoted pyrite dissolution; since neither strains T-21 and T-23 nor T. thiooxidans could oxidize this mineral in yeast extract-free media, this was a novel example of bacterial synergism. Mixed cultures of strains T-21 and T-23 and the sulfur-oxidizing mixotroph Thiobacillus acidophilus also oxidized pyrite but to a lesser extent than did mixed cultures containing T. thiooxidans. Pyrite leaching by strain T -23 grown in an organic compound-rich medium and incubated either shaken or unshaken was also assessed. The potential environmental significance of iron-oxidizing heterotrophs in accelerating pyrite oxidation is discussed.

  9. Carrier-microencapsulation using Si-catechol complex for suppressing pyrite floatability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, R.K.T.; Satur, J.; Hiroyoshi, N.; Ito, M.; Tsunekawa, M. [Hokkaido University, Hokkaido (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    2008-11-15

    Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) is a common sulfide mineral associated with valuable metal minerals and coal, and it is rejected as a gangue mineral using physical separation techniques such as froth flotation and discharged into tailing pond. In the flotation, pyrite is frequently entrapped in the froth due to its hydrophobic nature. Formation of acid mine drainage due to the air-oxidation of pyrite in the tailing pond is also a serious problem. The authors have proposed carrier-microencapsulation (CME) as a method for suppressing both the floatability and oxidation of pyrite. In this method, pyrite is coated with a thin layer of metal oxide or hydroxide using catechol solution as a carrier combined with metal ions. The layer converts the pyrite surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and acts as a protective coating against oxidation. The present study demonstrates the effect of CME using Si-catechol complex to suppress the pyrite floatability: The bubble pick-up experiments showed that attachment of pyrite particles to air bubble is suppressed by the CME treatment at pH 4-10, Si-catechol complex concentration over 0.5 mol m{sup -3} and treatment time within 2 min. The Hallimond tube flotation experiments showed that the pyrite floatability is suppressed by the CME treatment even in the presence of typical flotation collectors such as kerosene and xanthate. SEM-EDX analysis confirmed that Si present on the pyrite surface treated by Si-catechol complex, implying that SiO{sub 2} or SiOH{sub 4} layer formed by the CME treatment convert the pyrite surface hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

  10. The behavior of biogenic silica-rich rocks and volcanic tuffs as pozzolanic additives in cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoulis, Dimitris; Stamatakis, Michael; Anastasatou, Marianthi

    2015-04-01

    Cements currently produced, include a variety of pozzolanic materials, aiming for lower clinker addition and utilization of vast deposits of certain raw materials and/or mining wastes and byproducts. The major naturally occurring pozzolanic materials include glassy tuffs, zeolitic tuffs, diatomites and volcanic lavas rich in glassy phase, such as perlites. Therefore, based on the available raw materials in different locations, the cement composition might vary according to the accessibility of efficient pozzolanic materials. In the present investigation, the behavior of pozzolanic cements produced with representative samples of the aforementioned materials was studied, following the characterization of the implemented pozzolanas with respect to their chemical and mineralogical characteristics. Laboratory cements were produced by co-grinding 75% clinker, 5% gypsum and 20% pozzolana, for the same period of time (45 min). Regarding pozzolanic materials, four different types of pozzolanas were utilized namely, diatomite, perlite, zeolite tuff and glassy tuff. More specifically, two diatomite samples originated from Australia and Greece, with high and low reactive silica content respectively, two perlite samples originated from Turkey and from Milos Island, Greece, with different reactive silica contents, a zeolite tuff sample originated from Turkey and a glassy tuff sample originated from Milos Island, Greece. The above pozzolana samples, which were ground in the laboratory ball mill for cement production performed differently during grinding and that was reflected upon the specific surface area (cm2/gr) values. The perlites and the glassy tuff were the hardest to grind, whereas, the zeolite tuff and the Australian diatomite were the easiest ones. However, the exceedingly high specific surface area of the Australian diatomite renders cement difficult to transport and tricky to use for concrete manufacturing, due to the high water demand of the cement mixture. Regarding

  11. Eruption sequence of the Suwanoharu tuff ring in the Pliocene Oyano formation, western Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, H.; Yokose, H.

    2005-12-01

    Volcanism in the Ariake sea region, west Kyushu, Japan, where is the northern extension of the Okinawa trough, have been active during the last 5 million years, from Pliocene to present Unzen volcano. The region has been subsided with development of the tectonic graben. Pliocene Oyano formation is predominated in shallow marine pyroclastic deposits including some base surge deposits. A series of stratified pyroclastic deposits, which were originated by phreatomagmatic eruption cycles is exposed on a sea cliff and is considered to be a remnant of tuff ring, which is called Suwanoharu tuff ring. Suwanoharu tuff ring is expected to preserve the complete eruption sequence. The sequence is basically alternation of massive white tuff layers and laminated gray coarse to lapilli tuff layers. We can identify seven eruption cycles bounded by the massive white air fall pyroclastic deposits (unit 1- 7). The gray pyroclastic deposits consist of massive dark gray medium tuff, crudely laminated medium to coarse-grained tuff, inversely graded lapilli tuff, cross-bedded lapilli tuff, and lapillistone and are considered to be a base surge deposit. Ascending to the eruption cycles, the thickness of massive white tuff layers is decreasing, but the gray layers are increasing. Representative samples were collected from 42 horizons of the tuff ring sequence and analyzed the bulk rock chemical compositions using XRF and the mineral assemblages using XRD. The bulk rock chemical compositions of the gray layers changes from andesite at the lower horizon to basalt at the upper horizon. On the other hand, massive white tuff layers have almost identical and are andesite. Because the compositions of basal layers are very similar to the silt of the basement rock, the beds in the unit 1 may have been deposited fragmented basement rocks by the first phreatomagmatic eruption. At the upper layers of the first eruption cycle (unit 1), chlorine contents are up to the maximum level (ca. 4%) and the

  12. Electrochemical Properties for Co-Doped Pyrite with High Conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchao Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the hydrothermal method was adopted to synthesize nanostructure Co-doped pyrite (FeS2. The structural properties and morphology of the synthesized materials were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, respectively. Co in the crystal lattice of FeS2 could change the growth rate of different crystal planes of the crystal particles, which resulted in various polyhedrons with clear faces and sharp outlines. In addition, the electrochemical performance of the doping pyrite in Li/FeS2 batteries was evaluated using the galvanostatic discharge test, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that the discharge capacity of the doped material (801.8 mAh·g−1 with a doping ratio of 7% was significantly higher than that of the original FeS2 (574.6 mAh·g−1 because of the enhanced conductivity. Therefore, the doping method is potentially effective for improving the electrochemical performance of FeS2.

  13. New data on the Volcanic Tuff from Petrestii de Jos (Cluj District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedelean Horea

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out on the cineritic interlayers from Petreştii de Jos (closed quarry from Indolului Valley, in order to present their detailed mineralogical-petrographical features. Previous work already noticed the similarity of this tuff level with Dej Tuff Complex in other areas. The studied outcrop consists of a compact volcanic tuff interlayered with marls and tuffaceous clays. The analytical investigations: chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and electron microscopy reveal the nature of the diagenetic transformations dominated by zeolitization. Besides clinoptilolite, which is the typical zeolite for Dej Tuff from the Transylvanian Depression, our investigation evidenced also the presence of phillipsite. The process was stepwise: during the primary, syngenetic stage K-clinoptilolite formed, while during the late epigenetic stage Ca-phillipsite crystallized; on behalf of the latter one, Ca-clinoptilolite was also generated. It is worth to mention that the highest amounts of zeolites are to be found in the basal horizon, while this amount decreases in the interlayers associated with the marly-clayey levels. From genetic point of view, the lower horizon in the outcrop represents a primary fall-out tuff. The thin interlayers within the upper horizons are resedimented tuffs. The tuff from Petreştii de Jos represents a cheap raw material located in the neighborhood of the industrial area of Turda town. For using it, only a more detailed research and the removal of the vegetal and soil layer on the top would be necessary.

  14. Feldspar dissolution rates in the Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, C.R.; Helean, K.B.; Marshall, B.D.; Brady, P.V.

    2009-01-01

    Two different field-based methods are used here to calculate feldspar dissolution rates in the Topopah Spring Tuff, the host rock for the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The center of the tuff is a high silica rhyolite, consisting largely of alkali feldspar (???60 wt%) and quartz polymorphs (???35 wt%) that formed by devitrification of rhyolitic glass as the tuff cooled. First, the abundance of secondary aluminosilicates is used to estimate the cumulative amount of feldspar dissolution over the history of the tuff, and an ambient dissolution rate is calculated by using the estimated thermal history. Second, the feldspar dissolution rate is calculated by using measured Sr isotope compositions for the pore water and rock. Pore waters display systematic changes in Sr isotopic composition with depth that are caused by feldspar dissolution. The range in dissolution rates determined from secondary mineral abundances varies from 10-16 to 10-17 mol s-1 kg tuff-1 with the largest uncertainty being the effect of the early thermal history of the tuff. Dissolution rates based on pore water Sr isotopic data were calculated by treating percolation flux parametrically, and vary from 10-15 to 10-16 mol s-1 kg tuff-1 for percolation fluxes of 15 mm a-1 and 1 mm a-1, respectively. Reconciling the rates from the two methods requires that percolation fluxes at the sampled locations be a few mm a-1 or less. The calculated feldspar dissolution rates are low relative to other measured field-based feldspar dissolution rates, possibly due to the age (12.8 Ma) of the unsaturated system at Yucca Mountain; because oxidizing and organic-poor conditions limit biological activity; and/or because elevated silica concentrations in the pore waters (???50 mg L-1) may inhibit feldspar dissolution. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surfactant-Assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis of Single Phase Pyrite FeS2 Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadia, Cyrus; Wu, Yue; Gul, Sheraz; Volkman, Steven; Guo, Jinghua; Alivisatos, Paul

    2009-03-27

    Iron pyrite nanocrystals with high purity have been synthesized through a surfactant-assisted hydrothermal reaction under optimum pH value. These pyrite nanocrystals represent a new group of well-defined nanoscale structures for high-performance photovoltaic solar cells based on non-toxic and earth abundant materials.

  16. Relationship between pyrite Stability and arsenic mobility during aquifer storage and recovery in southwest central Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregg W; Pichler, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Elevated arsenic concentrations are common in water recovered from aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems in west-central Florida that store surface water. Investigations of the Suwannee Limestone of the Upper Floridan aquifer, the storage zone for ASR systems, have shown that arsenic is highest in pyrite in zones of high moldic porosity. Geochemical modeling was employed to examine pyrite stability in limestone during simulated injections of surface water into wells open only to the Suwannee Limestone with known mineralogy and water chemistry. The goal was to determine if aquifer redox conditions could be altered to the degree of pyrite instability. Increasing amounts of injection water were added to native storage-zone water, and resulting reaction paths were plotted on pyrite stability diagrams. Native storage-zone water plotted within the pyrite stability field, indicating that conditions were sufficiently reducing to allow for pyrite stability. Thus, arsenic is immobilized in pyrite, and its groundwater concentration should be low. This was corroborated by analysis of water samples, none of which had arsenic concentrations above 0.036 microg/L. During simulation, however, as injection/native storage-zone water ratios increased, conditions became less reducing and pyrite became unstable. The result would be release of arsenic from limestone into storage-zone water.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of PDLLA/pyrite composite bone scaffold for osteoblast culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lifang Zhang; Yanyan Zheng; Chengdong Xiong

    2015-06-01

    A series of highly interconnected porous poly(D,L-lactide acid) (PDLLA)/pyrite (Zi-Ran-Tong, FeS2) scaffold containing 5–20% of pyrite was fabricated by particle leaching combined with the thermal-induced phase separation method. Pyrite (FeS2, named as Zi-Ran-Tong in Chinese medicine), as a traditional Chinesemedicine, has been used in the Chinese population to treat bone diseases and to promote bone healing. The mechanical properties of the PDLLA scaffold were significantly enhanced after the addition of pyrite. The osteoblastic ROS17/2.8 cell line was used and seeded on the PDLLA/pyrite scaffold to study its potential to support the growth of osteoblastic cells and to estimate the optimal dose of pyrite for bone tissue engineering. The effects of pyrite on cell proliferation and differentiation were evaluated by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and alkaline phosphatase activity assay. The cells on the porous composite scaffold formed a continuous layer on the outer and inner surface observed by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscope. The results strongly suggested that the PDLLA/pyrite composite scaffold could stimulate the growth of ROS17/2.8 cells in vitro and it could be potentially used as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

  18. Isotopic and microbiological signatures of pyrite-driven denitrification in a sandy aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.-C.; Slomp, C.P.; Broers, H.P.; Bostick, B.; Passier, H.F.; Böttcher, M.E.; Omoregie, E.O.; Lloyd, J.R.; Polya, D.A.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Denitrificationdriven by pyrite oxidation can play a major role in the removal of nitrate from groundwater systems. As yet, limited information is available on the interactions between the micro-organisms and aqueous and mineral phases in aquifers where pyrite oxidation is occurring. In this study,

  19. Intermediary sulfur compounds in pyrite oxidation: implications for bioleaching and biodepyritization of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schippers, A.; Rohwerder, T.; Sand, W. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Botanik und Botanischer Garten

    1999-07-01

    Accumulation of elemental sulfur during pyrite oxidation lowers the efficiency of coal desulfurization and bioleaching. In the case of pyrite bioleaching by Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, an iron(II)-ion-oxidizing organism without sulfur-oxidizing capacity, from the pyritic sulfur moiety about 10% elemental sulfur, 2% pentathionate, and 1% tetrathionate accumulated by a recently described cyclic pyrite oxidation mechanism. In the case of pure cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and mixed cultures of L. ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans, pyrite was nearly completely oxidized to sulfate because of the capacity of these cultures to oxidize both iron(II) ions and sulfur compounds. Pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions, mediated chemically by iron(III) ion, resulted in an accumulation of similar amounts of sulfur compounds as obtained with L. ferrooxidans. Changes of pH to values below 2 or in the iron ion concentration are not decisive for diverting the flux of sulfur compounds. The literature on pyrite bioleaching is in agreement with the findings indicating that the chemistry of direct and indirect pyrite leaching is identical. (orig.)

  20. Bio-reduction of pyrite investigated in a gas lift loop reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, A.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Weert, van G.; Kondos, P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    To liberate gold from refractory pyrite, oxidative destruction techniques that consume lots of energy and generate acidic waste streams are custom. As an alternative the “bio-reduction” of pyrite is proposed and investigated in this study. Bio-reduction is an anaerobic process based on sulfate/sulfu

  1. The mineralogical and physicochemical properties of clinoptilolite tuff: A comparative study and an outlook for its potential use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nistratova, I.E.; Novikova, V.A.; Marsii, I.M.; Sokolova, A.L. [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    Mineral and chemical composition, petrographical characteristics, mechanical strength, and ion exchange selectivity of clinoptilolite tuff were studied with the aim of estimating its potential use in water treatment.

  2. Framboidal and idiomorphic pyrite in the upper Maastrichtian sedimentary rocks at Gabal Oweina, Nile Valley, Egypt: Formation processes, oxidation products and genetic implications to the origin of framboidal pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mamdouh F.; El Goresy, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    The upper Maastrichtian organic-rich sediments studied at Gabal Oweina, Egypt, are moderately enriched in syngenetic and diagenetic pyrite. Pyrite occurs mostly as layers or bands, group of lamina, lenses, diagenetic intercalated pockets, burrow fills and disseminated individual pyrite framboids and crystals within the host sediments. The pyritic thin bands and lamina consist mostly of unconsolidated to compact-oriented pyrite (oriented along the bedding planes) in gypsiferous-clayey matrix and less common as poorly oriented pyrite crystallites. In several cases, pyrite crystals of the latter type depict zoning, fracturing and micro-concretions. Pyritic burrow fills are composed mainly of pyrite, phosphatic ooids, microfossils, glauconitic grains, poorly graphitized carbon and native sulfur. Pyrite replaces minerals other than gypsum, sulfur or carbon. It also replaces microfossils thus turning some of the phosphatic ooids and microfossils to pyritized pseudomorphs. None of the studied phosphate ooids or framboids contains any mackinawite, pyrrhotite or greigite. Based on the microscopic and SEM observations of the micro-textures of disseminated pyrite found at Gabal Oweina section, four morphological forms of primary pyrite could be identified: (1) Grouped multiple-framboids; (2) Individual framboids; (3) Pyrite idiomorphic crystal overgrowths on framboids and (4) Single and aggregates of euhedral pyrite crystals. The multiple-framboid formation may have emerged from three successive processes: nucleation and growth of individual aggregates of the microcrystals to form combined micro-framboids (the growth of framboids); and followed by grouping of the several pyrite framboids. Direct pyrite nucleation (shell formation), crystallization, and aggregation processes might complete a single framboid. The disseminated single and aggregated euhedral pyrite crystals bear evidence indicating that their formation was via nucleation and growth of pyrite crystallites and

  3. The coupled geochemistry of Au and As in pyrite from hydrothermal ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deditius, Artur P.; Reich, Martin; Kesler, Stephen E.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Chryssoulis, Stephen L.; Walshe, John; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquity of Au-bearing arsenian pyrite in hydrothermal ore deposits suggests that the coupled geochemical behaviour of Au and As in this sulfide occurs under a wide range of physico-chemical conditions. Despite significant advances in the last 20 years, fundamental factors controlling Au and As ratios in pyrite from ore deposits remain poorly known. Here we explore these constraints using new and previously published EMPA, LA-ICP-MS, SIMS, and μ-PIXE analyses of As and Au in pyrite from Carlin-type Au, epithermal Au, porphyry Cu, Cu-Au, and orogenic Au deposits, volcanogenic massive sulfide (VHMS), Witwatersrand Au, iron oxide copper gold (IOCG), and coal deposits. Pyrite included in the data compilation formed under temperatures from ∼30 to ∼600 °C and in a wide variety of geological environments. The pyrite Au-As data form a wedge-shaped zone in compositional space, and the fact that most data points plot below the solid solubility limit defined by Reich et al. (2005) indicate that Au1+ is the dominant form of Au in arsenian pyrite and that Au-bearing ore fluids that deposit this sulfide are mostly undersaturated with respect to native Au. The analytical data also show that the solid solubility limit of Au in arsenian pyrite defined by an Au/As ratio of 0.02 is independent of the geochemical environment of pyrite formation and rather depends on the crystal-chemical properties of pyrite and post-depositional alteration. Compilation of Au-As concentrations and formation temperatures for pyrite indicates that Au and As solubility in pyrite is retrograde; Au and As contents decrease as a function of increasing temperature from ∼200 to ∼500 °C. Based on these results, two major Au-As trends for Au-bearing arsenian pyrite from ore deposits are defined. One trend is formed by pyrites from Carlin-type and orogenic Au deposits where compositions are largely controlled by fluid-rock interactions and/or can be highly perturbed by changes in temperature and

  4. Lipid extraction and esterification for microalgae-based biodiesel production using pyrite (FeS2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Oh, You-Kwan; Han, Jong-In

    2015-09-01

    In this study, pyrite (FeS2) was used for lipid extraction as well as esterification processes for microalgae-based biodiesel production. An iron-mediated oxidation reaction, Fenton-like reaction, produced an expected degree of lipid extraction, but pyrite was less effective than FeCl3 commercial powder. That low efficiency was improved by using oxidized pyrite, which showed an equivalent lipid extraction efficiency to FeCl3, about 90%, when 20 mM of catalyst was used. Oxidized pyrite was also employed in the esterification step, and converted free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters under acidic conditions; thus, the fatal problem of saponification during esterification with alkaline catalysts was avoided, and esterification efficiency over 90% was obtained. This study clearly showed that pyrite could be utilized as a cheap catalyst in the lipid extraction and esterification steps for microalgae-based biodiesel production.

  5. Pyrite surface interaction with selected organic aqueous species under anoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bebié Joakim

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between low-molecular weight organic compounds and pyrite under anoxic conditions has been studied using a combination of electrophoresis and batch sorption experiments. The results suggest that acetate, carbamide, ethylamine, formamide, purine, D-ribose, and adenine, as well as the amino acids alanine, cysteine and glycine, interact within the electrophoretic shearplane of the pyrite surface. The observed surface interaction between the negatively charged surface of pyrite and the organic aqueous species takes place regardless of the formal charge of the aqueous species of interest. This indicates that the interaction of organic molecules with pyrite surfaces under anoxic conditions is dictated by interactions with specific surface sites (thiol or iron surface sites rather than electrostatic forces. Dissolved metals typically enhance the interaction of the organics species. This enhancement is either due to an alteration in the distribution of thiol and iron groups on the pyrite surface or by the formation of ternary surface complexes.

  6. Occurrence and Geological Genesis of Pyrites in Late Paleozoic Coals in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘大锰; 杨起; 等

    2000-01-01

    The occurrence and geological genesis of pyrites in Late Paleozoic colas of North china have been systematically studied in terms of coal petrology,coal chemistry,elemental geochemistry and sulfur isotope geochemistry.The results suggest that eight types of pyrite,i.e.,framboidal,automorphic graular,oolitic,massive,homogeneous spherical,allotriomorphic,nodular,joint-and fisure-filling pyrintes can be subdivided under the microscope,Four generations of pyrite are also reconized according to the shape,size,coexisting assemblage,spacial distribution relationship with macerals,the contents of sulfur and iron.atomic S/Fe ratios and associated elements in pryites.Sulfur in Late Palozoic colas of North China is of diverse source as evidenced by sulfur isotope variations in the pyrites.The δ34S values of pyrite generated at the early stage ted to be negative,and at the late stage,positive.

  7. Spectroscopic study of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface: From vacuum to solution conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Mateo-Marti, E.

    2015-09-01

    We characterized the adsorption of cystine molecules on pyrite surface via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Anoxic conditions were simulated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. In contrast, to simulate oxidation conditions, the molecules were adsorbed on pyrite surface from solution. A novel comparative analysis revealed remarkable differences with respect to molecular adsorption and surface chemistry induced by environmental conditions. Molecular adsorption under anoxic conditions was observed to be more favorable, concentrating a large number of molecules on the surface and two different chemical species. In contrast, the presence of oxygen induced an autocatalytic oxidation process on the pyrite surface, which facilitated water binding on pyrite surface and partially blocked molecular adsorption. Pyrite is a highly reactive surface and contains two crucial types of surface functional groups that drive molecular chemistry on the surface depending on the surrounding conditions. Therefore, the system explored in this study holds interesting implications for supporting catalyzed prebiotic chemistry reactions.

  8. Remnant colloform pyrite at the haile gold deposit, South Carolina: A textural key to genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, N.; Ayuso, R.A.; Seal, R.R.

    2001-01-01

    Auriferous iron sulfide-bearing deposits of the Carolina slate belt have distinctive mineralogical and textural features-traits that provide a basis to construct models of ore deposition. Our identification of paragenetically early types of pyrite, especially remnant colloform, crustiform, and layered growth textures of pyrite containing electrum and pyrrhotite, establishes unequivocally that gold mineralization was coeval with deposition of host rocks and not solely related to Paleozoic tectonic events. Ore horizons at the Haile deposit, South Carolina, contain many remnants of early pyrite: (1) fine-grained cubic pyrite disseminated along bedding; (2) fine- grained spongy, rounded masses of pyrite that may envelop or drape over pyrite cubes; (3) fragments of botryoidally and crustiform layered pyrite, and (4) pyritic infilling of vesicles and pumice. Detailed mineral chemistry by petrography, microprobe, SEM, and EDS analysis of replaced pumice and colloform structures containing both arsenic compositional banding and electrum points to coeval deposition of gold and the volcanic host rocks and, thus, confirms a syngenetic origin for the gold deposits. Early pyrite textures are present in other major deposits of the Carolina slate belt, such as Ridgeway and Barite Hill, and these provide strong evidence for models whereby the sulfide ores formed prior to tectonism. The role of Paleozoic metamorphism was to remobilize and concentrate gold and other minerals in structurally prepared sites. Recognizing the significance of paragenetically early pyrite and gold textures can play an important role in distinguishing sulfide ores that form in volcanic and sedimentary environments from those formed solely by metamorphic processes. Exploration strategies applied to the Carolina slate belt and correlative rocks in the eastern United States in the Avalonian basement will benefit from using syngenetic models for gold mineralization.

  9. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Richardson, P.E.

    1993-05-19

    In Part I, Surface Chemistry of Coal Pyrite the mechanisms responsible for the inefficient rejection of coal pyrite were investigated using a number of experimental techniques. The test results demonstrate that the hydrophobicity of coal pyrite is related to the surface products formed during oxidation in aqueous solutions. During oxidation, a sulfur-rich surface layer is produced in near neutral pH solutions. This surface layer is composed mainly of sulfur species in the form of an iron-polysulfide along with a smaller amount of iron oxide/hydroxides. The floatability coal pyrite increases dramatically in the presence of frothers and hydrocarbon collectors. These reagents are believed to absorb on the weakly hydrophobic pyrite surfaces as a result of hydrophobic interaction forces. In Part III, Developing the Best Possible Rejection Schemes, a number of pyrite depressants were evaluated in column and conventional flotation tests. These included manganese (Mn) metal, chelating agents quinone and diethylenetriamine (DETA), and several commercially-available organic depressants. Of these, the additives which serve as reducing agents were found to be most effective. Reducing agents were used to prevent pyrite oxidation and/or remove oxidation products present on previously oxidized surfaces. These data show that Mn is a significantly stronger depressant for pyrite than quinone or DETA. Important factors in determining the pyrite depression effect of Mn include the slurry solid content during conditioning, the addition of acid (HCl), and the amount of Mn. The acid helps remove the oxide layer from the surface of Mn and promotes the depression of pyrite by Mn.

  10. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite. Final technical report, September 1990--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, Dawei

    1996-01-01

    This project seeks to advance the fundamental understanding of the physico-chemical processes occurring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, coal desulfurization, and acid mine drainage. Central to this research is the use of synthetic microsize particles of pyrite as model microelectrodes to investigate the semiconductor electrochemistry of pyrite. The research focuses on: (a) the synthesis of microsize particles of pyrite in aqueous solution at room temperature, (b) the formation of iron sulfide complex, the precursor of FeS or FeS{sub 2}, and (c) the relationship between the semiconductor properties of pyrite and its interfacial electrochemical behavior in the dissolution process. In Chapter 2, 3 and 4, a suitable protocol for preparing microsize particles of pyrite in aqueous solution is given, and the essential roles of the precursors elemental sulfur and ``FeS`` in pyrite formation are investigated. In Chapter 5, the formation of iron sulfide complex prior to the precipitation of FeS or FeS{sub 2} is investigated using a fast kinetics technique based on a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. The stoichiometry of the iron sulfide complex is determined, and the rate and formation constants are also evaluated. Chapter 6 provides a summary of the semiconductor properties of pyrite relevant to the present study. In Chapters 7 and 8, the effects of the semiconductor properties on pyrite dissolution are investigated experimentally and the mechanism of pyrite dissolution in acidic aqueous solution is examined. Finally, a summary of the conclusions from this study and suggestions for future research are presented in Chapter 9.

  11. A model for the formation of vesiculated tuff by the coalescence of accretionary lapilli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Mauro

    1992-07-01

    Observations on phreatomagmatic ash deposits of Phlegraean Fields and Vesuvius supply evidence for the origin of vesiculated tuff in a cool environment. Early deposition by fallout of a matrix-free bed of damp accretionary lapilli is followed by deposition of cohesive mud or a mud rain. The lapilli bed becomes partly or completely transformed into a vesiculated tuff by mud percolation and eventual coalescence of accretionary lapilli with consequent trapping of air originally contained in the interstices. The proposed mechanism accounts for vesiculated tuff formation in distal deposits beyond limits commonly attained by pyroclastic surges. This same mechanism may, nevertheless, also operate in proximal tuff-ring and cone deposits during fallout of phreatomagmatic ash separating bed sets in surge-dominated successions. The sequence of events in the proposed model fits well with the evolution of a cooling phreatomagmatic ash cloud in which early ash aggregation (accretionary lapilli fallout) is followed closely by steam condensation (mud or muddy rainfall). This new model invoking a cool-temperature origin is intended to be complementary to previously proposed theories. Although difficult to assess because of the often complete obliteration of original lapilli, the process is believed to be relatively common in the generasion of vesiculated tuffs within phreatomagmatic deposits.

  12. Retention and reduction of uranium on pyrite surface; Retention et reduction de l'uranium a la surface de la pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eglizaud, N

    2006-12-15

    In the hypothesis of a storage of the spent fuel in a deep geological formation, understanding the uranium dispersion in the environment is important. Pyrite is a reducing mineral present in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, the geological formation actually studied for such a storage. However, pyrite impact on uranium migration has already been poorly studied. The aim of the study was to understand the mechanisms of uranium(VI) retention and reduction on the pyrite surface (FeS{sub 2}). Solution chemistry was therefore coupled with solid spectroscopic studies (XPS and Raman spectroscopy). All uranium-pyrite interactions experiments were performed under an anoxic atmosphere, in a glove box. Pyrite dissolution under anoxic conditions releases sulfoxy-anions and iron(II), which can then be adsorbed on the pyrite surface. This adsorption was confirmed by interaction experiments using iron(II) isotopic dilution. Uranium(VI) is retained by an exchange reaction with iron(II) adsorbed on sulphur sites, with a maximal amount of sorbed uranium at pH {>=} 5.5. Cobalt(II) and europium(III) are also adsorbed on the pyrite surface above pH 5.5 confirming then that reduction is not required for species to adsorb on pyrite. When the concentration of uranium retained is lower than 4 x 10{sup -9} mol g{sup -1}, an oxidation-reduction reaction leads to the formation of a uranium (VI) (IV) mixed oxide and to solid sulphur (d.o. {>=} -I). During this reaction, iron remains mostly at the +II oxidation degree. The reaction products seem to passivate the pyrite surface: at higher amounts of retained uranium, the oxidation-reduction reaction is no longer observed. The surface is saturated by the retention of (3.4 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} of uranium(VI). Modelling of uranium sorption at high surface coverage ({>=} 4 x 10{sup -9} mol g{sup -1}) by the Langmuir model yields an adsorption constant of 8 x 10{sup 7} L mol{sup -1}. Finally, a great excess of uranium(VI) above the

  13. Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh {times} 0, 200 mesh {times} 0, and 325 mesh {times} 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

  14. Oxygen adsorption on pyrite (100) surface by density functional theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙伟; 胡岳华; 邱冠周; 覃文庆

    2004-01-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) bulk and (100) surface properties and the oxygen adsorption on the surface were studied by using density functional theory methods. The results show that in the formation of FeS2 (100) surface, there exists a process of electron transfer from Fe dangling bond to S dangling bond. In this situation, surface Fe and S atoms have more ionic properties. Both Fe2+ and S2- have high electrochemistry reduction activity, which is the base for oxygen adsorption. From the viewpoint of adsorption energy, the parallel form oxygen adsorption is in preference.The result also shows that the state of oxygen absorbed on FeS2 surface acts as peroxides rather than O2.

  15. All inorganic iron pyrite nano-heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeminde, Alec; Scott, Randall; Ren, Shenqiang

    2012-11-01

    The large absorption coefficient of iron pyrite (FeS2) nanocrystals coupled with their low-cost and vast-abundance shows great promise as a potential photovoltaic absorber. Here, we demonstrate that bulk heterojunction (BHJ) nanostructures consisting of 80 nm FeS2 nanocubes (NCs) and 4 nm CdS quantum dot (QD) matrix, lead to a well-defined percolation network, which significantly improved open-circuit voltage (Voc) to 0.79 V and power conversion efficiency of 1.1% under AM 1.5 solar illumination. The localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) arising from p-type colloidal FeS2 NCs exhibit plasmonic photoelectron conversion. Our approach can be applied to a wide range of colloidal nanocrystals exhibiting the LSPRs effect and is compatible with solution processing, thereby offering a general tactic to enhancing the efficiency of all inorganic BHJ solar cells and LSPRs-based NIR photodetectors.The large absorption coefficient of iron pyrite (FeS2) nanocrystals coupled with their low-cost and vast-abundance shows great promise as a potential photovoltaic absorber. Here, we demonstrate that bulk heterojunction (BHJ) nanostructures consisting of 80 nm FeS2 nanocubes (NCs) and 4 nm CdS quantum dot (QD) matrix, lead to a well-defined percolation network, which significantly improved open-circuit voltage (Voc) to 0.79 V and power conversion efficiency of 1.1% under AM 1.5 solar illumination. The localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) arising from p-type colloidal FeS2 NCs exhibit plasmonic photoelectron conversion. Our approach can be applied to a wide range of colloidal nanocrystals exhibiting the LSPRs effect and is compatible with solution processing, thereby offering a general tactic to enhancing the efficiency of all inorganic BHJ solar cells and LSPRs-based NIR photodetectors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32097e

  16. Mo and Ni Removal from Drinking Water Using Zeolitic Tuff from Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil M. Ibrahim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mo and Ni metals could be hazardous in natural waters. The initial Mo and Ni concentration in the sampled domestic drinking water of north Jordan is 550 and 110 μg/L, respectively. The efficiency of using natural faujasite–phillipsite and phillipsite–chabazite tuffs in removing Mo and Ni from contaminated drinking water was tested. Batch experiments using different weights of the adsorbent were conducted at different contact times to determine the optimum conditions. The maximal uptake capacity of Mo from drinking water was equivalent to 440–420 μg/g adsorbent. The maximum removal efficiency of Mo by faujasite–phillipsite, phillipsite–chabazite, and the modified surfactant phillipsite–chabazite tuffs were 80%, 76%, and 78%, respectively. The proportional relationship between contact time and removal efficiency of Ni from water samples was observed. The maximum removal efficiency of Ni by the zeolitic tuffs is up to 90% compared to the original groundwater sample.

  17. Hydraulic Characterization of Overpressured Tuffs in Central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.J. Halford; R.J. Laczniak; D.L. Galloway

    2005-10-07

    A sequence of buried, bedded, air-fall tuffs has been used extensively as a host medium for underground nuclear tests detonated in the central part of Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Water levels within these bedded tuffs have been elevated hundreds of meters in areas where underground nuclear tests were detonated below the water table. Changes in the ground-water levels within these tuffs and changes in the rate and distribution of land-surface subsidence above these tuffs indicate that pore-fluid pressures have been slowly depressurizing since the cessation of nuclear testing in 1992. Declines in ground-water levels concurrent with regional land subsidence are explained by poroelastic deformation accompanying ground-water flow as fluids pressurized by underground nuclear detonations drain from the host tuffs into the overlying water table and underlying regional carbonate aquifer. A hydraulic conductivity of about 3 x 10-6 m/d and a specific storage of 9 x 10-6 m-1 are estimated using ground-water flow models. Cross-sectional and three-dimensional ground-water flow models were calibrated to measured water levels and to land-subsidence rates measured using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar. Model results are consistent and indicate that about 2 million m3 of ground water flowed from the tuffs to the carbonate rock as a result of pressurization caused by underground nuclear testing. The annual rate of inflow into the carbonate rock averaged about 0.008 m/yr between 1962 and 2005, and declined from 0.005 m/yr in 2005 to 0.0005 m/yr by 2300.

  18. Hydraulic characterization of overpressured tuffs in central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Galloway, Devin L.

    2005-01-01

    A sequence of buried, bedded, air-fall tuffs has been used extensively as a host medium for underground nuclear tests detonated in the central part of Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Water levels within these bedded tuffs have been elevated hundreds of meters in areas where underground nuclear tests were detonated below the water table. Changes in the ground-water levels within these tuffs and changes in the rate and distribution of land-surface subsidence above these tuffs indicate that pore-fluid pressures have been slowly depressurizing since the cessation of nuclear testing in 1992. Declines in ground-water levels concurrent with regional land subsidence are explained by poroelastic deformation accompanying ground-water flow as fluids pressurized by underground nuclear detonations drain from the host tuffs into the overlying water table and underlying regional carbonate aquifer. A hydraulic conductivity of about 3 x 10-6 m/d and a specific storage of 9 x 10-6 m-1 are estimated using ground-water flow models. Cross-sectional and three-dimensional ground-water flow models were calibrated to measured water levels and to land-subsidence rates measured using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar. Model results are consistent and indicate that about 2 million m3 of ground water flowed from the tuffs to the carbonate rock as a result of pressurization caused by underground nuclear testing. The annual rate of inflow into the carbonate rock averaged about 0.008 m/yr between 1962 and 2005, and declined from 0.005 m/yr in 2005 to 0.0005 m/yr by 2300.

  19. Role of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical in pyrite oxidation by molecular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Martin A. A.; Harrington, Andrea D.; Laffers, Richard; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2010-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical are readily formed during the oxidation of pyrite with molecular oxygen over a wide range of pH conditions. However, pretreatment of the pyrite surface influences how much of the intermediates are formed and their fate. Acid-washed pyrite produces significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical when suspended in air-saturated water. However, the hydrogen peroxide concentration shows an exponential decrease with time. Suspensions made with partially oxidized pyrite yield significantly lower amounts of hydrogen peroxide product. The presence of Fe(III)-oxide or Fe(III)-hydroxide patches facilitates the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Hence, the degree to which a pyrite surface is covered with patches of Fe(III)-oxide or Fe(III)-hydroxide patches is an important control on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in solution. Hydrogen peroxide appears to be an important intermediate in the four-electron transfer from pyrite to molecular oxygen. Addition of catalase, an enzyme that decomposes hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, to a pyrite suspension reduces the oxidation rate by 40%. By contrast, hydroxyl radical does not appear to play a significant role in the oxidation mechanism. It is estimated on the basis of a molecular oxygen and sulfate mass balance that 5-6% of the molecular oxygen is consumed without forming sulfate.

  20. [Characterization of oxidation on pyrite by in situ attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Chen, Yong-Heng; Liu, Juan; Wang, Chun-Lin

    2008-11-01

    Pyrite is one of common natural minerals in the environment, which is easily oxidated and is the main source of acidity mine drainage (AMD). The study on the oxidation of pyrite is helpful to comprehend the mechanism of its pollution. In the present paper, the oxidation of pyrite under the condition of air and water was respectively investigated by the attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) through the designing experiment on the formation of carbon dioxide by the reaction of carbonate in pyrite with sulfuric acid formed by the oxidation of pyrite. The CO2 measurement by in situ ATR indicated that the oxidation rate of pyrite both in the air and in water both reduced by time and the latter reduced more obviously than the former, which indicates that the oxidation rate of pyrite in water is slower than that in the air. In the ATR measurement, the double absorption peaks at 2 350 cm(-1) that indicates CO2 have high selectivity, and permits the in situ analysis.

  1. Flocculation of Pyrite Fines in Aqueous Suspensions with Corn Starch to Eliminate Mechanical Entrainment in Flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ge

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The hydrophilic flocculation of pyrite fines in aqueous suspensions with corn starch was studied by measuring particle size distribution, microscopy observation and micro-flotation. Furthermore, the interaction of corn starch with pyrite was investigated by determining the adsorption density and based on zeta potential measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS analysis in this work. The results of the particle size distribution measurement show that corn starch can effectively aggregate pyrite fines, and the pyrite floccules (flocs are sensitive to mechanical stirring. The micro-flotation results suggest that the mechanical entrainment of pyrite fines in flotation can be effectively eliminated through the formation of large-size flocs. The zeta potential of pyrite particles decreases with the addition of corn starch. The XPS results prove that carboxyl groups are generated on the digested corn starch, and both iron hydroxyl compounds and ferrous disulfide on the pyrite surface can chemically interact with the corn starch digested by sodium hydroxide.

  2. Particulate Pyrite Autotrophic Denitrification (PPAD) for Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, S.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, L. C.; Henderson, M.; Feng, C.; Ergas, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid movement of human civilization towards urbanization, industrialization, and increased agricultural activities has introduced a large amount of nitrate into groundwater. Nitrate is a toxic substance discharged from groundwater to rivers and leads to decreased dissolved oxygen and eutrophication. For this experiment, an electron donor is needed to convert nitrate into non-toxic nitrogen gas. Pyrite is one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust making it an ideal candidate as an electron donor. The overall goal of this research was to investigate the potential for pyrite to be utilized as an electron donor for autotrophic denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Batch studies of particulate pyrite autotrophic denitrification (PPAD) of synthetic groundwater (100 mg NO3--N L-1) were set up with varying biomass concentration, pyrite dose, and pyrite particle size. Reactors were seeded with mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (VSS) from a biological nitrogen removal wastewater treatment facility. PPAD using small pyrite particles (treatment and promoted the utilization of pyrite in the field of environmental remediation.

  3. Lithostratigraphy of the Calico Hills Formation and Prow Pass Tuff (Crater Flat Group) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, T.C.; Geslin, J.K. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Lithostratigraphic relations within the Calico Hills Formation and Prow Pass Tuff (Crater Flat Group) were reconstructed from analysis of core samples and observation of outcrop exposures. The Calico Hills Formation is composed of five nonwelded pyroclastic units (each formed of one or more pyroclastic-flow deposits) that overlie an interval of bedded tuff and a basal volcaniclastic sandstone unit. The Prow Pass Tuff is divided into four pyroclastic units and an underlying interval of bedded tuff. The pyroclastic units of the Prow Pass Tuff are distinguished by the sizes and amounts of their pumice and lithic clasts and their degree of welding. Pyroclastic units of the Prow Pass Tuff are distinguished from those of the Calico Hills Formation by their phenocryst assemblage, chemical composition, and ubiquitous siltstone lithic clasts. Downhole resistivity tends to mirror the content of authigenic minerals, primarily zeolites, in both for-mations and may be useful for recognizing the vitric-zeolite boundary in the study area. Maps of zeolite distribution illustrate that the bedded tuff and basal sandstone units of the Calico Hills Formation are altered over a wider area than the pyroclastic units of both the Calico Hills Formation and the upper Prow Pass Tuff.

  4. Decay of Rhenish Tuffs in Dutch Monuments. Part 2: Laboratory Experiments as a Basis for the Choice of Restoration Stone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hees, R.P.J.; Brendle, S.; Nijland, T.G.; De Haas, G.J.L.M.; Tolboom, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Rhenish tuffs (Eifel, Germany), have been used as building material in the Netherlands since Roman times. They were the most important natural building stone in the Netherlands in early medieval times. In addition, tuff was used as raw material for production of trass, that served as a pozzolanic ad

  5. Decay of Rhenish Tuff in Dutch monuments. Part 2 : Laboratory experiments as a basis for the choice of restoration stone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Brendle, S.; Nijland, T.G.; Haas, G.J.L.M. de; Tolboom, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Rhenish tuffs (Eifel, Getmany), have been used as building material in the Netherlands since Roman times. They were the most important natural building stone in the Netherlands in early medieval times. In addition, tuff was used as raw material for production of trass, that served as a pozzolanic ad

  6. Abundances and isotopic compositions of rhenium and osmium in pyrite samples from the Huaibei coalfield, Anhui, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gaisheng; Chou, C.-L.; Peng, Z.; Yang, G.

    2008-01-01

    Two pyrite samples from the Shihezi Formation (Lower Permian), Huaibei coalfield, Anhui, China, have been analyzed for abundances and isotopic compositions of rhenium and osmium using negative thermal ion mass spectrometry. The Re-Os ages of the pyrites are 64.4 and 226 Ma, which are younger than the formation age of the coal seam. The pyrite samples may consist of pyrite formed at various stages during the history of coal formation. The ??Osvalues of the two pyrite samples are +17 and +18, respectively. Such high ??Osvalues are reported for the first time for recycles crustal materials from a sedimentary basin. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  7. Some geochemical considerations for a potential repository site in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdal, B.R.; Bish, D.L.; Crowe, B.M.; Daniels, W.R.; Ogard, A.E.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vaniman, D.T.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1982-12-31

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, which is evaluating potential locations for a high-level waste repository at the Nevada Test Site and environs, is currently focusing its investigations on tuff, principally in Yucca Mountain, as a host rock. This paper discusses some of the geochemical investigations. Particular emphasis is placed on definition of some basic elements and necessary technical approaches for the geochemistry data acquisition and modeling program. Some site-specific tuff geochemical information that is important for site selection and repository performance will be identified and the current status of knowledge will then be discussed.

  8. Hydrothermal convection and mordenite precipitation in the cooling Bishop Tuff, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Breen, S. J.; Hernandez, A.; Self, S.; Manga, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present field observations of erosional columns in the Bishop Tuff and then use laboratory results and numerical models to argue that these columns are evidence of relict convection in a cooling ignimbrite. Many square kilometers of the Bishop Tuff have evenly-spaced, vertical to semi-vertical erosional columns, a result of hydrothermal alteration. These altered regions are more competent than the surrounding tuff, are 0.1-0.7 m in diameter, are separated by ~ 1 m, and in some cases are more than 8 m in height. JE Bailey (U. of Hawaii, dissertation, 2005) suggested that similar columns in the Bandelier Tuff were formed when slumping allowed water to pool at the surface of the still-cooling ignimbrite. As water percolated downward it boiled generating evenly spaced convection cells similar to heat pipes. We quantify this conceptual model and apply it the Bishop Tuff to understand the physics within ignimbrite-borne hydrothermal systems. We use thin sections to measure changing porosity and use scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses to show that pore spaces in the columns are cemented by the mineral mordenite, a low temperature zeolite that precipitates between 120-200 oC (Bish et al., 1982), also found in the Bandelier Tuff example. We then use scaling to show 1) that water percolating into the cooling Bishop Tuff would convect and 2) that the geometry and spacing of the columns is predicted by the ignimbrite temperature and permeability. We use the computer program HYDROTHERM (Hayba and Ingebritsen, 1994; Kipp et al., 2008) to model 2-phase convection in the Bishop Tuff. By systematically changing permeability, initial temperature, and topography we can identify the pattern of flows that develop when the ignimbrite is cooled by water from above. Hydrothermally altered columns in ignimbrite are the natural product of coupled heat, mass, and chemical transport and have similarities to other geothermal systems, economic ore deposits

  9. Geochemical investigation of the galvanic effects during oxidation of pyrite and base-metals sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopard, Aurélie; Plante, Benoît; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Bouzahzah, Hassan; Marion, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Predicting the water quality at mine sites is of significant importance for developing mines with respect for the environment. Acid mine drainage (AMD) occurs when sulfides are in contact with oxygen and water, and several parameters and mechanisms influence final drainage quality. Galvanic interactions influence the reactivity of sulfide minerals, which act as semi-conductors. These galvanic interactions have been insufficiently studied in the context of AMD generation. In this study, the influence of pyrite on the reactivity of sphalerite and chalcopyrite was investigated. Five blends, comprised of free grains of quartz/pyrite, quartz/chalcopyrite, quartz/sphalerite, quartz/pyrite/chalcopyrite, and quartz/pyrite/sphalerite, were subjected to geochemical testing. Five weathering cells were monitored over a 200-day period during which they were leached twice weekly. Leachates were analyzed for pH, Eh, electrical conductivity, and sulfate and metal concentrations. The results of these analyses showed that galvanic interactions occurred between free sulfide grains. Pyrite was galvanically protected over the full testing period in the quartz/pyrite/chalcopyrite blend, and partially protected in the quartz/pyrite/sphalerite blend. Moreover, the release of Cu from chalcopyrite and Zn, Mn, and Cd from sphalerite was accelerated in the presence of pyrite. This work provides a better understanding of the influence of pyrite on chalcopyrite and sphalerite reactivity by highlighting the galvanic effects. In the future, to improve the reliability of AMD prediction tests, galvanic interactions should be considered in both the prediction of the acid generation potential and the estimation of metal and metalloid release rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Late Triassic tuff intervals in the Ordos basin, Central China: Their depositional, petrographic, geochemical characteristics and regional implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xinwei; Liu, Chiyang; Mao, Guangzhou; Deng, Yu; Wang, Feifei; Wang, Jianqiang

    2014-02-01

    Tuff intervals of Upper Triassic Yanchang Formation are laterally widespread in the Ordos basin, Central China. This paper focuses on magmatic origins and potential source regions of these tuff intervals through detail depositional, petrographic and geochemical analyses. Most of the tuff intervals are well-documented at the bottom of the Chang7 oil reservoir unit and can be correlated laterally, and certain tuff beds are reworked by turbidity current or seismic activity. Petrographic studies of the Chang7 tuffs indicate that they are composed of crystal shards, lithic shards and altered glass shards, and the crystal shards include plagioclase, quartz and biotite. Alteration of the Chang7 tuffs is ubiquitous, thus, most of these tuffs transformed into illite/smectite (I/S) mixed-layers which are identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Less common minerals are also detected in the Chang7 tuffs such as zircon, hematite, siderite, anatase. Major elements are determined by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, the results indicate that the Chang7 tuffs are enriched in K2O (average 4.21%), the ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 ranges from 1.73 to 2.85 (average 2.17), and the ratio of TiO2/Al2O3 varies between 0.006 and 0.032 (average 0.017), which imply that the Chang7 tuffs originated from a felsic parental magma. Trace elements are determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), indicating the total rare earth element (∑REE) concentrations are variable, and range from 117.46 to 466.83 ppm (average 251.88 ppm). REE distribution pattern of the Chang7 tuffs presents a LREE rightward incline with flat HREE curve. The value of δEu ranges from 0.151 to 0.837 (average 0.492), suggesting a strong to weak negative Eu anomaly. The Chang7 tuffs show positive anomalies in Rb, Th and U and negative anomalies in Nb, Sr and Eu on a primitive mantle normalized spidergram. A preliminary analysis of the geochemical composition of the

  11. Adsorção de xantatos sobre pirita Adsorption of xanthate on pyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Garcia Penha

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of adsorption of xanthate with alkyl chain of two (C2XK, four (C4XK and eight (C8XK atoms of carbon, on pyrite from Santa Catarina, Brazil. The results showed that pyrite surface changes from hydrophilic to hydrophobic when xanthate is adsorbed increasing the contact angle to 35º for C2XK, and to 90º for C4XK and C8XK. The rate of flotation of pyrite particles after adsorption increases with the increase of the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain in agreement with the results of contact angle measurements.

  12. Quantification of Pyritic Sulfur of One Colombian Coal by Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, F.; Pérez Alcázar, G. A.; Barraza, J. M.; Bohórquez, A.; Tabares, J. A.

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this work was to identify and quantify by means of Mössbauer spectroscopy the amount of pyritic sulfur in coal samples of the Guachinte mine, Valle, Colombia. For the quantification a calibration curve for pyritic sulfur content vs. relative spectral area ratio of sulfur and pure (99.99%) Fe-powder was obtained, using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The samples used in the calibration were the representative ones of the fractions obtained after one and two hydrocyclonic removal processes of a homogeneous sample of raw coal. A linear relationship was obtained and used to determine the amount of pyritic sulfur of the original coal.

  13. Nickel mobilization in a groundwater well field: Release by pyrite oxidation and desorption from manganese oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Dieke; Larsen, Flemming

    1997-01-01

    is furthermore characterized by enhanced Mn2+ concentrations. Apparently nickel accumulates on manganese oxides during pyrite oxidation. When the water table rises again, partially oxidized pyritic layers are resubmerged, and due to an insufficient supply of oxygen, the oxidation of Fe2+ released during pyrite...... oxidation becomes incomplete. The mobilized Fe2+ may reduce manganese oxides and thereby release large amounts of Ni2+ to the groundwater. Calculations using a surface complexation model indicate retardation of nickel to be strongly affected by bulk water composition. At the background groundwater...

  14. Selective separation of arsenopyrite from pyrite by biomodulation in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandraprabha, M N; Natarajan, K A; Somasundaran, P

    2004-08-15

    Effective methods for selective separation using flotation or flocculation of arsenopyrite from pyrite by biomodulation using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans are presented here. Adhesion of the bacterium to the surface of arsenopyrite was very slow compared to that to pyrite, resulting in a difference in surface modification of the minerals subsequent to interaction with cells. The cells were able to effectively depress pyrite flotation in presence of collectors like potassium isopropyl xanthate and potassium amyl xanthate. On the other hand the flotability of arsenopyrite after conditioning with the cells was not significantly affected. The activation of pyrite by copper sulfate was reduced when the minerals were conditioned together, resulting in better selectivity. Selective separation could also be achieved by flocculation of biomodulated samples.

  15. Electronic, thermodynamic and elastic properties of pyrite RuO_2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Ze-Jin; Guo Yun-Dong; Wang Guang-Chang; Li Jin; Dai Wei; Liu Jin-Chao; Cheng Xin-Lu; Yang Xiang-Dong

    2009-01-01

    This paper calculates the elastic, thermodynamic and electronic properties of pyrite (Pa3) RuO_2 by the plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory (DFT) method. The lattice parameters, normalized elastic constants, Cauchy pressure, brittle-ductile relations, heat capacity and Debye temperature are successfully obtained. The Murnaghan equation of state shows that pyrite RuO_2 is a potential superhard material. Internal coordinate parameter increases with pressure, which disagrees with experimental data. An analysis based on electronic structure and the pseudogap reveals that the bonding nature in RuO_2 is a combination of covalent, ionic and metallic bonding. A study of the elastic properties indicates that the pyrite phase is isotropic under usual conditions. The relationship between brittleness and ductility shows that pyrite RuO_2 behaves in a ductile matter at zero pressure and the degree of ductility increases with pressure.

  16. Geological significance of componential characteristics of pyrite from Shibaqinghao gold deposit in central Inner Mongolia, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yihong Liang; Hongying Zhang; Yanhua Ma

    2006-01-01

    There are two types of gold ore in Shibaqinghao gold deposit, mylonite ore and quartz vein ore. Pyrite accompanying with native gold in mylonite ore has Fe from 43.66 to 45.32 wt% and S from 52.64 to 53.55 wt%. It is clear that this kind of pyrite is poor in both sulphur and iron. That means that the mylonite ore may be related to metamorphic water. Pyrite in the quartz vein ore has Fe from 44.38 to 45.30 wt% and S from 53.08 to 54.00 wt%. It means that this kind of pyrite is poor in iron but rich in sulphur, while the quartz vein ore may be related to magma water.

  17. Pyrite Iron Sulfide Solar Cells Made from Solution Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Matt [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-03-21

    This document summarizes research done under the SunShot Next Generation PV II project entitled, “Pyrite Iron Sulfide Solar Cells Made from Solution,” award number DE-EE0005324, at the University of California, Irvine, from 9/1/11 thru 11/30/16. The project goal was to develop iron pyrite (cubic FeS2) as an absorber layer for solution-processible p-n heterojunction solar cells with a pathway to >20% power conversion efficiency. Project milestones centered around seven main Tasks: (1) make device-quality pyrite thin-films from solar ink; (2) develop an ohmic bottom contact with suitable low resistivity; (3) produce a p-n heterojunction with VOC > 400 mV; (4) make a solar cell with >5% power conversion efficiency; (5) use alloying to increase the pyrite band gap to ~1.2-1.4 eV; (6) produce a p-n heterojunction with VOC > 500 mV; and finally (7) make a solar cell with >10% power conversion efficiency. In response to project findings, the Tasks were amended midway through the project to focus particular effort on passivating the surface of pyrite in order to eliminate excessively-strong surface band bending believed to be responsible for the low VOC of pyrite diodes. Major project achievements include: (1) development and detailed characterization of several new solution syntheses of high-quality thin-film pyrite, including two “molecular ink” routes; (2) demonstration of Mo/MoS2 bilayers as good ohmic bottom contacts to pyrite films; (3) fabrication of pyrite diodes with a glass/Mo/MoS2/pyrite/ZnS/ZnO/AZO layer sequence that show VOC values >400 mV and as high as 610 mV at ~1 sun illumination, although these high VOC values ultimately proved irreproducible; (4) established that ZnS is a promising n-type junction partner for pyrite; (5) used density functional theory to show that the band gap of pyrite can be increased from ~1.0 to a more optimal 1.2-1.3 eV by alloying with oxygen; (6) through extensive measurements of ultrahigh

  18. New method for the simultaneous determination of pyrite content and proximate analysis in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aylmer, D.M.; Rowe, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    A combined thermogravimetric and thermomagnetometric procedure using inert, oxidising and reducing gases is described. It is shown to give good agreement with the ASTM methods and to have advantages over the latter, especially as regards occluded or weathered pyrite.

  19. The role of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus thiooxidans in pyrite weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, K.; Tsunekawa, M.; Ohtsuka, T.; Konno, H. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    1998-02-28

    The paper investigates the role of the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus thiooxidans in pyrite weathering in order to clarify the effects of the bacteria on the dissolution behavior of pyrite and the formation of secondary minerals using Raman spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) in addition to solution analysis. It was found that T. thiooxidans, when present with the iron-oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, enhanced the dissolution of Fe and S species for pyrite, whereas T. thiooxidans alone did not oxidize pyrite. Enhancement of the consumption of elemental sulfur and regeneration of Fe(II) ions were also observed with T. thiooxidans together with T. ferrooxidans, while this did not occur with T. ferrooxidans alone.

  20. Copper-arsenic decoupling in an active geothermal system: A link between pyrite and fluid composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardani, Daniele; Reich, Martin; Deditius, Artur P.; Chryssoulis, Stephen; Sánchez-Alfaro, Pablo; Wrage, Jackie; Roberts, Malcolm P.

    2017-05-01

    Over the past few decades several studies have reported that pyrite hosts appreciable amounts of trace elements which commonly occur forming complex zoning patterns within a single mineral grain. These chemical zonations in pyrite have been recognized in a variety of hydrothermal ore deposit types (e.g., porphyry Cu-Mo-Au, epithermal Au deposits, iron oxide-copper-gold, Carlin-type and Archean lode Au deposits, among others), showing, in some cases, marked oscillatory alternation of metals and metalloids in pyrite growth zones (e.g., of Cu-rich, As-(Au, Ag)-depleted zones and As-(Au, Ag)-rich, Cu-depleted zones). This decoupled geochemical behavior of Cu and As has been interpreted as a result of chemical changes in ore-forming fluids, although direct evidence connecting fluctuations in hydrothermal fluid composition with metal partitioning into pyrite growth zones is still lacking. In this study, we report a comprehensive trace element database of pyrite from the Tolhuaca Geothermal System (TGS) in southern Chile, a young and active hydrothermal system where fewer pyrite growth rims and mineralization events are present and the reservoir fluid (i.e. ore-forming fluid) is accessible. We combined the high-spatial resolution and X-ray mapping capabilities of electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) with low detection limits and depth-profiling capacity of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in a suite of pyrite samples retrieved from a ∼1 km drill hole that crosses the argillic (20-450 m) and propylitic (650-1000 m) alteration zones of the geothermal system. We show that the concentrations of precious metals (e.g., Au, Ag), metalloids (e.g., As, Sb, Se, Te), and base and heavy metals (e.g., Cu, Co, Ni, Pb) in pyrite at the TGS are significant. Among the elements analyzed, As and Cu are the most abundant with concentrations that vary from sub-ppm levels to a few wt.% (i.e., up to ∼5 wt.% As, ∼1.5 wt.% Cu). Detailed wavelength-dispersive spectrometry (WDS) X

  1. Chalcophile Siderophile Trace Element Systematics of Hydrothermal Pyrite from Martian Regolith Breccia NWA 7533

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorand, J.-P.; Hewins, R. H.; Humayun, M.; Remusat, L.; Zanda, B.; La, C.; Pont, S.

    2016-08-01

    Martian impact breccia NWA 7533 contains hydrothermal pyrite. Laser ablation ICPMS analyses show that its chalcophile siderophile element content was inherited from both early meteorite bombardment and later hydrothermal inputs from H2S fluids.

  2. Estimation of engineering properties of selected tuffs by using grain/matrix ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkanç, Mustafa; Solak, Burak

    2016-08-01

    Petrographic properties of rocks substantially affect their physical and mechanical properties. In the present study, for the purpose of examining the relationship between the petrographic and geomechanical properties of pyroclastic rocks, fresh samples were taken from tuffs of different textural properties that have wide distribution in Cappadocia region. Experimental studies were conducted on 20 fresh samples to determine their engineering properties through petrographic examinations. Dry and saturated unit weights, water absorption by weight, effective porosity, capillary water absorption, slake durability index, P-wave velocity, point load index, uniaxial compressive strength and nail penetration index of the samples were determined. Higher geomechanical values were obtained from the samples of Kavak tuffs affected by hydromechanical alteration and by tuffs with high welded rates. On thin sections prepared with the fresh samples, petrographic studies were carried out by using a point counter with a polarizing microscope, and mineral composition, texture, void ratio, volcanic glass presence and state of these fragments within the rock, secondary mineral formation and opaque mineral presence were determined. Grain/matrix ratio (GMR) was calculated by using the ratios of phenocrysts, microlites, volcanic glass, voids and opaque minerals after point counting on thin sections. A potential relationship between the petrographic and geomechanical properties of fresh samples was tried to determine by counting correlation analysis. Such a relationship can be significantly and extensively suggestible for engineering applications. For this purpose, we used the poorly-welded Kavak and densely-welded Kızılkaya tuff samples in our study.

  3. Corrosion testing of type 304L stainless steel in tuff groundwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Haberman, J.H.

    1987-11-01

    The stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of Type 304L stainless steel (SS) to elevated temperatures in tuff rock and tuff groundwater environments was determined under irradiated and nonirradiated conditions using U-bend specimens and slow-strain-rate tests. The steel was tested both in the solution-annealed condition and after sensitization heat treatments. The material was found to be susceptible to SCC in both the solution-annealed and solution-annealed-and-sensitized conditions when exposed to an irradiated crushed tuff rock environment containing air and water vapor at 90{sup 0}C. A similar exposure at 50{sup 0}C did not result in failure after a 25-month test duration. Specimens of sensitized 304 SS conditioned with a variety of sensitization heat treatments resisted failure during a test of 1-year duration in which a nonirradiated environment of tuff rock and groundwater held at 200{sup 0}C was allowed to boil to dryness on a cyclical basis. All specimens of sensitized 304 SS exposed to this environment failed. Slow-strain-rate studies were performed on 304L, 304, and 316L SS specimens. The 304L SS was tested in J-13 well water at 150{sup 0}C, and the 316L SS at 95{sup 0}C. Neither material showed evidence of SCC in these tests. Sensitized 304 SS did exhibit SCC in J-13 well water in tests conducted at 150{sup 0}C. 12 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

  4. Cerro Xalapaxco: An Unusual Tuff Cone with Multiple Explosion Craters, in Central Mexico (Puebla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, M. J.; Siebe, C.

    1994-01-01

    The Xalapaxco tuff cone is located on the northeast flank of La Malinche stratovolcano in central Mexico. An unusually large number (10) of explosion craters, concentrated on the central and on the uphill side of the cone, expose alternating beds of stratified surge deposits and massive fall deposits.

  5. Maximum likelihood Bayesian averaging of airflow models in unsaturated fractured tuff using Occam and variance windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Casique, E.; Neuman, S.P.; Vesselinov, V.V.

    2010-01-01

    We use log permeability and porosity data obtained from single-hole pneumatic packer tests in six boreholes drilled into unsaturated fractured tuff near Superior, Arizona, to postulate, calibrate and compare five alternative variogram models (exponential, exponential with linear drift, power, trunca

  6. Variability of the physical properties of tuff at Yucca Mountain, NV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, P.J.; Martin, R.J. III [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Lateral and vertical variabilities in the bulk and mechanical properties of silicic volcanic tuff at the potential nuclear waste repository site in Yucca Mountain, NV have been evaluated. Laboratory measurements have been performed on tuff specimens recovered from boreholes located to support the design of the Exploratory Studies Facility/North Ramp. The data include dry and saturated bulk densities, average grain density, porosity, compressional and shear wave velocities, elastic moduli, and compressional and tensional fracture strengths. Data from eight boreholes aligned in a northwest-southeast direction have been collected under the required quality assurance program. Three boreholes have penetrated the potential repository horizon. The information collected provides for an accurate appraisal of the variability of rock properties in the vicinity of the boreholes. As expected, there is substantial variability in the bulk and mechanical properties of the tuff with depth (lithology). This is due to variations in gross characteristics of the tuffs (e.g., cooling units, mode of deposition, etc.), as well as smaller scale features (welding, porosity, and internal structures) that have developed as a result of depositional and post-depositional mechanisms. An evaluation of the lateral variability in bulk and mechanical properties is somewhat limited, at this time, due to a lack of borehole control to the north and south (parallel to the depositional flow direction). Initial observations indicate that there is minimal lateral variability within lithologic units. There are observable differences however, that can be related to variability in specific properties (e.g., porosity, and internal structures).

  7. Cerro Xalapaxco: An Unusual Tuff Cone with Multiple Explosion Craters, in Central Mexico (Puebla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, M. J.; Siebe, C.

    1994-01-01

    The Xalapaxco tuff cone is located on the northeast flank of La Malinche stratovolcano in central Mexico. An unusually large number (10) of explosion craters, concentrated on the central and on the uphill side of the cone, expose alternating beds of stratified surge deposits and massive fall deposits.

  8. Occurrence of rhyolytic tuffs at deep sea drilling project site 219 on the Laccadive Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Siddiquie, H.N.; Sukheswala, R.N.

    A study of thin sections from the lower and middle parts of Unit 5 (Paleocene) from Site 219 shows that these largely consist of acidic or rhyolitic tuffs. The overlying limestones in Unit 5 (Paleocene) and Unit 4 (Lower Eocene) also contain...

  9. Experimental study on the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff: Salt weathering and consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Russa, Mauro Francesco; Ruffolo, Silvestro Antonio; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Ricca, Michela; Belfiore, Cristina Maria; Pezzino, Antonino; Mirocle Crisci, Gino

    2016-04-01

    Salt crystallization is one of the major weathering agents in porous building materials due to the crystallization pressure exerted by salt crystals growing in confined pores. The consolidation of such degraded stone materials is a crucial issue in the field of Cultural Heritage restoration.
 This contribution deals with laboratory experimentation carried out on the Neapolitan Tuff, a pyroclastic rock largely used in the Campanian architecture. Several specimens, collected from a historical quarry nearby the city of Naples, were treated with two different consolidating products: a suspension of nanosilica in water (Syton X30®) and ethyl silicate (Estel 1000®) dispersed in organic solvent (TEOS). Then, in order to assess the effectiveness of consolidation treatments, both treated and untreated samples underwent accelerated degradation through salt crystallization tests. A multi-analytical approach, including mercury intrusion porosimetry, peeling tests and point load test, was employed to evaluate the correlation between the salt crystallization and the micro-structural features of the examined tuff specimens. In addition, the calculation of the crystallization pressures was also performed in order to make a correlation between the porous structure of the tuff and its susceptivity to salt crystallization. Obtained results show that both the tested products increase the resistance of tuff to salt crystallization, although inducing an increase of crystallization pressure. Ethyl silicate, however, shows a better behaviour in terms of superficial cohesion, even after several degradation cycles.

  10. Pyrite Genesis During Early Diagenesis in Yellow Sea and East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段伟民; 陈丽蓉

    1994-01-01

    The content and isotopic compositions of different sulphur species in pore-water and solid phases have been examined on five sediment cores taken from muddy sediment region in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea. Relationships among these data have been investigated with the combination of morphology of mineral pyrite and organic matter so as to role out the diagenetic behaviour of sulphur species at the early stage of diagenesis in modern marine sediment and the origin of pyrite formation.

  11. Preparation of pyrite-coated sand grains for research on roll-type uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Carol A.

    1977-01-01

    Ordinary quartz sand grains can be coated with pyrite for use in laboratory experiments on the genetic geochemistry of roll-type uranium deposits. The sand is first added to a ferric chloride solution. The slow addition of sodium hydroxide to the mixture gives the sand grains an iron oxide coating. This coating is then converted to pyrite by reaction with hydrogen sulfide, thus yielding a product suitable for experimental use.

  12. The Fe removal through mineralogical phase transformation of pyrite by physicochemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, BongJu; Cho, Kanghee; Jo, JiYu; Bak, GeonYeong; Choi, NagChoul; Park*, Cheonyoung

    2015-04-01

    Gold is often associated with sulfide minerals (arsenopyrite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, galena) as ''invisible'' gold that is thought to consist either of submicrometer metallic particles or to be bound to sulfur in metal sulfide lattice. Pyrite is one of the major minerals accumulating gold in most ores, although a solubility of Au in nonarsenian pyrite is minor, and increased concentrations of gold are associated with arsenic content and iron deficiency. The objective of this study was to investigate the Fe removal through mineralogical phase transformation of pyrite by physical treatment (high frequency) and chemical leaching (ammonia solvent). The high frequency treatment experiment for the pyrite showed that (1) the pyrite phase was transformed pyrrhotite and magnetite, (2) mass loss of the sample by volatilization of included sulfur(S) in pyrite. The treated pyrite by high frequency was observed rim structure from photomicrograph result. Fe removal experiments for were performed under various conditions of high frequency exposure (10~60min), grain size (+140 mesh~-325mesh), sulfuric acid concentration (0.5~3.0M), ammonia sulfate concentration (1.7~6.8M), hydrogen peroxide concentration (0.5~3.0M). Increasing the high frequency exposure produced a positive effect on Fe removal in arsenopyrite. The highest percentage Fe removal of 95.53% was obtained under the following conditions by ammonia solvent: grain size = -325mesh, sulfuric acid concentration = 2.0M, ammonia sulfate concentration = 5.1M, hydrogen peroxide concentration = 1.0M. This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment(MOE) as "Advanced Technology Program for Environmental Industry".

  13. Enhanced bioleaching on attachment of indigenous acidophilic bacteria to pyrite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, D. W.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, bioleaching has been widely applied on an industrial scale due to the advantages of low cost and environment friendliness. The direct contact mechanism of bioleaching assumes the action of a metal sulfide-attached cell oxidizing the mineral by an enzyme system with oxygen to sulfate and metal cations. Fundamental surface properties of sulfide particles and leaching-bacteria in bioleaching play the key role in the efficiency of this process. The aim of this work is to investigate of direct contact bioleaching mechanism on pyrite through attachment properties between indigenous acidophilic bacteria and pyrite surfaces. The bacteria were obtained from sulfur hot springs, Hatchobaru thermal electricity plant in Japan. And pyrite was collected from mine waste from Gwang-yang abandoned gold mines, Korea. In XRD analyses of the pyrite, x-ray diffracted d-value belong to pyrite was observed. The indigenous acidophilic bacteria grew well in a solution and over the course of incubation pH decreased and Eh increased. In relation to a bacterial growth-curve, the lag phase was hardly shown while the exponential phase was very fast. Bioleaching experiment result was showed that twenty days after the indigenous acidophilic bacteria were inoculated to a pyrite-leaching medium, the bacterial sample had a greater concentration of Fe and Zn than within the control sample. In SEM-EDS analyses, rod-shaped bacteria and round-shaped microbes were well attached to the surface of pyrite. The size of the rod-shaped bacteria ranged from 1.05~1.10 ? to 4.01~5.38 ?. Round-shaped microbes were more than 3.0 ? in diameter. Paired cells of rod-shaped bacteria were attached to the surface of pyrite linearly.

  14. Application of fuel cell for pyrite and heavy metal containing mining waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, H.; Ju, W. J.; Jho, E. H.; Nam, K.

    2015-12-01

    Once pyrite and heavy metal containing mining waste reacts with water and air it produces acid mine drainage (AMD) and leads to the other environmental problems such as contamination of surrounding soils. Pyrite is the major source of AMD and it can be controlled using a biological-electrochemical dissolution method. By enhancing the dissolution of pyrite using fuel cell technology, not only mining waste be beneficially utilized but also be treated at the same time by. As pyrite-containing mining waste is oxidized in the anode of the fuel cell, electrons and protons are generated, and electrons moves through an external load to cathode reducing oxygen to water while protons migrate to cathode through a proton exchange membrane. Iron-oxidizing bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, which can utilize Fe as an electron donor promotes pyrite dissolution and hence enhances electrochemical dissolution of pyrite from mining waste. In this study mining waste from a zinc mine in Korea containing 17 wt% pyrite and 9% As was utilized as a fuel for the fuel cell inoculated with A. ferrooxidans. Electrochemically dissolved As content and chemically dissolved As content was compared. With the initial pH of 3.5 at 23℃, the dissolved As concentration increased (from 4.0 to 13 mg/L after 20 d) in the fuel cell, while it kept decreased in the chemical reactor (from 12 to 0.43 mg/L after 20 d). The fuel cell produced 0.09 V of open circuit voltage with the maximum power density of 0.84 mW/m2. Dissolution of As from mining waste was enhanced through electrochemical reaction. Application of fuel cell technology is a novel treatment method for pyrite and heavy metals containing mining waste, and this method is beneficial for mining environment as well as local community of mining areas.

  15. Progressive oxidation of pyrite in five bituminous coal samples: An As XANES and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Allan; Huggins, Frank E.

    2007-01-01

    Naturally occurring pyrite commonly contains minor substituted metals and metalloids (As, Se, Hg, Cu, Ni, etc.) that can be released to the environment as a result of its weathering. Arsenic, often the most abundant minor constituent in pyrite, is a sensitive monitor of progressive pyrite oxidation in coal. To test the effect of pyrite composition and environmental parameters on the rate and extent of pyrite oxidation in coal, splits of five bituminous coal samples having differing amounts of pyrite and extents of As substitution in the pyrite, were exposed to a range of simulated weathering conditions over a period of 17 months. Samples investigated include a Springfield coal from Indiana (whole coal pyritic S = 2.13 wt.%; As in pyrite = detection limit (d.l.) to 0.06 wt.%), two Pittsburgh coal samples from West Virginia (pyritic S = 1.32–1.58 wt.%; As in pyrite = d.l. to 0.34 wt.%), and two samples from the Warrior Basin, Alabama (pyritic S = 0.26–0.27 wt.%; As in pyrite = d.l. to 2.72 wt.%). Samples were collected from active mine faces, and expected differences in the concentration of As in pyrite were confirmed by electron microprobe analysis. Experimental weathering conditions in test chambers were maintained as follows: (1) dry Ar atmosphere; (2) dry O2 atmosphere; (3) room atmosphere (relative humidity ∼20–60%); and (4) room atmosphere with samples wetted periodically with double-distilled water. Sample splits were removed after one month, nine months, and 17 months to monitor the extent of As and Fe oxidation using As X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, respectively. Arsenic XANES spectroscopy shows progressive oxidation of pyritic As to arsenate, with wetted samples showing the most rapid oxidation. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy also shows a much greater proportion of Fe3+ forms (jarosite, Fe3+ sulfate, FeOOH) for samples stored under wet conditions, but much less

  16. Spatial Mapping for Managing Oxidized Pyrite (FeS2 in South Sumatra Wetlands, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Edi Armanto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to analyze spatial mapping for managing oxidized pyrite (FeS2 in South Sumatra wetlands, Indonesia. The field observations are done by exploring several transect on land units. The field description refers to Soil Survey Staff (2014. Water and soil samples were taken from selected key areas for laboratory analysis. The vegetation data was collected by making sample plots (squares method placed on each vegetation type with plot sizes depending on the vegetation type, namely 10 x 10 m for secondary forests and 5 x 5 m for shrubs and grass. The observations of surface water level were done during the river receding with units of m above sea level (m asl. The research results showed that pyrite formation is largely determined by the availability of natural vegetation as Sulfur (S donors, climate and uncontrolled water balance and supporting fauna such as crabs and mud shrimp.  Climate and water balance as well as supporting faunas is the main supporting factors to accelerate the process of pyrite formation. Oxidized pyrite serves to increase soil acidity, becomes toxic to fish ponds and arable soils, plant growth and disturbing the water and soil nutrient balances. Oxidized pyrite is predominantly accelerated by the dynamics of river water and disturbed natural vegetation by human activities.  The pyrite oxidation management approach is divided into three main components of technologies, namely water management, land management and commodity management.

  17. Mineralogy, geochemistry and pyrite content of Bulgarian subbituminous coals, Pernik Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostova, I.; Petrov, O.; Kortenski, J. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Applied Mineralogy

    1996-08-01

    The mineralogy and geochemistry of Pernik subbituminous coals (coal bed A) and some genetic peculiarities related to the mineral formation were studied. The mineral matter of the coal consists chiefly of pyrite, kaolinite, siderite, quartz and calcite. Other minerals (dolomite, ankerite, plagioclase and some sulphates) are present in minor amounts, some occurring as accessory single crystals. Pyrite is them main mineral in these coals and exhibits a large array of textures and morphology. Isolated and clustered euhedral, bacterial and inorganic framboidal, cluster-like, homogeneous and microconcretional massive, infilling and replacing anhedral, and cleat-filling and fracture-filling infiltrational pyrite types were observed. Four stages of mineralization were distinguished: pyrite-kaolinite, pyrite, pyrte-siderite and sulphate stages. The amount of pyrite present in two sections of coal bed A was determined by quantitative powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The concentrations of 37 trace elements were determined. As, Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Pb, V, Ti, Mo Rb, Cr and Mn are typomorphic for this coal. On the basis of their relation to organic or inorganic matter, four groups of trace elements were subdivided; and on the basis of cluster analysis four associations were differentiated. 19 refs., 31 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Bio-oxidation of pyrite, chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the bio-oxidation processes by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans of pyrite, chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite. Our experimental results show distinctive bio-oxidation characteristics for the three sulfide minerals. In the presence of A. ferrooxidans, the sulfide oxidation rates generally decrease in the order of pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite and pyrite. The pH during bio-oxidation of pyrite tends to decrease as a whole, whereas a rise-fall pattern was recorded for both chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite in their pH variations. No deposition was observed during the bio-oxidation of pyrite, suggesting a possible link to lower pH value in the process. However, large amounts of jarosite and element sulfur were determined in the bio-oxidation processes of chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite. A. ferrooxidans individuals were found directly as attachments to erosion pits on the smooth surface of pyrite. The erosion pits are similar to the bacterium in shape and length, and thus are probably products of dissolution of organic acid secreted by the cells on the mineral surface. More complicatedly, biofilm exists on the surfaces of chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite. This type of structured community of A. ferrooxidans is enclosed in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and covered with the deposition generated in the bio-oxidation processes of chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite. Different bio-oxidation processes of pyrite, chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite may be linked mainly to characteristics of individual minerals and the pH in the reaction solution of the bio-oxidation system.

  19. A kinetic assessment of substantial oxidation by sulfolobus acidocaldarius in pyrite dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitaya, V.B.; Koizumi, J.; Toda, K. (King Mongkuts Institute of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    The relative contributions of biological and chemical reactions to the total rate of pyrite oxidation in the presence of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were studied on the basis of experimental work coupled with mathematical modeling. Kinetic constants for the individual reactions were determined in independent experiments. The specific growth rate of cells on the pyrite surface, which is the only unknown parameter, was assumed to be [mu](s) 0.1 h[sup -1] and justified by the agreement of the simulated results of a proposed model and the experimental results. The model includes: reversible adsorption, biological dissolution of pyrite by the adsorbed cells, chemical dissolution of pyrite accompanied by the reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions, biochemical oxidation of ferrous ions to ferric ions by free cells, and change of the surface area of pyrite particles. It is suggested that the contributions of direct (biological) and indirect (chemical) reaction to the total rate of pyrite oxidation were in a ratio of 2:1.

  20. Degradation of off-gas toluene in continuous pyrite Fenton system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyunghoon; Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Woojin

    2014-09-15

    Degradation of off-gas toluene from a toluene reservoir and a soil vapor extraction (SVE) process was investigated in a continuous pyrite Fenton system. The removal of off-gas toluene from the toluene reservoir was >95% by 8h in the pyrite Fenton system, while it was ∼97 % by 3h in classic Fenton system and then rapidly decreased to initial level by 8h. Continuous consumption of low Fe(II) concentration dissolved from pyrite surface (0.05-0.11 mM) was observed in the pyrite Fenton system, which can lead to the effective and successful removal of the gas-phase toluene due to stable production of OH radical (OH). Inhibitor and spectroscopic test results showed that OH was a dominant radical that degraded gas-phase toluene during the reaction. Off-gas toluene from the SVE process was removed by 96% in the pyrite Fenton system, and remnant toluene from rebounding effect was treated by 99%. Main transformation products from toluene oxidation were benzoic acid (31.4%) and CO2 (38.8%) at 4h, while traces of benzyl alcohol (1.3%) and benzaldehyde (0.7%) were observed. Maximum operation time of continuous pyrite Fenton system was estimated to be 56-61 d and its optimal operation time achieving emission standard was 28.9 d. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Research on Genesis of Pyrite near the Permian-Triassic Boundary in Meishan, Zhejiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yao-fa; TANG Yue-gang; CHOU Chen-lin

    2006-01-01

    The content and crystal forms of pyrite and sulfur isotope composition of pyrite sulfur as well as its vertical distribution near the Permian-Triassic (P/T) boundary in the Meishan section, Changxing county, Zhejiang province, China were studied using geological, petrological, mineralogical and geochemical methods (techniques). The result showed that the genesis of abundant pyrites in bed 24e2 at the uppermost part of the Changxing Formation in the Meishan section may be related to volcanic activity. In bed 24e2 of the Meishan section, pyrite has its highest content of 1.84% and the sulfur isotope composition has the highest δ34S value at +2.2‰ which is very similar to that of the average value of volcanic gas. There are some volcanic products such as β-quartz, siliceous cylinders and siliceous spherules which coexisted with pyrites in beds 24e2 and 24f. It can be concluded that a large quantity of volcanic ash fell into the South China Sea and was incorporated into marine sediments during the formation of limestone at the uppermost part of the Changxing Formation. The volcanic eruption with massive amounts of H2S and SO2 gas at the end of the Permian period resulted in the enrichment of H2S in the South China Sea areas. The reaction of H2S with reactive iron minerals formed the mass of abundant pyrites.

  2. Biogeochemistry of pyrite and iron sulfide oxidation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippers, A.; Jørgensen, BB

    2002-01-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) and iron monosulfide (FeS) play a central role in the sulfur and iron cycles of marine sediments, They may be buried in the sediment or oxidized by O-2 after transport by bioturbation to the sediment surface. FeS2 and FeS may also be oxidized within the anoxic sediment in which NO3......-, Fe(III) oxides, or MnO2 are available as potential electron acceptors. In chemical experiments, FeS2 and FeS were oxidized by MnO2 but not with NO3- or amorphous Fe(III) oxide (Schippers and Jørgensen, 2001). Here we also show that in experiments with anoxic sediment slurries, a dissolution of tracer......-marked (FeS2)-Fe-55 occurred with MnO2 but not with NO3- or amorphous Fe(III) oxide as electron acceptor. To study a thermodynamically possible anaerobic microbial FeS, and FeS oxidation with NO3- or amorphous Fe(III) oxide as electron acceptor, more than 300 assays were inoculated with material from several...

  3. In-situ tuff water migration/heater experiment: experimental plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, J.K.

    1980-08-01

    Tuffs on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are currently under investigation as a potential isolation medium for heat-producing nuclear wastes. The National Academy of Sciences has concurred in our identification of the potentially large water content ({le}40 vol %) of tuffs as one of the important issues affecting their suitability for a repository. This Experimental Plan describes an in-situ experiment intended as an initial assessment of water generation/migration in response to a thermal input. The experiment will be conducted in the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff in Tunnel U12g (G-Tunnel) located in the north-central region of the NTS. While the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff is not a potential repository medium, it has physical, thermal, and mechanical properties very similar to those tuffs currently under consideration and is accessible at depth (400 m below the surface) in an existing facility. Other goals of the experiment are to support computer-code and instrumentation development, and to measure in-situ thermal properties. The experimental array consists of a central electrical heater, 1.2 m long x 10.2 cm diameter, surrounded by three holes for measuring water-migration behavior, two holes for measuring temperature profiles, one hole for measuring thermally induced stress in the rock, and one hole perpendicular to the heater to measure displacement with a laser. This Experimental Plan describes the experimental objectives, the technical issues, the site, the experimental array, thermal and thermomechanical modeling results, the instrumentation, the data-acquisition system, posttest characterization, and the organizational details.

  4. Heulandite and mordenite-rich tuffs from Greece: a potential source for pozzolanic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsopoulos, K. P.; Dunham, A. C.

    1996-09-01

    The microcystalline mass of the Pliocene tuffs of Santorini and Polyegos islands, in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc, Greece, is very rich in zeolite minerals, more specifically heulandite type 3, i.e. clinoptilolite, and mordenite. In Santorini, clinoptilolite is the dominant authigenic phase and it was formed in a semi-closed system, by the activity of interstitial water within the volcaniclastic sequence. In Polyegos, mordenite dominates and it was formed by hydrothermal alteration of pyroclastics. Experiments described in this work show that the presence of the zeolite minerals has created materials with excellent pozzolanic properties. Tuffs from the two areas were calcined at 760 °C and for 12 h and then mixed with lime in a constant ratio of 1 part lime to 3 parts calcined tuff. As a result, the free lime content of the lime-calcined tuff mixtures was reduced from 25% to 2.05% (Santorini) and 1.31% (Polyegos). Compressive strength tests were carried out on concrete cubes made with 100% Portland cement as the cementitious agent, to be used as reference cubes, and concrete cubes in which the Portland cement has been replaced in 4% and 7% proportions by the calcined tuff as pozzolans. The free lime estimation and the compressive strength tests were all carried out in accordance with the British Standards Institution (BS 4550 and BS 1881) guidelines. Early stage measurements of the compressive strength showed that pozzolan-bearing concrete cubes reached values as high as 140% of the reference cubes. The pozzolan-bearing concrete cubes maintained this superior strength throughout the entire one year period of the experiments. After 360 days, they finally maintained 107% of the compressive strength of the reference cubes.

  5. Evenly-spaced columns in the Bishop Tuff as relicts of hydrothermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Breen, S. J.; Hernandez, A.; Self, S.; Manga, M.

    2015-12-01

    A few square km of the Bishop Tuff in eastern California, USA have evenly spaced erosional columns. These columns are more resistant to erosion due to the precipitation of the low-temperature zeolite (120-200 ºC), mordenite, which is not found in the surrounding tuff. Similar features observed in the Bandelier Tuff were hypothesized to form when cold water from above infiltrated into the still-hot tuff interior. This water would become gravitationally unstable and produced convection with steam upwellings and liquid water downwellings. These downwellings became cemented with mordenite while the upwellings were too dry for chemical reactions. We use two methods to quantitatively assess this hypothesis. First, scaling that ignores the effects of latent heat and mineral precipitation suggests the Rayleigh number (Ra, a measure of convective vigor) for this system is ~103 well above the critical Ra of 4π2. Second, to account for the effect of multiphase flow and latent heat, we use two-dimensional numerical models in the finite difference code HYDROTHERM. We find that the geometry of flow is consistent with field observations and confirm that geometry is sensitive to permeability and topography. These tests suggest a few things about low-pressure hydrothermal systems. 1) The geometry of at least some convection appears to be broadly captured by linear stability theory that ignores reactive transport, heterogeneity of host rock, and the effects of latent heat. 2) Topographic flow sets the wavelength of convection meaning that these columns formed somewhere without topography—probably a lake. Finally, these observations imply a wet paleoclimate in the Eastern Sierra namely that, in the aftermath of the Long Valley eruption, either rain or snow was able to pool in the caldera before the tuff cooled on the order of a hundred years after the eruption.

  6. The Tala Tuff, La Primavera caldera Mexico. Pre-eruptive conditions and magma processes before eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Ceballos, G.

    2015-12-01

    La Primavera caldera, Jalisco Mexico, is a Pleistocenic volcanic structure formed by dome complexes and multiple pyroclastic flows and fall deposits. It is located at the intersection of the Chapala, Colima, and Tepic grabens in western Mexico. The first volcanic activity associated to La Primavera started ~0.1 Ma with the emission of pre-caldera lavas. The caldera collapse occurred 95 ka and is associated to the eruption of ~20 km3of pumice flows known as the Tala tuff (Mahood 1980). The border of the caldera was replaced by a series of domes dated in 75-30 ky, which partially filled the inner depression of the caldera with pyroclastic flows and falls. For more than a decade the Federal Commission of Electricity in Mexico (CFE) has prospected and evaluated the geothermal potential of the Cerritos Colorados project at La Primavera caldera. In order to better understand the plumbing system that tapped the Tala tuff and to investigate its relation with the potential geothermal field at La Primavera we performed a series of hydrothermal experiments and studied melt inclusions hosted in quartz phenocrysts by Fourier Infra red stectroscopy (FTIR). Although some post caldera products at La Primavera contain fayalite and quartz (suggesting QFM conditions) the Tala tuff does not contain fayalite and we ran experiments under NNO conditions. The absence of titanomagnetite does not allowed us to calculate pre-eruptive temperature. However, the stability of quartz and plagioclase, which are natural phases, suggest that temperature should be less than 750 °C at a pressure of 200 MPa. The analyses of H2O and CO2 dissolved in melt inclusions yielded concentrations of 2-5 wt.% and 50-100 ppm respectively. This data confirm that the pre-eruptive pressure of the Tala tuff is ~200 MPa and in addition to major elements compositions suggest that the Tala tuff is either, compositionally zoned or mixed with other magma just prior to eruption.

  7. In-situ tuff water migration/heater experiment: experimental plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, J.K.

    1980-08-01

    Tuffs on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are currently under investigation as a potential isolation medium for heat-producing nuclear wastes. The National Academy of Sciences has concurred in our identification of the potentially large water content ({le}40 vol %) of tuffs as one of the important issues affecting their suitability for a repository. This Experimental Plan describes an in-situ experiment intended as an initial assessment of water generation/migration in response to a thermal input. The experiment will be conducted in the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff in Tunnel U12g (G-Tunnel) located in the north-central region of the NTS. While the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff is not a potential repository medium, it has physical, thermal, and mechanical properties very similar to those tuffs currently under consideration and is accessible at depth (400 m below the surface) in an existing facility. Other goals of the experiment are to support computer-code and instrumentation development, and to measure in-situ thermal properties. The experimental array consists of a central electrical heater, 1.2 m long x 10.2 cm diameter, surrounded by three holes for measuring water-migration behavior, two holes for measuring temperature profiles, one hole for measuring thermally induced stress in the rock, and one hole perpendicular to the heater to measure displacement with a laser. This Experimental Plan describes the experimental objectives, the technical issues, the site, the experimental array, thermal and thermomechanical modeling results, the instrumentation, the data-acquisition system, posttest characterization, and the organizational details.

  8. Early diagenetic pyrite morphology in a mudstone-dominated succession: the Lower Jurassic Cleveland Ironstone Formation, eastern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K. G.; Macquaker, J. H. S.

    2000-03-01

    Diagenetic pyrite in the mudstones and ironstones of the Lower Jurassic Cleveland Ironstone Formation of eastern England exhibits two distinct morphologies: framboidal pyrite, commonly associated with organic matter, and euhedral pyrite, associated with detrital clay pellets. These two morphologies are mutually exclusive in occurrence. Framboidal pyrite is present in clay-rich mudstones, ooidal ironstones, apatite-rich units and some silt-rich mudstones. Euhedral pyrite is present in silt-rich and sand-rich mudstones. δ34S isotopic analysis of six samples of pyrite suggests that both types of pyrite morphology precipitated during early diagenesis from porewaters with open access to overlying sea-water, although both probably acted as sites for continued pyrite precipitation during burial. It is proposed that framboidal pyrite precipitated from iron-dominated porewaters at sites of sulfide supply (i.e. in the region of organic matter as a result of bacterial sulfate reduction) where, locally, sulfide production rates were high enough for porewaters to reach supersaturation with respect to FeS. Euhedral pyrite also precipitated from iron-dominated porewaters, but sulfide production rates from organic matter was such that FeS saturation was not reached at the sites of sulfide production. Instead, euhedral pyrite was precipitated directly from porewater when FeS2 saturation was reached. The control over pyrite morphology was probably the amount and reactivity of the organic matter within the deposited sediments. The sand-rich mudstones contained less reactive organic matter due to clastic dilution and deposition in shallower environments with O2-rich bottom waters. The ironstones and apatite-rich units were deposited under very low sedimentation rates, and as a result organic matter contents were very low and iron reduction dominated early diagenesis, which inhibited sulfate-reduction. The presence of minor framboidal pyrite within these units, however, suggests that

  9. Diatreme evolution during the phreatomagmatic eruption of the Songaksan tuff ring, Jeju Island, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, S. Y.; Kim, G. B.; Jeong, J. O.; Sohn, Y. K.

    2017-03-01

    The Songaksan tuff ring, Jeju Island, Korea, which erupted ca. 3.7 ka BP in a coastal setting, provides an unusual opportunity to study the processes of phreatomagmatic eruption and the formation of a diatreme because of the exceptionally well-preserved ejecta beds and well-known subsurface geology. The tuff sequence can be divided into four units (A to D), which have distinctly different accidental componentry (quartz-rich vs. quartz-poor), grain surface features (abraded and ash-coated vs. unabraded and uncoated), and chemical compositions of juvenile particles. The basal tephra bed of unit A, which probably erupted after the removal of the relatively hard shallow-level (120 m deep) accidental grains, suggesting that the early erupted tephra had not yet experienced recycling and pre-eruption mixing in the diatreme. On the other hand, the overlying tephra beds of units A, B, and D contain an abundance of abraded and ash-coated juvenile/accidental grains, suggesting that the tephra comprised significant proportions of "recycled" or "premixed" materials from previous eruptions or subsurface explosions, which participated in the explosion-driven mixing in the diatreme before eventual ejection from the diatreme. Unit C is unusual in that it comprises extremely rare accidental grains and ash-coated juvenile/accidental grains. We interpret that the supply of solid materials, either accidental or juvenile, to the diatreme was greatly reduced because of temporary stabilization of the diatreme and the reduction in magma flux to the diatreme. The diatreme is therefore envisaged to have been filled with a water-saturated slurry, in which particle abrasion and adhesion were inhibited. We also infer that the diatreme fill was temporarily removed by a powerful explosion before eruption of unit C on the basis of the near absence of the tephra grains from earlier eruptions throughout the tephra beds of unit C. The ratio of tachylite to sideromelane grains generally increases up

  10. DFT study on the galvanic interaction between pyrite (100) and galena (100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Baolin; Li, Yuqiong; Chen, Jianhua; Zhao, Cuihua; Chen, Ye

    2016-03-01

    The galvanic interaction between pyrite and galena surface has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) method. The calculated results show that galvanic interactions between pyrite and galena surface are decreased with the increase of contact distance. The galvanic interactions still occurs even the distance larger than the sum of two atoms radius (≈2.8 Å), and the limit distance of galvanic interaction between galena and pyrite surface is about 10 Å, which is consistent with the quantum tunneling effect. Through Mulliken charge population calculation, it is found that electrons transfer from galena to pyrite. For galena surface, Pb 6s and 6p states lose electrons and S 3p state loses a small amount of electrons, which causes the electron loss of galena. For pyrite surface, Fe 4p state obtains large numbers of electrons, resulting in the decrease of positive charge of Fe atom. However, the 3p state of S atom loses a small numbers of electrons. The reactivity of mineral surface has also been studied by calculating the frontier orbitals of minerals. Results suggest that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) coefficients of galena are increased whereas those of pyrite are decreased with the enhancing galvanic interaction, indicating that the oxidation of galena surface would be enhanced due to the galvanic interaction. The Fukui indices and dual descriptor values of surface atoms suggest that the nucleophilicity of the galena surface increases, meanwhile, the electrophilicity of pyrite surface increases with the decrease of the contact distance. In addition, the density of states (DOS) of atoms results show that the activity of electrons in Pb 6s and 6p orbitals enhances while the activity of electrons in Fe 3d orbitals weaken due to the galvanic contact between minerals.

  11. Action time effect of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tichang Sun

    2004-01-01

    Two sample groups of bulk concentrates consisting mainly of pyrite and chalcopyrite from Daye and Chenghchao Mines in Hubei Province of China were used to investigate the effect of the action time of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite. The experimental results conducted with different samples and collectors showed that the action time between lime and pyrite markedly influences the depressive ability of lime. The depressive ability of lime increased with the action time increasing. It was also proved that the depressive results obtained at a large lime dosage after a shorter action time are similar to those obtained at a small lime dosage after a longer action time. The increase of depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because that there are different mechanisms in different action time. The composition on the surface of pyrite acted for different time with lime was studied by using ESCA (Electron Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis). The results showed that iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate formed on the pyrite surface at the presence of lime in the pulp but the amounts of iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate were different at different action time. At the beginning action time the compound formed on the pyrite surface was mainly calcium sulphate and almost no iron hydroxide formed; but with the action time increasing, iron hydroxide formed. The longer the action time, the more iron hydroxide and the less calcium sulphate formed. It was considered that the stronger depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because more iron hydroxide forms on the pyrite surface.

  12. Studies of the mobility of uranium and thorium in Nevada Test Site tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S.; Smith, A.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Hydro-geochemical processes must be understood if the movement of radionuclides away from a breached radioactive waste canister is to be modeled and predicted. In this respect, occurrences of uranium and thorium in hydrothermal systems are under investigation in tuff and in rhyolitic tuff that was heated to simulate the effects of introduction of radioactive waste. In these studies, high-resolution gamma spectrometry and fission-track radiography are coupled with observations of alteration mineralogy and thermal history to deduce the evidence of, or potential for movement of, U and Th in response to the thermal environment. Observations to date suggest that U was mobile in the vicinity of the heater but that localized reducing environments provided by Fe-Ti-Mn-oxide minerals concentrated U and thus attenuated its migration.

  13. Diffusion of sodium, potassium, calcium, manganese, and radon in tuff and clinoptilolite under leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikii, N. P.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Lyashko, Yu. V.; Medvedev, D. V.; Medvedeva, E. P.; Uvarov, V. L.; Achkasov, K. V.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear physics methods are used to determine the diffusion coefficients of Na, Ca, Mn, K, and 222Rn in clinoptilolite (Sokirnitsa occurrence, Ukraine) and in natural tuff (Yucca Mountain, Nevada, United States) and in tuff irradiated by γ-quanta ( E max = 23 MeV) to a dose of 107 Gy at a leaching temperature of 37°C. The diffusion coefficients of sodium and potassium in clinoptilolite are found to differ considerably: 4 × 10-17 and 2 × 10-20 m2/s, respectively. This indicates the influence of aquacomplexes on the cation transfer. The diffusion coefficient of radon in these materials is determined: in clinoptilolite it equals 2.5 × 10-12 m2/s.

  14. Sorption and desorption of remazol yellow by a Fe-zeolitic tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solache R, M. J. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Villalva C, R.; Diaz N, M. C., E-mail: marcos.solache@inin.gob.m [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Division de Estudios del Posgrado, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The adsorption of remazol yellow from aqueous solution was evaluated using a Fe-zeolitic tuff. The adsorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Sorption kinetic and isotherms were determined and the adsorption behavior was analyzed. Kinetic pseudo-second order and Langmuir-Freundlich models were successfully applied to the experimental results, indicating chemisorption on a heterogeneous material. The regeneration of the material was best accomplished by using a H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution. The sorption capacity of the Fe-zeolitic tuff increased when the saturated samples were treated with a H{sub 2O2} or FeCl{sub 3} solution. (Author)

  15. Evaluating the paleomagnetic potential of single zircon crystals using the Bishop Tuff

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Roger R; Lima, Eduardo A; Kehayias, Pauli; Araujo, Jefferson F D F; Glenn, David R; Gelb, Jeff; Einsle, Joshua F; Bauer, Ann M; Harrison, Richard J; Ali, Guleed A H; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Zircon crystals offer a unique combination of suitability for high-precision radiometric dating and high resistance to alteration. Paleomagnetic experiments on ancient zircons may potentially constrain the earliest geodynamo, which holds broad implications for the early Earth interior and atmosphere. However, the ability of zircons to record accurately the geomagnetic field has not been fully demonstrated. Here we conduct thermal and room temperature alternating field (AF) paleointensity experiments on 767.1 thousand year old (ka) zircons from the Bishop Tuff, California. The rapid emplacement of these zircons in a well-characterized magnetic field provides a high-fidelity test of the zircons intrinsic paleomagnetic recording accuracy. Successful dual heating experiments on nine zircons measured using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope yield a mean paleointensity of 46.2 +/- 18.8 microtesla (1sigma), which agrees closely with high-precision results from Bishop Tuff whole rock (43...

  16. An astronomical age for the Bishop Tuff and concordance with radioisotopic dates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivera, Tiffany; Zeeden, Christian; Storey, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Bishop Tuff forms a key stratigraphic horizon for synchronization of Quaternary sedimentary records in North America. The unit stratigraphically overlies the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic polarity reversal by several thousand years; high-precision dating of this tuff may be valuable for regional...... and global correlation of records. The Quaternary time scale is anchored by 40Ar/39Ar ages on lava flows and ash layers where available, with stage boundaries and geomagnetic reversals including astronomically tuned records. However, astronomical dating has not yet validated the high-precision 238U/206Pb...... ages, including new single crystal 40Ar/39Ar sanidine fusion analyses presented here, which demonstrates that concordance through multiple dating techniques is achievable within the Quaternary...

  17. Magnetic links among lava flows, tuffs and the underground plumbing system in a monogenetic volcano, derived from magnetics and paleomagnetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Trigo-Huesca, Alfonso; Pérez-Cruz, Ligia

    2012-12-01

    A combined study using magnetics and paleomagnetism of the Toluquilla monogenetic volcano and associated lavas and tuffs from Valsequillo basin in Central Mexico provides evidence on a 'magnetic' link between the lavas, ash tuffs and the underground volcanic conduit system. Paleomagnetic analyses show that the lava and ash tuff carry reverse polarity magnetizations, which correlate with the inversely polarized dipolar magnetic anomaly over the volcano. The magnetizations in the lava and tuff show similar southward declinations and upward inclinations, supporting petrological inferences that the tuff was emplaced while still hot and indicating a temporal correlation for lava and tuff emplacement. Modeling of the dipolar anomaly gives a reverse polarity source magnetization associated with a vertical prismatic body with southward declination and upward inclination, which correlates with the reverse polarity magnetizations in the lava and tuff. The study documents a direct correlation of the paleomagnetic records with the underground magmatic conduit system of the monogenetic volcano. Time scale for cooling of the volcanic plumbing system involves a longer period than the one for the tuff and lava, suggesting that magnetization for the source of dipolar anomaly may represent a long time average as compared to the spot readings in the lava and tuff. The reverse polarity magnetizations in lava and tuff and in the underground source body for the magnetic anomaly are interpreted in terms of eruptive activity of Toluquilla volcano at about 1.3 Ma during the Matuyama reverse polarity C1r.2r chron.

  18. Dynamics of electrodeposition of tetraethylthioram disulphide(TETD) on pyrite surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The electrode process of pyrite in diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) solution pH 11.4 was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry, potentiostatic and ehronopotentiometry. Tetraethylthioram disulphide (TETD) was electrodeposited on pyrite electrode surface as the electrode potential is higher than 0.2 V. The relationship of the current density caused by diffusion and reaction time can be ascertained as i = 1/(9.08×10-5 + 4.77 × 10-3 t0.5 ), and the diffusion coefficient of DDTC on pyrite surface is about 3.72×10-6 cm2/s.At pH 11.4, the thickness of TETD adsorbed on pyrite surface is about 1.63 molecule layer. The electrochemical dynamics equation of the reduction of TETD on pyrite surface is given as η = 0.116- 0.0641og[1-(t/τ)0.5]. The kinetic parameters were determined as follows: the exchange current density (io) is 3.08μA/cm2; the transmission coefficient(α) is 0.462.

  19. Pyrite Oxidation in Leaching Process of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals from Uranium Mill Tailings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Pyrite is a sensitive mineral in the geological environment, and its oxidation produces an important geochemical and environmental effect on the control of the redox and pH conditions. Column experiment results were used for modeling the geochemical processes in uranium mill tailings under lcaching conditions. Oxidation of pyrite dominates the control of the tailings leaching process. The experimental and modeling results show that the leachate chemistry changes substantially with the decrease in pyrite consumption. In the initial stage of the leaching experiment, the pyrite is consumed several hundred times greater than that in the later stages, for much more oxygen is present in the tailings in the initial stage. As the experiment continues, the tailings is gradually saturated with water and the oxygen concentration greatly decreases and so does pyrite consumption. The experimental and modeling results are useful for the design of mill tailing decommissioning., oxidation process and transport of radioactive nuclides and heavy metals can be constrained by controlling the oxygen concentration of tailings and the infiltration of meteoric water.

  20. Trace element mapping of pyrite from Archean gold deposits – A comparison between PIXE and EPMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agangi, A., E-mail: aagangi@uj.ac.za [University of Johannesburg, Department of Geology, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Przybyłowicz, W., E-mail: przybylowicz@tlabs.ac.za [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics & Applied Computer Science, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Hofmann, A., E-mail: ahofmann@uj.ac.za [University of Johannesburg, Department of Geology, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2015-04-01

    Chemical zoning of pyrites can record the evolution of mineralising fluids at widely varying P–T conditions ranging from diagenesis to medium-grade metamorphism. If preserved, zoning can reveal growth textures, brecciation and veining, resorption and recrystallisation events, thus shedding light on the processes that contributed to ore formation. Chemical zoning of sulfides is invisible in optical microscopy, but can be studied by chemical etching, high-contrast back-scattering electron images, and elemental imaging. In this study we compared micro-PIXE and WDS-EPMA elemental maps on the chemically zoned pyrites in mineralised vein-bearing samples from the Sheba and Fairview gold mines in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. Elemental images show complex distribution of trace elements, suggesting multiple events of pyrite crystallisation and gold deposition. EPMA maps show fine-scale variations reflecting growth and recrystallisation textures marked, in particular, by variations of As, Ni, and Co. In PIXE maps, gold occurs both as finely-distributed and discrete inclusions, suggesting incorporation in the pyrite structure as solid solution, and deposition as electrum inclusions, respectively. Micro-PIXE and EPMA provide complementary information, forming together a powerful tool to obtain information on chemical zoning of pyrites in ore deposits.

  1. A demonstration of an affinity between pyrite and organic matter in a hydrothermal setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Nils G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the key-principles of the iron-sulphur world theory is to bring organic molecules close enough to interact with each other, using the surface of pyrite as a substrate in a hydrothermal setting. The present paper explores the relationship of pyrite and organic matter in a hydrothermal setting from the geological record; in hydrothermal calcite veins from Carboniferous limestones in central Ireland. Here, the organic matter is accumulated as coatings around, and through, pyrite grains. Most of the pyrite grains are euhedral-subhedral crystals, ranging in size from ca 0.1-0.5 mm in diameter, and they are scattered throughout the matrix of the vein calcite. The organic matter was deposited from a hydrothermal fluid at a temperature of at least 200°C, and gives a Raman signature of disordered carbon. This study points to an example from a hydrothermal setting in the geological record, demonstrating that pyrite can have a high potential for the concentration and accumulation of organic materials.

  2. Pyrite Formation in Organic-rich Clay, Calcitic and Coal-Forming Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gordana DEVI(C); Petar PFENDT; Branimir JOVAN(C)I(C)EVI(C); Zoran POPOVIC

    2006-01-01

    The early diagenetic characteristics of pyrite formation processes in a Miocene freshwater sequence of mixed sediments (coal fragments in clays, sandstones or shales) alternating with continuous brown coal layers was investigated. Based on abundant minerals, the following main sedimentary environments were distinguished: the illite-montmorillonitic (I-M), calcitic (Ct) and coal-forming environment (CL). For these hydrogeochemically differing environments the effects of limiting factors on the pyrite formation process (availability of sulphate and Fe, amount of organic matter and participation of organic sulphur) were assessed by correlation analysis. Significant differences in the effects of these limiting factors in the particular environments were observed. These differences were explained taking in account the different oxidative activity, Fe-complex and surface complex forming properties of hnmic substances in dependence of pH of environment and the abundance of sorptionally active clay minerals. In environments having a relatively low pH and containing clay minerals (I-Mand CL-environments) the oxidative activity of humic substances (Hs) on pyrite precursors was greatly prevented however pyrite formation depended on reactive Fe availability as the consequence of complex formation. On the contrary, in environments with a relatively high pH, as it was the calcitic,the oxidative activity of Hs was greatly enhanced, thus oxidizing the sulfur precursors of pyrite. The oxidation degree of organic matter was probably also a consequence of the differing activity of the humic electron-acceptors.

  3. New method for the simultaneous determination of pyrite content and proximate analysis in coal and lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aylmer, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    The new method combines thermogravimetry and thermomagnetometry and utilizes inert, oxidizing, and reducing gases. Results by the new technique are compared to the ASTM method, one set obtained by the author on a Fisher Coal Analyzer and one set by the Coal Research Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University. Comparison of thermo-magneto-gravimetric-analysis with the ASTM method indicates good agreement and comparable accuracy. These studies show that the thermo-magneto-gravimetric-analysis are: 1) ease of determination of both proximate analysis and pyrite, which permits use of unskilled technicians; 2) widespread availability of the apparatus; 3) cost effectiveness due to use of unskilled operators; 4) automation, presently available for proximate analysis on some commercial instruments and is easily accomplished for pyrite analysis, as well; 5) advantage over pyrite analysis by the ASTM method in two situations: first, when pyrite is totally surrounded by acid-insoluble organic-material and secondly where significant amounts of pyrite have been oxidized to FeSO/sub 4/; and 6) a permanent record of the measurements, which are continuous, is made in contrast to the ASTM method which records only initial and final conditions.

  4. [Limestone and pyrite-limestone constructed wetlands for treating river water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Rui-hua; Li, Jie; Hu, Jun-song; Sun, Qian-qian

    2013-09-01

    Polluted river water was treated with limestone and pyrite-limestone subsurface horizontal constructed wetlands. The aims were to know the performance of two wetlands on removal of common pollutants, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, and analyze the actions of these minerals. The relationship between hydraulic retention time and purification performance of two constructed wetlands was studied. The optimal hydraulic retention time for pollutant removal was about 3 d, The average removal efficiency of COD, TN and TP were 51%, 70% and 95%, respectively. With same influent and hydraulic loading, the average removal efficiency of COD, NH4+ -N, TN and TP were 53.93%, 82.13%, 66%, 50.9%, and 51.66%, 77.43%, 72.06%, 97.35% for limestone and pyrite-limestone constructed wetlands, respectively. There were few differences between limestone and pyrite-limestone wetlands on COD removal, but the nitrogen and phosphorus removal of pyrite-limestone constructed wetland was higher than that of limestone constructed wetland. The phosphorus removal of pyrite-limestone wetland was more efficiency and stable, not affected by temperature.

  5. Zeolitic volcanic tuffs from Macicas (Cluj County, natural raw materials used for NH4+ removal from wastewaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horea Bedelean

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic tuffs out cropping in Măcicaş area (Cluj County have been investigated and tested for their ammonium removal capacity. The zeolitic volcanic tuffs from Măcicaş are mainly represented by vitric and vitric crystal tuffs. In this region, significant amounts of volcanic glass in the pyroclastic sequence have been replaced by zeolites (between 50-80 %. The main zeolite species identified in volcanic tuffs from Măcicaş is clinoptilolite and subordinately mordenite. The zeolitic tuff samples considered in zeolitic sodium form (labeled M1-Na and M2-Na are tested in ammonium removal experiments. The ammonium ions were completely removed from 0.0716g/dm3 NH4+ solution onto 10g of zeolitic material in static regime. In dynamic regime, the ammonium ions were completely removed after 250 ml and 500 ml solution passed on M1-Na and M2-Na sample respectively. Also the zeolite exhaustion takes place after more than 1500 ml solution is processed in both cases. The ionic exchange properties suggest that the zeolitic tuff of the Măcicaş region can be used as a final stage (following the biological process in wastewater treatment plants in order to assure compliance with environmental standards.

  6. Alteration history of Mount Epomeo Green Tuff and a related polymictic breccia, Ischia Island, Italy: evidence for debris avalanche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaner, S.; Demosthenous, C.; Pozzuoli, A.; Rolandi, G.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents mineralogical, chemical, and textural data for the Mount Epomeo Green Tuff and an associated polymictic breccia on Ischia Island, Italy with the purpose of defining the alteration history of the two units and the emplacement origin of the polymictic breccia. Our results indicate that the Green Tuff trachytic ignimbrite experienced three alteration events that produced the following mineral assemblages: (1) phillipsite, randomly interstratified (R0) illite/smectite (I/S), Fe-illite, and smectite (in situ Green Tuff); (2) chabazite, phillipsite, R0 I/S, and Fe-illite (proximal facies Green Tuff at Scarrupata di Barano); and (3) analcime, authigenic K-feldspar, Fe-illite, R0 I/S, and smectite (clasts of Green Tuff in polymictic breccia). Phillipsite, chabazite, and R0 I/S within the in situ and proximal facies Green Tuff indicate low-temperature alteration ( T 70 °C) alteration within a mostly closed chemical system. These data suggest that the polymictic breccia represents a debris avalanche deposit created by a catastrophic volcanic collapse, which was associated with low-temperature hydrothermal alteration and thus structural weakening of the volcano. The debris avalanche that produced the polymictic breccia on Ischia may be related to nearby massive debris avalanche deposits recently discovered offshore of southern Ischia. The young age of the polymictic breccia (5.7-8.6 ka) and the possibility of its catastrophic emplacement indicate an additional volcanic hazard for Ischia Island.

  7. On the physics of unstable infiltration, seepage, and gravity drainage in partially saturated tuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faybishenko, B; Bodvarsson, G S; Salve, R

    2003-01-01

    To improve understanding of the physics of dynamic instabilities in unsaturated flow processes within the Paintbrush nonwelded unit (PTn) and the middle nonlithophysal portion of the Topopah Spring welded tuff unit (TSw) of Yucca Mountain, we analyzed data from a series of infiltration tests carried out at two sites (Alcove 4 and Alcove 6) in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), using analytical and empirical functions. The analysis of infiltration rates measured at both sites showed three temporal scales of infiltration rate: (1) a macro-scale trend of overall decreasing flow, (2) a meso-scale trend of fast and slow motion exhibiting three-stage variations of the flow rate (decreasing, increasing, and [again] decreasing flow rate, as observed in soils in the presence of entrapped air), and (3) micro-scale (high frequency) fluctuations. Infiltration tests in the nonwelded unit at Alcove 4 indicate that this unit may effectively dampen episodic fast infiltration events; however, well-known Kostyakov, Horton, and Philip equations do not satisfactorily describe the observed trends of the infiltration rate. Instead, a Weibull distribution model can most accurately describe experimentally determined time trends of the infiltration rate. Infiltration tests in highly permeable, fractured, welded tuff at Alcove 6 indicate that the infiltration rate exhibits pulsation, which may have been caused by multiple threshold effects and water-air redistribution between fractures and matrix. The empirical relationships between the extrinsic seepage from fractures, matrix imbibition, and gravity drainage versus the infiltration rate, as well as scaling and self-similarity for the leading edge of the water front are the hallmark of the nonlinear dynamic processes in water flow under episodic infiltration through fractured tuff. Based on the analysis of experimental data, we propose a conceptual model of a dynamic fracture flow and fracture-matrix interaction in fractured tuff

  8. Bench-scale experimental determination of the thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryder, E.E.; Finley, R.E.; George, J.T.; Ho, C.K.; Longenbaugh, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Connolly, J.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    A bench-scale experiment was designed and constructed to determine the effective thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff. Crushed tuff particles ranging from 12.5 mm to 37.5 mm (0.5 in. to 1.5 in.) were used to fill a cylindrical volume of 1.58 m{sup 3} at an effective porosity of 0.48. Two iterations of the experiment were completed; the first spanning approximately 502 hours and the second 237 hours. Temperatures near the axial heater reached 700 degrees C, with a significant volume of the test bed exceeding 100 degrees C. Three post-test analysis techniques were used to estimate the thermal diffusivity of the crushed tuff. The first approach used nonlinear parameter estimation linked to a one dimensional radial conduction model to estimate thermal diffusivity from the first 6 hours of test data. The second method used the multiphase TOUGH2 code in conjunction with the first 20 hours of test data not only to estimate the crushed tuffs thermal diffusivity, but also to explore convective behavior within the test bed. Finally, the nonlinear conduction code COYOTE-II was used to determine thermal properties based on 111 hours of cool-down data. The post-test thermal diffusivity estimates of 5.0 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s to 6.6 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s were converted to effective thermal conductivities and compared to estimates obtained from published porosity-based relationships. No obvious match between the experimental data and published relationships was found to exist; however, additional data for other particle sizes and porosities are needed.

  9. Reaction of the Topopah Spring Tuff with J-13 water at 120{sup 0}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oversby, V.M.

    1984-07-18

    This report describes a series of hydrothermal experiments using crushed tuff from the Topopah Spring Member and natural ground water from well J-13. The purpose of these experiments is to define the changes in water chemistry that would result from temperature changes caused by emplacing high-level nuclear waste in a repository in the Topopah Spring tuff. Experiments were conducted at 120{sup 0}C in Teflon-lined reaction vessels at four separate rock-to-water ratios and for reaction times up to 72 days. The composition of evaporite deposits contained in the pores of the surface-outcrop rock material used in these experiments is determined from solution compositions resulting from treatment of the rock before the start of the experiments. Results from the experiments at 120{sup 0}C are compared with previous experimental results from hydrothermal reaction of the Topopah Spring tuff with J-13 water at 90 and 150{sup 0}C. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that changes in the water chemistry due to heating of the rock-water system can be expected to be very minor. There is no significant source of anions (F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, or SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) in the rock; solution anion compositions after reaction of pretreated rock with J-13 water differ very little from the starting compositions. The major changes in cations are an increase in silica to approximately the level of cristobalite solubility, supersaturation of aluminum followed by slow precipitation, and fairly rapid precipitation of calcium and magnesium due to the retrograde solubility of calcite. These results are in good agreement with those previously reported for reaction of the tuff with J-13 water at 90 and 150{sup 0}C. 7 references, 7 figures, 28 tables.

  10. On the physics of unstable infiltration, seepage, and gravity drainage in partially saturated tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, B.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Salve, R.

    2002-04-01

    To improve understanding of the physics of dynamic instabilities in unsaturated flow processes within the Paintbrush nonwelded unit (PTn) and the middle nonlithophysal portion of the Tonopah Spring welded tuff unit (TSw) of Yucca Mountain, we analyzed data from a series of infiltration tests carried out at two sites (Alcove 4 and Alcove 6) in the Exploratory Studies Facility, using analytical and empirical functions. The analysis of infiltration rates measured at both sites showed three temporal scales of infiltration rate: (1) a macro-scale trend of overall decreasing flow, (2) a meso-scale trend of fast and slow motion exhibiting three-stage variations of the flow rate (decreasing, increasing, and [again] decreasing flow rate, as observed in soils in the presence of entrapped air), and (3) micro-scale (high frequency) fluctuations. Infiltration tests in the nonwelded unit at Alcove 4 indicate that this unit may effectively dampen episodic fast infiltration events; however, well-known Kostyakov, Horton, and Philip equations do not satisfactorily describe the observed trends of the infiltration rate. Instead, a Weibull distribution model can most accurately describe experimentally determined time trends of the infiltration rate. Infiltration tests in highly permeable, fractured, welded tuff at Alcove 6 indicate that the infiltration rate exhibits pulsation, which may have been caused by multiple threshold effects and water-air redistribution between fractures and matrix. The empirical relationships between the extrinsic seepage from fractures, matrix imbibition, and gravity drainage versus the infiltration rate, as well as scaling and self-similarity for the leading edge of the water front are the hallmark of the nonlinear dynamic processes in water flow under episodic infiltration through fractured tuff. Based on the analysis of experimental data, we propose a conceptual model of a dynamic fracture flow and fracture-matrix interaction in fractured tuff

  11. Creep in Topopah Spring Member welded tuff. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Noel, J.S. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-06-01

    A laboratory investigation has been carried out to determine the effects of elevated temperature and stress on the creep deformation of welded tuffs recovered from Busted Butte in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water saturated specimens of tuff from thermal/mechanical unit TSw2 were tested in creep at a confining pressure of 5.0 MPa, a pore pressure of 4.5 MPa, and temperatures of 25 and 250 C. At each stress level the load was held constant for a minimum of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 5} seconds and for as long as 1.8 {times} 10{sup 6} seconds. One specimen was tested at a single stress of 80 MPa and a temperature of 250 C. The sample failed after a short time. Subsequent experiments were initiated with an initial differential stress of 50 or 60 MPa; the stress was then increased in 10 MPa increments until failure. The data showed that creep deformation occurred in the form of time-dependent axial and radial strains, particularly beyond 90% of the unconfined, quasi-static fracture strength. There was little dilatancy associated with the deformation of the welded tuff at stresses below 90% of the fracture strength. Insufficient data have been collected in this preliminary study to determine the relationship between temperature, stress, creep deformation to failure, and total failure time at a fixed creep stress.

  12. Micromorphology of pedogenically derived fracture fills in Bandelier Tuff, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, D.W.; Wilcox, B.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Allen, B.L. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Fractures in the Bandelier Tuff are potential paths for water movement and transport of contaminants from waste disposal sites and other contaminated areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM. Contaminants transported in this way could ultimately be found in Los Alamos drinking water or in the Rio Grande, which flows through heavily populated areas in both the USA and Mexico. We conducted this study to determine (i) the morphology and origin of soil-like material in the fractures, and (ii) the likelihood of significant water movement through the fractures. We examined thin sections of fracture fills, soils, and tuffs to obtain fabric and mineralogical data, and collected field data on soil horizons, color, texture, structure, clay films, and root abundance. Fracture fills consist of clay, CaCO{sub 3}, or combinations of the two with minor inclusions of tuff and sand grains. Clay consists of thick, highly oriented argillans aligned parallel to fracture walls, and of discrete books in fracture interiors. Carbonate consists of massive microcrystalline calcite, which completely fills some fractures, and laminae or infillings between clay laminae or books in clay-dominated fractures. The potential creation of new macropores by a variety of processes, however, including seismic activity and biological disturbance, could allow rapid water movement and contaminant transport. 44 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Studies of ancient concrete as analogs of cementitious sealing materials for a repository in tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1989-03-01

    The durability of ancient cementitious materials has been investigated to provide data applicable to determining the resistance to weathering of concrete materials for sealing a repository for storage of high-level radioactive waste. Because tuff and volcanic ash are used in the concretes in the vicinity of Rome, the results are especially applicable to a waste repository in tuff. Ancient mortars, plasters, and concretes collected from Rome, Ostia, and Cosa dating to the third century BC show remarkable durability. The aggregates used in the mortars, plasters, and concretes included basic volcanic and pyroclastic rocks (including tuff), terra-cotta, carbonates, sands, and volcanic ash. The matrices of ancient cementitious materials have been characterized and classified into four categories: (1) hydraulic hydrated lime and hydrated lime cements, (2) hydraulic aluminous and ferruginous hydrated lime cements ({plus_minus} siliceous components), (3) pozzolana/hydrated lime cements, and (4) gypsum cements. Most of the materials investigated are in category (3). The materials were characterized to elucidate aspects of the technology that produced them and their response to the environmental exposure throughout their centuries of existence. Their remarkable properties are the result of a combination of chemical, mineralogical, and microstructural factors. Their durability was found to be affected by the matrix mineralogy, particle size, and porosity; aggregate type, grading and proportioning; and the methodology of placement. 30 refs.

  14. Studies of ancient concrete as analogs of cementitious sealing materials for a repository in tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1989-03-01

    The durability of ancient cementitious materials has been investigated to provide data applicable to determining the resistance to weathering of concrete materials for sealing a repository for storage of high-level radioactive waste. Because tuff and volcanic ash are used in the concretes in the vicinity of Rome, the results are especially applicable to a waste repository in tuff. Ancient mortars, plasters, and concretes collected from Rome, Ostia, and Cosa dating to the third century BC show remarkable durability. The aggregates used in the mortars, plasters, and concretes included basic volcanic and pyroclastic rocks (including tuff), terra-cotta, carbonates, sands, and volcanic ash. The matrices of ancient cementitious materials have been characterized and classified into four categories: (1) hydraulic hydrated lime and hydrated lime cements, (2) hydraulic aluminous and ferruginous hydrated lime cements ({plus_minus} siliceous components), (3) pozzolana/hydrated lime cements, and (4) gypsum cements. Most of the materials investigated are in category (3). The materials were characterized to elucidate aspects of the technology that produced them and their response to the environmental exposure throughout their centuries of existence. Their remarkable properties are the result of a combination of chemical, mineralogical, and microstructural factors. Their durability was found to be affected by the matrix mineralogy, particle size, and porosity; aggregate type, grading and proportioning; and the methodology of placement. 30 refs.

  15. Effects of Sabalan Tuff as a Natural Pozzolan on Properties of Plastic Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doodaran, R. Sadeghi; Khiavi, M. Pasbani

    One of the most common methods for watertighting in dams is to use cutoff or watertight walls. These types of walls should have high plasticity and low permeability [1]. Developing these walls with such qualities requires using plastic concrete with paneling method. In most cases, adding these materials to concrete improves some of its qualities such as consistency, viscosity of fresh concrete, decrease in permeability, increase in plasticity, long term increase in compressive strength, durability against sulphats and decrease in price. The main purpose of this project is using Sabalan natural tuff in plastic concrete for an access to a desirable modulus of elasticity without a decrease in compressive strength. In this paper, in addition to the impact of Sabalan natural pozzolan tuff on plastic concrete qualities, the impacts of pozzolan cement made of this kind of tuff (Ardebil pozzolan cement) on it has been considered. The results showed improvement on the qualities of plastic concrete such as decrease in permeability, decrease in modulus of elasticity and increase in durability against destructive factors with retaining compressive strength.

  16. Magnetic fabric, welding texture and strain fabric in the Nuraxi Tuff, Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioli, L.; Lanza, R.; Ort, M.; Rosi, M.

    2008-09-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been used to interpret flow directions in ignimbrites, but no study has demonstrated that the AMS fabric corresponds to the flow fabric. In this paper, we show that the AMS and strain fabric coincide in a high-grade ignimbrite, the Nuraxi Tuff, a Miocene rhyolitic ignimbrite displaying a wide variability of rheomorphic features and a well-defined magnetic fabric. Natural remanent magnetization (NRM) data indicate that the magnetization of the tuff is homogeneous and was acquired at high temperatures by Ti-magnetite crystals. Comparison between the magnetic fabric and the deformation features along a representative section shows that AMS and anisotropy of isothermal remanent magnetization (AIRM) fabric are coaxial with and reproduce the shape of the strain ellipsoid. Magnetic tests and scanning electron microscopy observations indicate that the fabric is due to trails of micrometer-size, pseudo-single domain, magnetically interacting magnetite crystals. Microlites formed along discontinuities such as shard rims and vesicle walls mimicking the petrofabric of the tuff. The fabric was thus acquired after deposition, before late rheomorphic processes, and accurately mimics homogeneous deformation features of the shards during welding processes and mass flow.

  17. Leaching of solutes from ion-exchange resins buried in Bandelier Tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essington, E.H.; Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Lopez, E.A.; Stallings, E.A.

    1986-10-01

    Prediction of solute transport at shallow land burial facilities requires a knowledge of the rates of release of solutes (source term) from the buried wastes and of those processes affecting transport through the surrounding media. The leaching (removal) of lithium, strontium, and cesium from a resin/tuff mixture (Bandelier Tuff) was conducted under unsaturated steady and unsteady (drainage) flow conditions in both laboratory columns and large-scale field caissons to approximate the conditions of buried contaminated-waste resins. Lithium was leached most rapidly and strontium least rapidly. Stopping the flow for a period of 40 to 60 days to create drainage (unsteady flow) conditions had very little effect on the concentrations of solutes leached from the resin/tuff layer. Leaching of these solutes in laboratory columns simulated the large-scale (caisson) leaching very well. Thus, laboratory studies may be reasonable predictors of leaching under certain large-scale field conditions. Also, leaching appears to be a kinetics-controlled process that, for the experimental conditions of this study, may be represented by simple first-order kinetics. Further work should concentrate on understanding the effect of environmental factors such as solute mixtures, concentrations, and temperature, as well as those mechanisms that control leaching of solutes. Also, the evaluation and development of alternative mathematical models for describing the source term are needed.

  18. Galvanic Interaction between Chalcopyrite and Pyrite with Low Alloy and High Carbon Chromium Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Azizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the galvanic interaction between pyrite and chalcopyrite with two types of grinding media (low alloy and high carbon chromium steel ball in grinding of a porphyry copper sulphide ore. Results indicated that injection of different gases into mill altered the oxidation-reduction environment during grinding. High carbon chromium steel ball under nitrogen gas has the lowest galvanic current, and low alloy steel ball under oxygen gas had the highest galvanic current. Also, results showed that the media is anodic relative to pyrite and chalcopyrite, and therefore pyrite or chalcopyrite with a higher rest potential acted as the cathode, whilst the grinding media with a lower rest potential acted as the anode, when they are electrochemically contacted. It was also found that low alloy steel under oxygen produced the highest amount of EDTA extractable iron in the slurry, whilst high carbon chromium steel under nitrogen atmosphere led to the lowest amount.

  19. Crystalomorphological Characteristics of Pyrite in Hydrothermal Gold Deposit--An Experimental Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡元吉; 周茂

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of the geological characteristics of primary gold deposits, with an experiment on modelling the environment of gold mineralization , the evolutionary array and growth mechanism and their relationship with gold mineralization of the crystal forms of pyrite, i. e. pentagonal dodecahedron, octahedron and cube, formed under the different values of fo2, fs2, T (℃), P(Pa) and C (salinity) in the hy-drothermal system are studied. The results show that the crystal form of pyrite is not only related to the temperature L, but also affected by the geochemistry of iron and sulfur which formed pyrite and other physicochemical conditions.Our results promote the study of gold mineralization, genetic and prospecting mineralogy.

  20. Re-Os dating of pyrite from Giant Bayan Obo REE-Nb-Fe deposit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yulong; YANG Gang; CHEN Jiangfeng; DU Andao; XIE Zhi

    2004-01-01

    Six pyrite samples from the giant Bayan Obo REE-Nb-Fe deposit are dated by Re-Os technique. Pyrite studied is associated with barite and separated from a vein cutting REE mineralization. Pyrites analyzed contain 16-30 ng Re and 0.10-0.16 ng Os, and yield a Caledonian isochron age of 439 ± 86 Ma. High Re/Os ratio, low Os concentration and highly radiogenic Os isotopic ratios of these samples suggest that they are of crustal origin. The northern margin of the North China Block was a passive continental margin, but not a subduction zone with enormous volcanic activities in the Early Paleozoic Era. Our Re-Os result provides new evidences, showing that Bayan Obo deposit experienced a thermal disturbance of crustal origin in the Caledonian time and some isotopic systems recorded only the time of the disturbance, not the mineralization age.

  1. Hydrometallurgical-UV process to produce ferrous sulfate from the pyrite present in coal tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viganico, E.M.; Silva, R.A. [South Rio Grande Federal Univ., Porto Alegre (Brazil).Graduate Program in Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Technology Center

    2010-07-01

    The oxidation of pyrite can promote acid mine drainage (AMD). This study developed a hydrometallurgical-UV route for the production of ferrous sulfate. The laboratory study was conducted using a pyrite concentrate obtained from a processed coal tailing. Leaching of the tailing was performed in packed bed columns in an oxidizing environment with an aqueous medium. Recirculation of the liquor produced an Fe{sup 3+} iron rich extract. Ultraviolet irradiation was then used to convert the Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 2+}. Heat provided by the UV lamps caused the ferrous sulfate to crystallize. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of the crystals demonstrated that it is possible to produce commercial-grade ferrous sulfate heptahydrate crystals from the pyrite present in coal tailings. The crystals are used to treat anemia in humans and animals, and are also used as reagents for waste and waste water treatment. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  2. Ferruginous Microspherules in Bauxite at Maochang, Guizhou Province, China: Products of Microbe-Pyrite Interaction?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yuefei; WANG Rucheng; LU Jianjun; LI Yiliang

    2006-01-01

    The Maochang bauxite in Guizhou Province is one of the important aluminum ore deposits in southwestern China. Ferruginous spherules, measuring about a few microns across, were found in the transitional layer of the deposit. The EDS and XRD results show that the microspherules are composed mostly of iron (hydr)oxide minerals (goethite) with only weak presence of aluminum and silicon.Occasionally, some pyrite micrograins with dissolved surface are found associated with goethite within the spherules. It is thus suggested that microspherules are linked to pyrite oxidization. It is also thought that microbial activities contribute not only to pyrite oxidization, but also to ball-like assemblage of the iron (hydr)oxides. The mechanism of the formation of ferruginous microspherules is also believed to be important in studying geomicrobiology of bauxite.

  3. Evidence for microbial dissolution of pyrite from the Lower Cambrian oolitic limestone, South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative dissolution of the sulphide mineral pyrite (FeS2 has been of significant interest since it affects global geochemical cycles, generates acid mine drainage, and is used in industrial metal extraction. Several different groups of prokaryotes are known to catalyze the dissolution of pyrite and use the free energy generated from the oxidation, which may result in the dissolution of the mineral and the precipitation of the secondary ferric iron minerals either on the cell surface or is separated from the cells. However, straightforward evidence for such metabolic process in the ancient sediments is rare. Here we report pyrite crystals from the Lower Cambrian oolitic limestones that show indications of microbial erosion in various degrees. Erosion pits and tubular micro-tunnels with characteristic shapes and sizes in our samples are generally similar to those obtained from the laboratory studies on the oxidative dissolution of pyrite by iron-oxidizing bacteria. Diagenetic examination demonstrates that the bioerosion predates the consolidation of the limestone. In addition, bacillus-sized and -shaped microfossils encrusted with iron oxides are present in our samples, which are very likely to be fossilized sheaths produced by iron-oxidizing bacteria. Our findings indicate that the microbial oxidative dissolution of pyrite existed in the Cambrian shallow marine carbonate sediments. Furthermore, we suggest that characteristic pitting patterns on the pyrite crystals from ancient sediments are an important clue to trace the evolution of life, in particular, the evolution of metabolism like microbial iron oxidation in the remote past on our planet, independent of biomarkers, isotopic signals and body fossils as well.

  4. Pyrite-enhanced methylene blue degradation in non-thermal plasma water treatment reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetoli, Luis Otavio de Brito, E-mail: luskywalcker@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cadorin, Bruno Mena; Baldissarelli, Vanessa Zanon [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Geremias, Reginaldo [Departamento de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Goncalvez de Souza, Ivan [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Debacher, Nito Angelo, E-mail: debacher@qmc.ufsc.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use O{sub 2} as the feed gas and pyrite was added to the non-thermal plasma reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The methylene blue removal by NTP increased in the presence of pyrite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The total organic carbon content decreased substantially. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acute toxicity test showed that the treated solution is not toxic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dye degradation occurs via electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation. - Abstract: In this study, methylene blue (MB) removal from an aqueous phase by electrical discharge non-thermal plasma (NTP) over water was investigated using three different feed gases: N{sub 2}, Ar, and O{sub 2}. The results showed that the dye removal rate was not strongly dependent on the feed gas when the electrical current was kept the same for all gases. The hydrogen peroxide generation in the water varied according to the feed gas (N{sub 2} < Ar < O{sub 2}). Using O{sub 2} as the feed gas, pyrite was added to the reactor in acid medium resulting in an accentuated increase in the dye removal, which suggests that pyrite acts as a Fenton-like catalyst. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the dye solution decreased slightly as the plasma treatment time increased, but in the presence of the pyrite catalyst the TOC removal increased substantially. The acute toxicity test using Artemia sp. microcrustaceans showed that the treated solution is not toxic when Ar, O{sub 2} or O{sub 2}-pyrite is employed. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis (ESI-MS) of the treated samples indicated that the dye degradation occurs via high energy electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation in the benzene rings of the dye molecules.

  5. Contributions to the research on the principles of a pyrite solar cell. Beitraege zur Erforschung der Grundlagen einer Pyritsolarzelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, B.

    1994-01-01

    Within the framework of the dissertation experiences on pyrite thin film production by plasma sulfurization of iron films and thermal sulfurization of iron films in closed, evacuated quartz ampullas are given. X-ray investigation show that both methods are suitable for pyrite thin film production. Problems have been shown concerning film porosity, film adhesion on the substrates and film stability. (BWI)

  6. Atomistic simulation of the structure and elastic properties of pyrite (FeS2) as a function of pressure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sithole, Happy M

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Interatomic potential parameters have been derived at simulated temperatures of 0 K and 300 K to model pyrite FeS2. The predicted pyrite structures are within 1% of those determined experimentally, while the calculated bulk modulus is within 7...

  7. Proving of Golden Pyrite (golden pyrite (Pyr-d. Patogenesia de Pirita dorada (pirita dorada (Pyr-d. Patogenesia de Pirita dorada (pirita dorada (Pyr-d.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Waisse Priven

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the proving of Golden Pyrite are presented here. The proving followed the protocol adopted for Brosimum gaudichaudii, further modified to adjust to our group’s demands. They are also presented a thematic study of the remedy, its reportorial rubrics, its differential diagnosis and new rubrics that ought to be added to the repertory. The experience created the need of suggesting new practical guidelines to be included in the protocol.

  8. A combined chemical, isotopic and microstructural study of pyrite from roll-front uranium deposits, Lake Eyre Basin, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Edwina S.; Cook, Nigel J.; Cliff, John; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.; Huddleston, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The common sulfide mineral pyrite is abundant throughout sedimentary uranium systems at Pepegoona, Pepegoona West and Pannikan, Lake Eyre Basin, South Australia. Combined chemical, isotopic and microstructural analysis of pyrite indicates variation in fluid composition, sulfur source and precipitation conditions during a protracted mineralization event. The results show the significant role played by pyrite as a metal scavenger and monitor of fluid changes in low-temperature hydrothermal systems. In-situ micrometer-scale sulfur isotope analyses of pyrite demonstrated broad-scale isotopic heterogeneity (δ34S = -43.9 to +32.4‰VCDT), indicative of complex, multi-faceted pyrite evolution, and sulfur derived from more than a single source. Preserved textures support this assertion and indicate a genetic model involving more than one phase of pyrite formation. Authigenic pyrite underwent prolonged evolution and recrystallization, evidenced by a genetic relationship between archetypal framboidal aggregates and pyrite euhedra. Secondary hydrothermal pyrite commonly displays hyper-enrichment of several trace elements (Mn, Co, Ni, As, Se, Mo, Sb, W and Tl) in ore-bearing horizons. Hydrothermal fluids of magmatic and meteoric origins supplied metals to the system but the geochemical signature of pyrite suggests a dominantly granitic source and also the influence of mafic rock types. Irregular variation in δ34S, coupled with oscillatory trace element zonation in secondary pyrite, is interpreted in terms of continuous variations in fluid composition and cycles of diagenetic recrystallization. A late-stage oxidizing fluid may have mobilized selenium from pre-existing pyrite. Subsequent restoration of reduced conditions within the aquifer caused ongoing pyrite re-crystallization and precipitation of selenium as native selenium. These results provide the first qualitative constraints on the formation mechanisms of the uranium deposits at Beverley North. Insights into

  9. Morphology, origin and infrared microthermometry of fluid inclusions in pyrite from the Radka epithermal copper deposit, Srednogorie zone, Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzmanov, Kalin; Bailly, Laurent; Ramboz, Claire; Rouer, Olivier; Bény, Jean-Michel

    2002-08-01

    Pyrite samples from the Radka epithermal, replacement type, volcanic rock-hosted copper deposit, Bulgaria, have been studied using near-infrared (IR) microscopy. Two generations of pyrite based on their textures, composition and behaviour in IR light can be distinguished. Electron microprobe analyses, X-ray elemental mapping and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the relationship between crystal zoning, trace element contents and IR transmittance of pyrite. The observed crystal zoning is related to variable arsenic contents in massive fine-grained and colloform pyrite from the early pyrite-quartz assemblage, and cobalt contents in pyrite crystals from the late quartz-pyrite vein assemblage. There is a negative correlation between trace element content and IR transmittance of pyrite. The IR transparency of pyrite is thus a sensitive indicator of changes in trace element concentrations. Fluid inclusions have only been found in the second pyrite generation. Scanning electron microscopy observations on open fluid inclusion cavities permitted the crystallographic features of vacuoles to be determined. A characteristic feature of primary fluid inclusions in pyrite is a negative crystal habit, shaped mainly by {100}, {111} and {210}. This complicated polyhedral morphology is the reason for the observed opacity of some isometric primary inclusions. Secondary fluid inclusion morphology depends on the nature of the surface of the healed fracture. Recognition of the primary or secondary origin of fluid inclusions is enhanced by using crystallographically oriented sections. Microthermometric measurements of primary inclusions indicate that the second pyrite generation was deposited at maximum P-T conditions of 400 °C and 430 bar and from a fluid of low bulk salinity (3.5-4.6 wt%), possibly KCl-dominant. There are large ranges for homogenisation temperatures in secondary inclusions because of necking-down processes. Decrepitation features of some of

  10. Synchrotron Spectroscopic Studies of the Reaction of Cleaved Pyrite ( {FeS2}) Surfaces with Cr(VI) Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, C. S.; Kendelewicz, T.; Bostick, B. C.; Brown, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    Pyrite is one of the most common sulfide ores, and the separation of valuable sulfide minerals from it has been an area of considerable interest for a long time. This extraction has led to a large quantity of pyrite waste, typically remaining in mine tailings piles which can interact with oxygen and surface water. The oxidation of pyrite under these conditions leads to the commonly known environmental problem of acid mine drainage, with acidification of surface waters, and the release of potentially toxic metals remaining within the pyrite matrix. A microscopic understanding of this oxidation process is extremely important and has been the aim of a number of studies. We apply the methods of synchrotron based surface science to this problem, utilizing surface sensitive photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study the surface species present on the pyrite surface at the initial stages of oxidation. We have reacted pyrite surfaces with solutions containing chromate. Chromium exists in solution in two principal valence states, trivalent Cr(III) and hexavalent Cr(VI). Hexavalent chromium is itself considered an environmental problem due to its high toxicity and solubility, and thus mobility, whilst trivalent chromium is much less toxic and relatively insoluble. Hexavalent chromate is a strong oxidizing agent, and will react rapidly with the pyrite surface allowing the identification of oxidized iron and sulfur surface species. The possibility of using pyrite as a means of reducing chromate, and at the same time using chromate to passivate the pyrite surface to further oxidation through the buildup of a non-reactive iron-chromium (oxy)hydroxide layer will be investigated. The work was performed on rods cut from a natural pyrite single crystal from the Logroño region of Spain. The rods were then fractured over a reaction vessel, producing a fresh (100) surface for each experiment. The pyrite surfaces were reacted with 50 μM Cr(VI) solutions for 5 minutes at

  11. Pyritization processes and greigite formation in the advancing sulfidization front in the Upper Pleistocene sediments of the Black Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neretin, LN; Bottcher, ME; Jørgensen, BB

    2004-01-01

    Pyritization in late Pleistocene sediments of the Black Sea is driven by sulfide formed during anaerobic methane oxidation. A sulfidization front is formed by the opposing gradients of sulfide and dissolved iron. The sulfidization processes are controlled by the diffusion flux of sulfide from above...... and by the solid reactive iron content. Two processes of diffusion-limited pyrite formation were identified. The first process includes pyrite precipitation with the accumulation of iron sulfide precursors with the average chemical composition of FeSn (n = 1.10-1.29), including greigite. Elemental sulfur...... and polysulfides, formed from H,S by a reductive dissolution of Fe(Ill)-containing minerals, serve as intermediates to convert iron sulfides into pyrite. In the second process, a "direct" pyrite precipitation occurs through prolonged exposure of iron-containing minerals to dissolved sulfide. Methane-driven sulfate...

  12. Preparation of natural pyrite nanoparticles by high energy planetary ball milling as a nanocatalyst for heterogeneous Fenton process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathinia, Siavash [Department of Mining Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Laboratory of Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathinia, Mehrangiz [Research Laboratory of Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmani, Ali Akbar [Department of Mining Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khataee, Alireza, E-mail: a_khataee@tabrizu.ac.ir [Research Laboratory of Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pyrite nanoparticles were successfully produced by planetary ball milling process. • The physical and chemical properties of pyrite nanoparticles were fully examined. • The degradation of AO7 was notably enhanced by pyrite nanoparticles Fenton system. • The influences of basic operational parameters were investigated using CCD. - Abstract: In the present study pyrite nanoparticles were prepared by high energy mechanical ball milling utilizing a planetary ball mill. Various pyrite samples were produced by changing the milling time from 2 h to 6 h, in the constant milling speed of 320 rpm. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) linked with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) were performed to explain the characteristics of primary (unmilled) and milled pyrite samples. The average particle size distribution of the produced pyrite during 6 h milling was found to be between 20 nm and 100 nm. The catalytic performance of the different pyrite samples was examined in the heterogeneous Fenton process for degradation of C.I. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) solution. Results showed that the decolorization efficiency of AO7 in the presence of 6 h-milled pyrite sample was the highest. The impact of key parameters on the degradation efficiency of AO7 by pyrite nanoparticles catalyzed Fenton process was modeled using central composite design (CCD). Accordingly, the maximum removal efficiency of 96.30% was achieved at initial AO7 concentration of 16 mg/L, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 5 mmol/L, catalyst amount of 0.5 g/L and reaction time of 25 min.

  13. AN INNOVATIVE INTEGRATED APPROACH TO MINIMIZING GYPSUM AND PYRITE WASTES BY CONVERSION TO MARKETABLE PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Tao

    2000-06-27

    The objective of this research program is to develop a novel integrated process to eliminate millions of tons of gypsum and pyrite wastes generated annually by the U.S. energy industries and reduce the emission of millions of tons of greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. This was accomplished by converting gypsum and pyrite wastes to marketable products such as lime, direct reduced iron (DRI), and sulfur products and obviating the need to calcine millions of tons of limestone for use in utility scrubbers. Specific objectives included: (1) Develop a novel, integrated process for utilizing two major wastes generated by mining and energy industries to produce lime for recycling and other marketable products. (2) Study individual chemical reactions involved in pyrite decomposition, DRI production, and Muller-Kuhne process for lime regeneration to determine optimum process variables such as temperature, time, and reactant composition. (3) Investigate techniques for effective concentration of pyrite from tailing waste and methods for effective separation of DRI from calcium sulfide.

  14. Pyrite nanoparticles as a Fenton-like reagent for in situ remediation of organic pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gil-Lozano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Fenton reaction is the most widely used advanced oxidation process (AOP for wastewater treatment. This study reports on the use of pyrite nanoparticles and microparticles as Fenton reagents for the oxidative degradation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc as a representative contaminant. Upon oxidative dissolution in water, pyrite (FeS2 particles can generate H2O2 at their surface while simultaneously promoting recycling of Fe3+ into Fe2+ and vice versa. Pyrite nanoparticles were synthesized by the hot injection method. The use of a high concentration of precursors gave individual nanoparticles (diameter: 20 nm with broader crystallinity at the outer interfaces, providing a greater number of surface defects, which is advantageous for generating H2O2. Batch reactions were run to monitor the kinetics of CuPc degradation in real time and the amount of H2O2. A markedly greater degradation of CuPc was achieved with nanoparticles as compared to microparticles: at low loadings (0.08 mg/L and 20 h reaction time, the former enabled 60% CuPc removal, whereas the latter enabled only 7% removal. These results confirm that the use of low concentrations of synthetic nanoparticles can be a cost effective alternative to conventional Fenton procedures for use in wastewater treatment, avoiding the potential risks caused by the release of heavy metals upon dissolution of natural pyrites.

  15. Pyrite oxidation in saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media Flow: AComparison of alternative mathematical modeling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; White, Stephen P.; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-02-15

    Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) is one of the most common naturally occurring minerals that is present in many subsurface environments. It plays an important role in the genesis of enriched ore deposits through weathering reactions, is the most abundant sulfide mineral in many mine tailings, and is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. The pyrite oxidation reaction serves as a prototype for oxidative weathering processes with broad significance for geoscientific, engineering, and environmental applications. Mathematical modeling of these processes is extremely challenging because aqueous concentrations of key species vary over an enormous range, oxygen inventory and supply are typically small in comparison to pyrite inventory, and chemical reactions are complex, involving kinetic control and microbial catalysis. We present the mathematical formulation of a general multi-phase advective-diffusive reactive transport model for redox processes. Two alternative implementations were made in the TOUGHREACT and TOUGH2-CHEM simulation codes which use sequential iteration and simultaneous solution, respectively. The simulators are applied to reactive consumption of pyrite in (1) saturated flow of oxidizing water, and (2) saturated-unsaturated flow in which oxygen transport occurs in both aqueous and gas phases. Geochemical evolutions predicted from different process models are compared, and issues of numerical accuracy and efficiency are discussed.

  16. The Influence of Pyrite on the Solubility of Minjingu and Panda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with pyrite also resulted into high amounts of A I and Mn being released in ... low P:S ratios this point was attained earlier than those with high P:S ratios. ..... tribution of ST AMICO staff who pro- ... maize- wheat rotation on submontarie soils.

  17. Comment on "Abiotic pyrite formation produces a large Fe isotope fractionation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Andrew D; Johnson, Clark M; Yamaguchi, Kosei E; Beard, Brian L

    2012-02-01

    Guilbaud et al. (Reports, 24 June 2011, p. 1548) suggest that the geologic record of Fe isotope fractionation can be explained by abiological precipitation of pyrite. We argue that a detailed understanding of the depositional setting, mineralogy, and geologic history of Precambrian sedimentary rocks indicates that the Fe isotope record dominantly reflects biological fractionations and Fe redox processes.

  18. Degradation of anthraquinone dye reactive blue 4 in pyrite ash catalyzed Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becelic-Tomin, Milena; Dalmacija, Bozo; Rajic, Ljiljana; Tomasevic, Dragana; Kerkez, Djurdja; Watson, Malcolm; Prica, Miljana

    2014-01-01

    Pyrite ash (PA) is created by burning pyrite in the chemical production of sulphuric acid. The high concentration of iron oxide, mostly hematite, present in pyrite ash, gives the basis for its application as a source of catalytic iron in a modified Fenton process for anthraquinone dye reactive blue 4 (RB4) degradation. The effect of various operating variables such as catalyst and oxidant concentration, initial pH and RB4 concentration on the abatement of total organic carbon, and dye has been assessed in this study. Here we show that degradation of RB4 in the modified Fenton reaction was efficient under the following conditions: pH=2.5; [PA]0=0.2 g L(-1); [H2O2]0=5 mM and initial RB4 concentration up to 100 mg L(-1). The pyrite ash Fenton reaction can overcome limitations observed from the classic Fenton reaction, such as the early termination of the Fenton reaction. Metal (Pb, Zn, and Cu) content of the solution after the process suggests that an additional treatment step is necessary to remove the remaining metals from the water. These results provide basic knowledge to better understand the modified, heterogeneous Fenton process and apply the PA Fenton reaction for the treatment of wastewaters which contains anthraquinone dyes.

  19. Influence of the sulfur species reactivity on biofilm conformation during pyrite colonization by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, René H; García-Meza, J Viridiana; Cruz, Roel; Valdez-Pérez, Donato; González, Ignacio

    2012-08-01

    Massive pyrite (FeS₂) electrodes were potentiostatically modified by means of variable oxidation pulse to induce formation of diverse surface sulfur species (S(n)²⁻, S⁰). The evolution of reactivity of the resulting surfaces considers transition from passive (e.g., Fe(1-x )S₂) to active sulfur species (e.g., Fe(1-x )S(2-y ), S⁰). Selected modified pyrite surfaces were incubated with cells of sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans for 24 h in a specific culture medium (pH 2). Abiotic control experiments were also performed to compare chemical and biological oxidation. After incubation, the attached cells density and their exopolysaccharides were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLMS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on bio-oxidized surfaces; additionally, S(n)²⁻/S⁰ speciation was carried out on bio-oxidized and abiotic pyrite surfaces using Raman spectroscopy. Our results indicate an important correlation between the evolution of S(n)²⁻/S⁰ surface species ratio and biofilm formation. Hence, pyrite surfaces with mainly passive-sulfur species were less colonized by A. thiooxidans as compared to surfaces with active sulfur species. These results provide knowledge that may contribute to establishing interfacial conditions that enhance or delay metal sulfide (MS) dissolution, as a function of the biofilm formed by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

  20. Pyrite-pyrrhotite intergrowths in calcite marble from Bistriški Vintgar, Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavašnik, J.

    2016-02-01

    Roman marble quarry in Bistrica gorge in southern Pohorje Mt. (north-eastern Slovenia) is situated in a 20 m thick lens of layered marble, at the contact zone between granodiorite and metamorphites. Grey and yellowish non-homogenous calcite marble is heavily included by mica, quartz, feldspars, zoisite, pyrite and amphiboles. In the present research, we have studied numerous pyrite (FeS2) crystals associated with yellowish-bronze non-stoichiometric pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS), not previously reported from this locality. SEM investigation revealed unusual sequence of crystallisation: primary skeletal pyrrhotite matrix is sparsely overgrown by well-crystalline pyrite, both being overgrown by smaller, well-developed hexagonal pyrrhotite crystals of the second generation. With TEM we identify the pyrrhotite as 5T-Fe1-xS phase, where x is about 0.1 and is equivalent to Fe9S10. The pyrite-pyrrhotite coexistence allows us a construction of fO2-pH diagram of stability fields, which reflects geochemical conditions at the time of marble re-crystallisation.

  1. Enhanced Photoresponse of FeS2 Films : The Role of Marcasite–Pyrite Phase Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Longfei; Dzade, N.Y.; Gao, L.; Scanlon, D. O.; Özturk, Zafer; Hollingsworth, N.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Hensen, E. J. M.; de Leeuw, Nora H.; Hofmann, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial role of marcasite in iron sulfide-based photo-electrochemical applications is reported for the first time. A spectacular improvement of the photoresponse observed experimentally for mixed pyrite/marcasite-FeS2 films can be ascribed to the presence of p/m phase junctions at the interfa

  2. Microbial Oxidation of Pyrite Coupled to Nitrate Reduction in Anoxic Groundwater Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Juncher; Elberling, Bo; Jacobsen, Ole Stig;

    2009-01-01

    denitrification process with pyrite as the primary electron donor. The process demonstrates a temperature dependency (Q10) of 1.8 and could be completely inhibited by addition of a bactericide (NaN3). Experimentally determined denitrification rates show that more than 50% of the observed nitrate reduction can...

  3. Degradation of Anthraquinone Dye Reactive Blue 4 in Pyrite Ash Catalyzed Fenton Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Becelic-Tomin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrite ash (PA is created by burning pyrite in the chemical production of sulphuric acid. The high concentration of iron oxide, mostly hematite, present in pyrite ash, gives the basis for its application as a source of catalytic iron in a modified Fenton process for anthraquinone dye reactive blue 4 (RB4 degradation. The effect of various operating variables such as catalyst and oxidant concentration, initial pH and RB4 concentration on the abatement of total organic carbon, and dye has been assessed in this study. Here we show that degradation of RB4 in the modified Fenton reaction was efficient under the following conditions: pH=2.5; [PA]0=0.2 g L−1; [H2O2]0=5 mM and initial RB4 concentration up to 100 mg L−1. The pyrite ash Fenton reaction can overcome limitations observed from the classic Fenton reaction, such as the early termination of the Fenton reaction. Metal (Pb, Zn, and Cu content of the solution after the process suggests that an additional treatment step is necessary to remove the remaining metals from the water. These results provide basic knowledge to better understand the modified, heterogeneous Fenton process and apply the PA Fenton reaction for the treatment of wastewaters which contains anthraquinone dyes.

  4. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Larsen, Flemming; Postma, Diederik Jan

    2001-01-01

    the reaction stoichiometry and partitioning of gases between the solution and the gas phase. Pyrite oxidation with concurrent calcite dissolution was found to be consistent with the experimental data while organic carbon oxidation was not. The reaction involves changes in the total volume of the gas phase...

  5. Pyrite (FeS 2) oxidation: A sub-micron synchrotron investigation of the initial steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Anand P.; Gerson, Andrea R.

    2011-10-01

    Pyrite is an environmentally significant mineral being the major contributor to acid rock drainage. Synchrotron based SPEM (scanning photoelectron microscopy) and micro-XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) have been used to characterise fresh and oxidised pyrite (FeS 2) with a view to understanding the initial oxidation steps that take place during natural weathering processes. Localised regions of the pyrite surface containing Fe species of reduced coordination have been found to play a critical role. Such sites not only initiate the oxidation process but also facilitate the formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radical species, which then lead the S oxidation process. Four different S species are found to be present on fresh fractured pyrite surfaces: S 22-(bulk) (4-fold coordination), S 22-(surface) (3-fold coordination), S 2- and S 0/S n2- (metal deficient sulfide and polysulfide respectively). These species were found to be heterogeneously distributed on the fractured pyrite surface. Both O 2 and H 2O gases are needed for effective oxidation of the pyrite surface. The process is initiated when O 2 dissociatively and H 2O molecularly adsorb onto the surface Fe sites where high dangling bond densities exist. H 2O may then dissociate to produce rad OH radicals. The adsorption of these species leads to the formation of Fe-oxy species prior to the formation of sulfoxy species. Evidence suggests that Fe-O bonds form prior to Fe-OH bonds. S oxidation occurs through interactions of rad OH radicals formed at the Fe sites, with formation of SO 42- occurring via S 2O 32-/SO 32- intermediates. The pyrite oxidation process is electrochemical in nature and was found to occur in patches, where site specific adsorption of O 2 and H 2O has occurred. Fe and S oxidation was found to occur within the same area of oxidation probably in atomic scale proximity. Furthermore, the O in SO 42- arises largely from H 2O; however, depending on the surface history, SO 42- formed early in

  6. Magnesium oxide-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic: a novel cadmium(II) adsorbing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Md; Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Maneesh, Namburath; Munekage, Yukihiro; Motomura, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The contamination of cadmium (Cd) in the aquatic environment is one of the serious environmental and human health's risks. The present study attempted to develop the potential magnesium oxide (MgO)-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic (MITDC)-based novel adsorbent media for adsorbing higher rate of cadmium [Cd(II)] from water phase. A potential MITDC adsorbent media was developed using volcanic raw tuff soil and its Cd(II) adsorption capacity from water phase was evaluated comparing with the raw tuff soil. A series of studies were carried out in an agitated batch method at 20 ± 2 °C to characterize the adsorption capacity of MITDC under different conditions of factors, such as contact time (0-360 min), initial pH (3-11) of solution, dose of MITDC (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 g/L), and initial concentration of Cd(II) (5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg/L), influencing the adsorption mechanism. MITDC exhibited the equilibrium state of maximum Cd(II) adsorption at the contact time 120 min and pH 4.7 (removed 98.2 % Cd) when initial Cd(II) concentration was 10 mg/L in the present study. The dose of 7.5 g MITDC/L showed maximum removal of Cd(II) from water. Experimental data were described by the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherms and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model ( R 2 = 0.996). The Cd(II) adsorption capacity of MITDC was 31.25 mg/g. The high Cd(II) adsorption capacity indicated that novel MITDC could be used as a potential ceramic adsorbent media to remove high rate of Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  7. Estimation of possibilities of making euro pallets from reclaimed polyolefin’s with tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kuciel

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of reusing and developing of waste plastics are one of the main problems of waste management for municipal governmentespecially in the context of adapting Polish law to standards of EC [1]. During the last 10 years total amount of plastics waste increasedtwice, especially in communal agglomerations. Among communal waste plastics make up 7 to 14% of whole their mass and 30% of theirvolume [1,2]. Plastic products have been recycled to be used in a number of different products often different from their original use.Reclaimed plastics can’t be used as products which have contact with food or as high demands esthetic and hygienic products, they alsoshouldn’t be applied as short-time used products because they quickly come back to plastics store-place. Reclaimed plastics have lowerproperties than virgin plastics – mainly the strength falls with the simultaneous fall of modules and increase fragile especially for PP, PE,PS and PET [1]. One of the possibilities of reinforcement of polyolefines is adding diverse fillers like glass or carbon fibers (but they arerather expensive and natural fillers like mineral, wood and others [3]. It’s especially important for wasted of low density polyethylenewhich has low modulus. For the tests it was used waste polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE from industrial with 15% mineral fillers – tuff.For the tests it was prepared two kinds of composites materials with 15% of tuff powder. Besides for comparison it was tested recycledpolyethylene (HDPE and LDPE and next was tested specimens cut out from produced europallets (with 15% of tuff. It was testedmechanical properties all prepared composite materials like tensile strength, stress and bending e-modulus and processing properties likemelt flow, Vicat point and photos on SEM microscope.

  8. Magnesium oxide-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic: a novel cadmium(II) adsorbing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Md; Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Maneesh, Namburath; Munekage, Yukihiro; Motomura, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    The contamination of cadmium (Cd) in the aquatic environment is one of the serious environmental and human health's risks. The present study attempted to develop the potential magnesium oxide (MgO)-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic (MITDC)-based novel adsorbent media for adsorbing higher rate of cadmium [Cd(II)] from water phase. A potential MITDC adsorbent media was developed using volcanic raw tuff soil and its Cd(II) adsorption capacity from water phase was evaluated comparing with the raw tuff soil. A series of studies were carried out in an agitated batch method at 20 ± 2 °C to characterize the adsorption capacity of MITDC under different conditions of factors, such as contact time (0-360 min), initial pH (3-11) of solution, dose of MITDC (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 g/L), and initial concentration of Cd(II) (5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg/L), influencing the adsorption mechanism. MITDC exhibited the equilibrium state of maximum Cd(II) adsorption at the contact time 120 min and pH 4.7 (removed 98.2 % Cd) when initial Cd(II) concentration was 10 mg/L in the present study. The dose of 7.5 g MITDC/L showed maximum removal of Cd(II) from water. Experimental data were described by the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherms and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model (R 2 = 0.996). The Cd(II) adsorption capacity of MITDC was 31.25 mg/g. The high Cd(II) adsorption capacity indicated that novel MITDC could be used as a potential ceramic adsorbent media to remove high rate of Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  9. Evaluating the paleomagnetic potential of single zircon crystals using the Bishop Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Roger R.; Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Kehayias, Pauli; Araujo, Jefferson F. D. F.; Glenn, David R.; Gelb, Jeff; Einsle, Joshua F.; Bauer, Ann M.; Harrison, Richard J.; Ali, Guleed A. H.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2017-01-01

    Zircon crystals offer a unique combination of suitability for high-precision radiometric dating and high resistance to alteration. Paleomagnetic experiments on ancient zircons may potentially constrain the history of the earliest geodynamo, which would hold broad implications for the early Earth's interior and atmosphere. However, the ability of zircons to record accurately the geomagnetic field has not been demonstrated. Here we conduct thermal and alternating field (AF) paleointensity experiments on 767.1 thousand year old (ka) zircons from the Bishop Tuff, California. The rapid emplacement of these zircons in a well-characterized magnetic field provides a high-fidelity test of the zircons' intrinsic paleomagnetic recording accuracy. Successful dual heating experiments on eleven zircons measured using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope yield a mean paleointensity of 54.1 ± 6.8μT (1σ; 42.6 ± 5.3μT after excluding possible maghemite-bearing zircons), which is consistent with high-precision results from Bishop Tuff whole rock (43.0 ± 3.2μT). High-resolution quantum diamond magnetic (QDM) mapping, electron microscopy, and X-ray tomography indicate that the bulk of the remanent magnetization in Bishop Tuff zircons is carried by Fe oxides associated with apatite inclusions, which may be susceptible to destruction via metamorphism and aqueous alteration in older zircons. As such, while zircons can reliably record the geomagnetic field, robust zircon-derived paleomagnetic results require careful characterization of the ferromagnetic carrier and demonstration of their occurrence in primary inclusions. We further conclude that a combination of quantum diamond magnetometry and high-resolution imaging can provide detailed, direct characterization of the ferromagnetic mineralogy of geological samples.

  10. Radionuclide Transport in Tuff and Carbonate Fractures from Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M; Johnson, M R; Roberts, S K; Pletcher, R; Rose, T P; Kersting, A B; Eaton, G; Hu, Q; Ramon, E; Walensky, J; Zhao, P

    2006-02-01

    In the Yucca Flat basin of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), 747 shaft and tunnel nuclear detonations were conducted primarily within the tuff confining unit (TCU) or the overlying alluvium. The TCU in the Yucca Flat basin is hypothesized to reduce radionuclide migration to the regional carbonate aquifer (lower carbonate aquifer) due to its wide-spread aerial extent and chemical reactivity. However, shortcuts through the TCU by way of fractures may provide a migration path for radionuclides to the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA). It is, therefore, imperative to understand how radionuclides migrate or are retarded in TCU fractures. Furthermore, understanding the migration behavior of radionuclides once they reach the fractured LCA is important for predicting contaminant transport within the regional aquifer. The work presented in this report includes: (1) information on the radionuclide reactive transport through Yucca Flat TCU fractures (likely to be the primary conduit to the LCA), (2) information on the reactive transport of radionuclides through LCA fractures and (3) data needed to calibrate the fracture flow conceptualization of predictive models. The predictive models are used to define the extent of contamination for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. Because of the complex nature of reactive transport in fractures, a stepwise approach to identifying mechanisms controlling radionuclide transport was used. In the first set of TCU experiments, radionuclide transport through simple synthetic parallel-plate fractured tuff cores was examined. In the second, naturally fractured TCU cores were used. For the fractured LCA experiments, both parallel-plate and rough-walled fracture transport experiments were conducted to evaluate how fracture topography affects radionuclide transport. Tuff cores were prepared from archived UE-7az and UE-7ba core obtained from the USGS core library, Mercury, Nevada. Carbonate cores were prepared from archived ER-6-1 core, also obtained

  11. Experimental research on sealing of boreholes, shafts and ramps in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenkajorn, K. [Rock Engineering International, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Laboratory and in-situ experiments have been conducted to determine the mechanical and hydraulic performance of cement borehole seals in densely welded Apache Leap tuff. Test results indicate that under saturated conditions, commercial expansive cement can provide good bond strength and adequate hydraulic performance for borehole seal under changing stress conditions. The cement seal should be installed at the intact portion of the opening, and should have a length-to-diameter ratio greater than four. Drying increases borehole plug permeability and decreases mechanical and hydraulic bonds at the plug-rock interface. In-situ testing indicates that installation procedure may significantly affect the cement plug performance.

  12. Fossil Fumarolic Pipes in the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporuscio, F. A.; Gardner, J. N.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Lewis, C. J.; Kelley, R. E.; Greene, M. K.

    2008-12-01

    The geology exposed on the walls (3000 m2) of a large pit in the Bandelier Tuff gives unparalled 3-D exposures of many structures that develop in thick deposits of pyroclastic flows. Subunits of the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff, erupted at 1.25 Ma, exhibit distinct rubble-filled fissures, or pipes, that range in width from centimeters to meters. The fissures exhibit zones of fines depletion, indurated wall structures, upward flaring geometry to the top of the host unit, and fissure-filling blocks of the host unit as well as rubble derived from overlying pyroclastic units. In the units directly overlying the fissures are intensely fractured in- place rubble zones. Additionally, the fissures appear to be regularly spaced at about 4.5 or 7.5 meters apart. All these field characteristics are indicative of fumarolic activity. Petrographic, XRD, and XRF studies of distinct pipes were done to investigate the physical changes imparted to the tuff by the fumarolic activity. Petrography indicates that the pipe wall and pipe centers are enriched in tridymite and potassium feldspar. These minerals fill the void spaces in pumice and groundmass void spaces of the pipe wall rocks, imparting the indurated nature. Other mineralogic indicators of late stage fumarolic gas phase deposition are optically continuous, feathery overgrowths on sanidine phenocrysts and scapolite in pipe centers. Also, clinopyroxenes in the overlying rubble zones have oxidized rims indicative of highly oxidizing gases emanating from the fumarolic pipes below. XRD analyses of rubble zones above the pipes show decreased cristobalite (4 wt. %) and feldspar (9 wt. %), and increased clay contents (12 to 26 wt. %). This change from feldspar and cristobalite to clay suggests an acidic nature of fumarolic gases. XRF analyses show trends in bulk chemistry consistent with fumarolic data from other tuffs. The data indicate that there have been systematic changes in the geochemistry of the fissures readily

  13. Nanoscale analysis of pyritized microfossils reveals differential heterotrophic consumption in the ~1.9-Ga Gunflint chert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacey, David; McLoughlin, Nicola; Kilburn, Matt R; Saunders, Martin; Cliff, John B; Kong, Charlie; Barley, Mark E; Brasier, Martin D

    2013-05-14

    The 1.88-Ga Gunflint biota is one of the most famous Precambrian microfossil lagerstätten and provides a key record of the biosphere at a time of changing oceanic redox structure and chemistry. Here, we report on pyritized replicas of the iconic autotrophic Gunflintia-Huroniospora microfossil assemblage from the Schreiber Locality, Canada, that help capture a view through multiple trophic levels in a Paleoproterozoic ecosystem. Nanoscale analysis of pyritic Gunflintia (sheaths) and Huroniospora (cysts) reveals differing relic carbon and nitrogen distributions caused by contrasting spectra of decay and pyritization between taxa, reflecting in part their primary organic compositions. In situ sulfur isotope measurements from individual microfossils (δ(34)S(V-CDT) +6.7‰ to +21.5‰) show that pyritization was mediated by sulfate-reducing microbes within sediment pore waters whose sulfate ion concentrations rapidly became depleted, owing to occlusion of pore space by coeval silicification. Three-dimensional nanotomography reveals additional pyritized biomaterial, including hollow, cellular epibionts and extracellular polymeric substances, showing a preference for attachment to Gunflintia over Huroniospora and interpreted as components of a saprophytic heterotrophic, decomposing community. This work also extends the record of remarkable biological preservation in pyrite back to the Paleoproterozoic and provides criteria to assess the authenticity of even older pyritized microstructures that may represent some of the earliest evidence for life on our planet.

  14. Pore-water extraction from unsaturated tuff by triaxial and one-dimensional compression methods, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mower, T.E. [PRC Environmental Management, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Higgins, J.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Yang, In C.; Peters, C.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The hydrologic system in the unsaturated tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated for the US Department of Energy by the Yucca Mountain Project Branch of the US Geological Survey as a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository. Part of this investigation includes a hydrochemical study that is being made to assess characteristics of the hydrologic system such as: traveltime, direction of flow, recharge and source relations, and types and magnitudes of chemical reactions in the unsaturated tuff. In addition, this hydrochemical information will be used in the study of the dispersive and corrosive effects of unsaturated-zone water on the radioactive-waste storage canisters. This report describes the design and validation of laboratory experimental procedures for extracting representative samples of uncontaminated pore water from welded and nonwelded, unsaturated tuffs from the Nevada Test Site.

  15. Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of a section through the Tiva Canyon Tuff at Antler Ridge, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, F.R.; Widmann, B.L.; Dickerson, R.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States); Byers, F.M. Jr. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Tiva Canyon Tuff of the Paintbrush Group of Miocene age caps much of Yucca Mountain, Nevada and is a compositionally zoned, compound cooling, pyroclastic flow that ranges from a dominantly high-silica rhyolitic base to a quartz-latitic caprock. Petrographic and geochemical studies have focused on rigorously defining the internal stratigraphy of this unit to support the detailed mapping of the Ghost Dance fault and other structures in the central fault block of Yucca Mountain. This study shows that devitrification textures and vapor phase mineralogy, in addition to other physical attributes such as pumice variability (flattening) and crystal content, can be used as distinguishing criteria to better define lithologic zones within the Tiva Canyon Tuff. In addition, the study also shows that the petrographic textures and chemistry of the groundmass vary systematically within recognizable lithologic zones and may be used to characterize and vertically divide litho-stratigraphic zones within the Tiva Canyon Tuff.

  16. Attenuation of pyrite oxidation with a fly ash pre-barrier: Reactive transport modelling of column experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lopez, R.; Cama, J.; Nieto, J.M.; Ayora, C.; Saaltink, M.W. [University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain). Dept. of Geology

    2009-09-15

    Conventional permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for passive treatment of groundwater contaminated by acid mine drainage (AMD) use limestone as reactive material that neutralizes water acidity. However, the limestone-alkalinity potential ceases as inevitable precipitation of secondary metal-phases on grain surfaces occurs, limiting its efficiency. In the present study, fly ash derived from coal combustion is investigated as an alternative alkalinity generating material for the passive treatment of AMD using solution-saturated column experiments. Unlike conventional systems, the utilization of fly ash in a pre-barrier to intercept the non-polluted recharge water before this water reacts with pyrite-rich wastes is proposed. Chemical variation in the columns was interpreted with the reactive transport code RETRASO. In parallel, kinetics of fly ash dissolution at alkaline pH were studied using flow-through experiments and incorporated into the model. In a saturated column filled solely with pyritic sludge-quartz sand (1: 10), oxidation took place at acidic conditions (pH 3.7). According to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} release and pH, pyrite dissolution occurred favourably in the solution-saturated porous medium until dissolved O{sub 2} was totally consumed. In a second saturated column, pyrite oxidation took place at alkaline conditions (pH 10.45) as acidity was neutralized by fly ash dissolution in a previous level. At this pH Fe release from pyrite dissolution was immediately depleted as Fe-oxy(hydroxide) phases that precipitated on the pyrite grains, forming Fe-coatings (microencapsulation). With time, pyrite microencapsulation inhibited oxidation in practically 97% of the pyritic sludge. Rapid pyrite-surface passivation decreased its reactivity, preventing AMD production in the relatively short term.

  17. Arsenic chemistry with sulfide, pyrite, zero-valent iron, and magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fenglong

    The aim of this thesis is to study the immobilization reactions of arsenic in water. Since compounds containing iron or sulfide are common in most natural and engineered systems, the research focused on the redox reactions and adsorption of arsenic with sulfide, pyrite, zero-valent iron (ZVI), and magnetite which were studied through wet chemistry methods and spectroscopic techniques. The kinetic and thermodynamic information of the reactions of As(V) with S(-II), As(V)/As(III) with pyrite and surface-oxidized pyrite, As(V) with ZVI and acid-treated ZVI, As(III) with magnetite was used to identify mechanisms. The necessity to maintain strictly anoxic conditions was emphasized for the study of arsenic redox chemistry with sulfides and ZVI. The major findings of this research can be stated as follows. First, dissolved sulfide reduced As(V) to lower valences to form a yellow precipitate at acidic pH. The reaction involved the formation of thioarsenic intermediate species. Dissolved O2, granular activated carbon (GAC) and dissolved Fe(II) inhibited the removal of As(V) by sulfide. Elemental sulfur catalyzed the reduction of As(V) by sulfide, which implied the possible benefit of using sulfur-loaded GAC for arsenic removal. Possible reaction mechanisms were discussed. Second, As(III) adsorbed on pristine pyrite over a broader pH range than on surface-oxidized pyrite, while As(V) adsorbed over a narrower pH range with pristine pyrite. As(V) was completely reduced to As(III) on pristine pyrite at acidic pH but not at higher pH. The reduction was first-order with respect to As(V). As(V) was not reduced on surface-oxidized pyrite at pH = 4--11. The different behaviors of As(V) and As(III) on pristine and surface oxidized pyrite determines the toxicity and mobility of arsenic under oxic/anoxic environments. Third, commercial ZVI reduced As(V) to As(III) at low pH (treated ZVI reduced As(V) to As(0), indicated by wet chemical analyses and by XANES/EXAFS, which could result in

  18. Existing forms of REE in gold-bearing pyrite of the Jinshan gold deposit,Jiangxi Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛光周; 华仁民; 高剑峰; 李伟强; 赵葵东; 龙光明; 陆慧娟

    2009-01-01

    Rare earth element(REE) is widely used in various fields of geology.Study of the existing forms of REE in geological objects is a necessity for us to solve geological problems related with REE.This paper tried to make it clear the existing forms of REE in gold-bearing pyrite in Jinshan gold deposit by stepwise dissolution test with ICP-MS analysis.Results showed that content of REE in fluid-inclusions of gold-bearing pyrite was very low,which only took about 0.07%-0.70% of the ΣREE,and that of pyrite phase ...

  19. The origin of copiapite from chlorite pyritic schist (Wiesciszowice, Lower Silesia, Poland) in the light of Moessbauer analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, Z., E-mail: zdzislaw.adamczyk@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Applied Geology (Poland); Komraus, J. L., E-mail: komraus@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics (Poland)

    2008-01-15

    This work presents the results of the analysis of copiapite, formed from weathering and oxidation of pyrite in pyritic schist from Wiesciszowice, Lower Silesia (Poland). The pure phase of copiapite was found in secondary minerals after pyrite and identified by optical microscopy, XRD and Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the analyzed copiapite major cations appear to be Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. Some Fe{sup 3+} is substituted by other cations, mainly Al{sup 3+}. Al{sup 3+} probably comes from leaching of chlorite from which hydrated sulphates of iron, mainly szomolnokite, form followed by hydrated sulphates fibroferrite, which is replaced by copiapite.

  20. THE STUDY OF THE BASIC THEORY AND THE APPLICATION OF REMOVAL PYRITE AND ASH FROM FINE COAL WITH ELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章新喜; 陈清加

    1996-01-01

    The effect of removing pyrite and ash from fine coal with electrostatic separator is determined by the electric property of coal, the distribution of corona ion and electrostatic field, and the disperse and even feed. The dielectric constant of coal and mineral matter is studied in this paper and the amendment has been made to survey theory. The oscillogram is adopted to study the distribution of corona ion and electrostatic field. The paper details the study of remoing pyrite and ash from fine coal, and the test results demonstrate the high efficiency of removing pyrite and ash with electrostatic separator.

  1. Uranium(VI adsorption on surfactant modified heulandite/clinoptilolite rich tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRDJAN MATIJASEVIC

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of uranium(VI on heulandite/clinoptilolite rich zeolitic tuff modified with diferent amounts (2, 5 and 10 meq/100 g of hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA ion was investigated. The organozeolites were prepared by ion exchange of inorganic cations at the zeolite surface with HDTMA ions, and the three prepared samples were denoted as OA-2, OA-5 and OA-10. The maximal amount of HDTMAin the organozeolite OA-10 (10 meq/100 g was equal to the external cation exchange capacity of the starting material. The results showed that uranium( VI adsorption on unmodified zeolitic tuff was low (0.34 mg uranium(VI/g adsorbent, while for the organozeolites, the adsorption increased with increasing amount of HDTMA at the zeolitic surface. The highest adsorption indexes were achieved for the organozeolite OA-10, in which all the surface inorganic cations had been replaced with HDTMA. An investigation of the adsorption of uranium(VI ions onto organozeolite OA-10 at different pH values (3, 6 and 8 showed that the adsorption index increased with increasing amount of adsorbent in the suspension. Since uranium(VI speciation is highly dependent on pH, from the adsorption isotherms, it can be seen that uranium(VI adsorption on organozeolite OA-10 at pH 6 and 8 is well described by a Langmuir type of isotherm, while at pH 3, it corresponds to a Type III isotherm.

  2. Clinoptilolite compositions in diagenetically-altered tuffs at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broxton, D.E.

    1987-12-31

    The compositions of Yucca Mountain clinoptilolites and their host tuffs are highly variable. Clinoptilolites and heulandites in fractures near the repository and in a thin, altered zone at the top of the Topopah Spring basal vitrophyre have consistent calcium-rich compositions. Below this level, clinoptilolites in thick zones of diagenetic alteration on the east side of Yucca Mountain have calcic-potassic compositions and become more calcium rich with depth. Clinoptilolites in stratigraphically equivalent tuffs to the west have sodic-potassic compositions and become more sodic with depth. Clinoptilolite properties important for repository performance assessment include thermal expansion/contraction behavior, hydration/dehydration behavior, and ion-exchange properties. These properties can be significantly affected by clinoptilolite compositions. The compositional variations for clinoptilolites found by this study suggest that the properties will vary vertically and laterally at Yucca Mountain. Used in conjunction with experimental data, the clinoptilolite compositions presented here can be used to model the behavior of clinoptilolites in the repository environment and along transport pathways.

  3. Biofilms on tuff stones at historical sites: identification and removal by nonthermal effects of radiofrequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, P; Caputo, P; Giorgio, A; Moretti, A; Pasquino, N

    2013-10-01

    A methodology aiming at identifying and removing biofilms from cultural heritage was applied to stones from tuff walls in historical sites. Identification of phototrophic encrusting microorganisms was carried out by optical and electron microscopy, as well as by molecular techniques (DNA analyses and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)). In all sites, the examination of microbial components of biofilms resulted in the identification of 17 species belonging to Cyanobacteria, Rhodophyta, Bacillariophyta and Chlorophyta, with Cyanobacteria being the dominant components in all biofilms. In order to remove the biofilms, an innovative technique based on the use of nonthermal effects of radiofrequencies was adopted. The source of the electromagnetic fields was a signal generator connected to a horn antenna through an amplifier to provide the power boost required to generate the target field amplitude. Seven days after exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field, about 50 % reduction of biofilm was observed; after 14 days, biofilm extension was reduced by about 90 %. DGGE analyses performed after 14 days confirmed these visual inspections. Also, DGGE analyses carried out before and 14 days after treatments showed that 12 out of 17 identified species disappeared. A complete visual disappearance of biofilms was observed a month after the beginning of treatments. DGGE repeated at this time confirmed the total disappearance of biofilm-forming species. Treated stones, when transferred back to their original sites, did not show any microorganism re-growing after 6 months. No alteration in the color and structural consistency of tuff substrata was observed after radiofrequency treatments.

  4. Wireline-rotary air coring of the Bandelier Tuff, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, W.E.; Pemberton, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes experiments using wireline-rotary air-coring techniques conducted in the Bandelier Tuff using a modified standard wireline core-barrel system. The modified equipment was used to collect uncontaminated cores of unconsolidated ash and indurated tuff at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Core recovery obtained from the 210-foot deep test hole was about 92 percent. A standard HQ-size, triple-tube wireline core barrel (designed for the passage of liquid drilling fluids) was modified for air coring as follows: (1) Air passages were milled in the latch body part of the head assembly; (2) the inside dimension of the outer core barrel tube was machined and honed to provide greater clearance between the inner and outer barrels; (3) oversized reaming devices were added to the outer core barrel and the coring bit to allow more clearance for air and cuttings return; (4) the eight discharge ports in the coring bit were enlarged. To control airborne-dust pollution, a dust-and-cuttings discharge subassembly, designed and built by project personnel, was used. (USGS)

  5. Analysis of Fracture in Cores from the Tuff Confining Unit beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lance Prothro

    2008-03-01

    The role fractures play in the movement of groundwater through zeolitic tuffs that form the tuff confining unit (TCU) beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, is poorly known. This is an important uncertainty, because beneath most of Yucca Flat the TCU lies between the sources of radionuclide contaminants produced by historic underground nuclear testing and the regional carbonate aquifer. To gain a better understanding of the role fractures play in the movement of groundwater and radionuclides through the TCU beneath Yucca Flat, a fracture analysis focusing on hydraulic properties was performed on conventional cores from four vertical exploratory holes in Area 7 of Yucca Flat that fully penetrate the TCU. The results of this study indicate that the TCU is poorly fractured. Fracture density for all fractures is 0.27 fractures per vertical meter of core. For open fractures, or those observed to have some aperture, the density is only 0.06 fractures per vertical meter of core. Open fractures are characterized by apertures ranging from 0.1 to 10 millimeter, and averaging 1.1 millimeter. Aperture typically occurs as small isolated openings along the fracture, accounting for only 10 percent of the fracture volume, the rest being completely healed by secondary minerals. Zeolite is the most common secondary mineral occurring in 48 percent of the fractures observed.

  6. Stable isotopes of authigenic minerals in variably-saturated fractured tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, D.S.; Evans, D.D.

    1988-11-01

    Identifying stable isotope variation and mineralogical changes in fractured rock may help establish the history of climatic and geomorphological processes that might affect the isolation properties of a waste repository site. This study examines the use of the stable isotope ratios of oxygen ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) and carbon ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in authigenic minerals as hydrogeochemical tools tracing low-temperature rock-water interaction in variably-saturated fractured stuff. Isotopic compositions of fracture-filling and rock matrix minerals in the Apache Leap tuff, near Superior, Arizona were concordant with geothermal temperatures and in equilibrium with water isotopically similar to present-day meteoric water and groundwater. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of fracture-filling, in unsaturated fractured tuff, displayed an isotopic gradient believed to result from near-surface isotopic enrichment due to evaporation rather than the effects of rock-water interaction. Oxygen isotope ratios of rock matrix opal samples exhibited an isotopic gradient believed to result from, leaching and reprecipitation of silica at depth. Methods and results can be used to further define primary flowpaths and the movement of water in variably-saturated fractured rock. 71 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Mineralogy, petrology and whole-rock chemistry data compilation for selected samples of Yucca Mountain tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, J.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-12-01

    Petrologic, bulk chemical, and mineralogic data are presented for 49 samples of tuffaceous rocks from core holes USW G-1 and UE-25a{number_sign}1 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Included, in descending stratigraphic order, are 11 samples from the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, 12 samples from the Tuffaceous Beds of Calico Hills, 3 samples from the Prow Pass Member of the Crater Flat Tuff, 20 samples from the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff and 3 samples from the Tram Member of the Crater Flat Tuff. The suite of samples contains a wide variety of petrologic types, including zeolitized, glassy, and devitrified tuffs. Data vary considerably between groups of samples, and include thin section descriptions (some with modal analyses for which uncertainties are estimated), electron microprobe analyses of mineral phases and matrix, mineral identifications by X-ray diffraction, and major element analyses with uncertainty estimates.

  8. Inverse Dipolar Magnetic Anomaly Over the Volcanic Cone Linked to Reverse Polarity Magnetizations in Lavas and Tuffs - Implications for the Conduit System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Trigo-Huesca, A.

    2012-12-01

    A combined magnetics and paleomagnetic study of Toluquilla monogenetic volcano and associated lavas and tuffs from Valsequillo basin in Central Mexico provides evidence on a magnetic link between lavas, ash tuffs and the underground volcanic conduit system. Paleomagnetic analyses show that lavas and ash tuffs carry reverse polarity magnetizations, which correlate with the inversely polarized dipolar magnetic anomaly over the volcano. The magnetizations in the lava and tuff show similar southward declinations and upward inclinations, supporting petrological inferences that the tuff was emplaced while still hot and indicating a temporal correlation for lava and tuff emplacement. Conduit geometry is one of the important controlling factors in eruptive dynamics of basaltic volcanoes. However volcanic conduits are often not, or only partly, exposed. Modeling of the dipolar anomaly gives a reverse polarity source magnetization associated with a vertical prismatic body with southward declination and upward inclination, which correlates with the reverse polarity magnetizations in the lava and tuff. The study documents a direct correlation of the paleomagnetic records with the underground magmatic conduit system of the monogenetic volcano. Time scale for cooling of the volcanic plumbing system involves a longer period than the one for the tuff and lava, suggesting that magnetization for the source of dipolar anomaly may represent a long time average as compared to the spot readings in the lava and tuff. The reverse polarity magnetizations in lava and tuff and in the underground source body for the magnetic anomaly are interpreted in terms of eruptive activity of Toluquilla volcano at about 1.3 Ma during the Matuyama reverse polarity C1r.2r chron.

  9. On the origin of framboidal pyrite in sediments of the Suakin Deep (Red Sea)Sur l'origine de la pyrite framboïdale dans les sédiments de la fosse Suakin (mer Rouge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, Marie-Claire; Blanc, Gérard; Clauer, Norbert

    2000-01-01

    Suakin Deep is one of the southern depressions of the Red Sea, with sediments containing up to 20 % of pyrite. Although metalliferous sediments result from hydrothermal activity in most deeps, those of Suakin have different characteristics. Pyrite is framboïdal and the REE patterns of its sediments are similar to those of biodetrital sediments. The sediments seem to be of biodetritic origin and to have undergone diagenetic changes without hydrothermal activity.

  10. Biohydrometallurgical process to produce the coagulant ferric sulfate from the pyrite present in coal tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colling, A.V.; Santos Menezes dos, J.C.S.; Silveira, P.S.; Schneider, I.A.H. [South Rio Grande Federal Univ., Porto Alegre (Brazil). Graduate Program in Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Technology Center

    2010-07-01

    This paper presented details of a biohydrometallurgical study conducted to characterize the production of a ferric sulfate coagulate from pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) contained in coal tailings. Leaching experiments were conducted with coal tailings samples from the Santa Catarina mining site in Brazil. The experiments were conducted for sterile and non-sterile samples, as well as samples inoculated with acidophilic bacteria and acidophilic bacteria with the addition of nutrients. Samples were collected weekly in order to analyze total iron, sulfate, and the amounts of Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans bacteria. An analysis of the samples showed that the pyrite oxidation, iron sulfate production, and quantities of bacteria were higher in the column inoculated with the bacteria and nutrient additions. The samples produced an aqueous solution that was rich in ferric sulfate. Water treatment tests demonstrated that the resulting coagulant is as efficient as conventionally-produced coagulants. 8 refs., 2 tab., 2 figs.

  11. Simulation of electrocatalytic hydrogen production by a bioinspired catalyst anchored to a pyrite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipoli, Federico; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2010-06-30

    The possibility of using the active site, the [FeFe](H) cluster, of the bacterial di-iron hydrogenases as a catalyst for hydrogen production from water by electro- or photocatalysis is of current scientific and technological interest. We present here a theoretical study of hydrogen production by a modified [FeFe](H) cluster stably linked to a pyrite electrode immersed in acidified water. We employed state-of-the-art electronic-structure and first-principles molecular-dynamics methods. We found that a stable sulfur link of the cluster to the surface analogous to that linking the cluster to its enzyme environment cannot be made. However, we have discovered a modification of the cluster which does form a stable, tridentate link to the surface. The pyrite electrode readily produces hydrogen from acidified water when functionalized with the modified cluster, which remains stable throughout the hydrogen production cycle.

  12. Pyrite thermochemistry, ash agglomeration, and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akan-Etuk, A.; Diaz, R.; Niksa, S.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to introduce an experimental program that will eventually lead to time-resolved iron ash composition over the technological operating domain. The preceding literature survey suggests two important stipulations on any such experimental program. The first stipulation is that good control must be established over the operating conditions, to accurately quantify their effects. The other is that data must be obtained rapidly, to thoroughly cover the important operating domain. This work presents a series of studies that has characterized the desulfurization of pyrite during the early stages of combustion. An experimental system was established and used to monitor the effects of oxygen, temperature, and residence time on the evolution of condensed phase products of the combustion of pure pyrite. (VC)

  13. Pyrite thermochemistry, ash agglomeration, and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akan-Etuk, A.; Diaz, R.; Niksa, S.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to introduce an experimental program that will eventually lead to time-resolved iron ash composition over the technological operating domain. The preceding literature survey suggests two important stipulations on any such experimental program. The first stipulation is that good control must be established over the operating conditions, to accurately quantify their effects. The other is that data must be obtained rapidly, to thoroughly cover the important operating domain. This work presents a series of studies that has characterized the desulfurization of pyrite during the early stages of combustion. An experimental system was established and used to monitor the effects of oxygen, temperature, and residence time on the evolution of condensed phase products of the combustion of pure pyrite. (VC)

  14. Influences of silver sulfide on the bioleaching of chalcopyrite, pyrite and chalcopyrite-containing ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡岳华; 王军; 邱冠周; 王淀佐

    2002-01-01

    The effects of silver sulfide (Ag2S) on the bioleaching of chalcopyrite and pyrite were investigated in this paper. It has been shown that Ag2S enhanced the yields of bioleaching of chalcopyrite but inhibited the bio-oxidation of pyrite. The addition of Ag2S selectively increased the copper dissolution from the chalcopyrite-containing ores in shake flasks with a recovery of 85.3% compared with 24.3% without Ag2S, while slightly decreased the iron yields from 51% to 41.8%. The copper extraction of the chalcoopyrite-containing waste rock in column leaching charged with 18 kg mass increased up to 21.7% in the presence of Ag2S, while only 3.4% in the absence of the catalyst. The mechanism of Ag2S catalysis could be explained well by the "Mixed potential model".

  15. Preparation of Metallic Iron Powder from Pyrite Cinder by Carbothermic Reduction and Magnetic Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongming Long

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The reduction and magnetic separation procedure of pyrite cinder in the presence of a borax additive was performed for the preparation of reduced powder. The effects of borax dosage, reduction temperature, reduction time and grinding fineness were investigated. The results show that when pyrite cinder briquettes with 5% borax were pre-oxidized at 1050 °C for 10 min, and reduced at 1050 °C for 80 min, with the grinding fineness (<0.44 mm passing 81%, the iron recovery was 91.71% and the iron grade of the magnetic concentrate was 92.98%. In addition, the microstructures of the products were analyzed by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and mineralography, and the products were also studied by the X-ray powder diffraction technique (XRD to investigate the mechanism; the results show that the borax additive was approved as a good additive to improve the separation of iron and gangue.

  16. Factors Influencing Conversion of Pyritic Sulfur in Coal by Microwave Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Jian-cai; XU Ming-hou; QIU Ji-hua; CHENG Rong

    2005-01-01

    The high sulfur coal from southwest of China was used to examine the influence of different factors such as irradiation time, particle size of coal, and leachant (Na2CO3, NaOH and CuCl2.2H2O)on the conversion rate of pyrite to pyrrhotite by microwave irradiation. Single factor experiment was performed firstly, then orthogonal test method was used to explore these factors. The result shows that the optimal treating conditions for the conversion are a treatment time of 3 min, a particle size from 0.086 mm to 0.102 mm, and a favorable leachant of sodium hydroxide. Under these conditions the conversion rate of pyrite can reach 45.7 %.

  17. Preparation of solid polyferric sulfate from pyrite cinders and its structure feature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑雅杰; 龚竹青; 陈白珍; 刘立华

    2003-01-01

    Acid leaching solution was obtained after mixing pyrite cinders with H2SO4, then heating the mixture of pyrite cinders and H2SO4 at 200-300 ℃, leaching the heated mixture with water and filtrating. Polyferric sulfate (PFS) solution was produced by adding suitable amounts of FeSO4*7H2O and NaClO3 into acid leaching solution. By concentrating and drying PFS solution, solid PFS with alkali degree of 6.40%-22.4% was prepared. Fe4.67(SO4)6(OH)2*20H2O in the solid PFS was discovered by XRD analysis. FT-IR spectroscopy shows that the absorption peaks at 3 400 cm-1 and 1 635 cm-1 arise from OH and absorption peaks at 998 cm-1 and 669 cm-1 come from Fe-OH in the solid PFS.

  18. Comparisons of species and coagulation effects of PFS solution and solid PFS from pyrite cinders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑雅杰; 龚竹青; 刘立华; 陈白珍

    2002-01-01

    Pyrite cinder is a kind of solid waste of sulfuric acid industry. After mixing pyrite cinders with sulfuric acid, ferric sulfate was obtained by heating, maturing, dissolving and filtrating. Suitable amounts of FeSO4 * 7H2O and NaClO3 were added into ferric sulfate solution and polyferric sulfate(PFS) solution was produced. Solid PFS was made by concentrating and drying PFS solution. Time-dependent complex colorimetric tests were done while ferron agent reacted with Fe3+ in the solution. The results show that the proportion of transitional low polymeric species and high polymeric species are increased after PFS solution is transferred into solid PFS. It was discovered by jar tests that solid PFS has very good coagulation effects relevant to the increase of transitional lower polymeric species.

  19. Pyrite oxidation in the presence of hematite and alumina: I. Batch leaching experiments and kinetic modeling calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar; Veerawattananun, Suchol; Ito, Mayumi; Hiroyoshi, Naoki; Igarashi, Toshifumi

    2017-02-15

    Pyrite is one of the most common and geochemically important sulfide minerals in nature because of its role in the redox recycling of iron (Fe). It is also the primary cause of acid mine drainage (AMD) that is considered as a serious and widespread problem facing the mining and mineral processing industries. In the environment, pyrite oxidation occurs in the presence of ubiquitous metal oxides, but the roles that they play in this process remain largely unknown. This study evaluates the effects of hematite (α-Fe2O3) and alumina (α-Al2O3) on pyrite oxidation by batch-reactor type experiments, surface-sensitive characterization of the oxidation layer and thermodynamic/kinetic modeling calculations. In the presence of hematite, dissolved sulfur (S) concentration dramatically decreased independent of the pH, and the formation of intermediate sulfoxy anionic species on the surface of pyrite was retarded. These results indicate that hematite minimized the overall extent of pyrite oxidation, but the kinetic model could not explain how this suppression occurred. In contrast, pyrite oxidation was enhanced in the alumina suspension as suggested by the higher dissolved S concentration and stronger infrared (IR) absorption bands of surface-bound oxidation products. Based on the kinetic model, alumina enhanced the oxidative dissolution of pyrite because of its strong acid buffering capacity, which increased the suspension pH. The higher pH values increased the oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+) by dissolved O2 (DO) that enhanced the overall oxidative dissolution kinetics of pyrite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High-resolution (SIMS) versus bulk sulfur isotope patterns of pyrite in Proterozoic microbialites with diverse mat textures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, M. L.; Fike, D. A.; Bergmann, K.; Knoll, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur (S) isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrite preserved in marine rocks provide a rich suite of information about changes in biogeochemical cycling associated with the evolution of microbial metabolisms and oxygenation of Earth surface environments. Conventionally, these S isotope records are based on bulk rock measurements. Yet, in modern microbial mat environments, S isotope compositions of sulfide can vary by up to 40‰ over a spatial range of ~ 1 mm. Similar ranges of S isotope variability have been found in Archean pyrite grains using both Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and other micro-analytical techniques. These micron-scale patterns have been linked to changes in rates of microbial sulfate reduction and/or sulfide oxidation, isotopic distillation of the sulfate reservoir due to microbial sulfate reduction, and post-depositional alteration. Fine-scale mapping of S isotope compositions of pyrite can thus be used to differentiate primary environmental signals from post-depositional overprinting - improving our understanding of both. Here, we examine micron-scale S isotope patterns of pyrite in microbialites from the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic Sukhaya Tunguska Formation and Neoproterozoic Draken Formation in order to explore S isotope variability associated with different mat textures and pyrite grain morphologies. A primary goal is to link modern observations of how sulfide spatial isotope distributions reflect active microbial communities present at given depths in the mats to ancient processes driving fine-sale pyrite variability in microbialites. We find large (up to 60‰) S isotope variability within a spatial range of less than 2.5cm. The micron-scale S isotope measurements converge around the S isotope composition of pyrite extracted from bulk samples of the same microbialites. These micron-scale pyrite S isotope patterns have the potential to reveal important information about ancient biogeochemical cycling in Proterozoic mat environments

  1. Dependence of reaction rate of pyrite oxidation on temperature, pH and oxidant concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Long; WANG; Rucheng; XUE; Jiyue; CHEN; Fanrong; CHEN; J

    2005-01-01

    The kinetic sstudy of pyrite oxidation was performed in a series of experiments by a mixed flow reactor. The release rates of Fe(II) are in the order of 3.22×10-9-5.51×10-7 mol·m-2·s-1 at temperature (T ) 25 to 44℃, initial pH (pH )1.4 to 2.7, and initial Fe(III) concentration ([Fe(III)]I) 10-5 to 5×10-3 mol·kg-1. The release rate of Fe(II) increased with increasing T or/and pH or/and [Fe(III)]I in the above range. The rate law and activation energy of pyrite oxidation were derived by statistical analyses of Rfe(II) vs. [Fe(III)]I, Rfe(II) vs. pH and Rfe(II) vs. T, and are given as (1) Rate law: Rfe(II)=104.65e-64.54×103/8.31T[Fe(III)]i0.6./[H+]0.45 ; (2) activation energy: 64.54 ( 8.07 kJ·mol-1. The expression can be applied to more cases (e.g., quantifying the pollutant released from sulfide-rich mining waste and assessing reliable performance of underground repository sites where pyrite acts as an engineered barrier material). Using the rate law derived from this study, the magnitude of the pollutants transferred to secondary phases, soil and water from oxidized pyrite during Jiguanshan mine waste weathering was preliminarily estimated. The estimated magnitude is very high, suggesting that the pile has possibly posed significant impact on the water quality in this region.

  2. Pyrite as a proxy for the identification of former coastal lagoons in semiarid NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago O.; Nóbrega, Gabriel N.; Albuquerque, Antonia G. B. M.; Sartor, Lucas R.; Gomes, Irlene S.; Artur, Adriana G.; Otero, Xosé L.

    2015-10-01

    This work aimed to test the suitability of pyrite (FeS2) as a proxy for reconstructing past marine environmental conditions along the semiarid coast of Brazil. Morphological description combined with physicochemical analyses including Fe partitioning were conducted for soil depth profiles (30 and 60 cm depths) at three sites in two contrasting lagoons of the state of Ceará: a suspected former lagoon that would have been transformed into a freshwater "lake" at a site vegetated by Juncus effusus (site P1), and another lagoon with connection to the sea at sites vegetated by J. effusus (site P2) or Portulaca oleracea (site P3). Soil samples were collected in September 2010. Site P3 had more reducing conditions, reaching Eh values of -132 mV in the surface layer (0-10 cm), whereas minimum values for the P1 and P2 sites were +219 and +85 mV, respectively. Lower pyritic Fe values were found at site P1, with a degree of pyritization (DOP) ranging from 10 to 13%. At sites P2 and P3, DOP ranged from 9 to 67% and from 55 to 72%, respectively. These results are consistent with an interruption of tidal channels by eolian dune migration inducing strong changes in the hydrodynamics and physicochemical characteristics (lower salinity, oxidizing conditions) of these sites, causing the dieback of suspected former mangroves and a succession to freshwater marshes with an intermediate salt marsh stage. Together with other physicochemical signatures, pyrite can evidently serve as a useful proxy in tracking environmental changes in such ecotones, with implications for coastal management.

  3. Mineral chemistry and isotope geochemistry of pyrite from the Heilangou gold deposit, Jiaodong Peninsula, Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutong Yan; Na Zhang; Shengrong Li; Yongsheng Li

    2014-01-01

    The Heilangou gold deposit is located in the northern QixiaePenglai gold belt, which is one amongst the three large gold belts in the eastern Shandong Province (Jiaodong Peninsula). The ore body has formed within the Guojialing granite. In this study, we report the mineral chemistry of pyrite, as well as the S, Pb, and HeO isotope data of the Heilangou gold deposit. The chemical composition of pyrite in the Heilangou gold deposit indicates that the associated gold deposit is a typical magmatic hydrothermal one. The geochemical signatures and crystal structure of pyrite show that the ore-forming materials have been derived from the crust. The S isotope data of the pyrites from Heilangou show an overall range from 5.5 to 7.8&and an average of 6.7&. The S isotope data in this deposit are similar to those from the deposits in the Jiaodong gold belt. The Pb and S isotope variations are small in the Heilangou gold deposit. The 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios are 17.4653e17.5958, 15.5105e15.5746 and 38.0749e38.4361, respec-tively. These data plot between the lower crust and the orogenic belt. The Pb isotope data in the Heilangou gold deposit are similar to those in the Linglong gold deposit. From the Qixia gold area (the Liukou and Majiayao gold deposits) to the MupingeRushan gold belt (Rushan gold deposit) to the ZhaoeYe gold belt (the Linglong, Sanshandao and Jiaojia gold deposits), the 206Pb/204Pb ratios progressively increase. The DeO isotope data obtained from quartz separates suggest that the ore-forming fluid was similar to a mixture of magmatic and meteoric waters. These results suggest that the ore-forming elements were primarily from source fluids derived from the lower crust.

  4. Equation of state of pyrite to 85 GPa and 2400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E. C.; Chidester, B.; Campbell, A. J.; Prakapenka, V.

    2014-12-01

    Pyrite (FeS2), a Pa3 space group non-magnetic semiconductor, is the most abundant iron sulfide in nature, yet the high cosmic abundance of sulfur is not reflected in the terrestrial crust, implying it is either sequestered in the Earth's interior or was volatilized during accretion. As it has widely been suggested that sulfur could be one of the contributing light elements leading to the density deficit of Earth's core, a robust thermal equation of state of FeS2 is vital for understanding the evolution and properties of Earth's interior. We performed X-ray diffraction measurements on FeS2 at the GSECARS sector 13-ID-D and HPCAT sector 16-ID-B beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source. Pressures from 17 to 85 GPa and temperatures up to 2400 K were achieved using laser-heated diamond anvil cells. Pressures were determined from the lattice parameters of KBr [1], which served as an insulator and pressure medium, and temperatures were determined by spectroradiometry. No phase transitions were observed in the pyrite structure over the pressure and temperature ranges investigated. By combining our new P-V-T data with previously published room temperature compression data [2], we have determined a thermal equation of state for FeS2, with bulk modulus K=182.6(74) GPa, pressure derivative K'=3.82(25), and αKT=0.00329(45). Our revised equation of state for pyrite is consistent with a core density deficit satisfied by 9-10 wt.% sulfur. We compare these findings to previously published ab intio equation of state parameters for pyrite under a similar range of pressures [3]. [1] Fischer et al. (2012) EPSL 357-358, 268-276. [2] Merkel et al. (2002) PCM 29, 1-9. [3] Le Page and Rodgers (2005) PCM 32, 564-567.

  5. Arsenopyrite and pyrite bioleaching: evidence from XPS, XRD and ICP techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantauzzi, Marzia; Licheri, Cristina; Atzei, Davide; Loi, Giovanni; Elsener, Bernhard; Rossi, Giovanni; Rossi, Antonella

    2011-10-01

    In this work, a multi-technical bulk and surface analytical approach was used to investigate the bioleaching of a pyrite and arsenopyrite flotation concentrate with a mixed microflora mainly consisting of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray-induced Auger electron spectroscopy mineral surfaces investigations, along with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy and carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur determination (CHNS) analyses, were carried out prior and after bioleaching. The flotation concentrate was a mixture of pyrite (FeS(2)) and arsenopyrite (FeAsS); after bioleaching, 95% of the initial content of pyrite and 85% of arsenopyrite were dissolved. The chemical state of the main elements (Fe, As and S) at the surface of the bioreactor feed particles and of the residue after bioleaching was investigated by X-ray photoelectron and X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy. After bioleaching, no signals of iron, arsenic and sulphur originating from pyrite and arsenopyrite were detected, confirming a strong oxidation and the dissolution of the particles. On the surfaces of the mineral residue particles, elemental sulphur as reaction intermediate of the leaching process and precipitated secondary phases (Fe-OOH and jarosite), together with adsorbed arsenates, was detected. Evidence of microbial cells adhesion at mineral surfaces was also produced: carbon and nitrogen were revealed by CHNS, and nitrogen was also detected on the bioleached surfaces by XPS. This was attributed to the deposition, on the mineral surfaces, of the remnants of a bio-film consisting of an extra-cellular polymer layer that had favoured the bacterial action.

  6. Studying the sorption properties of a clinoptilolite-containing tuff with respect to europium(III) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikova, N. M.

    2014-03-01

    The kinetic laws of sorption of europium(III) ions from sulfate solutions by a clinoptilolite-containing tuff are studied. The kinetic parameters of sorption process are determined and absorption isotherms are constructed for europium ions. It is found that both external and internal diffusion are rate-limiting steps, and europium is completely extracted from dilute solutions (<0.0025 m).

  7. Zeolitic alteration and fracture fillings in silicic tuffs at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broxton, D.E.; Carlos, B.A.

    1986-12-31

    This paper describes the distribution and chemistry of zeolites in tuffs and in fractures at Yucca Mountain. Samples used in this study were collected from continuously-cored exploratory drill holes. A variety of analytical techniques, including optical petrography, x-ray powder diffraction, electron microanalysis, and x-ray fluorescence, were used to characterize the distribution and chemistry of zeolites in these samples.

  8. Structure, stratigraphy, and eruption dynamics of a young tuff ring: Hanauma Bay, O'ahu, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottas, K. M.; Houghton, B. F.

    2012-09-01

    The Hanauma Bay-Koko Head complex is one of several young volcanic landforms along the Koko fissure, in southeastern O'ahu. The Hanauma Bay region of the complex comprises two nested tuff rings, inner and outer Hanauma Bay, and multiple smaller vents. The internal structure of the inner tuff ring, well exposed due to subsequent breaching by the ocean and wave erosion, indicates that it formed during a minimum of five distinct phases of deposition that produced five mappable units. Significant inward collapses generated major unconformities that separate the units exposed in the inner wall. The planes of failure are cut by narrow steep-walled, locally overhung channels and gullies, suggesting that the collapse events were each followed by short time breaks during which the deposits were eroded by rainfall runoff. Within each pyroclastic unit, there are many local slump scars and unconformities, suggesting that minor instability of the inner wall was a near-constant feature. From bedding sags and surge bed forms, it is apparent that the vent shifted at least twice during tuff ring growth. Ballistic blocks in the youngest unit indicate that the eruption overlapped in time with a separate eruption to the north, most likely to be that of the Kahauloa tuff ring 880 m away.

  9. Spectral Differences Between Palagonite Tuffs Formed in Sub-Glacial Versus Liquid Water Environments: Relevance to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrand, W. H.; Lane, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    The reflectance and emissivity spectra of palagonite tuffs formed in sub-glacial environments are compared with those formed in liquid water environments. The relevance to palagonites produced by water-magma interactions on Mars is discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Further studies of the effects of oxidation on the surface properties of coal and coal pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Miguel Nicolas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the oxidation behavior of coal and coal pyrite and to correlate the changes in the surface properties induced by oxidation, along with the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these organic and inorganic materials, with the behavior in physical coal cleaning processes. This provide more fundamental knowledge for understanding the way in which different factors interact in a medium as heterogeneous as coal. Fourteen coal samples of different ranks ranging from high to medium sulfur content were studied by dry oxidation tests at different temperatures and humidities, and by wet oxidation tests using different oxidizing agents. The concentration of surface oxygen functional groups was determined by ion-exchange methods. The changes in the coal composition with oxidation were analyzed by spectroscopic techniques. The wettability of as-received and oxidized coal and coal pyrite samples was assessed by film flotation tests. The electrokinetic behavior of different coals and coal pyrite samples was studied by electrokinetic tests using electrophoresis. Possible oxidation mechanisms have been proposed to explain the changes on the coal surface induced by different oxidation treatments.

  11. Selective Sulfidation of Lead Smelter Slag with Pyrite and Flotation Behavior of Synthetic ZnS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dawei; Jiao, Fen; Zhang, Tianfu; Qin, Wenqing

    2016-08-01

    The selective sulfidation of lead smelter slag with pyrite in the presence of carbon and Na salts, and the flotation behavior of synthetic ZnS were studied. The effects of temperature, time, pyrite dosage, Na salts, and carbon additions were investigated based on thermodynamic calculation, and correspondingly, the growth mechanism of ZnS particles was studied at high temperatures. The results indicated that the zinc in lead smelter slag was selectively converted into zinc sulfides by sulfidation roasting. The sulfidation degree of zinc was increased until the temperature, time, pyrite, and carbon dosages reached their optimum values, under which it was more than 95 pct. The growth of ZnS particles largely depended upon roasting temperature, and the ZnS grains were significantly increased above 1373 K (1100 °C) due to the formation of a liquid phase. After the roasting, the zinc sulfides generated had a good floatability, and 88.34 pct of zinc was recovered by conventional flotation.

  12. Further studies of the effects of oxidation on the surface properties of coal and coal pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, M.N.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this research was to investigate the oxidation behavior of coal and coal pyrite and to correlate the changes in the surface properties induced by oxidation, along with the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these organic and inorganic materials, with the behavior in physical coal cleaning processes. This provide more fundamental knowledge for understanding the way in which different factors interact in a medium as heterogeneous as coal. Fourteen coal samples of different ranks ranging from high to medium sulfur content were studied by dry oxidation tests at different temperatures and humidities, and by wet oxidation tests using different oxidizing agents. The concentration of surface oxygen functional groups was determined by ion-exchange methods. The changes in the coal composition with oxidation were analyzed by spectroscopic techniques. The wettability of as-received and oxidized coal and coal pyrite samples was assessed by film flotation tests. The electrokinetic behavior of different coals and coal pyrite samples was studied by electrokinetic tests using electrophoresis. Possible oxidation mechanisms have been proposed to explain the changes on the coal surface induced by different oxidation treatments.

  13. Bio-decomposition of rock phosphate containing pyrites by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Ru-an; XIAO Chun-qiao; HUANG Xiao-hui; WANG Cun-wen; WU Yuan-xin

    2007-01-01

    Leaching soluble phosphorus from rock phosphate containing pyrites by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. f) is feasible,and the reaction mechanism is as follows. Pyrites are oxidized by A. f. to produce H2SO4 and FeSO4; the rock phosphate is decomposed by H2SO4, forming soluble phosphorus compounds; and Fe2+ from FeSO4 is oxidized to Fe3+, providing energy for the growth of A. f.. In this process, as H2SO4 is produced in the reaction, an acidic condition in the culture medium is formed, which benefits the growth of A. f. and aids both continuous oxidation of pyrites and leaching of soluble phosphorus from rock phosphate.The fraction of phosphorous leached can reach the largest in the presence of 1.0 g/L Fe3+, 200 mg/L Mg2+ and 400 mg/L NH4+. The optimal technological parameters on the fraction of phosphorous leached are as follows: the volume fraction of inocula of A. f, the

  14. Biogeochemical processes governing natural pyrite oxidation and release of acid metalliferous drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-ting; Li, Jin-tian; Chen, Lin-xing; Hua, Zheng-shuang; Huang, Li-nan; Liu, Jun; Xu, Bi-bo; Liao, Bin; Shu, Wen-sheng

    2014-05-20

    The oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals (principally pyrite) is responsible for the majority of acid metalliferous drainage from mine sites, which represents a significant environmental problem worldwide. Understanding the complex biogeochemical processes governing natural pyrite oxidation is critical not only for solving this problem but also for understanding the industrial bioleaching of sulfide minerals. To this end, we conducted a simulated experiment of natural pyrite oxidative dissolution. Pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial community revealed a distinct succession across three stages. At the early stage, a newly proposed genus, Tumebacillus (which can use sodium thiosulfate and sulfite as the sole electron donors), dominated the microbial community. At the midstage, Alicyclobacillus (the fifth most abundant genus at the early stage) became the most dominant genus, whereas Tumebacillus was still ranked as the second most abundant. At the final stage, the microbial community was dominated by Ferroplasma (the tenth most abundant genus at the early stage). Our geochemical and mineralogical analyses indicated that exchangeable heavy metals increased as the oxidation progressed and that some secondary sulfate minerals (including jarosite and magnesiocopiapite) were formed at the final stage of the oxidation sequence. Additionally, we propose a comprehensive model of biogeochemical processes governing the oxidation of sulfide minerals.

  15. Matrix composition and community structure analysis of a novel bacterial pyrite leaching community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Sibylle; Ackermann, Sonia; Majzlan, Juraj; Gescher, Johannes

    2009-09-01

    Here we describe a novel bacterial community that is embedded in a matrix of carbohydrates and bio/geochemical products of pyrite (FeS(2)) oxidation. This community grows in stalactite-like structures--snottites--on the ceiling of an abandoned pyrite mine at pH values of 2.2-2.6. The aqueous phase in the matrix contains 200 mM of sulfate and total iron concentrations of 60 mM. Micro-X-ray diffraction analysis showed that jarosite [(K,Na,H(3)O)Fe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6)] is the major mineral embedded in the snottites. X-ray absorption near-edge structure experiments revealed three different sulfur species. The major signal can be ascribed to sulfate, and the other two features may correspond to thiols and sulfoxides. Arabinose was detected as the major sugar component in the extracellular polymeric substance. Via restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, a community was found that mainly consists of iron oxidizing Leptospirillum and Ferrovum species but also of bacteria that could be involved in dissimilatory sulfate and dissimilatory iron reduction. Each snottite can be regarded as a complex, self-contained consortium of bacterial species fuelled by the decomposition of pyrite.

  16. Hydrothermal vents as a source of pyrite and trace metal- containing mineral nanoparticles to the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartman, A.; Yucel, M.; Luther, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    The pathways by which metals from hydrothermal vents may be transported through the ocean are still largely unknown. We demonstrate that pyrite nanoparticles as small as 4nm aggregate into nanoframboids of 50-350nm and are emitted from high temperature black smokers from vents at Lau Basin and the East Pacific Rise. These nanoparticles, which contain other metals including copper, are characterized via chemical methods as well as by using a combination of physical chemical techniques (TEM, SEM-EDS and EELS). Data indicate that the metal sulfide nanoparticles from Lau Basin, a back arc basin and EPR 9N, a fast spreading mid ocean ridge, have similar morphology. We report that laboratory hydrothermal syntheses can reproduce the size and morphology of the natural pyrite nanoparticles. Laboratory oxidation experiments show that these synthesized pyrite nanoparticles are stable in oxic seawater for months, and thus provide a potential transport mechanism for iron far from vent sources. These nanoparticles as well as others including iron silicates, which have also been identified, likely influence the transport of iron and other elements from the hydrothermal environment to the ocean. Hydrothermal vents serve as nanoparticle 'factories' that fertilize the ocean with metals that are important in a variety of biogeochemical processes.

  17. Synthesis and adsorption/photocatalysis performance of pyrite FeS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuling; Li, Miaomiao; Li, Shu; Li, Honglin; Yan, Lu

    2013-03-01

    FeS2 crystallites were synthesized successfully via a solvothermal method, using potassium ferrocyanide K4[Fe(CN)6]·3H2O as Fe source, sulfur powder as S source in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as dispersant. And potassium carbonate provided an alkaline environment. The phase and morphology of the products were characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the temperature and solvent ratio (V:VO) play a crucial role in the formation of FeS2 with a cubic phase structure (pyrite). Then based on a series of experiments, the possible formation mechanism of pyrite FeS2 crystallites was proposed. In addition, research also showed that the as-prepared pyrite FeS2 crystallites could high-efficiently absorb or photocatalytically degrade some organic dyes such as Methylene blue (MB), Safranine T, Methyl orange (MO), Rhodamine B (Rh B) and Pyronine B. Furthermore, the adsorption and photocatalytic degradation abilities of FeS2 for organic dyes were also compared.

  18. Copper and cobalt recovery from pyrite ashes of a sulphuric acid plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erust, Ceren; Akcil, Ata

    2016-06-01

    The pyrite ashes formed as waste material during the calcination of concentrated pyrite ore used for producing sulphuric acid not only has a high iron content but also contains economically valuable metals. These wastes, which are currently landfilled or dumped into the sea, cause serious land and environmental pollution problems owing to the release of acids and toxic substances. In this study, physical (sulphation roasting) and hydrometallurgical methods were evaluated for their efficacy to recover non-iron metals with a high content in the pyrite ashes and to prevent pollution thereby. The preliminary enrichment tests performed via sulphation roasting were conducted at different roasting temperatures and with different acid amounts. The leaching tests investigated the impact of the variables, including different solvents, acid concentrations and leach temperatures on the copper and cobalt leaching efficiency. The experimental studies indicated that the pre-enrichment via sulphation roasting method has an effect on the leaching efficiencies of copper and cobalt, and that approximate recoveries of 80% copper and 70% cobalt were achieved in the H2O2-added H2SO4 leaching tests.

  19. Biogeneration of iron-based catalyst precursors by Acidianus brierleyi on high- and low-pyrite coals for direct liquefaction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, M.V.S.; Huggins, F.E.; Aleem, M.I.H.; Kermode, R.I.; Bhattacharyya, D. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-03-01

    Treatment of high-pyrite, high-sulphur Illinois (IBS) coals and pyrite-free Blind Canyon (DECS) coal with added pyrite in the presence of {ital Acidianus brierleyi} showed formation of iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) particles and subsequent sulphiding caused enhancement in liquefaction and oil yield. IBC No. 101 and 105, and DECS No. 17 containing different amounts of pyrite were treated with {ital A. brierleyi} to evaluate its effect on FeOOH formation. Chemical analysis of the liquid phase and Moessbauer analysis of the coals revealed that all the biotreated coals showed significant reduction in pyrite after 21 days (or less with pH alteration in the middle of IBC No. 105 coal run) of incubation. Further data on bioprocessed coals obtained from Moessbauer spectroscopy verified the formation of an FeOOH phase, which acts as a catalyst precursor for direct coal liquefaction (DCL). The direct liquefaction conversion and oil yield of the biotreated DECS No. 17 coal with added pyrite increased by 14 and 5% respectively, over the control which did not contain {ital A. brierleyi}. 40 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Sulfur amino acids and alanine on pyrite (100) by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy: Surface or molecular role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Galvez-Martinez, S.; Mateo-Marti, E.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes the first successful adsorption of the cysteine, cystine, methionine and alanine amino acids on the pyrite (100) surface under ultra-high vacuum conditions with crucial chemical adsorption parameters driving the process. We have demonstrated by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) that the surface pretreatment annealing process on pyrite surfaces is a critical parameter driving surface reactivity. The presence of enriched monosulfide species on the pyrite (100) surface favours the amino acid NH2 chemical form, whereas a longer annealing surface pretreatment of over 3 h repairs the sulfur vacancies in the pyrite, enriching disulfide species on the pyrite surface, which promotes NH3+ adsorption due to the sulfur vacancies in the pyrite being replaced by sulfur atom dimers (S22-) on the surface. Furthermore, even if the surface chemistry (monosulfide or disulfide species enrichment) is the main factor promoting a partial conversion from NH2 to NH3+ species, the unique chemical structure of each amino acid provides a particular fingerprint in the process.

  1. A silica/fly ash-based technology for controlling pyrite oxidation. Semi-annual, March 1, 1996 - August 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelou, V.P. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The overall objective is to develop methodologies by which metasilicate or fly ash may produce an effective coating on pyrite surfaces for inhibiting pyrite oxidation. During the past six months, the investigators produced wet chemistry evidence demonstrating that pyrite-HCO{sub 3} complexes promote pyrite oxidation. This is an important finding for their over all strategy in controlling pyrite oxidation because it suggests that pyrite microencapsulation is important in order to control oxidation in near cirumneutral pH environments produced by addition of alkaline material, e.g., fly ash. In their previous studies, the investigators reported that pyrite microencapsulation could be carried out by reacting pyrite with a pH buffered solution and in the presence of metasilicate. The coating formed on the surface of pyrite appeared to be an amorphous iron-oxide-silicate material which inhibited pyrite oxidation. During this past six months, the investigators evaluated: the molecular mechanisms of silicate adsorption by iron oxide; the effects of silicate on the bulk and surface properties of iron oxides; and the effect of silicate on metal-cation adsorption properties by iron oxides.

  2. Geochemistry of Early Frasnian (Late Devonian) pyrite-ammonoid level in the Kostomłoty Basin, Poland, and a new proxy parameter for assessing the relative amount of syngenetic and diagenetic pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarzowska, Agnieszka; Berner, Zsolt A.; Racki, Grzegorz

    2014-07-01

    Pyrite geochemistry (isotope and trace element composition, degree of pyritization, S/Corg ratio) was used in context of selected lithogeochemical parameters (major and trace elements, including sulphur, organic carbon, and δ13C of carbonate carbon) to constrain fluctuations in depositional conditions during the Early to Middle Frasnian carbon isotopic perturbation (punctata Event) in the Kostomłoty Basin, Poland. Based on the ratio between the sum of oxyanionic elements and transition metals in pyrite, a new proxy parameter (index of syngenetic pyrite, ISYP) is proposed for assessing the relative amount of syngenetic pyrite in a sample. The distribution of the ISYP along the Kostomłoty - Małe Górki section (upper Szydłówek to the basal Kostomłoty beds) is in concert with conclusions inferred from paleoecologic data and other geochemical parameters (degree of pyritization, S/Corg, δ34Spyrite). According to these, the lower segment of the Szydłówek Beds was deposited in a normally oxygenated environment, but undergoing increasing primary productivity in surface water, as indicated by an increase in δ13Ccarb and in Cu/Zr ratio in bulk rock, which triggered the periodic deposition of sediments slightly enriched in organic matter, notably within the pyrite-ammonoid level (= Goniatite Level). Fluctuating, but in general high S/Corg ratios, DOPR values and ISYP values suggest that during this time - against the background of a generally dysoxic environment - shorter or longer lasting episodes of more restricted (anoxic and possibly even euxinic) bottom water conditions developed. Low sedimentation rates enabled a continuous and practically unlimited supply of sulphate during bacterial sulphate reduction (BSR), which in turn led to a strong depletion of pyrite sulphur in 34S in this interval (constantly around -29‰). In contrast, below and above the Goniatite Level, higher δ34S values (up to + 3‰), are compatible with closed system conditions and higher

  3. In defense of Magnetite-Ilmenite Thermometry in the Bishop Tuff and its implication for gradients in silicic magma reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bernard W; Hildreth, Edward; Bachmann, Olivier; Scaillet, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Despite claims to the contrary, the compositions of magnetite and ilmenite in the Bishop Tuff correctly record the changing conditions of T and fO2 in the magma reservoir. In relatively reduced (∆NNO 1, e.g., Fish Canyon Tuff, Pinatubo), and the d(aTiO2)/dT slope can be negative. Biotite, FeTi-oxides, liquid, and possibly plagioclase largely maintained equilibrium in the Bishop Tuff magma (unlike the pyroxenes, and cores of quartz, sanidine, and zircon) prior ro and during a mixing event triggered by a deeper recharge, which, based on elemental diffusion profiles in minerals, took place at least several decades before eruption. Equilibrating phases and pumice compositions show evolving chemical variations that correlate well with mutually consistent temperatures based on the FeTi-oxides, sanidine-plagioclase, and ∆18O quartz-magnetite pairs. Early Bishop Tuff (EBT) temperatures are lower (700 to ~780‎°C) than temperatures (780 to >820°C) registered in Late Bishop Tuff (LBT), the latter defined here not strictly stratigraphically, but by the presence of orthopyroxene and reverse-zoned rims on quartz and sanidine. The claimed similarity in compositions, Zr-saturation temperatures and thermodynamically calculated temperatures (730-740°C) between EBT and less evolved LBT reflect the use of glass inclusions in quartz cores in LBT that were inherited from the low temperature rhyolitic part of the reservoir characteristic of the EBT. LBT temperatures as high as 820°C, the preservation of orthopyroxene, and the presence of reverse-zoned minerals (quartz, sanidine, zircons) are consistent with magma recharge at the base of the zoned reservoir, heating the cooler rhyolitic melt, partly remelting cumulate mush, and introducing enough CO2 (0.4-1.4 wt%, mostly contained in the exsolved fluid phase) to significantly lower H2O-activity in the system.

  4. Neogene fallout tuffs from the Yellowstone hotspot in the Columbia Plateau region, Oregon, Washington and Idaho, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P Nash

    Full Text Available Sedimentary sequences in the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest ranging in age from 16-4 Ma contain fallout tuffs whose origins lie in volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in northwestern Nevada, eastern Oregon and the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Silicic volcanism began in the region contemporaneously with early eruptions of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG, and the abundance of widespread fallout tuffs provides the opportunity to establish a tephrostratigrahic framework for the region. Sedimentary basins with volcaniclastic deposits also contain diverse assemblages of fauna and flora that were preserved during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum, including Sucker Creek, Mascall, Latah, Virgin Valley and Trout Creek. Correlation of ashfall units establish that the lower Bully Creek Formation in eastern Oregon is contemporaneous with the Virgin Valley Formation, the Sucker Creek Formation, Oregon and Idaho, Trout Creek Formation, Oregon, and the Latah Formation in the Clearwater Embayment in Washington and Idaho. In addition, it can be established that the Trout Creek flora are younger than the Mascall and Latah flora. A tentative correlation of a fallout tuff from the Clarkia fossil beds, Idaho, with a pumice bed in the Bully Creek Formation places the remarkably well preserved Clarkia flora assemblage between the Mascall and Trout Creek flora. Large-volume supereruptions that originated between 11.8 and 10.1 Ma from the Bruneau-Jarbidge and Twin Falls volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in the central Snake River Plain deposited voluminous fallout tuffs in the Ellensberg Formation which forms sedimentary interbeds in the CRBG. These occurrences extend the known distribution of these fallout tuffs 500 km to the northwest of their source in the Snake River Plain. Heretofore, the distal products of these large eruptions had only been recognized to the east of their sources in the High Plains of Nebraska and Kansas.

  5. Neogene fallout tuffs from the Yellowstone hotspot in the Columbia Plateau region, Oregon, Washington and Idaho, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Barbara P; Perkins, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Sedimentary sequences in the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest ranging in age from 16-4 Ma contain fallout tuffs whose origins lie in volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in northwestern Nevada, eastern Oregon and the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Silicic volcanism began in the region contemporaneously with early eruptions of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), and the abundance of widespread fallout tuffs provides the opportunity to establish a tephrostratigrahic framework for the region. Sedimentary basins with volcaniclastic deposits also contain diverse assemblages of fauna and flora that were preserved during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum, including Sucker Creek, Mascall, Latah, Virgin Valley and Trout Creek. Correlation of ashfall units establish that the lower Bully Creek Formation in eastern Oregon is contemporaneous with the Virgin Valley Formation, the Sucker Creek Formation, Oregon and Idaho, Trout Creek Formation, Oregon, and the Latah Formation in the Clearwater Embayment in Washington and Idaho. In addition, it can be established that the Trout Creek flora are younger than the Mascall and Latah flora. A tentative correlation of a fallout tuff from the Clarkia fossil beds, Idaho, with a pumice bed in the Bully Creek Formation places the remarkably well preserved Clarkia flora assemblage between the Mascall and Trout Creek flora. Large-volume supereruptions that originated between 11.8 and 10.1 Ma from the Bruneau-Jarbidge and Twin Falls volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in the central Snake River Plain deposited voluminous fallout tuffs in the Ellensberg Formation which forms sedimentary interbeds in the CRBG. These occurrences extend the known distribution of these fallout tuffs 500 km to the northwest of their source in the Snake River Plain. Heretofore, the distal products of these large eruptions had only been recognized to the east of their sources in the High Plains of Nebraska and Kansas.

  6. Performance predictions for mechanical excavators in Yucca Mountain tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdemir, L.; Gertsch, L.; Neil, D.; Friant, J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Earth Mechanics Inst.

    1992-09-01

    The performances of several mechanical excavators are predicted for use in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain: Tunnel boring machines, the Mobile Miner, a roadheader, a blind shaft borer, a vertical wheel shaft boring machine, raise drills, and V-Moles. Work summarized is comprised of three parts: Initial prediction using existing rock physical property information; Measurement of additional rock physical properties; and Revision of the initial predictions using the enhanced database. The performance predictions are based on theoretical and empirical relationships between rock properties and the forces-experienced by rock cutters and bits during excavation. Machine backup systems and excavation design aspects, such as curves and grades, are considered in determining excavator utilization factors. Instanteous penetration rate, advance rate, and cutter costs are the fundamental performance indicators.

  7. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  8. Hydration of tricalcium silicate in blended Cements manufactured with cuban tuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duque Fernández, Gabriel Luis

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available The tricalcium silicate (alite hydration velocity in cements with and without additives is studied in the presence of "Las Carolinas" quarry tuffs from Cienfuegos province, Cuba, the alite hydration velocity is enhanced reaching velocity constants 1.5 higher than in the standard cement.

    Se estudia la velocidad de hidratación del silicato tricálcico (alita presente en el cemento con y sin adiciones, demostrándose que en presencia de tobas del yacimiento "Las Carolinas" en la provincia de Cienfuegos, Cuba, se acelera la velocidad de hidratación de este componente, obteniéndose constantes de velocidad de reacción aproximadamente 1,5 veces mayores que en el cemento patrón.

  9. Stratigraphic relations and hydrologic properties of the Paintbrush Tuff (PTn) hydrologic unit, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, T.C.; Geslin, J.K. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States); Flint, L.E. [U.S. Geological Survey, Yucca Mountain Project, Mercury, NV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Yucca Mountain is being investigated as a potential site for a high- level nuclear waste repository. The intent of this study was to clarify stratigraphic relations within the Paintbrush Tuff (PTn) unit at Yucca Mountain in order to better understand vertical and lateral variations in hydrologic properties as they relate to the lithologic character of these rocks. This report defines informal stratigraphic units within the PTn interval, demonstrates their lateral continuity in the Yucca Mountain region, describes later and vertical variations within them, and characterizes their hydrologic properties and importance to numerical flow and transport models. We present tables summarizing the depth to stratigraphic contacts in cored borehole studies, and unit descriptions and correlations in 10 measured sections.

  10. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and eruptive mechanisms in the tuff cone of El Golfo (Lanzarote, Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Martí, Joan; Geyer, Adelina

    2013-07-01

    The tuff cone of El Golfo on the western coast of Lanzarote (Canary Islands) is a typical hydrovolcanic edifice. Along with other edifices of the same age, it was constructed along a fracture oriented NEE-SWW that coincides with the main structural trend of recent volcanism in this part of the island. We conducted a detailed stratigraphic study of the succession of deposits present in this tuff cone and here interpret them in light of the depositional processes and eruptive dynamics that we were able to infer. The eruptive sequence is represented by a succession of pyroclastic deposits, most of which were emplaced by flow, plus a number of air-fall deposits and ballistic blocks and bombs. We distinguished five different eruptive/depositional stages on the basis of differences in inferred current flow regimes and fragmentation efficiencies represented by the resulting deposits; the different stages may be related to variations in the explosive energy. Eight lithofacies were identified based on sedimentary discontinuities, grain size, components, variations in primary laminations and bedforms. The volcanic edifice was constructed very rapidly around the vent, and this is inferred to have controlled the amount of water that was able to enter the eruption conduit. The sedimentological characteristics of the deposits and the nature and distribution of palagonitic alteration suggest that most of the pyroclastic succession in El Golfo was deposited in a subaerial environment. This type of hydrovolcanic explosive activity is common in the coastal zones of Lanzarote and the other Canary Islands and is one of the main potential hazards that could threaten the human population of this archipelago. Detailed studies of these hydrovolcanic eruptions such as the one we present here can help volcanologists understand the hazards that this type of eruption can generate and provide essential information for undertaking risk assessment in similar volcanic environments.

  11. Fitful and protracted magma assembly leading to a giant eruption, Youngest Toba Tuff, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Mary R; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2017-01-01

    The paroxysmal eruption of the 74 ka Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT) of northern Sumatra produced an extraordinary 2800 km3 of non-welded to densely welded ignimbrite and co-ignimbrite ash-fall. We report insights into the duration of YTT magma assembly obtained from ion microprobe U-Th and U-Pb dates, including continuous age spectra over >50% of final zircon growth, for pumices and a welded tuff spanning the compositional range of the YTT. A relatively large subpopulation of zircon crystals nucleated before the penultimate caldera-related eruption at 501 ka, but most zircons yielded interior dates 100-300 ka thereafter. Zircon nucleation and growth was likely episodic and from diverse conditions over protracted time intervals of >100 to >500 ka. Final zircon growth is evident as thin rim plateaus that are in Th/U chemical equilibrium with hosts, and that give crystallization ages within tens of ka of eruption. The longevity and chemical characteristics of the YTT zircons, as well as evidence for intermittent zircon isolation and remobilization associated with magma recharge, is especially favored at the cool and wet eutectoid conditions that characterize at least half of the YTT, wherein heat fluxes could dissolve major phases but have only a minor effect on larger zircon crystals. Repeated magma recharge may have contributed to the development of compositional zoning in the YTT but, considered together with limited allanite, quartz, and other mineral dating and geospeedometry, regular perturbations to the magma reservoir over >400 ka did not lead to eruption until 74 ka ago.

  12. Derivation of S and Pb in phanerozoic intrusion-related metal deposits from neoproterozoic sedimentary pyrite, Great Basin, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikre, P.G.; Poulson, S.R.; Koenig, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    The thick (???8 km), regionally extensive section of Neoproterozoic siliciclastic strata (terrigenous detrital succession, TDS) in the central and eastern Great Basin contains sedimentary pyrite characterized by mostly high d34S values (-11.6 to 40.8%, derived from reduction of seawater sulfate, and by markedly radiogenic Pb isotopes ( 207Pb/204Pb derivation of deposit S and Pb from TDS pyrite. Minor element abundances in TDS pyrite (e.g., Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, and Au) compared to sedimentary and hydrothermal pyrite elsewhere are not noticeably elevated, implying that enrichment in source minerals is not a precondition for intrusion-related metal deposits. Three mechanisms for transferring components of TDS sedimentary pyrite to intrusion-related metal deposits are qualitatively evaluated. One mechanism involves (1) decomposition of TDS pyrite in thermal aureoles of intruding magmas, and (2) aqueous transport and precipitation in thermal or fluid mixing gradients of isotopically heavy S, radiogenic Pb, and possibly other sedimentary pyrite and detrital mineral components, as sulfide minerals in intrusion-related metal deposits. A second mechanism invokes mixing and S isotope exchange in thermal aureoles of Pb and S exsolved from magma and derived from decomposition of sedimentary pyrite. A third mechanism entails melting of TDS strata or assimilation of TDS strata by crustal or mantle magmas. TDS-derived or assimilated magmas ascend, decompress, and exsolve a mixture of TDS volatiles, including isotopically heavy S and radiogenic Pb from sedimentary pyrite, and volatiles acquired from deeper crustal or mantle sources. In the central and eastern Great Basin, the wide distribution and high density of small to mid-sized vein, replacement, and skarn intrusion-related metal deposits in lower Paleozoic rocks that contain TDS sedimentary pyrite S and Pb reflect (1) prolific Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary magmatism, (2) a regional, substrate reservoir of S and Pb in

  13. Pyrite deformation and connections to gold mobility: insight from micro-structural analysis and trace element mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubosq, Renelle; Rogowitz, Anna; Lawley, Christopher; Schneider, David; Jackson, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Pyrite is an important and ubiquitous gold-bearing phase in many orogenic gold deposits making the study of its deformation behaviour under metamorphic conditions crucial to the understanding of gold (re)mobilization. However, pyrite deformation mechanisms and their influence on the retention or release of trace elements during deformation and metamorphism remain poorly understood. We propose a syn- to post-peak metamorphic and deformation driven gold upgrading model where gold is remobilized through deformation-induced diffusion pathways in the form of substructures in pyrite. The middle amphibolite facies assemblage (actinolite-biotite-plagioclase-almandine) of the Detour Lake deposit (Canada) makes it an ideal study area due to maximum temperatures reaching 550°C, exceeding the conditions for plastic deformation in pyrite (450°C). The world-class Detour Lake deposit, containing 16.4 Moz of Au at 1 g/t, is a Neoarchean orogenic gold ore body located in the northern Abitibi district within the Superior Province. The mine is situated along the high strain, sub-vertical ductile-brittle Sunday Lake Deformation Zone (SLDZ) parallel to the broadly E-W trending Abitibi greenstone belt. Herein we combine orientation contrast (OC) forescatter imaging, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) trace element pyrite mapping to evaluate the influence of pyrite brittle and plastic deformation on the release of trace elements during syn-metamorphic gold remobilization. Local misorientation patterns in pyrite exhibit parallel bands that can be described by continuous rotation around one of the axes, whereas higher strain areas reveal more heterogeneous misorientation patterns and the development of low-angle grain boundaries with late fractures indicative of dislocation creep and strain hardening. These late fractures are an important micro-structural setting for gold and clusters of precious

  14. Mineralogy, origin and commercial value of the zeolite-rich tuffs in the Petrota-Pentalofos area, Evros County, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsh, J. N.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The zeolite-rich tuffs of the Petrota-Pentalofos area were deposited in the Arrestees Basin during the Eocene. They are up to 100 m thick and extend more than 15 Km in a long axis. Most of the outcrops consist of frequent alternations of very fine grained tuff with pumice and lapel tuffs, the latter containing detrital fragments of the Mesozoic substrate of the basin. X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and light microscopy analysis on quarry and borehole samples has shown that the tuffs are composed mainly of clinoptilolite and minor cristobalite, with a small proportion of detrital constituents (quartz, mica-schist and pyrogenic crystals (feldspars, quartz, biotite. Minor amounts of mordenite randomly occur in some of the northern outcrops, closer to the occurrences of lava. ICP-AES chemical analysis of the tuffs gives evidence that the original magmas were of quartz-latite composition. The tuffs rest on pre-Cenozoic metamorphic basement and pass gradationally upwards into sandstone and limestone. Evidence is given for deposition of the tuffs in a supra to infra-littoral environment. The zeolitic tuffs originated as epiclastic volcanic sediments, transported by water from the source of the eruption. The transformation of the volcanic glass of the tuffs to zeolite and cristobalite has taken place by meteoric waters in an open hydrological system existed during the Tertiary. The zeolitic rocks are currently being exploited as an animal feed supplement.Las tobas ricas en cebollitas del área de Petrota-Pentalofos se depositaron en la cuenca de Orejitas durante el Doceno. Alcanzan 100 m de potencia y superan los 15 km de extensión longitudinal. La mayoría de los afloramientos consisten en alternancias de toba de grano muy fino y toba de pómez y lapilli con fragmentos detritos del sustrato Mesozoico de la cuenca. Análisis por difamación de rayos X, microscopía electrónica de barrido y microscopía óptica en muestras de mano y de

  15. Gold and trace element zonation in pyrite using a laser imaging technique: Implications for the timing of gold in orogenic and carlin-style sediment-hosted deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, R.R.; Danyushevsky, L.; Hollit, C.; Maslennikov, V.; Meffre, S.; Gilbert, S.; Bull, S.; Scott, R.; Emsbo, P.; Thomas, H.; Singh, B.; Foster, J.

    2009-01-01

    Laser ablation ICP-MS imaging of gold and other trace elements in pyrite from four different sediment- hosted gold-arsenic deposits has revealed two distinct episodes of gold enrichment in each deposit: an early synsedimentary stage where invisible gold is concentrated in arsenian diagenetic pyrite along with other trace elements, in particular, As, Ni, Pb, Zn, Ag, Mo, Te, V, and Se; and a later hydrothermal stage where gold forms as either free gold grains in cracks in overgrowth metamorphic and/or hydrothermal pyrite or as narrow gold- arsenic rims on the outermost parts of the overgrowth hydrothermal pyrite. Compared to the diagenetic pyrites, the hydrothermal pyrites are commonly depleted in Ni, V, Zn, Pb, and Ag with cyclic zones of Co, Ni, and As concentration. The outermost hydrothermal pyrite rims are either As-Au rich, as in moderate- to high- grade deposits such as Carlin and Bendigo, or Co-Ni rich and As-Au poor as in moderate- to low-grade deposits such as Sukhoi Log and Spanish Mountain. The early enrichment of gold in arsenic-bearing syngenetic to diagenetic pyrite, within black shale facies of sedimentary basins, is proposed as a critical requirement for the later development of Carlin-style and orogenic gold deposits in sedimentary environments. The best grade sediment-hosted deposits appear to have the gold climax event, toward the final stages of deformation-related hydrothermal pyrite growth and fluid flow. ?? 2009 Society of Economic Geologists, Inc.

  16. Research on the growth orientation of pyrite grains in the colloform textures in Baiyunpu Pb-Zn polymetallic deposit, Hunan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shang; Huang, Fei; Gu, Xiangping; Chen, Zhenyu; Xing, Miaomiao; Li, Yongli

    2017-02-01

    A large number of colloform-textured pyrites were found in Baiyunpu Pb-Zn ore bodies in Xinshao County, Hunan, China. This study investigates the growth orientation of the pyrite grains in these structures by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), in situ micro X-ray diffraction (μXRD) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The growth proceeded from micro-crystalline cores in the colloform textures. Moreover, the pyrite layers were discrete and separated by locally significant quantities of galena and calcite. The μXRD results suggested clear crystalline characteristics and weakly preferred orientations of the colloform textures. EBSD confirmed that the pyrite grains exist preferred orientations or in the layered zones. According to the crystal growth theory, the formation and variation of crystal preferred orientations (CPOs) in pyrite are mainly restricted by the internal crystal structure of the pyrite and depends on the external environment conditions, such as trace element concentrations and the supersaturation degree. We inferred the evolutionary regularity of lattice planes with different indices in the pyrite crystal structure from morphological, compositional and growth orientation information, which reflect the crystal growth history of the colloform pyrite. This study will advance our understanding of the growth processes of colloform pyrite and environmental evolution in the Baiyunpu Pb-Zn polymetallic deposits.

  17. Flotation and Adsorption of a New Polysaccharide Depressant on Pyrite and Talc in the Presence of a Pre-Adsorbed Xanthate Collector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Deng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The flotation and adsorption of a new polysaccharide konjac gum (KG on pyrite and talc in the presence of pre-adsorbed potassium butyl xanthate (PBX is investigated. The micro-flotation results show that KG is a quality depressant for talc and that conditioning the minerals initially with PBX before KG will increase the recovery difference between pyrite and talc. The results of artificially mixing the minerals show that compared with adding KG before PBX, when minerals are pre-adsorbed with PBX, the grade and the recovery of sulfur (S increases by 1.96% and 5.44%, respectively. The contact angle results show that the addition of PBX before KG will increase the contact angles of pyrite, but the addition order of KG/PBX has little influence on the contact angles of talc. The adsorption tests show that KG can adsorb on pyrite and talc surfaces, while PBX can only adsorb on the pyrite surface. The addition order of KG/PBX affects the adsorption of KG and PBX on the pyrite surface but not on the talc surface. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra analysis further demonstrates the chemical adsorption of KG on pyrite and talc surfaces, while PBX chemisorbs on the pyrite surface. Based on these analyses, a schematic illustration of the reagent adsorption forms on pyrite and talc surfaces is drawn to explain the competitive adsorption of KG and PBX on mineral surfaces.

  18. Direct Detection of Fe(II) in Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) at the Mineral-Microbe Interface in Bacterial Pyrite Leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Zhu, Ming; Takeichi, Yasuo; Ohigashi, Takuji; Suga, Hiroki; Jinno, Muneaki; Makita, Hiroko; Sakata, Masahiro; Ono, Kanta; Mase, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    We herein investigated the mechanisms underlying the contact leaching process in pyrite bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM)-based C and Fe near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) analyses. The C NEXAFS analysis directly showed that attached A. ferrooxidans produces polysaccharide-abundant extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at the cell-pyrite interface. Furthermore, by combining the C and Fe NEXAFS results, we detected significant amounts of Fe(II), in addition to Fe(III), in the interfacial EPS at the cell-pyrite interface. A probable explanation for the Fe(II) in detected EPS is the leaching of Fe(II) from the pyrite. The detection of Fe(II) also indicates that Fe(III) resulting from pyrite oxidation may effectively function as an oxidizing agent for pyrite at the cell-pyrite interface. Thus, our results imply that a key role of Fe(III) in EPS, in addition to its previously described role in the electrostatic attachment of the cell to pyrite, is enhancing pyrite dissolution.

  19. Direct Detection of Fe(II) in Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) at the Mineral-Microbe Interface in Bacterial Pyrite Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Zhu, Ming; Takeichi, Yasuo; Ohigashi, Takuji; Suga, Hiroki; Jinno, Muneaki; Makita, Hiroko; Sakata, Masahiro; Ono, Kanta; Mase, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    We herein investigated the mechanisms underlying the contact leaching process in pyrite bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM)-based C and Fe near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) analyses. The C NEXAFS analysis directly showed that attached A. ferrooxidans produces polysaccharide-abundant extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at the cell-pyrite interface. Furthermore, by combining the C and Fe NEXAFS results, we detected significant amounts of Fe(II), in addition to Fe(III), in the interfacial EPS at the cell-pyrite interface. A probable explanation for the Fe(II) in detected EPS is the leaching of Fe(II) from the pyrite. The detection of Fe(II) also indicates that Fe(III) resulting from pyrite oxidation may effectively function as an oxidizing agent for pyrite at the cell-pyrite interface. Thus, our results imply that a key role of Fe(III) in EPS, in addition to its previously described role in the electrostatic attachment of the cell to pyrite, is enhancing pyrite dissolution. PMID:26947441

  20. Cinnabar, arsenian pyrite and thallium-enrichment in active shallow submarine hydrothermal vents at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kati, Marianna; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Magganas, Andreas; Baltatzis, Emmanouil; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    We herein report the discovery of active cinnabar-depositing hydrothermal vents in a submarine setting at Paleochori Bay, within the offshore southeastern extension of the Milos Island Geothermal Field, South Aegean Active Volcanic Arc. Active, low temperature (up to 115 °C) hydrothermal venting through volcaniclastic material has led to a varied assemblage of sulfide and alteration mineral phases in an area of approximately 1 km2. Our samples recovered from Paleochori Bay are hydrothermal edifices composed of volcaniclastic detrital material cemented by pyrite, or pure sulfide (mainly massive pyrite) mounts. Besides pyrite and minor marcasite, the hydrothermal minerals include cinnabar, amorphous silica, hydrous ferric oxides, carbonates (aragonite and calcite), alunite-jarosite solid solution and Sr-rich barite. Among others, growth textures, sieve-textured pyrite associated with barite, alunite-jarosite solid solution and hydrous ferric oxides rims colloform-banded pyrite layers. Overgrowths of arsenian pyrite layers (up to 3.2 wt. % As and/or up to 1.1 wt. % Mn) onto As-free pyrite indicate fluctuation in As content of the hydrothermal fluid. Mercury, in the form of cinnabar, occurs in up to 5 μm grains within arsenian pyrite layers, usually forming distinct cinnabar-enriched micro-layers. Hydrothermal Sr-rich barite (barite-celestine solid solution), pseudocubic alunite-jarosite solid solution and Mn- and Sr-enriched carbonates occur in various amounts and closely associated with pyrite and/or hydrous ferric oxides. Thallium-bearing sulfides and/or sulfosalts were not detected during our study; however, hydrous ferric oxides show thallium content of up to 0.5 wt. % Tl. The following scenarios may have played a role in pyrite precipitation at Paleochori: (a) H2S originally dissolved in the deep fluid but separated upon boiling could have reacted with oxygenated seawater under production of sulphuric acid, thus causing leaching and dissolution of primary iron

  1. Multiscale characterization of pyritized plant tissues in blueschist facies metamorphic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Sylvain; Benzerara, Karim; Beyssac, Olivier; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2010-09-01

    Pyritized plant tissues with well-preserved morphology were studied in rocks from Vanoise (western Alps, France) that experienced high-pressure, low-temperature metamorphic conditions in the blueschist facies during the Alpine orogeny. Organic and inorganic phases composing these fossils were characterized down to the nanometer scale by Raman microspectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The graphitic but disordered organic matter composing these fossils is chemically and structurally homogeneous and mostly contains aromatic functional groups. Its original chemistry remains undefined likely because it was significantly transformed by diagenetic processes and/or thermal degradation during metamorphism. Various mineral phases are closely associated with this organic matter, including sulphides such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, carbonates such as ankerite and calcite, and iron oxides. A tentative time sequence of formation of these diverse mineral phases relative to organic matter decay is proposed. The absence of traces of organic matter sulphurization, the pervasive pyritization of the vascular tissues and the presence of ankerite suggest that the depositional/diagenetic environment of these metasediments was likely rich in reactive iron. Fe-sulphides and ankerite likely precipitated early and might have promoted the preservation of the fossilized biological soft tissues by providing mechanical resistance to compaction during diagenesis and subsequent metamorphism. In contrast, iron oxides which form rims of 100-nm in thickness at the interface between organic matter and Fe-sulphides may result from metamorphic processes. This study illustrates that it may be possible in some instances to deconvolve metamorphic from diagenetic imprints and opens new avenues to better constrain processes that may allow the preservation of organic fossils during diagenesis and metamorphism.

  2. The pyrite-type high-pressure form of FeOOH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Masayuki; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Jun; Tsuchiya, Taku

    2017-07-01

    Water transported into Earth’s interior by subduction strongly influences dynamics such as volcanism and plate tectonics. Several recent studies have reported hydrous minerals to be stable at pressure and temperature conditions representative of Earth’s deep interior, implying that surface water may be transported as far as the core-mantle boundary. However, the hydrous mineral goethite, α-FeOOH, was recently reported to decompose under the conditions of the middle region of the lower mantle to form FeO2 and release H2, suggesting the upward migration of hydrogen and large fluctuations in the oxygen distribution within the Earth system. Here we report the stability of FeOOH phases at the pressure and temperature conditions of the deep lower mantle, based on first-principles calculations and in situ X-ray diffraction experiments. In contrast to previous work suggesting the dehydrogenation of FeOOH into FeO2 in the middle of the lower mantle, we report the formation of a new FeOOH phase with the pyrite-type framework of FeO6 octahedra, which is much denser than the surrounding mantle and is stable at the conditions of the base of the mantle. Pyrite-type FeOOH may stabilize as a solid solution with other hydrous minerals in deeply subducted slabs, and could form in subducted banded iron formations. Deep-seated pyrite-type FeOOH eventually dissociates into Fe2O3 and releases H2O when subducted slabs are heated at the base of the mantle. This process may cause the incorporation of hydrogen into the outer core by the formation of iron hydride, FeHx, in the reducing environment of the core-mantle boundary.

  3. Iron pyrite thin films synthesized from an Fe(acac)3 ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seefeld, Sean; Limpinsel, Moritz; Liu, Yu; Farhi, Nima; Weber, Amanda; Zhang, Yanning; Berry, Nicholas; Kwon, Yon Joo; Perkins, Craig L; Hemminger, John C; Wu, Ruqian; Law, Matt

    2013-03-20

    Iron pyrite (cubic FeS2) is a promising candidate absorber material for earth-abundant thin-film solar cells. Here, we report on phase-pure, large-grain, and uniform polycrystalline pyrite films that are fabricated by solution-phase deposition of an iron(III) acetylacetonate molecular ink followed by sequential annealing in air, H2S, and sulfur gas at temperatures up to 550 °C. Phase and elemental compositions of the films are characterized by conventional and synchrotron X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These solution-deposited films have more oxygen and alkalis, less carbon and hydrogen, and smaller optical band gaps (E(g) = 0.87 ± 0.05 eV) than similar films made by chemical vapor deposition. XPS is used to assess the chemical composition of the film surface before and after exposure to air and immersion in water to remove surface contaminants. Optical measurements of films rich in marcasite (orthorhombic FeS2) show that marcasite has a band gap at least as large as pyrite and that the two polymorphs share similar absorptivity spectra, in excellent agreement with density functional theory models. Regardless of the marcasite and elemental impurity contents, all films show p-type, weakly activated transport with curved Arrhenius plots, a room-temperature resistivity of ~1 Ω cm, and a hole mobility that is too small to measure by Hall effect. This universal electrical behavior strongly suggests that a common defect or a hole-rich surface layer governs the electrical properties of most FeS2 thin films.

  4. Evolution of biofilms during the colonization process of pyrite by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Dulce M; Lara, René H; Alvarado, Keila N; Valdez-Pérez, Donato; Navarro-Contreras, Hugo R; Cruz, Roel; García-Meza, Jessica Viridiana

    2012-01-01

    We have applied epifluorescence principles, atomic force microscopy, and Raman studies to the analysis of the colonization process of pyrite (FeS(2)) by sulfuroxidizing bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans after 1, 15, 24, and 72 h. For the stages examined, we present results comprising the evolution of biofilms, speciation of S (n) (2-) /S(0) species, adhesion forces of attached cells, production and secretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and its biochemical composition. After 1 h, highly dispersed attached cells in the surface of the mineral were observed. The results suggest initial non-covalent, weak interactions (e.g., van der Waal's, hydrophobic interactions), mediating an irreversible binding mechanism to electrooxidized massive pyrite electrode (eMPE), wherein the initial production of EPS by individual cells is determinant. The mineral surface reached its maximum cell cover between 15 to 24 h. Longer biooxidation times resulted in the progressive biofilm reduction on the mineral surface. Quantification of attached cell adhesion forces indicated a strong initial mechanism (8.4 nN), whereas subsequent stages of mineral colonization indicated stability of biofilms and of the adhesion force to an average of 4.2 nN. A variable EPS (polysaccharides, lipids, and proteins) secretion at all stages was found; thus, different architectural conformation of the biofilms was observed during 120 h. The main EPS produced were lipopolysaccharides which may increase the hydrophobicity of A. thiooxidans biofilms. The highest amount of lipopolysaccharides occurred between 15-72 h. In contrast with abiotic surfaces, the progressive depletion of S (n) (2-) /S(0) was observed on biotic eMPE surfaces, indicating consumption of surface sulfur species. All observations indicated a dynamic biooxidation mechanism of pyrite by A. thiooxidans, where the biofilms stability and composition seems to occur independently from surface sulfur species depletion.

  5. Inertization of pyrite cinders and co-inertization with electric arc furnace flue dusts by pyroconsolidation at solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñals, J; Balart, M J; Roca, A

    2002-01-01

    The viability of a pyroconsolidation process to render pyrite cinders inert and to co-inert pyrite cinders with a hazardous polymetallic residue such as electric arc furnace flue dusts (EAF) containing Pb, Cu, Zn, As, Cr, Ni and Mo were investigated. The effects of pyroconsolidation temperature (800-1200 degrees C), milling pyrite cinders and additions of both CaO and EAF on the resulting microstructure of the pellets were determined. The microstructural changes were then compared with the results of the standard leaching tests. Full inertization of pyrite cinders was achieved after milling to < 100 micron followed by a pelletization and pyroconsolidation process at a temperature of 1200 degrees C. This process also allows co-inertization of pyrite cinders with controlled additions of EAF (up to approximately to 10%). Following pyroconsolidation at 1200 degrees C, the metallic elements were inert components in the four main phases: traces of Cr in hematite; Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni in spinel-phase; traces of Cr and Zn in calcium ferrites; and Pb and traces of Cu, Zn and Ba in K-Ca-Al-Fe glassy silicate.

  6. Surficial phase-identification and structural profiles from weathered natural pyrites: A grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Yuanfeng [State Key Laboratory of Mineral Deposits Research, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Earth Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)], E-mail: caiyf@nju.edu.cn; Pan, Yuguan [State Key Laboratory of Mineral Deposits Research, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xue Jiyue; Su Guizhen [Department of Earth Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-01-15

    Five pyrites with original crystal face (1 0 0) with different tarnish colours were selected from one pyrite-bearing ore sample from Tongling multi-metal deposit, Anhui, China. They are henna mottled with dark violet, yellow mottled with red, yellow, blue mottled with violet and reddish brown in surface colour. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD) was used to study the phases formed or precipitated on the surface of pyrite (1 0 0) face during chemical weathering. By changing the incident angle, GIXRD can provide information on the changes in the mineral phases from the surface as a function of depth. Products formed or precipitated on the surface of pyrite (1 0 0) face are one or several sulfur or iron-bearing hydrated oxides and include gypsum, jalpaite, goethite, goldichite. The sulfur-bearing minerals present on the surface imply the oxidation of sulfur to sulfate, or the reduction of sulfur to sulfide. By analyzing a series of GIXRD patterns obtained at different angles of incidence for a single pyrite, the mineral assemblage differs from the surface into the body of the crystal. Taking the reddish brown sample as an example, four diffraction profiles at 2.575, 2.2105, 1.9118 and 1.613 A are present in the pattern of a 2{sup o} incident angle experiment whereas they cannot be found at a GIXRD angle smaller than 0.6{sup o}.

  7. Influence of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans on Initial Attachment and Pyrite Leaching by Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Acidianus sp. DSM 29099

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available At the industrial scale, bioleaching of metal sulfides includes two main technologies, tank leaching and heap leaching. Fluctuations in temperature caused by the exothermic reactions in a heap have a pronounced effect on the growth of microbes and composition of mixed microbial populations. Currently, little is known on the influence of pre-colonized mesophiles or moderate thermophiles on the attachment and bioleaching efficiency by thermophiles. The objective of this study was to investigate the interspecies interactions of the moderate thermophile Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293T and the thermophile Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 during initial attachment to and dissolution of pyrite. Our results showed that: (1 Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 interacted with S. thermosulfidooxidansT during initial attachment in mixed cultures. In particular, cell attachment was improved in mixed cultures compared to pure cultures alone; however, no improvement of pyrite leaching in mixed cultures compared with pure cultures was observed; (2 active or inactivated cells of S. thermosulfidooxidansT on pyrite inhibited or showed no influence on the initial attachment of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099, respectively, but both promoted its leaching efficiency; (3 S. thermosulfidooxidansT exudates did not enhance the initial attachment of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 to pyrite, but greatly facilitated its pyrite dissolution efficiency. Our study provides insights into cell-cell interactions between moderate thermophiles and thermophiles and is helpful for understanding of the microbial interactions in a heap leaching environment.

  8. Selenium, tellurium and precious metal mineralogy in Uchalinsk copper-zinc-pyritic district, the Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikentev, I.

    2016-04-01

    During processing the most of Au, Ag, Se, Te, Pb, Bi, Sb, Hg as well as notable part of Cu, Zn and Cd fail for tailings and became heavy metal pollutants. Modes of occurrence of Au, Ag, Te and Se covers two giant VMS deposits: Uchaly (intensively deformed) and Uzelginsk (altered by late hydrothermal processes) as well as middle-sized Molodezn and West Ozern deposits (nondeformed) have been studied. Mineral forms of these elements as well as their presence in disperse mode in common ore minerals (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) have been studied using SEM, EPMA, INAA, ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and processing of cubic iron pyrite nanocrystals in a photovoltaic cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam Khan, M., E-mail: alamkhan77@gmail.com; Sarker, J.C.; Lee, Seunyong; Mangham, Scott C.; Manasreh, M.O.

    2014-12-15

    Cubic iron pyrite (fool's gold) nanocrystals with an average diameter of ∼60 nm were grown in an oleylamine ligand which acts as a solvent and surfactant without the utilization of alkyl phosphine and phosphonic acids at 230 °C in a Schlenk flask. For the first time photoluminescence properties of such cubic nanocrystals were analyzed at 77 K, showing band gaps of 1.71 eV. However, UV–Vis spectra shows a band gap of 1.41 eV for the same nanocrystals, close to the direct band gap (1.38 eV) of reported pyrite materials. The discrepancy of 0.3 eV in absorption (UV–Vis) and emission spectra (PL) are attributed to the phonon coupling (stokes shift). The prepared cubic nanocrystals were well suited for an inexpensive thin film solar cells and further processed and spin casted with a synthesized CdSe quantum dots in chloroform solvent as a bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell in order to get photovoltaic responses in real devices. We successfully report here an efficiency of 0.5% with the J{sub SC} of 3.7 mA/cm{sup −2} and V{sub OC} of 0.16 mV with a cell structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/FeS{sub 2}:CdSe/Au. The morphology and optoelectronic properties are elucidated by SEM, TEM, TEM-EDS, XRD, micro-Raman spectra, IV curve and micro-PL techniques. - Highlights: • Excellent cubic iron pyrite nanocrystals are synthesized by using an oleylamine ligand. • First time PL spectra were used to measure band gaps of such colloidal cubic nanocrytsals. • Pyrite ink was made in suitable solvent to fabricate practical devices. • A successful 0.5% efficiency is reported in bulk-heterojunction cell with CdSe QDs.

  10. Degree of trace metal pyritization in sediments from the Pacific coast of Baja California, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava Lopez, Carmen; Huerta Diaz, Miguel Angel [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanologicas, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2001-06-01

    We analyzed sediments from a core collected on the Pacific coast of Baja California, 45 km off the city of Tijuana and at 1257 m water depth (32 Celsius degrees 9.5N , 117 Celsius degrees 8.3W), for trace metal content in two operationally-defined fractions, HCl and pyrite. Our results indicate transference of Cu>Ni>Zn>>Hg y Ag from the HCl to the pyrite fraction. Sediments have degrees of pyritization (DOP) that average 7.2{+-} 4.9% with a maximum value of 18.5%. Average degrees of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) range from 6.2 {+-}2.1% to 83{+-} 8% for Mn and Hg, respectively, although maximum values for some metals were closed to 100%. This transference is apparently a function of the solubility products of metal sulfides and the relative abundances of metals in the HCl fraction, as suggested by the significant correlation (p<0.001) observed between these two parameters and the DTMP of a number of trace metals. A similar correlation was obtained from published data of two cores collected in the Gulf of Mexico. [Spanish] Se analizaron sedimentos de un nucleo recolectado en la costa del Pacifico de Baja California 45 km de la costa de la ciudad de Tijuana y a 1257 m de profundidad del agua (32 grados Celsius 9.5N, 117 grados Celsius 8.3W), para determinar su contenido de metales traza en dos fracciones operacionales definidas HCl y pirita. Los resultados indican una transferencia de Cu>Ni>Zn>>Hg y Ag de la fraccion de HCl a la fase piritica. Los grados de piritizacion (DOP) en los sedimentos promediaron 7.2{+-} 4.9%, con un valor maximo de 18.5%. Los valores promedio de los grados de piritizacion de metales traza (DTMP) abarcaron el intervalo de 6.2 {+-}2.1% a 83{+-}18% para Mn y Hg, respectivamente, aunque los valores maximos para algunos metales estuvieron cercanos al 100%. Esta transferencia aparentemente es funcion de los productos de solubilidad de los sulfuros metalicos y de la abundancia relativa de metales en la fraccion HCl, como sugiere la correlacion

  11. Determination of the Content of Heavy Metals in Pyrite Contaminated Soil and Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Marić

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Determination of a pyrite contaminated soil texture, content of heavy metals in the soil and soil pH, was the aim in the investigation. Acidification of damaged soil was corrected by calcium carbonate. Mineral nutrients and organic matter (NPK, dung, earthworm cast, straw and coal dust were added to damaged soil. Afterwards, the soil was used for oat production. Determination of total heavy metal contents (Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe in soil was performed by atomic absorption spectrofotometry. Plant material (stems, seeds was analysed, too. Total concentration of the heavy metals in the plant material were greater than in crop obtained in unaffected soil.

  12. Green-tuff landslide areas are beneficial for rice nutrition in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazue Tazaki

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Japanese Islands are covered with weathered volcanic rocks and soils. Terraced rice field are located in green-tuff areas which are very fertile but where landslides occur associated to strong earthquakes. The Xray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analyses of the soils in landslide area identified predominant smectite and Mg, Al, Si, K, Ti, Mn and Fe are main components. The rice leaf showed that S, Cl, K and Ca play important roles for nutrients in the area. Drainpipe systems have set up in the green- tuff areas to reduce the risks of landslides. Reddish brown microbial mats inhabited bacteria and diatom in the drainpipe outlets. The microbial mats are rich in Fe and PO4(3-. The iron bacteria in the ground water have a high metabolic rate suggesting that the weathering materials were produced by not only physical and chemical influence but also by microorganism. Many microorganisms attach to mineral surfaces and show their high impact in the water mineral chemistry in the landslide area. Bacteria in the green-tuff over landslide area play important roles for sustainable agriculture including rice nutrition.As Ilhas Japonesas são cobertas de rochas e solos vulcânicos intemperizados. Terraços de campos de arroz estão comumente localizados em áreas de tufos verdes, as quais são férteis, mas estão geralmente sujeitas a trágicos deslizamentos de terra associados a grandes terremotos. As análises dos solos por difração e fluorescência de raios-X em áreas de deslizamento identificam a predominância de esmectitas, cujos componentes principais são Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, e Fe como principais componentes. A palha de arroz mostrou que S, Cl, K, e Ca têm importantes papéis para a nutrição dos solos dessa área. Sistemas de tubos de deslizamento foram instalados nestas áreas detufos verdes de forma a reduzir os riscos de deslizamentos. Nas saídas dos tubos de descarga se formou uma esteira de algas microbianas marrom avermelhadas

  13. Confort 15 model of conduit dynamics: applications to Pantelleria Green Tuff and Etna 122 BC eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, S.; Romano, C.; Mastin, L. G.; Vona, A.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations are useful tools to illustrate how flow parameters and physical processes may affect eruption dynamics of volcanoes. In this paper, we present an updated version of the Conflow model, an open-source numerical model for flow in eruptive conduits during steady-state pyroclastic eruptions (Mastin and Ghiorso in A numerical program for steady-state flow of magma-gas mixtures through vertical eruptive conduits. U.S. Geological Survey Open File Report 00-209, 2000). In the modified version, called Confort 15, the rheological constraints are improved, incorporating the most recent constitutive equations of both the liquid viscosity and crystal-bearing rheology. This allows all natural magma compositions, including the peralkaline melts excluded in the original version, to be investigated. The crystal-bearing rheology is improved by computing the effect of strain rate and crystal shape on the rheology of natural magmatic suspensions and expanding the crystal content range in which rheology can be modeled compared to the original version ( Conflow is applicable to magmatic mixtures with up to 30 vol% crystal content). Moreover, volcanological studies of the juvenile products (crystal and vesicle size distribution) of the investigated eruption are directly incorporated into the modeling procedure. Vesicle number densities derived from textural analyses are used to calculate, through Toramaru equations, maximum decompression rates experienced during ascent. Finally, both degassing under equilibrium and disequilibrium conditions are considered. This allows considerations on the effect of different fragmentation criteria on the conduit flow analyses, the maximum volume fraction criterion ("porosity criterion"), the brittle fragmentation criterion and the overpressure fragmentation criterion. Simulations of the pantelleritic and trachytic phases of the Green Tuff (Pantelleria) and of the Plinian Etna 122 BC eruptions are performed to test the upgrades in

  14. Influence of temperature on the adsorption of α-tocopherol from ethanol solutions on acid-activated clinoptilolite tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, D. L.; Vasilyeva, S. Yu.; Krysanova, T. A.

    2014-08-01

    Patterns in the adsorption of α-tocopherol on acid-activated clinoptilolite tuff at 283, 295, 305, and 333 K are established and explained. It is found that the selectivity of the sorbent toward the vitamin rises as the temperature of the process falls. The adsorption of α-tocopherol from dilute solutions is described in terms of the Langmuir adsorption theory. It is shown that the fixing of vitamin E monolayers in the structural matrix of clinoptilolite tuff is due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between isolated silanol groups of the adsorbent and oxygen atoms of the chromane ring and the phenol residue of α-tocopherol. The thermodynamic functions of monolayer adsorption of the vitamin are estimated. It is concluded that the formation of polymolecular layers in the form of associates is due to hydrophobic interactions between side substituents of α-tocopherol.

  15. The one-dimensional compression method for extraction of pore water from unsaturated tuff and effects on pore-water chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, J.D.; Burger, P.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Yang, L.C. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Study of the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires extraction of pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff bedrock. Two generations of compression cells have been designed and tested for extracting representative, unaltered pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff cores. The one-dimensional compression cell has a maximum compressive stress rating of 552 MPa. Results from 86 tests show that the minimum degree of saturation for successful extraction of pore water was about 14% for non welded tuff and about 61% for densely welded tuff. The high-pressure, one-dimensional compression cell has a maximum compressive stress rating of 827 MPa. Results from 109 tests show that the minimum degree of saturation for successful extraction of pore water was about 7.5% for non welded tuff and about 34% for densely welded tuff. Geochemical analyses show that, in general, there is a decrease in ion concentration of pore waters as extraction pressures increase. Only small changes in pore-water composition occur during the one-dimensional extraction test.

  16. Estimates of flow direction for calc-alkaline welded tuffs and paleomagnetic data reliability from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility measurements: Central San Juan Mountains, southwest Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Brooks B.

    1982-07-01

    Flow directions are estimated from the measurement of the magnetic fabric of 106 samples, collected at 18 sites in four welded tuff units in the central San Juan Mountains of southern Colorado. The estimates assume that the tuffs generally flowed directly away from the extrusive vents and that the lineations of magnetic grains within the tuffs represent the flow direction at individual sites. Errors in the estimation may arise from topographic variation, rheomorphism (post-emplacement mass flow) within the tuff, and other factors. Magnetic lineation is defined as the site mean anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility maximum azimuth. A test on the flow directions for individual units is based on the projection of lineation azimuths and their intersection within or near the known source caldera for the tuff. This test is positive for the four units examined. Paleomagnetic results for these tuffs are probably reliable indicators of the geomagnetic field direction in southwest Colorado, during the time (28.2-26.5 Ma) of emplacement.

  17. Permian plate margin volcanism and tuffs in adjacent basins of west Gondwana: Age constraints and common characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gamundí, Oscar

    2006-12-01

    Increasing evidence of Permian volcanic activity along the South American portion of the Gondwana proto-Pacific margin has directed attention to its potential presence in the stratigraphic record of adjacent basins. In recent years, tuffaceous horizons have been identified in late Early Permian-through Middle Permian (280-260 Ma) sections of the Paraná Basin (Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay). Farther south and closer to the magmatic tract developed along the continental margin, in the San Rafael and Sauce Grande basins of Argentina, tuffs are present in the Early to Middle Permian section. This tuff-rich interval can be correlated with the appearance of widespread tuffs in the Karoo Basin. Although magmatic activity along the proto-Pacific plate margin was continuous during the Late Paleozoic, Choiyoi silicic volcanism along the Andean Cordillera and its equivalent in Patagonia peaked between the late Early Permian and Middle Permian, when extensive rhyolitic ignimbrites and consanguineous airborne tuffaceous material erupted in the northern Patagonian region. The San Rafael orogenic phase (SROP) interrupted sedimentation along the southwestern segment of the Gondwana margin (i.e., Frontal Cordillera, San Rafael Basin), induced cratonward thrusting (i.e., Ventana and Cape foldbelts), and triggered accelerated subsidence in the adjacent basins (Sauce Grande and Karoo) located inboard of the deformation front. This accelerated subsidence favored the preservation of tuffaceous horizons in the syntectonic successions. The age constraints and similarities in composition between the volcanics along the continental margin and the tuffaceous horizons in the San Rafael, Sauce Grande, Paraná, and Karoo basins strongly suggest a genetic linkage between the two episodes. Radiometric ages from tuffs in the San Rafael, Paraná, and Karoo basins indicate an intensely tuffaceous interval between 280 and 260 Ma.

  18. The effect of rehabilitation on the rate of oxidation of pyrite in a mine waste rock dump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, J R; Ritchie, A I

    1987-06-01

    Temperature profiles within a mine waste rock dump undergoing pyritic oxidation have been used to estimate the rate of oxidation and the sites where oxidation was occurring. The waste rock dump is located at the abandoned Rum Jungle mine site in Northern Australia and was a major source of pollution to the local river system. The dump was rehabilitated in 1983-84 by reshaping to reduce erosion and covering with clay and soil to reduce infiltration of water.Heat source distributions were derived from temperature profiles measured in the dump. The oxidation of pyritic material is the main cause of heat in the dump, hence the rate and location of oxidation can be obtained from the distribution of heat sources. A comparison of the heat source distributions before and after rehabilitation showed that rehabilitation greatly reduced or stopped the oxidation of pyrite in the dump.

  19. Report on static hydrothermal alteration studies of Topopah Spring tuff waters in J-13 water at 150{sup 0}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauss, K.G.; Beiriger, W.B.

    1984-08-31

    This report presents the results of preliminary experimental work done to define the package environment in a potential nuclear waste repository in the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff. The work is supported by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project as a part of the Waste Package task to design a package suitable for waste storage within volcanic units at the Nevada Test Site. Static hydrothermal alteration experiments were run for 4 months using polished wafers either fully submerged in an appropriate natural ground water or exposed to water-saturated air with enough excess water to allow refluxing. The aqueous results agreed favorably with similar experiments run using crushed tuff, and the use of solid polished wafers allowed us to directly evaluate the effects of reaction on the tuff. The results are preliminary in the sense that these experiments were run in Teflon-lined, static autoclaves, whereas subsequent experiments have been run in Dickson-type gold-cell rocking autoclaves. The results predict relatively minor changes in water chemistry, very minor alteration of the host rock, and the production of slight amounts of secondary minerals, when liquid water could return to the rock pores following the temperature maximum during the thermal period. 7 references, 16 figures, 10 tables.

  20. Stochastic Model of Fracture Frequency Heterogeneity in a Welded Tuff EGS reservoir, Snake River Plain, Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, A.; Fairley, J. P., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    In light of recent advancements in reservoir enhancement and injection tests at active geothermal fields, there is interest in investigating the geothermal potential of widespread subsurface welded tuffs related to caldera collapse on the Snake River Plain (SRP). Before considering stimulation strategies, simulating heat extraction from the reservoir under in-situ fracture geometries will give a first-order estimation of extractable heat. With only limited deep boreholes drilled on the SRP, few analyses of the bulk hydrologic properties of the tuffs exist. Acknowledging the importance of the spatial heterogeneity of fractures to the permeability and injectivity of reservoirs hosted in impermeable volcanic units, we present fracture distributions from ICDP hole 5036-2A drilled as a part of Project HOTSPOT. The core documents more than 1200 m of largely homogeneous densely welded tuff hosting an isothermal warm-water reservoir at ~60˚ C. Multiple realizations of a hypothetical reservoir are created using sequential indicator algorithms that honor the observed vertical fracture frequency statistics. Results help form criteria for producing geothermal energy from the SRP.

  1. Testing the Consistency of Diffusion Modelling in Multiple Crystal Phases: A Case Study from the Bishop Tuff, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D. J.; Chamberlain, K. J.; Wilson, C. J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion modelling of elemental gradients across compositional zones within crystals is frequently used to investigate timescales of various magmatic processes. In most cases, however, only a single crystal phase is used for this modelling. The ~0.76 Ma Bishop Tuff (Long Valley, eastern California) in later parts of its eruptive sequence has zoned orthopyroxene, quartz and sanidine. It thus provides an unusual opportunity to compare the modelled timescales from each phase, and assess the limitations of single-phase diffusion modelling in lower-temperature, rhyolitic volcanic systems. The presence of a late-stage compositionally distinct melt (the 'bright-rim' melt) mixing into the lower parts of the Bishop magma chamber has been noted by many authors [e.g. Wark et al. 2007, Geology 35, 235; Roberge et al. 2013, CMP 165, 237; Chamberlain et al. 2014, J Petrol 55, 395] in later-erupted material discharged from vents along the northern ring fracture of the caldera. Here we present the results of 1D diffusion modelling of Ba and Sr in sanidine, Ti in quartz and Fe-Mg interdiffusion in orthopyroxene in samples from later-erupted ignimbrite packages in the tuff. Timescales from diffusion modelling of Fe-Mg interdiffusion in orthopyroxene are Bishop Tuff eruption. We highlight the importance of having a good understanding of the assumptions made and uncertainties in diffusion coefficients when undertaking such modelling, especially in examples where only one phase is available for diffusion modelling.

  2. Adsorption kinetic of arsenates as water pollutant on iron, manganese and iron-manganese-modified clinoptilolite-rich tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Cedillo, M.J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Quimica, A.P. 18-1027, Col, Escandon, Del, Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon y Paseo Tollocan s/n, Toluca (Mexico); Olguin, M.T. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Quimica, A.P. 18-1027, Col, Escandon, Del, Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: mog@nuclear.inin.mx; Fall, Ch. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, CIRA, km 14.5 de la Carretera Toluca - Ixtlahuaca, Unidad San Cayetano, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-04-30

    Arsenate adsorption from aqueous solutions onto clinoptilolite-heulandite rich tuffs modified with iron or manganese or a mixture of both iron and manganese in this work was investigated. A kinetic model was considered to describe the arsenates adsorption on each zeolitic material. The modified clinoptilolite-heulandite rich tuffs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The elemental composition and the specific surface area of the zeolitic material were also determined. The arsenate adsorption by the modified zeolites was carried on in a batch system considering a contact time from 5 min to 24 h for the kinetic experimentation. The arsenic was detected by atomic absorption spectrometer using a hydride generator. The kinetics of the arsenate adsorption processes were described by the pseudo-second-order model and the obtained parameter k varies from 0.15 to 5.66 {mu}g/gh. In general, the results suggested that the kinetic adsorption of arsenates on the modified clinoptilolite-rich tuffs depend of the metallic specie that modified the surface characteristics of the zeolitic material, the chemical nature of the metal as well as the association between different metallic chemical species in the zeolitic surface.

  3. Removal and recovery of p-phenylenediamines developing compounds from photofinishing lab-washwater using clinoptilolite tuffs from Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlessidis, A G; Triantafillidis, C S; Evmiridis, N P

    2001-04-01

    Clinoptilolite tuffs from areas in Thrace region of Greece are compared with synthetic zeolites NaY and NH4Y for the uptake of N4-ethyl-N4-(2-methansulphonamidoethyl)-2-methyl-1,4-phenylenediamin (sesquisulphate, monohydrate) with the trade name CD-3 for the purpose to be used for clean-up and recycling photo-finishing and photo-developing washwaters. The cation-exchange capacity is found to be 6.15-11.1 mg/g for zeoliferous tuffs at equilibrium concentration of 50 ppm CD-3 in aqueous solution compared to 65.0 mg/g of NaY and 48.2 mg/g for NH4Y synthetic zeolites corresponding to the removal of CD-3 from 120 to 2001 of 50 ppm aqueous solution per kg of natural zeoliferous tuff; this capacity is only 6-10 times lower than type-Y synthetic zeolite. Initial rates of uptake are 20.8 mg/l/min for natural and 38.5 mg/l/min for synthetic zeolites. Regeneration levels of 55, 23, 35, and 33% are obtained for MCH, SF, NaY, and NH4Y, respectively. The rapid and almost complete uptake of CD-3 from its aqueous solutions at low CD-3 concentrations by the natural zeolites is promising for such an application.

  4. Archaeal diversity and the extent of iron and manganese pyritization in sediments from a tropical mangrove creek (Cardoso Island, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, X. L.; Lucheta, A. R.; Ferreira, T. O.; Huerta-Díaz, M. A.; Lambais, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    Even though several studies on the geochemical processes occurring in mangrove soils and sediments have been performed, information on the diversity of Archaea and their functional roles in these ecosystems, especially in subsurface environments, is scarce. In this study, we have analyzed the depth distribution of Archaea and their possible relationships with the geochemical transformations of Fe and Mn in a sediment core from a tropical mangrove creek, using 16S rRNA gene profiling and sequential extraction of different forms of Fe and Mn. A significant shift in the archaeal community structure was observed in the lower layers (90-100 cm), coinciding with a clear decrease in total organic carbon (TOC) content and an increase in the percentage of sand. The comparison of the archaeal communities showed a dominance of methanogenic Euryarchaeota in the upper layers (0-20 cm), whereas Crenarchaeota was the most abundant taxon in the lower layers. The dominance of methanogenic Euryarchaeota in the upper layer of the sediment suggests the occurrence of methanogenesis in anoxic microenvironments. The concentrations of Fe-oxyhydroxides in the profile were very low, and showed positive correlation with the concentrations of pyrite and degrees of Fe and Mn pyritization. Additionally, a partial decoupling of pyrite formation from organic matter concentration was observed, suggesting excessive Fe pyritization. This overpyritization of Fe can be explained either by the anoxic oxidation of methane by sulfate and/or by detrital pyrite tidal transportation from the surrounding mangrove soils. The higher pyritization levels observed in deeper layers of the creek sediment were also in agreement with its Pleistocenic origin.

  5. Re-Os pyrite geochronology of Zn-Pb mineralization in the giant Caixiashan deposit, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengfeng; Chen, Huayong; Hollings, Pete; Zhang, Li; Mi, Mei; Li, Jie; Fang, Jing; Wang, Chengming; Lu, Wanjian

    2016-03-01

    The newly discovered Caixiashan Irish-type Zn-Pb deposit (˜131 Mt at 3.95 % Zn + Pb), located in the Eastern Tianshan of Xinjiang, is one of the largest Zn-Pb deposits in NW China. Massive colloform/framboidal textured syn-sedimentary pyrite yielded a Re-Os isochron age of 1019 ± 70 Ma (MSWD = 3.5), which is interpreted to be the depositional age of the Kawabulake group that hosts the ore. The age of the main mineralization stage is constrained by two types of pyrite: the layered pyrite coexists with recrystallized calcite and dolomite and is locally replaced by sphalerite, whereas the euhedral pyrite occurs with galena that crosscuts the massive sphalerite. The layered pyrite yielded a Re-Os age of 859 ± 79 Ma (MSWD = 6.7; initial 187Os/188Os ratio [IOs] = 0.19 ± 0.25) and the euhedral pyrite 837 ± 39 Ma (MSWD = 6.5; [IOs] = 0.16 ± 0.09), which are interpreted to be the Zn and Pb mineralization ages, respectively. The low radiogenic initial Os values of the Zn-Pb mineralization suggest interaction between a hydrothermal fluid and a mafic or ultramafic source rock with a mantle Os signature with some contamination with Mesoproterozoic Kawabulake group. Based on our new Re-Os ages, we conclude that the giant Caixiashan Zn-Pb deposit formed in the early Neoproterozoic and it represents a newly identified mineralization epoch in the Eastern Tianshan of the Central Asia Orogenic Belt.

  6. Electrochemical mineralization of the antibiotic levofloxacin by electro-Fenton-pyrite process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoumi, Natija; Labiadh, Lazhar; Oturan, Mehmet A; Oturan, Nihal; Gadri, Abdellatif; Ammar, Salah; Brillas, Enric

    2015-12-01

    Levofloxacin is a large spectrum antibiotic from fluoroquinolones family, widely used and detected in natural waters. Here, this drug was degraded by a novel heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process, so-called EF-pyrite, in which pyrite powder in suspension regulates the solution pH to 3.0 and supplies 0.2mM Fe(2+) as catalyst to the solution. Trials were performed with a stirred boron-doped diamond (BDD)/carbon-felt cell under O2 bubbling for cathodic H2O2 generation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the BDD anode and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between Fe(2+) and H2O2 were the main oxidizing agents. The effect of applied current and antibiotic concentration over the mineralization rate and degree, mineralization current efficiency and specific energy consumption was studied. An almost total mineralization was achieved for a 0.23mM drug solution operating at 300mA for 8h. The kinetic decay of the drug was followed by reversed-phase HPLC and obeyed a pseudo-first-order reaction. Ion-exclusion HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic and oxamic acids, the most persistent final products, were the predominant pollutants remaining in solution at long electrolysis time. Ion chromatography analysis confirmed the release of F(-), NO3(-) and NH4(+) ions during levofloxacin mineralization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficient hydrogen evolution catalysis using ternary pyrite-type cobalt phosphosulphide

    KAUST Repository

    Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel

    2015-09-14

    The scalable and sustainable production of hydrogen fuel through water splitting demands efficient and robust Earth-abundant catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Building on promising metal compounds with high HER catalytic activity, such as pyrite structure cobalt disulphide (CoS 2), and substituting non-metal elements to tune the hydrogen adsorption free energy could lead to further improvements in catalytic activity. Here we present a combined theoretical and experimental study to establish ternary pyrite-type cobalt phosphosulphide (CoPS) as a high-performance Earth-abundant catalyst for electrochemical and photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Nanostructured CoPS electrodes achieved a geometrical catalytic current density of 10 mA cm at overpotentials as low as 48mV, with outstanding long-term operational stability. Integrated photocathodes of CoPS on n -p-p silicon micropyramids achieved photocurrents up to 35 mA cm at 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), onset photovoltages as high as 450 mV versus RHE, and the most efficient solar-driven hydrogen generation from Earth-abundant systems.

  8. Sulfidation Roasting of Hemimorphite with Pyrite for the Enrichment of Zn and Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Xiao-Bo; Xue, Ke; Ke, Yong; Zhou, Bo-Sheng; Li, Yang-Wen-Jun; Wang, Qing-Wei

    2016-09-01

    With the increasing consumption of zinc and the depletion of zinc sulfide ores, the exploitation of low-grade zinc oxide ores may be important for the sustainability of the zinc industry. Hemimorphite, a zinc hydroxyl silicate hydrate, is a significant source of Zn and Pb. It is difficult to obtain Zn and Pb from the hemimorphite using traditional technology. In this work, for the first time, sulfidation roasting of hemimorphite with pyrite was studied for the enrichment of Zn and Pb by a flotation process. Four stages of sulfidation roasting were determined based on x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry analysis. Then, the effects of sulfidation temperature, pyrite dosage and reaction time on the sulfidation percentages were investigated at the laboratory scale. The experimental results showed that the sulfidation percentages of Pb and Zn were as high as 98.08% and 90.55% under optimum conditions, respectively. Finally, a flotation test was performed to enrich Zn and Pb in the sulfidation product. A flotation concentrate with 8.78% Zn and 9.25% Pb was obtained, and the recovery of Zn and Pb reached 56.14% and 75.94%, respectively.

  9. An experimental study of pyrite bio-leaching as a way to control spontaneous combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Shenghua; Wu Aixiang; Liu Jinzhi; Huang Mingqing; Wang Hongjiang

    2011-01-01

    Bio-leaching of pyrite by native strains of acidophilic bacteria was examined by laboratory scale tests.Three groups of batch trials in agitated flasks and three continuous column leaching tests were performed.The leaching ability and efficiency of native bacteria was greatly improved by adaptation of the bacteria to the test conditions.These cultivated bacteria were then used for the leaching process.The changes in solution pH,Eh,Fe2+ concentration,and sulfate ion concentration were monitored throughout the tests.A portion of the pyritic sulfur is transformed into soluble sulfate ion.The desulfurization ratio of 42.6% was obtained in a flask shaking test and a ratio of 39.4% was obtained during column leaching.A weight gain test was performed on leached and unleached samples by exposing the samples to humid air for several days.A smaller weight gain of the bio-leached samples indicates that removing sulfur from the sulphide ore helps reduce its oxidation rate and the potential for spontaneous combustion.

  10. A novel magnetic 4A zeolite adsorbent synthesised from kaolinite type pyrite cinder (KTPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqing; Feng, Qiming; Liu, Kun; Zhang, Guofan; Liu, Jing; Huang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    As a solid waste, kaolinite type pyrite cinder (KTPC) is a special pyrite cinder, its mineral components include metakaolin and magnetite, and the chemical compositions of these minerals include SiO2, Al2O3, FeO and Fe2O3. In this study, a novel magnetic 4A zeolite adsorbent was synthesised from KTPC using the hydrothermal method, and the optimum hydrothermal synthesis conditions were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and by determining the specific surface area (SSA) and the saturated cation exchange adsorption capacity (SCEAC) to Cs+. Under the optimum hydrothermal synthesis conditions, the magnetic 4A zeolite adsorbent can be synthesised with high crystallinity, and the SSA and SCEAC to Cs+ are 24.49 m2/g and 106.63 mg/g, respectively. The further characterisations of pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), thermogravimetry-derivative thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTG-DTA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were performed. The results revealed that magnetic particles are coated onto the zeolite surface and further form magnetic aggregates, and the existing magnetic particles in KTPC do not change their crystal structure and do not affect the synthesis of the 4A zeolite. In addition, the synthesised 4A zeolite adsorbent can be used as a magnetic adsorbent in wastewater treatment with high magnetic sensitivity and is thermally stable up to approximately 900 °C.

  11. Bacterial communities involved in soil formation and plant establishment triggered by pyrite bioweathering on arctic moraines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapelli, Francesca; Marasco, Ramona; Rizzi, Agostino; Baldi, Franco; Ventura, Stefano; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2011-02-01

    In arctic glacier moraines, bioweathering primed by microbial iron oxidizers creates fertility gradients that accelerate soil development and plant establishment. With the aim of investigating the change of bacterial diversity in a pyrite-weathered gradient, we analyzed the composition of the bacterial communities involved in the process by sequencing 16S rRNA gene libraries from different biological soil crusts (BSC). Bacterial communities in three BSC of different morphology, located within 1 m distance downstream a pyritic conglomerate rock, were significantly diverse. The glacier moraine surrounding the weathered site showed wide phylogenetic diversity and high evenness with 15 represented bacterial classes, dominated by Alphaproteobacteria and pioneer Cyanobacteria colonizers. The bioweathered area showed the lowest diversity indexes and only nine bacterial families, largely dominated by Acidobacteriaceae and Acetobacteraceae typical of acidic environments, in accordance with the low pH of the BSC. In the weathered BSC, iron-oxidizing bacteria were cultivated, with counts decreasing along with the increase of distance from the rock, and nutrient release from the rock was revealed by environmental scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analyses. The vegetated area showed the presence of Actinomycetales, Verrucomicrobiales, Gemmatimonadales, Burkholderiales, and Rhizobiales, denoting a bacterial community typical of developed soils and indicating that the lithoid substrate of the bare moraine was here subjected to an accelerated colonization, driven by iron-oxidizing activity.

  12. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists.

  13. Mineralogic Zonation Within the Tuff Confining Unit, Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lance Prothro

    2005-09-01

    Recently acquired mineralogic data from drill hole samples in Yucca Flat show that the tuff confining unit (TCU) can be subdivided into three mineralogic zones based on the relative abundances of primary and secondary mineral assemblages. These zones are (1) an upper zone characterized by the abundance of the zeolite mineral clinoptilolite with lesser amounts of felsic and clay minerals; (2) a middle zone with felsic minerals dominant over clinoptilolite and clay minerals; and (3) a basal argillic zone where clay minerals are dominant over felsic minerals and clinoptilolite. Interpretation of the mineralogic data, along with lithologic, stratigraphic, and geophysical data from approximately 500 drill holes, reveals a three-layer mineralogic model for the TCU that shows all three zones are extensive beneath Yucca Flat. The mineralogic model will be used to subdivide the TCU in the Yucca Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model, resulting in a more accurate and versatile framework model. In addition, the identification of the type, quantity, and distribution of minerals within each TCU layer will permit modelers to better predict the spatial distribution and extent of contaminant transport from underground tests in Yucca Flat, at both the level of the hydrologic source term and the corrective action unit.

  14. Properties of Vulcanized Polyisoprene Rubber Composites Filled with Opalized White Tuff and Precipitated Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Samaržija-Jovanović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Opalized white tuff (OWT with 40 μm average particle size and 39.3 m2/g specific surface area has been introduced into polyisoprene rubber (NR. Their reinforcing effects were evaluated by comparisons with those from precipitated silica (PSi. The cure characteristic, apparent activation energy of cross-link (Eac and reversion (Ear, and mechanical properties of a variety of composites based on these rubbers were studied. This was done using vulcanization techniques, mechanical testing, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that OWT can greatly improve the vulcanizing process by shortening the time of optimum cure (tc90 and the scorch time (ts2 of cross-linked rubber composites, which improves production efficiency and operational security. The rubber composites filled with 50 phr of OWT were found to have good mechanical and elastomeric properties. The tensile strengths of the NR/OWT composites are close to those of NR/PSi composites, but the tear strength and modulus are not as good as the corresponding properties of those containing precipitated silica. Morphology results revealed that the OWT is poorly dispersed in the rubber matrix. According to that, the lower interactions between OWT and polyisoprene rubber macromolecules are obtained, but similar mechanical properties of NR/OWT (100/50 rubber composites compared with NR/PSi (100/50 rubber composites are resulted.

  15. Potential corrosion and degradation mechanisms of Zircaloy cladding on spent nuclear fuel in a tuff repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, A.J.

    1984-09-01

    A literature review and analysis were made of corrosion and degradation processes applicable to Zircaloy cladding on spent nuclear fuel in a tuff repository. In particular, lifetime sought for the Zircaloy is 10,000 years. Among the potential failure mechanisms examined were: oxidation by steam, air, and water, including the effects of ions whose presence is anticipated in the water; mechanical overload; stress (creep) rupture; stress-corrosion cracking (SCC); and delayed failure due to hydride cracking. The conclusion is that failure due to oxidation is not credible, although a few experiments are suggested to confirm the effect of aqueous fluoride on the Zircaloy cladding. Mechanical overload is not a problem, and failure from stress-rupture does not appear likely based on a modified Larson-Miller analysis. Analysis shows that delayed hydride cracking is not anticipated for the bulk of spent fuel pins. However, for a minority of pins under high stress, there is some uncertainty in the analysis as a result of: (1) uncertainty about crack depths in spent fuel claddings and (2) the effect of slow cooling on the formation of radially oriented hydride precipitates. Experimental resolution is called for. Finally, insufficient information is currently available on stress-corrosion cracking. While evidence is presented that SCC failure is not likely to occur, it is difficult to demonstrate this conclusively because the process is not clearly understood and data are limited. Further experimental work on SCC susceptibility is especially needed.

  16. Testing for fullerenes in geologic materials: Oklo carbonaceous substances, Karelian shungites, Sudbury Black Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossman, David; Eigendorf, Guenter; Tokaryk, Dennis; Gauthier-Lafaye, François; Guckert, Kristal D.; Melezhik, Victor; Farrow, Catharine E. G.

    2003-03-01

    Fullerenes have been reported from diverse geologic environments since their discovery in shungite from Karelian Russia. Our investigation is prompted by the presence of onionskin-like structures in some carbonaceous substances associated with the fossil nuclear fission reactors of Oklo, Gabon. The same series of extractions and the same instrumental techniques, laser desorption ionization and high-resolution mass spectroscopy (electron-impact mass spectroscopy), were employed to test for fullerenes in samples from three different localities: two sites containing putative fullerenes (Sudbury Basin and Russian Karelia) and one new location (Oklo, Gabon). We confirm the presence of fullerenes (C60 and C70) in the Black Tuff of the Onaping Formation impact breccia in the Sudbury Basin, but we find no evidence of fullerenes in shungite samples from various locations in Russian Karelia. Analysis of carbonaceous substances associated with the natural nuclear fission reactors of Oklo yields no definitive signals for fullerenes. If fullerenes were produced during sustained nuclear fission at Oklo, then they are present below the detection limit (˜100 fmol), or they have destabilized since formation. Contrary to some expectations, geologic occurrences of fullerenes are not commonplace.

  17. Correlation of the oldest Toba Tuff to sediments in the central Indian Ocean Basin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J N Pattan; M Shyam Prasad; E V S S K Babu

    2010-08-01

    We have identified an ash layer in association with Australasian microtektites of ∼0.77Ma old in two sediment cores which are ∼450 km apart in the central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB). Morphology and chemical composition of glass shards and associated microtektites have been used to trace their provenance. In ODP site 758 from Ninetyeast Ridge, ash layer-D (13 cm thick, 0.73–0.75 Ma) and layer-E (5 cm thick, 0.77–0.78 Ma) were previously correlated to the oldest Toba Tuff (OTT) eruptions of the Toba caldera, Sumatra. In this investigation, we found tephra ∼3100 km to the southwest of Toba caldera that is chemically identical to layer D of ODP site 758 and ash in the South China Sea correlated to the OTT. Layer E is not present in the CIOB or other ocean basins. The occurrence of tephra correlating to layer D suggests a widespread distribution of OTT tephra (∼3.6 × 107 km2), an ash volume of at least ∼1800 km3, a total OTT volume of 2300 km3, and classification of the OTT eruption as a super-eruption.

  18. Electromagnetic experiment to map in situ water in heated welded tuff: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1987-03-16

    An experiment was conducted in Tunnel Complex G at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate geotomography as a possible candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Alterant tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for a vertical and a horizontal plane. After the 1 kilowatt heater was turned on, the tomographs indicated a rapid and strong drying adjacent to the heater. Moisture loss was not symmetric about the heater, but seemed to be strongly influenced by heterogeneity in the rock mass. The linear character of many tomographic features and their spatial correlation with fractures mapped in boreholes are evidence that drying was most rapid along some fractures. When the heater was turned off, an increase in moisture content occurred around the heater and along the dry fractures. However, this process is much slower and the magnitude of the moisture increase much smaller than the changes observed during heating of the rock. The interpretation of the tomographs is preliminary until they can be processed without the restrictive assumption of straight ray paths for the signals through the highly heterogeneous rock mass. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Rapid estimate of solid volume in large tuff cores using a gas pycnometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thies, C. [ed.; Geddis, A.M.; Guzman, A.G. [and others

    1996-09-01

    A thermally insulated, rigid-volume gas pycnometer system has been developed. The pycnometer chambers have been machined from solid PVC cylinders. Two chambers confine dry high-purity helium at different pressures. A thick-walled design ensures minimal heat exchange with the surrounding environment and a constant volume system, while expansion takes place between the chambers. The internal energy of the gas is assumed constant over the expansion. The ideal gas law is used to estimate the volume of solid material sealed in one of the chambers. Temperature is monitored continuously and incorporated into the calculation of solid volume. Temperature variation between measurements is less than 0.1{degrees}C. The data are used to compute grain density for oven-dried Apache Leap tuff core samples. The measured volume of solid and the sample bulk volume are used to estimate porosity and bulk density. Intrinsic permeability was estimated from the porosity and measured pore surface area and is compared to in-situ measurements by the air permeability method. The gas pycnometer accommodates large core samples (0.25 m length x 0.11 m diameter) and can measure solid volume greater than 2.20 cm{sup 3} with less than 1% error.

  20. Experimental Analysis and Process Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Removal Using Tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Bonamente

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Removal of carbon dioxide via selective adsorption is a key process to obtain consumer-grade natural gas from biogas and, more generally, CO2 capture and sequestration from gaseous mixtures. The aim of this work is the characterization and classification of a natural alternative to synthetic zeolites that could be used as a carbon dioxide adsorbent. Tuff particulate, easily available as a byproduct of the construction industry, was tested with different laboratory procedures to verify its suitability for CO2 removal applications. Relevant physical and adsorption properties were measured during an intensive experimental campaign. Porosity, pore size distribution, and specific surface area were obtained with mercury intrusion porosimetry. Adsorption isotherms and saturation curves were obtained using two custom experimental apparatuses. The selective adsorption was finally modeled using an original phenomenological parameterization, and a simplified simulation of the process was performed using a computational fluid dynamic approach, validated against observed data. Results show that natural zeolites represent a very promising and sustainable alternative to synthetic zeolites in pressure swing adsorption processes for CO2 removal.

  1. Hybrid fall deposits in the Bishop Tuff, California: A novel pyroclastic depositional mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C.J.N.; Hildreth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Hybrid fall deposits in the Bishop Tuff show features common to both archetypal fall and surge deposits. Like normal-fall deposits, they have an overall plane-parallel bedding and flat-lying pumice clasts but also, like surge deposits, they show variable development of cross-bedding, some crystal and pumice sorting, and some rounding of pumice clasts. All variations exist from normal-fall deposits, through streaky material with incipient development of cross-bedding, to the hybrid fall deposits with well-developed cross-bedding. The streaky and hybrid deposits are interpreted as fall material contemporaneously redeposited by strong (up to 40 m/s) swirling winds, comparable to firestorm whirlwinds, generated by air currents associated with coeval emplacement of pyroclastic flows. Recognition of hybrid fall deposits is important in interpreting the dynamics of explosive eruptions and correctly assessing volcanic hazards. However, although such deposits may be commonly produced by explosive eruptions, especially where pyroclastic flows accompany fall activity, they are likely to be overlooked, or wrongly interpreted as surge deposits or secondary, reworked material.

  2. Investigation by sup 5 sup 7 Fe- Moessbauer spectroscopy of some pyrite samples of different Romanian natural deposits

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinescu, S; Calogero, S

    2002-01-01

    Extracted pyrites from four Romanian geological deposits have been investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The room temperature results of this investigation have been correlated with the data of sulfur isotope ratio and minor elements analysis of pyrite samples. The presence of three signals is identified in the Moessbauer spectra. They correspond to the two crystalline structure of FeS sub 2 while the third is suggested to be assigned to one of the components of the iron-sulfur-arsenic series of investigated minerals. (authors)

  3. Cretaceous Cu-Au, pyrite, and Fe-oxide-apatite deposits in the Ningwu basin, Lower Yangtze Area, Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin-Jie; Lu, Bang-Cheng; Wang, Tie-Zhu; Che, Lin-Rui

    2015-05-01

    The Cretaceous Ningwu volcanic basin of the Middle and Lower Yangtze River Valley metallogenic belt of eastern China hosts numerous Fe-oxide-apatite, Cu-Au, and pyrite deposits. The mineralization in the Ningwu basin is associated with subvolcanic rocks, consisting of gabbro-diorite porphyry and/or pyroxene diorite. However, the mineralization is associated with subvolcanic and volcanic rock suite belonging to the Niangniangshan Formation in the Tongjing Cu-Au deposit, including nosean-bearing aegirine-augite syenites, quartz syenites, and quartz monzonites. The zoning displayed by the alteration and mineralization comprises: (1) an upper light-colored zone of argillic, carbonate, and pyrite alteration and silicification that is locally associated with pyrite and gold mineralization, (2) a central dark-colored zone of diopside, fluorapatite-magnetite, phlogopite, and garnet alteration associated with fluorapatite-magnetite mineralization, and (3) a lowermost light-colored zone of extensive albite alteration. The Cu-Au and pyrite orebodies are peripheral to the Fe-oxide-apatite deposits in this area and overlie the iron orebodies, including the Meishan Cu-Au deposit in the northern Ningwu basin and the pyrite deposits in the central Ningwu basin. The δ34S values of sulfides from the Fe-oxide-apatite, Cu-Au, and pyrite deposits in the Ningwu basin show large variation, with a mixed sulfur source, including magmatic sulfur and/or a mixture of sulfur derived from a magmatic component, country rock, and thermochemical reduction of sulfate at 200-300 °C. The ore-forming fluids associated with iron mineralization were derived mainly from magmatic fluids, and the late-stage ore-forming fluids related to Cu-Au and pyrite mineralization may have formed by the introduction of cooler meteoric water to the system. The Fe-oxide-apatite, Cu-Au, and pyrite deposits of the Ningwu basin formed in an extensional environment and are associated with a large-scale magmatic

  4. S/Se ratio of pyrite from eastern Australian VHMS deposits: implication of magmatic input into volcanogenic hydrothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huston, D.L. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Cooke, D.R. [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    The proton microprobe was used to determine the concentrations of over twenty trace elements in pyrite grains from four volcanic-hosted massive sulphide (VHMS) deposits in eastern Australia. Of the elements determined, Se has the most potential in resolving important problems in the genesis of this class of ore deposits. This paper summarises analytical conditions, describes the distribution of Se in pyrite in VHMS deposits as determined in this and other studies, discusses the speciation of Se in hydrothermal fluids, and presents a genetic model on the relative contribution of magmatic versus sea water Se (and S) in VHMS systems. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Degradation of tyrosol by a novel electro-Fenton process using pyrite as heterogeneous source of iron catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Salah; Oturan, Mehmet A; Labiadh, Lazhar; Guersalli, Amor; Abdelhedi, Ridha; Oturan, Nihal; Brillas, Enric

    2015-05-01

    Tyrosol (TY) is one of the most abundant phenolic components of olive oil mill wastewaters. Here, the degradation of synthetic aqueous solutions of 0.30 mM TY was studied by a novel heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process, so-called EF-pyrite, in which pyrite powder was the source of Fe(2+) catalyst instead of a soluble iron salt used in classical EF. Experiments were performed with a cell equipped with a boron-doped diamond anode and a carbon-felt cathode, where TY and its products were destroyed by hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between Fe(2+) and H2O2 generated at the cathode. Addition of 1.0 g L(-1) pyrite provided an easily adjustable pH to 3.0 and an appropriate 0.20 mM Fe(2+) to optimize the EF-pyrite treatment. The effect of current on mineralization rate, mineralization current efficiency and specific energy consumption was examined under comparable EF and EF-pyrite conditions. The performance of EF-pyrite was 8.6% superior at 50 mA due to self-regulation of soluble Fe(2+) by pyrite. The TY decay in this process followed a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The absolute rate constant for TY hydroxylation was 3.57 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), as determined by the competition kinetics method. Aromatic products like 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and catechol, as well as o-benzoquinone, were identified by GC-MS and reversed-phase HPLC. Short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids like maleic, glycolic, acetic, oxalic and formic were quantified by ion-exclusion HPLC. Oxalic acid was the major and most persistent product found. Based on detected intermediates, a plausible mineralization pathway for TY by EF-pyrite was proposed.

  6. Abiotic oxidation of pyrite by Fe(III) in acidic media and its implications for sulfur isotope measurements of lattice-bound sulfate in sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumdar, A.; Goldberg, T.; Strauss, H

    from our pure pyrite oxidation experiments show that in a solution of acidic pH, the amount of sulfate formed is very similar under both oxygenated and oxygen-free experimental conditions which is suggestive of the dominant role of Fe sup(3+) in pyrite...

  7. Application of the Plagioclase-Liquid Hygrometer to the Bishop Tuff: Consistency with Melt Inclusion H2O Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolles, J.; Lange, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    High-silica (74-77 wt% SiO2) rhyolites are the most evolved magmas on Earth and constitute some of the largest eruptions (1000s of km3). Of these, one classic example is the Bishop Tuff, a 760 ka eruption of >670 km3 of high-silica rhyolite erupted from Long Valley caldera, CA. Documenting dissolved H2O contents is crucial for understanding its origin and evolution. Analyses of water contents measured in quartz-hosted melt inclusions from the Bishop Tuff (Wallace et al. 1999; Anderson et al. 2000) show that the Early and Middle Bishop Tuff (Ig1Eb, Ig2Ea) have higher water contents (≤ 6.3 wt% H2O) than the Late Bishop Tuff (Ig2NWa; ≤ 5.2 wt%). Our work utilizes the revised plagioclase-liquid hygrometer (Waters & Lange, 2015), which is applicable to rhyolite, to evaluate internal consistency between Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, the plagioclase hygrometer, and melt inclusion H2O analyses. Two-oxide thermometry (Ghiorso & Evans, 2008), using all possible Fe-Ti oxide pairs (between 56 and 1500 pairs for individual samples), was carried out on 2-3 pumice clasts for each sampled eruptive unit. Resulting temperatures (°C ± 1σ) for individual clasts are: 705 ± 12, 728 ± 10 for unit Ig1Eb; 710 ± 12, 728 ± 11 for unit Ig2Ea; 752 ±10, 776 ± 8, 778 ± 7 for unit Ig2NWa; 791 ± 7, 795 ± 8 for unit Ig2Nb. The compositions of the most calcic plagioclase phenocrysts in the Early and Middle units are An17-19, whereas in the Late units they are An29-30. When the Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, whole rock analyses, and plagioclase compositions are incorporated into the plagioclase hygrometer, they give water contents at the onset of plagioclase crystallization of 6.6-6.9 wt% for the Early and Middle units and 4.8-4.9 wt % for the Late units. These results show internal consistency between melt inclusion analyses of water, Fe-Ti oxide thermometry, and the plagioclase-liquid hygrometer; they further support a temperature gradient across the Early, Middle, and Late Bishop Tuff units.

  8. Summary of Radionuclide Reactive Transport Experiments in Fractured Tuff and Carbonate Rocks from Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Reimus, P; Johnson, M

    2006-10-11

    In the Yucca Flat basin of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), 747 shaft and tunnel nuclear detonations were conducted primarily within the tuff confining unit (TCU) or the overlying alluvium. The TCU in the Yucca Flat basin is hypothesized to inhibit radionuclide migration to the highly transmissive and regionally extensive lower carbonate aquifer (LCA) due to its wide-spread aerial extent, low permeability, and chemical reactivity. However, fast transport pathways through the TCU by way of fractures may provide a migration path for radionuclides to the LCA. Radionuclide transport in both TCU and the LCA fractures is likely to determine the location of the contaminant boundary for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). Radionuclide transport through the TCU may involve both matrix and fracture flow. However, radionuclide migration over significant distances is likely to be dominated by fracture transport. Transport through the LCA will almost certainly be dominated by fracture flow, as the LCA has a very dense, low porosity matrix with very low permeability. Because of the complex nature of reactive transport in fractures, a stepwise approach to identifying mechanisms controlling radionuclide transport was used. The simplest LLNL experiments included radionuclide transport through synthetic parallel-plate fractured tuff and carbonate cores. These simplified fracture transport experiments isolated matrix diffusion and sorption effects from all other fracture transport processes (fracture lining mineral sorption, heterogeneous flow, etc.). Additional fracture transport complexity was added by performing induced fractured LCA flowthrough experiments (effect of aperture heterogeneity) or iron oxide coated parallel plate TCU flowthrough experiments (effect of fracture lining minerals). Finally naturally fractured tuff and carbonate cores were examined at LLNL and LANL. All tuff and carbonate core used in the experiments was obtained from the USGS Core Library

  9. Eruptive history and petrogenesis of the mid-Miocene McDermitt tuff, northern NV and southern OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkel, W. A.; Henry, C. D.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Miocene McDermitt caldera on the northern NV - southern OR border is commonly considered to mark initial silicic volcanism associated with the Yellowstone hotspot track, proposed by Pierce and Morgan (1992). It was initially interpreted to consist of five, partly overlapping calderas. Our new work substantially revises this picture to show that silicic magmatism began at ~16.5 Ma, after emplacement of Steens basalts likely erupted from vents to the north, but consisted of a mix of metaluminous and peralkaline rhyolite lavas, and that a single, 30 x 40 km caldera formed during eruption of a zoned rhyolite-dacite ignimbrite, the McDermitt tuff (MDT), at ~16.2 Ma. This tuff is spectacularly exposed along the west side of the caldera where Basin and Range faulting has revealed pre-caldera lavas overlain by a complete section of MDT and megabreccia, locally strongly rheomorphic and mega-rheomorphic (Hargrove and Sheridan, 1984), capped by post-collapse icelandite lava. The MDT varies from aphyric, high-SiO2, peralkaline rhyolite to abundantly porphyritic, metaluminous dacite. Detailed sections through the 600m - thick MDT have revealed significant variations in the lithologic characteristics of the tuff. These variations include 1) fiamme content (eutaxitic to fiamme-absent), 2) degree of rheomorphism, 3) phenocryst abundance and 4) lithic contents: lithic-rich tuff (clast sizes on mm- to cm-scale), single lithic mesobreccias (up to m-scale), and multi-lithic mega-breccia (up to 10’s of m-scale). Similar lithologic horizons within the MDT are found in different lateral and stratigraphic locations that cannot be easily correlated. These observations indicate that the MDT has a rather complex depositional history involving multiple eruptive events. High-precision single crystal 40Ar / 39Ar dates are all within analytical error (16.18 Ma +/- 0.03 Ma; n = 4), which indicates that all events probably occurred over much less than 100 ka. The interdigitation of

  10. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Pleistocene tuffs: an accurate age for the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal (MBGR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D. F.; Renne, P. R.; Morgan, L. E.; Deino, A.; Smith, V. C.; Ellis, B. S.; Pearce, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent recalibrations of the 40Ar/39Ar system [1,2] reveal inconsistencies with some previous ages inferred for the MBGR. An Ar/Ar age [3] for the Bishop Tuff (BT) (which post-dates the MBGR by at least 15.3 ± 2.2 ka [3]) recalculated [2] yields an age of 778.0 ± 3.8 ka (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). The age is c. 10 ka older than the BT zircon ID-TIMS U-Pb age [4] and places the MBGR at c. 793 ka, c. 13 and 20 ka older than astronomical ages for the MBGR of 780 ka [5] and 773 ka [6], respectively. To determine an accurate age for the MBGR, we have made a series of 40Ar/39Ar age determinations for Pleistocene tuffs from both Indonesia and North America that have direct relationships to the MBGR. Blind analyses were conducted at SUERC and BGC. We observed excellent inter-laboratory agreement and no systematic offset in data. Ar/Ar ages are reported relative to [2] (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). Drill cores from ODP Site 758 show the precise location of the MBGR. Below the MBGR are two distal tephra horizons that we have identified as products of two temporally distinct Old Toba Tuff (OTT) eruptions (layer d OTT1 and layer D OTT2). Continuous sedimentation between OTT1 (802.8 ± 0.7 ka, n = 100, MSWD 1.2) and OTT2 (796.2 ± 0.8 ka, n = 62, MSWD 1.3) allows for calculation of an accurate sedimentation rate and for extrapolation of an age from OTT2 to the MBGR. Data define an age for the MBGR of 795.2 ± 0.9 ka. Using tephra above the MBGR boundary, the Middle Toba Tuff (layer C) and Young Toba Tuff (layer A), extrapolation down core supports a MBGR age of c. 795 ka. Recent age data for BT sanidine reported relative to FCs at 28.172 Ma (767.4 ± 1.1 Ma) [7] oddly yielded an Ar/Ar age that was indistinguishable from the BT zircon U-Pb age [4], which is consistent with previous 40Ar/39Ar age measurements made relative to FCs at 28.02 Ma [3]. Thus we made a series of 40Ar/39Ar measurements on the exact same sample as used by Rivera et al. [7] and observed

  11. 某矿山硫铁矿尾砂浮选试验研究%Study on the flotation test of pyrite tailings from a pyrite mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淑红; 董风芝; 孙永峰

    2009-01-01

    在对试验用硫铁矿尾砂进行物理化学性质研究的基础上,对其进行浮选试验.以乙黄药为捕收剂,2号油为起泡剂,经过一粗一扫一精闭路试验,一次精选尾矿和扫选精矿合并返回粗选可以得到精矿品位41.07%、回收率92.73%、产率10.95%、尾矿品位0.4%的最终指标.%Flotation test was conducted on the basis of the study on physical and chemical characteristics of the tailings from pyrite ores.With ethylxanthate as collector and 2# oil as frother, roughing was under way in alkaline slurry with one roughing and one concentrating ,and the final indexes of concentrate grade of 41.07%, recovery rateof 92.73%, yield of 10.95% and grade of railings 0.4% are obtained.

  12. Evidence of CFC degradation in groundwater under pyrite-oxidizing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebol, L.A.; Robertson, W.D.; Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L.N.; Ryan, M.C.; Schiff, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed local-scale monitoring network was used to assess CFC distribution in an unconfined sand aquifer in southwestern Ontario where the zone of 1-5-year-old groundwater was known with certainty because of prior use of a bromide tracer. Groundwater ???5 years old was confined to an aerobic zone at ???5 m depth and had CFC concentrations consistent with modern atmospheric mixing ratios at recharge temperatures of 7-11 ??C, as was observed in the 3-m thick vadose zone at the site. At depths below 6 m, the groundwater became progressively more reducing, however, with a denitrifying horizon at 6-7 m depth, and a Mn and Fe reducing zone below 7 m depth. In the anaerobic zone, 3H/3He ratios indicated that groundwater-age continued to increase uniformly with depth, to a maximum value of 27 years at 13 m depth. CFC concentrations, however, decreased abruptly within the denitrifying zone, leading to substantial age overestimation compared to the 3H/3He ages. Noble gas data indicated that the apparent CFC mass loss was not likely the result of gas stripping from possible bubble formation; thus, CFC degradation was indicated in the anoxic zone. The field data are consistent with first-order degradation rates of 0.3 yr-1 for CFC-12, 0.7 yr-1 for CFC-11, and 1.6 yr-1 for CFC-113. CFC attenuation at this site coincides with a zone where reduced S (pyrite) is actively oxidized by NO3 and dissolved oxygen (DO). Similar behavior has been observed at other sites [Tesoriero, A.J., Liebscher, H., Cox, S.E., 2000. Mechanism and rate of denitrification in an agricultural watershed: electron and mass balance along groundwater flow path. Water Resour. Res. 36 (6), 1545-1559; Hinsby, K., Hojberg, A.L., Engesgaard, P., Jensen, K.H., Larsen, F., Plummer, L.N., Busenberg, E., Accepted for publication. Transport and degradation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in a pyritic aquifer, Rabis Creek, Denmark. Water Resour. Res.], further demonstrating that the use of CFCs for age-dating anaerobic

  13. Reactivity of Dazomet, a Hydraulic Fracturing Additive: Hydrolysis and Interaction with Pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolazio, N.; Lowry, G. V.; Karamalidis, A.; Hakala, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Marcellus Shale is currently the largest shale gas formation in play across the world. The low-permeability formation requires hydraulic fracturing to be produced. In this process, millions of gallons of water are blended with chemical additives and pumped into each well to fracture the reservoir rock. Although additives account for less than 2% of the fracking fluid mixture, they amount to hundreds of tons per frack job. The environmental properties of some of these additives have been studied, but their behavior under downhole conditions is not widely reported in the peer-reviewed literature. These compounds and their reaction products may return to the surface as produced or waste water. In the event of a spill or release, this water has the potential to contaminate surface soil and water. Of these additives, biocides may present a formidable challenge to water quality. Biocides are toxic compounds (by design), typically added to the Marcellus Shale to control bacteria in the well. An assessment of the most frequently used biocides indicated a need to study the chemical dazomet under reservoir conditions. The Marcellus Shale contains significant deposits of pyrite. This is a ubiquitous mineral within black shales that is known to react with organic compounds in both oxic and anoxic settings. Thus, the objective of our study was to determine the effect of pyrite on the hydrolysis of dazomet. Liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QQQ) was used to calculate the loss rate of aqueous dazomet. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to identify the reaction products. Our experiments show that in water, dazomet rapidly hydrolyses in water to form organic and inorganic transformation products. This reaction rate was unaffected when performed under anoxic conditions. However, with pyrite we found an appreciable increase in the removal rate of dazomet. This was accompanied by a corresponding change in the distribution of observed

  14. The Fish Canyon Tuff: A new look at an old low-temperature thermochronology standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleadow, Andrew; Harrison, Mark; Kohn, Barry; Lugo-Zazueta, Rául; Phillips, David

    2015-08-01

    The Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) has served as an important source for geochronology standards, particularly for fission track, K-Ar and (40Ar/39Ar) dating, even though efforts to establish precise ages for its constituent minerals have proved to be unexpectedly complex. To evaluate the suitability of FCT apatite as a standard for apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He (AHe) thermochronometry, and to test underlying assumptions about its suitability for apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronometry, we analysed samples from a series of sites throughout the vertical and lateral extent of the host ignimbrite sheet. Samples were collected from the relatively lithic-rich, classic sampling location in the lower part of the thick proximal ignimbrite and a ∼ 330 m vertical section of FCT immediately above it. Average weighted mean AHe ages from multiple analyses at five sites in this profile range from 20.8 ± 0.4 Ma from the classic site at the base, to an average of 28.4 ± 0.2 Ma (all ± 1 σ) in the upper part of the section. The AHe age at the classic site is substantially reduced at 20.8 ± 0.4 Ma relative to a reference age for ignimbrite emplacement of 28.2 Ma. Corresponding zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) ages for these samples are all concordant at 28.3 ± 0.4 Ma. By contrast, apatite fission track (AFT) ages from the same vertical section are all concordant at 27.4 ± 0.7 Ma with the central age of 28.8 ± 0.8 Ma at the classic site, except for the uppermost sample (23.2 ± 1.7 Ma) for which clear evidence for local, probably fire, disturbance is seen in the track length distribution. The AHe data at the classic site thus provide evidence for substantial post-eruptive Early Miocene cooling of the tuff consistent with its position at the bottom of a deeply incised valley with ∼ 800 m of local relief and probably > 1000 m of removed section above it. The AFT age of the classic sampling site, however, is indistinguishable from ignimbrite emplacement and thus continues to be a useful standard

  15. Mechanisms of pyrite oxidation to non-slagging species. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akan-Etuk, A.E.J.; Mitchell, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    This document is the fourth quarterly status report on a project that is conducted at the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University, Stanford, California and is concerned with enhancing the transformation of iron pyrite to non-slagging species during staged, low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (P.C.) combustion. The research project is intended to advance PETC`s efforts to improve our technical understanding of the high-temperature chemical and physical processes involved in the utilization of coal. The work focuses on the mechanistic description and rate quantification of the effects of fuel properties and combustion environment on the oxidation of iron pyrite to form the non-slagging species magnetite. The knowledge gained from this work is intended to be incorporated into numerical codes that can be used to formulate anti-slagging strategies involving minimal disturbance of coal combustor performance. This project is to be performed over the three-year period from September 1994 to August 1997. The project aims to identify the mechanisms of pyrite combustion and to quantify their effects, in order to formulate a general rate expression for the combustion of pyrite that accounts for coal properties as well as furnace conditions.

  16. Model-based integration and analysis of biogeochemical and isotopic dynamics in a nitrate-polluted pyritic aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.-C.; Prommer, H.; Broers, H.P.; Slomp, C.P.; Greskowiak, J.; Van Der Grift, B.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from agricultural land to groundwater and the resulting nitrate pollution are a major environmental problem worldwide. Its impact is often mitigated in aquifers hosting sufficiently reactive reductants that can promote autotrophic denitrification. In the case of pyrite acting as

  17. Element mobility during pyrite weathering: implications for acid and heavy metal pollution at mining-impacted sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Long; Wang, Rucheng; Chen, Fanrong; Xue, Jiyue; Zhang, Peihua; Lu, Jianjun

    2005-11-01

    Based on back scattered electron images and electron micro-probe analysis results, four alteration layers, including a transition layer, a reticulated ferric oxide layer, a nubby ferric oxide layer and a cellular ferric oxide layer, were identified in the naturally weathering products of pyrite. These layers represent a progressive alteration sequence of pyrite under weathering conditions. The cellular ferric oxide layer correlates with the strongest weathering phase and results from the dissolution of nubby ferric oxide by acidic porewater. Leaching coefficient was introduced to better express the response of element mobility to the degree of pyrite weathering. Its variation shows that the mobility of S, Co and Bi is stronger than As, Cu and Zn. Sulfur in pyrite is oxidized to sulfuric acid and sulfate that are basically released into to porewater, and heavy metals Co and Bi are evidently released by acid dissolution. As, Cu and Zn are enriched in ferric oxide by adsorption and by co-precipitation, but they would re-release to the environment via desorption or dissolution when porewater pH becomes low enough. Consequently, Co, Bi, As, Cu and Zn may pose a substantial impact on water quality. Considering that metal mobility and its concentration in mine waste are two important factors influencing heavy metal pollution at mining-impacted sites, Bi and Co are more important pollutants in this case.

  18. Study on Bailing Properties of Pyrite Cinder%硫酸渣成球性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文达; 翟大成; 李航

    2011-01-01

    对硫酸渣成球性能进行了研究.对硫酸渣磨矿后,其粒度和成球性能得到很大的改善.通过对硫酸渣球团的落下强度、抗压强度和生球爆裂温度等进行测定,得出在粒度水平(74μm/95.1%)及膨润土为1.0%条件下,硫酸渣的成球性能较好,能够满足冶金工艺的要求.%The bailing pmpenies of pyrite cinder are studied in this paper. AFter grinding on pyrite cinder, particle size and bailing properties are greatlly improved. Through the measuring of drop strength, compressive strength and cracking temperture on pyrite cinder pellet, it is found that the bailing properties of pyrite cinder is best at the level panicle size (74μm95.1%) and 1.0% bentonite, which can meet the requirements of metallurgical technology.

  19. Adsorption of Ba{sup 2+} by Ca-exchange clinoptilolite tuff and montmorillonite clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, M.L., E-mail: marilu@servidor.unam.mx [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cd. Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Pablo, L. de, E-mail: liberto@servidor.unam.mx [Instituto de Geologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cd. Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Garcia, T.A., E-mail: nenaquim@hotmail.com [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cd. Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    The adsorption of barium by Ca-exchanged clinoptilolite and montmorillonite is presented. The kinetics of adsorption of Ba{sup 2+} were evaluated contacting 1 g portion of each adsorber with 100 mL 0.1N BaCl{sub 2} for 200 h. Adsorption by Ca-clinoptilolite is defined by second-order kinetics of rate constant K{sub v} 8.232 x 10{sup -2} g mg{sup -1} h{sup -1} and maximum removal of 71.885 mg g{sup -1}. It is a two-stage process initiated by a rapid uptake of Ba{sup 2+} followed by more moderate kinetics. The adsorption isotherms were determined contacting 0.2 g of each adsorber with 10 mL 0.1-0.005N BaCl{sub 2} + CaCl{sub 2} solution, Ba{sup 2+}/Ca{sup 2+} ratio 1, for periods of 7 days for the tuff and 2 days for the clay. The equilibrium adsorption is described by the Langmuir model, of equilibrium constant K 0.0151 L mg{sup -1} and maximum adsorption of 15.29 mg g{sup -1}. The adsorption of Ba{sup 2+} by Ca-exchanged montmorillonite also follows a second-order reaction of rate constant K{sub v} 3.179 x 10{sup -2} g mg{sup -1} h{sup -1}, and calculated separation of 36.74 mg g{sup -1}; the Langmuir isotherm is defined by the constant K 0.034 L mg{sup -1} and maximum adsorption of 15.29 mg g{sup -1}. X-ray diffraction shows that the exchange of Ba{sup 2+} modifies the d{sub 001} of Ca-montmorillonite from 15.4 to 12.4 A.

  20. Potentiodynamic polarization studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, N.G.; Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L. [Cortest Columbus Technologies, OH (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Cortest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level radioactive waste packages. This information is being developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to aid in their assessment of the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This report summarizes the results of cyclic-potentiodynamic-polarization (CCP) studies performed on candidate container materials for the Tuff Repository. The CPP technique was used to provide an understanding of how specific variables such as environmental composition, temperature, alloy composition, and welding affect both the general- and localized-corrosion behavior of two copper-base and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in simulated repository environments. A statistically-designed test solution matrix was formulated, based on an extensive search of the literature, to evaluate the possible range of environmental species that may occur in the repository over the life of the canister. Forty-two CPP curves were performed with each alloy and the results indicated that several different types of corrosion were possible. The copper-base alloys exhibited unusual CCP behavior in that hysteresis was not always associated with pitting. The effects of temperature on the corrosions behavior were evaluated in two types of tests; isothermal tests at temperatures from 50{degrees}C to 90{degrees}C and heat-transfer tests where the solution was maintained at 50{degrees}C and the specimen was internally heated to 90{degrees}C. In the isothermal test, CPP curves were obtained with each alloy in simulated environments at 50{degrees}C, 75{degrees}C, and 90{degrees}C. The results of these CCP experiments indicated that no systematic trends were evident for the environments tested. Lastly, the effects of welding on the corrosion behavior of the alloys in simulated environments were examined.

  1. Divergent late-stage crystal records in melt domains from the Youngest Toba Tuff, Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, C. R.; Reid, M. R.; Vazquez, J. A.; Chesner, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    The voluminous 74 ka Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT) ejected an enormous >1000 km3 of high-silica (>74 wt.% SiO2) rhyolite (HSR). Based on melt inclusion morphology, quartz crystallized at least several thousand years before eruption in the dominant HSR melt domain represented by moderately crystalline pumices (HSR-A; 12-25% crystals). Quartz crystallized within a couple thousand years of eruption in melts represented by rare crystal-poor pumices (HSR-B; 175 kyr before eruption for HSR-A zircon and allanite, and to 100 kyr (zircon) and 75 kyr (allanite) for the HSR-B. Additionally, HSR-B pumices have a higher proportion of crystals with detectable eruption-aged rim growth than HSR-A in zircon ( 60 vs 50%) and especially allanite ( 80 vs 40%). Rim compositions, except for HSR-B allanite, are heterogeneous, even in crystals that date to within error of eruption. Shallow depth profiles reveal that rim and near-rim growth may either be relatively continuous, or mantle distinctly older and different interior zones. The diversity in rim ages shows that individual crystals were not always at conditions suitable for detectable growth, either due to stagnation of magmatic conditions, or inclusion in other phases or crystal aggregates. Heterogeneity in rim ages and compositions of zircon and allanite within the same HSR pumice reveals a dynamic system involving migration and mixing of crystals with diverse histories. Coupled with the distinct differences in quartz crystallization, the relative youthfulness of rims and greater affinity of allanites to each other indicate the HSR-B may have experienced different conditions of magmatic storage than the HSR-A. In addition, there may have been less mixing of non-cognate crystals into the HSR-B domain. Although growth of individual crystals was sometimes interrupted, the diverse and continuous distribution of rim ages imply a sustained 175 ka history of melt residence and accumulation for the YTT overall.

  2. Laboratory study of fracture healing in Topopah Spring tuff: Implications for near field hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wunan; Daily, W.D.

    1989-09-01

    Seven Topopah Spring tuff samples were studied to determine water permeability in this rock under pressure and temperature conditions similar to those expected in the near field of a nuclear waste package. Six of the seven samples were studied under isothermal condition; the other was subjected to a thermal gradient. Four of the six fractured samples contained a reopened, healed, natural fracture; one contained an induced tensile fracture and the other contained a saw-cut. The fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after the experiments and the water that flowed through the samples was sampled for chemical analysis. The experimental durations ranged from about 3 months to almost 6 months. Water permeability of the fractured samples was found to decrease by more than three orders of magnitude when the sample temperature increased to 150{degree}C. The sharpest decrease in permeability occurred when the temperature was increased above 90{degree}C. Permeability of the intact sample did not change significantly under the similar experimental conditions. When the temperature returned to room conditions, the water permeability did not recover. The mechanical strength of one healed sample was about half that of the intact rock. SEM studies of the fracture surfaces and water chemical analysis of the water suggested that both dissolution and deposition occurred on the fracture surfaces. Smoothing of fracture asperities because of dissolution and deposition was probably the main cause of the permeability decrease. Deposition of dissolved silica was probably the main cause of fracture healing. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Stratigraphy, paleomagnetism, and magnetic fabric of the Toba Tuffs: Constraints on the sources and eruptive styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Michael D.; Walker, George P. L.; Ellwood, Brooks B.; Diehl, Jimmy F.

    1986-09-01

    The Toba depression in north central Sumatra is a complex of several overlapping calderas resulting from three major ignimbrite-forming eruptions. Within the depression, the upland masses of Samosir and northern Uluan consist of welded ignimbrite capped by coarse breccia and lacustrine sediment, hitherto interpreted to be two parts of a single resurgent dome. This study has demonstrated that the welded tuffs of Samosir and Uluan have different magnetic polarities and therefore at least two different ignimbrites are present; the Samosir/Uluan massif may consist of parts of two resurgent domes. The first ignimbrite eruption occurred at 0.84 Ma and produced a very thick (>400 m), densely welded unit having a reversed polarity. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) flow direction and lithic size data indicate that the source lies in the southern part of the Toba depression, and the thick deposit of Uluan is thought to have ponded in a 40-km-wide caldera. The second ignimbrite is normally magnetized. AMS flow direction data indicate two separate source vents, one to the north in the Haranggaol caldera, and another to the south. The thick deposit at Samosir is thought to have ponded in the southern caldera. Coarse sediments then accumulated over Samosir and northern Uluan and were capped by lacustrine deposits. A renewed episode of resurgence then uplifted Samosir Island and possibly the northern part of Uluan. At approximately 0.075 Ma the last and apparently largest ignimbrite eruption occurred from calderas in the north and south parts of the Toba depression. This ignimbrite is mostly nonwelded and normally magnetized. Part of the Uluan dome was destroyed by collapse of the Sibandung caldera and Latung graben and concomitant with renewed subsidence of the Haranggaol and Porsea calderas.

  4. Regional and local correlations of feldspar geochemistry of the Peach Spring Tuff, Alvord Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesch, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of feldspar grains in an ignimbrite from the Spanish Canyon Formation in the Alvord Mountain area, California, have been used to confirm similarities in three measured sections locally, and they are similar to exposures of the Peach Spring Tuff (PST) regionally. Feldspar grains were identified on the basis of texture (zoning, as mantled feldspars, or in crystal clusters), whether the grains were attached to glass or were in pumice clasts, or were simply crystal fragments with no textural context. Chemistry was determined by electron microprobe analysis, and each analysis is calculated in terms of the percent endmember and plotted on orthoclase (Or) versus anorthite (An) plots. In general, the PST has sanidine and plagioclase compositions that are consistent with having formed in high-silica rhyolite and trachyte within a zoned magma chamber. Feldspars from the PST in Spanish Canyon area cluster along the rhyolitic trend with no grains along the trachytic trend. Similar clustering of feldspars along the rhyolitic trend with no grains along the trachytic trend also occur in the PST from Granite Spring and Providence Mountains to the east of the Alvord Mountain area, and the ranges in compositions are also similar in these locations. In contrast, the PST in the Kane Wash area of the Newberry Mountains has feldspars only from the rhyolitic trend in the basal deposits, but some grains from the trachytic trend are in the upper part of the deposit, and the range in compositions are greater than in the Spanish Canyon area. The variations in vertical compositional zoning and compositional range in these different deposits suggests there were probably different flow paths (or timing of the delivery) during the eruption and runout of the pyroclastic flow(s) generated from the climactic eruption of the PST magma chamber.

  5. Zircon crystallization and recycling in the magma chamber of the rhyolitic Kos Plateau Tuff (Aegean arc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, O.; Charlier, B.L.A.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to most large-volume silicic magmas in continental arcs, which are thought to evolve as open systems with significant assimilation of preexisting crust, the Kos Plateau Tuff magma formed dominantly by crystal fractionation of mafic parents. Deposits from this ~60 km3 pyroclastic eruption (the largest known in the Aegean arc) lack xenocrystic zircons [secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) U-Pb ages on zircon cores never older than 500 ka] and display Sr-Nd whole-rock isotopic ratios within the range of European mantle in an area with exposed Paleozoic and Tertiary continental crust; this evidence implies a nearly closed-system chemical differentiation. Consequently, the age range provided by zircon SIMS U-Th-Pb dating is a reliable indicator of the duration of assembly and longevity of the silicic magma body above its solidus. The age distribution from 160 ka (age of eruption by sanidine 40Ar/39Ar dating; Smith et al., 1996) to ca. 500 ka combined with textural characteristics (high crystal content, corrosion of most anhydrous phenocrysts, but stability of hydrous phases) suggest (1) a protracted residence in the crust as a crystal mush and (2) rejuvenation (reduced crystallization and even partial resorption of minerals) prior to eruption probably induced by new influx of heat (and volatiles). This extended evolution chemically isolated from the surrounding crust is a likely consequence of the regional geodynamics because the thinned Aegean microplate acts as a refractory container for magmas in the dying Aegean subduction zone (continent-continent subduction).

  6. A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed.

  7. The magnitude and impact of the Youngest Toba Tuff super-eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eCosta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Super-eruptions, orders of magnitude larger than eruptions experienced in historic times, have devastated wide areas by pyroclastic flows, covered continent-size areas by ash fallout, and injected large quantities of aerosols into the stratosphere affecting global climate. The Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT is the largest known super-eruption in the Quaternary. Here we reconstructed the ultra-distal volcanic ash dispersal during this super-eruption using a computational ash dispersal model, which provides insights into the eruption dynamics and the impact of the event. The method uses a 3D time-dependent tephra dispersion model, a set of wind fields, and several tens of thickness measurements of the YTT tephra deposit. Results reveal that the YTT eruption dispersed ~8600 km3 (~3800 km3 dense rock equivalent, DRE of ash, covering ~40 million km2 with more than 5 mm of ash. These new fallout volume estimations indicate that the total volume of the material erupted (including the massive pyroclastic density current, 1500 km3 DRE, deposits on Sumatra was ~5300 km3 DRE. Simulation results indicate that the eruption had a very large mass flow rate and that the umbrella cloud, associated with the eruption plume, spread as an enormous gravity current around the neutral buoyancy level. The YTT tephra forms a key chronostratigraphic marker in the sedimentary sequences, and is particularly useful for constraining the age of the palaeoenvironmental and archaeological records, and synchronizing these archives to investigate temporal relationships. These new constraints on the extent of the YTT deposit are therefore particularly useful for cryptotephra studies that aim to find non-visible tephra layers for these chronological purposes. This method used to constrain volcanological parameters of eruptions in the past provides insights into the dispersal processes, and allows the amount of volatiles released to be estimated which is crucial to assessing the impact of

  8. Redox potential (Eh) and anion effects of pyrite (FeS 2 ) leaching at pH 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Anand P.; Gerson, Andrea R.

    2011-11-01

    Pyrite plays the central role in the environmental issue of acid rock drainage. Natural weathering of pyrite results in the release of sulphuric acid which can lead to further leaching of heavy and toxic metals from other associated minerals. Understanding how pyrite reacts in aqueous solution is critical to understanding the natural weathering processes undergone by this mineral. To this end an investigation of the effect of solution redox potential (Eh) and various anions on the rate of pyrite leaching under carefully controlled conditions has been undertaken. Leaching of pyrite has been shown to proceed significantly faster at solution Eh of 900 mV (SHE) than at 700 mV, at pH 1, for the leach media of HCl, H 2SO 4 and HClO 4. The predominant effect of Eh suggests electrochemical control of pyrite leaching with similar mechanism(s) at Eh of 700 and 900 mV albeit with different kinetics. Leach rates at 700 mV were found to decrease according to HClO 4 > HCl > H 2SO 4 while at 900 mV the leach rate order was HCl > HClO 4 > H 2SO 4. Solution Fe 3+ activity is found to continually increase during all leaches; however, this is not accompanied by an increase in leach rate. Synchrotron based photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) measurements showed a localised distribution of adsorbed and oxidised surface species highlighting that pyrite oxidation and leaching is a highly site specific process mediated by adsorption of oxidants onto specific surface sites. It appears that rates may be controlled, in part, by the propensity of acidic anions to bind to the surface, which varies according to SO42->Cl->ClO4-, thus reducing the reactive or effective surface area. However, anions may also be involved in specific reactions with surface leach products. Stoichiometric dissolution data (Fe/S ratio), XPS and XRD data indicate that the highest leach rates (in HCl media at 900 mV Eh) correlate with relatively lower surface S abundance. Furthermore, there are indications that

  9. A Comprehensive Utilization Process for Black Manganese-silver Ores by Pyrite Reducing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    On a 5 kg bench scale, the separating of Mn-Ag from black manganese-silver ores by pyrite reducing was investigated. Leached Mn content of 98.3% (mass fraction) along with silver loss of 1.5% is achieved. The purification of solution by the precipitation method was effectively used. Chemical grade -MnO2 with TMn content of 60.13% (mass fraction) and MnO2 content of 92.28% (mass fraction) is obtained. Mn recovery efficiency is 94.04%. The residues from leaching Mn process of black Mn-Ag ores was employed for silver extraction by cyanidation with leached silver content of 92.17% (mass fraction), displacement ratio of 99.5%, recovery efficiency of 90.79%. Therefore, the present study provides a feasible process for making full use of black manganese-silver ore resources.

  10. Evaluating structure selection in the hydrothermal growth of FeS2 pyrite and marcasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchaev, Daniil A.; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-12-01

    While the ab initio prediction of the properties of solids and their optimization towards new proposed materials is becoming established, little predictive theory exists as to which metastable materials can be made and how, impeding their experimental realization. Here we propose a quasi-thermodynamic framework for predicting the hydrothermal synthetic accessibility of metastable materials and apply this model to understanding the phase selection between the pyrite and marcasite polymorphs of FeS2. We demonstrate that phase selection in this system can be explained by the surface stability of the two phases as a function of ambient pH within nano-size regimes relevant to nucleation. This result suggests that a first-principles understanding of nano-size phase stability in realistic synthesis environments can serve to explain or predict the synthetic accessibility of structural polymorphs, providing a guideline to experimental synthesis via efficient computational materials design.

  11. Elastic stability and electronic structure of pyrite type PtN2: Ahard semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Rong; Zhan, Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2006-08-29

    The elastic properties and electronic structure of PtN2 withthe pyrite structure (PtN2(C2)) were studied with first-principlescalculations. The crystal structure is demonstrated to be elasticallystable with a lower energy than the metastable fluorite structureproposed before. The calculated shear modulus of 214 GPa suggests thatPtN2(C2) is harder than some well known hard materials such as TiN andSiC. The high elastic moduli are attributed to a stacking ofcorner-shared PtN6 octahedra bonded by strong N-N covalent bonding. Incontrast to the metallic fluorite-type phase, PtN2(C2) is semiconductingwith an indirect band gap.

  12. Pyrite oxidation and reduction - Molecular orbital theory considerations. [for geochemical redox processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, George W., III

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, molecular orbital theory is used to explain a heterogeneous reaction mechanism for both pyrite oxidation and reduction. The mechanism demonstrates that the oxidation of FeS2 by Fe(3+) may occur as a result of three important criteria: (1) the presence of a suitable oxidant having a vacant orbital (in case of liquid phase) or site (solid phase) to bind to the FeS2 via sulfur; (2) the initial formation of a persulfido (disulfide) bridge between FeS2 and the oxidant, and (3) an electron transfer from a pi(asterisk) orbital in S2(2-) to a pi or pi(asterisk) orbital of the oxidant.

  13. Density functional calculation of equilibrium geometry and electronic structure of pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱冠周; 肖奇; 胡岳华; 徐竞

    2001-01-01

    The equilibrium geometry and electronic structure of pyrite has been studied using self-consistent density-functional theory within the local density approximation (LDA). The optimum bulk geometry is in good agreement with crystallographic data. The calculated band structure and density of states in the region around the Fermi energy show that valence-band maximum (VBM) is at X (100), and the conduction-band minimum (CBM) is at G (000). The indirect and direct band gaps are 0.6eV and 0.74eV, respectively. The calculated contour map of difference of charge density shows excess charge in nonbonding d electron states on the Fe sites. The density increases between sulfur nuclei and between iron and sulfur nuclei qualitatively reveal that S-S bond and Fe-S bond are covalent binding.

  14. Spin-driven symmetry breaking in the frustrated fcc pyrite MnS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Simon A J; Chatterji, Tapan

    2015-06-10

    We report the characterisation of natural samples of the cubic pyrite mineral MnS2 using very high resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction techniques. At low temperatures we find a new low temperature polymorph, which results from coupling between magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom. Below the magnetic ordering temperature T(N) = 48 K, we detect a pseudo-tetragonal distortion with a tiny c/a ratio of 1.0006. The structure can be refined in the space group Pbca The symmetry lowering reduces magnetic frustration in the fcc Mn(2+) lattice and is likely responsible for the previously reported lock-in of the magnetic propagation vector. This behaviour is similar to the spin-Peierls phase transitions reported in other three-dimensional Heisenberg magnets like the chromate spinels.

  15. Near infrared to ultraviolet optical properties of bulk single crystal and nanocrystal thin film iron pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Indra; Bhandari, Khagendra P.; Ellingson, Randall J.; Podraza, Nikolas J.

    2016-07-01

    We report optical properties of iron pyrite (FeS2) determined from ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements made on both a commercially available bulk single crystal and nanocrystalline thin film over a spectral range of 0.735-5.887 eV. The complex dielectric function, ɛ (E) = ɛ 1 (E) + iɛ 2 (E), spectra have been determined by fitting a layered parametric model to the ellipsometric measurements. Spectra in ɛ are modeled using a Kramers-Kronig consistent critical point parabolic band model involving seven critical points for the bulk single crystal and four critical points for the nanocrystalline film. Absorption coefficient spectra for both types of samples are also determined from ɛ. Critical point features in the nanocrystalline films are broader, have lower amplitude and lower energy critical points detected having a small blue shift when compared to the single crystal sample.

  16. Metalloproteins and the Pyrite-based Origin of Life: A Critical Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Mario; Becerra, Arturo; Peretó, Juli; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Lazcano, Antonio

    2011-08-01

    We critically examine the proposal by Wächtershäuser (Prokaryotes 1:275-283, 2006a, Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 361: 787-1808, 2006b) that putative transition metal binding sites in protein components of the translation machinery of hyperthermophiles provide evidence of a direct relationship with the FeS clusters of pyrite and thus indicate an autotrophic origin of life in volcanic environments. Analysis of completely sequenced cellular genomes of Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya does not support the suggestion by Wächtershäuser (Prokaryotes 1:275-283, 2006a, Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 361: 787-1808, 2006b) that aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and ribosomal proteins bear sequence signatures typical of strong covalent metal bonding whose absence in mesophilic species reveals a process of adaptation towards less extreme environments.

  17. The volcanic-sedimentary sequence of the Lousal deposit, Iberian Pyrite Belt (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Carlos; Rosa, Diogo; Matos, Joao; Relvas, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) is a massive sulfide province that is located in the south of Portugal and Spain, and hosts more than 90 massive sulfide deposits that amount to more than 1850 million metric tonnes of sulfide ore (Tornos, 2006). The ore deposits size, vary from ~1Mt to >100Mt (e.g. Neves Corvo and Aljustrel in Portugal, and Rio Tinto and Tharsis in Spain). The ore deposits are hosted by a submarine sedimentary and volcanic, felsic dominated, succession that constitutes the Upper Devonian to Lower Carboniferous Volcanic and Sedimentary Complex (VSC). The VSC ranges in thickness from approximately 600 to 1300 m (Tornos 2006). The VSC overlies the Phyllite-Quartzite Group (PQ) (Upper Devonian, base unknown) and is overlain by the Baixo Alentejo Flysch Group (Lower to Upper Carboniferous). The Lousal massive sulfide deposit is located in the western part of the IPB and occurs mostly interbedded with black mudstone. The VSC sequence at Lousal mine consists of a mudstone and quartzite sequence (PQ Group) in the lower part of the succession, over which a thick sequence of rhyolitic lavas (>300 m) occurs. Above the rhyolitic lavas there is a thick sequence of black and grey mudstone that hosts the massive sulfide ore bodies, and a rhyolitic sill. The upper part of the VSC sequence consists of a thick mudstone interval that hosts two thick basaltic units, locally with pillows. The rhyolites have small coherent cores, locally with flow bands, that grade to surrounding massive clastic intervals, with large lateral extent. The clasts show jigsaw-fit arrangement in many places and have planar or curviplanar margins and locally are perlitic at the margin. The top contact of these units is in most locations not exposed, which makes difficult to interpret the mode of emplacement. However, the thick clastic intervals, above described, are in accordance with quenching of volcanic glass with abundant water and therefore indicate that quenching of the rhyolites was the

  18. The role of isomorphous substitutions in natural selenides belonging to the pyrite group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindi, Luca [Museo di Storia Naturale, sez. di Mineralogia e Litologia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, I-50121 Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: luca.bindi@unifi.it; Cipriani, Curzio [Museo di Storia Naturale, sez. di Mineralogia e Litologia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Pratesi, Giovanni [Museo di Storia Naturale, sez. di Mineralogia e Litologia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Trosti-Ferroni, Renza [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, I-50121 Firenze (Italy)

    2008-07-14

    The present paper reports chemical and structural data of selenide minerals belonging to the pyrite group. Eighteen samples of minerals in this group with variable chemical composition (7 samples of penroseite, NiSe{sub 2}; 10 samples of krutaite, CuSe{sub 2}; 1 sample of trogtalite, CoSe{sub 2}) were studied by means of X-ray single-crystal diffraction and electron microprobe. On the basis of information gained from the chemical characterization, we can conclude that a complete solid solution between NiSe{sub 2} and CuSe{sub 2} exists in nature with the absence of pure end-members. Although verified only for the Ni-rich members, we also infer a solid solution between NiSe{sub 2} and CoSe{sub 2}. The unit-cell parameters were modeled using a multiple regression method as a function of the Co, Ni, and Cu contents.

  19. Transport and degradation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the pyritic Rabis Creek aquifer, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsby, K.; Hojberg, A.L.; Engesgaard, P.; Jensen, K.H.; Larsen, F.; Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.

    2007-01-01

    Vertical profiles of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113 penetrating aerobic and anaerobic parts of a shallow sandy aquifer show that the CFC gases are degraded in the groundwater in a pyritic sand aquifer at Rabis Creek, Denmark. Two-dimensional solute transport simulations with either zero-order or first-order degradation in the anaerobic zone corroborate this interpretation. The transport model was previously calibrated against detailed tritium profiles in the same wells. First-order degradation is found to best match the observed CFC profiles yielding an approximate half-life of a few months for CFC-11. Degradation is not as clearly recognized for CFC-12 and CFC-113, but it may occur with rates corresponding to a half-life of a few years or more. Data indicate a geochemical control of the CFC concentration gradient at the redox front and that denitrification and denitrifiers are not of major importance for the observed CFC degradation. The responsible mechanism behind the observed degradation is not known but we suggest that reductive dehalogenation by surface-bound Fe(II) on pyrite possibly enhanced by the presence of Fe(III)-bearing weathering products (green rust) may be a plausible mechanism. The observed data and the performed simulations confirm the potential application of the CFC gases as age-dating tools in the aerobic part of the investigated aquifer, but also that CFC data must be analyzed carefully before it is used as a dating tool in reducing aquifers because degradation may have occurred. The use of multiple or alternative tracers should be considered in anaerobic environments. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Natural Monocrystalline Pyrite as Sensor for Potentiometric Redox Titrations. Part I. Titrations with Permanganate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Vukanovic

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Results obtained in potentiometric titrations of Fe(II, Mn(II, Fe(CN64-, C2O42- and As(III with standard potassium permanganate solution, are presented. The titration end point (TEP was detected with a universal electrode whose sensor is natural crystalline pyrite. The titrations of As(III were carried out in HCl (1.2 M and H2SO4 solutions (0.1- 4.5 M, whereas oxalate was determined in H2SO4 (0.1-4.5 M. Iron(II and hexacyanoferrate(II were titrated in H2SO4 and also in H3PO4 solutions (0.1-4.5 M. The titrations of Mn(II were performed in H2P2O72- media at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 7.0. The results obtained by using the pyrite electrode were compared with those obtained by the application of a Pt-electrode, and good agreement, reproducibility and accuracy were obtained. The potentials in the course of the titration and at the end-point (TEP are rapidly established. The potential changes at the TEP ranged from 90 to 330 mV/0.1 mL, depending on the titrated system. The highest changes were observed in titrations of Fe(II in H3PO4 (240-330 mV/0.1 mL. Reversed titrations were also performed and accurate and reproducible results were obtained.

  1. Trace elements contamination of agricultural soils affected by sulphide exploitation (Iberian Pyrite Belt, Sw Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, María; González, Isabel; Romero, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    Agricultural soils of the Riotinto mining area (Iberian Pyrite Belt) have been studied to assess the degree of pollution by trace elements as a consequence of the extraction and treatment of sulphides. Fifteen soil samples were collected and analysed by ICP-OES and INAA for 51 elements. Chemical analyses showed an As-Cu-Pb-Zn association related with the mineralisation of the Iberian Pyrite Belt. Concentrations were 19-994 mg kg-1 for As, 41-4,890 mg kg-1 for Pb, 95-897 mg kg-1 for Zn and of 27-1,160 mg kg-1 for Cu. Most of the samples displayed concentrations of these elements higher than the 90th percentile of the corresponding geological dominium, which suggests an anthropogenic input besides the bedrock influence. Samples collected from sediments were more contaminated than leptosols because they were polluted by leachates or by mining spills coming from the waste rock piles. The weathering of the bedrock is responsible for high concentrations in Co, Cr and Ni, but an anthropogenic input, such as wind-blown dust, seems to be indicative of the high content of As, Cu, Pb and Zn in leptosols. The metal partitioning patterns show that most trace elements are associated with Fe amorphous oxy-hydroxides, or take part of the residual fraction. According to the results obtained, the following mobility sequence is proposed for major and minor elements: Mn, Pb, Cd, > Zn, Cu > Ni > As > Fe > Cr. The high mobility of Pb, Cu and Zn involve an environmental risk in this area, even in soils where the concentrations are not so high.

  2. Extracting gold from pyrite roster cinder by ultra-fine-grinding and resin-in-pulp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    危俊婷; 严规有; 郭炳昆; 高桂兰

    2003-01-01

    The ultra-fine-grinding and resin-in-pulp with pH value of 10 are used to extract gold from pyrite roster cinder. During leaching process, aluminium oxide ball is used as stirring medium, hydrogen peroxide as leaching agent and sodium hexametaphosphate as grinding agent. With AM-26 resin as absorber and sulfocarbamide as eluent, gold is recovered from cyanide pulp of pyrite roster cinder by resin-in-pulp. The effects of contact time, temperature and acidity etc. on the gold absorption are investigated by static methods and dynamic method respectively. The effects of flow rate of solution on dynamic adsorption and elution of gold are studied. The results show that AM-26 resin has good adsorbability in cyanide solution, and gold can be easily eluated from the loaded resin with 0. 1mol/L hydrochloric acid and lmol/L sulfocabamide. The adsorption rate and the elution of gold exceed 98%. When leaching time is 2 h, mass ratio of liquid to solid 4: 1, consumption of sodium cyanide 3 kg/t, concentration of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hexametaphosphate 0. 05% respectively, adsorption time 30 min, temperature 10-30 ℃, volume of resin 3 mL, ratio of eluent to resin (10-20): 1, velocity of eluent 1.5 mL/min, the leaching rate of gold reaches 85%. Compared with traditional leaching technology, it can reduce leaching time, avoid complex filter process, decrease sodium cyanide consumption and increase leaching rate of gold by 35%.

  3. Phase Stability and Stoichiometry in Thin Film Iron Pyrite: Impact on Electronic Transport Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Scott, Tom; Socha, Tyler; Nielsen, David; Manno, Michael; Johnson, Melissa; Yan, Yuqi; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Dowben, Peter; Aydil, Eray S; Leighton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    The use of pyrite FeS2 as an earth-abundant, low-cost, nontoxic thin film photovoltaic hinges on improved understanding and control of certain physical and chemical properties. Phase stability, phase purity, stoichiometry, and defects, are central in this respect, as they are frequently implicated in poor solar cell performance. Here, phase-pure polycrystalline pyrite FeS2 films, synthesized by ex situ sulfidation, are subject to systematic reduction by vacuum annealing (to 550 °C) to assess phase stability, stoichiometry evolution, and their impact on transport. Bulk probes reveal the onset of pyrrhotite (Fe(1-δ)S) around 400 °C, rapidly evolving into the majority phase by 425 °C. This is supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on (001) crystals, revealing surface Fe(1-δ)S formation as low as 160 °C, with rapid growth near 400 °C. The impact on transport is dramatic, with Fe(1-δ)S minority phases leading to a crossover from diffusive transport to hopping (due to conductive Fe(1-δ)S nanoregions in an FeS2 matrix), followed by metallicity when Fe(1-δ)S dominates. Notably, the crossover to hopping leads to an inversion of the sign, and a large decrease in magnitude of the Hall coefficient. By tracking resistivity, magnetotransport, magnetization, and structural/chemical parameters vs annealing, we provide a detailed picture of the evolution in properties with stoichiometry. A strong propensity for S-deficient minority phase formation is found, with no wide window where S vacancies control the FeS2 carrier density. These findings have important implications for FeS2 solar cell development, emphasizing the need for (a) nanoscale chemical homogeneity, and (b) caution in interpreting carrier types and densities.

  4. Pyrite oxidation in the presence of hematite and alumina: II. Effects on the cathodic and anodic half-cell reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar; Veerawattananun, Suchol; Ito, Mayumi; Hiroyoshi, Naoki; Igarashi, Toshifumi

    2017-03-01

    The oxidative dissolution of pyrite is an important process in the redox recycling of iron (Fe) and is well-known for its role in the formation of acid mine drainage (AMD), which is considered as the most serious and widespread problem after the closure of mines and mineral processing operations. Because this process requires the movement of electrons, common metal oxides in nature that have either semiconducting (e.g., hematite) or insulating (e.g., alumina) properties may have strong effects on it. In this study, changes in the electrochemical behavior of pyrite in the presence of hematite and alumina were investigated. Results showed that the formation of surface-bound species directly influenced the anodic and cathodic half-cell reactions as well as the transfer of electrons between these sites. Pyrite pretreated in the air became anodically more reactive than that pretreated in oxygenated water, but the type of oxidizing media had little effect on the cathodic half-cell reaction. The presence of hematite and alumina during pretreatment also had strong effects on the electrochemical properties of pyrite. Chronoamperometry measurements suggest that hematite and alumina enhanced the anodic half-cell reaction but suppressed the cathodic half-cell reaction of pyrite oxidation. Increased anodic half-cell reaction in the presence of hematite could be attributed to electron "bridging" and catalytic effects of this mineral. In contrast, the effects of alumina on the anodic half-cell reaction were indirect and could be explained by the formation of Fe(3+)-oxyhydroxide surface species during pretreatment. Suppression of the cathodic half-cell reaction by both minerals was attributed to their "protective" effect on cathodic sites. Our results also point to the cathodic half-cell reaction as the rate determining-step of the overall oxidative dissolution process.

  5. The Menengai Tuff: A 36 ka widespread tephra and its chronological relevance to Late Pleistocene human evolution in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, Nick; Brown, Francis H.; Jicha, Brian R.; Binetti, Katie M.; Faith, J. Tyler; Ferraro, Joseph V.; Gathogo, Patrick N.; Richardson, Jonathan L.; Tryon, Christian A.

    2016-11-01

    The East African Rift preserves the world's richest Middle and Late Pleistocene (∼780-12 ka) geological, archaeological and paleontological archives relevant to the emergence of Homo sapiens. This region also provides unparalleled chronological control for many important sites through tephrochronology, the dating and correlation of volcanic ashes as widespread isochronous markers in the geological record. There are many well-characterized Pliocene-Early Pleistocene tephras that are widespread across East Africa. A comparable framework is lacking for the Middle and Late Pleistocene; a period characterized by spatially and temporally complex patterns of climate change, as well as the emergence of modern Homo sapiens and the dispersal of this species across and out of Africa. Unraveling relationships among these spatial and temporally complex phenomena requires a precise chronology. To this end we report the Menengai Tuff, a widespread volcanic ash produced by the large-scale caldera-forming eruption in Kenya and 40Ar/39Ar dated to 35.62 ± 0.26 ka. Geochemical characterization of 565 glass shards from 36 samples by wavelength-dispersive electron probe microanalysis show the Menengai Tuff was deposited over >115,000 km2 and is found in the Baringo, Chalbi, Elmenteita, Nakuru, Olorgesailie, Turkana, and Victoria basins, all of which preserve rich Late Pleistocene paleoenvironmental and archaeological archives. Correlation and dating of the Menengai Tuff demonstrate that it is the most widespread tephra and largest eruption currently known from the Late Pleistocene of East Africa. As such, it is a valuable marker in establishing a Late Pleistocene chronology for paleoclimatic, archeological, and paleontological records relevant to the study of human evolution.

  6. A preliminary guidebook for identifying stratigraphic contacts at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawloski, G.A.; McKague, H.L.; Wagoner, J.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); McKinnis, W.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Mercury, NV (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Lithologic variation, regional depositional trends, and the lack of written guidelines have resulted in inconsistencies in the recognition of stratigraphic contacts in drill holes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Stratigraphic identification, based on mineralogy of discrete samples, can be augmented by geophysical logs and downhole movies to more accurately and consistently locate contacts between units. Criteria are established for locating the base of the Pahute Mesa ash-flow tuff, the top of the Ammonia Tanks ash-flow tuff, the top of the Ammonia Tanks bedded tuff, and the top and the base of the Rainier Mesa Tuff.

  7. Stratigraphic and micropetrographic occurrences of pyrite in sediments at the confluence of carbonate and peat-forming depositional systems, southern Florida, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.E.; Cohen, A.D. (University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate peat/carbonate relationships in a modern coal-forming setting, with initial research on pyrite and sulfur contents relative to stratigraphic and petrographic conditions. Over 40 closely spaced cores were taken from transects from Florida Bay inland through mangrove swamps and freshwater Everglades. Core stratigraphy confirms an overall transgressive sequence, but new evidence supports a small regression within the overall transgression. On average, both total S and pyrite are lowest at inland sites, highest near the coastline, and intermediate in Florida Bay sediments. Total S is higher in marine than freshwater peats, but freshwater peats overlain by marine peats are enriched in S. In cores that start with peat at the top, pyrite is generally absent or very low in the top 20 cm. Higher percentages of pyrite occur in carbonate rather than peat facies. Pyrite exists in three forms, framboidal aggregates, minute crystals, and large solitary crystals. Most of the pyrite occurs as minute crystals ([lt]2[mu]m) and framboidal aggregates. The occurrence of large crystals ([gt]2[mu]m) is less common and generally restricted to the cavities of larger cells or cavities within other organics (e.g. foraminifer, pollen grains, fungal sclerotia). A general relationship seems to exist in certain cases between the occurrence of spherical organic cell fillings and the occurrence of the framboidal form of pyrite. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1984-06-01

    This report summarizes characterization studies conducted with outcrop samples of Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (Tpt). In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), Tpt is being studied both as a primary object and as a constituent used to condition water that will be reacted with waste form, canister, or packing material. These studies directly or indirectly support NNWSI subtasks concerned with waste package design and geochemical modeling. To interpret the results of subtask experiments, it is necessary to know the exact nature of the starting material in terms of the intial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry. 31 figures, 5 tables.

  9. Sorption Kinetics Of Selected Heavy Metals Adsorption To Natural And Fe(III Modified Zeolite Tuff Containing Clinoptilolite Mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirotiak Maroš

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the research described in this paper, studied was sorption capacity of natural and ferric modification of zeolite tuff containing mineral clinoptilolite from the Nižný Hrabovec deposit to remove potentially toxic metals (ionic forms of chromium, nickel, copper and aluminium from their water solutions. We reported that the Fe (III zeolite has an enhanced ability to sorption of Cu (II, and a slight improvement occurs in the case of Cr (VI and Ni (II. On the other hand, the deterioration was observed in the case of Al (III adsorption.

  10. Sorption Kinetics Of Selected Heavy Metals Adsorption To Natural And Fe(III) Modified Zeolite Tuff Containing Clinoptilolite Mineral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotiak, Maroš; Lipovský, Marek; Bartošová, Alica

    2015-06-01

    In the research described in this paper, studied was sorption capacity of natural and ferric modification of zeolite tuff containing mineral clinoptilolite from the Nižný Hrabovec deposit to remove potentially toxic metals (ionic forms of chromium, nickel, copper and aluminium) from their water solutions. We reported that the Fe (III) zeolite has an enhanced ability to sorption of Cu (II), and a slight improvement occurs in the case of Cr (VI) and Ni (II). On the other hand, the deterioration was observed in the case of Al (III) adsorption.

  11. Primary and redeposited facies from a large-magnitude, rhyolitic, phreatomagmatic eruption: Cana Creek Tuff, Late Carboniferous, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhie, J.

    1986-07-01

    The Cana Creek Tuff is one of four rhyolitic ignimbrite members of the Late Carboniferous Currabubula Formation, a volcanogenic conglomeratic braidplain sequence exposed along the western margin of the New England Orogen in northeastern New South Wales. The source is not exposed but was probably located tens of kilometres to the west of existing outcrops. The medial to distal parts of the tuff average about 70 m in thickness, are widespread (minimum present area ˜ 1400 km 2), and comprise a primary pyroclastic facies (ignimbrite, ash-fall tuff) and a redeposited volcaniclastic facies (sandstone, conglomerate). Both facies are composed of differing proportions of crystal fragments (quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar), pumiceous clasts (pumice, shards, fine ash), and accidental lithics. The eruption responsible for this unit was explosive and of large magnitude (dense rock equivalent volume about 100 km 3). That it was also phreatomagmatic in character is proposed on the basis of: the intimate association of primary and redeposited facies; the presence of accretionary lapilli both in ignimbrite and in ash-fall tuff; the fine grain size of juvenile pyroclasts; the low grade of the ignimbrite; and the close similarity in facies, composition and magnitude to the deposits from the 20,000y. B.P. phreatomagmatic eruption at Taupo, New Zealand (the Wairakei and parts of the Hinuera Formations). The eruption began and ended from a vent with excess water available, possibly submersed in a caldera lake, and generated volcaniclastic sheet floods and debris flows. The emplacement of the primary pyroclastic facies is correlated with an intervening stage when the water:magma mass ratio was lower. The deposits from a large-magnitude, phreatomagmatic eruption are predicted to show systematic lateral variations in facies. Primary pyroclastic facies predominate near the source although the preserved stratigraphy is an incomplete record because of widespread contemporaneous erosion

  12. Solution-based Syntheses of Iron Pyrite Thin Films for Photovoltaic and Protein Foot-printing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Makkaoui, Mohammed

    Iron pyrite (cubic FeS2) is a non-toxic, earth abundant semiconductor possessing a set of excellent optical/electronic properties for serving as an absorber layer in PV devices. Additionally, pyrite is a very efficient hydroxyl radical generator via Fenton chemistry and has shown promise in oxidative protein and DNA foot-printing application. The main focus of this thesis is on fabricating phase and elementally pure iron pyrite thin films using a solution-based approach that employs hydrazine as a solvent. A precursor ink is formed at room temperature by mixing elemental iron and sulfur in anhydrous hydrazine and then deposited on Mo-coated glass substrates, via spin coating, to yield amorphous iron sulfide films that are then annealed in H2S (340°C) and sulfur gas (≤ 500 °C) to form uniform, polycrystalline and phase pure pyrite films with densely packed grains. This approach is likely to yield the most elementally pure pyrite thin films made to date, through a very simple and scalable process. The ink has shown to be very sensitive to environmental conditions and has a very short shelf life (˜1 day). Additionally, the film microstructure is greatly influenced by the S:Fe concentration ratio that when tuned to 3:1, yielded uniform, robust and optically flat iron sulfide thin films with an optimal thickness (˜320 nm) for PV application. The results however were not reproducible, mainly due to failure in applying multiple layers without compromising film morphology. Thinner (films, on the other hand, are reproducibly produced, but are too thin to be employed in PV devices. Direct annealing in sulfur gas at 475°C for 4 hours, bypassing the > 12 hour H2S annealing step, yielded phase pure pyrite films, with good morphology, at lower processing time and annealing temperatures (polymer laminates for protein foot-printing application in collaboration with the Brenowitz lab at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Khine lab at the University of California

  13. Chemical and sulphur isotope compositions of pyrite in the Jaduguda U (-Cu-Fe) deposit, Singhbhum shear zone, eastern India: Implications for sulphide mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dipak C.; Sarkar, Surajit; Mishra, Biswajit; Sarangi, A. K.

    2011-06-01

    The Jaduguda U (-Cu-Fe) deposit in the Singhbhum shear zone has been the most productive uranium deposit in India. Pyrite occurs as disseminated grains or in sulphide stringers and veins in the ore zone. Veins, both concordant and discordant to the pervasive foliation, are mineralogically either simple comprising pyrite ± chalcopyrite or complex comprising pyrite + chalcopyrite + pentlandite + millerite. Nickel-sulphide minerals, though fairly common in concordant veins, are very rare in the discordant veins. Pyrite in Ni-sulphide association is commonly replaced by pentlandite at the grain boundary or along micro-cracks. Based on concentrations of Co and Ni, pyrite is classified as: type-A - high Co (up to 30800 ppm), no/low Ni; type-B - moderate Co (up to 16500 ppm) and moderate to high Ni (up to 32700 ppm); type-C - no/low Co and high Ni (up to 43000 ppm); type-D - neither Co nor Ni. Textural and compositional data of pyrites suggest that the hydrothermal fluid responsible for pre-/early-shearing mineralization evolved from Co-rich to Ni-rich and the late-/post-shearing fluid was largely depleted in minor elements. Sulphur isotope compositions of pyrite mostly furnish positive values ranging between -0.33 and 12.06‰. Composite samples of pyrites with only type-A compositions and mixed samples of type-A and type-B are consistently positive. However, pyrite with mixed type-A and type-C and pyrite with type