WorldWideScience

Sample records for pylori gastric malt

  1. Treatment outcome of localized Helicobacter pylori-negative low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyung; Soon; Park; Yu; Jin; Kim; Woo; Ick; Yang; Chang; Ok; Suh; Yong; Chan; Lee

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate treatment outcome of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori )-negative low-grade gastric mucosaassociated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma.METHODS: In this study,we retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcome and clinicopathologic factors of stage Ⅰ E H.pylori -negative low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma cases from August 1998 to June 2009.RESULTS: A total of eleven patients with H.pylori -negative low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma were enrolled in the study and received anti-H.pylori eradication tre...

  2. Treatment of low-grade gastric malt lymphoma using Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grgov Saša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma of the stomach usually occurs as a consequence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of treatment of low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma with the H. pylori eradication method. Methods. In the period 2002-2012 in 20 patients with dyspepsia, mean age 55.1 years, the endoscopic and histologic diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma in the early stages were made. Histological preparations of endoscopic biopsy specimens were stained with hematoxyllineosin (HE, histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Results. Endoscopic findings of gastritis were documented in 25% of the patients, and 75% of the patients had hypertrophic folds, severe mucosal hyperemia, fragility, nodularity, exulcerations and rigidity. Histopathologically, pathognomonic diagnostic criterion were infiltration and destruction of glandular epithelium with neoplastic lymphoid cells, the so-called lymphoepithelial lesions. In all 20 patients H. pylori was verified by rapid urease test and Giemsa stain. After the triple eradication therapy complete remission of MALT lymphoma was achieved in 85% of the patients, with no recurrence of lymphoma and H. pylori infection in the average follow-up period of 48 months. In 3 (15% of the patients, there was no remission of MALT lymphoma 12 months after the eradication therapy. Of these 3 patients 2 had progression of MALT lymphoma to diffuse large-cell lymphoma. Conclusion. Durable complete re-mission of low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma is achieved in a high percentage after eradication of H. pylori infection, thus preventing the formation of diffuse large-cell lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma.

  3. Radiological features in paediatric primary gastric MALT lymphoma and association with Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurugoglu, Sebuh; Mihmanli, Ismail; Aksoy, Hilmi; Korman, Ugur [Department of Radiology, University of Istanbul, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty (Turkey); Celkan, Tiraje [Department of Paediatric Oncology, University of Istanbul, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Aki, Hilal [Department of Pathology, University of Istanbul, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2002-02-01

    Primary malignant tumours of the stomach are very rare in children, most being lymphomas and sarcomas. The majority of primary gastric lymphomas are high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are of B-cell origin. However, a significant number are low-grade B-cell lymphomas that are derived from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) that is not found in the normal stomach. Helicobacter pylori infection predisposes to the development of MALT in the stomach and provides the pathogenic background for MALT-type lymphomagenesis. To our knowledge, only eight paediatric cases of primary gastric lymphoma have been described. The diagnosis and follow-up of gastric lymphoma are mainly made by endoscopy. Nevertheless, radiologists must be aware of this disease because it may be observed on radiological examinations that are performed for non-specific upper digestive symptoms in children. (orig.)

  4. Trisomy 3 may predict a poor response of gastric MALT lymphoma to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sawako Taji; Masuji Morita; Masafumi Taniwaki; Kenichi Nomura; Yosuke Matsumoto; Hideaki Sakabe; Naohisa Yoshida; Shoji Mitsufuji; Kazuhiro Nishida; Shigeo Horiike; Shigeo Nakamura

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relation of the response to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy to the depth of tumor invasion and chromosome abnormalities in patients with mucosaassociated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to determine the clinical value of aneuploidy.METHODS: We studied 13 patients with localized gastric MALT lymphoma of stage E1. Before eradication therapy,the depth of tumor invasion was assessed by endoscopic ultrasonography in 8 patients and by endoscopic examination and gastrointestinal series in the remaining patients. To detect chromosomal abnormalities, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of diagnostic biopsy specimens underwent tissuefluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using chromosomespecific α-satellite DNA probes for chromosomes 3,7,12,and 18 and YAC clones for t(11;18)(q21;q21).RESULTS: Seven of the 13 patients had complete regression(CR) in response to H pylori eradication therapy. No patient with CR had submucosal tumor invasion. Trisomy 18 was seen in 1 patient with CR, and both trisomies 12 and 18 were present in another patient with CR. All patients with no response or progressive disease had deep submucosal tumor invasion and showed t(11;18)(q21;q21) or trisomy 3. Trisomy 7 was not detected in this series of patients.CONCLUSION: The depth of tumor invasion is an accurate predictor of the response of stage E1 MALT lymphoma to H pylori eradication therapy and is closely associated with the presence of chromosomal abnormalities. Trisomy 3 may predict the aggressive development of MALT lymphoma.

  5. Consecutive regression of MALT lymphomas coexisting in the pharyngeal and gastric tissue after the eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Ivan Potente

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The stomach is one of the most common organs in which mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma develops. It is well established that Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection plays a major role in the development of gastric MALT lymphoma and that the presence of Hp in the gastric mucosa is connected with mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue (MALT.The same tissue is located in the oral cavity and pharynx in Waldayer’s circuit. Recently, the oral cavity was proposed as an extragastric reservoir of Hp infection. We report the case of a 79-year-old female patient with concomitant pharyngeal (MALT lymphoma and Hp-related gastric MALT lymphoma. Gastric MALT lymphoma was detected both through endoscopic examination as well as in biopsies. Pharyngeal MALT lymphoma was also detected in biopsies. Hp has been recognized in the gastric mucosa by positive serum H. pylori antibody and urease tests. Treatment of the Hp infection in our patient using antibiotics led to the regression of both lesions. This is the first case report on the regression of a pharyngeal MALT lymphoma after Hp eradication.

  6. Prevalencia de la infección por Helicobacter pylori en el linfoma MALT gástrico: una revisión sistemática Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric MALT lymphoma: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Asenjo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: realizar una revisión sistemática de los estudios que evalúan la prevalencia de H. pylori en los pacientes con linfoma MALT, así como analizar los factores de los que depende. Métodos: se efectuó una búsqueda bibliográfica en Pubmed seleccionando aquellos artículos en los que se estudiaba la prevalencia de H. pylori en pacientes con linfoma MALT. Resultados: se identificaron 38 estudios, incluyendo un total de 1.844 pacientes. La prevalencia media global de infección por H. pylori fue del 79%. En pacientes en los que se utilizaron 2 o más métodos para el diagnóstico de H. pylori la prevalencia fue del 85%, frente al 77% cuando se empleó un método diagnóstico (p Objective: to perform a systematic review of studies evaluating H. pylori prevalence in patients with MALT lymphoma, and to analyze predictive factors of response. Methods: a literature search in Pubmed was performed of papers studying H. pylori prevalence in patients with MALT lymphoma. Results: 38 studies were identified including 1,844 patients. The average prevalence of H. pylori infection was 79%. In patients diagnosed with H. pylori infection using 2 or more methods prevalence was 85%, whereas it was 77% when only one diagnostic method was used (p < 0.0001. H. pylori prevalence in patients diagnosed by histology was 75%, whereas it was 85% when serology was used (p < 0.0001. H. pylori prevalence in high-grade lymphomas was 60%, and 79% in low-grade lymphomas (p < 0.0001. H. pylori infection was detected in 74% of lymphomas confined to the submucosa, but only in 44% of those reaching deeper beyond the submucosa (p < 0.0001. Conclusions: H. pylori prevalence in patients with MALT lymphoma is variable, and seems to depend, at least partly, on the number and type of diagnostic methods used, histologic grade, and deep tumor invasion. If appropriate diagnostic methods are used, and if only low-grade lymphomas are considered, H. pylori prevalence is high, nearly

  7. Expression of CD86 and increased infiltration of NK cells are associated with Helicobacter pylori-dependent state of early stage high-grade gastric MALT lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Hsin Kuo; Jaw-Town Lin; Ann-Lii Cheng; Li-Tzong Chen; Chi-Long Chen; Shin-Lian Doong; Kun-Huei Yeh; Ming-Shiang Wu; Tsui-Lien Mao; Hui-Chen Hsu; Hsiu-Po Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A high percentage of early-stage high-grade gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas remain Helicobacter pylori(H pylori)-dependent. However,unlike their low-grade counterparts, high-grade gastric MALT lymphomas may progress rapidly if unresponsive to H pylori eradication. It is mandatory to identify markers that may predict the H pylori-dependent status of these tumors. Proliferation of MALT lymphoma cells depends on cognate help and cell-to-cell contact of H pylori-specific intratumoral T-cells. To examine whether the expression of co-stimulatory marker CD86 (B7.2) and the infiltration of CD56 (+) natural killer (NK) cells can be useful markers to predict Hpylori-dependent status of high-grade gastric MALT lymphoma.METHODS: Lymphoma biopsies from 26 patients who had participated in a prospective study of H pylori-eradication for stage IE high-grade gastric MALT lymphomas were evaluated. Tumors that resolved to Wotherspoon grade Ⅱ or less after H pylorieradication were classified as H pyloridependent; others were classified as H pylori-independent.The infiltration of NK cells and the expression of CD86 in pre-treatment paraffin-embedded lymphoma tissues were determined by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: There were 16 H pylori-dependent and 10H pylori-independent cases. CD86 expression was detected in 11 (68.8%) of 16 Hpyiori-dependent cases but in none of 10 Hpylori-independent cases (P = 0.001).H pylori-dependent high-grade gastric MALT lymphomas contained significantly higher numbers of CD56 (+) NK cells than H pylori-independent cases (2.8±1.4% vs 1.1±0.8%; P = 0.003). CD86 positive MALT lymphomas also showed significantly increased infiltration of CD56 (+)NK cells compared to CD86-negative cases (2.9±1.1% vs1.4±1.3%; P= 0.005).CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the expression of co-stimulatory marker CD86 and the increased infiltration of NK cells are associated with H pylori-dependent state of early-stage high-grade gastric MALT

  8. Is there a link between the lipopolysaccharide of Helicobacter pylori gastric MALT lymphoma associated strains and lymphoma pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lehours

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the Lewis antigen expression in Helicobacter pylori gastric MALT lymphoma associated strains in comparison to chronic gastritis only strains. Forty MALT strains (19 cagPAI (- and 21 cagPAI (+ and 39 cagPAI frequency-matched gastritis strains (17 cagPAI (- and 22 cagPAI (+ were included in this study. The lipopolyssacharide for each strain was extracted using a hot phenol method and the expression of Le(x and Le(y were investigated using Western Blot. The data were analyzed according to the strains' cagPAI status and vacA genotype. Le(x was identified in 21 (52.5% MALT strains and 29 (74.3% gastritis strains. Le(y was identified in 30 (75% MALT strains and 31 (79.5% gastritis strains. There was an association between cagPAI positivity and Le(x expression among MALT strains (p<0.0001, but not in gastritis strains (p = 0.64. Among cagPAI (- strains, isolates expressing solely Le(y were associated with MALT with an odds ratio of 64.2 (95% CI 4.9-841.0 when compared to strains expressing both Le(x and Le(y. vacA genotypes did not modify the association between Lewis antigen expression and disease status. In conclusion, cagPAI (- MALT strains have a particular Lewis antigen profile which could represent an adaptive mechanism to the host response or participate in MALT lymphomagenesis.

  9. Novel insights into the molecular pathogenesis of gastric MALT lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Gastric marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) represents a distinct class of extranodal lymphoma that evolves against a background of chronic inflammation induced by persistent infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. In its early stages, MALT lymphoma is an antigen-dependent disease characterised by an indolent clinical course and in most cases is treatable by antibiotic eradication therapy alone. Low grade MALT lymphomas c...

  10. Can we eradicate gastric MALT-lymphoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Zullo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of primary gastric lymphoma in Italy is considerably higher than that observed in the rest of Europe. It is widely accepted that gastric B-cell, low-grade mucosalassociated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma is caused by specific host-bacterial interactions that occur during Helicobacter pylori infection. This review examines recent findings on the origins, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of gastric MALT lymphomas. Clinical and endoscopic findings at diagnosis vary widely. In a substantial number of cases, the patient presents only vague dyspeptic symptoms or poorly defined abdominal pain with no macroscopic lesions on the gastric mucosa. Review of data from 32 trials in which a total of 1,387 MALT-lymphoma patients of the stomach were treated solely with H. pylori eradication revealed high remission rates when the disease is treated early (stage I-II1. Neoplasia confined to the submucosa, antral localization of tumors, and negativity for the API2-MALT1 translocation were associated with a high probability of remission following H. pylori eradication. When the latter approach is not sufficient, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and, in selected cases, surgery are associated with high success rates; data on the efficacy of monoclonal antibody therapy (rituximab are still limited. Five-year survival rates are higher than 90%. Patients whose tumors have been eliminated require close, long-term endoscopic follow-up since recurrence has been reported in some cases. Broader clinical follow-up is also advisable because the incidence of other solid tumors and of cardiovascular events is reportedly increased in these patients.

  11. Gastric low-grade MALT lymphoma, high-grade MALT lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma show different frequencies of trisomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, M A; Gisbertz, I A; Schouten, H C; Schuuring, E; Bot, F J; Hermans, J; Hopman, A; Kluin, P M; Arends, J E; van Krieken, J H

    1999-01-01

    Gastric MALT lymphoma is a distinct entity related to Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Some studies suggest a role for trisomy 3 in the genesis of these lymphomas, but they mainly focused on low-grade MALT lymphoma. Gastric MALT lymphoma, however, comprises a spectrum from low- to high-grade cases. Fu

  12. Helicobacter pylori-associated malignancies: Genetics, Epidemiology and Gastric Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Capelle (Lisette)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHelicobacter pylori infection affects at least 50% of the world population. The chronic inflammation caused by H. pylori can progress to pre-malignant gastric lesions, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric MALT lymphoma. The widespread high prevalence of H. pylori explains that gastric canc

  13. Gastric MALT lymphoma: clinical characteristics and prevalence of H. pylori infection in a series of 37 cases Linfoma MALT gástrico: características clínicas y prevalencia de la infección por H. pylori en una serie de 37 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Gisbert

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to perform a retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with gastric MALT lymphoma diagnosed in our hospital during the last 15 years. Methods: patients with gastric MALT lymphoma diagnosed in our hospital during the last 15 years were retrospectively included. Demographic, clinic, analytic, endoscopic, and histological variables were reviewed. The extension study, the staging classification, and the presence of H. pylori infection were assessed. Results: thirty-seven patients with gastric MALT lymphoma were identified. Mean age was 61 years, with 62% of males. The most common presentation symptom was dyspepsia (76%, followed by digestive bleeding (11% and constitutional syndrome (8%. At endoscopy, erosive lesions were identified in 41%, and proliferative or exophytic lesions in 43%. Most lymphomas were classified as low-grade (68%. The stage distribution was EI for 56%, EII for 13%, EIII for 3%, and EIV for 28%. The prevalence of H. pylori infection (histology in all cases, rapid urease test in 19%, and 13C-urea breath test in 24% was 46%. When only low-grade lymphomas in stage EI were considered, H. pylori prevalence increased to 55%. When H. pylori infection was evaluated by 13C-urea breath testing (in addition to histology, the prevalence of H. pylori infection increased to 78%. Conclusions: it is probable that the reduced H. pylori prevalence found in some studies, as in ours, could be explained by false-negative results obtained when only one diagnostic method was used. Therefore, at least two (invasive diagnostic methods should be performed. Furthermore, the performance of a non-invasive diagnostic method (such as a 13C-urea breath test before the exclusion of H. pylori infection should be considered.Objetivo: revisar retrospectivamente las características clínicas y la prevalencia de infección por H. pylori en los pacientes con linfoma MALT gástrico diagnosticados

  14. [MALT-type low-grade B-cell lymphomas of the stomach and Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, J; Morant, R; Weber, A; Schmid, U; Hammer, B

    1996-05-11

    From January 1 1994 to March 1 1995 we observed 6 patients with gastric low-grade B-cell lymphoma of MALT type in association with Helicobacter pylori infection. Endoscopically only 3 of the 6 patients presented with pathological findings. All but one patient with metastatic carcinoma received antibiotic therapy for Helicobacter pylori. Follow-up was not possible in one patient who died unexpectedly. In all 4 patients followed-up, eradication of Helicobacter pylori resulted in regression of the malignant lymphoma. During the median follow-up time of 7 months (2-13 months) no relapse of lymphoma was observed. Our results confirm that gastric low-grade B-cell lymphoma of MALT type can regress after eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

  15. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo; Jun; Ahn; Dong; Soo; Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to theoccurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cag A and vac A are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  16. -------------Gastric malignancy : Clinicopathologic spectrum and relationship to helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satti Mohamed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Upper gastrointestinal cancer particularly of stomach is a relatively frequent form of cancer. Gastric H pylori infection has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both gastric carcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Gastric carcinoma has been addressed by many articles in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA and the Middle East, while only a few addressed gastric lymphoma. Aim of the study: To investigate the relative frequency of gastric carcinoma and gastric lymphoma and their association with H pylori infection in endoscoped patients. Patients and methods: A retrospective study of patients endoscoped at King Fahad Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, KSA during the period 1983-1999 was performed. Endoscopy and pathology records were retrieved and reviewed. The histopathology slides were re-examined, applying immunohistochemical techniques on corresponding paraffin sections to classify the various tumors. H pylori were identified on routine histology and by utilizing Giemsa stain. Results: During the study period of 17 years (1983-1999, a total of 94 endoscopically-diagnosed, histologically-confirmed cases of gastric malignancy were identified. Of these, there were 55 gastric adenocarcinoma and 39 gastric lymphoma. H pylori was identified in the adjacent gastric mucosa in 18 of all cases of gastric adenocarcinoma and in 27 of the 39 cases of lymphoma. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the comparatively high frequency of gastric lymphoma in this population and confirms the intimate association of H-pylori infection to both gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT-lymphoma. Gastric lymphoma should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric malignancy and the use of immunohistochemistry is essential for the differential diagnosis of some of these tumors

  17. Prevalence of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains in gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgilier, Ceren; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Raderer, Markus; Dolak, Werner; Makristathis, Athanasios; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Gastric MALT lymphoma is closely associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Bacterial eradication therapy comprising clarithromycin is the first-line treatment in gastric MALT lymphoma patients. However, antimicrobial resistance to clarithromycin has been increasing in Europe, and thus far, it has not been examined in gastric MALT lymphoma patients. Based upon histopathological investigation, 17 adult gastric MALT lymphoma patients were identified to be related with H. pylori infection between 1997 and 2014. Detection of H. pylori infection in these patients and clarithromycin susceptibility testing were performed by 23S rRNA gene real-time PCR. Twelve of the patients were confirmed with H. pylori infection by real-time PCR. Among these patients, only two were found to be infected with clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori strain. In one of them, both the clarithromycin-resistant and sensitive genotype were detected. The rate of clarithromycin resistance was 15.4 %. Clarithromycin resistance pattern in gastric MALT lymphoma patients is under the predictions since a previous study performed in Central Europe revealed a rate of 36.6 % in Austria. Considering the low antimicrobial resistance rate, clarithromycin is still an option in gastric MALT lymphoma management.

  18. Cytotoxic T Cells in H. pylori-Related Gastric Autoimmunity and Gastric Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathijs P. Bergman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of gastroduodenal pathologies, but only a minority of infected patients develop gastric B-cell lymphoma, gastric autoimmunity, or other life threatening diseases, as gastric cancer or peptic ulcer. The type of host immune response against H. pylori, particularly the cytolytic effector functions of T cells, is crucial for the outcome of the infection. T cells are potentially able to kill a target via different mechanisms, such as perforins or Fas-Fas ligand interaction. In H. pylori-infected patients with gastric autoimmunity cytolytic T cells, that cross-recognize different epitopes of H. pylori proteins and H+K+-ATPase autoantigen, infiltrate the gastric mucosa and lead to gastric atrophy via long-lasting activation of Fas ligand-mediated appotosis and perforin-induced cytotoxicity. On the other hand, gastric T cells from MALT lymphoma exhibit defective perforin- and Fas-Fas ligand-mediated killing of B cells, with consequent abnormal help for B-cell proliferation, suggesting that deregulated and exhaustive H. pylori-induced T cell-dependent B-cell activation can support both the onset and the promotion of low-grade B-cell lymphoma.

  19. Clinical Outcome of Eradication Therapy for Gastric Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma according to H. pylori Infection Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Seok Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To evaluate the long-term outcome of H. pylori eradication therapy for gastric MALT lymphoma according to the presence of H. pylori infection. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients between January 2001 and June 2014. The clinicopathologic characteristics and clinical outcomes were compared between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative gastric MALT lymphoma groups. Results. Fifty-four patients were enrolled: 12 H. pylori-negative and 42 H. pylori-positive patients. The tumor was located more frequently in both the proximal and distal parts of the stomach (P=0.001, and the percentage of multiple lesions was significantly greater in the H. pylori-negative group (P=0.046. Forty-seven patients received initial eradication therapy, and 85% (35/41 of H. pylori-positive patients and 50% (3/6 of H. pylori-negative patients achieved complete remission after eradication therapy. The presence of multiple lesions was a predictive factor for unresponsiveness to H. pylori eradication (P=0.024. The efficacy of eradication therapy (P=0.133, complete remission (CR maintenance period, and relapse after eradication therapy were not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusions. H. pylori eradication therapy could be an effective first-line treatment for localized H. pylori-negative gastric MALT lymphoma, especially for single lesions.

  20. Chlorambucil versus observation after anti-Helicobacter therapy in gastric MALT lymphomas: results of the international randomised LY03 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Barry W; Qian, Wendi; Linch, David; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Smith, Paul; Jakupovic, Ira; Burton, Cathy; Souhami, Robert; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Capella, Carlo; Traulle, Catherine; Levy, Michael; Cortelazzo, Sergio; Ferreri, Andres J M; Ambrosetti, Achille; Pinotti, Graziella; Martinelli, Giovanni; Vitolo, Umberto; Cavalli, Franco; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Zucca, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas are uncommon tumours characterised by a tendency to remain localised for long periods. The aetiological association between MALT lymphomas and Helicobacter pylori is well established. The role of additional chemotherapy after H. pylori eradication in localised MALT lymphomas is unclear. The LY03 trial was designed to establish whether chlorambucil after treatment for H. pylori would help prevent recurrence. Patients were treated with antibiotics for H. pylori infection. Those with successful eradication of H. pylori and no evidence of progression of lymphoma were eligible for randomisation to chlorambucil or observation. Two hundred and thirty-one patients were registered. Ninety-seven percent patients had H. pylori eradicated after antibiotics and 59% achieved macroscopically normal gastric mucosa. One hundred and ten patients were randomised. With a median follow-up of 58 months, six patients were dead and 17 had recurrent/progressive disease. The recurrence/progression rates at 5 years were 11% for chlorambucil, and 21% for observation with a difference of 10%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = −9% to 29%, P = 0·15. No difference was detected in recurrence/progression-free survival [Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0·96, 95% CI = 0·41–2·2, P = 0·91] or overall survival (HR = 1·93, 95% CI = 0·39–9·58, P = 0·42). This is the first randomised trial to show there is no good evidence to support that additional single agent chemotherapy to anti-H. pylori treatment contributes to prevent recurrence in localised gastric MALT lymphomas. PMID:19036078

  1. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  2. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial. The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H. pylori infection. About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H. pylori infection. Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection are under way. Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H. pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer; however, a population-based H. pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora. Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  3. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems. PMID:28151409

  4. Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas and Helicobacter pylori infection: A Colombian perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sally Yepes; Maria Mercedes Torres; Carlos Saavedra; Rafael Andrade

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess the significance of chromosome translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21),B-cell lymphoma 10 (BCL-10)protein and Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection in gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in Colombia.METHODS:Fifty cases of gastric MALT lymphoma and their respective post-treatment follow-up biopsies were examined to assess the presence of the translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21) as identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization; to detect protein expression patterns of BCL10 using immunohistochemistry; and for evaluation of tumor histology to determine the correlation of these factors and resistance to H.pylori eradication.RESULTS:Infection with H.pylori was confirmed in all cases of gastric MALT lymphoma in association with chronic gastritis.Bacterial eradication led to tumor regression in 66% of cases.The translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21) was not present in any of these cases,nor was there evidence of tumor transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.Thirty-four percent of the patients showed resistance to tumor regression,and within this group,7 cases,representing 14% of all those analyzed,were considered to be t(11;18)(q21;q21)-positive gastric MALT lymphomas.Protein expression of BCL10 in the nucleus was associated with the presence of translocation and treatment resistance.Cases that were considered unresponsive to therapy were histologically characterized by the presence of homogeneous tumor cells and a lack of plasmacytic differentiation.Responder cases exhibited higher cellular heterogeneity and a greater frequency of plasma cells.CONCLUSION:Both t(11;18)(q21;q21)-positive MALT lymphoma cases and those with nuclear BCL10 expression are considered resistant to H,pylori eradication.It is suggested that chronic antigenic stimulation is not a dominant event in resistant cases.

  5. The Human Gastric Pathogen Helicobacter pylori and Its Association with Gastric Cancer and Ulcer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Bauer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the momentous discovery in the 1980's that a bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, can cause peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, antibiotic therapies and prophylactic measures have been successful, only in part, in reducing the global burden of these diseases. To date, ~700,000 deaths worldwide are still attributable annually to gastric cancer alone. Here, we review H. pylori's contribution to the epidemiology and histopathology of both gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Furthermore, we examine the host-pathogen relationship and H. pylori biology in context of these diseases, focusing on strain differences, virulence factors (CagA and VacA, immune activation and the challenges posed by resistance to existing therapies. We consider also the important role of host-genetic variants, for example, in inflammatory response genes, in determining infection outcome and the role of H. pylori in other pathologies—some accepted, for example, MALT lymphoma, and others more controversial, for example, idiopathic thrombocytic purpura. More recently, intriguing suggestions that H. pylori has protective effects in GERD and autoimmune diseases, such as asthma, have gained momentum. Therefore, we consider the basis for these suggestions and discuss the potential impact for future therapeutic rationales.

  6. Draft genome sequences of Helicobacter pylori isolates from Malaysia, cultured from patients with functional dyspepsia and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaletchumy, Selva Perumal; Teh, Xinsheng; Khosravi, Yalda; Ramli, Nur Siti Khadijah; Chua, Eng Guan; Kavitha, Thevakumar; Mason, Joanne N; Lee, Huey Tyng; Alias, Halimah; Zaidan, Nur Zafirah; Yassin, Norzawani Buang M; Tay, Liang Chung; Rudd, Stephen; Mitchell, Hazel M; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Loke, Mun Fai; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2012-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main bacterial causative agent of gastroduodenal disorders and a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The draft genomes of 10 closely related H. pylori isolates from the multiracial Malaysian population will provide an insight into the genetic diversity of isolates in Southeast Asia. These isolates were cultured from gastric biopsy samples from patients with functional dyspepsia and gastric cancer. The availability of this genomic information will provide an opportunity for examining the evolution and population structure of H. pylori isolates from Southeast Asia, where the East meets the West.

  7. 18F-FDG PET/CT in gastric MALT lymphoma: a bicentric experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albano, Domenico; Bertoli, Mattia [Nuclear Medicine, Spedali Civili Brescia, Brescia (Italy); University Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Ferro, Paola [University Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Fallanca, Federico; Gianolli, Luigi; Picchio, Maria [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco [University of Brescia and Spedali Civili Brescia, Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    The role of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in evaluating gastric MALT lymphoma is still controversial. In the literature the detection rate of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in patients with gastric MALT lymphoma is variable, and the reason for this heterogeneity is not still clear. Our aim was to investigate the particular metabolic behavior of these lymphoma. Sixty-nine patients (26 female, 43 male) with histologically confirmed gastric MALT lymphoma who underwent a 18F-FDG-PET/CT for initial staging from two centers were included. The PET images were analyzed visually and semi-quantitatively by measuring the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), lesion-to-liver SUVmax ratio, and lesion-to-blood pool SUVmax ratio and compared with Ann Arbor stage, epidemiological (age, sex), histological (presence of gastritis, ulcer, H. pylori infection, plasmacytic differentiation, Ki-67 index), and morphological (tumor size, superficial lesions or mass-forming) characteristics. Thirty-six patients (52 %) had positive PET/CT (average SUVmax was 9±6.7; lesion-to-liver SUVmax ratio 3.7±2.6, lesion-to-blood pool SUVmax ratio 4.8±3.3) at the corresponding gastric lesion; the remaining 33 were not 18F-FDG-avid. In the univariate analysis, 18F-FDG avidity was significantly associated with morphological features (mass forming p<0.001 and high maximum diameter p<0.001), Ann Arbor stage (p=0.010), and Ki67 index (p<0.001) and not correlated with age, sex, presence of gastritis, ulcer, Helicobacter pylori infection, and plasmacytic differentiation. In the multivariate analysis, the correlations with gross morphological appearance, Ann Arbor stage, and Ki-67 score were confirmed. SUVmax, lesion-to-liver SUVmax ratio, and lesion-to-blood pool SUVmax ratio correlated significantly only with Ki67 index (p=0.047; p=0.012; p=0.042). 18F-FDG avidity was noted in 52 % of gastric MALT lymphoma and this avidity is correlated with gross morphological characteristics, tumor stage, and Ki-67 index. SUVmax, lesion

  8. From array-based hybridization of Helicobacter pylori isolates to the complete genome sequence of an isolate associated with MALT lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mégraud Francis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background elicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastro-duodenal inflammatory diseases of various levels of severity. To determine whether certain combinations of genetic markers can be used to predict the clinical source of the infection, we analyzed well documented and geographically homogenous clinical isolates using a comparative genomics approach. Results A set of 254 H. pylori genes was used to perform array-based comparative genomic hybridization among 120 French H. pylori strains associated with chronic gastritis (n = 33, duodenal ulcers (n = 27, intestinal metaplasia (n = 17 or gastric extra-nodal marginal zone B-cell MALT lymphoma (n = 43. Hierarchical cluster analyses of the DNA hybridization values allowed us to identify a homogeneous subpopulation of strains that clustered exclusively with cagPAI minus MALT lymphoma isolates. The genome sequence of B38, a representative of this MALT lymphoma strain-cluster, was completed, fully annotated, and compared with the six previously released H. pylori genomes (i.e. J99, 26695, HPAG1, P12, G27 and Shi470. B38 has the smallest H. pylori genome described thus far (1,576,758 base pairs containing 1,528 CDSs; it contains the vacAs2m2 allele and lacks the genes encoding the major virulence factors (absence of cagPAI, babB, babC, sabB, and homB. Comparative genomics led to the identification of very few sequences that are unique to the B38 strain (9 intact CDSs and 7 pseudogenes. Pair-wise genomic synteny comparisons between B38 and the 6 H. pylori sequenced genomes revealed an almost complete co-linearity, never seen before between the genomes of strain Shi470 (a Peruvian isolate and B38. Conclusion These isolates are deprived of the main H. pylori virulence factors characterized previously, but are nonetheless associated with gastric neoplasia.

  9. Effective predictive factors for regression of gastric MALT lymphoma after anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment%胃粘膜相关淋巴样组织淋巴瘤抗H.Pylori治疗的有效预测因子

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡莲; 李昌平

    2006-01-01

    胃粘膜相关淋巴样组织(MALT)型结外边缘区B细胞淋巴瘤发病机制主要与幽门螺杆菌(H.pylori)感染有关,目前认为根治H.pylori治疗已成为胃粘膜相关淋巴样组织淋巴瘤的一线治疗.然而,抗H.pylori治疗不能使胃MALT淋巴瘤100%完全缓解,即使完全缓解后仍有复发的可能.随着研究的深入,哪些患者更能从抗H.pylori治疗中受益,抗H.pylori治疗后随访是目前研究的热点.此文对胃MALT淋巴瘤与H.pylori的关系,抗H.pylori治疗的有效预测、随访作一综述.

  10. An unusual presentation of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT-type lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikram Shrestha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT-type lymphoma is a relatively rare disease; nevertheless, it is the third most common lymphoma type, accounting for 5–7% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Case series and retrospective analysis published in the literature have suggested that extra gastrointestinal (GI MALT-type lymphoma can occur simultaneously with MALT-type lymphoma involving the GI tract. We report the case of a healthy, 64-year-old Caucasian male who presented with progressive fatigue, non-productive cough, and worsening exertional shortness of breath for 3 months who was subsequently diagnosed with gastric extra-nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma or MALToma with simultaneous metastasis to the lung (bronchi based on biopsy reports. Case presentation: A 64-year-old Caucasian male presented to the emergency room complaining of progressive fatigue for 3 months which had progressed to the point of hindering his usual activities of daily living (ADL. He had recently visited his primary care provider for evaluation of a non-productive cough and exertional shortness of breath. A chest radiography obtained at the time showed bilateral infiltrates. He was then treated for atypical pneumonia but his symptoms unfortunately did not improve. Initial investigations in the emergency room revealed severe anemia and a positive stool guaiac test. Imaging showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and an irregular gastric mass. Gastric and transbronchial biopsies were suggestive of extra-nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma with simultaneous metastasis to the bronchi. He was treated symptomatically with transfusion of packed red blood cells (PRBC and intravenous iron followed by radiotherapy. Helicobacter pylori infection was ruled out eliminating the possibility of treating him with eradication therapy. Conclusion: Although the stomach is the most common and most extensively studied site of involvement of MALT lymphomas, they can also emerge in many other

  11. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Li-Ya Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial.The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect.Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015.Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H.pylori infection.About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H.pylori infection.Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H.pylori infection are under way.Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H.pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer;however, a population-based H.pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora.Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  12. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  14. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue.

  15. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Clyne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of many enteric diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a duodenal pathogen that adheres to the gastric epithelium and causes gastritis and peptic ulceration. The mechanism by which H pylori causes disease has not yet been elucidated but adherence to the gastric mucosa is thought to be an important virulence determinant of the organism. What is known about adherence of H pylori to the gastric mucosa is summarized. Topics discussed are the mechanism of H pylori adherence; in vitro and in vivo models of H pylori infection; and adherence and potential adhesins and receptors for H pylori.

  16. BCL10 aberations and NF-kappa B activation involving p65 are absent or rare in primary gastric MALT lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajder Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma accounts for 5-17% non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL. The molecular pathogenesis of MALT lymphomas is not well-established. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunohistochemically determined nuclear coexpression of BCL10 and NF-kappaB (NF-κB in tumor cells of gastric MALT lymphoma and its impact on the patogenesis and outcome of the disease. Methods. Medical records of 35 patients with newly diagnosed gastric MALT lymphoma were analyzed and biopsy specimens were immunostained for BCL10 and NF-kB expression (p65 subunit. Results. The median age of 35 patients diagnosed with gastric MALT lymphoma was 63.5 years (male/female = 21/14. Symptoms were present in 23/35 (65.7% patients with the weight loss as the most common symptom. Gastric MALT lymphomas were usually localized in the stomach corpus and corpus and antrum (45.7% and 31.2%, respectively. H. pylori infection was confirmed in 20 out of 30 (66.7% patients. Treatment options were as follows: immunochemotherapy in 10 (28.5% patients, surgery in 9 (25.8% patients, combined surgery and chemotherapy in 14 (40% patients and supportive measures in 2 (5.7% patients. Complete remission was achieved in 13 (37.1% patients and partial remission in two (5.7% patients. Sixteen (45.7% patients had disease progression (p < 0.001. Cytoplasmatic expression of BCL10 in tumor cells was detected in 19 (54.3% specimens. Nuclear expression was detected in no specimen. Cytoplasmic expression of NF-κB was present in 22 (65.7% specimens, but nuclear expression was not detected in any specimens. Conclusion. Nuclear expressions (activation of NF-κB p65 subunit and BCL10 were not detected in specimens of gastric MALT lymphoma. The correlation of nuclear coexpression of BCL10 and NF-κB in gastric MALT lymphoma was not established. These results indicate that other mechanisms and signal pathways are active in lymphogenesis of gastric MALT lymphoma, as that

  17. Gastric and enterohepatic helicobacters other than Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Armelle; Péré-Védrenne, Christelle; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2014-09-01

    During the past year, research on non-Helicobacter pylori species has intensified. H. valdiviensis was isolated from wild birds, and putative novel species have been isolated from Bengal tigers and Australian marsupials. Various genomes have been sequenced: H. bilis, H. canis, H. macacae, H. fennelliae, H. cetorum, and H. suis. Several studies highlighted the virulence of non-H. pylori species including H. cinaedi in humans and hyperlipidemic mice or H. macacae in geriatric rhesus monkeys with intestinal adenocarcinoma. Not surprisingly, increased attention has been paid to the position of Helicobacter species in the microbiota of children and animal species (mice, chickens, penguins, and migrating birds). A large number of experimental studies have been performed in animal models of Helicobacter induced typhlocolitis, showing that the gastrointestinal microbial community is involved in modulation of host pathways leading to chronic inflammation. Animal models of H. suis, H. heilmannii, and H. felis infection have been used to study the development of severe inflammation-related pathologies, including gastric MALT lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prevalence of Coinfection with Gastric Non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter (NHPH) Species in Helicobacter pylori-infected Patients Suffering from Gastric Disease in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; He, Lihua; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Gong, Yanan; Flahou, Bram; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-08-01

    The Helicobacter heilmannii sensu lato (H. heilmannii s.l.) group consists of long, spiral-shaped bacteria naturally colonizing the stomach of animals. Moreover, bacteria belonging to this group have been observed in 0.2-6% of human gastric biopsy specimens, and associations have been made with the development of chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric MALT lymphoma in humans. To gain insight into the prevalence of H. heilmannii s.l. infections in patients suffering from gastric disease in China, H. heilmannii s.l. species-specific PCRs were performed on DNA extracts from rapid urease test (RUT)-positive gastric biopsies from 1517 patients followed by nucleotide sequencing. At the same time, Helicobacter pylori cultivation and specific PCR was performed to assess H. pylori infection in these patients. In total, H. heilmannii s.l. infection was detected in 11.87% (178/1499) of H. pylori-positive patients. The prevalence of H. suis, H. felis, H. bizzozeronii, H. heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.), and H. salomonis in the patients was 6.94%, 2.20%, 0.13%, 0.07%, and 2.54%, respectively. Results revealed that all patients with H. heilmannii s.l. infection were co-infected with H. pylori, and some patients were co-infected with more than two different Helicobacter species. Helicobacter heilmannii s.l. infections are fairly common in Chinese patients. This should be kept in mind when diagnosing the cause of gastric pathologies in patients. Helicobacter suis was shown to be by far the most prevalent H. heilmannii s.l.species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... pathways. As such, this review highlights the consequences of H. pylori infection on the integrity of DNA in the host cells. By down-regulating major DNA repair pathways, H. pylori infection has the potential to generate mutations. In addition, H. pylori infection can induce direct changes on the DNA...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Figueiredo, Céu; Seruca, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...

  1. Prevention of Gastric Cancer: Eradication of Helicobacter Pylori and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Tsukamoto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although its prevalence is declining, gastric cancer remains a significant public health issue. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is known to colonize the human stomach and induce chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer. Results using a Mongolian gerbil model revealed that H. pylori infection increased the incidence of carcinogen-induced adenocarcinoma, whereas curative treatment of H. pylori significantly lowered cancer incidence. Furthermore, some epidemiological studies have shown that eradication of H. pylori reduces the development of metachronous cancer in humans. However, other reports have warned that human cases of atrophic metaplastic gastritis are already at risk for gastric cancer development, even after eradication of these bacteria. In this article, we discuss the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication and the morphological changes that occur in gastric dysplasia/cancer lesions. We further assess the control of gastric cancer using various chemopreventive agents.

  2. [Gastric Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Based on Outcome of Domestic Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin Tae

    2016-10-25

    Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. H. pylori eradication can be performed as a primary therapy regardless of H. pylori status. In Korea, six articles were published about low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma with H. pylori. Complete regression rate after H. pylori eradication is reported at 74.5% to 94.4%. Radiotherapy results in favorable clinical long-term outcomes in patients with early-stage gastric MALT lymphoma who fail H. pylori eradication therapy and those who are H. pylori negative. Chemotherapy could be reserved for patients with metastatic or high-grade lymphoma. In gastric MALT lymphoma, patients with polypoid type on initial endoscopy had a higher likelihood of recurrence than those with diffuse infiltration or ulceration types. The depth of invasion, location of lesions, and chromosomal abnormality with t(11;18) together are predictive factors for failure to remission by H. pylori eradication.

  3. Regulation of RKIP function by Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika L Moen

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacterium that infects more than half of the world's population and is a major cause of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mechanisms that link H. pylori infection to gastric carcinogenesis are not well understood. In the present study, we report that the Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP has a role in the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. Western blot and luciferase transcription reporter assays demonstrate that the pathogenicity island of H. pylori rapidly phosphorylates RKIP, which then localizes to the nucleus where it activates its own transcription and induces apoptosis. Forced overexpression of RKIP enhances apoptosis in H. pylori-infected cells, whereas RKIP RNA inhibition suppresses the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori infection. While inducing the phosphorylation of RKIP, H. pylori simultaneously targets non-phosphorylated RKIP for proteasome-mediated degradation. The increase in RKIP transcription and phosphorylation is abrogated by mutating RKIP serine 153 to valine, demonstrating that regulation of RKIP activity by H. pylori is dependent upon RKIP's S153 residue. In addition, H. pylori infection increases the expression of Snail, a transcriptional repressor of RKIP. Our results suggest that H. pylori utilizes a tumor suppressor protein, RKIP, to promote apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

  4. Immune Homeostasis of Human Gastric Mucosa in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, I V; Yamamoto, T; Vershinina, S S; Reva, G V

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of electron microscopic, microbiological, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic studies of gastric biopsy specimens taken for diagnostic purposes according by clinical indications during examination of patients with gastrointestinal pathology. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa against the background of infection with various pathogen strains of Helicobacter pylori was studied in patients of different age groups with peptic ulcer, gastritis, metaplasia, and cancer. Some peculiarities of Helicobacter pylori contamination in the gastric mucosa were demonstrated. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa in different pathologies was analyzed depending on the Helicobacter pylori genotype.

  5. Diet, microbial virulence, and Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover, Timothy L; Peek, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the strongest known risk factors for this malignancy. H. pylori strains exhibit a high level of genetic diversity, and the risk of gastric cancer is higher in persons carrying certain strain types (for example, those that contain a cag pathogenicity island or type s1 vacA alleles) than in persons carrying other strain types. Additional risk factors for gastric cancer include specific human genetic polymorphisms and specific dietary preferences (for example, a high-salt diet or a diet deficient in fruits and vegetables). Finally, iron-deficiency anemia is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Recent studies have provided evidence that several dietary risk factors for gastric cancer directly impact H. pylori virulence. In this review article, we discuss mechanisms by which diet can modulate H. pylori virulence and thereby influence gastric cancer risk.

  6. Endoscopic gastric atrophy is strongly associated with gastric cancer development after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Osamu; Yamaji, Yutaka; Yoshida, Shuntaro; Matsumoto, Shuhei; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Hata, Keisuke

    2017-05-01

    Risk factors for gastric cancer during continuous infection with Helicobacter pylori have been well documented; however, little has been reported on the risk factors for primary gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication. We conducted a retrospective, endoscopy-based, long-term, large-cohort study to clarify the risk factors for gastric cancer following H. pylori eradication. Patients who achieved successful H. pylori eradication and periodically underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy surveillance thereafter at Toyoshima Endoscopy Clinic were enrolled. The primary endpoint was the development of gastric cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox's proportional hazards models. Gastric cancer developed in 15 of 1232 patients. The cumulative incidence rates were 1.0 % at 2 years, 2.6 % at 5 years, and 6.8 % at 10 years. Histology showed that all gastric cancers (17 lesions) in the 15 patients were of the intestinal type, within the mucosal layer, and pylori, and gastric ulcers were marginally associated. Multivariate analysis identified higher grade of gastric atrophy (hazard ratio 1.77; 95 % confidence interval 1.12-2.78; P = 0.01) as the only independently associated parameter. Endoscopic gastric atrophy is a major risk factor for gastric cancer development after H. pylori eradication. Further long-term studies are required to determine whether H. pylori eradication leads to regression of H. pylori-related gastritis and reduces the risk of gastric cancer.

  7. Eradication of H pylori for the prevention of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karolin Trautmann; Manfred Stolte; Stephan Miehlke

    2006-01-01

    Tnfection with H pylori is the most important known etiological factor associated with gastric cancer. While colonization of the gastric mucosa with H pylori results in active and chronic gastritis in virtually all individuals infected, the likelihood of developing gastric cancer depends on environmental, bacterial virulence and host specific factors. The majority of all gastric cancer cases are attributable to H pylori infection and therefore theoretically preventable. There is evidence from animal models that eradication of H pylori at an early time point can prevent gastric cancer development. However, randomized clinical trials exploring the prophylactic effect of H pylori eradication on the incidence of gastric cancer in humans remain sparse and have yielded conflicting results. Better markers for the identification of patientsat risk for H pylori induced gastric malignancy are needed to allow the development of a more efficient public eradication strategy. Meanwhile, screening and treatment of H pylori in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients as well as certain high-risk populations might be beneficial.

  8. Diet, microbial virulence, and Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cover, Timothy L.; Peek, Jr, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the strongest known risk factors for this malignancy. H. pylori strains exhibit a high level of genetic diversity, and the risk of gastric cancer is higher in persons carrying certain strain types (for example, those that contain a cag pathogenicity island or type s1 vacA alleles) than in persons carrying other strain types. Additional risk factors for gastric cancer includ...

  9. Dynamic expression of pepsinogen C in gastric cancer, precancerous lesions and Helicobacter pylori associated gastric diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Fang Ning; Hui-Jie Liu; Yuan Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the expression of pepsinogen C (PGC) and gastric cancer, precancerous diseases, and Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection. METHODS: The expression of PGC was determined by immunohistochemistry method in 430 cases of gastric mucosa. H pylori infection was determined by HE staining, PCR and ELISA in 318 specimens.RESULTS: The positive rate of PGC expression in 54 cases of normal gastric mucosa was 100%. The positive rates of PGC expression in superficial gastritis or gastric ulcer or erosion, atrophic gastritis or gastric dysplasia and gastric cancer decreased significantly in sequence (P<0.05;100%/89.2% vs 14.3%/15.2% vs 2.4%). The overexpression rate of PGC in group of superficial gastritis with H pylori infection was higher than that in group without H pylori infection (P<0.05; χ2= 0.032 28/33 vs 15/25).The positive rate of PGC expression in group of atrophic gastritis with H pylori infection was lower than that in group without H pylori infection (P<0.01; χ2 = 0.003 4/61vs 9/30), and in dysplasia and gastric cancer. CONCLUSION: The level of PGC expression has a close relationship with the degree of malignancy of gastric mucosa and development of gastric lesions. There is a relationship between H pylori infection and expression of antigen PGC in gastric mucosa, the positive rate of PGC expression increases in early stage of gastric lesions with H pylori infection such as gastric inflammation and decreases during the late stage such as precancerous diseases and gastric cancer. PGC-negative cases with H pylori-positive gastric lesions should be given special attention.

  10. Dyslipidemia and H pylori in gastric xanthomatosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Young Yi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship among gastric xanthomatosis (GX),H pylori, dyslipidemia, and gastritis in Korea, a well-known H pylori endemic area.METHODS: A total of 771 patients who had undergone gastroduodenoscopy by one endoscopist were included in this study. Among them, 54 patients with GX were assessed for H pylori infection and their endoscopic characteristics and serum lipid profiles. The findings were compared with 54 age- and sex-matched control subjects without GX.RESULTS: The prevalence of GX was 7% (54/771) with no sex difference. GX was mainly single (64.8%) and located in the antrum (53.7%). The mean diameter was 7 ± 3 mm. Mean body mass index (BMI) of patients with GX was 23.1 ± 2.8 and no one was above 30.Compared with the controls, lipid profiles of GX group showed significantly lower HDL-cholesterol (48.8 ± 12.3vs 62.9 ± 40.5, P = 0.028) and higher LDL-cholesterol (112.9 ± 29.9 vs 95.9 ± 22.4, P = 0.032). The level of total serum cholesterol, triglyceride and the existence of dyslipoproteinemia were not related to the presence of GX. However, GX showed a close relationship with endoscopically determined atrophic gastritis and histologic severity (24/53, 44.4% vs 8/54, 14.8%, P =0.0082). H pylori infection and bile reflux gastritis were not significantly related with GX.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of GX is 7% and it may be an increasing entity in Korea. Moreover, dyslipidemia and atrophic gastritis are found to be related to GX, but H pylori infection is not.

  11. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  12. Helicobacter pylori and gastric or duodenal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer associated with Helicobacter pylori, treatment of the infection improves healing and prevents complications and recurrences. The drug regimen generally consists of a high-dose proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) such as omeprazole plus antibiotics. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we conducted a review of the literature in order to determine the standard empirical antibiotic regimen for H. pylori infection in adults with gastric or duodenal ulcer in France. In 2015, due to an increase in H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, a 7-day course of the PPI + clarithromycin + amoxicillin combination is effective in only about 70% of cases. A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis of trials involving thousands of patients suggests that prolonging treatment with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin or a PPI + amoxicillin + metronidazole to 10 or 14 days improves the rate of H. pylori eradication by 5% to 10%. A metanalysis of seven trials including a total of about 1000 patients showed that combination therapy with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days eradicates H. pylori in about 90% of cases, compared to about 80% of cases with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin given for 7 days. Sequential treatment with amoxicillin for 5 days, followed by clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days, has also been tested in thousands of patients. Efficacy and adverse effects were similar to those observed when the same antibiotics were taken simultaneously for 5 days. In randomised trials, replacing clarithromycin or amoxicillin with a fluoroquinolone yielded conflicting results. In 2009, nearly 20% of H. pylori isolates were resistant to levofloxacin in France. Tetracycline has only been evaluated in combination with bismuth. The few available data on doxycycline suggest that its efficacy is similar to that of tetracycline. A fixed-dose combination of bismuth subcitrate potassium + metronidazole

  13. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takafumi Ando; Yasuyuki Goto; Osamu Maeda; Osamu Watanabe; Kazuhiro Ishiguro; Hidemi Goto

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most frequent cancer in the world, accounting for a large proportion of all cancer cases in Asia, Latin America, and some countries in Europe. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) is regarded as playing a specific role in the development of atrophic gastritis, which represents the most recognized pathway in multistep intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis. Recent studies suggest that a combination of host genetic factors, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental and lifestyle factors determine the severity of gastric damage and the eventual clinical outcome of H pylori infection. The seminal discovery of H pylori as the leading cause of gastric cancer should lead to effective eradication strategies. Prevention of gastric cancer requires better screening strategies to identify candidates for eradication.

  14. 胃B细胞淋巴瘤API2-MALT1融合基因表达与幽门螺杆菌感染的相关性%Correlation between the expression of API2-MALT1 fusion mRNA and infection of helicobacter pylori in gastric B-cell lymphomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文秀; 李甘地; 周桥; 刘卫平; 李俸媛

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨胃MALT淋巴瘤和弥漫性大B细胞淋巴瘤演进中t(11;18)(q21;q21)与幽门螺杆菌(HP)感染的关系,以及检测API2-MALT1融合基因的意义.方法 47例胃淋巴瘤病例(MALT淋巴瘤31例,弥漫性大B细胞淋巴瘤16例),经复查诊断后,用RT-PCR和巢式PCR,检测肿瘤组织中API2-MALT1融合基因的表达,用半巢式PCR和特殊染色检查HP感染情况.根据淋巴瘤类型及融合基因检测结果将病例分组,观察各组病例HP感染的差异.结果 47例胃淋巴瘤中20例API2-MALT1融合基因mRNA检测阳性,包括16例MALT淋巴瘤和4例弥漫大B细胞淋巴瘤.HP感染检出率:API2-MALT1阳性组为25%(5/20),API2-MALT1阴性组25.92%(7/27).统计学分析表明两组间差异无显著性.2例API2-MALT1融合基因检测阴性的胃MALT淋巴瘤病例经抗HP治疗后病情稳定.结论胃MALT淋巴瘤和DLBCL中API2-MALT1 mRNA表达与胃淋巴瘤HP感染无明显相关,API2-MALT1融合基因可能成为胃MALT淋巴瘤抗HP治疗效果不良的预测因子.

  15. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: Updates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is highly prevalentin human, affecting nearly half of the world'spopulation; however, infection remains asymptomaticin majority of population. During its co-existence withhumans, H. pylori has evolved various strategies tomaintain a mild gastritis and limit the immune responseof host. On the other side, presence of H. pylori is alsoassociated with increased risk for the development ofvarious gastric pathologies including gastric cancer (GC).A complex combination of host genetics, environmentalagents, and bacterial virulence factors are consideredto determine the susceptibility as well as the severityof outcome in a subset of individuals. GC is one of themost common cancers and considered as the third mostcommon cause of cancer related death worldwide. Manystudies had proved H. pylori as an important risk factorin the development of non-cardia GC. Although both H.pylori infection and GC are showing decreasing trendsin the developed world, they still remain a major threatto human population in the developing countries. Thecurrent review attempts to highlight recent progress inthe field of research on H. pylori induced GC and aimsto provide brief insight into H. pylori pathogenesis,the role of major virulence factors of H. pylori thatmodulates the host environment and transform thenormal gastric epithelium to neoplastic one. This reviewalso emphasizes on the mechanistic understanding ofhow colonization and various virulence attributes of H.pylori as well as the host innate and adaptive immuneresponses modulate the diverse signaling pathways thatleads to different disease outcomes including GC.

  16. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in benign gastric ulcers in a cohort of Sri Lankan patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijetunge, S; Kotakadeniya, R; Noordeen, F; Buharideen, S M; Samarasinghe, B; Dharmapala, A; Galketiya, K B

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence is decreasing globally and prevalence of non H. pylori gastric ulcers is increasing. The following study was conducted to assess the prevalence of H. pylori in benign gastric ulcers in a sample of Sri Lankan patients. This was a cross-sectional study of 59 dyspeptic patients with benign gastric ulcers. Multiple endoscopic gastric biopsies were obtained and histology, immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction were performed for H. pylori detection. An immunochromatography assay was performed to detect blood anti H. pylori antibodies. Four (6.8%) were positive for H. pylori. Therefore, it is likely that most benign gastric ulcers are of non-H. pylori aetiology.

  17. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori-induced Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amieva, Manuel; Peek, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori and its role in causing gastric cancer is one of the richest examples of complex relationship among human cells, microbes, and their environment. It is also a puzzle of enormous medical importance given the incidence and lethality of gastric cancer worldwide. We review recent findings that have changed how we view these relationships and affected the direction of gastric cancer research. For example, recent data indicate that subtle mismatches between host and microbe genetic traits greatly affect risk of gastric cancer. The ability of H pylori and its oncoprotein CagA to reprogram epithelial cells and activate properties of stemness demonstrates the sophisticated relationship among H pylori and progenitor cells in the gastric mucosa. The observation that cell-associated H pylori can colonize the gastric glands and directly affect precursor and stem cells supports these observations. The ability to mimic these interactions in human gastric organoid cultures as well as animal models will allow investigators to more fully unravel the extent of H pylori control on the renewing gastric epithelium. Finally, our realization that external environmental factors, such as dietary components and essential micronutrients, as well as the gastrointestinal microbiota, can change the balance between H pylori’s activity as a commensal or a pathogen has provided direction to studies aimed at defining the full carcinogenic potential of this organism. PMID:26385073

  18. Characterization of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Patients with Gastric Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, infection due to Helicobacter Pylori is recognized as a medical problem worldwide. It causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, lymphatic proliferative disorders and it is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Objective: To characterize Helicobacter Pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcer and to relate this infection to gastric histological diagnoses. Methods: An observational, descriptive, correlational retrospective study in patients with gastric ulcers at the Dr.Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital was carried out from January 2005 to December 2007. Endoscopy and mucous gastric biopsy were performed for the histological and diagnostic study of the infection due to Helicobacter Pylori by means of the hematoxiline-eosine and giemsa stain respectively. The sample was composed by 137 patients. Results: the frequency of infection due to Helicobacter pylori was 59,1 % prevailing in the age groups 51-60 years old (34,6 % and 61-70 yearsold. (30,8 %. The highest frequency of malignant ulcers were located at the antral region (85,7 % with predominance of Helicobacter Pylori (80 %. There was a 95 % reliability between the relationship of Helicobacter Pylori and the histological diagnoses. The patients under the diagnosis of Helicobacter Pylori showed a greater probability to present cancer (OR 4,32 IC: 0,58-39,44 and worsened chronic gastritis (OR 2,59 IC: 0,61-11,30. Chronic gastritis did not constitute a risk factor for acute gastritis(OR 0,86 IC: 0,09-7,08. Conclusions: The probability of suffering from gastric cancer, chronic gastritis and worsened chronic gastritis was greater in all those patients who presented with Helicobacter pylori infection but in this study Helicobacter pylori did not constitute a risk factor for acute gastritis

  19. A novel chimeric flagellum fused with the multi-epitope vaccine CTB-UE prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer in a BALB/c mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Lv, Xiaobo; Yang, Jue; Liu, Wei; Yang, Huan; Xi, Tao; Xing, Yingying

    2015-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection causes peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The eradication of H. pylori might be an effective means of preventing gastric cancer. A dual-antigen epitope and dual-adjuvant vaccine called CTB-UE-CF (CCF) was constructed by combining a multi-epitope vaccine CTB-UE with a novel chimeric flagellum (CF) to simultaneously activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5-agonist activity and preserve the immunogenicity of H. pylori flagellum FlaA. The evaluation of efficacy to reduce H. pylori colonization was performed using BALB/c mice by oral immunization with a triple dose of this vaccine strain. Two weeks after the last immunization, mice were sacrificed to determine specific antibody levels and proinflammatory cytokine production. To determine the presence of H. pylori, we detected the number of H. pylori by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and measured the urease activity in the gastric tissue. The results showed that the immunogenicity and mucosal immune responses of CCF performed significantly better than those of CTB-UE. This dual-antigen epitope and dual-adjuvant system might greatly contribute to the development of a safe and efficient therapeutic vaccine for humans against H. pylori infection.

  20. Detection and location of Helicobacter pylori in human gastric carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Lian Tang; Run-Liang Gan; Bi-Hua Dong; Ri-Chen Jiang; Rong-Jun Tang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To define the infection status of Helicobacter pylori in 109 patients with gastric cancers and Hpylorilocalization in gastric carcinoma tissues in South China.METHODS: The incidence of Hpyloriinfection in gastric carcinomas was estimated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), simultaneously; both morphological features and the localization of H pylori in gastric carcinomas were demonstrated by Warthin-Starry (WS) staining. The relationships between Hpylori infection and the clinicalpathologic factors of gastric carcinomas were analyzed by software SPSS10.0.RESULTS: Hpyloriwas found in 42 (39.03%) and 58(53.21%) cases of 109 patients with gastric carcinomas by PCRand WS, respectively. H pyloriinfection rate detected in gastric carcinomas by WS was higher than that by PCR (x2 = 9.735,P<0.005<0.01). WS stain showed that H pylori existed in the gastric antrum mucus, mucosal gland of normal tissues adjacent to gastric carcinomas and the gland, mucus pool of cancer tissues. The positive rate of H pyloriin normal tissues adjacent to carcinomas was higher than that in cancer tissues (x2 = 15.750, P<0.005<0.01). No significant differences in age, sex, site,histological types and lymph node metastasis were found between H pylorFpositive gastric carcinomas and H pylorinegative cases by both methods, but there were statistically significant differences of H pylori positive rate between early and advanced stage of gastric carcinomas (x2=4.548or 5.922, P = 0.033 or 0.015<0.05).CONCLUSION: These results suggested that H pylori infection might play a certain role in the early stage of carcinogenesis of human gastric mucosa epithelia.

  1. [Esophageal adenoma-carcinoma and Barrett's esophagus. Gastric adenocarcinoma and Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu Garcia, Montserrat

    2008-10-01

    In the last two decades, the incidence of esophageal cancer has progressively increased, especially that of adenocarcinomas localized in the esophagogastric junction. The incidence of gastric cancer has decreased in the last few decades, although this decrease shows wide geographical variations. Thus, the prevalence of gastric cancer continues to be high in countries such as Chile, Colombia and Ireland and this disease remains the most frequent neoplasm in both sexes in China and Japan. In the meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association, notable among all the studies presented on the prevention and treatment of esophageal and gastric cancer were the following contributions: the use of clinical practice guidelines for the prevention and surveillance of Barrett's esophagus (BE) should be improved; treatment with proton pump inhibitors does not seem to reduce the risk of esophageal cancer; endoscopic therapy of intramucosal cancer through complete mucosal resection is effective; Helicobacter pylori eradication prevents the development of metachronous gastric cancer in patients treated for a first intramucosal adenocarcinoma through endoscopic resection; the risk of developing gastric cancer is 6 times higher in patients with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma than in the general population; and photodynamic therapy may be an alternative for the treatment of "invisible" gastric adenocarcinoma, which should be followed-up endoscopically.

  2. Alterations in gastric mucin synthesis by Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James C, Byrd; Robert S, Bresalier

    2000-01-01

    AIM To determine the role of Helicobacter pylori in altering gastric mucin synthesis and define how thprocess relates to H. pylori-related diseases.METHODS Analyses of human gastric tissues using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridizatiodocument the role of H. pylori in altering the composition and distribution of gastric mucins.RESULTS These data indicate a decrease in the product of the MUC5 (MUC5AC) gene and aberraexpression of MUC6 in the surface epithelium of H. pylori-infected patients. A normal pattern was restorby H. pylori eradication. Inhibition of mucin synthesis including MUC5AC and MUCl mucins by H. pvlohas been established in vitro using biochemical and Western blot analyses. This effect is not due to inhibitiof glycosylation, but results from inhibition of synthesis of mucin core structures. In vitro experiments usiinhibitors of mucin synthesis indicate that cell surface mucins decrease adhesion of H. pylori to gastepithelial cells.CONCLUSION Inhibition of mucin synthesis by H. pylori in vivo can disrupt the protective mucous layand facilitate bacterial adhesion, which may lead to increased inflammation in thc gastric epithelium.

  3. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load and cytoki...

  4. Expression, purification and immuno-characteristics of recombination UreB protein of H.pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Wu; Quan Ming Zou; Hong Guo; Xiao Peng Yuan; Wei Jun Zhang; Dong Shui Lu; Xu Hu Mao

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Helicobacter pylori (H . pylori) is associated with the development of chronic gastritis ,peptic ulcer and gastric cancer and gastric MALT lymphoma[1-9],H .pylori has many antigens ,including urease ,heat shock protein and vacuolating cytotoxin and so on ,and urease is an important factor in the colinization of the gastric mucosa and suspected to cause damage to the gastric mucosa[10-14].At the same time ,urdase is also one of the important protective antigens .

  5. Helicobacter pylori eradication as a preventive tool against gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Goto, Yasuyuki; Nishio, Kazuko; Tanaka, Daisuke; Kawai, Sayo; Sakakibara, Hisataka; Kondo, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which increases the risk of gastric diseases, including digestive ulcers and gastric cancer, is highly prevalent in Asian countries. There is no doubt that eradication of the bacterium is effective as a treatment of digestive ulcer, but eradication aiming to reduce the gastric cancer risk is still controversial. Observational studies in Japan demonstrated that the eradication decreased the gastric cancer risk among 132 stomach cancer patients undergoing endoscopical resection (65 treated with omeprazol and antibiotics and 67 untreated). In Columbia, 976 participants were randomized into eight groups in a three-treatment factorial design including H. pylori eradication, resulting in significant regression in the H. pylori eradication group. A recent randomized study in China also showed a significant reduction of gastric cancer risk among those without any gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. Efficacy of eradication may vary in extent among countries with different incidence rates of gastric cancer. Since the lifetime cumulative risk (0 to 84 years old) of gastric cancer in Japan is reported to be 12.7% for males and 4.8% for females (Inoue and Tominaga, 2003), the corresponding values for H. pylori infected Japanese can be estimated at 21.2% in males and 8.0% in females under the assumptions that the relative risk for infected relative to uninfected is 5 and the proportion of those infected is 0.5. Both the fact that not all individuals are infected among those exposed and the knowledge that only a small percentage of individuals infected with the bacterium develop gastric cancer, indicate the importance of gene-environment interactions. Studies on such interactions should provide useful information for anti-H. pylori preventive strategies.

  6. Analysis of Helicobacter pylori genotypes in clinical gastric wash samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Oikawa, Ritsuko; Ono, Shoko; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Kudo, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Kato, Mototsugu; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a key factor in the development of gastric cancer; indeed, clearance of H. pylori helps prevent gastric cancer. However, the relationship between gastric cancer and the abundance and diversity of H. pylori genotypes in the stomach remains unknown. Here, we present, for the first time, a quantitative analysis of H. pylori genotypes in gastric washes. A method was first developed to assess diversity and abundance by pyrosequencing and analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), a gene associated with clarithromycin resistance. This method was then validated using arbitrarily mixed plasmids carrying 23S rRNA with single nucleotide polymorphisms. Multiple strains were detected in many of 34 clinical samples, with frequency 24.3 ± 24.2 and 26.3 ± 33.8 % for the A2143G and A2144G strains, respectively. Importantly, results obtained from gastric washes were similar to those obtained from biopsy samples. The method provides opportunities to investigate drug resistance in H. pylori and assess potential biomarkers of gastric cancer risk, and should thus be validated in large-scale clinical trials.

  7. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on Bax protein expression in patients with gastric precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Feng Liu; Wei-Wen Liu; Guo-An Wang; Xiao-Chun Teng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection on Bax protein expression, and explore the role of H pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS: H pylori was assessed by rapid urease test and Warthin-Starry method, and expression of Bax protein was examined immunohistochemically in 72 patients with pre-malignant lesions.RESULTS: Bax protein was differently expressed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric dysplasia, and showed 63.99% positivity. The positivity of Bax protein expression in H pylori-positive gastric precancerous lesions (72.3%) was significantly higher than that in H pylori-negative gastric precancerous lesions (48.0%, χ2 = 4.191, P<0.05).H pylori infection was well correlated with the expression of Bax protein in gastric precancerous lesions (r = 0.978,P<0.01). After eradication of H pylori, the positivity of Bax protein expression significantly decreased in H pylori-positive gastric precancerous lesions (χ2= 5.506,P<0.05). In the persisting H pylori-infected patients,the positivity of Bax protein expression was not changed.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection may be involved in the upregulation of Bax gene, which might be one of the mechanisms of H pylori infection-induced gastric epithelial cell apoptosis. H pylori might act as a tumor promoter in the genesis of gastric carcinoma and eradication of H pylori could inhibit gastric carcinogenesis.

  8. Helicobacter pylori and gastric acid: an intimate and reciprocal relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldum, Helge L.; Kleveland, Per M.; Sørdal, Øystein F.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is the main cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. There are still unanswered questions related to the interaction between Hp and man, like what determines the susceptibility for the initial infection and the mechanisms for the carcinogenic effect. The initial infection seems to require a temporal gastric hypoacidity. For Hp to survive in the gastric mucous layer, some acidity is necessary. Hp itself is probably not directly carcinogenic. Only when inducing oxyntic mucosal inflammation and atrophy with hypoacidity, Hp predisposes for gastric cancer. Gastrin most likely plays a central role in the Hp pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer.

  9. Helicobacter pylori update: gastric cancer, reliable therapy, and possible benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to the development of diverse gastric and extragastric diseases. The infection is necessary but not sufficient for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its eradication would eliminate a major worldwide cause of cancer death, therefore there is much interest in identifying how, if, and when this can be accomplished. There are several mechanisms by which H pylori contributes to the development of gastric cancer. Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of many cancers associated with inflammation, which is induced by H pylori infection, yet the bacteria also cause genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells. H pylori eradication reduces both. However, many factors must be considered in determining whether treating this bacterial infection will prevent cancer or only reduce its risk-these must be considered in designing reliable and effective eradication therapies. Furthermore, H pylori infection has been proposed to provide some benefits, such as reducing the risks of obesity or childhood asthma. When tested, these hypotheses have not been confirmed and are therefore most likely false. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Helicobacter pylori : Epidemiology, Premalignant Gastric Lesions, and Associations with Non-gastric Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. den Hollander (Wouter)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis focuses on the current epidemiology of H. pylori in a multi-ethnic Western city (Rotterdam, the Netherlands). It further examines the associations of H. pylori with non-gastric disease, like asthmatic conditions, pregnancy complications and obesity. The studies include a

  11. Helicobacter pylori : Epidemiology, Premalignant Gastric Lesions, and Associations with Non-gastric Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. den Hollander (Wouter)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis focuses on the current epidemiology of H. pylori in a multi-ethnic Western city (Rotterdam, the Netherlands). It further examines the associations of H. pylori with non-gastric disease, like asthmatic conditions, pregnancy complications and obesity. The studies include a

  12. Relatedness of Helicobacter pylori populations to gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Jiang Dong; Shu-Hui Zhan; Li-Li Wang; Yong-Ning Xin; Man Jiang; Shi-Ying Xuan

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects half of the human population.The infection is associated with chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa and peptic ulcers.It is also a major risk factor for gastric cancer.Phylogenetic analysis of global strains reveals there are seven populations of H.pylori,including hpAfrica1,hpAfrica2,hpEastAsia,hpEurope,hpNEAfrica,hpAsia2 and hpSahul.These populations are consistent with their geographical origins,and possibly result from geographical separation of the bacterium leading to reduced bacterial recombination in some populations.For each population,H.pylori has evolved to possess genomic contents distinguishable from others.The hpEurope population is distinct in that it has the largest genome of 1.65 mbp on average,and the highest number of coding sequences.This confers its competitive advantage over other populations but at the cost of a lower infection rate.The large genomic size could be a cause of the frequent occurrence of the deletion of the cag pathogenicity island in H.pylori strains from hpEurope.The incidence of gastric cancer varies among different geographical regions.This can be attributed in part to different rates of infection of H.pylori.Recent studies found that different populations of H.pylori vary in their carcinogenic potential and contribute to the variation in incidence of gastric cancer among geographical regions.This could be related to the ancestral origin of H.pylori.Further studies are indicated to investigate the bacterial factors contributing to differential virulence and their influence on the dinical features in infected individuals.

  13. A Possible Link between Gastric Mucosal Atrophy and Gastric Cancer after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of H. pylori eradication in gastric cancer prevention can be attributed to the improvement of atrophic gastritis, which is a known risk of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer has also been diagnosed after long-term H. pylori eradication. This study aimed to clarify the association between gastric atrophy and gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication, including its clinicopathological features. Methods A total of 55 consecutive patients with 64 early gastric cancers (EGCs) diagnosed after H. pylori eradication were enrolled. The degree of endoscopic atrophy and the histological degrees of mononuclear cell infiltration, atrophy, and metaplasia in the corpus and adjacent mucosa of the EGCs were determined and scored. Results The majority of EGCs (63/64) were located within the endoscopically assessed atrophic mucosa or along the atrophic border. The adjacent mucosa of the EGCs presented significantly higher degrees of all histological parameters than in the corpus (mononuclear cell infiltration, 0.86+/-0.09 vs. 0.51+/-0.11, P = 0.016; atrophy, 1.77+/-0.13 vs. 0.65+/-0.14, Pgastric ulcers. Conclusions Severe gastric atrophy remained in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs after H. pylori eradication, which may be linked to gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27706195

  14. H pylori status and angiogenesis factors in human gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anita Mangia; Alfredo Di Leo; Stefania Tommasi; Pasquale Berloco; Jian Ming Xu; Angelo Paradiso; Annalisa Chiriatti; Girolamo Ranieri; Ines Abbate; Maria Coviello; Giovanni Simone; Francesco Alfredo Zito; Severino Montemurro; Antonello Rucci

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate H pylori expression in gastric cancer patients in relation to primary tumor angiogenic markers, such as microvessel density (MVD), thymidine phosphorylase (TP), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGF-R1), p53 and circulating VEGF levels.METHODS: Angiogenic markers were analyzed immunohistochemically in 56 primary gastric cancers. H pylori cytotoxin (vacA) and the cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA) amplification were evaluated using PCR assay. Serum H pylori IgG antibodies and serum/plasma circulating VEGF levels were detected in 39 and 38 patients by ELI SA, respectively.RESULTS: A total of 69% of patients were positive for circulating IgG antibodies against H pylori. cagA-positive H pylori strains were found in 41% of gastric patients. vacA was found in 50% of patients; s1 strains were more highly expressed among vacA-positive patients. The presence of the s1 strain was significantly associated with cagA (P = 0.0001). MVD was significantly correlated with both tumor VEGF expression (r = 0.361, P = 0.009) and serum VEGF levels (r = -0.347, P = 0.041).Conversely, neither VEGF-R1 expression nor MVD was related to p53 expression. However, H pylori was not related to any angiogenic markers except for the plasma VEGF level (P = 0.026).CONCLUSION: H pylori antigen is related to higher plasma VEGF levels, but not to angiogenic character istics. It can be hypothesized that the toxic effects of H pylori on angiogenesis occurs in early preclinical disease phase or in long-lasting aggressive infections, but only when high H pylori IgG levels are persistent.

  15. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  16. Helicobacter pylori and oral pathology: Relationship with the gastric infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Isabel; Muiño, Andrea; Aguas, Silvia; Harada, Laura; Diaz, Mariana; Lence, Adriana; Labbrozzi, Mario; Muiño, Juan Manuel; Elsner, Boris; Avagnina, Alejandra; Denninghoff, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the oral cavity and stomach, and its infection is one of the most frequent worldwide. We reviewed the literature and conducted a Topic Highlight, which identified studies reporting an association between H. pylori-infection in the oral cavity and H. pylori-positive stomach bacterium. This work was designed to determine whether H. pylori is the etiologic agent in periodontal disease, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), squamous cell carcinoma, burning and halitosis. Record selection focused on the highest quality studies and meta-analyses. We selected 48 articles reporting on the association between saliva and plaque and H. pylori-infection. In order to assess periodontal disease data, we included 12 clinical trials and 1 meta-analysis. We evaluated 13 published articles that addressed the potential association with RAS, and 6 with squamous cell carcinoma. Fourteen publications focused on our questions on burning and halitosis. There is a close relation between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and the stomach. The mouth is the first extra-gastric reservoir. Regarding the role of H. pylori in the etiology of squamous cell carcinoma, no evidence is still available. PMID:25110422

  17. Helicobacter pylori and oral pathology: relationship with the gastric infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Isabel; Muiño, Andrea; Aguas, Silvia; Harada, Laura; Diaz, Mariana; Lence, Adriana; Labbrozzi, Mario; Muiño, Juan Manuel; Elsner, Boris; Avagnina, Alejandra; Denninghoff, Valeria

    2014-08-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the oral cavity and stomach, and its infection is one of the most frequent worldwide. We reviewed the literature and conducted a Topic Highlight, which identified studies reporting an association between H. pylori-infection in the oral cavity and H. pylori-positive stomach bacterium. This work was designed to determine whether H. pylori is the etiologic agent in periodontal disease, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), squamous cell carcinoma, burning and halitosis. Record selection focused on the highest quality studies and meta-analyses. We selected 48 articles reporting on the association between saliva and plaque and H. pylori-infection. In order to assess periodontal disease data, we included 12 clinical trials and 1 meta-analysis. We evaluated 13 published articles that addressed the potential association with RAS, and 6 with squamous cell carcinoma. Fourteen publications focused on our questions on burning and halitosis. There is a close relation between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and the stomach. The mouth is the first extra-gastric reservoir. Regarding the role of H. pylori in the etiology of squamous cell carcinoma, no evidence is still available.

  18. Cloning and Expression of Helicobacter pylori HpaA Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Moein Farshchian; Saman Hoseinkhani; Javad Atoofi; Shahin Najar Peerayeh

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinomaand gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Antibiotictherapies do not protect from potential re-infection and have a risk for development of drugresistance. Therefore, prophylactic vaccine mediated protection against H. pylori is an attractiveclinical interest. H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA) is a conserved surface lipoprotein and playsimportant roles in the pathogenesis of...

  19. Effect of Helicobacter pylori on gastric epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Shatha; Lina, Taslima T; Gonzalez, Jazmin; Pinchuk, Irina V; Beswick, Ellen J; Reyes, Victor E

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium has cells with features that make them a powerful line of defense in innate mucosal immunity. Features that allow gastrointestinal epithelial cells to contribute in innate defense include cell barrier integrity, cell turnover, autophagy, and innate immune responses. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a spiral shape gram negative bacterium that selectively colonizes the gastric epithelium of more than half of the world’s population. The infection invariably becomes persistent due to highly specialized mechanisms that facilitate H. pylori’s avoidance of this initial line of host defense as well as adaptive immune mechanisms. The host response is thus unsuccessful in clearing the infection and as a result becomes established as a persistent infection promoting chronic inflammation. In some individuals the associated inflammation contributes to ulcerogenesis or neoplasia. H. pylori has an array of different strategies to interact intimately with epithelial cells and manipulate their cellular processes and functions. Among the multiple aspects that H. pylori affects in gastric epithelial cells are their distribution of epithelial junctions, DNA damage, apoptosis, proliferation, stimulation of cytokine production, and cell transformation. Some of these processes are initiated as a result of the activation of signaling mechanisms activated on binding of H. pylori to cell surface receptors or via soluble virulence factors that gain access to the epithelium. The multiple responses by the epithelium to the infection contribute to pathogenesis associated with H. pylori. PMID:25278677

  20. Autoantibodies to gastric mucosa in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, R; Savio, A; Appelmelk, B J

    1997-07-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori is recognized as the main cause of chronic gastritis and its associated diseases, very little is known about the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to intestinal metaplasia and atrophic gastritis. We reviewed the data regarding the possible pathogenetic role played by the anti-H. pylori immune responses in the genesis of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Although only type A (corpus-restricted atrophic gastritis), often associated to pernicious anemia, is considered autoimmune in nature, abundant evidence supports the presence of cellular and humoral autoimmune responses also in patients with H. pylori infection. In a mechanism known as antigenic mimicry, highly conserved immunogenic molecules expressed by infectious pathogens may act as a trigger for the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses that cross-react with host cellular antigens. Numerous studies support the view that H. pylori is very effective in inducing antigenic mimicry, and antibodies against H. pylori have been found to cross-react with both antral mucosal cells (the membrane of the secretory canalicular structures of the parietal cells) and gastrin-producing cells. Such autoantibodies were detected both in human infections and in experimental work in rodents. The detection of antibodies that cross-react with H. pylori and various components of the gastric mucosa provides strong support to the view that immune responses against H. pylori not only participate in the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to atrophy in the progressive atrophic gastritis associated with Helicobacter infection but also in the corpus-restricted autoimmune gastritis.

  1. Anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy significantly reduces Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric mucosal damage in Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Chao Chang; Sheng-Hsuan Chen; Gi-Shih Lien; Yuarn-Jang Lee; Horng-Yuan Lou; Ching-Ruey Hsieh; Chia-Lang Fang; Shiann Pan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of 4 d' anti-Helicobacter pyloritherapy on the H pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils based on physiological and pathological changes.METHODS: We used 6-wk-old male gerbils orally inoculated with H pylori (ATCC43504, 2x108 CFU/mL).Seven weeks after H pylori inoculation, the animals of study group received 4 d' anti-H pylori triple therapy (H pylorieradicated group). Seven days later, all animals of the H pylori-eradicated and control groups (H pylori-infected& H pylori-uninfected groups) were sacrificed. We examined gastric mucosal lesions macroscopically, studied gastritis microscopically and determined the stomach weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin (PG) E2 level.RESULTS: The results showed that both macroscopic and histological gastric damages were significantly less in H pylori-eradicated group than H pylori-infected group.Stomach weight ratio, MPO activity and PGE2 levels were significantly higher in H pylori-infected group than those in the other two groups.CONCLUSION: Four days' anti-H pylori therapy was effective in the improvement of H pylori-induced gastric lesions in Mongolian gerbils.

  2. Human Gastric Mucosal Hydrophobicity Does dot Decrease with Helicobacter Pylori Infection or Chronological Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S Al-Marhoon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Infection with cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe gastric diseases. Previous studies in humans have reported a decreased gastric hydrophobicity with H pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to differentiate between the effect of cagA+ and cagA- strains on gastric mucus hydrophobicity.

  3. Helicobacter pylori-induced modulation of the promoter methylation of Wnt antagonist genes in gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyo-Joon; Kim, Sang Gyun; Lim, Joo Hyun; Choi, Ji Min; Kim, Woo Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2017-06-22

    This study aimed to investigate the changes in the promoter methylation and gene expression of multiple Wnt antagonists between the chronic infection and eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in gastric carcinogenesis. The levels of methylation and corresponding mRNA expression of seven Wnt antagonist genes (SFRP1, -2, -5, DKK1, -2, -3, WIF1) were compared among the patients with H. pylori-positive gastric cancers (GCs), and H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative controls, by quantitative MethyLight assay and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. The changes of the methylation and expression levels of the genes were also compared between the H. pylori eradication and H. pylori-persistent groups 1 year after endoscopic resection of GCs. The methylation levels of SFRP and DKK family genes were significantly increased in the patients with H. pylori-positive GCs and followed by H. pylori-positive controls compared with H. pylori-negative controls (P pylori-negative controls, H. pylori-positive controls, and to H. pylori-positive GCs (P pylori eradication (P pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. The epigenetic field may not be reversed even after H. pylori eradication except by DKK3 methylation.

  4. Relationship of Halitosis with Gastric Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz HajiFattahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori may be one of the main causes of halitosis. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship of Heli- cobacter pylori infection with halitosis.Materials and Methods: This case control study was performed on 44 dyspeptic patients with a mean age of 34.29±13.71 years (range 17 to 76 years. The case group included 22 patients with halitosis and no signs of diabetes mellitus, renal or liver failure, upper respiratory tract infection, malignancies, deep carious teeth, severe  periodontitis,  coated  tongue,  dry  mouth  or poor  oral  hygiene.  Control group included 22 patients without halitosis and the same age, sex, systemic and oral conditions as the case group. Halitosis was evaluated using organoleptic test (OLT and Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated by Rapid Urease Test (RUT during endoscopy. The data were statistically analyzed using chi square, Mann Whitney and t-tests.Results: Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 20 (91% out of 22 halitosis patients, and 7 control subjects (32% (P<0.001.Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori gastric infection can be a cause of bad breath. Dentists should pay more attention to this infection and refer these patients to in- ternists to prevent further gastrointestinal (GI complications and probable malig- nancies.

  5. ИММУНОГИСТОХИМИЧЕСКИЕ ПРЕДПОСЫЛКИ ПРОГРЕССИРОВАНИЯ ХРОНИЧЕСКОГО H. PYLORI-АССОЦИИРОВАННОГО ГАСТРИТА В MALT-ЛИМФОМУ ЖЕЛУДКА

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    КОРОЛЕВА И.А.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify new mechanisms of MALT-lymphoma of the stomach in patients with chronic H. pylori-associated gastritis. The article shows that the lowest level of the expression of Ki-67 and the molecule Bcl-2 is observed in lymphoid follicles of gastric mucosa in patients with chronic non-atrophic H. pylori-associated gastritis. Expression of Ki-67 and Bcl-2 has consistently increased in patients with chronic atrophic H. pylori-associated gastritis, reaching maximum values in patients with MALT-lymphoma of the stomach, which allows us to consider this as an option in the tumor progression of H. pylori-associated gastritis. The data obtained are able to improve the forecasting of H. pylori-associated gastritis.

  6. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in advanced gastric carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irami Araújo-Filho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUD: There is substantial evidence that infection with Helicobacter pylori plays a role in the development of gastric cancer and that it is rarely found in gastric biopsy of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. On advanced gastric tumors, the bacteria can be lost from the stomach. AIMS: To analyze the hypothesis that the prevalence of H.pylori in operated advanced gastric carcinomas and adjacent non-tumor tissues is high, comparing intestinal and diffuse tumors according to Lauren's classification METHODS: A prospective controlled study enrolled 56 patients from "Hospital Universitário", Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil, with advanced gastric cancer, treated from February 2000 to March 2003. Immediately after partial gastrectomy, the resected stomach was opened and several mucosal biopsy samples were taken from the gastric tumor and from the adjacent mucosa within 4 cm distance from the tumor margin. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Lauren's classification for gastric cancer was used, to analyse the prevalence of H. pylori in intestinal or diffuse carcinomas assessed by the urease rapid test, IgG by ELISA and Giemsa staining. H. pylori infected patients were treated with omeprazole, clarithromycin and amoxicillin for 7 days. Follow-up endoscopy and serology were performed 6 months after treatment to determine successful eradication of H. pylori in non-tumor tissue. Thereafter, follow-up endoscopies were scheduled annually. Chi-square and MacNemar tests with 0.05 significance were used. RESULTS: Thirty-four tumors (60.7% were intestinal-type and 22 (39.3% diffuse type carcinomas. In adjacent non-tumor gastric mucosa, chronic gastritis were found in 53 cases (94.6% and atrophic mucosa in 36 patients (64.3%. All the patients with atrophic mucosa were H. pylori positive. When examined by Giemsa and urease test, H. pylori positive rate in tumor tissue of intestinal type carcinomas was

  7. Serum Helicobacter pylori NapA antibody as a potential biomarker for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Huimin; Zhang, Tingting; Ren, Xiyun; Nadolny, Christina; Dong, Xiaoqun; Huang, Lina; Yuan, Kexin; Tian, Wenjing; Jia, Yunhe

    2014-02-20

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is strongly associated with gastric cancer. However, only a minority of infected individuals ever develop gastric cancer. This risk stratification may be in part due to differences among strains. The relationship between neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) and gastric cancer is unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of NapA as a biomarker in gastric cancer. We used enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the status of H. pylori infection. Indirect ELISA method was used for detection of NapA antibody titer in the serum of H. pylori infected individuals. Unconditional logistic regressions were adopted to analyze the variables and determine the association of NapA and gastric cancer. The results of study indicated serum H. pylori NapA antibody level were associated with a reduced risk for development of gastric cancer. It may be used in conjugation with other indicators for gastric cancer detection.

  8. Gastric cancer development after the successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaname Uno; Katsunori Iijima; Tooru Shimosegawa

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer(GC) develops as a result of inflammationassociated carcinogenesis due to Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infection and subsequent defects in genetic/epigenetic events. Although the indication for eradication therapy has become widespread, clinical studies have revealed its limited effects in decreasing the incidence of GC. Moreover, research on biopsy specimens obtained by conventional endoscopy has demonstrated the feasibility of the restoration of some genetic/epigenetic alterations in the gastric mucosa. Practically, the number of sporadic cases of primary/metachronous GC that emerge after successful eradication has increased, while on-going guidelines recommend eradication therapy for patients with chronic gastritis and those with background mucosa after endoscopic resection for GC. Accordingly, regular surveillance of numerous individuals who have received eradication therapy is recommended despite the lack of biomarkers. Recently, the focus has been on functional reversibility after successful eradication as another cue to elucidate the mechanisms of restoration as well as those of carcinogenesis in the gastric mucosa after H. pylori eradication. We demonstrated that Congo-red chromoendoscopy enabled the identification of the multifocal distribution of functionally irreversible mucosa compared with that of restored mucosa after successful eradication in individuals at extremely high risk for GC. Further research that uses functional imaging may provide new insights into the mechanisms of regeneration and carcinogenesis in the gastric mucosa post-eradication and may allow for the development of useful biomarkers.

  9. Gastric cancer development after the successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-15

    Gastric cancer (GC) develops as a result of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis due to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and subsequent defects in genetic/epigenetic events. Although the indication for eradication therapy has become widespread, clinical studies have revealed its limited effects in decreasing the incidence of GC. Moreover, research on biopsy specimens obtained by conventional endoscopy has demonstrated the feasibility of the restoration of some genetic/epigenetic alterations in the gastric mucosa. Practically, the number of sporadic cases of primary/metachronous GC that emerge after successful eradication has increased, while on-going guidelines recommend eradication therapy for patients with chronic gastritis and those with background mucosa after endoscopic resection for GC. Accordingly, regular surveillance of numerous individuals who have received eradication therapy is recommended despite the lack of biomarkers. Recently, the focus has been on functional reversibility after successful eradication as another cue to elucidate the mechanisms of restoration as well as those of carcinogenesis in the gastric mucosa after H. pylori eradication. We demonstrated that Congo-red chromoendoscopy enabled the identification of the multi-focal distribution of functionally irreversible mucosa compared with that of restored mucosa after successful eradication in individuals at extremely high risk for GC. Further research that uses functional imaging may provide new insights into the mechanisms of regeneration and carcinogenesis in the gastric mucosa post-eradication and may allow for the development of useful biomarkers.

  10. Study of regulatory T-cells in patients with gastric malt lymphoma: influence on treatment response and outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar García

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg play an essential role in modulating host responses to tumors and infections. The role of these cells in the pathogenesis of MALT lymphomas remains unknown. The aims of the study were to quantify the number of infiltrating FOXP3+ and CD3+ cells in patients with gastric MALT lymphoma at diagnosis and to study kinetics of these cells and CD20+ tumor cells after treatment and during long-term follow-up. METHODS: FOXP3+, CD3+ and CD20+ cells were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and the number of cells was quantified using a micrometric ocular. Samples of 35 patients with gastric MALT lymphoma at diagnosis and after treatment were included. Diagnostic samples were compared to 19 cases of chronic gastritis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL of the stomach. RESULTS: The median number of FOXP3+ infiltrating cells was higher (27 cells/cm(2 in gastric MALT patients than in DLBCL (10 cells; p = 0.162 but similar to chronic gastritis (20 cells; p = 0.605. No characteristic or specific distribution pattern of infiltrating FOXP3+ cells was found. Gastric MALT lymphoma patients responding to bacterial eradication therapy had higher number of FOXP3+ cells at study entry. Kinetics of both infiltrating FOXP3+ cells and tumor CD20+ cells were strongly dependent on the treatment administered. DISCUSSION: Gastric MALT lymphomas have a number of Treg cells more similar to chronic gastritis than to DLBCL. Patients with higher number of tumor infiltrating FOXP3+ cells at study entry seem to have better response to antibiotics. Kinetics of Treg and tumor cells are influenced by type of treatment.

  11. Loss of FHIT expression in gastric mucosa of patients with family histories of gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krystyna Stec-Michalska; Slawomir Antoszczyk; Grazyna Klupinska; Barbara Nawrot

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To answer the question whether FHIT gene expression is affected by the family history of gastric carcinoma and the presence of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) in the gastric mucosa of patients with dyspepsia.METHODS: FHIT gene expression in two different topographic sites of the gastric mucosa of twenty-one patients with dyspepsia and with or without familial gastric carcinoma, infected or not infected with H pylori, was evaluated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and IMAGE QUANT methods. A rapid urease test and histopathological examination were used to determine H pylori colonization.RESULTS: In the gastric mucosa of patients with family histories of gastric carcinoma, the amount of FHIT protein mRNA was reduced down to 32%, and for patients with H pylori colonization, to 24% in comparison to controls with dyspepsia and without cancer in the family. FHIT expression was independent of the topography of specimens (corpus vsantrum), and for the control patients it was less sensitive to infection with H pylori. A considerable statistical difference in FHIT levels was observed in the gastric mucosa from the corpus of patients with family histories of gastric carcinoma in respect to H pylori colonization (P = 0.06). Macroscopic evaluation of the gastric mucosa demonstrated that pathologic changes classified according to the Sydney system had no significant influence on FHIT expression within each tested group of patients.CONCLUSION: Loss of FHIT expression was observed in patients with dyspepsia and family histories of gastric carcinoma, especially those infected with H pylori. Such results may constitute an early indication of the development of gastric carcinoma, which is associated with family factors including heredity and H pylori infection. The loss of the FHIT gene may serve as a marker for early diagnosis and prevention of gastric carcinoma, especially in context of early monitoring of H pylori infection in individuals with a record of familial stomach

  12. Effect of Rebamipide, a Novel Antiulcer Agent, on Helicobacter pylori Adhesion to Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shunji; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Isogai, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko; Aihara, Miki; Kikuchi, Mikio; Asaka, Masahiro; Yokota, Kenji; Oguma, Keiji; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Hirai, Yoshikazu

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major etiological agent in gastroduodenal disorders. The adhesion of H. pylori to human gastric epithelial cells is the initial step of H. pylori infection. Inhibition of H. pylori adhesion is thus a therapeutic target in the prevention of H. pylori infection. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of rebamipide, a novel antiulcer agent, on H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells, derived from human gastric carcinomas, were used as target cells. Ten H. pylori strains isolated from patients with chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer were used in the study. We evaluated the effect of rebamipide on H. pylori adhesion to MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells quantitatively using our previously established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The adhesion of H. pylori to MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of these cells with 100 μg of rebamipide per ml. However, the adhesion was not affected by the pretreatment of H. pylori with rebamipide. On the other hand, the viabilities of H. pylori, MKN-28 cells, and MKN-45 cells were not affected by rebamipide. Our studies suggest that rebamipide inhibits the adhesion of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. PMID:9687380

  13. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文新

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and gastric carcinogenesis,and to investigate its mechanism.Methods Totally 333elderly patients with different degrees of gastric mucosal lesions in our hospital were selected.Patients were

  14. The role of gastric mucins in interactions with Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Radziejewska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the stomach of over 50�0of the world’s population. The pathogen is responsible for many diseases including gastritis, ulcers and also gastric cancers. It is said that adherence of bacteria to epithelial cells plays a key role in infection development. Two gastric mucins, components of mucus, are assumed to have an important role in protection against adhesion and in this way in progression of infection. These are a secretory MUC5AC mucin, produced by mucous epithelial cells, and a membrane-bound MUC1 mucin, expressed by epical surfaces of epithelial cells. Interactions with bacteria occur between carbohydrate antigens of mucins and specific adhesins of the Helicobacter pylori surface. In this paper we present the latest knowledge about these intriguing interactions of both mucins and their interplay with the pathogen providing protection against infection.

  15. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: advances and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wenbo; Bai, Bing; Sheng, Liang; Li, Yan; Yue, Ping; Li, Xun; Qiao, Liang

    2015-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers of digestive system globally and Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is believed to be a major risk factor. HP can be classified into different types based on the presence and expression level of CagA and VacA, and, when exposed to adverse environment, HP changes its phenotype from helical type to coccoid type, with each having different pathogenicity. The mechanisms of HP-induced gastric carcinogenesis and progression are complicated, including DNA nitration and oxidation induced by mutagenic factors, HP-induced epigenetic modifications, HP-induced disruption of the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis, and HP-induced cancer cell invasion and metastasis. HP may also affect the biological function of cancer stem cells and induction of cell autophagy. The lipopolysaccharide produced by HP can act through toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) to induce gastric mucosal inflammation and is thereby linked to the development of gastric cancer.

  16. MicroRNAs 142-3p, miR-155 and miR-203 Are Deregulated in Gastric MALT Lymphomas Compared to Chronic Gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Concepción; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Ferraro, Mariana; Seoane, Agustín; Sánchez-González, Blanca; Pairet, Silvia; Pons, Aina; Barranco, Luis; Vela, María Carmen; Gimeno, Eva; Colomo, Lluís; Besses, Carles; Navarro, Alfons; Salar, Antonio

    2017-01-02

    Over the last years, our knowledge on pathogenesis of gastric MALT lymphoma has greatly improved, but its morphological diagnosis is still hampered by overlapping histological features with advanced chronic gastritis. MicroRNAs are deregulated in lymphomas, but their role and usefulness in gastric MALT lymphoma has not been extensively investigated. We analyzed the expression of 384 miRNAs using TaqMan microRNA assay in a training series of 10 gastric MALT lymphomas, 3 chronic gastritis and 2 reactive lymph nodes. Then, significantly deregulated miRNAs were individually assessed by real-time PCR in a validation series of 16 gastric MALT lymphomas and 12 chronic gastritis. Gastric MALT lymphoma is characterized by a specific miRNA expression profile. Among the differentially expressed miRNAs, a significant overexpression of miR-142-3p and miR-155 and down-regulation of miR-203 was observed in gastric MALT lymphoma when compared to chronic gastritis. miR-142-3p, miR-155 and miR-203 expression levels might be helpful biomarkers for the differential diagnosis between gastric MALT lymphomas and chronic gastritis. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. H pylori and gastric cancer: Shifting the global burden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Prinz; Susanne Schwendy; Petra Voland

    2006-01-01

    Infection with H pylori leads to a persistent chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa, thereby increasing the risk of distal gastric adenocarcinoma. Numerous studies have determined a clear correlation between H pylori infection and the risk of gastric cancer; however, general eradication is not recommended as cancer prophylaxis and time points for treatment remain controversial in different areas of the world. Prevalence rates in Western countries are decreasing, especially in younger people (< 10%); and a decline in distal gastric adenocarcinoma has been observed. Risk groups in Western countries still show considerably higher risk of developing cancer, especially in patients infected with cagA+ strains and in persons harboring genetic polymorphism of the IL-1B promoter (-511T/T) and the corresponding IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN*2). Thus, general eradication of all infected persons in Western countries not recommended and is limited to risk groups in order to achieve a risk reduction. In contrast, infection rates and cancer prevalence are still high in East Asian countries. A prevention strategy to treat infected persons may avoid the development of gastric cancer to a large extent and with enormous clinical importance. However, studies in China and Japan indicate that prevention of gastric cancer is effective only in those patients that do not display severe histological changes such as atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Thus, prophylactic strategies to prevent gastric cancer in high risk populations such as China should therefore especially aim at individuals now at younger age when the histological alterations caused by the bacterial infection was still reversible. In countries with a low prevalence of gastric cancer, risk groups carrying cagA+ strains and IL-1 genetic polymorphisms should be identified and treated.

  18. Serum Helicobacter pylori NapA antibody as a potential biomarker for gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jingjing Liu; Huimin Liu; Tingting Zhang; Xiyun Ren; Christina Nadolny; Xiaoqun Dong; Lina Huang; Kexin Yuan; Wenjing Tian; Yunhe Jia

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is strongly associated with gastric cancer. However, only a minority of infected individuals ever develop gastric cancer. This risk stratification may be in part due to differences among strains. The relationship between neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) and gastric cancer is unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of NapA as a biomarker in gastric cancer. We used enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the...

  19. DNA transfer in the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Esther; Backert, Steffen

    2014-04-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is one of the most genetically diverse bacteria. Recombination and DNA transfer contribute to its genetic variability and enhance host adaptation. Among the strategies described to increase genetic diversity in bacteria, DNA transfer by conjugation is one of the best characterized. Using this mechanism, a fragment of DNA from a donor cell can be transferred to a recipient, always mediated by a conjugative nucleoprotein complex, which is evolutionarily related to type IV secretion systems (T4SSs). Interestingly, the H. pylori chromosomes can encode up to four T4SSs, including the cagPAI, comB, tfs3, and tfs4 genes, some of which are known to promote chronic H. pylori infection. The T4SS encoded by the cagPAI mediates the injection of the effector protein CagA and proinflammatory signaling, and the comB system is involved in DNA uptake from the environment. However, the role of tfs3 and tfs4 is not yet clear. The presence of a functional XerD tyrosine recombinase and 5'AAAGAATG-3' border sequences as well as two putative conjugative relaxases (Rlx1 and Rlx2), a coupling protein (TraG), and a chromosomal region carrying a putative origin of transfer (oriT) suggest the existence of a DNA transfer apparatus in tfs4. Moreover, a conjugation-like DNA transfer mechanism in H. pylori has already been described in vitro, but whether this occurs in vivo is still unknown. Some extrachromosomal plasmids and phages are also present in various H. pylori strains. Genetic exchange among plasmids and chromosomes, and involved DNA mobilization events, could explain part of H. pylori's genetic diversity. Here, we review our knowledge about the possible DNA transfer mechanisms in H. pylori and its implications in bacterial adaptation to the host environment.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection affects mitochondrial function and DNA repair, thus, mediating genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Madsen, Claus Desler; Bøggild, Cecilie Sisse Line

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for the development of atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms explaining the effects of H. pylori infection are not fully elucidated. H. pylori infection is known to induce genetic instability in both nuclear...

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection affects mitochondrial function and DNA repair, thus, mediating genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Madsen, Claus Desler; Bøggild, Cecilie Sisse Line

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for the development of atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms explaining the effects of H. pylori infection are not fully elucidated. H. pylori infection is known to induce genetic instability in both nuclear and...

  2. Alterations in Gastric Microbiota After H. Pylori Eradication and in Different Histological Stages of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tung Hiu; Qin, Youwen; Sham, Pak Chung; Lau, K.S.; Chu, Kent-Man; Leung, Wai K.

    2017-01-01

    The role of bacteria other than Helicobacter pylori (HP) in the stomach remains elusive. We characterized the gastric microbiota in individuals with different histological stages of gastric carcinogenesis and after receiving HP eradication therapy. Endoscopic gastric biopsies were obtained from subjects with HP gastritis, gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM), gastric cancer (GC) and HP negative controls. Gastric microbiota was characterized by Illumina MiSeq platform targeting the 16 S rDNA. Apart from dominant H. pylori, we observed other Proteobacteria including Haemophilus, Serratia, Neisseria and Stenotrophomonas as the major components of the human gastric microbiota. Although samples were largely converged according to the relative abundance of HP, a clear separation of GC and other samples was recovered. Whilst there was a strong inverse association between HP relative abundance and bacterial diversity, this association was weak in GC samples which tended to have lower bacterial diversity compared with other samples with similar HP levels. Eradication of HP resulted in an increase in bacterial diversity and restoration of the relative abundance of other bacteria to levels similar to individuals without HP. In conclusion, HP colonization results in alterations of gastric microbiota and reduction in bacterial diversity, which could be restored by antibiotic treatment. PMID:28322295

  3. Clinical relevance of Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rui M; Machado, José C; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major etiological factor of gastric carcinoma. This disease is the result of a long, multistep, and multifactorial process, which occurs only in a small proportion of patients infected with H. pylori. Gastric carcinoma development is influenced by host genetic susceptibility factors, environmental factors, and H. pylori virulence. H. pylori is genetically highly variable, and variability that affects H. pylori virulence factors may be useful to identify strains with different degrees of pathogenicity. This review will focus on VacA and CagA that have polymorphic regions that impact their functional properties. The characterization of H. pylori vacA and cagA-associated could be useful for identifying patients at highest risk of disease, who could be offered H. pylori eradication therapy and who could be included in programs of more intensive surveillance in an attempt to reduce gastric carcinoma incidence.

  4. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load...... and cytokines which may improve knowledge concerning the outcome of gastric diseases caused by H. pylori. Antral biopsies from 42 dyspeptic patients including 27 H. pylori-positive and 15 H. pylori-negative patients were tested for apoptotic activity by the TUNEL assay, and immuno-histochemically for p53...... and the proliferative marker Ki-67. H. pylori infection, bacteria load and inflammatory activity were associated with increased cell turnover as judged by enhanced activities of TUNEL, p53 and Ki-67. Only p53 was significantly correlated to IFN-gamma, IL-8 and IL-10. The H. pylori-positive state was furthermore...

  5. Gastric Carcinogenesis and Underlying Molecular Mechanisms: Helicobacter pylori and Novel Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Nishizawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen-derived free radicals that are released from activated neutrophils are one of the cytotoxic factors of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric mucosal injury. Increased cytidine deaminase activity in H. pylori-infected gastric tissues promotes the accumulation of various mutations and might promote gastric carcinogenesis. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA is delivered into gastric epithelial cells via bacterial type IV secretion system, and it causes inflammation and activation of oncogenic pathways. H. pylori infection induces epigenetic transformations, such as aberrant promoter methylation in tumor-suppressor genes. Aberrant expression of microRNAs is also reportedly linked to gastric tumorogenesis. Moreover, recent advances in molecular targeting therapies provided a new interesting weapon to treat advanced gastric cancer through anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2 therapies. This updated review article highlights possible mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis including H. pylori-associated factors.

  6. Gastric carcinoid in a patient infected with Helicobacter pylori : A new entity?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pantelis Antonodimitrakis; Apostolos Tsolakis; Staffan Welin; Gordana Kozlovacki; Kjell (O)berg; Dan Granberg

    2011-01-01

    There are four types of gastric carcinoid tumors, classified according to their histology and malignant potential. Only a few cases of carcinoid tumors in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) have been reported so far. We report a patient infected with H. pylori presenting with a small solitary gastric carcinoid tumor with very low proliferative rate and normal gastrin levels. The tumor was endoscopically removed and the patient received an eradication therapy against H. pylori . No signs of metastatic disease have been found so far during more than 3 year of follow-up. Infection with H. pylori may cause chronic gastritis with normal or elevated gastrin levels, leading to the development of gastric carcinoids by mechanisms unrelated to gastrin. Enterochromaffin-like cell tumors related to a chronic H. pylori infection may be considered as a distinct type of gastric carcinoid tumors.

  7. Helicobacter pylori HP0231 Influences Bacterial Virulence and Is Essential for Gastric Colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhong

    Full Text Available The Dsb protein family is responsible for introducing disulfide bonds into nascent proteins in prokaryotes, stabilizing the structure of many proteins. Helicobacter pylori HP0231 is a Dsb-like protein, shown to catalyze disulfide bond formation and to participate in redox homeostasis. Notably, many H. pylori virulence factors are stabilized by the formation of disulfide bonds. By employing H. pylori HP0231 deficient strains we analyzed the effect of lack of this bacterial protein on the functionality of virulence factors containing putative disulfide bonds. The lack of H. pylori HP0231 impaired CagA translocation into gastric epithelial cells and reduced VacA-induced cellular vacuolation. Moreover, H. pylori HP0231 deficient bacteria were not able to colonize the gastric mucosa of mice, probably due to compromised motility. Together, our data demonstrate an essential function for H. pylori HP0231 in gastric colonization and proper function of bacterial virulence factors related to gastric pathology.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of screening and treating Helicobacter pylori for gastric cancer prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); L. Sharp

    2013-01-01

    textabstractGastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. A meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials concluded that Helicobacter pylori eradication reduces gastric cancer incidence by 35%. Current consensus is that H. pylori screening and treatment is cost-

  9. Helicobacter pylori Eradication and Gastric Cancer: When Is the Horse Out of the Barn?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. de Vries; E.J. Kuipers; E.A.J. Rauws

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Therefore, H. pylori eradication may be an important approach in the prevention of gastric cancer. However, long-term data proving the efficacy of this approach are lacking. This report describes two patients who de

  10. Effects of EGFR Inhibitor on Helicobacter pylori Induced Gastric Epithelial Pathology in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Robinson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori transactivates the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR and predisposes to gastric cancer development in humans and animal models. To examine the importance of EGFR signalling to gastric pathology, this study investigated whether treatment of Mongolian gerbils with a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, EKB-569, altered gastric pathology in chronic H. pylori infection. Gerbils were infected with H. pylori and six weeks later received either EKB-569-supplemented, or control diet, for 32 weeks prior to sacrifice. EKB-569-treated H. pylori-infected gerbils had no difference in H. pylori colonisation or inflammation scores compared to infected animals on control diet, but showed significantly less corpus atrophy, mucous metaplasia and submucosal glandular herniations along with markedly reduced antral and corpus epithelial proliferation to apoptosis ratios. EKB-569-treated infected gerbils had significantly decreased abundance of Cox-2, Adam17 and Egfr gastric transcripts relative to infected animals on control diet. EGFR inhibition by EKB-569 therefore reduced the severity of pre-neoplastic gastric pathology in chronically H. pylori-infected gerbils. EKB-569 increased gastric epithelial apoptosis in H. pylori-infected gerbils which counteracted some of the consequences of increased gastric epithelial cell proliferation. Similar chemopreventative strategies may be useful in humans who are at high risk of developing H.pylori-induced gastric adenocarcinoma.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of screening and treating Helicobacter pylori for gastric cancer prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); L. Sharp

    2013-01-01

    textabstractGastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. A meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials concluded that Helicobacter pylori eradication reduces gastric cancer incidence by 35%. Current consensus is that H. pylori screening and treatment is

  12. Genome Sequence of a Helicobacter pylori Strain Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Intestinal Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Olguín-Ruiz, Gabriela Edith; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos Javier; Torres-López, Roberto Carlos; Avilés-Jiménez, Francisco; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains are the major risk factor for gastric cancer. Strains vary in their content of disease-associated genes, so genome-wide analysis of cancer-isolated strains will help elucidate their pathogenesis and genetic diversity. We present the draft genome sequence of H. pylori isolated from a Mexican patient with intestinal gastric cancer. PMID:24459275

  13. Protease activity of the API2-MALT1 fusion oncoprotein in MALT lymphoma development and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebeck, Shaun; Lucas, Peter C; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M

    2011-05-01

    Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a prototypical cancer that occurs in the setting of chronic inflammation and an important model for understanding how deregulated NF-κB transcriptional activity contributes to malignancy. Most gastric MALT lymphomas require ongoing antigenic stimulation for continued tumor growth, and Stage I disease is usually cured by eradicating the causative microorganism, Helicobacter pylori, with antibiotics. However, in a subset of MALT lymphomas, chromosomal translocations are acquired that render the lymphoma antigen-independent. The recurrent translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21) is associated with failure to respond to antibiotic therapy and increased rate of dissemination. This translocation creates the API2-MALT1 fusion oncoprotein, which comprises the amino terminus of inhibitor of apoptosis 2 (API2 or cIAP2) fused to the carboxy terminus of MALT1. A common characteristic of chromosomal translocations in MALT lymphoma, including t(11;18), is that genes involved in the regulation of the NF-κB transcription factor are targeted by the translocations, and these genetic perturbations thereby result in deregulated, constitutive NF-κB stimulation. In the last decade, great insights into the roles of API2 and MALT1 in NF-κB signaling have been made. For example, recent pivotal studies have uncovered the long sought-after proteolytic activity of MALT1 and have demonstrated its critical involvement in the survival of certain lymphomas. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of MALT1 in normal lymphocyte function and lymphomagenesis. We then highlight our recent work that has revealed an intriguing link between the proteolytic activity of the API2-MALT1 fusion and its ability to influence lymphomagenesis by cleaving a key NF-κB regulatory protein, NF-κB-inducing kinase.

  14. Gastric juice for the diagnosis of H pylori infection in patients on proton pump inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javed Yakoob; Shahid Rasool; Zaigham Abbas; Wasim Jafri; Shahab Abid; Muhammad Islam; Zubair Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To determine the efficacy of gastric juice polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Hpylon infection in comparison with histology and gastric antral biopsy PCR in patients on a proton pump inhibitor(PPI).METHODS:Eighty-five consecutive patients with dyspeptic symptoms were enrolled.Gastric biopsies for histology,PCR and gastric juice were collected at endoscopy for PCR of the H pylori urease C gene (ure C).Sensitivity,specificity,positive predictive value (PPV),negative predictive value (NPV),accuracy,positive and negative likelihood ratio for PCR of gastric juice for the H pylori ure C gene was compared to histology and gastric antral biopsy H pylori ure C PCR in patients with and without PPI.RESULTS:Gastric juice PCR was positive in 66 (78%)patients.Histology showed H pylori associated gastritis in 57 (67%).Gastric biopsy PCR was positive in 72 (85%).In patients not taking PPI,the sensitivity,specificity,PPV,NPV,accuracy and positive and negative likelihood ratio for gastric juice PCR were 89%,72%,91%,67%,90%,85%,3.1 and 0.1 respectively.In patients on PPI these values were 86%,100%%,100%,29%,86%,9.5 and 1.4,respectively.CONCLUSION:Gastric juice PCR for the diagnosis of H pylori infection has increased sensitivity compared to histology with PPI.The use of gastric juice PCR is recommended to confirm H pylori status in patients taking PPIs.

  15. A comparison of Helicobacter pylori and non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter spp. Binding to canine gastric mucosa with defined gastric glycophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Irina; Freitas, Daniela P; Magalhães, Ana; Faria, Fátima; Lopes, Célia; Faustino, Augusto M; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2014-08-01

    The gastric mucosa of dogs is often colonized by non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH), while H. pylori is the predominant gastric Helicobacter species in humans. The colonization of the human gastric mucosa by H. pylori is highly dependent on the recognition of host glycan receptors. Our goal was to define the canine gastric mucosa glycophenotype and to evaluate the capacity of different gastric Helicobacter species to adhere to the canine gastric mucosa. The glycosylation profile in body and antral compartments of the canine gastric mucosa, with focus on the expression of histo-blood group antigens was evaluated. The in vitro binding capacity of FITC-labeled H. pylori and NHPH to the canine gastric mucosa was assessed in cases representative of the canine glycosylation pattern. The canine gastric mucosa lacks expression of type 1 Lewis antigens and presents a broad expression of type 2 structures and A antigen, both in the surface and glandular epithelium. Regarding the canine antral mucosa, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion score whereas in the body region the SabA-positive H. pylori strain was the strain that adhered more. The canine gastric mucosa showed a glycosylation profile different from the human gastric mucosa suggesting that alternative glycan receptors may be involved in Helicobacter spp. binding. Helicobacter pylori and NHPH strains differ in their ability to adhere to canine gastric mucosa. Among the NHPH, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion capacity in agreement with its reported colonization of the canine stomach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and mice gastric mucosa colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori drug-resistant strains and non-compliance to therapy are the major causes of H. pylori eradication failure. For some bacterial species it has been demonstrated that fatty acids have a growth inhibitory effect. Our main aim was to assess the ability of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA to inhibit H. pylori growth both in vitro and in a mouse model. The effectiveness of standard therapy (ST in combination with DHA on H. pylori eradication and recurrence prevention success was also investigated. The effects of DHA on H. pylori growth were analyzed in an in vitro dose-response study and n in vivo model. We analized the ability of H. pylori to colonize mice gastric mucosa following DHA, ST or a combination of both treatments. Our data demonstrate that DHA decreases H. pylori growth in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DHA inhibits H. pylori gastric colonization in vivo as well as decreases mouse gastric mucosa inflammation. Addition of DHA to ST was also associated with lower H. pylori infection recurrence in the mouse model. In conclusion, DHA is an inhibitor of H. pylori growth and its ability to colonize mouse stomach. DHA treatment is also associated with a lower recurrence of H. pylori infection in combination with ST. These observations pave the way to consider DHA as an adjunct agent in H. pylori eradication treatment.

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection inhibits phagocyte clearance of apoptotic gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimczok, Diane; Smythies, Lesley E; Waites, Ken B; Grams, Jayleen M; Stahl, Richard D; Mannon, Peter J; Peter, Shajan; Wilcox, C Mel; Harris, Paul R; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B; Smith, Phillip D

    2013-06-15

    Increased apoptotic death of gastric epithelial cells is a hallmark of Helicobacter pylori infection, and altered epithelial cell turnover is an important contributor to gastric carcinogenesis. To address the fate of apoptotic gastric epithelial cells and their role in H. pylori mucosal disease, we investigated phagocyte clearance of apoptotic gastric epithelial cells in H. pylori infection. Human gastric mononuclear phagocytes were analyzed for their ability to take up apoptotic epithelial cells (AECs) in vivo using immunofluorescence analysis. We then used primary human gastric epithelial cells induced to undergo apoptosis by exposure to live H. pylori to study apoptotic cell uptake by autologous monocyte-derived macrophages. We show that HLA-DR(+) mononuclear phagocytes in human gastric mucosa contain cytokeratin-positive and TUNEL-positive AEC material, indicating that gastric phagocytes are involved in AEC clearance. We further show that H. pylori both increased apoptosis in primary gastric epithelial cells and decreased phagocytosis of the AECs by autologous monocyte-derived macrophages. Reduced macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells was mediated in part by H. pylori-induced macrophage TNF-α, which was expressed at higher levels in H. pylori-infected, compared with uninfected, gastric mucosa. Importantly, we show that H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa contained significantly higher numbers of AECs and higher levels of nonphagocytosed TUNEL-positive apoptotic material, consistent with a defect in apoptotic cell clearance. Thus, as shown in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, insufficient phagocyte clearance may contribute to the chronic and self-perpetuating inflammation in human H. pylori infection.

  18. Distribution of H.pylori antigens in gastric mucosa and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆新良; 钱可大; 唐训球; 朱永良

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of H. pylori antigens in the gastric mucosa in patients with H. pylori infection, and the relationship between the distribution and gastric cancer. Methods: Of 112 patients confirmed by pathological study to have chronic superficial gastritis, precancerous changes (chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia or atypical hyperplasia) and gastric cancer, 28 were H. pylori negative and 84 were H. pylori positive. H. pylori antigens in the gastric mucosa were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: The H. pylori positive group, comprised 12 of 22 (50.0%) in the chronic superficial gastritis group, 22 of 25 (88.0%) in the precancerous changes group and 13 of 35 (37.1%) in the gastric cancer group. The positive rates of H. pylori antigens in the cytoplasm progressively increased, respectively at 0.0% (0/12),63.6% (14/22) and 84.6% (11/13) for the same groups (χ2=19.76, P=0.000); H.pylori antigens were located in the mucus layer and above the neck of the mucosal gland in 9 of 12 (75.0%) cases with chronic superficial gastritis, at the neck of the mucosal gland and the isthmus in 12 of 22 (54.5%) cases with precancerous changes, below the isthmus in 9 of 13 (69.2%) cases with gastric cancer (x2=25.30, P=0.000). In the H. pylori negative group, no H.pylori antigen was observed. Conclusion: With the progression of chronic superficial gastritis→precancerous changes→gastric cancer, H. pylori antigens progressively migrated from the outer part to the inner part of the cell, and from the superficial to the deep gastric mucosa.

  19. Etude des interactions entre Helicobacter pylori et les cellules épithéliales gastriques

    OpenAIRE

    Mustapha, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori causes inflammation that can persist asymptomatically or evolve into more severe pathologies such as gastric or peptic ulcers, MALT lymphoma and gastric cancer. The cag pathogenicity island is one of the major virulence factors of this bacterium. Several cytokines and antimicrobial peptides are involved in modulating the inflammatory response of the gastric epithelial mucosa during infection with H. pylori. This work has focused on the study of the interacti...

  20. Apoptosis, proliferation and p53 gene expression of H. pylori associated gastric epithelial lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Zhang1; Yuan Yuan; Hua Gao; Ming Dong; Lan Wang; Yue-Hua Gong

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) and gastric carcinoma and its possible pathogenesis by H. Pylori. METHODS: DNEL technique and immunohistochemical technique were used to study the state of apoptosis,proliferation and p53 gene expression. A total of 100 gastric mucosal biopsy specimens, including 20 normal mucosa, 30H. Pylori-negative and 30 H. Pylorf-positive gastric precancerous lesions along with 20 gastric carcinomas were studied. RESULTS: There were several apoptotic cells in the superficial epithelium and a few proliferative cells within the neck of gastric glands, and no p53 protein expression in normal mucosa. In gastric carcinoma, there were few apoptotic cells, while there were a large number of proliferative cells, and expression of p53 protein significantly was increased. In the phase of metaplasia, the apoptotic index (Al, 4.36% ± 1.95%), proliferative index (PI, 19.11% ± 6.79%) and positivity of p53 expression (46.7%) in H. Pylori-positive group were higher than those in normal mucosa (P< 0.01). Al in H. Pylori-positive group was higher than that in H. Pylori-negative group (3.81% ±1.76%), PI in H. Pylori-positive group was higher than that in H. Pylori-negative group (12.25% ±5.63%, P<0.01 ). In the phase of dysplasia, Al (2.31% ± 1.10%) in H. Pylori-positive group was lower (3.05% ± 1.29%) than that in H. Pylori-negative group, but PI (33.89% ± 11.65%)wassignificantly higher(22.09± 8018%, P< 0.01). In phases of metaplasia, dysplasia and gastric cancer in the H. Pylori-positive group, Als had an evidently graduall decreasing trend (P < 0.01 ), while Pis had an evidently gradual increasing trend (P< 0.05 or P< 0.01), and there was also a trend of gradual increase in the expression of p53 gene. CONCLUSION: In the course of the formation of gastric carcinoma, proliferation of gastric mucosa can be greatly increased by H. Pylori, and H. Pylori can induce apoptosis in the phase of metaplasia but in the phase of

  1. Expression of differential nitric oxide synthase isoforms in human gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屠振兴; 龚燕芳; 丁华; 许国铭; 李兆申; 满晓华

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression in human gastric mucosa and Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection. Methods: Gastric mucosa samples were obtained from antrum of 33 patients received gastroendoscopy. H.pylori infection was confirmed by Giems staining and bacteria culture under microaerophilic conditions. Expression of iNOS, eNOS and nitrotyrosine were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: (1) The positive rate of H. pylori infection was 66.7%(22/33). (2) iNOS positive staining in inflammatory cells was detected in 77.3%(17/22) of samples with H.pylori and 27.3%(3/11) without H.pylori infection (P0.05). (5) Moderate and severe infiltrations of inflammatory cells were found in 86.4%(19/22) of gastric biopsies with H. pylori and 9.1%(1/11) of samples without H. pylori infection (P<0.01). Conclusion: H.pylori infection might promote infiltration of mononuclear cells and macrophages in gastric mucosa and induce iNOS expression in these cells. The accumulated nitric oxide in local area may result in gastric mucosa damage.

  2. Helicobacter pylori detection in gastric biopsies, saliva and dental plaque of Brazilian dyspeptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Trevizani Rasmussen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is an important human pathogen that causes chronic gastritis and is associated with the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies. The oral cavity has been implicated as a potential H. pylori reservoir and may therefore be involved in the reinfection of the stomach, which can sometimes occur following treatment of an H. pylori infection. The objectives of this paper were (i to determine the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity and (ii to examine the relationship between oral H. pylori and subsequent gastritis. Gastric biopsies, saliva samples and dental plaques were obtained from 78 dyspeptic adults. DNA was extracted and evaluated for the presence of H. pylori using polymerase chain reaction and Southern blotting methods. Persons with gastritis were frequently positive for H. pylori in their stomachs (p < 0.0001 and there was a statistically significant correlation between the presence of H. pylori in gastric biopsies and the oral cavity (p < 0.0001. Our results suggest a relationship between gastric infection and the presence of this bacterium in the oral cavity. Despite this, H. pylori were present in the oral cavity with variable distribution between saliva and dental plaques, suggesting the existence of a reservoir for the species and a potential association with gastric reinfection.

  3. Rare Gastric Lesions Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Histopathological Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Mee

    2017-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. However, some rare gastric lesions exhibiting distinctive histological features may also be associated with H. pylori infection, including lymphocytic gastritis, granulomatous gastritis, Russell body gastritis, or crystal-storing histiocytosis. Although diverse factors can contribute to their development, there is convincing evidence that H. pylori infection may play a pathogenic role. These findings are mainly based on studies in patients with these lesions who exhibited clinical and histological improvements after H. pylori eradication therapy. Thus, H. pylori eradication therapy might be indicated in patients with no other underlying disease, particularly in countries with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. This review describes the characteristic histological features of these rare lesions and evaluates the evidence regarding a causative role for H. pylori infection in their pathogenesis.

  4. Helicobacter pylori and its reservoirs: A correlation with the gastric infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Spencer Luiz Marques Pay?o; Lucas Trevizani Rasmussen

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) has long been found to cause gastric diseases such as gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. The transmission medium of this bacterium has yet to be determined, though several studies have speculated that the oral cavity is a reservoir for H. pylori. Others have also reported that the oral cavity may be a source of both transmission and gastric reinfection; however, such results are controversial. We reviewed the literature and selected studies that report an association among H. pylori detections in the oral cavity(dental plaque, saliva, tongue, tonsil tissue, root canals, oral mucosa) in humans and in animals, as well as in the human stomach. The oral cavity may be considered the main reservoir for H. pylori. There are a correlations between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and periodontal disease, oral tissue inflammation, H. pylori transmission, and gastric reinfection. We believe that the mouth is a reservoir and that it plays a crucial role in both H. pylori transmission and gastric infection.

  5. Helicobacter pylori and its reservoirs: A correlation with the gastric infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payão, Spencer Luiz Marques; Rasmussen, Lucas Trevizani

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has long been found to cause gastric diseases such as gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. The transmission medium of this bacterium has yet to be determined, though several studies have speculated that the oral cavity is a reservoir for H. pylori. Others have also reported that the oral cavity may be a source of both transmission and gastric reinfection; however, such results are controversial. We reviewed the literature and selected studies that report an association among H. pylori detections in the oral cavity (dental plaque, saliva, tongue, tonsil tissue, root canals, oral mucosa) in humans and in animals, as well as in the human stomach. The oral cavity may be considered the main reservoir for H. pylori. There are a correlations between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and periodontal disease, oral tissue inflammation, H. pylori transmission, and gastric reinfection. We believe that the mouth is a reservoir and that it plays a crucial role in both H. pylori transmission and gastric infection.

  6. Helicobacter pylori induces cell migration and invasion through casein kinase 2 in gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeo Song; Lee, Do Yeon; Yu, Da Yeon; Kim, Shin; Lee, Yong Chan

    2014-12-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is causally linked with gastric carcinogenesis. Virulent H. pylori strains deliver bacterial CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Induction of high motility and an elongated phenotype is considered to be CagA-dependent process. Casein kinase 2 plays a critical role in carcinogenesis through signaling pathways related to the epithelial mesenchymal transition. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of H. pylori infection on the casein kinase 2-mediated migration and invasion in gastric epithelial cells. AGS or MKN28 cells as human gastric epithelial cells and H. pylori strains Hp60190 (ATCC 49503, CagA(+)) and Hp8822 (CagA(-)) were used. Cells were infected with H. pylori at multiplicity of infection of 100 : 1 for various times. We measured in vitro kinase assay to examine casein kinase 2 activity and performed immunofluorescent staining to observe E-cadherin complex. We also examined β-catenin transactivation through promoter assay and MMP7 expression by real-time PCR and ELISA. H. pylori upregulates casein kinase 2 activity and inhibition of casein kinase 2 in H. pylori-infected cells profoundly suppressed cell invasiveness and motility. We confirmed that casein kinase 2 mediates membranous α-catenin depletion through dissociation of the α-/β-catenin complex in H. pylori-infected cells. We also found that H. pylori induces β-catenin nuclear translocation and increases MMP7 expressions mediated through casein kinase 2. We show for the first time that CagA(+) H. pylori upregulates cellular invasiveness and motility through casein kinase 2. The demonstration of a mechanistic interplay between H. pylori and casein kinase 2 provides important insights into the role of CagA(+) H. pylori in the gastric cancer invasion and metastasis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cancer stem cells in Helicobacter pylori infection and aging: Implications for gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edi; Levi; Paula; Sochacki; Nabiha; Khoury; Bhaumik; B; Patel; Adhip; PN; Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrated the combined effects of aging and carcinogen treatment on cancer stem/stem-like cells(CSCs) of gastric mucosa in an animal model. METHODS: In this study we investigated the effects of aging and Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) inflammation as a model for inflammation induced carcinogenesis in human and rat gastric mucosa samples. In aging studies, we compared 4-mo old(young) with 22 mo(aged) old Fischer-344 rats. For human studies, gastric biop-sies and resection specimens representing normal mucosa or different stages of H. pylori gastritis and gastric adenocarcinomas were used for determining the expression of stem cell markers CD166, ALDH1 and LGR5. In addition we performed immunofluorescent double labeling for B-catenin and Lgr5 in both rat and human gastric tissues to examine the status of Wnt signaling in these cells. RESULTS: CSC markers ALDH1, LGR5, and CD166 were expressed in very low levels in normal human gastric mucosa or young rat gastric mucosa. In contrast, level of expression for all three markers significantly increased in H. pylori gastritis and gastric adenocarcinomas as well as in normal gastric mucosa in aged rats. We also observed cytoplasmic B-catenin staining in both aged rat and human H. pylori inflamed gastric mucosa, which were found to be colocalized with Lgr5 immunoreactive cells. The increased number of ALDH1, CD166 and LGR5 positive cells in H. pylori gastritis indicates that increased number of stem-like cells in gastric mucosa is an early event, and may constitute an important step in the progression to neoplasia. CONCLUSION: Our observation of the age-related increase in cancer stem/stem-like cells in the gastric mucosa may explain the increased incidence of gastric cancer during aging. Combination of aging and H. pylori infection may have additive effects in progression to neoplasia.

  8. ABH and Lewis antigen distributions in blood, saliva and gastric mucosa and H pylori infection in gastric ulcer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luisa Caricio Martins; Juciclayton Tavares de Souza; Tereza Cristina de Oliveira Corvelo; Henrique Takeshi Oti; Rosane do Socorro Pompeu Loiola; Délia Cristina Figueira Aguiar; Katarine Ant(o)nia dos Santos Barile; Renata Kelly Costa do Amaral; Hivana Patricia Melo Barbosa; Amanda Alves Fecury

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ABH and Lewis antigen expression in erythrocytes, saliva and gastric epithelium, as well as the association between H pylori and the presence of gastric epithelial lesions.METHODS: The distribution of ABH and Lewis blood group antigens in erythrocytes, saliva and gastric mucosa of H pylori-infected gastric ulcer patients was analyzed. Forty-two patients with gastric ulcer were studied,and fifty healthy individuals were used as control group.The blood group antigens were determined by direct hemagglutination, dot-ELISA and immunohistochemicai methods in erythrocytes, saliva and gastric mucosa specimens, respectively. Diagnosis for H pylori infection was performed by conventional optical microscopy and ELISA.RESULTS: A higher seroprevalence of IgG H pylori specific antibodies was observed in gastric ulcer patients (90%) compared to the control group (60%). We observed a significant increase of phenotypes O, A2 and Lewis b in H pylori-infected patients. The expression of these antigens had progressive alterations in areas of ulcerous lesions and intestinal metaplasia.CONCLUSION: ABH and Lewis blood group antigens are a good indicator for cellular alterations in the gastric epithelium.

  9. Analyzing the influence of gastric intestinal metaplasia on gastric ulcer healing in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients without atrophic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Wei; Chang, Liang-Che; Hua, Chung-Ching; Hsieh, Bor-Jen; Chen, Shuo-Wei; Chien, Rong-Nan

    2017-01-03

    Gastric epithelial hyper-proliferation was reported in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected gastric mucosa with intestinal metaplasia (IM) changes. In patients with gastric ulcer (GU) and IM, the GU may have a different healing rate in comparison to patients without IM. This study aimed to compare the difference in GU healing between H. pylori-infected patients with IM and those without IM. We retrospectively analyzed patients at the Keelung Chung Gung Memorial Hospital during the period from March 2005 to January 2011. The inclusion criteria were: 1) endoscopic findings of GU and biopsy histological examination plus rapid urease test indicating H. pylori infection; 2) gastric IM adjacent to a GU but with no atrophic gastritis changes; 3) patients receiving H. pylori eradication triple therapy and 8 weeks of maintenance therapy with a proton pump inhibitor; and 4) patients receiving follow-up endoscopy within the 3(rd) and the 4(th) months after treatment. In total, 327 patients with GU and H. pylori infection (136 with IM and 191 without IM) were included. Patients with IM had a higher GU healing rate than those without IM (91.9% vs. 84.3%, P = 0.040). Multivariate logistical regression analysis revealed that failure of H. pylori eradication (Odds = 4.013, 95% CI: 1.840-8.951, P gastric IM (Odds = 0.369, 95% CI: 0.168-0.812, P = 0.013) were the predictors of non-healing GU following treatment. Patient with gastric IM change may have a higher GU healing rate than those without gastric IM. However, successful H. pylori eradication is a more important factor for GU healing than gastric IM.

  10. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  11. Surface Antigen Profiling of Helicobacter pylori-Infected and -Uninfected Gastric Cancer Cells Using Antibody Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukri, Asif; Hanafiah, Alfizah; Kosai, Nik Ritza; Mohamed Taher, Mustafa; Mohamed Rose, Isa

    2016-10-01

    Comprehensive immunophenotyping cluster of differentiation (CD) antigens in gastric adenocarcinoma, specifically between Helicobacter pylori-infected and -uninfected gastric cancer patients by using DotScan(™) antibody microarray has not been conducted. Current immunophenotyping techniques include flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry are limited to the use of few antibodies for parallel examination. We used DotScan(™) antibody microarray consisting 144 CD antibodies to determine the distribution of CD antigens in gastric adenocarcinoma cells and to elucidate the effect of H. pylori infection toward CD antigen expression in gastric cancer. Mixed leukocytes population derived from gastric adenocarcinoma patients were immunophenotyped using DotScan(™) antibody microarray. AGS cells were infected with H. pylori strains and cells were captured on DotScan(™) slides. Cluster of differentiation antigens involved in perpetuating the tolerance of immune cells to tumor cells was upregulated in gastric adenocarcinoma cells compared to normal cells. CD279 which is essential in T cells apoptosis was found to be upregulated in normal cells. Remarkably, H. pylori-infected gastric cancer patients exhibited upregulated expression of CD27 that important in maintenance of T cells. Infection of cagA+ H. pylori with AGS cells increased CD antigens expression which involved in cancer stem cell while cagA- H. pylori polarized AGS cells to express immune-regulatory CD antigens. Increased CD antigens expression in AGS cells infected with cagA+ H. pylori were also detected in H. pylori-infected gastric cancer patients. This study suggests the tolerance of immune system toward tumor cells in gastric cancer and distinct mechanisms of immune responses exploited by different H. pylori strains. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Helicobacter pylori Strain 29CaP Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucito-Varela, Eduardo; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Cevallos, Miguel A.; Lozano, Luis; Merino, Enrique; López-Leal, Gamaliel

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a risk factor for the development of gastric cancer and other gastroduodenal diseases. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. pylori strain 29CaP, isolated from a Mexican patient with gastric cancer. The genomic data analysis revealed a cag-negative H. pylori strain that contains a prophage sequence. PMID:26769924

  13. Endoscopic staging of low-grade gastric malt lymphoma Estadificación por ecoendoscopia en el linfoma gástrico tipo malt de bajo grado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Varas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS has already proven useful in the assessment of submucosal lesions, and the staging of gastrointestinal cancer, particularly gastric MALT-type lymphoma. The goal of this paper was EUS staging. Patients and method: 24 patients (10 females, 14 males with a median age of 56 years and possibly gastric MALT lymphoma (25 cases were studied using videoendoscopy, biopsies, and echoendoscopy with 7.5- and 20-MHz radial EUS, and also with 12- and 20-MHz miniprobes (MPs. Nineteen patients were definitely evaluated (7 females, 12 males as having 20 MALT-type lymphomas, as five patients were post-hoc disregarded when an invasive, high-grade gastric lymphoma (3c or plasmocytoma (2c was subsequently demonstrated. Of these 19 patients, all had T1 lesions except for two with T2 lesions; one patient had a gastroduodenal T1 lymphoma. Echographic findings with MPs were compared to EUS (gold standard and histology both before and after eradication. Then, patients were followed up every 1-3-6 months using videoendoscopy and MPs. Results: echoendoscopy correctly identified T stages in 90% of cases. MPs identified T stages in 88% of cases, and N stages in 33% of cases, with results being slightly inferior to those obtained with conventional EUS (91 vs. 45%; they were consequently used for follow-up. After eradication, all but two patients are in complete remission and have been followed every 1-3-6 months using MPs without echographic abnormalities, except for a patient who relapsed.Introducción: la ultrasonografía endoscópica (USE ha demostrado ya su utilidad en la evaluación de las lesiones submucosas, en la estadificación del cáncer digestivo en general, y del linfoma gástrico tipo MALT en particular. El objetivo de este trabajo fue la estadificación por USE. Pacientes y método: veinticuatro enfermos (10 mujeres y 14 varones con edad media de 56 años y con posible linfoma gástrico tipo MALT (25 casos fueron

  14. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: a state of the art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Sauid; Nunn, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. It is now well- established that Helicobacter pylori infection predispose individuals toward gastric adenocarcinoma later in life. It has since been classified as a class I carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Research suggests that the oncogenic effects of Helicobacter pylori can occur through a variety of mechanisms, including the indirect inflammatory effects of Helicobacter pylori on the gastric mucosa and the direct epigenetic effects of Helicobacter pylori on individual cells. Whilst infected with Helicobacter pylori, a combination of environmental and host-dependent factors determines the likelihood of developing gastric cancer. Controversy remains regarding the effects of eradication of Helicobacter pylori on the prevention of further progression of gastric lesions and the possibility for regression of atrophic gastritis. The aim of this review is to synthesis different elements that contribute to the step-wise progression of normal gastric mucosa to gastric adenocarcinoma. This review helps clinicians to better identify those infected individuals who are at high risk of developing gastric cancer and implement the necessary investigations and treatment.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first...

  16. Human gastric mucins differently regulate Helicobacter pylori proliferation, gene expression and interactions with host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C Skoog

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the mucus niche of the gastric mucosa and is a risk factor for gastritis, ulcers and cancer. The main components of the mucus layer are heavily glycosylated mucins, to which H. pylori can adhere. Mucin glycosylation differs between individuals and changes during disease. Here we have examined the H. pylori response to purified mucins from a range of tumor and normal human gastric tissue samples. Our results demonstrate that mucins from different individuals differ in how they modulate both proliferation and gene expression of H. pylori. The mucin effect on proliferation varied significantly between samples, and ranged from stimulatory to inhibitory, depending on the type of mucins and the ability of the mucins to bind to H. pylori. Tumor-derived mucins and mucins from the surface mucosa had potential to stimulate proliferation, while gland-derived mucins tended to inhibit proliferation and mucins from healthy uninfected individuals showed little effect. Artificial glycoconjugates containing H. pylori ligands also modulated H. pylori proliferation, albeit to a lesser degree than human mucins. Expression of genes important for the pathogenicity of H. pylori (babA, sabA, cagA, flaA and ureA appeared co-regulated in response to mucins. The addition of mucins to co-cultures of H. pylori and gastric epithelial cells protected the viability of the cells and modulated the cytokine production in a manner that differed between individuals, was partially dependent of adhesion of H. pylori to the gastric cells, but also revealed that other mucin factors in addition to adhesion are important for H. pylori-induced host signaling. The combined data reveal host-specific effects on proliferation, gene expression and virulence of H. pylori due to the gastric mucin environment, demonstrating a dynamic interplay between the bacterium and its host.

  17. Human β-defensin-3 induction in H pylori-infected gastric mucosal tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K Kawauchi; A Yagihashi; N Tsuji; N Uehara; D Furuya; D Kobayashi; N Watanabe

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3)expression in inflamed gastric mucosal tissues or MKN45 gastric cancer cells with or without H pylori infection for better understanding the innate immune response to H pylori.METHODS: We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and immunohistochemistry to examine hBD-3 expression in inflamed gastric mucosal tissues or MKN45 gastric cancer cells with or without H pylori.Effects of hBD-3 against H pylori were also evaluated.RESULTS: The mean mRNA expression of hBD-3 in H pylori-positive specimens was significantly higher than that in H pylori-negative specimens (P = 0.0002,Mann-Whitney). In addition, unlike uninfected samples,8 of 15 (53.33%) infected mucosal samples expressed hBD-3 protein. H pylori dose-dependently induced mRNA expression of hBD-3 in MKN45 cells, an effect inhibited by adding anti-toil-like receptor (TLR)-4 antibody. HBD-3 protein completely inhibited H pylori growth.CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that like hBD-2,hBD-3 may be involved in the pathophysiology of H pylori-induced gastritis.

  18. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric cancer:An Asian enigma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kartar Singh; Uday C Ghoshal

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) has been etiologically linked to gastric cancer. H pylori infection is more frequent in less developed Asian countries like India,Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Thailand and is acquired at early age than in more developed Asian countries like Japan and China. Frequency of gastric cancer, however,is very low in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Thailand compared to that in Japan and China. Similar enigma has been reported from Africa as compared to the West.Seroprevalence of H pylori infection in adult populations of India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Thailand varies from 55% to 92%. In contrast, seroprevalence of H pylori in Chinese and Japanese adults is 44% and 55%,respectively. Annual incidence rate of gastric cancer in India, Bangladesh, and Thailand is 10.6, 1.3, 7.1 per 100000 populations, respectively; in contrast, that in China and Japan is 32-59 and 80-115 per 100 000 populations,respectively. Several studies from India failed to show higher frequency of H pylori infection in patients with gastric cancer than controls. Available evidences did not support difference in H pylori strains as an explanation for this enigma. Despite established etiological role of H pylori, situation is somewhat enigmatic in Asian countries because in countries with higher frequency of infection,there is lower rate of gastric cancer. Host's genetic makeup and dietary and environmental factors might explain this enigma. Studies are urgently needed to solve this issue.

  19. [Research progress on the etiology and pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Can; Ke, Xiao-Yan

    2012-12-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma originated outside the lymph nodes is low grade malignant B cell lymphoma. It is the most frequent type of marginal zone non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, that usually occurs in the stomach, salivary gland, thyroid gland and orbital adnexa. Gastric MALT lymphoma accounts for 50% of MALT lymphoma. Gastric MALT lymphoma has been confirmed to relate with Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection, its main pathogenesis is immune reaction, but some patients with chromosome translocation have no response to HP eradication, suggesting presence of other unknown pathogenesis. The chromosome translocations in MALT lymphoma are t(11;18)(q21;q21), t(1;14)(p22;q32), t(14;18)(q32;q21), t(3;14)(p14.1;q32). Recent studies show some new chromosomal abnormalities such as 6q23.3/A20 and so on, which have some effects on clinical course and prognosis. MALT lymphoma with chromosome abnormalities usually activate common NF-κB molecular pathway, and persistent active NF-κB pathway drives tumor cell proliferative and active, resulting in lymphoma incidence. In this article, the advances in the etiology and pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma were reviewed.

  20. Diet, H pylori infection and gastric cancer: evidence and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Alba; Nardone, Gerardo

    2007-06-07

    Despite decreasing incidence and mortality rates, gastric cancer (GC) still remains the fourth most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Due to the limited treatment options, at present, prevention is likely to be the only effective means of controlling this disease. The success of a prevention strategy depends upon the understanding of etiological and pathogenic mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis. The etiology of GC is multi-factorial, however, in the recent years, mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors play a key role. The most important environmental factors implicated in the pathogenesis of GC are diet and H pylori infection. Thus, modifications in lifestyle and dietary habit associated with eradication of H pylori infection could hypothetically represent the most promising potential targets for GC prevention. In this review we will address the evidence and the controversies on the role of these agents in non-cardia GC by focusing on retrospective and prospective observational studies and interventional trials.

  1. Diet, H pylori infection and gastric cancer: Evidence and controversies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alba Rocco; Gerardo Nardone

    2007-01-01

    Despite decreasing incidence and mortality rates, gastric cancer (GC) still remains the fourth most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Due to the limited treatment options,at present, prevention is likely to be the only effective means of controlling this disease. The success of a prevention strategy depends upon the understanding of etiological and pathogenic mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis. The etiology of GC is multi-factorial,however, in the recent years, mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors play a key role. The most important environmental factors implicated in the pathogenesis of GC are diet and H pylori infection. Thus,modifications in lifestyle and dietary habit associated with eradication of H pylori infection could hypothetically represent the most promising potential targets for GC prevention. In this review we will address the evidence and the controversies on the role of these agents in noncardia GC by focusing on retrospective and prospective observational studies and interventional trials.

  2. Molecular detection and corelation of Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque and gastric biopsies of dyspeptic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharath, T Sreenivasa; Reddy, M Sesha; Dhanapal, Raghu; Raj Kumar, N Govind; Neeladri Raju, PV; Saraswathi, TR

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic organism, which colonizes in the gastric mucosa. Its role in etiology and development of acute and chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer diseases is scientifically proved. Oral cavity especially supragingival, subgingival plaque and so forth simulate the same microaerophilic environment favorable for the growth of this bacterium. Aim: Detection of H. pylori simultaneously in the oral cavity and gastric mucosa of patients suffering from gastric pathologies. Objectives: To detect H. pylori in the oral cavity and gastric mucosa using endoscopy, urease test and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (urease A gene). Determining its association and corelation with patient demographics, oral hygiene maintenance and periodontal disease status. Materials and Methods: Endoscopic examination, oral findings oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S) and community periodontal index and treatment needs (CPITN) indices were recorded. Antral biopsies and supragingival plaque samples were taken from 56 dyspeptic adult patients. The collected samples were subjected to histological examination, urease broth test and urease A gene amplification using real-time PCR. Result: H. pylori was detected in the supragingival plaque of individuals with H. pylori-induced gastric diseases using rapid urease test and real-time PCR analysis. Occurrence of same strain of H. pylori simultaneously in plaque and gastric mucosa was observed. Positive correlation was obtained between the collected indices and quantity of H. pylori colonization. PMID:24959032

  3. Molecular detection and corelation of Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque and gastric biopsies of dyspeptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sreenivasa Bharath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic organism, which colonizes in the gastric mucosa. Its role in etiology and development of acute and chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer diseases is scientifically proved. Oral cavity especially supragingival, subgingival plaque and so forth simulate the same microaerophilic environment favorable for the growth of this bacterium. Aim: Detection of H. pylori simultaneously in the oral cavity and gastric mucosa of patients suffering from gastric pathologies. Objectives: To detect H. pylori in the oral cavity and gastric mucosa using endoscopy, urease test and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR (urease A gene. Determining its association and corelation with patient demographics, oral hygiene maintenance and periodontal disease status. Materials and Methods: Endoscopic examination, oral findings oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S and community periodontal index and treatment needs (CPITN indices were recorded. Antral biopsies and supragingival plaque samples were taken from 56 dyspeptic adult patients. The collected samples were subjected to histological examination, urease broth test and urease A gene amplification using real-time PCR. Result: H. pylori was detected in the supragingival plaque of individuals with H. pylori-induced gastric diseases using rapid urease test and real-time PCR analysis. Occurrence of same strain of H. pylori simultaneously in plaque and gastric mucosa was observed. Positive correlation was obtained between the collected indices and quantity of H. pylori colonization.

  4. Distribution of H.pylori antigens in gastric mucosa and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆新良; 钱可大; 唐训球; 朱永良

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of H.p),lori antigens in the gastric mucosa in patients with H.pylori infection, and the relationship between the distribution and gastric cancer. Methods: Of 112 patients confirmed by pathological study to have chronic superficial gastritis, precancerous changes (chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia or atypical hyperplasia) and gastric cancer, 28 were H.pylori negative and 84 were H.pylori positive. H.pylori antigens in the gastric mucosa were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: The H.pylori positive group, comprised 12 of 22 (50.0%) in the chronic superficial gastritis group, 22 of 25 (88.0%) in the precancerous changes group and 13 of 35 (37.1%) in the gastric cancer group. The positive rates of H.pylori antigens in the cytoplasm progressively increased, respectively at 0.0% (0/12), 63.6% (14/22) and 84.6% (11/13) for the same groups (χ2= 19.76, P=0.000); H.pylori antigens were located in the mucus layer and above the neck of the mucosal gland in 9 of 12 (75.0%) cases with chronic superficial gastritis, at the neck of the mucosal gland and the isthmus in 12 of 22 (54.5%) cases with precancerous changes, below the isthmus in 9 of 13 (69.2%) cases with gastric cancer (χ2=25.30, P=0.000). In the H.pvlori negative group, no H.pylori antigen was observed. Conclusion: With the progression of chronic superficial gastritis→precancerous changes→gastric cancer, H.pylori antigens progressively migrated from the outer part to the inner part of the cell, and from the superficial to the deep gastric mucosa.

  5. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric emptying rate in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grigoris I Leontiadis; George I Minopoulos; Efstratios Maltezos; Stamatia Kotsiou; Konstantinos I Manolas; Konstantinos Simopoulos; Dimitrios Hatseras

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The pathogenesis of delayed gastric emptying in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) remains unclear.We aimed to examine whether gastric emptying rate in NUD patients was associated with Helicobacter pylori(H pylori)infection and whether it was affected by eradication of the infection.METHODS: Gastric emptying rate of a mixed solid-liquid meal was assessed by the paracetamol absorption method in NUD patients and asymptomatic controls (n=17). H pylori status was assessed by serology and biopsy urease test.H pylori-positive NUD patients (n=23) received 10-day triple eradication therapy. H pylori status was re-assessed by biopsy urease test four weeks later, and if eradication was confirmed, gastric emptying rate was re-evaluated.RESULTS: Thirty-three NUD patients and 17 controls were evaluated. NUD patients had significantly delayed gastric emptying compared with controls. The mean maximum plasma paracetamol concentration divided by body mass (P=0.02), the mean area under plasma paracetamol concentration-time curve divided by body mass (AUC/BM)Gastric emptying rate did not differ significantly between H pylori-positive and H pylori-negative NUD patients. The were initially H pylori-positive, confirmed eradication of the infection did not significantly alter gastric emptying rate.and after Hp eradication, respectively (P=0.64), the mean eradication, respectively (P=0.93).CONCLUSION: Although gastdc emptying is delayed in NUD patients compared with controls, gastric emptying rate is not associated with H pylori status nor it is affected by eradication of the infection.

  6. Helicobacter pylori Infection Induces Genetic Instability of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA in Gastric Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, Ceu; Touati, Eliette;

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of gastric carcinoma. To investigate a possible link between bacterial infection and genetic instability of the host genome, we examined the effect of H. pylori infection on known cellular repair pathways in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, various types...... of genetic instabilities in the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were examined. Experimental Design: We observed the effects of H pylori infection on a gastric cell line (AGS), on C57BL/6 mice, and on individuals with chronic gastritis. In AGS cells, the effect of H pylori infection on base excision...... cells and chronic gastritis tissue were determined by PCR, single-stranded conformation polymorphism, and sequencing. H pylori vacA and cagA genotyping was determined by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization. Results: Following H pylori infection, the activity and expression of base excision repair...

  7. Simultaneous Occurrence of Early Gastric Carcinoma and Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Omentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Murakami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous association of gastric carcinoma with omental mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma is a rare event that has not been reported previously. We focused on the hypothetic pathogenetic mechanisms, diagnosis and treatment of this rare condition. A 55-year-old woman with Helicobacter pylori infection underwent distal gastrectomy in our hospital. Three independent early gastric cancers and a mass near the cecum were diagnosed preoperatively. Pathological review of the resected stomach showed three independent early signet ring cell gastric carcinomas, and the mass in the omentum near the cecum was shown to be omental MALT lymphoma. Due to the nature of the patient's disease, she was started on medical eradication of H. pylori. Synchronous gastric adenocarcinoma and omental MALT lymphoma is a rare event. Special attention given to H. pylori-associated gastric cancer patients can avoid misdiagnosis and lead to adequate treatment.

  8. Gastric and enterohepatic non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flahou, Bram; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Smet, Annemieke; Yonezawa, Hideo; Osaki, Takako; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2013-09-01

    A substantial number of reports published in the last year have contributed to a better understanding of both human and animal infection with non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). Gastric infection of humans with Helicobacter suis and Helicobacter felis as well as unidentified NHPH has been described to cause a chronic gastritis and a variety of clinical symptoms, whereas enterohepatic NHPH, including Helicobacter cinaedi, Helicobacter bilis, and Helicobacter canis, have been reported to be associated with human diseases such as bacteremia, cellulitis, cutaneous diseases, and fever of unknown origin in immunocompromised hosts. In various animal species, including dogs and laboratory mice, high rates of infection with NHPH were described. For gastric NHPH, mainly H. suis and H. felis infection was studied, revealing that differences in the immune response evoked in the host do exist when compared to Helicobacter pylori. Pathogenic mechanisms of infection with Helicobacter pullorum, H. bilis, and Helicobacter hepaticus were investigated, as well as immune responses involved in H. bilis-, Helicobacter typhlonius-, and H. hepaticus-induced intestinal inflammation. Complete genome sequences of Helicobacter heilmannii strain ASB1 and a H. cinaedi strain isolated in a case of human bacteremia were published, as well as comparative genomics of a human-derived Helicobacter bizzozeronii strain and proteome or secretome analyses for H. hepaticus and Helicobacter trogontum, respectively. Molecular analysis has revealed a function for type VI secretion systems of H. hepaticus and H. pullorum, the Helicobacter mustelae iron urease, and several other functional components of NHPH. In each section of this chapter, new findings on gastric NHPH will first be discussed, followed by those on enterohepatic Helicobacter species. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Essential Role of Ferritin Pfr in Helicobacter pylori Iron Metabolism and Gastric Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The reactivity of the essential element iron necessitates a concerted expression of ferritins, which mediate iron storage in a nonreactive state. Here we have further established the role of the Helicobacter pylori ferritin Pfr in iron metabolism and gastric colonization. Iron stored in Pfr enabled H. pylori to multiply under severe iron starvation and protected the bacteria from acid-amplified iron toxicity, as inactivation of the pfr gene restricted growth of H. pylori under these condition...

  10. Efficacy of Sulforaphane in Eradicating Helicobacter pylori in Human Gastric Xenografts Implanted in Nude Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Haristoy, Xavier; Angioi-Duprez, Karine; Duprez, Adrien; Lozniewski, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate abundant in the form of its glucosinolate precursor in broccoli sprouts, has shown in vitro activity against Helicobacter pylori. We evaluated the effect of sulforaphane in vivo against this bacterium by using human gastric xenografts in nude mice. H. pylori was completely eradicated in 8 of the 11 sulforaphane-treated grafts. This result suggests that sulforaphane might be beneficial in the treatment of H. pylori-infected individuals.

  11. Influence of Lewis Antigen Expression by Helicobacter pylori on Bacterial Internalization by Gastric Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lozniewski, Alain; Haristoy, Xavier; Rasko, David A.; Hatier, Renée; Plénat, François; Diane E Taylor; Angioi-Duprez, Karine

    2003-01-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Lewis antigens in infection is still not well known. We investigated the influence of Lewis antigen expression by H. pylori on its internalization by AGS cells and the epithelium of human gastric xenografts in nude mice using isogenic mutants in LPS biosynthetic genes. In vivo, colonization rates were unaffected by the change in H. pylori Lewis antigen expression, whereas the number of viable intracellular bacteria was significantly hig...

  12. What exists beyond cagA and vacA? Helicobacter pylori genes in gastric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Débora Menezes; Pereira, Eliane dos Santos; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is present in more than half the world's population and has been associated with several gastric disorders, such as gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The clinical outcome of this infection depends on host and bacterial factors where H. pylori virulence genes seem to play a relevant role. Studies of cagA and vacA genes established that they were determining factors in gastric pathogenesis. However, there are gastric cancer cases that are cagA-negative. Several other virulence genes have been searched for, but these genes remain less well known that cagA and vacA. Thus, this review aimed to establish which genes have been suggested as potentially relevant virulence factors for H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal diseases. We focused on the cag-pathogenicity island, genes with adherence and motility functions, and iceA based on the relevance shown in several studies in the literature.

  13. Alterations in Helicobacter pylori triggered by contact with gastric epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Johnson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori lives within the mucus layer of the human stomach, in close proximity to gastric epithelial cells. While a great deal is known about the effects of H. pylori on human cells and the specific bacterial products that mediate these effects, relatively little work has been done to investigate alterations in H. pylori that may be triggered by bacterial contact with human cells. In this review, we discuss the spectrum of changes in bacterial physiology and morphology that occur when H. pylori is in contact with gastric epithelial cells. Several studies have reported that cell contact causes alterations in H. pylori gene transcription. In addition, H. pylori contact with gastric epithelial cells promotes the formation of pilus-like structures at the bacteria-host cell interface. The formation of these structures requires multiple genes in the cag pathogenicity island, and these structures are proposed to have an important role in the type IV secretion system-dependent process through which CagA enters host cells. Finally, H. pylori contact with epithelial cells can promote bacterial replication and the formation of microcolonies, phenomena that are facilitated by the acquisition of iron and other nutrients from infected cells. In summary, the gastric epithelial cell surface represents an important niche for H. pylori, and upon entry into this niche, the bacteria alter their behavior in a manner that optimizes bacterial proliferation and persistent colonization of the host.

  14. Latest insights into the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazunari Murakami; Masaaki Kodama; Toshio Fujioka

    2006-01-01

    There appears to be the strong association between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and gastric cancer. We reviewed the latest evidences about the effects of H pylori infection on gastric carcinogenesis, classified into epidemiology, dynamics of gastric mucosal changes,DNA damages, virulence factors, host factors, and source of gastric malignancy. Through the considerable progress made in research into virulence factors resulting from differences between H pylori strains, such as cagA positivity, as well as into host factors, such as gene polymorphisms, a diverse spectrum of H pyloriassociated diseases, including gastric cancer, is beginning to lend itself to elucidation. The impact of the novel hypothesis advanced by Houghton et al proposing bonemarrow derived stem cells (BMDC) as a potential source of gastric malignancy on evolving research remains to be seen with interest. Further progress in research into H pylori eradication as a viable prophylaxis of gastric cancer, as well as into the mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis, is to be eagerly awaited for the current year and beyond.

  15. Evaluation of the role of H pylori infection in pathogenesis of gastric cancer by immunoblot assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuo-Ching Yang; Alexander Chu; Chao-Sheng Liao; Yu-Min Lin; Gen-Min Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the different serological reactions to H pylori using the immunoblotting technique for further understanding of its pathogenic role in gastric cancer.METHODS: A total of 54 patients were divided into two groups after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: normal control group (25 patients) and gastric cancer group (29 patients). Both groups were further divided into H pylori (+) and H pylori (-) subgroups based on the results of CLO test, Giemsa staining and culture. Sera were further analyzed with the immunoblotting technique (HelicoBlot 2.0, Genelabs Diagnostics, Singapore).RESULTS: The positive rate of the immunoblotting test was as high as 88.9% in the H pylori (-) gastric cancer group and only 14.3% in the H pylori (-) normal control group with a statistically significant difference.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of H pylori infection is higher in gastric cancer patients than in the normal controls, suggesting that H pylori may play a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer.

  16. Gastric ghrelin in relation to gender, stomach topography and Helicobacter pylori in dyspeptic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krystyna Stec-Michalska; Sebastian Malicki; Blazej Michalski; Lukasz Peczek; Maria Wisniewska-Jarosinska; Barbara Nawrot

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the level of gastric ghrelin in stomach mucosa of dyspeptic patients in relation to Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection, bacterial cytotoxicity, topography and gender.METHODS: The study comprised 40 premenopausal women (19 H pylori positive) and 48 men (17 H pylori positive) with functional dyspepsia.All gastric biopsy specimens revealed normal mucosa or non-atrophic gastritis.Gastric ghrelin concentration was determined by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.The cagA and vacA strains of bacterial DNA were identified by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS: In general, infection with H pylori caused an increase in gastric ghrelin level regardless of gender and stomach topography.Significantly more hormone was present in both, non-infected and H pylori positive female samples, as compared to males.The distribution of bacterial strains showed cagA(+) vacA s1m1 and cagA(-) vacA s2m2 genotypes as the most common infections in the studied population.A tendency to higher ghrelin levels was observed in less cytotoxic ( cagA negative) strain-containing specimens from the antrum and corpus of both gender groups (without statistical significance).CONCLUSION: An increase in gastric ghrelin levels at the stage of non-atrophic gastritis in H pylori positive patients, especially in those infected with cagA(-) strains, can exert a gastroprotective effect.

  17. Relationship between H.Pylori infection and clinicopathological features and prognosis of gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guo-Qiang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aimed to assess the relationship between H.Pylori and the clinicopathological features and prognosis of gastric cancer by quantitative detection of H.Pylori. Methods 157 patients were enrolled, all patients had a record of clinicopathological parameters. Specimens including the tumor and non-neoplastic were detected for H.Pylori by Real-Time PCR and analyzed clinical data retrospectively. Variables independently affecting prognosis were investigated by means of multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results H.Pylori infection was greater in non-neoplastic tissue than the tumor tissue (p Conclusions H.Pylori infection status and its copies were related to N staging. The OS and RFS in patients with positive H.Pylori status has no significant difference from the patients with negative H.Pylori status.

  18. The impact of Helicobacter pylori infection on the gastric microbiota of the rhesus macaque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam E Martin

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonization is highly prevalent among humans and causes significant gastric disease in a subset of those infected. When present, this bacterium dominates the gastric microbiota of humans and induces antimicrobial responses in the host. Since the microbial context of H. pylori colonization influences the disease outcome in a mouse model, we sought to assess the impact of H. pylori challenge upon the pre-existing gastric microbial community members in the rhesus macaque model. Deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene identified a community profile of 221 phylotypes that was distinct from that of the rhesus macaque distal gut and mouth, although there were taxa in common. High proportions of both H. pylori and H. suis were observed in the post-challenge libraries, but at a given time, only one Helicobacter species was dominant. However, the relative abundance of non-Helicobacter taxa was not significantly different before and after challenge with H. pylori. These results suggest that while different gastric species may show competitive exclusion in the gastric niche, the rhesus gastric microbial community is largely stable despite immune and physiological changes due to H. pylori infection.

  19. Helicobacter pylori environmental interactions: effect of acidic conditions on H. pylori-induced gastric mucosal interleukin-8 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Il Ju; Fujimoto, Saori; Yamauchi, Kazuyoshi; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    Summary To explore the interactions between the host, environment and bacterium responsible for the different manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection, we examined the effect of acidic conditions on H. pylori-induced interleukin (IL)-8 expression. AGS gastric epithelial cells were exposed to acidic pH and infected with H. pylori [wild-type strain, its isogenic cag pathogenicity island (PAI) mutant or its oipA mutant]. Exposure of AGS cells to acidic pH alone did not enhance IL-8 production. However, following exposure to acidic conditions, H. pylori infection resulted in marked enhancement of IL-8 production which was independent of the presence of the cag PAI and OipA, indicating that H. pylori and acidic conditions act synergistically to induce gastric mucosal IL-8 production. In neutral pH environments H. pylori-induced IL-8 induction involved the NF-κB pathways, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)→ c-Fos/c-Jun→activating protein (AP-1) pathways, JNK→c-Jun→AP-1 pathways and the p38 pathways. At acidic pH H. pylori-induced augmentation of IL-8 production involved markedly upregulated the NF-κB pathways and the ERK→c-Fos→AP-1 pathways. In contrast, activation of the JNK→c-Jun→AP-1 pathways and p38 pathways were pH independent. These results might explain the clinical studies in which patients with duodenal ulcers had higher levels of IL-8 in the antral gastric mucosa than patients with simple H. pylori gastritis. PMID:17517062

  20. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Xiong, Ranhua

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid...... barriers-the highly viscoelastic gastric mucus and the bacterial cell envelope. We found that LNA/2'OMe is capable of diffusing rapidly through native, undiluted, gastric mucus isolated from porcine stomachs, without degradation. Moreover, although LNA/2'OMe hybridization was still successful without...... permeabilization and fixation of the bacteria, which is normally part of in vitro studies, the ability of LNA/2'OMe to efficiently hybridize with H. pylori was hampered by the presence of mucus. Future research should focus on developing nanocarriers that shield LNA/2'OMe from components in the gastric mucus...

  1. Rare case of Helicobacter pylori-related gastric ulcer: malignancy or pseudomorphism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting-Ting; Qiu, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Sun, Lu; Wan, Jun

    2013-03-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a pathogen and the most frequent cause of gastric ulcers. There is also a close correlation between the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the incidence of gastric cancer. We present the case of a 38-year-old woman referred by her primary care physician for screening positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), which showed a nodular strong accumulation point with standardized uptake value 5.6 in the gastric fundus. Gastroscopy was then performed, and a single arched ulcer, 12 mm in size, was found in the gastric fundus. Histopathological examination of the lesion revealed chronic mucosal inflammation with acute inflammation and H. pylori infection. There was an obvious mitotic phase with widespread lymphoma. Formal anti-H. pylori treatment was carried out. One month later, a gastroscopy showed a single arched ulcer, measuring 10 mm in size in the gastric fundus. Histopathological examination revealed chronic mucosal inflammation with acute inflammation and a very small amount of H. pylori infection. The mitotic phase was 4/10 high power field, with some heterotypes and an obvious nucleolus. Follow-up gastroscopy 2 mo later showed the gastric ulcer in stage S2. The mucosal swelling had markedly improved. The patient remained asymptomatic, and a follow-up PET-CT was performed 6 mo later. The nodular strong accumulation point had disappeared. Follow-up gastroscopy showed no evidence of malignant cancer. H. pylori-associated severe inflammation can lead to neoplastic changes in histiocytes. This underscores the importance of eradicating H. pylori, especially in those with mucosal lesions, and ensuring proper follow-up to prevent or even reverse early gastric cancer.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric autoimmune diseases: is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presotto, Fabio; Sabini, Beatrice; Cecchetto, Attilio; Plebani, Mario; De Lazzari, Franca; Pedini, Beniamino; Betterle, Corrado

    2003-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is thought to be involved in atrophic body gastritis. We explored the prevalence of H. pylori infection in asymptomatic subjects with gastric parietal cell antibodies, as well as in patients with pernicious anemia, to evaluate a possible role of H. pylori gastric infection in gastric autoimmunity. We studied 79 consecutive asymptomatic subjects with parietal cell antibodies, 24 patients with pernicious anemia, and 66 parietal cell antibody-negative controls. All patients underwent gastric biopsies for histology and detection of H. pylori. Red blood cell count and volume, serum levels of gastrin, pepsinogen I, iron, folic acid, vitamin B12, and circulating antibodies to H. pylori and to intrinsic factor were also determined. We found an atrophic body gastritis in 14 of the 79 asymptomatic subjects with parietal cell antibodies (18%) and in 2 of the 66 controls (3%) (p =.01). Mean levels of gastrin were increased (p antibodies were detected in 46 parietal cell antibody-positive subjects (58%) compared with 26 controls (39%) (p =.03). In patients with pernicious anemia we found an atrophic body gastritis in 18 of 24 cases (75%) (p antibodies and/or with pernicious anemia), H. pylori was found in 44 of 72 of those without atrophy (61%) but in 6 of 31 with gastric body atrophy (19%) (p detection of H. pylori infection in subjects with early gastric autoimmunity, indicated by the presence of parietal cell antibodies, suggests that H. pylori could have a crucial role in the induction and/or the maintenance of autoimmunity at the gastric level.

  3. Helicobacter pylori eradication to prevent gastric cancer:underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shingo Tsuji; Norio Hayashi; Masahiko Tsujii; Hiroaki Murata; Tsutomu Nishida; Masato Komori; Masakazu Yasumaru; Shuji Ishii; Yoshiaki Sasayama; Sunao Kawano

    2006-01-01

    Numerous cellular and molecular events have been described in development of gastric cancer. In this article,we overviewed roles of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection on some of the important events in gastric carcinogenesis and discussed whether these cellular and molecular events are reversible after cure of the infection. There are several bacterial components affecting gastric epithelial kinetics and promotion of gastric carcinogenesis. The bacterium also increases risks of genetic instability and mutations due to NO and other reactive oxygen species. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes such as RUNX3 may alter the frequency of phenotype change of gastric glands to those with intestinal metaplasia. Host factors such as increased expression of growth factors, cytokines and COX-2 have been also reported in non-cancerous tissue in H pylori-positive subjects. It is noteworthy that most of the above phenomena are reversed after the cure of the infection. However,some of them including overexpression of COX-2 continue to exist and may increase risks for carcinogenesis in metaplastic or dysplastic mucosa even after successful H pylori eradication. Thus, H pylori eradication may not completely abolish the risk for gastric carcinogenesis. Efficiency of the cure of the infection in suppressing gastric cancer depends on the timing and the target population,and warrant further investigation.

  4. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric carcinogenesis: Current knowledge and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokic-Milutinovic, Aleksandra; Alempijevic, Tamara; Milosavljevic, Tomica

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The outcome of the infection depends on environmental factors and bacterial and host characteristics. Gastric carcinogenesis is a multistep process that is reversible in the early phase of mucosal damage, but the exact point of no return has not been identified. Therefore, two main therapeutic strategies could reduce gastric cancer incidence: (1) eradication of the already present infection; and (2) immunization (prior to or during the course of the infection). The success of a gastric cancer prevention strategy depends on timing because the prevention strategy must be introduced before the point of no return in gastric carcinogenesis. Although the exact point of no return has not been identified, infection should be eradicated before severe atrophy of the gastric mucosa develops. Eradication therapy rates remain suboptimal due to increasing H. pylori resistance to antibiotics and patient noncompliance. Vaccination against H. pylori would reduce the cost of eradication therapies and lower gastric cancer incidence. A vaccine against H. pylori is still a research challenge. An effective vaccine should have an adequate route of delivery, appropriate bacterial antigens and effective and safe adjuvants. Future research should focus on the development of rescue eradication therapy protocols until an efficacious vaccine against the bacterium becomes available. PMID:26556993

  5. Increased gastric IL-1β concentration and iron deficiency parameters in H. pylori infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhaes; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; Melo, Fabricio Freire; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Teixeira, Kádima Nayara; Carvalho, Simone Diniz; Bittencourt, Paulo Fernando Souto; Castro, Lucia Porto Fonseca; Crabtree, Jean E

    2013-01-01

    Association between H. pylori infection, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia has been described, but the mechanisms involved have not been established. We hypothesized that in H. pylori infected children increased gastric concentrations of IL-1β and/or TNF-α, both potent inhibitors of gastric acid secretion that is essential for iron absorption, are predictors for low blood concentrations of ferritin and haemoglobin, markers of early depletion of iron stores and anaemia, respectively. We evaluated 125 children undergoing endoscopy to clarify the origin of gastrointestinal symptoms. Gastric specimens were obtained for H. pylori status and cytokine evaluation and blood samples for determination of iron deficiency/iron deficiency anaemia parameters and IL1 cluster and TNFA polymorphisms that are associated with increased cytokine secretions. Higher IL-1β and TNF-α gastric concentrations were observed in H. pylori-positive (n = 47) than in -negative (n = 78) children. Multiple linear regression models revealed gastric IL-1β, but not TNF-α, as a significant predictor of low ferritin and haemoglobin concentrations; results were reproduced in young children in whom IL1RN polymorphic genotypes associated with higher gastric IL-1β expression and lower blood ferritin and haemoglobin concentrations. In conclusion, high gastric levels of IL-1β can be the link between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency/iron deficiency anaemia in childhood.

  6. HOGG1 polymorphism in atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer after Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between Ser326Cys human oxoguanine glycosylase 1(hOGG1) polymorphism and atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer after Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) eradication.METHODS:A total of 488 subjects(73 patients with gastric cancer,160 with atrophic gastritis after H.pylori eradication and 255 controls) were prospectively collected.Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was performed to distinguish hOGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism.Statistical analys...

  7. High Dietary Salt Intake Exacerbates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Radin, Jana N.; Loh, John T.; Zhang, Feng; Washington, M. Kay; Peek, Richard M.; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Cover, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, and H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis is dependent on the actions of a bacterial oncoprotein known as CagA. Epidemiological studies have shown that high dietary salt intake is also a risk factor for gastric cancer. To investigate the effects of a high-salt diet, we infected Mongolian gerbils with a wild-type (WT) cagA+ H. pylori strain or an isogenic cagA mutant strain and main...

  8. How labile is gastric infection with H pylori?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Hobsley; FI Tovey; J Holton

    2007-01-01

    It is known that patients infected with H pylori can spontaneously become free from infection, and that the reverse change can occur. The time-scale of these conversions is expressed as percentages per year. Since they have been investigated in terms of serology, the changes are called sero-reversion and sero-conversion respectively. Using serological evidence to investigate these phenomena is open to the criticisms that positive serology can be present in the absence of all other evidence of infection, and that a time-lag of 6-12 mo or longer can occur between eradication of the infection and sero-reversion. Investigations using direct evidence of current infection are sparse. The few that exist suggest that some individuals can seroconvert or serorevert within six to twelve weeks. If these findings are confirmed, it means that some patients have an ability that is variable in time to resist, or spontaneously recover from, H pylori infection. Evidence suggests that the deciding factor of susceptibility is the level of gastric secretion of acid.

  9. Susceptibility to Allitridi of Helicobacter Pylori with Different Genotypes in Gastric Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; LIU Bo; GONG Yue-hua; YUAN Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the difference in susceptibilities to allitridi of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)strains in different gastric diseases and the associations with different genotypes. Methods:H.pylori strains were isolated from gastric antral biopsy specimens and identified.DNA was isolated from H.pylori strains.Different genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction(PCR),and the allitridi MICs were determined by agar dilution methods.MIC50 was calculated. Results:The susceptibilities of H.pylori strains varied among different gastric diseases.H.pylori strains in superficial gastritis were significantly more susceptible to allitridi than those in atrophic gastritis(relative median potency was 0.49,95% confidence interval was from 0.24 to 0.80),strains in superficial gastritis were significantly more susceptible than those in gastric cancer(relative median potency was 0.32,95% confidence interval was from 0.06 to 0.68)and strains in atrophic gastritis were significantly more susceptible than those in gastric cancer(relative median potency was 0.16,95% confidence interval was from 0.02 to 0.40).The susceptibilities of H.pylori strains with different genotypes varied among different gastric diseases.In atrophic gastritis,strains with vacAs1+ were significantly more susceptible to allitridi than those with vacAs1-(relative median potency was 0.21,95% confidence interval was from 0.04 to 0.73).In gastric cancer,strains with vacAm1b+ were significantly more susceptible than those with vacAm1b-(relative median potency was 0.07,95% confidence interval was from 0.03 to 0.49). Conclusion:The vacA genotypes play an important role in the susceptibility to allitridi in different gastric diseases.

  10. Helicobacter pylori Genotypes Associated with Gastric Histo-Pathological Damages in a Moroccan Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui Boukhris, Samia; Amarti, Afaf; El Rhazi, Karima; El Khadir, Mounia; Benajah, Dafr-Allah; Ibrahimi, Sidi Adil; Nejjari, Chakib; Mahmoud, Mustapha; Souleimani, Abdellah; Bennani, Bahia

    2013-01-01

    H. pylori persistent infection induces chronic gastritis and is associated with peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma development. The severity of these diseases is related to human’s genetic diversity, H. pylori genetic variability and environmental factors. To identify the prevalence of histo-pathological damages caused by H. pylori infection in Moroccan population, and to determine their association to H. pylori genotypes, a prospective study has been conducted during 3 years on patients attending the gastroenterology department of Hassan II University Hospital (CHU) of Fez, Morocco. A total of 801 Moroccan adults’ patients were recruited; H. pylori was diagnosed and genotyped by PCR in biopsy specimens and histological exam was performed. We found a high rate of glandular atrophy. Chronic inflammation, neutrophil activity and glandular atrophy showed statistically significant association with H. pylori infection. However, intestinal metaplasia was inversely associated to this infection and no association was observed with gastric cancer cases. A statistically significant association was found between intestinal metaplasia and vacAs1 and vac Am1 genotypes in patients aged 50 years and more but not in younger. This last genotype is also associated to gastric cancer. In this study, gastric cancer showed no significant association with H. pylori. Further studies are warranted to determine the role of other etiological agents such as Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and possibly environmental and dietetic factors in the occurrence of this pathology. PMID:24349327

  11. Specific Antibodies in Sera and Gastric Aspirates of Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Helicobacter pylori-Infected Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, A.; Tinnert, A.; Hamlet, A.; Lönroth, H.; Bölin, I.; Svennerholm, A.-M.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we have determined systemic and local antibody responses against different Helicobacter pylori antigens in H. pylori-infected and noninfected subjects. In addition, we studied whether differences in antibody responses between patients with duodenal ulcers and asymptomatic H. pylori carriers might explain the different outcomes of infection. Sera and in most instances gastric aspirates were collected from 19 duodenal ulcer patients, 15 asymptomatic H. pylori carriers, and 20 noninfected subjects and assayed for specific antibodies against different H. pylori antigens, i.e., whole membrane proteins (MP), lipopolysaccharides, flagellin, urease, the neuraminyllactose binding hemagglutinin HpaA, and a 26-kDa protein, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The H. pylori-infected subjects had significantly higher antibody titers against MP, flagellin, and urease in both sera and gastric aspirates compared with the noninfected subjects. Furthermore, the antibody titers against HpaA were significantly elevated in sera but not in gastric aspirates from the infected subjects. However, no differences in antibody titers against any of the tested antigens could be detected between the duodenal ulcer patients and the asymptomatic H. pylori carriers, either in sera or in gastric aspirates. PMID:9605978

  12. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António M. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available.

  13. Does the presence of the Helicobacter pylori in the dental plaque associate with its gastric infection? A meta-analysis and systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Navabi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Co-infection of gastric H. pylori and dental plaque is reported by half of the studies. However, there is not enough evidence for the efficacy of dental treatment on prevention of recurrent gastric H. pylori infection.

  14. In vitro inhibition of Helicobacter pylori growth and adherence to gastric mucosal cells by Pycnogenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohdewald, Peter; Beil, Winfried

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains has necessitated the identification of alternative additive therapies for the treatment of this infection. The study tested whether a specific pine bark extract (Pycnogenol is effective in inhibiting the growth and adherence of H. pylori in vitro. Inhibition of H. pylori growth by Pycnogenol was tested in liquid medium as well as in an in vitro model by using sessile bacteria attached to AGS cells. Adherence was determined by co-incubation of gastric cells with Pycnogenol and H. pylori in vitro. Pycnogenol inhibited H. pylori growth in suspension with an MIC(50) of 12.5 microg/mL. Growth of H. pylori in infected cells was reduced to 10% of the control value by 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. Adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells was reduced by 70% after 3 h incubation with 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. The results show a significant, yet limited inhibition of growth and adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells by Pycnogenol. In vivo studies have to demonstrate the clinical relevance of these findings.

  15. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on outcomes in resected gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Jennifer M; Ozbek, Umut; Harpaz, Noam; Holcombe, Randall F; Ang, Celina

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is a known risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) and has been linked with gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Studies examining the relationship between H. pylori infection, GC characteristics and prognosis are limited and have yielded conflicting results. We report on the clinicopathologic characteristics and oncologic outcomes of gastric and GEJ cancer patients with and without a history of H. pylori treated at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients over the age of 18 years who underwent curative resection for GEJ and GC at Mount Sinai Hospital between 2007 and 2012 who had histopathologic documentation of the presence or absence of H pylori infection. Demographic, clinical, pathologic, treatment characteristics and outcomes including recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared. Ninety-five patients were identified. The majority of patients were male (61%), white (36%) or Asian (34%), with median age at diagnosis 64. Tumors were stage I (51%), stage II (23%), stage III (25%), and stage IV (1%). H pylori infection status was documented at the time of cancer diagnosis in 89 (94%) patients, and following cancer diagnosis and treatment in 6 (6%) patients. Younger age at diagnosis, Asian race and Lauren histologic classification were associated with H Pylori infection. H pylori positive patients exhibited higher 5-year OS and 5-year RFS compared to H pylori negative patients, though the difference was not statistically significant in either univariate or multivariate analyses. In this retrospective series of predominantly early stage GC and GEJ cancers, H. pylori positive patients were significantly younger at cancer diagnosis and were more frequently Asian compared to H. pylori negative patients. Other demographic and histologic classifications except for Lauren histologic classification were similar between the two groups. H pylori positive patients appeared

  16. Antimicrobial Characterization of Inula britannica against Helicobacter pylori on Gastric Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Hwan; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2016-06-28

    The antimicrobial effects of methanol and ethanol extracts of Inula britannica against several Helicobacter pylori strains (26695, J99, and SS1) were evaluated in vitro, to determine their applicability as functional foods. In the paper disc diffusion method, the antimicrobial effects of the I. britannica extracts against the H. pylori strains were apparent. Viable cell counting also showed that the extracts at 100 μg/ml concentration dramatically decreased the viability of the H. pylori strains. In particular, the methanol and ethanol extracts at a concentration of 100 μg/ml reduced the H. pylori SS1 cell number to 2.46 log CFU/ml and 1.08 log CFU/ml, respectively. In the presence of 100 μg/ml extracts, the urease production of H. pylori SS1 was decreased to more than 30%, whereas that of H. pylori J99 and H. pylori 26695 was decreased to about 20%, relative to the controls. The extracts inhibited the attachment of the H. pylori strains to human gastric AGS cells as well as caused the detachment of already attached H. pylori cells. In addition, the H. pylori morphology was changed to a coccoidal shape in the presence of the extracts. In conclusion, the I. britannica extracts were effective against H. pylori strains in vitro, irrespective of genotype status, and could therefore be used as novel functional foods.

  17. Postoperative Helicobacter pylori Infection as a Prognostic Factor for Gastric Cancer Patients after Curative Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Da Hyun; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Chung, Hyunsoo; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2017-09-15

    Few studies have evaluated the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on the prognosis of patients diagnosed with gastric cancer (GC) after curative surgery. We investigated the association between the H. pylori infection status and clinical outcome after surgery. We assessed the H. pylori status of 314 patients who underwent curative resection for GC. The H. pylori status was examined using a rapid urease test 2 months after resection. Patients were followed for 10 years after surgery. An H. pylori infection was observed in 128 of 314 patients. The median follow-up period was 93.5 months. A Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients with H. pylori had a higher cumulative survival rate than those who were negative for H. pylori. Patients with stage II cancer who tested negative for H. pylori were associated with a poor outcome. In a multivariate analysis, H. pylori-negative status was a significant independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival. Having a negative H. pylori infection status seems to indicate poor prognosis for patients with GC who have undergone curative resection. Further prospective controlled studies are needed to evaluate the mechanism by which H. pylori affects GC patients after curative surgery in Korea.

  18. Molecular cross-talk between Helicobacter pylori and human gastric mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vittorio Ricci; Marco Romano; Patrice Boquet

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) has co-evolved with humans to be transmitted from person to person and to colonize the stomach persistently. A well-choreographed equilibrium between the bacterial effectors and host responses permits microbial persistence and health of the host, but confers a risk for serious diseases including gastric cancer. During its long coexistence with humans, H. pylori has developed complex strategies to limit the degree and extent of gastric mucosal damage and inflammation, as well as immune effector activity. The present editorial thus aims to introduce and comment on major advances in the rapidly developing area of H. pylori /human gastric mucosa interaction (and its pathological sequelae), which is the result of millennia of co-evolution of, and thus of reciprocal knowledge between, the pathogen and its human host.

  19. Stress-induced hemorrhagic gastric ulcer after successful Helicobacter pylori eradication: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyamoto Mitsuaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of gastric ulcers, and Helicobacter pylori eradication drastically reduces ulcer recurrence. It has been reported, however, that severe physical stress is closely associated with gastric ulceration even in Helicobacter pylori -negative patients. Case presentation We report the cases of a 47-year-old Japanese man and a 69-year-old Japanese man who developed psychological stress-induced hemorrhagic gastric ulcers, in both of whom Helicobacter pylori had been successfully eradicated. Conclusion Our cases strongly suggest that not only physical but also psychological stress is still an important pathogenic factor for peptic ulceration and accordingly that physicians should pay attention to the possible presence of psychological stress in the management of patients with peptic ulcers.

  20. Relationship between gastric disease and deletion of cag pathogenicity island genes of Helicobacter pylori in gastric juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Osamu; Murakami, Masami; Araki, Osamu; Yamada, Takuro; Tomizawa, Sayaka; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Minashi, Keiko; Maeda, Masaki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Mori, Masatomo

    2003-01-01

    The cag pathogenicity island genes of Helicobacter pylori (ie, cag1, cag5, cagT, cagE, and cagA) were detected by PCR in DNA extracted from endoscopically collected gastric juice, and the relationship between these genes and gastric disease was studied in 25 patients with early gastric cancer, 9 patients with gastric ulcer, and 15 patients with chronic active gastritis. In three patients with early gastric cancer and one patient with gastric ulcer, cag pathogenicity island genes were amplified although H. pylori was not detected by conventional methods. Compared with conventional methods, the sensitivity of detection of cag genes was 92.3% (36/39) and the specificity was 60% (6/10). Among the patients with cagA amplification, only cagE was not amplified in one case each with early cancer and chronic active gastritis. In addition, none of cag1, cag5, cagT, and cagE were amplified in spite of cagA amplification in one patient with gastric ulcer. This method is a simple procedure, has a high sensitivity, and appears to be useful for accurate assessment of infection with cagA-positive strains. Because deletion of cag PAI genes was found in the patients with all three gastric diseases that we studied, it was suggested that the pathogenicity of H. pylori might not be determined by cag PAI genes in those cases.

  1. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection favourably affects altered gastric mucosal MMP-9 levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kubben, F.J.G.M.; Sier, C.F.M.; Schram, M.; Witte, T.A.M.C.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Duijn, W. van; Verheijen, J.H.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.; Verspaget, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori gastritis is recognized as an important pathogenetic factor in peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinogenesis, and is accompanied by strongly enhanced gastric mucosal matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels. Aim: This study was performed to investigate whether H.

  2. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection favourably affects altered gastric mucosal MMP-9 levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kubben, F.J.G.M.; Sier, C.F.M.; Schram, M.; Witte, T.A.M.C.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Duijn, W. van; Verheijen, J.H.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.; Verspaget, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori gastritis is recognized as an important pathogenetic factor in peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinogenesis, and is accompanied by strongly enhanced gastric mucosal matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels. Aim: This study was performed to investigate whether H. p

  3. Evaluation of clinico-pathological features and Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric inflammatory fibroid polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Andreia; Rios, Elisabete; Carneiro, Fátima; Macedo, Guilherme

    2014-12-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyps are rare mesenchymal lesions. The frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection in the gastric mucosa overlying inflammatory fibroid polyps and its relation with the histologic features of the polyps are undetermined. The clinico-pathological features of inflammatory fibroid polyps, the frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection in the overlying gastric mucosa, and its putative impact on the phenotype of the polyps were evaluated. Gastric inflammatory fibroid polyps diagnosed in our Hospital from 1998 to 2012 were reviewed and the histological. The histological sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and modified Giemsa for the evaluation of Helicobacter pylori infection. Inconclusive cases were further analyzed by immunohistochemistry with anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody. Diagnosis was confirmed in 54 polyps, 85 % developed in females, mean age 63 ± 11 years. Most polyps were sessile (74 %), with a mean size of 15 ± 12 mm, 96 % were located in the antrum and 85 % were removed by snare polypectomy. Helicobacter pylori infection was identified in 48 % of the polyps. Most inflammatory fibroid polyps developed in the submucosa, and mucosal extension was observed in 96 % of the cases. Chronic gastritis was observed in all cases (63 % with activity, 31 % with intestinal metaplasia, and 61 % with foveolar hyperplasia). Erosion and ulceration of the overlying gastric mucosa was observed in 48 % and 11 % of the polyps, respectively. Onion skin features were present in 52 % of the polyps and were more frequently observed in cases without evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Background changes in gastric mucosa were not distinctive according to Helicobacter pylori infection. Chronic atrophic gastritis with intestinal metaplasia was associated with the presence of perivascular onion skin lesions. To our knowledge, this is the second largest series of gastric inflammatory fibroid polyps. Helicobacter pylori infection was

  4. Gastric microbiota and carcinogenesis: the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Dias-Jácome

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have revealed a complex microbial community in the stomach that could also contribute to the development of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to present recent scientific evidence regarding the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria in gastric carcinogenesis. Methods: A systematic review of original articles published in PubMed in the last ten years related to gastric microbiota and gastric cancer in humans was performed. Results: Thirteen original articles were included. The constitution of gastric microbiota appears to be significantly affected by gastric cancer and premalignant lesions. In fact, differences in gastric microbiota have been documented, depending on Helicobacter pylori status and gastric conditions, such as non-atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis can be associated with an increase in many bacteria (such as Lactobacillus coleohominis, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Acinetobacter baumannii as well as decrease in others (such as Porphyromonas spp, Neisseria spp, Prevotella pallens or Streptococcus sinensis. However, there is no conclusive data that confirms if these changes in microbiota are a cause or consequence of the process of carcinogenesis. Conclusions: Even though there is limited evidence in humans, microbiota differences between normal individuals, pre-malignant lesions and gastric cancer could suggest a progressive shift in the constitution of gastric microbiota in carcinogenesis, possibly resulting from a complex cross-talk between gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the specific role (if any of different microorganisms.

  5. Helicobacter pylori upregulates prion protein expression in gastric mucosa: A possible link to prion disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter C Konturek; Karolina Bazela; Vitaliy Kukharskyy; Michael Bauer; Eckhart G Hahn; Detlef Schuppan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Pathological prion protein (PrPSC) is responsible for the development of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). While PrPc enters the organism via the oral route, less data is available to know about its uptake and the role of gastrointestinal inflammation on the expression of prion precursor PrPc, which is constitutively expressed in the gastric mucosa.METHODS: We studied PrPc expression in the gastric mucosa of 10 Helicobacter pylori-positive patients before and after successful H pylori eradication compared to non-infected controls using RT-PCR and Western blotting.The effect of central mediators of gastric inflammation,i.e., gastrin, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) on PrPc expression was analyzed in gastric cell lines.RESULTS: PrPc expression was increased in H pyloriinfection compared with non-infected controls and decreased to normal after successful eradication. Gastrin,PGE2, and IL-1β dose-dependently upregulated PrPc in gastric cells, while TNF-α had no effect.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection leads to the upregulation of gastric PrPc expression. This can be linked to H pylori induced hypergastrinemia and increased mucosal PGE2 and IL-1β synthesis.H pylori creates a milieu for enhanced propagation of prions in the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Helicobacter pylori Eradication for Prevention of Metachronous Recurrence after Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Chang Seok; Baik, Gwang Ho; Shin, In Soo; Kim, Jin Bong; Suk, Ki Tae; Yoon, Jai Hoon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Dong Joon

    2015-06-01

    Controversies persist regarding the effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the development of metachronous gastric cancer after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer (EGC). The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication after endoscopic resection of EGC for the prevention of metachronous gastric cancer. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted using the core databases PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. The rates of development of metachronous gastric cancer between the Helicobacter pylori eradication group vs. the non-eradication group were extracted and analyzed using risk ratios (RRs). A random effect model was applied. The methodological quality of the enrolled studies was assessed by the Risk of Bias table and by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Publication bias was evaluated through the funnel plot with trim and fill method, Egger's test, and by the rank correlation test. Ten studies (2 randomized and 8 non-randomized/5,914 patients with EGC or dysplasia) were identified and analyzed. Overall, the Helicobacter pylori eradication group showed a RR of 0.467 (95% CI: 0.362-0.602, P < 0.001) for the development of metachronous gastric cancer after endoscopic resection of EGC. Subgroup analyses showed consistent results. Publication bias was not detected. Helicobacter pylori eradication after endoscopic resection of EGC reduces the occurrence of metachronous gastric cancer.

  7. Alteration or adaptation, the two roads for human gastric mucin glycosylation infected by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joncquel Chevalier Curt, Marie; Lecointe, Karine; Mihalache, Adriana; Rossez, Yannick; Gosset, Pierre; Léonard, Renaud; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the mucus niche of the gastric mucosa and infects more than half of the world's human population. Chronic infection may cause gastritis, duodenal ulcer, intestinal metaplasia or gastric cancer. In the stomach, H. pylori interacts with O-glycans of gastric mucins but the mechanism by which the bacteria succeed in altering the mucosa remains mainly unknown. To better understand the physiopathology of the infection, inhibitory adhesion assays were performed with various O-glycans expressed by human gastric mucins, and topographic expression of gastric mucins MUC5AC and MUC6 was analyzed for healthy uninfected individuals, for infected asymptomatic individuals and for patients infected by H. pylori and having the incomplete type of intestinal metaplasia. The glycosylation of the gastric mucosa of asymptomatic individuals infected by H. pylori was determined and compared with the glycosylation pattern found for patients with the incomplete type of intestinal metaplasia. Results show that H. pylori manages to modulate host's glycosylation during the course of infection in order to create a favorable niche, whereas asymptomatic infected individuals seem to counteract further steps of infection development by adapting their mucus glycosylation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. High Diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori Genotypes in Patients with and without Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yolanda López-Vidal; Sergio Ponce-de-León; Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas; Rafael Barreto-Zúñiga; Aldo Torre-Delgadillo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biops...

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection induces genetic instability of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Figueiredo, Ceu; Touati, Eliette

    2009-01-01

    of genetic instabilities in the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were examined. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We observed the effects of H. pylori infection on a gastric cell line (AGS), on C57BL/6 mice, and on individuals with chronic gastritis. In AGS cells, the effect of H. pylori infection on base excision...... cells and chronic gastritis tissue were determined by PCR, single-stranded conformation polymorphism, and sequencing. H. pylori vacA and cagA genotyping was determined by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization. RESULTS: Following H. pylori infection, the activity and expression of base excision repair...... and MMR are down-regulated both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, H. pylori induces genomic instability in nuclear CA repeats in mice and in mtDNA of AGS cells and chronic gastritis tissue, and this effect in mtDNA is associated with bacterial virulence. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that H. pylori...

  10. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori after endoscopic resection of gastric tumors does not reduce incidence of metachronous gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongmin; Kim, Sang Gyun; Yoon, Hyuk; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung; Kim, Woo Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2014-05-01

    It is not clear whether eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection reduces the risk for metachronous gastric carcinoma. We performed a prospective, randomized, open-label trial of the effects of H pylori eradication on the incidence of metachronous carcinoma after endoscopic resection of gastric tumors. From April 2005 through February 2011 there were 901 consecutive patients with H pylori infection who had been treated with endoscopic resection for gastric dysplasia or cancer and who were assigned randomly to groups given therapy to eradicate the infection (n = 444) or no therapy (controls, n = 457). The eradication group received 20 mg omeprazole, 1 g amoxicillin, and 500 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 1 week. Patients underwent endoscopic examination 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment, and then yearly thereafter. The primary outcome was development of metachronous gastric carcinoma. During a median follow-up period of 3 years, 10 patients who received H pylori eradication and 17 controls developed metachronous carcinoma; this difference was not significant (P = .15). The incidence of metachronous carcinoma between the 2 groups did not differ significantly at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years after administration of the therapy. There were no significant differences in the development of metachronous carcinoma among patients who were positive (n = 16) or negative (n = 11) for H pylori infection (P = .32). In this prospective trial, eradication of H pylori after endoscopic resection of gastric tumors did not significantly reduce the incidence of metachronous gastric carcinoma. ClinicalTrials.gov Number: NCT01510730. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of gastric cancer-associated MG7 antigen in gastric cancer, precancerous lesions and H. pylori-associated gastric diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Li Guo; Ming Dong; Lan Wang; Li-Ping Sun; Yuan Yuan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the antigen MG7 antigen expression and gastric cancer as well as precancerous condition; to study the relationship between the MG7 antigen expression and H. pyloriinfection in benign gastric lesions in order to find out the effect of H. pylori infection on the process of gastric cancer development.METHODS: The level of MG7 antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemical method in 383 gastric biopsied materials. The intestinal metaplasia was determined by histochemistry method. The H. pyloriinfection was determined by HE stain, PCR and ELISA in 291 specimens, among which only 34 cases of H. pylori-associated gastric lesions were followed up.RESULTS: The positive rate of MG7 expression in normal gastric mucosa, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and gastric cancer increased gradually in ascending order (P<0.01). The positive rate of MG7 antigen expression in type Ⅲ intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa was higher than that of type Ⅰand Ⅱ intestinal metaplasia, being highly significant (P<0.05).The positive rate of MG7 antigen expression in superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer increased gradually (11.9 %, 64.8 %, 91.2 %, P<0.01). There was no significant difference between H.pylori-negative and H. pyloripositive intestinal metaplasia, atrophic gastritis and dysplasia of gastric epithelium in the positive rate of MG7 antigen expression. There was no expression of MG7 antigen in H. pylori-negative superficial gastritis. The positive rate of MG7 expression in H. pylori-positive superficial gastritis was 20.5 %, and the difference between them was significant (P<0.05). During following up, one of the three H. pylori negative cases turned positive again, and its MG7 antigen expression turned to be stronger correspondingly. 3 of 31 H. pyloripositive cases were detected as early gastric cancer, among which one with "+++" MG7 antigen expression was diminished after H. pylori

  12. Presence of a high-grade component in gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is not associated with an adverse prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Mei-Kim; Hee, Siew Wan; Quek, Richard; Yap, Swee Peng; Loong, Susan; Tan, Leonard; Tao, Miriam; Lim, Soon Thye

    2009-05-01

    Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) show a spectrum of disease characterized by varying proportions of low-grade and high-grade components. While the natural history and optimum treatment for low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma and DLBCL is well established, the prognosis and optimal treatment of patients with both low- and high-grade components is not well established. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics, survival outcomes, and prognostic factors of patients with gastric MALT lymphoma and gastric DLBCL. A retrospective review of patients with gastric MALT lymphoma, gastric DLBCL, or MALT lymphoma with a high-grade component treated at our centers from 1994 to 2006 was performed. Patients were divided into three categories: "pure MALT lymphoma," "MALT lymphoma with high-grade component" (mixed), and "pure DLBCL." Seventy-six patients were included in our study-26 with pure MALT, 22 with MALT with high-grade component ("mixed"), and 28 with pure DLBCL. Pure MALT lymphoma and mixed lymphoma patients had similar clinical characteristics, whereas pure DLBCL patients had less favorable disease characteristics with significantly poorer performance status, higher number of extranodal sites of disease, higher stage, and larger proportion of bone marrow involvement and international prognostic index (IPI) scores compared with mixed lymphoma. The majority of mixed lymphoma (72.7%) and DLBCL patients (71.4%) were treated with chemotherapy. Of patients receiving chemotherapy, a higher proportion of mixed lymphoma and DLBCL patients received anthracycline-based combination chemotherapy regimens compared with MALT lymphoma (73% vs 71% vs 8%) whereas the proportion of mixed lymphoma and DLBCL patients was similar (p = 0.919). At a median follow-up of 37 months, the 5-year overall survival was 66.9%. The 5-year overall survival was 78% for MALT lymphoma, 84% for mixed lymphoma, and 45

  13. Diet, Helicobacter pylori strain-specific infection, and gastric cancer risk among Chinese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epplein, Meira; Zheng, Wei; Li, Honglan; Peek, Richard M; Correa, Pelayo; Gao, Jing; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Cai, Qiuyin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for the association of diet and gastric cancer is equivocal, and the majority of previous studies have not evaluated the interaction of diet and infection with Helicobacter pylori, the leading risk factor for gastric cancer. We examined these associations among 226 cases and 451 controls nested within a prospective cohort. Dietary intakes were calculated from validated food frequency questionnaires. Blood levels of 15 antibodies to Helicobacter pylori proteins were assessed using multiplex serology. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using logistic regression. Among individuals infected with high-risk Helicobacter pylori (sero-positivity to 5-6 virulent H. pylori proteins), increasing intake of red meat, heme iron, and sodium increased risk (comparing highest tertile to lowest: ORs [95% confidence interval {CI}]: 1.85 [1.01-3.40]; 1.95 [1.06-3.57]; and 1.76 [0.91-3.43], respectively) while increasing intake of fruit decreased gastric cancer risk (comparing highest tertile of intake to lowest: OR [95% CI]: 0.52 [0.28-0.94]). No associations of diet with risk were found among individuals infected with low-risk H. pylori (P for interaction for red meat and sodium: 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). In this population with over 90% prevalence of CagA-positive H. pylori infection, categorizing individuals using H. pylori multiplex serology may identify individuals for whom a diet intervention may be effective.

  14. Motility and chemotaxis mediate the preferential colonization of gastric injury sites by Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitaro Aihara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a pathogen contributing to peptic inflammation, ulceration, and cancer. A crucial step in the pathogenic sequence is when the bacterium first interacts with gastric tissue, an event that is poorly understood in vivo. We have shown that the luminal space adjacent to gastric epithelial damage is a microenvironment, and we hypothesized that this microenvironment might enhance H. pylori colonization. Inoculation with 106 H. pylori (wild-type Sydney Strain 1, SS1 significantly delayed healing of acetic-acid induced ulcers at Day 1, 7 and 30 post-inoculation, and wild-type SS1 preferentially colonized the ulcerated area compared to uninjured gastric tissue in the same animal at all time points. Gastric resident Lactobacillus spp. did not preferentially colonize ulcerated tissue. To determine whether bacterial motility and chemotaxis are important to ulcer healing and colonization, we analyzed isogenic H. pylori mutants defective in motility (ΔmotB or chemotaxis (ΔcheY. ΔmotB (10(6 failed to colonize ulcerated or healthy stomach tissue. ΔcheY (10(6 colonized both tissues, but without preferential colonization of ulcerated tissue. However, ΔcheY did modestly delay ulcer healing, suggesting that chemotaxis is not required for this process. We used two-photon microscopy to induce microscopic epithelial lesions in vivo, and evaluated accumulation of fluorescently labeled H. pylori at gastric damage sites in the time frame of minutes instead of days. By 5 min after inducing damage, H. pylori SS1 preferentially accumulated at the site of damage and inhibited gastric epithelial restitution. H. pylori ΔcheY modestly accumulated at the gastric surface and inhibited restitution, but did not preferentially accumulate at the injury site. H. pylori ΔmotB neither accumulated at the surface nor inhibited restitution. We conclude that bacterial chemosensing and motility rapidly promote H. pylori colonization of injury sites

  15. Mechanisms for the induction of gastric cancer by Helicobacter pylori infection: aberrant DNA methylation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Masahiro; Moro, Hiroshi; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2017-03-01

    Multiple pathogenic mechanisms by which Helicobacter pylori infection induces gastric cancer have been established in the last two decades. In particular, aberrant DNA methylation is induced in multiple driver genes, which inactivates them. Methylation profiles in gastric cancer are associated with specific subtypes, such as microsatellite instability. Recent comprehensive and integrated analyses showed that many cancer-related pathways are more frequently altered by aberrant DNA methylation than by mutations. Aberrant DNA methylation can even be present in noncancerous gastric mucosae, producing an "epigenetic field for cancerization." Mechanistically, H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation, but not H. pylori itself, plays a direct role in the induction of aberrant DNA methylation. The expression of three inflammation-related genes, Il1b, Nos2, and Tnf, is highly associated with the induction of aberrant DNA methylation. Importantly, the degree of accumulated aberrant DNA methylation is strongly correlated with gastric cancer risk. A recent multicenter prospective cohort study demonstrated the utility of epigenetic cancer risk diagnosis for metachronous gastric cancer. Suppression of aberrant DNA methylation by a demethylating agent was shown to inhibit gastric cancer development in an animal model. Induction of aberrant DNA methylation is the major pathway by which H. pylori infection induces gastric cancer, and this can be utilized for translational opportunities.

  16. Impact of Helicobacter pylori on the healing process of the gastric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnich, Eliza; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Sicińska, Paulina; Hinc, Krzysztof; Obuchowski, Michał; Gajewski, Adrian; Moran, Anthony P; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the impact of selected well defined Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) antigens on gastric barrier cell turnover. METHODS In this study, using two cellular models of gastric epithelial cells and fibroblasts, we have focused on exploring the effects of well defined H. pylori soluble components such as glycine acid extract antigenic complex (GE), subunit A of urease (UreA), cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on cell turnover by comparing the wound healing capacity of the cells in terms of their proliferative and metabolic activity as well as cell cycle distribution. Toxic effects of H. pylori components have been assessed in an association with damage to cell nuclei and inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation. RESULTS We showed that H. pylori GE, CagA and UreA promoted regeneration of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, which is necessary for effective tissue healing. However, in vivo increased proliferative activity of these cells may constitute an increased risk of gastric neoplasia. In contrast, H. pylori LPS showed a dose-dependent influence on the process of wound healing. At a low concentration (1 ng/mL) H. pylori LPS accelerated of healing epithelial cells, which was linked to significantly enhanced cell proliferation and MTT reduction as well as lack of alterations in cell cycle and downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) production as well as cell nuclei destruction. By comparison, H. pylori LPS at a high concentration (25 ng/mL) inhibited the process of wound repair, which was related to diminished proliferative activity of the cells, cell cycle arrest, destruction of cell nuclei and downregulation of the EGF/STAT3 signalling pathway. CONCLUSION In vivo H. pylori LPS driven effects might lead to the maintenance of chronic inflammatory response and pathological disorders on the level of the gastric mucosal barrier. PMID:27672275

  17. Early or late antibiotic intervention prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhua; Lee, Dong Soo; Morrissey, Rhiannon; Aponte-Pieras, Jose R; Rogers, Arlin B; Moss, Steven F

    2014-12-01

    H. pylori infection causes gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Eradicating H. pylori prevents ulcers, but to what extent this prevents cancer remains unknown, especially if given after intestinal metaplasia has developed. H. pylori infected wild-type (WT) mice do not develop cancer, but mice lacking the tumor suppressor p27 do so, thus providing an experimental model of H. pylori-induced cancer. We infected p27-deficient mice with H. pylori strain SS1 at 6-8 weeks of age. Persistently H. pylori-infected WT C57BL/6 mice served as controls. Mice in the eradication arms received antimicrobial therapy (omeprazole, metronidazole and clarithromycin) either "early" (at 15 weeks post infection, WPI) or "late" at 45 WPI. At 70 WPI, mice were euthanized for H. pylori determination, histopathology and cytokine/chemokine expression. Persistently infected mice developed premalignant lesions including high-grade dysplasia, whereas those given antibiotics did not. Histologic activity scores in the eradication groups were similar to each other, and were significantly decreased compared with controls for inflammation, epithelial defects, hyperplasia, metaplasia, atrophy and dysplasia. IP-10 and MIG levels in groups that received antibiotics were significantly lower than controls. There were no significant differences in expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1α or MIP-1β among the three groups. Thus, H. pylori eradication given either early or late after infection significantly attenuated gastric inflammation, gastric atrophy, hyperplasia, and dysplasia in the p27-deficient mice model of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer, irrespective of the timing of antibiotic administration. This was associated with reduced expression of IP-10 and MIG.

  18. VCP phosphorylation-dependent interaction partners prevent apoptosis in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chou Yu

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that valosin-containing protein (VCP is associated with H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. By identifying the interactome of VCP overexpressed in AGS cells using a subtractive proteomics approach, we aimed to characterize the cellular responses mediated by VCP and its functional roles in H. pylori-associated gastric cancer. VCP immunoprecipitations followed by proteomic analysis identified 288 putative interacting proteins, 18 VCP-binding proteins belonged to the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. H. pylori infection increased the interaction between Akt and VCP, Akt-dependent phosphorylation of VCP, levels of ubiquitinated proteins, and aggresome formation in AGS cells. Furthermore, phosphorylated VCP co-localized with the aggresome, bound ubiquitinated proteins, and increased the degradation of cellular regulators to protect H. pylori-infected AGS cells from apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that VCP phosphorylation following H. pylori infection promotes both gastric epithelial cell survival, mediated by the PI3K/Akt pathway, and the degradation of cellular regulators. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of H. pylori infection induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  19. Helicobacter pylori upregulates the expression of p16(INK4) in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Mei, Juan; Zhang, Ning; Tao, Jing; Tian, Hua; Fu, Guo-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that p16(INK4) protein is over expressed in gastric cancer. However, whether H. pylori infection induces p16(INK4) in human gastric epithelial cells remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to analyze the molecular mechanism of H. pylori-induced p16(INK4) expression. Expression of p16(INK4) mRNA and Sp1 mRNA were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR. Expression of p16(INK4) protein was assessed by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. A luciferase assay was used to monitor activation of the p16(INK4) gene promoter and to explore the binding of transcription factors to this promoter. H. pylori upregulates the expression of p16(INK4) in gastric cancer SGC7901 cells. p16 promoter is highly actived in SGC7901 cells by H. pylori. Sp1 activates the expression of p16(INK4)-Luc and promotes the protein level of p16(INK4). H. pylori upregulates the expression of p16(INK4) in gastric cancer SGC7901 cells via the p16(INK4) promoter, and Sp1 is involved in the activation of p16(INK4) promoter by H. pylori.

  20. How long will it take to reduce gastric cancer incidence by eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, John F; Cattaruzza, Maria S; Ferri, Anna M; De Angelis, Flora; Renzi, Davide; Marani, Alessandra; Vaira, Dino

    2013-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most important risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. The objective of this article is to estimate how the number of clinically diagnosed cases caused by H. pylori would reduce in the years after the eradication of the infection from a population. It is assumed that the eradication of H. pylori will prevent the start of some new gastric tumors, but those that have passed the "point of no return" will continue to develop until diagnosed clinically. The observed reduction in the number of clinically diagnosed cases of gastric cancer will depend on the form and parameters of the distribution of the time t taken for tumor to develop into a clinical case after passing the "point of no return." This analysis assumes that the time t follows normal and log-normal distributions with means 5, 10, and 15 years. If the mean value of time t were 5 years, H. pylori caused cases should be almost eliminated after 10 years, whereas if the mean were 10 years, the number of cases should be halved. If the mean were 15 years, the reduction would only be about 15% after 10 years. The eradication of H. pylori from a population will reduce the incidence of gastric cancer, but the follow-up time needed to show and evaluate the reduction may be longer than that that has been used in studies published so far. ©2013 AACR.

  1. Dietary prevention of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer with kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young-Min; Park, Kun Young; Lee, Don Haeng; Yoo, Joon-Hwan; Cho, Joo Young; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2015-10-06

    To prove whether dietary intervention can prevent Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer, we developed cancer preventive kimchi (cpKimchi) through special recipe and administered to chronic H. pylori-initiated, high salt diet-promoted, gastric tumorigenesis mice model. H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice were administered with cpKimchi mixed in drinking water up to 36 weeks. Gross and pathological gastric lesions were evaluated after 24 and 36 weeks, respectively and explored underlying molecular changes to explain efficacies. Cancer preventive actions of anti-inflammation and anti-mutagenesis were compared between standard recipe kimchi (sKimchi) and special recipe cpKimchi in in vitro H. pylori-infected cell model. The erythematous and nodular changes, mucosal ulcerative and erosive lesions in the stomach were noted at 24th weeks, but cpKimchi administration significantly ameliorated. After 36th weeks, scattered nodular masses, some ulcers, and thin nodular gastric mucosa were noted in H. pylori-infected mice, whereas these gross lesions were significantly attenuated in cpKimchi group. On molecular analysis, significant expressions of COX-2 and IL-6, activated NF-κB and STAT3, increased apoptosis, and marked oxidative stresses were noted in H. pylori-infected group relevant to tumorigenesis, but these were all significantly attenuated in cpKimchi group. cpKimchi extracts imparted significant selective induction of apoptosis only in cancer cells, led to inhibition of H. pylori-induced proliferation, while no cytotoxicity through significant HO-1 induction in non-transformed gastric cells. In conclusion, daily dietary intake of cpKimchi can be an effective way either to rejuvenate H. pylori-atrophic gastritis or to prevent tumorigenesis supported with the concerted actions of anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-mutagenic mechanisms.

  2. Prospective study of Helicobacter pylori antigens and gastric noncardia cancer risk in the Nutrition Intervention Trial cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Gwen; Freedman, Neal D; Michel, Angelika; Fan, Jin-Hu; Taylor, Philip R.; Pawlita, Michael; Qiao, You-Lin; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Abnet, Christian C.; DAWSEY, Sanford M.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylon (H. pylori) infection is the strongest known risk factor for gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA). We used multiplex serology to determine whether seropositivity to 15 H. pylori proteins is associated with the subsequent development of non-cardia gastric cancer in Linxian, China.

  3. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the “point of no return” and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions. PMID:24833876

  4. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the "point of no return" and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions.

  5. Helicobacter pylori enhances tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-mediated apoptosis in human gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ying Wu; Hwei-Fang Tsai; We-Cheng Lin; Ai-Hsiang Chou; Hui-Ting Chen; Jyh-Chin Yang; Ping-I Hsu; Ping-Ning Hsu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relations between tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection in apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells and to assess the expression of TRAIL onthe surface of infiltrating T-cells in Hpylori-infected gastric mucosa.METHODS: Human gastric epithelial cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells were co-cultured with H pylori in vitro, then recombinant TRAIL proteins were added to the culture. Apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells was determined by a specific ELISA for cell death. Infiltrating lymphocytes were isolated from H pylori-infected gastric mucosa, and expression of TRAIL in T cells was analyzed by flow cytometry.RESULTS: The apoptosis of gastric epithelial cell lines and primary human gastric epithelial cells was mildly increased by interaction with either TRAIL or H pylorialone. Interestingly,the apoptotic indices were markedly elevated when gastric epithelial cells were incubated with both TRAIL and H pylori (Control vsTRAIL and H pylori: 0.51±0.06 vs 2.29±0.27,P = 0.018). A soluble TRAIL receptor (DR4-Fc) could specifically block the TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Further studies demonstrated that infiltrating T-cells in gastric mucosa expressed TRAIL on their surfaces, and the induction of TRAIL sensitivity by H pylori was dependent upon direct cell contact of viable bacteria, but not CagA and VacA of H pylori.CONCLUSION: H pylori can sensitize human gastric epithelial ceils and enhance susceptibility to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Modulation of host cell sensitivity to apoptosis by bacterial interaction adds a new dimension to the immunopathogenesis of H pylori infection.

  6. Comparison between Resectable Helicobacter pylori-Negative and -Positive Gastric Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Yoon, Hyuk; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Ju Yup; Kwon, Yong Hwan; Yoon, Kichul; Jo, Hyun Jin; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung Ho; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-03-01

    Controversy exists regarding the characteristics of Helicobacter pylori infection-negative gastric cancer (HPIN-GC). The aim of this study was to evaluate clinicopathologic features of HPIN-GC compared to H. pylori infection-positive gastric cancer (HPIP-GC) using a comprehensive analysis that included genetic and environmental factors. H. pylori infection status of 705 resectable gastric cancer patients was determined by the rapid urease test, testing for anti-H. pylori antibodies, histologic analysis and culture of gastric cancer tissue samples, and history of H. pylori eradication. HPIN-GC was defined as gastric cancer that was negative for H. pylori infection based on all five methods and that had no evidence of atrophy in histology or serology. The prevalence of HPIN-GC was 4% (28/705). No significant differences with respect to age, sex, smoking, drinking, family history of gastric cancer or obesity were observed between the two groups. HPIN-GC tumors were marginally more likely to involve the cardia (14.3% for HPIN-GC vs 5.3% for HPIP-GC, p=0.068). The Lauren classification, histology, and TNM stage did not differ according to H. pylori infection status. Microsatellite instability was not different between the two groups, but p53 overexpression in HPIN-GC was marginally higher than in HPIP-GC (56.0% for HPIN-GC vs 37.0% for HPIP-GC, p=0.055). The prevalence of HPIN-GC was extremely low, and its clinicopathologic characteristics were similar to HPIP-GC.

  7. A Prospective Study of Urinary Prostaglandin E2 Metabolite, Helicobacter pylori Antibodies, and Gastric Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyi; Cai, Hui; Zheng, Wei; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Milne, Ginger; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Li, Hong-Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Epplein, Meira

    2017-05-15

    Previous studies suggest that a stable end-product of prostaglandin E2, the urinary metabolite PGE-M, is associated with colorectal cancer, and 1 study of relatively small sample size found an association with gastric cancer among women. In the present study we further investigate the PGE-M, Helicobacter pylori, and gastric cancer association. The present analysis included 359 prospectively ascertained gastric cancer cases and 700 individually matched controls from the Shanghai Women's and Men's Health Studies. Urinary PGE-M was measured by a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric method. Seropositivity to 15 H. pylori recombinantly expressed fusion proteins was detected by H. pylori multiplex serology. Adjusting for H. pylori, increasing PGE-M was associated with higher risk of gastric cancer (quartile 4 vs 1: odds ratio [OR], 1.76 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.17-2.66], Ptrend = .004). This association remained after excluding those diagnosed within 2 years from sample collection (OR, 1.73 [95% CI, 1.12-2.65], Ptrend = .007). However it was no longer present among individuals with 10 or more years of follow-up (2-4.9 years: OR, 3.15 [95% CI, 1.11-8.91]; 5-9.9 years: OR, 2.23 [95% CI, 1.22-4.06]; ≥10 years: OR, 0.73 [95% CI, .31-1.70]). Compared to H. pylori-negative individuals with below-median PGE-M levels, H. pylori-positive individuals with above-median PGE-M levels had a 5-fold increase in the odds of gastric cancer (OR, 5.08 [95% CI, 2.47-10.43]). In China, higher PGE-M levels may indicate an increased risk of gastric cancer independent of the risk conferred by H. pylori infection status, particularly for cancers diagnosed within 10 years of sample collection.

  8. H pylori stimulates proliferation of gastric cancer cells through activating mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Chang Chen; Ying Wang; Jing-Yan Li; Wen-Rong Xu; You-Li Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the mechanism by which H pylori causes activation of gastric epithelial cells.METHODS: A VacA (+) and CagA (+) standard Hpyloriline NCTC 11637 and a human gastric adenocarcinoma derived gastric epithelial cell line BGC-823 were applied in the study. MTT assay and 3H-TdR incorporation test were used to detect the proliferation of BGC-823 cells and Western blotting was used to detect the activity and existence of related proteins.RESULTS: Incubation with Hpylori extract increased the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells, reflected by both live cell number and DNA synthesis rate. The activity of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signal transduction cascade increased within 20 min after incubation with Hpylori extract and appeared to be a sustained event. MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059abolished the action of H pylori extract on both ERK activity and cell proliferation. Incubation with H pyloriextract increased c-Fos expression and SRE-dependentgene expression. H pylori extract caused phosphorylation of several proteins including a protein with molecular size of 97.4 kDa and tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibited the activation of ERK and the proliferation of cells caused by H pylori extract.CONCLUSION: Biologically active elements in H pylori extract cause proliferation of gastric epithelial cells through activating tyrosine kinase and ERK signal transduction cascade.

  9. Helicobacter pylori vacA Genotypes in Chronic Gastritis and Gastric Carcinoma Patients from Macau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Pinto-Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is the major triggering factor for gastric carcinoma, but only a small proportion of infected patients develop this disease. Differences in virulence observed among H. pylori strains, namely in the vacuolating cytotoxin vacA gene, may contribute to this discrepancy. Infection with vacA s1, i1 and m1 strains increases the risk for progression of gastric premalignant lesions and for gastric carcinoma. However, in East Asian countries most of the H. pylori strains are vacA s1, regardless of the patients’ clinical status, and the significance of the vacA i1 and m1 genotypes for gastric carcinoma in this geographic area remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate this relationship in 290 patients from Macau, China. Using very sensitive and accurate genotyping methods, we detected infection with vacA i1 and with vacA m1 strains in, respectively, 85.2% and 52.6% of the patients that were infected with single genotypes. The prevalence of cagA-positive strains was 87.5%. No significant associations were observed between vacA genotypes or cagA and gastric carcinoma. It is worth noting that 37.5% of the infected patients had coexistence of H. pylori strains with different vacA genotypes. Additional studies directed to other H. pylori virulence factors should be performed to identify high risk patients in East Asia.

  10. Evaluation of gastric histology in children and adolescents with Helicobacter pylori gastritis using the Update Sydney System

    OpenAIRE

    Langner,Marini; Machado, Rodrigo S. [UNIFESP; Francy R. S. PATRÍCIO; Kawakami, Elisabete

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Although Helicobacter pylori infection is prevalent in our country, there are few studies evaluating the associated histological abnormalities in children. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the histological features of the gastric mucosa in children and adolescents with Helicobacter pylori gastritis. METHODS: One hundred and thirty two gastric biopsies from 22 symptomatic patients infected with H. pylori (14F/8M, median age 10 y 5 mo, age range 2 y 11 mo to 16 y 9 mo) were evaluated. Evaluated ...

  11. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in patients without gastric symptoms suffering from recurrent aphthous stomatitis: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Latković Marina; Ranin Lazar; Teodorović Nevenka; Anđelković Marko

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim. Helicobacter (H.) pylori is a widespread bacterium and its involvement in pathogenesis of gastric diseases is well-known. However, H. pylori role in etiology of other histologically similar conditions, especially recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is still controversial. Research regarding H. pylori and its association with RAS, as well as the treatment options were always conducted on patients with diagnosed gastric problems. The aim of th...

  12. Lactobacillus plantarum B7 inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth and attenuates gastric inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chompoonut Sunanliganon; Duangporn Thong-Ngam; Somying Tumwasorn; Naruemon Klaikeaw

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To determine the anti-Helicobacter property of Lactobacillus plantarum B7 (L.plantarum) B7 supernatants in vitro and the protective effects of L.plantarum B7 on serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α),gastric malondialdehyde (MDA) level,apoptosis,and histopathology in Helicobacter pylori (H.pylorl)-induced gastric inflammation in rats.METHODS:In vitro,the inhibition of H,pylori growth was examined using L.plantarum B7 supernatants at pH 4 and pH 7 and at the concentration of 1×,5× and 10× on plates inoculated with H.pylori.The inhibitory effect of H.pylori was interpreted by the size of the inhibition zone.In vitro,male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups including group 1 (control group),group 2 (H.pylori infected group),group 3 (H.pylori infected with L.plantarum B7 10é CFUs/mL treated group) and group 4 (H.pylori infected with L.plantarum B7 1010 CFUs/mL treated group).One week after H.pylori inoculation,L.plantarum B7 106 CFUs/mL or 1010 CFUs/mL were fed once daily to group 3 and group 4,respectively,for one week.Blood and gastric samples were collected at the end of the study.RESULTS:In vitro,at intact pH 4,mean inhibitory zone diameters of 8.5 mm and 13 mm were noted at concentrations of 5× and 10× of L.plantarum B7supernatant disks,respectively.At adjusted pH 7,L.plantarum B7 supernatants at concentrations of 5 × and 10× yielded mean inhibitory zone diameters of 6.5 mm and 11 mm,respectively.In the in vitro study,in group 2,stomach histopathology revealed mild to moderate H.pylori colonization and inflammation.The level of gastric MDA and epithelial cell apoptosis were significantly increased compared with group 1.The serum TNF-α level was significant decreased in group 3compared with group 2 (P < 0.05).In addition,L.plantarum B7 treatments resulted in a significant improvement in stomach pathology,and decreased gastric MDA level and apoptotic epithelial cells.CONCLUSION:L.plantarum B7 supernatant inhibits H.pylori

  13. A Changing Gastric Environment Leads to Adaptation of Lipopolysaccharide Variants in Helicobacter pylori Populations during Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Christina; Björkholm, Britta; Normark, Staffan; Engstrand, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of half of the human population, and causes development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori-associated chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG) with loss of the acid-producing parietal cells, is correlated with an increased risk for development of gastric adenocarinoma. The majority of H. pylori isolates produce lipopolysaccharides (LPS) decorated with human-related Lewis epitopes, which have been shown to phase-vary in response to different environmental conditions. We have characterized the adaptations of H. pylori LPS and Lewis antigen expression to varying gastric conditions; in H. pylori isolates from mice with low or high gastric pH, respectively; in 482 clinical isolates from healthy individuals and from individuals with ChAG obtained at two time points with a four-year interval between endoscopies; and finally in isolates grown at different pH in vitro. Here we show that the gastric environment can contribute to a switch in Lewis phenotype in the two experimental mouse models. The clinical isolates from different human individuals showed that intra-individual isolates varied in Lewis antigen expression although the LPS diversity was relatively stable within each individual over time. Moreover, the isolates demonstrated considerable diversity in the levels of glycosylation and in the sizes of fucosylated O-antigen chains both within and between individuals. Thus our data suggest that different LPS variants exist in the colonizing H. pylori population, which can adapt to changes in the gastric environment and provide a means to regulate the inflammatory response of the host during disease progression. PMID:19517017

  14. A changing gastric environment leads to adaptation of lipopolysaccharide variants in Helicobacter pylori populations during colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Skoglund

    Full Text Available The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of half of the human population, and causes development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori-associated chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG with loss of the acid-producing parietal cells, is correlated with an increased risk for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. The majority of H. pylori isolates produce lipopolysaccharides (LPS decorated with human-related Lewis epitopes, which have been shown to phase-vary in response to different environmental conditions. We have characterized the adaptations of H. pylori LPS and Lewis antigen expression to varying gastric conditions; in H. pylori isolates from mice with low or high gastric pH, respectively; in 482 clinical isolates from healthy individuals and from individuals with ChAG obtained at two time points with a four-year interval between endoscopies; and finally in isolates grown at different pH in vitro. Here we show that the gastric environment can contribute to a switch in Lewis phenotype in the two experimental mouse models. The clinical isolates from different human individuals showed that intra-individual isolates varied in Lewis antigen expression although the LPS diversity was relatively stable within each individual over time. Moreover, the isolates demonstrated considerable diversity in the levels of glycosylation and in the sizes of fucosylated O-antigen chains both within and between individuals. Thus our data suggest that different LPS variants exist in the colonizing H. pylori population, which can adapt to changes in the gastric environment and provide a means to regulate the inflammatory response of the host during disease progression.

  15. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-10-28

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection.

  16. Expressions of MMPs and TIMP-1 in Gastric Ulcers May Differentiate H. pylori-Infected from NSAID-Related Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Chi Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Two major causes of gastric ulcers are Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use. Aims. This study aimed to determine if there were different expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 between H. pylori-infected and NSAID-related ulcers. Methods. The 126 gastric ulcer patients (H. pylori infected n=46; NSAID related n=30; combined with two factors n=50 provided ulcer and nonulcer tissues for assessment of MMP-3, -7, and -9 and TIMP-1 expression by immunohistochemical staining. Results. Gastric ulcer tissues had significantly higher MMP-3, -7, and -9 and TIMP-1 expressions than nonulcer tissues (P<0.05. H. pylori-infected gastric ulcers had even higher MMP-7, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 expressions in epithelial cells than NSAID-related gastric ulcers (P<0.05. In patients with the two combined factors, gastric ulcers expressed similar proportions of antral ulcers and MMP-7 and MMP-9 intensities to NSAID-related gastric ulcers, but lower MMP-9 and TIMP-1 than H. pylori-infected gastric ulcers (P<0.05. Conclusions. H. pylori-infected gastric ulcers express higher MMP-7, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 than NSAID-related ulcers. In patients with the two combined factors, ulcer location and MMP-7 and MMP-9 intensities are similar to NSAID use.

  17. Curcumin suppresses gastric NF-κB activation and macromolecular leakage in Helicobacter pylori-infected rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kawiya; Sintara; Duangporn; Thong-Ngam; Suthiluk; Patumraj; Naruemon; Klaikeaw; Tanittha; Chatsuwan

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether curcumin could attenuate nuclear factor(NF)-κB p65 expression and macromolecular leakage in the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)-infected rats.METHODS:Twenty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into five groups:control rats(Control),control rats supplemented with 600 mg/kg curcumin,H.pylori-infected rats(Hp),H.pylori-infected rats supplemented with 200 mg/kg curcumin(Hp + curIn H.pylori-infected groups,rats were inoculated with H.pylori suspension twi...

  18. DETECTION OF Helicobacter pylori IN GASTRIC MUCOSA OF SHEEP: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rella

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is an organism widespread in humans and sometimes responsible for serious illnesses. It has been hypothesized the existence of animal reservoirs, and that the infection route by H. pylori involves multiple pathways including food-borne transmission as the microorganism has been detected from sheep, goat and cow milk. This work reports the preliminary results of a survey conducted in order to investigate the presence of H. pylori in gastric mucosa of sheep slaughtered in Apulia region (Italy employing a Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (Nested-PCR assay for the detection of the phosphoglucosamine mutase gene (glmM, as screening method followed by conventional bacteriological isolation. Out of the 50 gastric mucosa samples examined, 3 (6% resulted positive for the presence of glmMgene, but at this time no strains were isolated. The results deserve further investigations to asses the role of ruminants as possible reservoirs of H. pylori.

  19. Proteomics-Based Identification and Analysis of Proteins Associated with Helicobacter pylori in Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjiang Zhou

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium that causes the most common chronic infection in the human stomach. Approximately 1%-3% of infected individuals develop gastric cancer. However, the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces gastric cancer are not completely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the virulence factor of H. pylori, cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA, and gastric cancer. To further characterize H. pylori virulence, we established three cell lines by infecting the gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and AGS with cagA+ H. pylori and transfecting SGC-7901 with a vector carrying the full-length cagA gene. We detected 135 differently expressed proteins from the three cell lines using proteome technology, and 10 differential proteins common to the three cell lines were selected and identified by LC-MS/MS as well as verified by western blot: β-actin, L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD, pre-mRNA-processing factor 19 homolog (PRPF19, ATP synthase, calmodulin (CaM, p64 CLCP, Ran-specific GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP, P43 and calreticulin. Detection of the expression of these proteins and genes encoding these proteins in human gastric cancer tissues by real-time PCR (RT-qPCR and western blot revealed that the expression of β-ACTIN, LDH, DLD, PRPF19 and CaM genes were up-regulated and RanGAP was down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues and/or metastatic lymph nodes compared to peri-cancerous tissues. High gene expression was observed for H. pylori infection in gastric cancer tissues. Furthermore, the LDH, DLD and CaM genes were demethylated at the promoter -2325, -1885 and -276 sites, respectively, and the RanGAP gene was highly methylated at the promoter -570 and -170 sites in H. pylori-infected and cagA-overexpressing cells. These results provide new insights into the molecular pathogenesis and treatment targets for gastric cancer with H

  20. Effects of different Helicobacter pylori culture filtrates on growth of gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Guo Yan; Gang Zhao; Jin-Ping Ma; Shi-Rong Cai; Wen-Hua Zhan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of different Helicobacter pylori (H py/orl) culture filtrates on growth of gastric epithelial cells.METHODS: Broth culture filtrates of H pylori were prepared. Gastric epithelial cells were treated with the filtrates, and cell growth was determined by growth curve and flow cytometry. DNA damage of gastric epithelial cells was measured by single-cell microgel electrophoresis.RESULTS: Gastric epithelial cells proliferated actively when treated by CagA-gene-positive broth culture filtrates, and colony formation reached 40%. The number of cells in S phase increased compared to controls. Comet assay showed 41.2% comet cells in GES-1 cells treated with CagA-positive filtrates (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: CagA-positive filtrates enhance the changes in morphology and growth characteristics of human gastric epithelial tumor cells. DNA damage maybe one of the mechanisms involved in the growth changes.

  1. Inhibitory Activities of Palmatine from Coptis chinensis Against Helicobactor pylori and Gastric Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joohee; Choi, Jae Sue; Jeong, Choon-Sik

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most important factor of gastric disease in clinical practice. Moreover, smoking, stress and a poor diet may be additive factors for gastric damage. With these factors, increasing infection of H. pylori triggers gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. To develop a new protective agent, we are concerned with plant-derived extract. The extract of Coptis chinensis (C. chinensis) and its constituents were investigated to assess their protective activities against gastric damage. The C. chinensis extract showed a scavenging effect against 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radicals, inhibition of H. pylori colonization and antiulcerogenic activities in rat. In particular, palmatine derived from C. chinensis was found to be the novel protective agent. It is better than the C. chinensis extract, berberine, a well-known constituent of C. chinensis. We suggest that palmatine from the root cortex of C. chinensis may be a good candidate for the development of new pharmaceuticals to prevent gastric disease.

  2. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication therapy in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masanori Ito; Shinji Tanaka; Tomoari Kamada; Ken Haruma; Kazuaki Chayama

    2006-01-01

    Many epidemiological reports indicate that Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the initiation, promotion, and progression of the cancer cells in a multi-step manner.H pyloriis known to induce chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa. Its products, including superoxides,participate in the DNA damage followed by initiation, and the inflammation-derived cytokines and growth factors contribute to the promotion of gastric carcinogenesis.By eradicating H pylori, gastric inflammation can be cured; the therapy diminishes the levels not only of inflammatory cell infiltration, but also atrophyl intestinal metaplasia in part. A randomized controlled trial revealed that the eradication therapy diminished the gastric cancer prevalence in cases without precancerous conditions. In addition, recent epidemiological studies from Japanese groups demonstrated that the development of gastric cancer, especially of the intestinal type, was decreased by successful eradication therapy, although these were designed in a nonrandomized manner. However, it should be mentioned that endoscopic detection is the only way to evaluate the degree of gastric carcinogenesis. We have reported that the endoscopic and histological morphologies could be modified by eradication therapy and it might contribute to the prevalence of gastric cancer development.Considering the biological nature of cancer cell proliferation, it is considered that a sufficiently long-term follow-up would be essential to discuss the anticancer effect of eradication therapy.

  3. Astaxanthin and β-carotene in Helicobacter pylori-induced Gastric Inflammation: A Mini-review on Action Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a dominant bacterium living in the human gastric tissues. In H. pylori-infected tissues, the infiltrated inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to gastric inflammation with production of various mediators. According to numerous epidemiological studies, dietary carotenoids may prevent gastric inflammation due to their antioxidant properties. Recent studies showed that antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of astaxanthin and β-carotene may contribute to inhibition of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation. Astaxanthin changes H. pylori-induced activation of T helper cell type 1 response towards T helper cell type 2 response in the infected tissues. Astaxanthin inhibits the growth of H. pylori. Even though astaxanthin reduces H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation, it does not reduce cytokine levels in the infected tissues. β-Carotene suppresses ROS-mediated inflammatory signaling, including mitogen-activated protein kinases and redox-sensitive transcription factors, and reduces expression of inflammatory mediators, including interleukin-8, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 in the infected tissues. Therefore, consumption of astaxanthin- and β-carotene-rich foods may be beneficial to prevent H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation. This review will summarize anti-inflammatory mechanisms of astaxanthin and β-carotene in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation.

  4. Helicobacter Pylori and the Prevention of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Sullivan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is an important cause of stomach cancer that infects a substantial proportion of the Canadian adult population. H pylori can be detected by noninvasive tests and effectively eradicated by medical treatment. Screening for and treatment of H pylori may represent a significant opportunity for preventive oncology.

  5. INFLAMMATORY DISORDERS ASSOCIATED WITH HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN THE ROUX-EN-Y BYPASS GASTRIC POUCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHAVES, Luiz Claudio Lopes; BORGES, Isabela Klautau Leite Chaves; de SOUZA, Maíra Danielle Gomes; SILVA, Ian Passos; SILVA, Lyz Bezerra; MAGALHÃES, Marcelo Alexandre Prado; FONSECA, Allan Herbert Feliz; CAMPOS, Josemberg Marins

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in obese candidates for bariatric surgery and its role in the emergence of inflammatory lesions after surgery has not been well established. Aim: To identify the incidence of inflammatory lesions in the stomach after bariatric surgery and to correlate it with H. pylori infection. Methods: This is a prospective study with 216 patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. These patients underwent histopathological endoscopy to detect H. pylori prior to surgery. Positive cases were treated with antibiotics and a proton inhibitor pump followed by endoscopic follow-up in the 6th and 12th month after surgery. Results: Most patients were female (68.1%), with grade III obesity (92.4%). Preoperative endoscopy revealed gastritis in 96.8%, with H. pylori infection in 40.7% (88/216). A biopsy was carried out in 151 patients, revealing H. pylori in 60/151, related to signs of inflammation in 90% (54/60). In the 6th and 12th month after surgery, the endoscopy and the histopathological exam showed a normal gastric pouch in 84% of patients and the incidence of H. pylori was 11% and 16%, respectively. The presence of inflammation was related to H. pylori infection (p<0,001). Conclusion: H. pylori has a similar prevalence in both obese patients scheduled to undergo bariatric surgery and the general population. There is a low incidence of it in the 6th and 12th months after surgery, probably owing to its eradication when detected prior to surgery. When inflammatory disease is present in the new gastric reservoir it is directly related to H. pylori infection. PMID:27683772

  6. Transcriptional profiling of gastric epithelial cells infected with wild type or arginase-deficient Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Songhee H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori causes acute and chronic gastric inflammation induced by proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines secreted by cells of the gastric mucosa, including gastric epithelial cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that the bacterial arginase, RocF, is involved in inhibiting T cell proliferation and CD3ζ expression, suggesting that arginase could be involved in a more general dampening of the immune response, perhaps by down-regulation of certain pro-inflammatory mediators. Results Global transcriptome analysis was performed on AGS gastric epithelial cells infected for 16 hours with a wild type Helicobacter pylori strain 26695, an arginase mutant (rocF- or a rocF+ complemented strain. H. pylori infection triggered altered host gene expression in genes involved in cell movement, death/growth/proliferation, and cellular function and maintenance. While the wild type strain stimulates host inflammatory pathways, the rocF- mutant induced significantly more expression of IL-8. The results of the microarray were verified using real-time PCR, and the differential levels of protein expression were confirmed by ELISA and Bioplex analysis. MIP-1B was also significantly secreted by AGS cells after H. pylori rocF- mutant infection, as determined by Bioplex. Even though not explored in this manuscript, the impact that the results presented here may have on the development of gastritis, warrant further research to understand the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between H. pylori RocF and IL-8 induction. Conclusions We conclude that H. pylori arginase modulates multiple host signaling and metabolic pathways of infected gastric epithelial cells. Arginase may play a critical role in anti-inflammatory host responses that could contribute to the ability of H. pylori to establish chronic infections.

  7. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors affecting gastric proton pump expression and acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Charles E; Beeson, Craig; Suarez, Giovanni; Peek, Richard M; Backert, Steffen; Smolka, Adam J

    2015-08-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric epithelial cells and human gastric biopsies represses H,K-ATPase α subunit (HKα) gene expression and inhibits acid secretion, causing transient hypochlorhydria and supporting gastric H. pylori colonization. Infection by H. pylori strains deficient in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) genes cagL, cagE, or cagM, which do not transfer CagA into host cells or induce interleukin-8 secretion, does not inhibit HKα expression, nor does a cagA-deficient strain that induces IL-8. To test the hypothesis that virulence factors other than those mediating CagA translocation or IL-8 induction participate in HKα repression by activating NF-κB, AGS cells transfected with HKα promoter-Luc reporter constructs containing an intact or mutated NF-κB binding site were infected with wild-type H. pylori strain 7.13, isogenic mutants lacking cag PAI genes responsible for CagA translocation and/or IL-8 induction (cagA, cagζ, cagε, cagZ, and cagβ), or deficient in genes encoding two peptidoglycan hydrolases (slt and cagγ). H. pylori-induced AGS cell HKα promoter activities, translocated CagA, and IL-8 secretion were measured by luminometry, immunoblotting, and ELISA, respectively. Human gastric biopsy acid secretion was measured by microphysiometry. Taken together, the data showed that HKα repression is independent of IL-8 expression, and that CagA translocation together with H. pylori transglycosylases encoded by slt and cagγ participate in NF-κB-dependent HKα repression and acid inhibition. The findings are significant because H. pylori factors other than CagA and IL-8 secretion are now implicated in transient hypochlorhydria which facilitates gastric colonization and potential triggering of epithelial progression to neoplasia.

  8. Innate Immunity Components and Cytokines in Gastric Mucosa in Children with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Michalkiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the expression of innate immunity components and cytokines in the gastric mucosa among H. pylori infected and uninfected children. Materials and Methods. Biopsies of the antral gastric mucosa from children with dyspeptic symptoms were evaluated. Gene expressions of innate immunity receptors and cytokines were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The protein expression of selected molecules was tested by immunohistochemistry. Results. H. pylori infection did not lead to a significant upregulation of MyD88, TLR2, TLR4, CD14, TREM1, and TREM2 mRNA expression but instead resulted in high mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CD163. H. pylori cagA(+ infection was associated with higher IL-6 and IL-10 mRNA expression, as compared to cagA(− strains. H. pylori infected children showed increased IFN-γ and TNF-α protein levels. IFN-γ mRNA expression correlated with both H. pylori density of colonization and lymphocytic infiltration in the gastric mucosa, whereas TNF-α protein expression correlated with bacterial density. Conclusion. H. pylori infection in children was characterized by (a Th1 expression profile, (b lack of mRNA overexpression of natural immunity receptors, and (c strong anti-inflammatory activities in the gastric mucosa, possibly resulting from increased activity of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. This may explain the mildly inflammatory gastric inflammation often observed among H. pylori infected children.

  9. Effects of Helicobacter pylori and Heat Shock Protein 70 on the Proliferation of Human Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Tao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori changed the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells and decreased the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70. However, the effects of H. pylori on the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells and the roles of HSP70 during the progress need further investigation. Objective. To investigate the effects of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 on the proliferation of human gastric epithelial cells. Methods. H. pylori and a human gastric epithelial cell line (AGS were cocultured. The proliferation of AGS cells was quantitated by an MTT assay, and the expression of HSP70 in AGS cells was detected by Western blotting. HSP70 expression in AGS cells was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA to investigate the role of HSP70. The siRNA-treated AGS cells were cocultured with H. pylori and cell proliferation was measured by an MTT assay. Results. The proliferation of AGS cells was accelerated by coculturing with H. pylori for 4 and 8 h, but was suppressed at 24 and 48 h. HSP70 expression was decreased in AGS cells infected by H. pylori for 48 h. The proliferation in HSP70-silenced AGS cells was inhibited after coculturing with H. pylori for 24 and 48 h compared with the control group. Conclusions. Coculture of H. pylori altered the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells and decreased HSP70 expression. HSP70 knockdown supplemented the inhibitory effect of H. pylori on proliferation of epithelial cells. These results indicate that the effects of H. pylori on the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells at least partially depend on the decreased expression of HSP70 induced by the bacterium.

  10. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Dietary Factors Act Synergistically to Promote Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raei, Negin; Behrouz, Bahador; Zahri, Saber; Latifi-Navid, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    However, the incidence of gastric cancer (GC) has been decreased in past decades; GC is the second cause of cancer related death in the world. Evidence has illustrated that several factors including Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, host genetics, and environmental factors (smoking and particularly diet) may play a crucial role in gastric carcinogenesis. It has been demonstrated that high consumption of fresh fruits, vegetables, high level of selenium and zinc in drinking water, sufficient iron, and cholesterol protect against GC, while; smoked , pickled, and preserved foods in salt, and nitrites increase the risk of GC. Epidemiological studies have also proved that H. pylori infection and a high salt diet could independently induce atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Recently, studies have been demonstrated that dietary factors directly influence H. pylori virulence. The use of appropriate diet could reduce levels of H. pylori colonization or virulence and prevent or delay development of peptic ulcers or gastric carcinoma. This is attractive from a number of perspectives including those of cost, treatment tolerability, and cultural acceptability. This review will describe new insights into the pathogenesis of H. pylori in relation to environmental factors, especially dietary, not only to find the developed means for preventing and treating GC, but also for understanding the role of chronic inflammation in the development of other malignancies.

  11. Lack of association between gastric cancer and hopQ alleles in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazemi Elham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori use a number of mechanisms to survive in the stomach lumen. The presence of these bacteria in the stomach can lead to gastritis and reduction in stomach acid production. Acute inflammation can directly damage to the peripheral cells that are responsible for the secretion of acid. The risk of developing gastric carcinoma is associated to heterogeneity of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors (such as cagA. The HopQ is one of the outer membrane proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to also play a role in the virulence of H. pylori. This gene has been shown in two types. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between different H. pylori virulence hopQ alleles (types I and II and patients with gastroduodenal disorders. For this purpose 58 stomach biopsies the of patients with gastric cancer and 100 saliva samples from healthy individuals were collected. Then genomic DNA was purified and PCR for was done for desired genes via specific primers. The H. pylori infections were diagnosed by PCR for GlmM gene. Then frequencies of hopQI+, hopQII+ and hopQI+ hopQII+ genotypes were determined in H. pylori infected cases. Statistical analysis showed that there were not significant differences between healthy and diseased ones for genotypes hopQI+, hopQII+ and hopQI+ hopQII+.

  12. Association of H. pylori infection with gastric carci noma: a Meta analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Bo Xue; Yong-Yong Xu; Yi Wan; Bo-Rong Pan; Jun Ren; Dai-Ming Fan

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To follow the principles of evidence based medicine to reach the integrated results of these studies. METHODS: Twenty-one papers of case-control studies were selected, including 11 on gastric cancer, 7 on precancerous lesion of stomach and 3 on lymphoma of stomach: Meta analysis was used to sum up the odds ratios (OR) of these studies. RESULTS: H. Pylori vsgastric cancer (intestinal and diffuse type): the odds ratio from the fixed effect model is 3.0016(95% Cl 2.4197-3.7234, P < 0.001 ). H. Pylori vs precancerous lesion of stomach: a random effect model was used to calculate the summary odds ratio and its value is 2.5635 (95% Cl: 1.8477-3.5566, P < 0.01). H. Pylori vs lymphoma of stomach: though the quantity of literature is too small to make Meta analysis, the data of these 3 studies show that lymphoma of stomach is highly associated with H. Pylori infections. CONCLUSION: Since it had been revealed that H. Pylori infection pre-exists in gastric carcinoma and precancerous lesions, the results of Meta analysis present a strong evidence to support the conclusion that H. Pylori infection is a risk factor for gastric carcinoma.

  13. Antralization at the edge of proximal gastric ulcers: Does Helicobacter pylori infection play a role?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harry Hua-Xinag Xia; Benjamin Chun-Yu Wong; Shiu Kum Lam; Wai Man Wong; Wayne Hsing Cheng Hu; Kam Chuen Lai; Sau Hing Wong; Suet Yi Leung; Siu Tsan Yuen; Nicholas A.Wright

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of antralization at the edge of proximal gastric ulcers, and the effect ofH. pylori eradication on the mucosal appearances. METHODS: Biopsies were taken from the antrum, body and the ulcer edge of patients with benign proximal gastric ulcers before and one year after treatment. Gastric mucosa was classified as antral, transitional or body type.H. pylori positive patients receivedeither triple therapy, or omeprazole. RESULTS: Patients with index ulcers in the incisura, body or fundus (n=116) were analyzed. Antral-type mucosa was more prevalent at the ulcer edge inH. pylori-positive patients thanH.pylori-negative patients (93% vs 60%, OR=8.95,95%CI: 2.47-32.4, P=0.001). At one year, there was a significant reduction in the prevalence of antralization (from 93 % to 61%, P=0.004) at the ulcer edge in patients with H. pyloribeing eradicated. However, there was no difference in the prevalence of antralization at the ulcer edge in those with persistent infection. CONCLUSION: H. pylori infection is associated with antralization at the edge of proximal gastric ulcers, which may be reversible in some patients after eradication of the infection.

  14. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Saroj, Sunil D; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-05-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit adherence of the gastric pathogen H. pylori In a screen with Lactobacillus isolates, we found that only a few could reduce adherence of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. Decreased attachment was not due to competition for space or to lactobacillus-mediated killing of the pathogen. Instead, we show that lactobacilli act on H. pylori directly by an effector molecule that is released into the medium. This effector molecule acts on H. pylori by inhibiting expression of the adhesin-encoding gene sabA Finally, we verified that inhibitory lactobacilli reduced H. pylori colonization in an in vivo model. In conclusion, certain Lactobacillus strains affect pathogen adherence by inhibiting sabA expression and thereby reducing H. pylori binding capacity.

  15. Oxyntic gastric atrophy in Helicobacter pylori gastritis is distinct from autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Varbanova, Mariya; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Reinhold, Dirk; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Jechorek, Doerthe; Weigt, Jochen; Link, Alexander; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-08-01

    To assess characteristics of oxyntic gastric atrophy (OGA) in autoimmune gastritis (AIG) compared with OGA as a consequence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients undergoing oesophagogastroduodenoscopy from July 2011 to October 2014 were prospectively included (N=452). Gastric biopsies were obtained for histology and H. pylori testing. Serum gastrin-17 (G17), pepsinogen (PG) I, PGII and antibodies against H. pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A protein were determined in all patients. Antibodies against parietal cells and intrinsic factor were determined in patients with advanced (moderate to severe) OGA. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were calculated for serum biomarkers and compared with histology. Overall, 34 patients (8.9%) had advanced OGA by histology (22 women, age 61±15 years). Current or past H. pylori infection and AIG were present in 14/34 and 22/34 patients, respectively. H. pylori-negative AIG patients (N=18) were more likely to have another autoimmune disease (OR 6.3; 95% CI 1.3 to 29.8), severe corpus atrophy (OR 10.1; 95% CI 1.9 to 54.1) and corpus intestinal metaplasia (OR 26.9; 95% CI 5.3 to 136.5) compared with H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA. Antrum atrophy was present in 39% of H. pylori-negative AIG patients. The diagnostic performance of G17, PG I and PGI/II was excellent for AIG patients (AUC=0.83, 0.95 and 0.97, respectively), but limited for H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA (AUC=0.62, 0.75 and 0.67, respectively). H. pylori-negative AIG has a distinct clinical, morphological and serological phenotype compared with advanced OGA in H. pylori gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Crosstalk between Helicobacter pylori and gastric epithelial cells is impaired by docosahexaenoic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori colonizes half of the world's population leading to gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori strains resistant to antibiotics are increasing which raises the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA has been shown to decrease H. pylori growth and its associated-inflammation through mechanisms poorly characterized. We aimed to explore DHA action on H. pylori-mediated inflammation and adhesion to gastric epithelial cells (AGS and also to identify bacterial structures affected by DHA. H. pylori growth and metabolism was assessed in liquid cultures. Bacterial adhesion to AGS cells was visualized by transmission electron microscopy and quantified by an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Inflammatory proteins were assessed by immunoblotting in infected AGS cells, previously treated with DHA. Bacterial total and outer membrane protein composition was analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Concentrations of 100 µM of DHA decreased H. pylori growth, whereas concentrations higher than 250 µM irreversibly inhibited bacteria survival. DHA reduced ATP production and adhesion to AGS cells. AGS cells infected with DHA pre-treated H. pylori showed a 3-fold reduction in Interleukin-8 (IL-8 production and a decrease of COX2 and iNOS. 2D electrophoresis analysis revealed that DHA changed the expression of H. pylori outer membrane proteins associated with stress response and metabolism and modified bacterial lipopolysaccharide phenotype. As conclusions our results show that DHA anti-H. pylori effects are associated with changes of bacteria morphology and metabolism, and with alteration of outer membrane proteins composition, that ultimately reduce the adhesion of bacteria and the burden of H. pylori-related inflammation.

  17. Gastric Juice-Based Real-Time PCR for Tailored Helicobacter Pylori Treatment: A Practical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xianhui; Song, Zhiqiang; He, Lihua; Lin, Sanren; Gong, Yanan; Sun, Lu; Zhao, Fei; Gu, Yixin; You, Yuanhai; Zhou, Liya; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2017-01-01

    A gastric juice-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was established to identify Helicobacter pylori infection, clarithromycin susceptibility and human CYP2C19 genotypes and to guide the choice of proton pump inhibitor (PPI), clarithromycin and amoxicillin treatment for tailored H. pylori eradication therapy. From January 2013 to November 2014, 178 consecutive dyspeptic patients were enrolled for collection of gastric biopsy samples and gastric juice by endoscopy at the Peking University Third Hospital; 105 and 73 H. pylori-positive and -negative patients, respectively, were included in this study. H. pylori infection was defined as samples with both a strongly positive rapid urease test (RUT) and positive H. pylori histology. A series of primers and probes were distributed into four reactions for identifying the H. pylori cagH gene coupled with an internal control (Rnase P gene), A2142G and A2143G mutants of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) G681A of CYP2C19*2 and G636A of CYP2C19*3. The E-test and DNA sequencing were used to evaluate the H. pylori clarithromycin susceptibility phenotype and genotype. The SNPs CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 were also evaluated by nucleotide sequencing. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of this gastric juice-based real-time PCR assay were evaluated by comparing with the same measures obtained through gastric biopsy-based PCR and culture. The H. pylori diagnostic sensitivities of the culture, PCR, and gastric biopsy- and gastric juice-based real-time PCR assays were 90.48% (95/105), 92.38% (97/105), 97.14% (102/105) and 100% (105/105), respectively; the specificities of the above methods were all 100%. Higher false-negative rates were found among the gastric biopsy samples assessed by culture (10.48%, 11/105), PCR (7.62%, 8/105) and real-time PCR (2.86%, 3/105) than in gastric juice by real-time PCR. Regarding

  18. Helicobacter pylori and EBV in gastric carcinomas:Methylation status and microsatellite instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adriana; Camargo; Ferrasi; Nídia; Alice; Pinheiro; Silvia; Helena; Barem; Rabenhorst; Otávia; Luisa; Caballero; Maria; Aparecida; Marchesan; Rodrigues; Fabrício; de; Carvalho; Celso; Vieira; de; Souza; Leite; Marcia; Valéria; Pitombeira; Ferreira; Marcos; Aurélio; Pessoa; Barros; Maria; Inês; de; Moura; Campos; Pardini

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To verify the methylation status of CDH1, DAPK, COX2, hMLH1 and CDKN2A genes and to evaluate their association with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-cagA+ and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infections in gastric adenocarcinomas.METHODS: Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assay was performed in 89 primary gastric carcinomas (intestinal and diffuse types). Microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis was performed using the BAT26 primer set and PCR products were analyzed with the ABI PRISM 3100 Genetic Analyzer using G...

  19. PBX1 attributes as a determinant of connexin 32 downregulation in Helicobacter pylori-related gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Can-Xia; Zhang, Lin-Fang; Huang, Li-Hua; Hu, Ting-Zi; Li, Rong; Xia, Xiu-Juan; Xu, Lin-Yong; Luo, Ling; Jiang, Xiao-Xia; Li, Ming

    2017-08-07

    To clarify the mechanisms of connexin 32 (Cx32) downregulation by potential transcriptional factors (TFs) in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric carcinogenesis. Approximately 25 specimens at each developmental stage of gastric carcinogenesis [non-atrophic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and gastric carcinoma (GC)] with H. pylori infection [H. pylori (+)] and 25 normal gastric mucosa (NGM) without H. pylori infection [H. pylori (-)] were collected. After transcriptional factor array analysis, the Cx32 and PBX1 expression levels of H. pylori-infected tissues from the developmental stages of GC and NGM with no H. pylori infection were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Regarding H. pylori-infected animal models, the Cx32 and PBX1 mRNA expression levels and correlation between the gastric mucosa from 10 Mongolian gerbils with long-term H. pylori colonization and 10 controls were analyzed. PBX1 and Cx32 mRNA and protein levels were further studied under the H. pylori-infected condition as well as PBX1 overexpression and knockdown conditions in vitro. Incremental PBX1 was first detected by TF microarray in H. pylori-related gastric carcinogenesis. The identical trend of PBX1 and Cx32 expression was confirmed in the developmental stages of H. pylori-related clinical specimens. The negative correlation of PBX1 and Cx32 was confirmed in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils. Furthermore, decreased PBX1 expression was detected in the normal gastric epithelial cell line GES-1 with H. pylori infection. Enforced overexpression or RNAi-mediated knockdown of PBX1 contributed to the diminished or restored Cx32 expression in GES-1 and the gastric carcinoma cell line BGC823, respectively. Finally, dual-luciferase reporter assay in HEK293T cells showed that Cx32 promoter activity decreased by 30% after PBX1 vector co-transfection, indicating PBX1 as a transcriptional downregulator

  20. Annexin A4: A novel molecular marker for gastric cancer with Helicobacter pylori infection using proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Ling; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lee, Po-Huang; Chang, King-Jen; Lai, Yo-Ping; Wang, Jin-Town; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2008-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori was reported to be an important risk factor for the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. Here, we used a proteomic approach to find differentially expressed proteins between the normal and tumor tissue of gastric cancer patients infected with H. pylori. In our results, we found annexin A4 was over-expressed in patients infected with H. pylori and was found in tumor cells, and over-expressed in gastric cancer SCM-1 cells after H. pylori infection. Ca(2+ ) can be induced by H. pylori and interact with annexin A4 Ca(2+) binding site to block the calmodulin-activated chloride conductance activation; therefore, it produces a new environment that benefits the malignant existence of H. pylori and raises the risk for gastric cancer. We also found interleuken-8 (IL-8) expression levels were increased in H. pylori infected SCM-1 cells. Combined with previous reports and our results, we summarize that the over-expression of annexin A4 in SCM-1 cells with H. pylori infection may subsequently induce IL-8 which can further cause tumor angiogenesis. In this paper, we show that annexin A4 is a potential novel molecular marker for gastric cancer with H. pylori infection, and our results may provide a new insight in the development of new anti-cancer drugs. Copyright © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Rebamipide, a novel antiulcer agent, attenuates Helicobacter pylori induced gastric mucosal cell injury associated with neutrophil derived oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M; Miura, S; Mori, M; Kai, A; Suzuki, H; Fukumura, D; Suematsu, M; Tsuchiya, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide, a novel antiulcer compound, on Helicobacter pylori activated neutrophil dependent in vitro gastric epithelial cell injury was investigated. Luminol dependent chemiluminescence (ChL), which detects toxic oxidants from neutrophils exhibited a 12-fold increase when the bacterial suspension of H pylori was added to the isolated human neutrophils. This change was significantly attenuated by rebamipide at a concentration less than 1 mM, showing that rebamipide may inhibit oxidant production from H pylori elicited neutrophils. To assess whether rebamipide attenuates gastric mucosal injury, we tested its inhibitory action on H pylori induced gastric mucosal damage associated with neutrophils in vitro. Rabbit gastric mucosal cells were monolayered in culture wells and coincubated with human neutrophils and H pylori, and the cytotoxicity index was then calculated. Cultured gastric cells were significantly damaged when they were incubated with human neutrophils activated by H pylori. This cellular damage was attenuated by rebamipide in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, spectrophotometrical measurement showed that rebamipide (1 mM) inhibits urease activity by 21.7%. As monochloramine (an oxidant yielded by reaction of neutrophil derived chlorinated oxidant and ammonia) is proposed as an important toxic molecule in this model, the current findings suggest that the preventive effect of rebamipide on H pylori elicited neutrophil induced gastric mucosal injury may result from its inhibitory actions on the neutrophilic oxidative burst as well as H pylori derived urease activity. PMID:7959190

  2. Histological examination of ulcer margin for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hui; Cheng, Hao-Tsai; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Yu, Li-Kuang; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lee, Mu-Shien

    2013-02-01

    Biopsy of ulcer margin is routinely performed to exclude malignancy in patients with gastric ulcers, but its utility in diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection has not yet been fully studied. A cohort of 50 patients with gastric ulcer was prospectively examined. Three tests including histology, rapid urease test, and urea breath test were performed in all patients for diagnosing H pylori infection. Six biopsied specimens from the margin of the gastric ulcer and 1 each specimen from antrum and body of non-ulcer part were obtained for histology using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) stain. The criterion used for defining H pylori infection was a positive result in at least 2 of the 3 tests. H pylori infection was diagnosed in 27 (54%) of the patients. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the histological examination of the ulcer margin were 92.6%, 95.7%, 96.2%, 91.7%, and 94%, respectively. The addition of 1 specimen from the antrum or body or a combination of the 2 specimens did not increase the diagnostic yields of those for histological examination of ulcer margin alone. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy for the rapid urease test were 96.3%, 100%, 100%, 95.8%, and 98%, respectively, and the corresponding values for the urea breath test were 88.9%, 87%, 88.9%, 87%, and 88%. We performed Giemsa stain for the 3 patients with false-negative and false-positive results of histological examination of ulcer margin using H&E stain, and all were positive for H pylori infection. In conclusion, histological examination of the ulcer margin using hematoxylin-eosin stain was quite accurate and useful for diagnosing H pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcers. A special stain is required when the diagnosis of H pylori infection is questionable on routine H&E staining.

  3. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: current status of the Austrian-Czech-German gastric cancer prevention trial (PRISMA-Study)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Miehlke; A. Leodolter; P. Malfertheiner; A. Neubauer; G. Ehninger; M. Stolte; E, Bayerdorffer; C. Kirsch; B. Dragosics; M. Gschwantler; G. Oberhuber; D. Antos; P. Dite; J. Lauter; J. Labenz

    2001-01-01

    AIM To test the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori eradication alone can reduce the incidence of gastric cancer in a subgroup of individuals with an increased risk for this fatal disease.METHODS It is a prospective, randomized,double-blind, placebo-controlled multinational multicenter trial. Men between 55 and 65 years of age with a gastric cancer phenotype of Helicobacterpylori gastritis are randomized to receive a 7-day course of omeprazole 2 × 20 mg,clarithromycin 2 × 500 mg, and amoxicillin 2 ×lg for 7 days, or omeprazole2 × 20mg plusplacebo. Follow - up endoscopy is scheduled 3months after therapy, and thereafter in one-year intervals. Predefined study endpoints are gastric cancer, precancerous lesions (dysplasia, adenoma), other cancers, anddeath.RESULTS Since March 1998, 1524 target patients have been screened, 279 patients (18.3%) had a corpus-dominant type of H.pylori gastritis, and 167 of those were randomized (58.8%). In the active treatment group (n -- 86), H. pylori infection infection was cured in 88.9% of patients. Currently, thecumulative follow-up time is 3046 months (253.8patient-years, median follow-up 16 months). So far, none of the patients developed gastric cancer or any precancerous lesion. Three(1.8%) patients reached study endpoints other than gastric cancer.CONCLUSION Among men between 55 and 65years of age, the gastric cancer phenotype of H.pylori gastritis appears to be more common than expected. Further follow- up and continuing recruitment are necessary to fulfil the main aim of the study.

  4. Protective effect of Korean Red Ginseng extract against Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation in Mongolian gerbils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkyung Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation includes induction of inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL-8 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, which are mediated by oxidant-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB. High levels of lipid peroxide (LPO and increased activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO, a biomarker of neutrophil infiltration, are observed in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa. Panax ginseng Meyer, a Korean herb medicine, is widely used in Asian countries for its biological activities including anti-inflammatory efficacy. The present study aims to investigate whether Korean Red Ginseng extract (RGE inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation in Mongolian gerbils. One wk after intragastric inoculation with H. pylori, Mongolian gerbils were fed with either the control diet or the diet containing RGE (200 mg RGE/gerbil for 6 wk. The following were determined in gastric mucosa: the number of viable H. pylori in stomach; MPO activity; LPO level; mRNA and protein levels of keratinocyte chemoattractant factor (KC, a rodent IL-8 homolog, IL-1β, and iNOS; protein level of phospho-IκBα (which reflects the activation of NF-κB; and histology. As a result, RGE suppressed H. pylori-induced mRNA and protein levels of KC, IL-1β, and iNOS in gastric mucosa. RGE also inhibited H. pylori-induced phosphorylation of IκBα and increases in LPO level and MPO activity of gastric mucosa. RGE did not affect viable H. pylori colonization in the stomach, but improved the histological grade of infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, intestinal metaplasia, and hyperplasia. In conclusion, RGE inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by suppressing induction of inflammatory mediators (KC, IL-1β, iNOS, MPO activity, and LPO level in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa.

  5. A five-year follow-up study on the pathological changes of gastric mucosa after H.pylori eradication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽雅; 沈祖尧; 林三仁; 金珠; 丁士刚; 黄雪彪; 夏志伟; 郭慧兰; 刘建军; 曹世植

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the relationship between H.pylori infection, gastric cancer and other gastric diseases through the changes in gastric mucosa and the status of different gastric diseases within 5 years after H.pylori eradication in H.pylori-positive subjects in a high incidence region of gastric cancer. Methods One thousand and six adults were selected from the general population in Yantai, Shandong province, a high incidence region for gastric cancer in China. Gastroscopy and Campylobacter-like organism (CLO) testing were performed on all subjects. Biopsy samples from the gastric antrum and body were obtained for histology and assessment of H.pylori infection. All H.pylori-positive subjects were then randomly divided into two groups: treatment group receiving Omeprazole Amoxicillin Clarythromycin (OAC) triple therapy and placebo as controls. These subjects were endoscopically followed up in the second and fifth year. We compared the endoscopic appearance and histology of the biopsy specimens from the same site obtained at the first and last visits. Conclusions H.pylori eradication results in remarkable reduction in the severity and activity of chronic gastritis, marked resolution of intestinal metaplasia in the antrum. On the other hand, continuous H.pylori infection leads to progressive aggravation of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer and early gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan Zhang; Nobutaka Yamada; Yun-Lin Wu; Min Wen; Takeshi Matsuhisa; Norio Matsukura

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histological features of gastric mucosa, including Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with early gastric cancer and endoscopically found superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis,gastric ulcer.METHODS: The biopsy specimens were taken from the antrum, corpus and upper angulus of all the patients.Giemsa staining, improved toluidine-blue staining, and H pylori-specific antibody immune staining were performed as appropriate for the histological diagnosis of H pylori infection. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used for the histological diagnosis of gastric mucosa inflammation, gastric glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia and scored into four grades according to the Updated Sydney System.RESULTS: The overall prevalence of H pylori infection in superficial gastritis was 28.7%, in erosive gastritis 57.7%,in gastric erosion 63.3%, in gastric ulcer 80.8%, in early gastric cancer 52.4%. There was significant difference (P<0.05), except for the difference between early gastric cancer and erosive gastritis. H pylori infection rate in antrum, corpus, angulus of patients with superficial gastritis was 25.9%, 26.2%, 25.2%, respectively; in patients with erosive gastritis 46.9%, 53.5%, 49.0%,respectively; in patients with gastric erosion 52.4%, 61.5%,52.4%, respectively; in patients with gastric ulcer 52.4%,61.5%, 52.4%, respectively; in patients with early gastric cancer 35.0%, 50.7%, 34.6%, respectively. No significant difference was found among the different site biopsies in superficial gastritis, but in the other diseases the detected rates were higher in corpus biopsy (P<0.05). The grades of mononuclear cell infiltration and polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, in early gastric cancer patients, were significantly higher than that in superficial gastritis patients, lower than that in gastric erosion and gastric ulcer patients (P<0.01);however, there was no significant difference compared with erosive gastritis. The grades

  7. Associations among Gastric Juice pH, Atrophic Gastritis, Intestinal Metaplasia and Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jihee; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Jongchan; Hwang, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Jung Wha; Kim, Jin-Wook; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-09-19

    Gastric juice plays a crucial role in the physiology of the stomach. The aim of this study is to evaluate associations among the pH of gastric juice, atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), pepsinogen, and Helicobacter pylori infection. Gastric biopsies and juice were collected from 46 subjects who underwent endoscopies at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between November 2011 and March 2013. H. pylori, AG and IM were evaluated, and pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio and interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured. The mean pH of gastric juice was higher in the H. pylori-positive group (n=17) than that in the H. pylori-negative group (n=29) (4.54 vs 2.46, p=0.002). When patients were divided into pH 〈3 (n=28) and pH ≥3 (n=18) groups, H. pylori was lower in the pH 〈3 group (21.4%) than in the pH ≥3 group (61.1%) (p=0.007). The pH ≥3 group demonstrated AG and IM more frequently than the pH 〈3 group in the body (p=0.047 and p=0.051, respectively) but not in the antrum. There were no differences in pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio and IL-1β levels between the two groups. There is a relationship between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric juice pH ≥3, which may originate from AG and IM in the body.

  8. Correlation analysis of riboflavin, RFT2 and Helicobater pylori in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matnuri, Muattar; Zheng, Chao; Sidik, Dildar; Bai, Ge; Abdukerim, Mamatjan; Abdukadier, Aliye; Ahmat, Kilara; Ma, Yue; Eli, Maynur

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between tissue riboflavin level and riboflavin transporter 2 (RFT2) protein expression, and the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection and the plasma riboflavin level in gastric carcinoma (GC). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect tissue riboflavin level in patients with GC. Western blotting was applied to analyze the expression of RFT2 protein in 60 tissue samples from gastric carcinoma together with their normal tissues. The Warthin-starry method, rapid urease test and (14)C-UBT were administered to detect the infection of H.pylori. High performance liquid chromatography (H.PYLORILC) was performed to detect plasma riboflavin level in the GC. A significant decrease in the tissue riboflavin level was detected in GC samples compared to those in the normal mucous membrane (17.02 ± 3.91 vs. 21.0 ± 4.73; P = 0.043), and a significant decrease in the RFT2 protein was found in GC samples compared to those in the normal mucous membrane (0.92 ± 0.39 vs. 1.23 ± 0.51; P = 0.042). A positive correlation of tissue riboflavin level with defective expression of RFT2 protein was observed in GC patients (χ(2) = 1.969; P = 0.039). Plasma riboflavin level in gastric cancer without H.pylori infection group (1.6674 ng/mL ± 0.37009 ng/mL) was higher than H.pylori infection group (1.2207 ng/mL ± 0.17727 ng/mL, P = 0.043). The results indicate that RFT2 plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis by modulating riboflavin absorption. H.pylori infection affects plasma riboflavin level and the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

  9. Phylogeographic origin of Helicobacter pylori is a determinant of gastric cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sablet, Thibaut; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Shaffer, Carrie L; Schneider, Barbara G; Asim, Mohammad; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Bravo, Luis E; Sicinschi, Liviu A; Delgado, Alberto G; Mera, Robertino M; Israel, Dawn A; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Cover, Timothy L; Correa, Pelayo; Wilson, Keith T

    2011-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonises the stomach in half of all humans, and is the principal cause of gastric cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While gastric cancer rates correlate with H pylori prevalence in some areas, there are regions where infection is nearly universal, but rates of gastric cancer are low. In the case of Colombia, there is a 25-fold increase in gastric cancer rate in the Andean mountain (high risk) region compared to the coastal (low risk) region, despite similarly high (∼90%) prevalence of H pylori in the two locations. Our aim was to investigate the ancestral origin of H pylori strains isolated from subjects in these high- and low-risk regions and to determine whether this is a predictive determinant of precancerous lesions. Multi-locus sequence typing was used to investigate phylogeographic origins of infecting H pylori strains isolated from subjects in the Pacific coast and Andes Mountains in the state of Nariño, Colombia. We analysed 64 subjects infected with cagA+ vacA s1m1 strains. Gastric biopsy slides from each individual were scored for histological lesions and evaluated for DNA damage by immunohistochemistry. We show that strains from the high-risk region were all of European phylogeographic origin, whereas those from the low risk region were of either European (34%) or African origin (66%). European strain origin was strongly predictive of increased premalignant histological lesions and epithelial DNA damage, even in the low-risk region; African strain origin was associated with reduced severity of these parameters. The phylogeographic origin of H pylori strains provides an explanation for geographic differences in cancer risk deriving from this infection.

  10. Comparison of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric mucosal histological features of gastric ulcer patients with chronic gastritis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan Zhang; Nobutaka Yamada; Yun-Lin Wu; Min Wen; Takeshi Matsuhisa; Norio Matsukura

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare Helicobacter pyloriinfection and gastric mucosal histological features of gastric ulcer patients with chronic gastritis patients in different age groups and from different biopsy sites.METHODS: The biopsy specimens were taken from the antrum, corpus and upper angulus of gastric ulcer and chronic gastritis patients. Giemsa staining, improved Toluidine-blue staining and H pylori-specific antibody immune staining were performed as appropriate for the histological diagnosis of H pylori infection. Hematoxylineosin staining was used for the histological diagnosis of activity of H pylori infection, mucosal inflammation,glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia and scored into four grades according to the Updated Sydney System.RESULTS: Total rate of H pylori infection, mucosal inflammation, activity of H pylori infection, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in 3 839 gastric ulcer patients (78.5%, 97.4%, 82.1%, 61.1% and 64.2%,respectively) were significantly higher than those in 4 102chronic gastritis patients (55.0%, 90.3%, 56.2%, 36.8%,and 37.0%, respectively, P<0.05). The rate of H pylori colonization of chronic gastritis in <30 years, 31-40 years,41-50 years, 51-60 years, 61-70 years and >70 years age groups in antrum was 33.3%, 41.7%, 53.6%, 57.3%,50.7%, 43.5%, respectively; in corpus, it was 32.6%,41.9%, 53.8%, 60.2%, 58.0%, 54.8%, respectively; in angulus, it was 32.4%, 42.1%, 51.6%, 54.5%, 49.7%,43.5%, respectively. The rate of Hpyloricolonization of gastric ulcer in <30 years, 31-40 years, 41-50 years,51-60 years, 61-70 years and >70 years age groups in antrum was 60.5%, 79.9%, 80.9%, 66.8%, 59.6%, 45.6%,respectively; in corpus, it was 59.7%, 79.6%, 83.6%,80.1%, 70.6%, 59.1%, respectively; in angulus, it was61.3%, 77.8%, 75.3%, 68.8%, 59.7%, 45.8%,respectively. The rate of H pylori colonization at antrum was similar to corpus and angulus in patients, below50 years, with chronic gastritis and in patients, below40 years, with

  11. High dietary salt intake exacerbates Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Jennifer A; Radin, Jana N; Loh, John T; Zhang, Feng; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2013-06-01

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, and H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis is dependent on the actions of a bacterial oncoprotein known as CagA. Epidemiological studies have shown that high dietary salt intake is also a risk factor for gastric cancer. To investigate the effects of a high-salt diet, we infected Mongolian gerbils with a wild-type (WT) cagA(+) H. pylori strain or an isogenic cagA mutant strain and maintained the animals on a regular diet or a high-salt diet. At 4 months postinfection, gastric adenocarcinoma was detected in 100% of the WT-infected/high-salt-diet animals, 58% of WT-infected/regular-diet animals, and none of the animals infected with the cagA mutant strain (P diet had more severe gastric inflammation, higher gastric pH, increased parietal cell loss, increased gastric expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and decreased gastric expression of hepcidin and hydrogen potassium ATPase (H,K-ATPase) compared to those on a regular diet. Previous studies have detected upregulation of CagA synthesis in response to increased salt concentrations in the bacterial culture medium, and, concordant with the in vitro results, we detected increased cagA transcription in vivo in animals fed a high-salt diet compared to those on a regular diet. Animals infected with the cagA mutant strain had low levels of gastric inflammation and did not develop hypochlorhydria. These results indicate that a high-salt diet potentiates the carcinogenic effects of cagA(+) H. pylori strains.

  12. THE CLINICAL PATHOLOGY AND DNA PLOIDY OF GASTRIC MUCOSA ASSOCIATED LYMPHOID TISSUE (MALT) LYMPHOMA INFILTRATING THE LEIOMYOMAS OF THE UTERUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Xiang; LI Xiangzhou; WANG Yihua; DAI Xiaobo

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinicopathology and DNA ploidy of gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma infiltraving the leiomyomas of the uterus of a patient. Methods: The routine paraffin slides were cut, stained with HE, immunochemically by ABC methodusing the and stained by Feulgen method.Then the DNA ploidy of tumor cells was measured with an image cytometer. Results: In the mucosa, submucosa and the smooth muscle layer of the stomach and in the leiomyomas of the uterus there was diffusive and dense infiltration of centrocyte-like cells. The DNA measurement results were that the distribution of DNA mass of lymphoma cells in stomach and in lymph nodes had a single main aneuploidy peak each, and the distribution of DNA mass of lymphoma cells in leiomyomas of uterus had two peaks; one of them was the diploid, the other aneuploid. Conclusion: The MALT lymphoma cell invasion in uterus must be differentiated with a primary lymphoma in the uterus, the chronic lymphocyte leukemia in uterus and an endometrial stromal sarcoma. The present prognosis of the patient under discussion was poor. The follow-up results indicated the DNA index seemed to be important for predicting the malignancy degree and prognosis.

  13. Prospective study of Helicobacter pylori biomarkers for gastric cancer risk among Chinese men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epplein, Meira; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Peek, Richard M.; Li, Honglan; Correa, Pelayo; Gao, Jing; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2012-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is the leading risk factor for gastric cancer, yet only a fraction of infected individuals ever develop neoplasia. Methods To identify potential predictive biomarkers, we assessed the association of 15 antibodies to Helicobacter pylori proteins and gastric cancer in a nested case-control study. Blood levels of antibodies were assessed using multiplex serology for 226 incident cases and 451 matched controls from the Shanghai Men’s Health Study. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Results Sero-positivity to four (Omp, HP0305, HyuA, and HpaA) proteins were associated with a one-and-a-half to three-fold increased risk for gastric cancer. When excluding cases diagnosed within two years of study enrollment, sero-positivity to two additional proteins (CagA and VacA) showed significant associations with risk. Compared to individuals with ≤3 sero-positive results to the six virulent proteins identified in this population, individuals with 4–5 sero-posit ive results were at a two-fold increased risk (OR=2.08, 95% CI: 1.31–3.30) and individuals sero-positive to all 6 proteins had a three-and-a-half-fold increase in risk (OR=3.49, 95% CI: 2.00–6.11) for gastric cancer. Among individuals diagnosed at least two years after study enrollment, these associations were even stronger (OR=2.79 and OR=4.16, respectively). Conclusions Increasing number of sero-positives to six H. pylori proteins may be a risk marker for distal gastric cancer in China. Impact In a population with a 90% prevalence of CagA-positive H. pylori infection, assessment of additional virulent H. pylori proteins might better identify individuals at high risk for gastric cancer. PMID:23035179

  14. Regulation of Noxa-mediated apoptosis in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Suvasmita; Das, Lopamudra; Kokate, Shrikant Babanrao; Pratheek, B M; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Goswami, Chandan; Chattopadhyay, Ranajoy; Crowe, Sheila Eileen; Bhattacharyya, Asima

    2015-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1) in human gastric epithelial cells (GECs). Apoptosis of oncogenic protein Mcl1-expressing cells is mainly regulated by Noxa-mediated degradation of Mcl1. We wanted to elucidate the status of Noxa in H. pylori-infected GECs. For this, various GECs such as AGS, MKN45, and KATO III were either infected with H. pylori or left uninfected. The effect of infection was examined by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, in vitro binding assay, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. Infected GECs, surgical samples collected from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma as well as biopsy samples from patients infected with H. pylori showed significant up-regulation of both Mcl1 and Noxa compared with noninfected samples. Coexistence of Mcl1 and Noxa was indicative of an impaired Mcl-Noxa interaction. We proved that Noxa was phosphorylated at Ser(13) residue by JNK in infected GECs, which caused cytoplasmic retention of Noxa. JNK inhibition enhanced Mcl1-Noxa interaction in the mitochondrial fraction of infected cells, whereas overexpression of nonphosphorylatable Noxa resulted in enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in the infected epithelium. Because phosphorylation-dephosphorylation can regulate the apoptotic function of Noxa, this could be a potential target molecule for future treatment approaches for H. pylori-induced gastric cancer.

  15. Fermented foods: are they tasty medicines for Helicobacter pylori associated peptic ulcer and gastric cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mydhily Nair R B

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10-20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases.

  16. Presence of Helicobacter pylori in supragingival dental plaque of individuals with periodontal disease and upper gastric diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, D.G.; Stevens, R.H.; Macedo, J.M.B.; Albano, R.M.; Falabella, M.E.V.; Fisher, R.G.; Veerman, E.C.; Tinoco, E.M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative microorganism which is able to colonize the gastric mucosa and is associated with peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Several studies have detected this bacterium in the oral cavity, suggesting it

  17. Presence of Helicobacter pylori in supragingival dental plaque of individuals with periodontal disease and upper gastric diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, D.G.; Stevens, R.H.; Macedo, J.M.B.; Albano, R.M.; Falabella, M.E.V.; Fisher, R.G.; Veerman, E.C.; Tinoco, E.M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative microorganism which is able to colonize the gastric mucosa and is associated with peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Several studies have detected this bacterium in the oral cavity, suggesting it

  18. Genomic variability of Helicobacter pylori isolates of gastric regions from two Colombian populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Andrés Jenuer; Pazos, Alvaro Jairo; Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier Andrés; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the genomic variability and the multiple colonization of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in patients with chronic gastritis from two Colombian populations with contrast in the risk of developing gastric cancer (GC): Túquerres-Nariño (High risk) and Tumaco-Nariño (Low risk). METHODS Four hundred and nine patients from both genders with dyspeptic symptoms were studied. Seventy-two patients were included in whom H. pylori was isolated from three anatomic regions of the gastric mucosa, (31/206) of the high risk population of GC (Túquerres) and (41/203) of the low risk population of GC (Tumaco). The isolates were genotyped by PCR-RAPD. Genetic diversity between the isolates was evaluated by conglomerates analysis and multiple correspondence analyses. RESULTS The proportion of virulent genotypes of H. pylori was 99% in Túquerres and 94% in Tumaco. The coefficient of similarity of Nei-Li showed greater genetic diversity among isolates of Túquerres (0.13) than those of Tumaco (0.07). After adjusting by age, gender and type of gastritis, the multiple colonization was 1.7 times more frequent in Túquerres than in Tumaco (P = 0.05). CONCLUSION In Túquerres, high risk of GC there was a greater probability of multiple colonization by H. pylori. From the analysis of the results of the PCR-RAPD, it was found higher genetic variability in the isolates of H. pylori in the population of high risk for the development of GC. PMID:28223724

  19. Susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection: results of an epidemiological investigation among gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panic, Nikola; Mastrostefano, Elena; Leoncini, Emanuele; Persiani, Roberto; Arzani, Dario; Amore, Rosarita; Ricci, Riccardo; Sicoli, Federico; Sioletic, Stefano; Bulajic, Milutin; D' Ugo, Domenico; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the clinical, demographic, lifestyle factors and selected genetic polymorphisms that affect the susceptibility towards Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in gastric cancer patients. Histological confirmed gastric adenocarcinoma cases that underwent curative gastrectomy between 2002 and 2012 were included. Gastric biopsy samples were obtained to determine the H. pylori status, and further cagA status and vacA m and s genotypes by polymerase chain reaction. Patients were interviewed with structured questionnaires, and blood samples were collected for EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, IL1B, IL1-RN, MTHFR and p53 genotyping. Proportions were compared in univariate analysis, while the relation between putative risk factors and H. pylori status and genotype were measured using logistic regression analysis. One hundred forty-nine gastric cancer patients were included, of which 78.5% were H. pylori positive. Among positive patients 50% were cagA+, 72.5% vacA m1 and 80.7% vacA s1. The presence of cagA was less frequent among vacA m1 (p = 0.031) and vacA s1 (p = 0.052) subtypes. The presence of father history for any cancer was a significant risk factor for H. pylori infection [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 8.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-64.55]. EPHX1 exon 3 T > C (OR = 0.35, CI 95% 0.13-0.94), IL1B-511 T > C (OR = 0.38, CI 95% 0.15-0.97) and IL1-RN VNTR (OR = 0.19, CI 95% 0.06-0.58) polymorphisms were protective towards H. pylori infection in the univariate analysis. Wine consumption was associated with higher risk of carrying the H. pylori vacA m1 virulent subtype (p = 0.034). Lastly, cardiovascular diseases were less common among cagA positive subjects (p = 0.023). Father history of any cancer is a risk factor for H. pylori infection. Polymorphisms in IL1B-511, IL1-RN and EPHX1 exon 3 genes might be protective towards H. pylori infection.

  20. In Vivo Analysis of the Viable Microbiota and Helicobacter pylori Transcriptome in Gastric Infection and Early Stages of Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorell, Kaisa; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Liu, Oscar Hsin-Fu; Palacios Gonzales, Reyna Victoria; Nookaew, Intawat; Rabeneck, Linda; Paszat, Lawrence; Graham, David Y; Nielsen, Jens; Lundin, Samuel B; Sjöling, Åsa

    2017-10-01

    Emerging evidence shows that the human microbiota plays a larger role in disease progression and health than previously anticipated. Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of gastric cancer and duodenal and gastric ulcers, was early associated with gastric disease, but it has also been proposed that the accompanying microbiota in Helicobacter pylori-infected individuals might affect disease progression and gastric cancer development. In this study, the composition of the transcriptionally active microbial community and H. pylori gene expression were determined using metatranscriptomic RNA sequencing of stomach biopsy specimens from individuals with different H. pylori infection statuses and premalignant tissue changes. The results show that H. pylori completely dominates the microbiota not only in infected individuals but also in most individuals classified as H. pylori uninfected using conventional methods. Furthermore, H. pylori abundance is positively correlated with the presence of Campylobacter, Deinococcus, and Sulfurospirillum Finally, we quantified the expression of a large number of Helicobacter pylori genes and found high expression of genes involved in pH regulation and nickel transport. Our study is the first to dissect the viable microbiota of the human stomach by metatranscriptomic analysis, and it shows that metatranscriptomic analysis of the gastric microbiota is feasible and can provide new insights into how bacteria respond in vivo to variations in the stomach microenvironment and at different stages of disease progression. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Direct measurement of gastric H + / K +-ATPase activities in patients with or without Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duangporn Thong-Ngam; Pisit Tangkijvanich; Pichet Sampatanukul; Paungpayom Prichakas; Varocha Mahachai; Piyaratana Tosukowong

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The role of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection in gastric acid secretion of patients with chronic gastritisremains controversial. This study was designed to elucidate the effect of H pylori on H+/K+-ATPase activities in gastric biopsy specimens.METHODS: Eighty-two patients with chronic gastritis who had undergone upper endoscopy were included in this study. H pylori infection was confirmed by rapid urease test and histology. Gastric H+/K+-ATPase activities and serum gastrin concentrations were measured by an enzymatic method and radioimmunoassay, respectively. For those patients who received triple therapy for eradicating H pylori, changes in the activity of gastric H+/K+-ATPase and serum gastrin levels were also measured. RESULTS: The mean gastric H+/K+-ATPase activity in H pyloripositive group (42 patients) was slightly higher than thatin H pylori-negative group (29 patients) (169.65±52.9 and eradication of H pylori, the gastric H+/K+-ATPase activities slightly decreased compared to prior therapy (165.03±59.50 The mean basal gastrin concentration was slightly higher in H pylori-positive patients than in H pylori-negative patients (87.92±39.65 pg/mL vs75.04± 42.57 pg/mL, P= 0.228). The gastrin levels fell significantly after the eradication of Hpylori. (Before treatment 87.00±30.78 pg/mL, aftertreatment 64.73±18.96 pg/mL, P = 0.015).CONCLUSION: Gastric H+/K+-ATPase activities are not associated with H pylori status in patients with chronicgastritis.

  2. Study of Helicobacter pylori genotype status in saliva,dental plaques, stool and gastric biopsy samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassan Momtaz; Negar Souod; Hossein Dabiri; Meysam Sarshar

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare genotype of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) isolated from saliva,dental plaques,gastric biopsy,and stool of each patient in order to evaluate the mode of transmission ofH.pylori infection.METHODS:This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed on 300 antral gastric biopsy,saliva,dental plaque and stool samples which were obtained from patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy referred to endoscopy centre of Hajar hospital of Shahrekord,Iran from March 2010 to February 2011.Initially,H.pylori strains were identified by rapid urease test (RUT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)were applied to determine the presence of H.pylori (ureC) and for genotyping of voculating cytotoxin gene A (vacA) and cytotoxin associated gene A (cagA) genes in each specimen.Finally the data were analyzed by using statistical formulas such as Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to find any significant relationship between these genes and patient's diseases.P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.RESULTS:Of 300 gastric biopsy samples,77.66%were confirmed to be H.pylori positive by PCR assay while this bacterium were detected in 10.72% of saliva,71.67% of stool samples.We were not able to find it in dental plaque specimens.The prevalence of H.pylori was 90.47% among patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD),80% among patients with gastric cancer,and 74.13% among patients with none ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) by PCR assay.The evaluation of vacA and cagA genes showed 6 differences between gastric biopsy and saliva specimens and 11 differences between gastric and stool specimens.94.42% ofH.pylori positive specimens were cagA positive and all samples had amplified band both for vacA s and m regions.There was significant relationship between vacA s1a/m1a and PUD diseases (P =0.04),s2/m2 genotype and NUD diseases (P =0.05).No statically significant relationship was found between cagA status with clinical outcomes and vacA genotypes (P =0

  3. CagA and VacA Helicobacter Pylori Antibodies in Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Suriani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with different genotypes of virulent Helicobacter pylori strains (cytotoxin-associated gene A [CagA]-and/or vacuolating cytotoxin A [VacA]-positive can play a role in the development of atrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer (DU and gastric cancer (GC.

  4. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in the Gastric Mucosa by Fluorescence In Vivo Hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontenete, Silvia; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Céu

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a fluorescence in vivo hybridization (FIVH) protocol, using nucleic acid probes, for the detection of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa of an infected C57BL/6 mouse model. This protocol should be easily extended to other microorganisms not only...

  5. Chlamydia psittaci in ocular adnexa MALT lymphoma: a possible role in lymphomagenesis and a different geographical distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collina Francesca

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ocular adnexa MALT-lymphomas represent approximatively 5-15% of all extranodal lymphomas. Almost 75% of OAMLs are localized in orbital fat, while 25% of cases involves conjunctive. MALT-lymphomas often recognize specific environmental factors responsible of lymphoma development and progression. In particular as Helicobacter pylori in gastric MALT lymphomas, other bacterial infections have been recognized related to MALT lymphomas in specific site. Recently Chlamydia psittaci has been identified in Ocular Adnexa MALT lymphomas, with variable frequence dependently from geographic areas. Thus bacterial infection is responsible of clonal selection on induced MALT with subsequent lymphoma development. Moreover Chlamydia psittaci could promote chromosomal aberration either through genetic instability as a consequence of induced proliferation and probably through DNA oxidative damage. The most common translocation described in MALT lymphomas affects NF-kB pathway with a substantial antiapoptotic effect. Several therapeutic approaches are now available, but the use of antibiotic-therapy in specific cases, although with conflicting results, could improve the treatment of ocular adnexa MALT lymphomas. In this review we analyse the most relevant features of Ocular adnexa MALT lymphomas, underlining specific biological characteristics mainly related to the potential role of Chlamydia psittaci in lymphomagenesis.

  6. Glycophenotypic alterations induced by Pteridium aquilinum in mice gastric mucosa: synergistic effect with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Gomes

    Full Text Available The bracken fern Pteridium aquilinum is a plant known to be carcinogenic to animals. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between bracken fern exposure and gastric cancer development in humans. The biological effects of exposure to this plant within the gastric carcinogenesis process are not fully understood. In the present work, effects in the gastric mucosa of mice treated with Pteridium aquilinum were evaluated, as well as molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic role with Helicobacter pylori infection. Our results showed that exposure to Pteridium aquilinum induces histomorphological modifications including increased expression of acidic glycoconjugates in the gastric mucosa. The transcriptome analysis of gastric mucosa showed that upon exposure to Pteridium aquilinum several glycosyltransferase genes were differently expressed, including Galntl4, C1galt1 and St3gal2, that are mainly involved in the biosynthesis of simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens. Concomitant treatment with Pteridium aquilinum and infection with Helicobacter pylori also resulted in differently expressed glycosyltransferase genes underlying the biosynthesis of terminal sialylated Lewis antigens, including Sialyl-Lewis(x. These results disclose the molecular basis for the altered pattern of glycan structures observed in the mice gastric mucosa. The gene transcription alterations and the induced glycophenotypic changes observed in the gastric mucosa contribute for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of Pteridium aquilinum in the gastric carcinogenesis process.

  7. Role of caspase-3/E-cadherin in helicobacter pylori-induced apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongmei; Du, Jie; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Yuanjian

    2017-08-29

    This study was designed to investigate the role of caspase-3/E-cadherin in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) -induced gastric epithelial apoptosis in cells, animal models and clinical gastritis patients. In cultured gastric mucosal epithelial cells, gastric glandular epithelial cells and C57BL/6 mice, H. pylori infection significantly induced apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells, down-regulated full-length E-cadherin and Bcl-2 expression, and up-regulated cleaved-caspase-3, E-cadherin/carboxy-terminal fragment 3 and Bax expression. Z-DEVD-FMK, an inhibitor of caspase-3, attenuated the effect of H. pylori. E-cadherin overexpression significantly inhibited the apoptosis of GES-1 and SGC-7901 cells induced by the H. pylori. The results from clinical studies also showed down-regulation of E-cadherin, up-regulation of cleaved-caspase-3 expression and increased apoptosis in gastric tissues from gastritis patients with H. pylori infection. These results suggest that the caspase-3/E-cadherin pathway is involved in the apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells induced by H. pylori.

  8. EGFR and Bcl-2 in gastric mucosa of children infected with Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Ryszczuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the expression of EGFR and Bcl-2 proteins as inhibitory markers of apoptosis in surface epithelial cells and gland cells of antral gastric mucosa in children infected with Helicobacter pylori according to the severity and activity of antral gastritis and to assess the correlation between the number of cells expressing EGFR and the number of cells expressing Bcl-2 in H. pylori infected children.Materials and methods: The study included 44 children: 68.2% with chronic gastritis and positive IgG against H. pylori, and 31.8% with functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and with normal IgG against H. pylori. The evaluation of EGFR expression in gastric mucosa was performed immunohistochemically using monoclonal mouse anti-EGFR antibody. The polyclonal antibody was used to determine the expression of anti-Bcl-2.Results: A significant increase in the number of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 protein was found in the epithelial cells in severe as well as mild and moderate gastritis in the group of children infected with H. pylori. An increase in the number of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 protein was also found in the epithelial cells in group I according to the activity of gastritis. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the numbers of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 in H. pylori infected children.Conclusion: Increased expression of EGFR and Bcl-2 proteins in the epithelial cells and a statistically significant positive correlation between the numbers of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 in H. pylori infected children could suggest increased regeneration abilities of gastric mucosa.

  9. Magnesium uptake by CorA is essential for viability of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Jens; Guhl, Johannes; Waidner, Barbara; Kist, Manfred; Bereswill, Stefan

    2002-07-01

    We show here that Mg(2+) acquisition by CorA is essential for Helicobacter pylori in vitro, as corA mutants did not grow in media without Mg(2+) supplementation. Complementation analysis performed with an Escherichia coli corA mutant revealed that H. pylori CorA transports nickel and cobalt in addition to Mg(2+). However, Mg(2+) is the dominant CorA substrate, as the corA mutation affected neither cobalt and nickel resistance nor nickel induction of urease in H. pylori. The drastic Mg(2+) requirement (20 mM) of H. pylori corA mutants indicates that CorA plays a key role in the adaptation to the low-Mg(2+) conditions predominant in the gastric environment.

  10. Connexin 32 and 43 promoter methylation in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Huang, Li-Hua; Xu, Can-Xia; Xiao, Jing; Zhou, Li; Cao, Dan; Liu, Xiao-Min; Qi, Yong

    2014-09-07

    To explore the mechanism of abnormal Connexin (Cx) 32 and Cx43 expression in the gastric mucosa after Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Biopsy specimens of gastric mucosa in different gastric carcinogenesis stages with H. pylori infection, that is, non-atrophic gastritis (NAG; n = 24), chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG; n = 25), intestinal metaplasia (IM; n = 28), dysplasia (DYS; n = 24), and gastric cancer (GC; n = 30), as well as specimens of normal gastric mucosa without H. pylori infection (NGM; n = 25), were confirmed by endoscopy and pathological examination. Cx32 and Cx43 mRNA expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cx32 and Cx43 promoter CpG island methylation status was determined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP), bisulfite PCR sequencing (BSP) and MassArray methods. The relative mRNA expression levels in the gastric mucosa of patients with NGM, NAG, CAG, IM, DYS and GC were 0.146 ± 0.011, 0.133 ± 0.026, 0.107 ± 0.035, 0.039 ± 0.032, 0.037 ± 0.01 and 0.03 ± 0.011 for Cx32; and 0.667 ± 0.057, 0.644 ± 0.051, 0.624 ± 0.049, 0.555 ± 0.067, 0.536 ± 0.058 and 0.245 ± 0.121 for Cx43, respectively, which were gradually decreasing and significantly different (GC vs NGM: P infection-associated gastric carcinogenesis, and it is associated with hypermethylation of these genes' promoter.

  11. Correlation of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and Endoscopic Findings of Twin Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (MALT) Lymphoma of the Stomach: Report of a Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee; Choi, Jin Wook [SungAe Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type lymphoma arises from extranodal marginal zone B-cell. It is etiologically associated with Helicobacter pylori infection and, hence, can be cured by antibiotic treatment. MALT type lymphoma is the most common variety of gastric lymphoma that is rare in the stomach). The published data of clinical studies on the usefulness of 18F-FDG PET in the diagnosis of MALT type lymphoma varied according to authors. Thus, the result of Hoffmann et al. was discouraging whereas a high diagnostic accuracy was reported by Ambrosini et al. The latter group further went to suggest that higher 18F-FDG uptake in gastric MALT type lymphoma would positively relate to the aggressiveness of neoplasm. The clinical studies conducted by other groups on MALT lymphomas of the stomach, lung, orbit and parotid gland and the stomach, lung, parotid gland, skin, orbit, mandible, esophagus and uterus confirmed that 18F-FDG scan is valuable.

  12. Expression of TFF2 and Helicobacter pylori infection in carcinogenesis of gastric mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Yong Hu; Bao-Ping Yu; Wei-Guo Dong; Mu-Qi Li; Jie-Ping Yu; He-Sheng Luo; Zong-Xue Rang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of TFF2 and Helicobacter pyloriinfection in carcinogenesis of gastric mucosa.METHODS: The expression of TFF2 was immunohistochemically analyzed in paraffin-embedded samples from 119 patients with endoscopic biopsy and subtotal gastrectomy specimens of gastric mucosal lesions, including 16 cases of chronic superficial gastritis (CSG), 20 chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG),35 intestinal metaplasia (IN), 23 gastric epithelial dysplasia (GED) and 25 gastric carcinoma (CA), and Helicobacter pylori infection was detected by Warthin-Starry staining.RESULTS: 1:TFF2 was located in the cytoplasm of gastrk mucous neck cell. The expression of TFF2 was 100 %,100 %, 0, 56.5 % and 0 in CSGs, CAGs, INs, GEDs and CAs, respectively. 2: The value of TFF2 positive cell density in CSG with Helicobacter pyloriinfection was higher than that without Helicobacter pyloriinfection. (52.89±7.27vs46.49±13.04, P>0.05); But the value of TFF2 positive cell density in CAG and GED with Helicobacter pyloriinfection was significantly lower than that without Helicobacter pylori infection (18.17±4.09 vs 37.93±13.80, P<0.01 and 14.44±9.32 vs 24.84±10.22, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Increase of TFF2 expression in CSG is perhaps associated with the protective mechanism after gastric mucosal injury. Decrease of TFF2 expression in CAG possibly attributes to the decrease in the number of gastric gland cell expressing TFF2. Re-expression of TFF2 in gastric epithelial dysplasia implies that TFF2 possibly contributes to the initiation of gastric carcinoma. The effect of Helicobacter pylori on the expression of TFF2 depends on the status of gastric mucosa.

  13. Relationship between ghrelin, Helicobacter pylori and gastric mucosal atrophy in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hitomi; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Sahara, Shu; Ohashi, Naro; Kato, Akihiko; Sugimoto, Ken; Furuta, Takahisa; Andoh, Akira; Sakao, Tadashi; Yasuda, Hideo

    2016-12-21

    To investigate the relationship between plasma ghrelin level, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection status and the severity of atrophy in hemodialysis patients. One hundred eights patients who received hemodialysis and 13 non-hemodialysis H. pylori-negative controls underwent gastroduodenoscopy to evaluate the severity of gastric atrophy. Serum levels of pepsinogen (PG) were measured as serum markers of gastric atrophy. H. pylori infection was evaluated by anti-H. pylori IgG antibody, rapid urease test and culture test. We classified H. pylori infection status as non-infection, present infection and past infection. In addition, plasma acyl-ghrelin and desacyl-ghrelin levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Infection rate of H. pylori was 45.4% (49/108). Acyl-ghrelin level in the non-infection group (39.4 ± 23.0 fmol/mL) was significantly higher than in the past (23.4 ± 19.9 fmol/mL, P = 0.005) and present infection groups (19.5 ± 14.0 fmol/mL, P atrophy (both P atrophy (24.5 ± 23.1 fmol/mL, 20.2 ± 14.9 fmol/mL and 18.3 ± 11.8 fmol/mL) than in those with non-atrophy (39.4 ± 22.2 fmol/mL, P = 0.039, P = 0.002 and P atrophy related to H. pylori infection.

  14. Therapy of gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea Morgner; Renate Schmelz; Christian Thiede; Manfred Stolte; Stephan Miehlke

    2007-01-01

    Gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT)lymphoma has recently been incorporated into the World Health Organization (WHO) lymphoma classification,termed as extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of MALT-type. In about 90% of cases this lymphoma is associated with H pylori infection which has been clearly shown to play a causative role in lymphomagenesis.Although much knowledge has been gained in defining the clinical features, natural history, pathology, and molecular genetics of the disease in the last decade, the optimal treatment approach for gastric MALT lymphomas,especially locally advanced cases, is still evolving. In this review we focus on data for the therapeutic, stage dependent management of gastric MALT lymphoma.Hence, the role of eradication therapy, surgery,chemotherapy and radiotherapy is critically analyzed.Based on these data, we suggest a therapeutic algorithm that might help to better stratify patients for optimal treatment success.

  15. Upregulation of miR-222 in both Helicobacter pylori-infected and noninfected gastric cancer patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MINA NOORMOHAMMAD; SAMIRA SADEGHI; HOSSEIN TABATABAEIAN; KAMRAN GHAEDI; ARDESHIR TALEBI; MANSOUREH AZADEH; MEHRI KHATAMI; MOHAMMAD MEHDI HEIDARI

    2016-12-01

    Despite of promising improvements in treatment of gastric cancer, the mortality rate of this malignancy remains high. Chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori, interfering with intracellular signalling pathways, is the main risk factor for gastric cancer.Some evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNA), the small noncoding RNA molecules, can play role as oncogenes or tumour suppressors in the cells. MiR-222 is one of the remarkable miRNAs undergoing upregulation in gastric cancer. However, the association between miR-222 upregulation and H. pylori infection in gastric cancer tissues remains unclear. The aim of this study was to analyse the expression level of miR-222 in gastric cancer tissues, evaluating the relationship between miR-222 expression level and H. pylori infection and also finding novel miR-222 targets based on in silico investigations. MiR-222 expression level in 200 patients including 112 H. pylori positive and 88 H. pylori negative was relatively measured using RT-qPCR and compared with 88 healthy samples. In silico enrichment analysis of miR-222 targets was performed byDAVID database to evaluate the possible role(s) of miR-222 in gastric tumourigenesis. We observed upregulated level of miR-222 in gastric cancer tissues compared with normal samples (P<0.05). However, no significant difference between miR-222 expression in H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative cases was observed. Our in silico analyses showed the possiblerole of p53, p27, PTEN and Elongin B in gastric cancer tumourigenesis. MiR-222 functions as an onco-miRNA and its overexpression can be involved in pathogenesis of gastric cancer, independent of H. pylori infection.

  16. Trends in gastric cancer mortality and in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Samantha; Ferro, Ana; Bastos, Ana; Castro, Clara; Lunet, Nuno; Peleteiro, Bárbara

    2016-07-01

    Portugal has the highest gastric cancer mortality rates in Western Europe, along with high prevalences of Helicobacter pylori infection. Monitoring their trends is essential to predict the burden of this cancer. We aimed to quantify time trends in gastric cancer mortality in Portugal and in each administrative region, and to compute short-term predictions, as well as to describe the prevalence of H. pylori infection, through a systematic review. Joinpoint analyses were used to identify significant changes in sex-specific trends in gastric cancer age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) and to estimate annual percent changes (APC). The most recent trends were considered to compute estimates up to 2020 by adjusting Poisson regression models. We searched PubMed and IndexRMP to identify studies carried out in Portugal reporting the prevalence of H. pylori. Gastric cancer mortality has been decreasing in Portugal since 1971 in men (from ASMR=55.3/100 000; APC=-2.4, 95% confidence interval: -2.5 to -2.3) and since 1970 in women (from ASMR=28.0/100 000; APC=-2.8, 95% confidence interval: -2.9 to -2.7), although large regional differences were observed. Predicted ASMR for 2015 and 2020 were 18.8/100 000 and 16.7/100 000 for men and 8.5/100 000 and 7.4/100 000 for women, respectively. The prevalence of H. pylori varied from almost 5% at 0.5-2 years to just over 90% at 70 years or more. No consistent variation was observed since the 1990s. The downward trends in mortality rates are expected to remain in the next decades. The high prevalence of H. pylori infection across age groups and studies from different periods shows a large potential for decrease in the burden of gastric cancer in Portugal.

  17. Does Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy for peptic ulcer prevent gastric cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katsuhiro Mabe; Mikako Takahashi; Haruhumi Oizumi; Hideaki Tsukuma; Akiko Shibata; Kazutoshi Fukase; Toru Matsuda; Hiroaki Takeda; Sumio Kawata

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori ) eradication therapy for treatment of peptic ulcer on the incidence of gastric cancer. METHODS: A multicenter prospective cohort study was conducted between November 2000 and December 2007 in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. The study included patients with H pylori -positive peptic ulcer who decided themselves whether to receive H pylori eradication (eradication group) or conventional antacid therapy (non-eradication group). Incidence of gastric cancer in the two groups was determined based on the results of annual endoscopy and questionnaire surveys, as well as Yamagata Prefectural Cancer Registry data, and was compared between the two groups and by results of H pylori therapy. RESULTS: A total of 4133 patients aged between 13 and 91 years (mean 52.9 years) were registered, and 56 cases of gastric cancer were identified over a mean follow-up of 5.6 years. The sex- and age-adjusted incidence ratio of gastric cancer in the eradication group, as compared with the non-eradication group, was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.28-1.19) and ratios by follow-up period (< 1 year, 1-3 years, > 3 years) were 1.16 (0.27-5.00), 0.50 (0.17-1.49), and 0.34 (0.09-1.28), respectively. Longer follow-up tended to be associated with better prevention of gastric cancer, although not to a significant extent. No significant difference in incidence of gastric cancer was observed between patients with successful eradication therapy (32/2451 patients, 1.31%) and those with treatment failure (11/639 patients, 1.72%). Among patients with duodenal ulcer, which is known to be more prevalent in younger individuals, the incidence of gastric cancer was significantly less in those with successful eradication therapy (2/845 patients, 0.24%) than in those with treatment failure (3/216 patients, 1.39%). CONCLUSION: H pylori eradication therapy for peptic ulcer patients with a mean age of 52.9 years at registration did not significantly decrease the

  18. Helicobacter pylori-infected animal models are extremely suitable for the investigation of gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaaki Kodama; Kazunari Murakami; Ryugo Sato; Tadayoshi Okimoto; Akira Nishizono; Toshio Fujioka

    2005-01-01

    Although various animal models have been developed to clarify gastric carcinogenesis, apparent mechanism of gastric cancer was not clarified in recent years. Since the recognition of the pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori), several animal models with Hpylori infection have been developed to confirm the association between Hpylori and gastric cancer. Nonhuman primate and rodent models were suitable for this study. Japanese monkey model revealed atrophic gastritis and p53mutation after long-term infection of Hpylori. Mongolian gerbil model showed the development of gastric carcinoma with H pylori infection alone, as well as with combination of chemical carcinogens, such as N-methylN-nitrosourea and N-methyl-N-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanidine.The histopathological changes of these animal models after Hpylori inoculation are closely similar to those in human beings with Hpylori infection. Eradication therapy attenuated the development of gastric cancer in Hpyloriinfected Mongolian gerbil. Although several features of animal models differ from those seen in human beings,these experimental models provide a starting point for further studies to clarify the mechanism of gastric carcinogenesis as a result of Hpylori infection and assist the planning of eradication therapy to prevent gastric carcinoma.

  19. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection Angiogénesis gástrica e infección por Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  20. Characteristics of Primary and Metachronous Gastric Cancers Discovered after Helicobacter pylori Eradication: A Multicenter Propensity Score-Matched Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehata, Yuji; Nakamura, Shotaro; Esaki, Motohiro; Ikeda, Fumie; Moriyama, Tomohiko; Hida, Risa; Washio, Ema; Umeno, Junji; Hirahashi, Minako; Kitazono, Takanari; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2017-09-15

    Gastric cancers develop even after successful Helicobacter pylori eradication. We aimed to clarify the characteristics of early gastric cancers discovered after H. pylori eradication. A total of 1,053 patients with early gastric cancer treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection were included. After matching the propensity score, we retrospectively investigated the clinicopathological features of 192 patients, including 96 patients who had undergone successful H. pylori eradication (Hp-eradicated group) and 96 patients who had active H. pylori infection (Hp-positive group). In the Hp-eradicated group, early gastric cancers were discovered 1 to 15 years (median, 4.1 years) after H. pylori eradication. Compared with Hp-positive patients, Hp-eradicated patients showed a more frequently depressed configuration (81% vs 53%, respectively, ppylori eradication. Among patients in the Hp-eradicated group, metachronous cancers showed less frequent depressed lesions (68% vs 84%, respectively, p=0.049) and smaller tumor sizes (median, 11 mm vs 14 mm, respectively, p=0.014) than primary cancers. Early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication are characterized by a depressed configuration. Careful follow-up endoscopies are necessary after H. pylori eradication.

  1. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Baik Hahm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  2. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Hong, Kyung-Sook; Hong, Hua [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, Ki Baik, E-mail: hahmkb@gachon.ac.kr [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Gastroenterology, Gachon Graduate School of Medicine, Gil Hospital, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-25

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  3. Early Molecular Events in Murine Gastric Epithelial Cells Mediated by Helicobacter pylori CagA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aditi; Basu, Malini; Blanchard, Thomas G; Chintalacharuvu, Subba R; Guang, Wei; Lillehoj, Erik P; Czinn, Steven J

    2016-10-01

    Murine models of Helicobacter pylori infection are used to study host-pathogen interactions, but lack of severe gastritis in this model has limited its usefulness in studying pathogenesis. We compared the murine gastric epithelial cell line GSM06 to the human gastric epithelial AGS cell line to determine whether similar events occur when cultured with H. pylori. The lysates of cells infected with H. pylori isolates or an isogenic cagA-deficient mutant were assessed for translocation and phosphorylation of CagA and for activation of stress pathway kinases by immunoblot. Phosphorylated CagA was detected in both cell lines within 60 minutes. Phospho-ERK 1/2 was present within several minutes and distinctly present in GSM06 cells at 60 minutes. Similar results were obtained for phospho-JNK, although the 54 kDa phosphoprotein signal was dominant in AGS, whereas the lower molecular weight band was dominant in GSM06 cells. These results demonstrate that early events in H. pylori pathogenesis occur within mouse epithelial cells similar to human cells and therefore support the use of the mouse model for the study of acute CagA-associated host cell responses. These results also indicate that reduced disease in H. pylori-infected mice may be due to lack of the Cag PAI, or by differences in the mouse response downstream of the initial activation events. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition downregulates Helicobacter pylori-induced epithelial inflammatory responses, DNA damage and gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Johanna C; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Delgado, Alberto G; Wroblewski, Lydia E; Barry, Daniel P; Peek, Richard M; Gobert, Alain P; Wilson, Keith T

    2017-05-04

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor. We have reported increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in the H. pylori-induced human carcinogenesis cascade, and association with DNA damage. Our goal was to determine the role of EGFR activation in gastric carcinogenesis. We evaluated gefitinib, a specific EGFR inhibitor, in chemoprevention of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and cancer development. Mice with genetically targeted epithelial cell-specific deletion of Egfr (Efgr(Δepi) mice) were also used. In C57BL/6 mice, gefitinib decreased Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 expression by gastric epithelial cells, myeloperoxidase-positive inflammatory cells in the mucosa and epithelial DNA damage induced by H. pylori infection. Similar reductions in chemokines, inflammatory cells and DNA damage occurred in infected Egfr(Δepi) versus Egfr(fl/fl) control mice. In H. pylori-infected transgenic insulin-gastrin (INS-GAS) mice and gerbils, gefitinib treatment markedly reduced dysplasia and carcinoma. Gefitinib blocked H. pylori-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3 (MAPK1/3) and activator protein 1 in gastric epithelial cells, resulting in inhibition of chemokine synthesis. MAPK1/3 phosphorylation and JUN activation was reduced in gastric tissues from infected wild-type and INS-GAS mice treated with gefitinib and in primary epithelial cells from Efgr(Δepi) versus Egfr(fl/fl) mice. Epithelial EGFR activation persisted in humans and mice after H. pylori eradication, and gefitinib reduced gastric carcinoma in INS-GAS mice treated with antibiotics. These findings suggest that epithelial EGFR inhibition represents a potential strategy to prevent development of gastric carcinoma in H. pylori-infected individuals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Serum Level of Trefoil Factor 2 can Predict the Extent of Gastric Spasmolytic Polypeptide-Expressing Metaplasia in the H. pylori-Infected Gastric Cancer Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Yu-Ching; Wu, Chung-Tai; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Lu, Cheng-Chang; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2017-02-01

    Gastric cancer has familial clustering in incidence, and the familial relatives of gastric cancer sufferers are prone to have spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM), and intestinal metaplasia (IM) after H. pylori infection. This study tested whether serum pepsinogen I/II and trefoil factor family (TFF) proteins can predict SPEM or IM in the H. pylori-infected relatives of patients with gastric cancer. We prospectively enrolled 119 H. pylori-infected relatives of gastric cancer patients of noncardiac gastric cancer patients, who then received panendoscopy to obtain gastric biopsy to define the presence of corpus gastritis index (CGI), SPEM, and IM. The advanced SPEM in histology was defined by TFF2 immunohistochemistry. Each patient also had checkups of serum TFF2, TFF3, and pepsinogen I/II by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The 119 H. pylori-infected relatives included 61 with SPEM, and 34 with IM. The presence of either IM or SPEM was not related to the serum TFF2, TFF3, and pepsinogen I/II levels (p > .05). Serum TFF2 levels were higher in relatives with CGI who also had advanced SPEM (p = .032). For relatives without CGI, the elevated serum TFF2 levels correlated with higher H. pylori density and more severe gastritis in antrum (p = .001). The serum TFF2 level cannot predict SPEM or IM in H. pylori-infected relatives of patients with gastric cancer. For H. pylori-infected relatives with CGI, serum TFF2 levels may predict the advanced severity of SPEM. Elevated serum TFF2 levels may indicate severe H. pylori-related inflammation, at risk of development or progression of SPEM in relatives without CGI. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. In Vivo Expression of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genes in Patients with Gastritis, Ulcer, and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés-Jiménez, Francisco; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Nieto-Patlán, Erik; Hansen, Lori M.; Burgueño, Juan; Ramos, Irma P.; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Bermúdez, Hector; Blancas, Juan M.; Cabrera, Lourdes; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María

    2012-01-01

    The best-studied Helicobacter pylori virulence factor associated with development of peptic ulcer disease or gastric cancer (GC) rather than asymptomatic nonatrophic gastritis (NAG) is the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI), which encodes a type IV secretion system (T4SS) that injects the CagA oncoprotein into host epithelial cells. Here we used real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) to measure the in vivo expression of genes on the cagPAI and of other virulence genes in patients with NAG, duodenal ulcer (DU), or GC. In vivo expression of H. pylori virulence genes was greater overall in gastric biopsy specimens of patients with GC than in those of patients with NAG or DU. However, since in vitro expression of cagA was not greater in H. pylori strains from patients with GC than in those from patients with NAG or DU, increased expression in GC in vivo is likely a result of environmental conditions in the gastric mucosa, though it may in turn cause more severe pathology. Increased expression of virulence genes in GC may represent a stress response to elevated pH or other environmental conditions in the stomach of patients with GC, which may be less hospitable to H. pylori colonization than the acidic environment in patients with NAG or DU. PMID:22124657

  7. Complete remission of gastric Burkitt's lymphoma after eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isabelle Baumgaertner; Christiane Copie-Bergman; Michael Levy; Corinne Haioun; Antoine Charachon; Maryse Baia; Iradj Sobhani; Jean-Charles Delchier

    2009-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a highly aggressive non- Hodgkin lymphoma, often presenting in extra-nodal sites. It generally has a poor spontaneous outcome and needs aggressive treatment with systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy. Occurrence at the gastric site is rare. We report the case of a 39-year old woman who presented with a prominent ulcerated lesion of the antrum corresponding histologically to a Burkitt's lymphoma associated with Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated c-MYC gene rearrangement in tumour cells without BCL2 or BCL6 gene translocations.Ulcer healing and tumour regression with a complete histological response were obtained 8 wk after H pylor ieradication. In spite of this complete remission, taking into account the high risk of recurrence, the patient received systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy. Two years later, the patient remained in complete remission.This is the first report of a gastric Burkitt's lymphoma responding to H pylori eradication. These findings raise the question of the potential role of H pylori in the pathogenesis of some gastric Burkitt's lymphomas, and show the importance of searching for and eradicating the bacteria in combination with conventional chemotherapy regimens.

  8. Increased Cell Proliferation in Chronic Helicobacter pylori Positive Gastritis and Gastric Carcinoma – Correlation between Immuno-Histochemistry and Tv Image Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Szaleczky

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgound: Epithelial cell proliferation activity has been reported both to be unaltered and increased in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori associated chronic gastritis. The proliferation rate decreased following H. pylori eradication, but results are controversial whether this change is dependent on the success of eradication. We compared the cell proliferation activity of H. pylori positive and negative gastric epithelial biopsies in chronic gastritis with and without intestinal metaplasia (IM and gastric cancer by the expression of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and Tv image cytometry, and assessed the effect of H. pylori eradication on the cell proliferation rate in the gastric epithelium.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric carcinoma: Not allthe strains and patients are alike

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) develops in only 1%-3% ofHelicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infected people. Therole in GC formation of the bacterial genotypes, genepolymorphisms and host's factors may therefore beimportant. The risk of GC is enhanced when individualsare infected by strains expressing the oncoprotein CagA,in particular if CagA has a high number of repeatscontaining the EPIYA sequence in its C'-terminal variableregion or particular amino acid sequences flank theEPIYA motifs. H. pylori infection triggers an inflammatoryresponse characterised by an increased secretion ofsome chemokines by immunocytes and colonisedgastric epithelial cells; these molecules are especiallyconstituted by proteins composing the interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) group and tumour necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α). Polymorphisms in the promoter regions ofgenes encoding these molecules, could account for highconcentrations of IL-1β and TNF-α in the gastric mucosa,which may cause hypochlorhydria and eventually GC.Inconsistent results have been attained with otherhaplotypes of inflammatory and anti-inflammatorycytokines. Genomic mechanisms of GC development aremainly based on chromosomal or microsatellite instability(MSI) and deregulation of signalling transductionpathways. H. pylori infection may induce DNA instabilityand breaks of double-strand DNA in gastric mucocytes.Different H. pylori strains seem to differently increasethe risk of cancer development run by the host. CertainH. pylori genotypes (such as the cagA positive) inducehigh degrees of chronic inflammation and determinean increase of mutagenesis rate, oxidative-stress,mismatch repair mechanisms, down-regulation of baseexcision and genetic instability, as well as generationof reactive oxygen species that modulate apoptosis;these phenomena may end to trigger or concur to GCdevelopment.

  10. Gastric mucosal status in populations with a low prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Nusi, Iswan Abbas; Akil, Fardah; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Wibawa, I Dewa Nyoman; Rezkitha, Yudith Annisa Ayu; Maimunah, Ummi; Subsomwong, Phawinee; Parewangi, Muhammad Luthfi; Mariadi, I Ketut; Adi, Pangestu; Uchida, Tomohisa; Purbayu, Herry; Sugihartono, Titong; Waskito, Langgeng Agung; Hidayati, Hanik Badriyah; Lusida, Maria Inge; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    In Indonesia, endoscopy services are limited and studies about gastric mucosal status by using pepsinogens (PGs) are rare. We measured PG levels, and calculated the best cutoff and predictive values for discriminating gastric mucosal status among ethnic groups in Indonesia. We collected gastric biopsy specimens and sera from 233 patients with dyspepsia living in three Indonesian islands. When ≥5.5 U/mL was used as the best cutoff value of Helicobacter pylori antibody titer, 8.6% (20 of 233) were positive for H. pylori infection. PG I and II levels were higher among smokers, and PG I was higher in alcohol drinkers than in their counterparts. PG II level was significantly higher, whereas PG I/II ratios were lower in H. pylori-positive than in H. pylori-negative patients. PG I/II ratios showed a significant inverse correlation with the inflammation and atrophy scores of the antrum. The best cutoff values of PG I/II were 4.05 and 3.55 for discriminating chronic and atrophic gastritis, respectively. PG I, PG II, and PG I/II ratios were significantly lower in subjects from Bangli than in those from Makassar and Surabaya, and concordant with the ABC group distribution; however, group D (H. pylori negative/PG positive) was the lowest in subjects from Bangli. In conclusion, validation of indirect methods is necessary before their application. We confirmed that serum PG level is a useful biomarker determining chronic gastritis, but a modest sensitivity for atrophic gastritis in Indonesia. The ABC method should be used with caution in areas with a low prevalence of H. pylori.

  11. Coordinate increase of telomerase activity and c-Myc expression in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xin Zhang; Yan-Hong Gu; Zhi-Quan Zhao; Shun-Fu Xu; Hong-Ji Zhang; Hong-Di Wang; Bo Hao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To detect the telomerase activity and c-Myc expression in gastric diseases and to examine the relation between these values and Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) as a risk factor for gastric cancer.METHODS: One hundred and seventy-one gastric samples were studied to detect telomerase activity using a telomerase polymerase chain reaction enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELTSA), and c-Myc expression using immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: The telomerase activity and c-Myc expression were higher in cancers (87.69% and 61.54%) than in noncancerous tissues. They were higher in chronic atrophic gastritis with severe intestinal metaplasia (52.38% and 47.62%) than in chronic atrophic gastritis with mild intestinal metaplasia (13.33% and 16.67%). Tn chronic atrophic gastritis with severe intestinal metaplasia, the telomerase activity and c-Myc expression were higher in cases with -H pylori infection (67.86% and 67.86%) than in those without infection (21.43%and 7.14%). c-Myc expression was higher in gastric cancer with H pylori infection (77.27%) than in that without infection (28.57%). The telomerase activity and c-Nyc expression were coordinately up-regulated in H pylori infected gastric cancer and chronic atrophic gastritis with severe intestinal metaplasia.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection may influence both telomerase activity and c-Myc expression in gastric diseases,especially in chronic atrophic gastritis.

  12. Essential role of ferritin Pfr in Helicobacter pylori iron metabolism and gastric colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waidner, Barbara; Greiner, Stefan; Odenbreit, Stefan; Kavermann, Holger; Velayudhan, Jyoti; Stähler, Frank; Guhl, Johannes; Bissé, Emmanuel; van Vliet, Arnoud H M; Andrews, Simon C; Kusters, Johannes G; Kelly, David J; Haas, Rainer; Kist, Manfred; Bereswill, Stefan

    2002-07-01

    The reactivity of the essential element iron necessitates a concerted expression of ferritins, which mediate iron storage in a nonreactive state. Here we have further established the role of the Helicobacter pylori ferritin Pfr in iron metabolism and gastric colonization. Iron stored in Pfr enabled H. pylori to multiply under severe iron starvation and protected the bacteria from acid-amplified iron toxicity, as inactivation of the pfr gene restricted growth of H. pylori under these conditions. The lowered total iron content in the pfr mutant, which is probably caused by decreased iron uptake rates, was also reflected by an increased resistance to superoxide stress. Iron induction of Pfr synthesis was clearly diminished in an H. pylori feoB mutant, which lacked high-affinity ferrous iron transport, confirming that Pfr expression is mediated by changes in the cytoplasmic iron pool and not by extracellular iron. This is well in agreement with the recent discovery that iron induces Pfr synthesis by abolishing Fur-mediated repression of pfr transcription, which was further confirmed here by the observation that iron inhibited the in vitro binding of recombinant H. pylori Fur to the pfr promoter region. The functions of H. pylori Pfr in iron metabolism are essential for survival in the gastric mucosa, as the pfr mutant was unable to colonize in a Mongolian gerbil-based animal model. In summary, the pfr phenotypes observed give new insights into prokaryotic ferritin functions and indicate that iron storage and homeostasis are of extraordinary importance for H. pylori to survive in its hostile natural environment.

  13. The gastric acid pocket is attenuated in H. pylori infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David R; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Wirz, Angela A; Orange, Clare; Ballantyne, Stuart A; Going, James J; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2017-09-01

    Gastric acid secretory capacity in different anatomical regions, including the postprandial acid pocket, was assessed in Helicobacter pylori positive and negative volunteers in a Western population. We studied 31 H. pylori positive and 28 H. pylori negative volunteers, matched for age, gender and body mass index. Jumbo biopsies were taken at 11 predetermined locations from the gastro-oesophageal junction and stomach. Combined high-resolution pH metry (12 sensors) and manometry (36 sensors) was performed for 20 min fasted and 90 min postprandially. The squamocolumnar junction was marked with radio-opaque clips and visualised radiologically. Biopsies were scored for inflammation and density of parietal, chief and G cells immunohistochemically. Under fasting conditions, the H. pylori positives had less intragastric acidity compared with negatives at all sensors >1.1 cm distal to the peak lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) pressure (ppylori positives at sensors 2.2, 3.3 and 4.4 cm distal to the peak LES pressure (ppylori positives. The H. pylori positives had a lower density of parietal and chief cells compared with H. pylori negatives in 10 of the 11 gastric locations (ppylori positives were CagA-seropositive and showed a more marked reduction in intragastric acidity and increased mucosal inflammation. In population volunteers, H. pylori positives have reduced intragastric acidity which most markedly affects the postprandial acid pocket. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric epithelial cell kinetics in patients with chronic renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selim Aydemir; Binnaz Handan Ozdemir; Gurden Gur; Ibrahim Dogan; Ugur Yilmaz; Sedat Boyacioglu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric epithelial cell kinetics in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF).METHODS: Forty-four patients were enrolled in this study and divided into four groups with respect to their Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and CRF status. Groups were labeled as follows: 1a: normal renal function, H pylori negative (n = 12), 1b: normal renal function,H pylori positive (n = 11), 2a: CRF, H pylori negative (n = 10), 2b: CRF, H pylori positive (n = 11). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was done in all the patients involved in the study. During endoscopical investigation,antral biopsy specimens were taken from each patient.In order to evaluate the cell apoptosis and proliferation in gastric epithelial cells, Bax and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes (LI) were assessed with immunohistochemical staining method.RESULTS: For groups 1a, 1b, 2a, and 2b, mean Bax LI was identified as 34.4±13.7, 44.1±16.5, 46.3±20.5,60.7±13.8, respectively and mean PCNA LI was identified as 36.2±17.2, 53.6±25.6, 59.5±25.6, 67.2±22,respectively. When the one-way ANOVA test was applied,statistically significant differences were detected between the groups for both Bax LI (P = 0.004 <0.01) and PCNA LI (P = 0.009 <0.01). When groups were compared further in terms of Bax LI and PCNA LI with Tukey's HSD test for multiple pairwise comparisons, statistically significant difference was observed only between groups 1a and 2b (P = 0.006 <0.01).CONCLUSION: In gastric epithelial cells, expression of both the pre-apoptotic protein Bax and the proliferation marker PCNA increase with H pylori infection. This increase is more evident in patients with uremia. These findings suggest that uremia accelerates apoptosis and proliferation in gastric epithelial cells.

  15. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer in the Middle East: A new enigma?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nawfal; R; Hussein

    2010-01-01

    The Middle East is the home of ethnic groups from three main backgrounds: Semitic (Arabs and Jews), Indo-European (Persians and Kurdish) and Turkic (Turkish and Turkmens). Its geographic location, which has been under continuous influences from Asia, Europe and Africa, has made it an ideal site for epidemiological studies on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and genotyping. The gastric cancer rate differs in this region from very high in Iran (26.1/105) to low in Israel (12.5/105) and very low in Eg...

  16. The Protective Effects of 18β-Glycyrrhetinic Acid on Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gastric Mucosa in Mongolian Gerbils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghui Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 18β-Glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA, a major component of Glycyrrhiza glabra, is widely used therapeutically in clinic. In this study, the effect of GRA on Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori- infected gastritis was investigated in Mongolian gerbils in vivo. The gerbils were randomly divided into groups: uninfected; H. pylori-infected; H. pylori + antibiotics (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and esomeprazole; and H. pylori + GRA. The gastric intraluminal pH value, histopathological changes, and the expression levels of inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS were investigated. The results showed that, in the H. pylori + GRA group, the intraluminal gastric pH value was lower (2.14±0.08 versus 3.17±0.23, P<0.05, erosion and hyperplasia were alleviated, the infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells was attenuated (P<0.05, and the expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, and iNOS were decreased (P<0.05 compared with the H. pylori-infected group. There was no significant difference in results between the H. pylori + GRA group and the H. pylori + antibiotics group. This study indicated that GRA significantly attenuated H. pylori-infected gastritis in gerbils and has the potential to be developed as a new therapeutic drug.

  17. Interplay of the Gastric Pathogen Helicobacter pylori with Toll-Like Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneesh Kumar Pachathundikandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are crucial for pathogen recognition and downstream signaling to induce effective immunity. The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is a paradigm of persistent bacterial infections and chronic inflammation in humans. The chronicity of inflammation during H. pylori infection is related to the manipulation of regulatory cytokines. In general, the early detection of H. pylori by TLRs and other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs is believed to induce a regulatory cytokine or chemokine profile that eventually blocks the resolution of inflammation. H. pylori factors such as LPS, HSP-60, NapA, DNA, and RNA are reported in various studies to be recognized by specific TLRs. However, H. pylori flagellin evades the recognition of TLR5 by possessing a conserved N-terminal motif. Activation of TLRs and resulting signal transduction events lead to the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators through activation of NF-κB, MAP kinases, and IRF signaling pathways. The genetic polymorphisms of these important PRRs are also implicated in the varied outcome and disease progression. Hence, the interplay of TLRs and bacterial factors highlight the complexity of innate immune recognition and immune evasion as well as regulated processes in the progression of associated pathologies. Here we will review this important aspect of H. pylori infection.

  18. Helicobacter pylori Is Associated with miR-133a Expression through Promoter Methylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Sang Gyun; Choi, Ji Min; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2017-09-28

    To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori eradication can reverse epigenetic silencing of microRNAs (miRNAs) which are associated with H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. We examined expression and promoter methylation of miR-34b/c, miR-133a, let-7a, and let-7i in gastric cancer cell line, before/after demethylation. Among them, epigenetically controlled miRNAs were identified. Their expression and promoter methylation was examined in human tissues of H. pylori-positive gastric cancer (T), H. pylori-positive gastritis (H), and H. pylori-negative controls (C). We also compared changes of miRNA expression and promoter methylation in H. pylori-positive patients who were endoscopically treated for early gastric cancer, between baseline and 1 year later according to eradication status. In gastric cancer cell line, miR-34b/c, and miR-133a showed epigenetic silencing. In human tissues, miR-34b/c and miR-133a showed serial increase of promoter methylation in order of C, H, and T (all, p〈0.01), and the miR-133a expression showed serial decrease (C vs H, p=0.02; H vs T, p=0.01; C vs T, p〈0.01) while miR-34b and miR-34c expressions did not. H. pylori eradication induced decrease of methylation (p〈0.01) and increase of miR-133a expression (p=0.03), compared with noneradication group. This result suggests H. pylori eradication could reverse methylation-silencing of miR-133a which is involved in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  19. High concentrations of human β-defensin 2 in gastric juice of patients with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajime Isomoto; Shigeru Kohno; Hiroshi Mukae; Hiroshi Ishimoto; Yoshito Nishi; Chun-Yang Wen; Akihiro Wada; Ken Ohnita; Toshiya Hirayama; Masamitsu Nakazato

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Human β-defensin (HBD)-1 and HBD-2 are endogenous antimicrobial peptides. Unlike HBD-1, the HBD-2 expression is augmented by Helicobacter pylori (H pylori). We sought to determine HBD-1 and HBD-2 concentrations in gastric juice duringH pylori infection.METHODS: HBD-1 and HBD-2 concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay in plasma and gastric juice of 49 H pylori-infected and 33 uninfected subjects and before and after anti-H pyloritreatment in 13 patients with H pylori-associated gastritis. Interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 concentrations in gastric juice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Histological grades of gastritis were determined using two biopsy specimens taken from the antrum and corpus. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC)was used to identify HBD-2.RESULTS: HBD-2 concentrations in gastric juice, but not in plasma, were significantly higher in H pylori-positive than -negative subjects, albeit the post-treatment levels were unchanged. Immunoreactivity for HBD-2 was exclusively identified in H pylori-infected mucosa by RPHPLC. HBD-2 concentrations in gastric juice correlated with histological degree of neutrophil and mononuclear cell infiltration in the corpus. IL-1β levels correlated with those of IL-8, but not HBD-2. Plasma and gastric juice HBD-1concentrations were similar in H pylori-infected and uninfected subjects.CONCLUSION: Our results place the β-defensins, especially HBD-2, in the front line of innate immune defence.Moreover, HBD-2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of H pylori-associated gastritis, possibly through its function as immune and inflammatory mediator.

  20. Helicobacter pylori strain-specific modulation of gastric inflammation in Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ken Ohnita; Hajime Isomoto; Shoji Honda; Akihiro Wada; Chun-Yang Wen; Yoshito Nishi; Yohei Mizuta; Toshiya Hirayama; Shigeru Kohno

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The cag pathogenicity island (PAI) is one of potential virulence determinants of Helicobacter pylori. The Mongolian gerbil is a suitable experimental animal for the screening of virulence factors of H pylori.METHODS: Five-week-old Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with a standard H pylori strain (ATCC 43504)possessing the cag PAI or a clinical isolate lacking the genes' cluster (OHPC-0002). The animals were killed at 2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 wk after inoculation (n = 5 each), and macroscopic and histopathological findings in the stomachs were compared.RESULTS: In gerbils infected with ATCC 43504, a more severe degree of infiltration of polynuclear and mononuclear cells and lymphoid follicles was observed from 4 wk after inoculation compared to gerbils infected with OHPC-0002 especially in the antrum and transitional zone from the fundic to pyloric gland area. In addition,glandular atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, gastric ulcer and hyperplastic polyps were noted in gerbils infected with ATCC 43504, whereas only mild gastric erosions occurred in those infected with OHPC-0002.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that the cag PAI could be directly involved in gastric immune and inflammatory responses in the Mongolian gerbils, leading to a more advanced gastric disease.

  1. A potential role for Helicobacter pylori heat shock protein 60 in gastric tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chen-Si [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); He, Pei-Juin [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Nu-Man [School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Li, Chi-Han; Yang, Shang-Chih; Hsu, Wei-Tung [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Shiang [Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chang-Jer [Department of Food Science, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tain-Lu [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Liao, Kuang-Wen, E-mail: kitchhen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China)

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori has been found to promote the malignant process leading to gastric cancer. Heat shock protein 60 of H. pylori (HpHSP60) was previously been identified as a potent immunogene. This study investigates the role of HpHSP60 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis. The effect of HpHSP60 on cell proliferation, anti-death activity, angiogenesis and cell migration were explored. The results showed that HpHSP60 enhanced migration by gastric cancer cells and promoted tube formation by umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); however, HpHSP60 did not increase cell proliferation nor was this protein able to rescue gastric cancer cells from death. Moreover, the results also indicated HpHSP60 had different effects on AGS gastric cancer cells or THP-1 monocytic cells in terms of their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important to cancer development. We propose that HpHSP60 may trigger the initiation of carcinogenesis by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine release and by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Thus, this extracellular pathogen-derived HSP60 is potentially a vigorous virulence factor that can act as a carcinogen during gastric tumorigenesis.

  2. [Role of animal gastric Helicobacter species in human gastric pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdeev, O K; Pozdeeva, A O; Pozdnyak, A O; Saifutdinov, R G

    2015-01-01

    Animal Helicobacter species other than Helicobacter pylori are also able to cause human gastritis, gastric ulcers, and MALT lymphomas. Animal Helicobacter species are presented with typical spiral fastidious microorganisms colonizing the gastric mucosa of different animals. Bacteria initially received their provisional name Helicobacter heilmannii, and out of them at least five species colonizing the gastric mucosa of pigs, cats, and dogs were isolated later on. A high proportion of these diseases are shown to be zoonotic. Transmission of pathogens occurs by contact. The factors of bacterial pathogenicity remain little studied.

  3. Gastric Helicobacter pylori infection associated with risk of diabetes mellitus, but not prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gi-Hua; Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2014-10-01

    The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and diabetes was inconsistent in previous studies. Moreover, there are no studies on the relationship between H. pylori infection and prediabetes in the literature. The aim of this study is thus to assess the association of Helicobacter infection, diagnosed by pathology from gastric biopsy, with diabetes and prediabetes. This cross-sectional study included 1285 subjects aged 19-85 who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and gastric biopsy during health examinations at National Cheng Kung University Hospital from 2000 to 2009. Subjects were divided into three groups, including normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, and diabetes. Diabetes and prediabetes were assessed according to the American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Gastric Helicobacter infection was an independent variable. Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and multinomial logistic regression models were used to analyze the effects of Helicobacter infection on the risk of diabetes and prediabetes while controlling for age, lifestyle, pathological conditions, and laboratory variables. There were significant differences in the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter infection among the three groups. The results of multivariate analysis showed that age, obesity, family history of diabetes, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia were significantly related to both prediabetes and diabetes. Helicobacter pylori infection was positively associated with diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-2.01), but not prediabetes (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.77-1.36), in addition to male gender, education level (≤ 9 vs > 12 years), pre-hypertension, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Gastric H. pylori infection is associated with diabetes, but not prediabetes. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Anti- Helicobacter pylori therapy followed by celecoxib on progression of gastric precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Jing Zhang; Shi-Yan Wang; Xiao-Hui Huo; Zhen-Long Zhu; Jian-Kun Chu; Jin-Cheng Ma; Dong-Sheng Cui; Ping Gu; Zeng-Ren Zhao; Ming-Wei Wang; Jun Yu

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate whether celecoxib,a selective cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitor,could reduce the severity of gastric precancerous lesions following Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication.METHODS:H pylori-eradicated patients with gastric precancerous lesions randomly received either celecoxib (n=30) or placebo (n=30) for up to 3 mo.COX-2 expression and activity was determined by immunostaining and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) assay,cell proliferation by Ki-67 immunostaining,apoptosis by TUNEL staining and angiogenesis by microvascular density (MVD) assay using CD31 staining.RESULTS:COX-2 protein expression was significantly increased in gastric precancerous lesions (atrophy,intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia,respectively) compared with chronic gastritis,and was concomitant with an increase in cell proliferation and angiogenesis.A significant improvement in precancerous lesions was observed in patients who received celecoxib compared with those who received placebo (P<0.001).Of these three changes,84.6% of sites with dysplasia regressed in patients treated with celecoxib (P=0.002) compared with 60% in the placebo group,suggesting that celecoxib was effective on the regression of dysplasia.COX-2 protein expression (P<0.001) and COX-2 activity (P<0.001) in the gastric tissues were consistently lower in celecoxib-treated patients compared with the placebo-treated subjects.Moreover,it was also shown that celecoxib suppressed cell proliferation (P<0.01),induced cell apoptosis (P<0.01) and inhibited angiogenesis with decreased MVD (P<0.001).However,all of these effects were not seen in placebo-treated subjects.Furthermore,COX-2 inhibition resulted in the up-regulation of PPARg expression,a protective molecule with anti-neoplastic effects.CONCLUSION:H pylori eradication therapy followed by celecoxib treatment improves gastric precancerous lesions by inhibiting COX-2 activity,inducing apoptosis,and suppressing cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  5. Effects of H pylori infection on gap-junctional intercellular communication and proliferation of gastric epithelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effects of H pylori infection on gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and proliferation of gastric epithelial cells in vitro. METHODS: A human gastric epithelial cell line (SGC-7901) cultured on coverslips was exposed overnight to intact H pylori (CagA+ or CagA- strains) and sonicated extracts, respectively. GJIC between the cells was detected by fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching (FRAP) technique. Proliferation of SGC cells was determined by methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT)assay.RESULTS: When compared with control in which cells were cultured with simple medium alone, both CagA+ and CagA- H pylori isolates could inhibit GJIC (CagA+:F = 57.98, P < 0.01; CagA-: F = 29.59, P < 0.01) and proliferation (CagA+: F = 42.65, P < 0.01; CagA-: F =58.14, P < 0.01) of SGC-7901 cells. Compared with CagA- strains, CagA+ H pylori more significantly downregulated GJIC of gastric cells (intact H pylori: t = 13.86,P < 0.01; sonicated extracts: t = 11.87, P < 0.01) and inhibited proliferation gastric cells to a lesser extent in vitro (intact H pylori: t = 3.06, P < 0.05; sonicated extracts: t = 3.94, P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Compared with CagA- H pylori strains,CagA+ strains down-regulate GJIC of gastric epithelial cells more significantly and inhibit proliferation of gastric cells to a lesser extent in vitro. H pylori, especially CagA+ strains, may play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis.

  6. Helicobacter pylori Activates IL-6-STAT3 Signaling in Human Gastric Cancer Cells: Potential Roles for Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Juan-Yu; Lee, Hee Geum; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Han, Hyeong-Jun; Ngo, Hoang-Kieu-Chi; Park, Sin-Aye; Woo, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Jeong-Sang; Na, Hye-Kyung; Cha, Young-Nam; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) that plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying H. pylori-mediated STAT3 activation is still not fully understood. In this study, we investigated H. pylori-induced activation of STAT3 signaling in AGS human gastric cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. AGS cells were cocultured with H. pylori, and STAT3 activation was assessed by Western blot analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and immunocytochemistry. To demonstrate the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in H. pylori-activated STAT3 signaling, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was utilized. The expression and production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The interaction between IL-6 and IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) was determined by the immunoprecipitation assay. H. pylori activates STAT3 as evidenced by increases in phosphorylation on Tyr(705) , nuclear localization, DNA binding and transcriptional activity of this transcription factor. The nuclear translocation of STAT3 was also observed in H. pylori-inoculated mouse stomach. In the subsequent study, we found that H. pylori-induced STAT3 phosphorylation was dependent on IL-6. Notably, the increased IL-6 expression and the IL-6 and IL-6R binding were mediated by ROS produced as a consequence of H. pylori infection. H. pylori-induced STAT3 activation is mediated, at least in part, through ROS-induced upregulation of IL-6 expression. These findings provide a novel molecular mechanism responsible for H. pylori-induced gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. How host regulation of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis protects against peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Poshmaal; Ng, Garrett Z; Sutton, Philip

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the etiological agent of a range of gastrointestinal pathologies including peptic ulcer disease and the major killer, gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection with this bacterium induces a chronic inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa (gastritis). It is this gastritis that, over decades, eventually drives the development of H. pylori-associated disease in some individuals. The majority of studies investigating H. pylori pathogenesis have focused on factors that promote disease development in infected individuals. However, an estimated 85% of those infected with H. pylori remain completely asymptomatic, despite the presence of pathogenic bacteria that drive a chronic gastritis that lasts many decades. This indicates the presence of highly effective regulatory processes in the host that, in most cases, keeps a check on inflammation and protect against disease. In this minireview we discuss such known host factors and how they prevent the development of H. pylori-associated pathologies.

  8. Changes in gastric microbiota induced by Helicobacter pylori infection and preventive effects of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 against such infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mingfang; Wan, Cuixiang; Xie, Qiong; Huang, Renhui; Tao, Xueying; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogen linked to gastric ulcers and stomach cancer. Gastric microbiota might play an essential role in the pathogenesis of these stomach diseases. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a probiotic candidate Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 as a protective agent against the gastric mucosal inflammation and alteration of gastric microbiota induced by H. pylori infection in a mouse model. Prior to infection, mice were pretreated with or without 400 µL of L. plantarum ZDY 2013 at a concentration of 10(9) cfu/mL per mouse. At 6 wk postinfection, gastric mucosal immune response and alteration in gastric microbiota mice were examined by quantitative real-time PCR and high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, respectively. The results showed that L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented increase in inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and IFN-γ) and inflammatory cell infiltration in gastric lamina propria induced by H. pylori infection. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinate analysis showed that L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented the alteration in gastric microbiota post-H. pylori infection. Linear discriminant analysis coupled with effect size identified 22 bacterial taxa (e.g., Pasteurellaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae, Halomonadaceae, Helicobacteraceae, and Spirochaetaceae) that overgrew in the gastric microbiota of H. pylori-infected mice, and most of them belonged to the Proteobacteria phylum. Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented this alteration; only 6 taxa (e.g., Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Clostridiaceae), mainly from the taxa of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, were dominant in the gastric microbiota of the L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreated mice. Administration of L. plantarum ZDY 2013 for 3 wk led to increase in several bacterial taxa (e.g., Rikenella, Staphylococcus, Bifidobacterium), although a nonsignificant alteration was found in the gastric microbiota

  9. Enhancement of adherence of Helicobacter pylori to host cells by virus: possible mechanism of development of symptoms of gastric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Nakano, Takashi; Suzuki, Youichi; Ooi, Yukimasa; Sano, Kouichi

    2017-06-01

    It remains unclear why gastric disease does not develop in all cases of Helicobacter pylori infection. In this study, we analyzed whether simian virus 5 (SV5) enhanced adherence of H. pylori to adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (AGS). H. pylori in AGS (harboring SV5) and SV5-infected Vero cells, and an agglutination of H. pylori mixed with SV5 were observed by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The adherent rate of H. pylori to SV5-infected Vero cells and treated with an anti-SV5 antibody was determined. H. pylori adhered to the surface of AGS cells near SV5 particles, as shown by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The adherence of H. pylori to SV5-infected Vero cells was significantly enhanced compared with that to Vero cells. In contrast, the adherence of H. pylori to Vero cells was decreased by treatment with the anti-SV5 antibody. Agglutination of H. pylori mixed with SV5 was observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Agglutination did not occur when SV5 was treated with the anti-SV5 antibody before mixing. These findings demonstrated that SV5 enhanced the adherence of H. pylori to host cells, suggesting that a persistently infected virus may be a factor enhancing the pathogenicity of H. pylori in humans.

  10. Is a 7-day Helicobater pylori treatment enough for eradication and inactivation of gastric inflammatory activity?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlos Robles-lara; Carlos Robles-Medranda; Manuel Moncayo; Byron Landivar; Johnny Parrales

    2008-01-01

    AIM- To compare the efficacy of a 7-d vs 10-d triple therapy regarding H pylori eradication, endoscopic findings and histological gastric inflammatory inactivation in the Ecuadorian population. METHODS: 136 patients with dyspepsia and H pylori infection were randomized in 2 groups (68 per group): group 1, 7-d therapy; group 2, t0-d therapy. Both groups received the same medication and daily dosage: omeprazole 20 mg bid, clarithromycin 500 mg bid and amoxicillin I g bid. Endoscopy was performed for histological assessment and H pylori infection status before and 8 wk after treatment. RESULTS: H pylori was eradicated in 68% of group 1 vs 83. 8% of group 2 for the intention-to-treat analysis (ITT) (P = 0. 03; OR = 2. 48; 95% CI, 1. 1-5. 8), and 68% in group 1 vs 88% in group 2 for the per-protocol analysis (PP) (P = 0. 008; OR = 3. 66; 95% CI, 1. 4-10). Endoscopic gastric mucosa normalization was observed in 56. 9% in group 1 vs 61. 2% in group 2 for ITT, with similar results for the PP, the difference being statistically not significant. The rate of inflammatory inactivation was 69% in group 1 vs 88. 7% in group 2 for ITT (P = 0. 007;OR = 3. 00; 95% CI, 1. 2-7. 5), and 69% in group 1 vs96% in group 2 for PP (P = 0. 0002; OR = 7. 25; 95% CI, 2-26). CONCLUSION: In this Ecuadorian population, the 10-d therapy was more effective than the 7-d therapy for H pylori eradication as well as for gastric mucosa inflammatory inactivation.

  11. Gastric expression of IL-17A and IFNγ in Helicobacter pylori infected individuals is related to symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamsson, Jenni; Ottsjö, Louise Sjökvist; Lundin, Samuel B; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Raghavan, Sukanya

    2017-07-03

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori leads to gastritis and in a subpopulation of infected individuals to ulcers and cancer. Bacterial virulence factors and host immune inflammatory responses are risk factors related to disease. CD4(+) T cells secrete cytokines that promote inflammation and an anti-bacterial response in the gastric mucosa during infection. The aim of the study was to investigate the pattern of expression of CD4(+) T cell derived cytokines, IL-17A and IFNγ in paired antrum and corpus biopsies and correlate it to H. pylori infection outcome. Gene and protein expression of IL-17A and IFNγ was analyzed in gastric biopsies from H. pylori infected subjects with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) or gastric ulcer; and for comparison uninfected individuals. Upregulation of IL-17A and IFNγ gene expression was seen in corpus and antrum biopsies of H. pylori infected individuals with NUD compared to in uninfected controls. The expression of these cytokines correlated significantly with each other. Immunofluorescence staining revealed increased frequencies of IL-17A(+) and IFNγ(+) cells in antrum biopsies of gastric ulcer patients compared to of H. pylori infected NUD individuals; positive cells were not detected in any of the biopsies of uninfected controls. The frequencies of IFNγ and IL-17A(+) cells correlated positively with inflammation in the antrum, but not the corpus, of H. pylori infected individuals. In the antrum, while there was no significant evidence of correlation between IFNγ and bacterial score, a positive correlation between bacterial score and IL-17A(+) cells was seen. In H. pylori infected individuals, the frequencies of IFNγ and IL-17A(+) cells were increased in the antrum, particularly in patients with H. pylori induced gastric ulcers. Even though H. pylori colonized both the corpus and antrum regions of the stomach, the cytokine responses and subsequent pathology were mainly detected in the antrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Helicobacter pylori Activates HMGB1 Expression and Recruits RAGE into Lipid Rafts to Promote Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Wei; Lee, Che-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Chen, Chih-Jung; Huang, Mei-Zi; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastrointestinal disorders in the human population worldwide. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, mediates various inflammation functions. The interaction between HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) triggers nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression, which in turn stimulates the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-8, and enhances the inflammatory response. However, how H. pylori activates HMGB1 expression and mobilizes RAGE into cholesterol-rich microdomains in gastric epithelial cells to promote inflammation has not been explored. In this study, we found that HMGB1 and RAGE expression increased significantly in H. pylori-infected cells compared with -uninfected cells. Blocking HMGB1 by neutralizing antibody abrogated H. pylori-elicited RAGE, suggesting that RAGE expression follows HMGB1 production, and silenced RAGE-attenuated H. pylori-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 production. Furthermore, significantly more RAGE was present in detergent-resistant membranes extracted from H. pylori-infected cells than in those from -uninfected cells, indicating that H. pylori exploited cholesterol to induce the HMGB1 signaling pathway. These results indicate that HMGB1 plays a crucial role in H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric epithelial cells, which may be valuable in developing treatments for H. pylori-associated diseases. PMID:27667993

  13. Helicobacter pylori Activates HMGB1 Expression and Recruits RAGE into Lipid Rafts to Promote Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Wei; Lee, Che-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Chen, Chih-Jung; Huang, Mei-Zi; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastrointestinal disorders in the human population worldwide. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, mediates various inflammation functions. The interaction between HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) triggers nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression, which in turn stimulates the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-8, and enhances the inflammatory response. However, how H. pylori activates HMGB1 expression and mobilizes RAGE into cholesterol-rich microdomains in gastric epithelial cells to promote inflammation has not been explored. In this study, we found that HMGB1 and RAGE expression increased significantly in H. pylori-infected cells compared with -uninfected cells. Blocking HMGB1 by neutralizing antibody abrogated H. pylori-elicited RAGE, suggesting that RAGE expression follows HMGB1 production, and silenced RAGE-attenuated H. pylori-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 production. Furthermore, significantly more RAGE was present in detergent-resistant membranes extracted from H. pylori-infected cells than in those from -uninfected cells, indicating that H. pylori exploited cholesterol to induce the HMGB1 signaling pathway. These results indicate that HMGB1 plays a crucial role in H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric epithelial cells, which may be valuable in developing treatments for H. pylori-associated diseases.

  14. Apigenin has anti-atrophic gastritis and anti-gastric cancer progression effects in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Weng, Bi-Chuang; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wu, Deng-Chang; Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-02-12

    Apigenin, one of the most common flavonoids, is abundant in celery, parsley, chamomile, passionflower, and other vegetables and fruits. Celery is recognized as a medicinal vegetable in Oriental countries to traditionally treat inflammation, swelling, blood pressure, serum lipid, and toothache. In this study, we investigated apigenin treatment effects on Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression in Mongolian gerbils. Five to eight-week-old Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with Helicobacter pylori for four weeks without (atrophic gastritis group) or with N'-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG) (gastric cancer group) in drinking water, and were then rested for two weeks. During the 7th-32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 7th-52th (gastric cancer group) weeks, they were given various doses (0-60 mg/kgbw/day) of apigenin. At the end of the 32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 52th (atrophic gastritis group) week, all Mongolian gerbils were sacrificed using the CO2 asphyxia method. The histological changes of Helicobacter pylori colonization, neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations, and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils were examined using immunohistochemistry stain and Sydney System scoring. Apigenin treatments (30-60 mg/kgbw/day) effectively decreased atrophic gastritis (atrophic gastritis group) and dysplasia/gastric cancer (gastric cancer group) rates in Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin treatment (60 mg/kgbw/day) significantly decreased Helicobacter pylori colonization and Helicobacter pylori-induced histological changes of neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin has the remarkable ability to inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression as well as possessing potent anti-gastric cancer activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  15. The influence of cytokine gene polymorphisms on the risk of developing gastric cancer in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stubljar David

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background.Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastric cancer. The disease progression is influenced by the host inflammatory responses, and cytokine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may have a role in the course of the disease. The aim of our study was to investigate proinflammatory cytokine polymorphisms, previously associated with the development of gastric cancer, in a Slovenian population.

  16. Human gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori and bracken carcinogens: A connecting hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros-Bastidas, Alberto; Calcagno-Pissarelli, María Pía; Naya, Marlene; Ávila-Núñez, Jorge Luis; Alonso-Amelot, Miguel E

    2016-03-01

    Long term infection of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) virulent strains is a key factor in the genesis of human gastric cancer, and so are certain dietary proinflammatory and genotoxic compounds. Carcinogenic bracken fern (Pteridium spp.) is one of these. Toxins from this plant are consumed as bracken culinary preparations, through milk and meat of bracken-exposed livestock, and drain waters from bracken swards. Bracken toxin ptaquiloside (PtQ), a suspected human carcinogen, elicits complex responses in animals leading to death. PtQ and Hp might cooperate in gastric pathologies. This paper presents an hypothesis on PtQ-Hp association leading to the enhancement of carcinogenesis in the human gastric environment that might explain the high gastric cancer incidence and death rates among Hp-infected people living in bracken zones at two levels: (1) The macroscopic scale comprising the flow of PtQ in the human diet. (2) the microscopic scale encompassing (A) gastric luminal medium; (B) gastric mucus structure and mucin degradation elicited by Hp; (C) bacterial pH gradient modification of the gastric mucosa that favors PtQ survival and its penetration into epithelial tissue; (D) combined PtQ/Hp effects on gastric immune and inflammatory responses; (E) PtQ-Hp complementary activity at selected cell signaling cascades and genome disturbance.

  17. Relationship between body mass index and the risk of early gastric cancer and dysplasia regardless of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Hyun Young; Lee, Hye Seung; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung Ho; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hee Man; Lee, Dong Ho

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is known to be associated with an increased risk of gastric cardia cancer but not with noncardia cancer. In terms of gastric dysplasia, few studies have evaluated its relationship with obesity. In addition, no study on the relationship between obesity and the risk of gastric cancer has analyzed the status of Helicobacter pylori infection. A case-control study was designed to investigate the relationship between obesity and the risk of gastric cancer and dysplasia adjusted for the status of H. pylori infection in Koreans. Nine hundred ninety-eight gastric cancer patients, 313 gastric dysplasia patients, and 1,288 subjects with normal endoscopic findings were included. As gender differences could be the largest confounding factor, the risk of gastric cancer and dysplasia with an increasing body mass index (BMI) was analyzed in men and women, separately, and was adjusted for age, smoking, drinking, family history of gastric cancer, H. pylori infection, atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and serum pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio. Obesity (BMI 25 kg/m(2) or greater but less than 30 kg/m(2)) was associated with increased risk of early gastric cancer [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.657; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.086-2.528; P = 0.019] and well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (aOR 1.566; 95 % CI 1.011-2.424; P = 0.044) compared with normal BMI status (BMI Obesity was related to gastric dysplasia (aOR 2.086; 95 % CI 1.011-4.302; P = 0.047) in women. The effect of obesity on gastric cancer showed a gender difference. That is, in men it was related to increased risk of early gastric cancer and well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, but it was associated with gastric dysplasia in women regardless of H. pylori infection in Korea. Further research into this difference is necessary.

  18. Influence of duodenogastric reflux in the gastric mucosa histological changes of rats infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, José Carlos Ribeiro DE; Carvalho, Jorge José DE; Serra, Humberto Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate the influence of Duodenal reflux in histological changes of the gastric mucosa of rats infected with Helicobacter pylori submitted to pyloroplasty. after two weeks of acclimation, we infected 30 male Wistar rats with Helicobacter pylori. We randomly divided them into three groups: one submitted to pyloroplasty, another to partial gastrectomy and the third, only infected, was not operated. After six months of surgery, euthanasia was carried out. Gastric fragments were studied by light microscopy to count the number of H. pylori, and to observe the histological changes (gastritis, metaplasia, dysplasia and neoplasia). We confirmed these changes by immunohistochemistry using the molecular markers PCNA and TGF-beta. the animals submitted to pyloroplasty had higher percentage of colonization by H. pylori (median=58.5; gastrectomy=16.5; control=14.5). There was a positive correlation between the amount of H. pylori and the occurrence of chronic gastritis present in the antral fragments. Neoplasia occurred in 40% of rats from the group submitted to pyloroplasty. The staining with PCNA and TGF-ß confirmed the histopathological changes visualized by optical microscopy. the antral region was the one with the highest concentration of H. pylori, regardless of the group. There was a positive correlation between the appearance of benign disorders (chronic gastritis, metaplasia, dysplasia) and cancer in mice infected with H. pylori submitted to pyloroplasty. avaliar a influência do refluxo duodenogástrico nas alterações histológicas da mucosa gástrica de ratos, infectados por Helicobacter pylori, submetidos à piloroplastia. após duas semanas de aclimatação, 30 ratos machos da raça Wistar, foram infectados com o microorganismo patogênico H. pylori. De forma aleatória, foram divididos em três grupos: um submetido à piloroplastia, outro à gastrectomia parcial e o terceiro, apenas infectados, não foi operado. Após seis meses de operados, procedeu-se a

  19. Isolation of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa and susceptibility to five antimicrobial drugs in Southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Otth

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes more than 50% of the world population thus, it is considered an important cause of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the isolation frequency of H. pylori in Southern Chile from patients with symptomatology compatible with gastritis or gastric ulcer and to correlate these findings with demographic parameters of infected patients and the susceptibility profiles of the isolated strains to the antimicrobial drugs used in the eradication treatments. A total of 240 patients were enrolled in the study. Each gastric biopsy was homogenized and seeded onto blood agar plates containing a selective antibiotics mixture (DENT supplement. Plates were incubated at 37° C in a microaerophilic environment for five days. The susceptibility profiles to amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, tetracycline and metronidazole were determined using the E-test method. H. pylori was isolated from 99 patients (41.3% with slightly higher frequency in female (42% positive cultures than male (40.2% positive cultures. With regard to age and educational level, the highest isolation frequencies were obtained in patients between 21-30 (55% and 41-50 (52.6% years old, and patients with secondary (43.9% and university (46.2% educational levels. Nineteen (21.6% strains showed resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug. Tetracycline was the most active antimicrobial in vitro, whereas metronidazole was the less active. One strain (5.3% showed resistance to amoxicillin, clarithomycin and metronidazole, simultaneously.

  20. Retinol-binding protein, acute phase reactants and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicolas Tsavaris; Christos Koufos; Athanasios Archimandritis; Christos Kosmas; Petros Kopterides; Dimitrios Tsikalakis; Hlias Skopelitis; Fotini Sakelaridi; Nikitas Papadoniou; Michalis Tzivras; Vasilios Balatsos

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the serum levels of c-reactive protein (CRP), transferrin (TRF), a2-macroglobulin (A2M),ceruloplasmin (CER), a1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), prealbumin (P-ALB) and retinol-binding protein (RBP) in gastric carcinoma patients and to explore their possible correlation with underlying Helicobacter pylori (H pylon)infection.METHODS: We measured the serum levels of CRP, TRF,A2M, CER, AAG, P-ALB, and RBP in 153 preoperative patients (93 males; mean age: 63.1±11.3 years) with non-cardia gastric adenocarcinoma and 19 healthy subjects.RESULTS: The levels of CRP, CER, RBP, andAAG in cancer patients were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (P<0.0001), while no difference was found regarding the TRF, P-ALB, and A2M levels. Cancer patients with H pylori infection had significantly lower RBP values compared to non-infected ones (P<0.0001)and also higher values of CRP and AAG (P = 0.09 and P = 0.08, respectively).CONCLUSION: High serum levels of CRP, CER and AAG in cancer patients do not seem to be related to H pylori infection. Retinol-binding protein seems to discriminate between infected and non-infected patients with gastric carcinoma. Further studies are needed to explore if it is directly involved in the pathogenesis of the disease or is merely an epiphenomenon.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Juliana Carvalho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2015-08-14

    Although thousands of DNA damaging events occur in each cell every day, efficient DNA repair pathways have evolved to counteract them. The DNA repair machinery plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability by avoiding the maintenance of mutations. The DNA repair enzymes continuously monitor the chromosomes to correct any damage that is caused by exogenous and endogenous mutagens. If DNA damage in proliferating cells is not repaired because of an inadequate expression of DNA repair genes, it might increase the risk of cancer. In addition to mutations, which can be either inherited or somatically acquired, epigenetic silencing of DNA repair genes has been associated with carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer represents the second highest cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The disease develops from the accumulation of several genetic and epigenetic changes during the lifetime. Among the risk factors, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is considered the main driving factor to gastric cancer development. Thus, in this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of H. pylori infection on the epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in gastric carcinogenesis.

  2. Immunoglobulin gene repertoire diversification and selection in the stomach – from gastritis to gastric lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri eMichaeli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic gastritis is characterized by gastric mucosal inflammation due to autoimmune responses or infection, frequently with Helicobacter pylori. Gastritis with H. pylori background can cause gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALT-L, which sometimes further transforms into diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL. However, gastric DLBCL can also be initiated de novo. The mechanisms underlying transformation into DLBCL are not completely understood. We analyzed immunoglobulin repertoires and clonal trees to investigate whether and how immunoglobulin gene repertoires, clonal diversification and selection in gastritis, gastric MALT-L and DLBCL differ from each other and from normal responses. The two gastritis types (positive or negative for H. pylori had similarly diverse repertoires. MALT-L dominant clones presented higher diversification and longer mutational histories compared with all other conditions. DLBCL dominant clones displayed lower clonal diversification, suggesting the transforming events are triggered by similar responses in different patients. These results are surprising, as we expected to find similarities between the dominant clones of gastritis and MALT-L and between those of MALT-L and DLBCL.

  3. Critical pathogenic steps to high risk Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inchul

    2014-06-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis may progress to high risk gastropathy and cancer. However, the pathological progression has not been characterized in detail. H. pylori induce persistent inflammatory infiltration. Neutrophils are unique in that they directly infiltrate into foveolar epithelium aiming the proliferative zone specifically. Neutrophilic proliferative zone foveolitis is a critical pathogenic step in H. pylori gastritis inducing intensive epithelial damage. Epithelial cells carrying accumulated genomic damage and mutations show the Malgun (clear) cell change, characterized by large clear nucleus and prominent nucleolus. Malgun cells further undergo atypical changes, showing nuclear folding, coarse chromatin, and multiple nucleoli. The atypical Malgun cell (AMC) change is a novel premalignant condition in high risk gastropathy, which may progress and undergo malignant transformation directly. The pathobiological significance of AMC in gastric carcinogenesis is reviewed. A new diagnosis system of gastritis is proposed based on the critical pathologic steps classifying low and high risk gastritis for separate treatment modality. It is suggested that the regulation of H. pylori-induced neutrophilic foveolitis might be a future therapeutic goal replacing bactericidal antibiotics approach.

  4. Antimicrobial activities of Eugenol and Cinnamaldehyde against the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khaja S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eradication of Helicobacter pylori is an important objective in overcoming gastric diseases. Many regimens are currently available but none of them could achieve 100% success in eradication. Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde that are commonly used in various food preparations are known to possess antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of bacteria. Aim The present study was performed to assess the in vitro effects of eugenol and cinnamaldehyde against indigenous and standard H. pylori strains, their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs and time course lethal effects at various pH. Methods A total of 31 strains (29 indigenous and one standard strain of H. pylori ATCC 26695, one strain of E. coli NCIM 2089 were screened. Agar dilution method was used for the determination of drug sensitivity patterns of isolates to the commonly used antibiotics and broth dilution method for the test compounds. Results Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde inhibited the growth of all the 30 H. pylori strains tested, at a concentration of 2 μg/ml, in the 9th and 12th hours of incubation respectively. At acidic pH, increased activity was observed for both the compounds. Furthermore, the organism did not develop any resistance towards these compounds even after 10 passages grown at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Conclusion These results indicate that the two bioactive compounds we tested may prevent H. pylori growth in vitro, without acquiring any resistance.

  5. PGC TagSNP and its interaction with H. pylori and relation with gene expression in susceptibility to gastric carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Yun He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pepsinogen C (PGC plays an important role in sustaining the cellular differentiation during the process of gastric carcinogenesis. This study aimed to assess the role of PGC tagSNPs and their interactions with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in the development of gastric cancer and its precursor, atrophic gastritis. METHODS: Four PGC tagSNPs (rs6941539, rs6912200, rs3789210 and rs6939861 were genotyped by Sequenom MassARRAY platform in a total of 2311 subjects consisting of 642 gastric cancer, 774 atrophic gastritis, and 895 healthy control subjects. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PGC in gastric tissues and in serum were respectively measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Eenzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA. RESULTS: We found associations between PGC rs3789210 CG/GG genotypes and reduced gastric cancer risk and between PGC rs6939861 A variant allele and increased risks of both gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis. As for the haplotypes of PGC rs6941539-rs6912200-rs3789210-rs6939861 loci, the TTCA and TTGG haplotypes were respectively associated with increased and reduced risks of both gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis; additionally, the CTCA haplotype was associated with increased atrophic gastritis risk. Very interestingly, rs6912200 CT/TT genotypes had a positive interaction with H. pylori, synergistically elevating the gastric cancer risk. Moreover, healthy subjects who carried rs6912200 CT, TT and CT/TT variant genotypes had lower histological and serum expression levels of PGC protein. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight an important role of PGC rs3789210 and rs6939861 in altering susceptibility to atrophic gastritis and/or gastric cancer. Moreover, people who carry rs6912200 variant genotypes exhibit higher gastric cancer risk in case of getting H. pylori infection, which strongly suggest a necessity of preventing and/or eliminating H

  6. H pylori receptor MHC class Ⅱ contributes to the dynamic gastric epithelial apoptotic response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A Bland; Giovanni Suarez; Ellen J Beswick; Johanna C Sierra; Victor E Reyes

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of MHC class Ⅱ in the modulation of gastric epithelial cell apoptosis induced by H pylori infection.METHODS: After stimulating a human gastric epithelial cell line with bacteria or agonist antibodies specific for MHC class Ⅱ and CD95, the quantitation of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic events, including caspase activation,BCL-2 activation, and FADD recruitment, was performed with a fluorometric assay, a cytometric bead array, and confocal microscopy, respectively.RESULTS: Pretreatment of N87 cells with the anti-MHC class Ⅱ IgM antibody RFD1 resulted in a reduction in global caspase activation at 24 h of H pylori infection.When caspase 3 activation was specifically measured,crosslinking of MHC class Ⅱ resulted in a marked reduced caspase activation, while simple ligation of MHC class Ⅱ did not. Crosslinking of MHC class Ⅱ also resulted in an increased activation of the anti-apoptosis molecule BCL-2 compared to simple ligation. Confocal microscope analysis demonstrated that the pretreatment of gastric epithelial cells with a crosslinking anti-MHC class Ⅱ IgM blocked the recruitment of FADD to the cell surface.CONCLUSION: The results presented here demonstrate that the ability of MHC class Ⅱ to modulate gastric epithelial apoptosis is at least partially dependent on its crosslinking. Furthermore, while previous research has demonstrated that MHC class Ⅱ signaling can be proapoptotic during extended ligation, we have shown that the crosslinking of this molecule has anti-apoptotic effects during the earlier time points of H pylori infection.This effect is possibly mediated by the ability of MHC class Ⅱ to modulate the activation of the pro-apoptotic receptor Fas by blocking the recruitment of the accessory molecule FADD, and this delay in apoptosis induction could allow for prolonged cytokine secretion by H pyloriinfected gastric epithelial cells.

  7. Comparison PCR Method and Rapid Urease Test to Detect Helicobacter Pylori in the Gastric Biopsy Tissue Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parastoo Chamanrokh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as a major risk factor in gastric and duodenum ulcers and gastric cancer. Some laboratory tests, such as culture, are not entirely satisfying. The aim of this study is to compare RUT with PCR in identifying H. pylori in the gastric biopsy tissue samples.Materials & Methods: First, the standard H.pylori sample (N:oC30 was provided. primers or the glmM (ureC gene were used In PCR method The PCR test was optimized by sensitivity and specificity methods. Then 100 clinical samples composed of stomach tissue biopsy were prepared. The rapid urease test was conducted on all obtained samples to identify H.pylori. DNA was extracted from samples using DNG plus technique. Then, samples were studied using PCR method.  Results: The 294 bp product was amplified in the optimized PCR test. The PCR test sensitivity was obtained at 10 CFU. Any unwanted products were not seen in the specificity test with the exception of H. pylori DNA samples. Of 100 stomach biopsy samples, 64% were reported as positive by RUT and 76% by the PCR test.Conclusion: Given that the PCR test has higher sensitivity and specificity to detect H.pylori comparing rapid ureaas test, therefore this method could be used to detect H.pylori.  

  8. [Isolation of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa, dental plaque and saliva in a population from the Venezuelan Andes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, Lilibeth; Vásquez, Libia; Velasco, Judith; Parlapiano, Donatella

    2006-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is common in people. However, the existence of extra gastric reservoirs and transmission routes remain controversial in the field. Because the oral cavity has been proposed as a reservoir for H. pylori, a study was carried out to determine the presence of H. pylori in dental plaque and saliva. The results were asociated with those obtained in the gastric biopsy. Ninety-seven dyspeptic and fifty asymptomatic patients were studied and samples taken for biopsy, dental plaque and saliva. The gastric biopsies were evaluated using microbiology and histology methods. Cultures and urease tests were carried out on the oral cavity samples and included pretreatment methods using urea and HCl. The frequency of H. pylori for all the patients evaluated was 75.5%. H. pylori was not isolated in saliva or dental plaque in any of the two groups studied with or without sample pretreatment. The urease test in dental plaque was positive in 99.3% of the patients and 89.8% in saliva. There was no statistically significant difference between the infection prevalence by H. pylori in dyspeptic or not dyspeptic patients. The obtained results suggest that the methodology used for the detection of H. pylori is not sufficiently sensitive for the determination of the microorganism in the oral cavity.

  9. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric mucosal pathologic change and level of nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Fu Wang; Chun-Lin Guo; Li-Zhen Zhao; Guo-An Yang; Peng Chen; Hong-Kun Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the level of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide synthase (NOS) enzyme and its effect on gastric mucosal pathologic change in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori (H pylori), and to study the pathogenic mechanism of H pylori.METHODS: The mucosal tissues of gastric antrum were taken by endoscopy, then their pathology, H pylori and anti-CagA-IgG were determined. Fifty H pyloripositive cases and 35 H pylori negative cases were randomly chosen.Serum level of NO and NOS was detected.RESULTS: One hundred and seven cases (71.33%) were anti-CagA-IgG positive in 150 H pyloripositive cases. The positive rate was higher especially in those with preneoplastic diseases, such as atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. The level of NO and NOS in positive group was higher than that in negative group, and apparently lower in active gastritis than in pre-neoplastic diseases such as atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia.CONCLUSION: H pyloriis closely related with chronic gastric diseases, and type Ⅰ Hpylorimay be the real factor for Hpylori-related gastric diseases. Infection with H pylori can induce elevation of NOS, which produces NO.

  10. Gastric mucin expression in Helicobacter pylori-related,nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related and idiopathic ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Doron Boltin; Marisa Halpern; Zohar Levi; Alex Vilkin; Sara Morgenstern; Samuel B Ho; Yaron Niv

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To determine the pattern of secreted mucin expression in Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori)-related,nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related and idiopathic gastric ulcers.METHODS:We randomly selected 92 patients with H.pylori-associated (n =30),NSAID-associated (n =18),combined H.pylori and NSAID-associated gastric ulcers (n =24),and patients with idiopathic gastric ulcers (n =20).Immunohistochemistry for T-cell CD4/CD8,and for mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) and mucin 6 (MUC6),was performed on sections of the mucosa from the ulcer margin.Inflammation score was assessed according to the Sydney system.RESULTS:MUC5AC was expressed on the surface epithelium (98.9%) and neck glands (98.9%) with minimal expression in the deep glands (6.5%).MUC6 was strongly expressed in the deep glands (97.8%),variable in the neck glands (19.6%) and absent in the surface epithelium (0%).The pattern of mucin expression in idiopathic ulcer margins was not different from the expression in ulcers associated with H.pylori,NSAIDs,or combined H.pylori and NSAIDs.CD4/CD8 ratio was higher in H.pylori-positive patients (P =0.009).Idiopathic ulcers are associated with hospitalized patients and have higher bleeding and mortality rates.CONCLUSION:Idiopathic ulcers have a unique clinical profile.Gastric mucin expression in idiopathic gastric ulcers is unchanged compared with H.pylori and/or NSAID-associated ulcers.

  11. THE ROLE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN GASTRIC CANCER AND PRECANCEROUS LESIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任刚; 蔡嵘; 陈强; 许幼如; 张文竹; 奚政君

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine the role of Helicobacter pylori ( Hp ) in the development of gastric cancer and gastric precancerous lesions. Methods From the biopsy specintestinal metaplasiaens of gastric cancer and precancerous lesions Hp organisms were detected by a combination use of three methods ( Clo-test,Giemsa and PCR ). Mutations of C-Ha-ras and p53 genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis-direct sequencing ( PCR-SSCP-S ). Results The detection rates of Hp in gastric cancer, dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia were significantly higher than that of normal gastric mucosa, and the mutational rates of C-Ha-ras and p53 genes in Hp positive patients were significantly higher than those in Hp negative patients. In gastric cancer patients, the mutational rate of p53 gene in Hp positive patients was significantly higher than that of Hp negative patients, in which spot mutation was the main pattern of gene changes. Conclusion Hp infection might be related to gastrocarcinogenesis and gene mutation might play a role in Hp related gastric cancer.

  12. Culturable bacterial microbiota of the stomach of Helicobacter pylori positive and negative gastric disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Yalda; Dieye, Yakhya; Poh, Bee Hoon; Ng, Chow Goon; Loke, Mun Fai; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2014-01-01

    Human stomach is the only known natural habitat of Helicobacter pylori (Hp), a major bacterial pathogen that causes different gastroduodenal diseases. Despite this, the impact of Hp on the diversity and the composition of the gastric microbiota has been poorly studied. In this study, we have analyzed the culturable gastric microbiota of 215 Malaysian patients, including 131 Hp positive and 84 Hp negative individuals that were affected by different gastric diseases. Non-Hp bacteria isolated from biopsy samples were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry based biotyping and 16SrRNA sequencing. The presence of Hp did not significantly modify the diversity of the gastric microbiota. However, correlation was observed between the isolation of Streptococci and peptic ulcer disease. In addition, as a first report, Burkholderia pseudomallei was also isolated from the gastric samples of the local population. This study suggested that there may be geographical variations in the diversity of the human gastric microbiome. Geographically linked diversity in the gastric microbiome and possible interactions between Hp and other bacterial species from stomach microbiota in pathogenesis are proposed for further investigations.

  13. Culturable Bacterial Microbiota of the Stomach of Helicobacter pylori Positive and Negative Gastric Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human stomach is the only known natural habitat of Helicobacter pylori (Hp, a major bacterial pathogen that causes different gastroduodenal diseases. Despite this, the impact of Hp on the diversity and the composition of the gastric microbiota has been poorly studied. In this study, we have analyzed the culturable gastric microbiota of 215 Malaysian patients, including 131 Hp positive and 84 Hp negative individuals that were affected by different gastric diseases. Non-Hp bacteria isolated from biopsy samples were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry based biotyping and 16SrRNA sequencing. The presence of Hp did not significantly modify the diversity of the gastric microbiota. However, correlation was observed between the isolation of Streptococci and peptic ulcer disease. In addition, as a first report, Burkholderia pseudomallei was also isolated from the gastric samples of the local population. This study suggested that there may be geographical variations in the diversity of the human gastric microbiome. Geographically linked diversity in the gastric microbiome and possible interactions between Hp and other bacterial species from stomach microbiota in pathogenesis are proposed for further investigations.

  14. Analysis of Gastric Microbiota by Pyrosequencing: Minor Role of Bacteria Other Than Helicobacter pylori in the Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jaeyeon; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Kim, Joo Sung; Kim, Jung Mogg; Kim, Jung Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the role of gastric microbiota except for Helicobacter pylori (HP) in human health and disease. We compared the differences of human gastric microbiota according to gastric cancer or control and HP infection status and assessed the role of bacteria other than HP. Gastric microbiota of 63 antral mucosal and 18 corpus mucosal samples were analyzed by bar-coded 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Antral samples were divided into four subgroups based on HP positivity in pyrosequencing and the presence of cancer. The analysis was focused on bacteria other than HP, especially nitrosating or nitrate-reducing bacteria (NB). The changes of NB in antral mucosa of 16 subjects were followed up. The number of NB other than HP (non-HP-NB) was two times higher in the cancer groups than in the control groups, but it did not reach statistical significance. The number of non-HP-NB tends to increase over time, but this phenomenon was prevented by HP eradication in the HP-positive control group, but not in the HP-positive cancer group. We could not find the significant role of bacteria other than HP in the gastric carcinogenesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Genetic Alterations in Gastric Cancer Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a world health problem and depicts the fourth leading mortality cause from malignancy in Mexico. Causation of gastric cancer is not only due to the combined effects of environmental factors and genetic variants. Recent molecular studies have transgressed a number of genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to understand the recent basics of gene expression in the development of the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants, polymorphisms, desoxyribonucleic acid methylation, and genes involved in mediating inflammation have been associated with the development of gastric carcinogenesis. Recently, these genes (interleukin 10, Il-17, mucin 1, β-catenin, CDX1, SMAD4, SERPINE1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 subunit alpha, GSK3β, CDH17, matrix metalloproteinase 7, RUNX3, RASSF1A, TFF1, HAI-2, and COX-2 have been studied in association with oncogenic activation or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. All these mechanisms have been investigated to elucidate the process of gastric carcinogenesis, as well as their potential use as biomarkers and/or molecular targets to treatment of disease.

  16. Relevance of MUC1 mucin variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in H pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natália R Costa; Nuno Mendes; Nuno T Marcos; Celso A Reis; Thomas Caffrey; Michael A Hollingsworth; Filipe Santos-Silva

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the influence of MUC1 mucin variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) variability on H pylori adhesion to gastric cells.METHODS:Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based adhesion assays were performed to measure the adhesion of different H pylori strains (HP26695 and HPTx30a) to gastric carcinoma cell lines (GP202 and MKN45) and GP202 clones expressing recombinant MUC1 with different VNTR lengths.RESULTS:Evaluation of adhesion results shows that H pylori pathogenic strain HP26695 has a significantly higher (P<0.05) adhesion to all the cell lines and clones tested,when compared to the non-pathogenic strain HPTx30a.Bacteria showed a significantly higher (P<0.05)adhesion to the GP202 cell line,when compared to the MKN45 cell line.Furthermore,both strains showed a significantly higher (P<0.05) adhesion to GP202 clones with larger MUC1 VNTR domains.CONCLUSION:This work shows that MUC1 mucin variability conditions H pylori binding to gastric cells.The extent of bacterial adhesion depends on the size of the MUC1 VNTR domain.The adhesion is further dependent on bacterial pathogenicity and the gastric cell line.MUC1 mucin variability may contribute to determine H pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa.

  17. Synthesis and bioevaluation of novel 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylbenzimidazole derivatives that inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced pathogenesis in human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Shiang; Liu, Ju-Fang; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lin, Chia-Der; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Dah-Yuu; Sing, Yu-Ting; Chen, Li-Yu; Kao, Min-Chuan; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2012-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and even gastric malignancy. H. pylori's antibiotic resistance is the major obstacle preventing its eradication. A series of 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylbenzimidazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-H. pylori activity. The compound, 2-fluorophenyl-5-methyl-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)benzimidazole (FMTMB), was determined as the most potent in the inhibition of H. pylori growth and pathogenesis of host cells. An in vitro H. pylori infection model revealed that FMTMB inhibited H. pylori adhesion and invasion of gastric epithelial cells. Results from this study provide evidence that FMTMB is a potent therapeutic agent that exhibits both anti-H. pylori growth properties and anti-H. pylori-induced pathogenesis of cells.

  18. Relationship of Helicobacter pylori eradication with gastric cancer and gastric mucosal histological changes: a 10-year follow-up study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Liya; Lin Sanren; Ding Shigang; Huang Xuebiao; Jin Zhu; Cui Rongli; Meng Lingmei

    2014-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is a common and potentially curable cause of gastric mucosa lesion.This study investigated the relationship of Hp infection with histological changes in gastric mucosa and gastric cancer in Hp-positive patients compared with Hp-eradication patients followed up for ten years.Methods From an initial group of 1 006 adults,552 Hp-positive subjects were randomly assigned to a treatment group (T;n=276) or a placebo group (P; n=276).In the randomized,double-blind,placebo-controlled,parallel trial,T group subjects received oral doses of omeprazole,amoxicillin and clarithromycin for 1 week; those in the P group received a placebo.One month after treatment ended,a 13C urea breath test was performed,and Hp was undetectable in 88.89% of the T group.All subjects were followed at 1,5,8,and 10 years after treatment,with endoscopy and biopsies for histological examination.Results Gastric mucosa inflammation was significantly milder in the T group than that in the P group one year after Hp eradication and this persisted for 10 years.Glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia (IM) had deteriorated in both groups during ten years.However,the increased score of glandular atrophy at both the gastric antrum and corpus,and IM only at the gastric antrum,in the P group was more obvious than that in the T group.During the 10 years,9 patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer (2 in the T group; 7 in the P group; P=0.176).When mucosal atrophy was absent at the gastric antrum and corpus when entering the study,the incidence of gastric cancer in the P group (n=6) was much higher than that in the T group (n=0,P=0.013).Conclusions Hp eradication may significantly diminish and help halt progression of gastric mucosal inflammation and delay the development of IM and atrophy gastritis.Hp eradication is helpful for reducing the risk for gastric cancer,especially in the early stage of Hp infection.

  19. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  20. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in Helicobacter pylori-induced migration and invasive growth of gastric epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieder Gabriele

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton is a significant hallmark of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infected gastric epithelial cells leading to cell migration and invasive growth. Considering the cellular mechanisms, the type IV secretion system (T4SS and the effector protein cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA of H. pylori are well-studied initiators of distinct signal transduction pathways in host cells targeting kinases, adaptor proteins, GTPases, actin binding and other proteins involved in the regulation of the actin lattice. In this review, we summarize recent findings of how H. pylori functionally interacts with the complex signaling network that controls the actin cytoskeleton of motile and invasive gastric epithelial cells.

  1. Lymphotoxin β receptor signalling executes Helicobacter pylori-driven gastric inflammation in a T4SS-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejías-Luque, Raquel; Zöller, Jessica; Anderl, Florian; Loew-Gil, Elena; Vieth, Michael; Adler, Thure; Engler, Daniela B; Urban, Sabine; Browning, Jeffrey L; Müller, Anne; Gerhard, Markus; Heikenwalder, Mathias

    2017-08-01

    Lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) signalling has been implicated in inflammation-associated tumour development in different tissues. We have analysed the role of LTβR and alternative NF-κB signalling in Helicobacter pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and pathology. We analysed several ligands and receptors of the alternative NF-κB pathway, RelB, p52 nuclear translocation and target genes in tissue samples of H. pylori-infected patients with different degrees of gastritis or early gastric tumours by in situ hybridisation, immunohistochemistry, Western blot and real-time PCR analyses. Molecular mechanisms involved in LTβR activation by H. pylori were assessed in vitro using human gastric cancer cell lines and distinct H. pylori isolates. The effects of blocking or agonistically activating LTβR on gastric pathology during challenge with a human pathogenic H. pylori strain were studied in a mouse model. Among the tested candidates, LT was significantly increased and activated alternative NF-κB signalling was observed in the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected patients. H. pyloriinduced LTβR-ligand expression in a type IV secretion system-dependent but CagA-independent manner, resulting in activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway, which was further enhanced by blocking canonical NF-κB during infection. Blocking LTβR signalling in vivo suppressed H. pylori-driven gastritis, whereas LTβR activation in gastric epithelial cells of infected mice induced a broadened pro-inflammatory chemokine milieu, resulting in exacerbated pathology. LTβR-triggered activation of alternative NF-κB signalling in gastric epithelial cells executes H. pylori-induced chronic gastritis, representing a novel target to restrict gastric inflammation and pathology elicited by H. pylori, while exclusively targeting canonical NF-κB may aggravate pathology by enhancing the alternative pathway. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  2. The intriguing relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection and acid secretion in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfertheiner, P

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induces chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa and thus profoundly affects gastric physiology. In the acute phase of infection, gastric acid secretion is transiently impaired. The morphological damage of the gastric mucosa, changes in gastric hormone release, and disruption of neural pathways all contribute to influence gastric acid secretion in a distinct manner. Changes in gastric acid secretion, whether impaired or increased, are intimately related with the topographic phenotypes of gastritis and the presence of atrophy or absence of corpus atrophy. The interplay of gastritis phenotype and acid secretion are key determinants in disease outcomes. Corpus-predominant gastritis and corpus atrophy are accompanied by hypochlorhydria and carry the highest risk for gastric cancer, whereas antrum-predominant gastritis with little involvement of the corpus-fundic mucosa is associated with hyperchlorhydria and predisposes to duodenal ulcer disease.

  3. Helicobacter pylori cag-Pathogenicity island-dependent early immunological response triggers later precancerous gastric changes in Mongolian gerbils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Wiedemann

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori, carrying a functional cag type IV secretion system (cag-T4SS to inject the Cytotoxin associated antigen (CagA into gastric cells, is associated with an increased risk for severe gastric diseases in humans. Here we studied the pathomechanism of H. pylori and the role of the cag-pathogenicity island (cag-PAI for the induction of gastric ulcer and precancerous conditions over time (2-64 weeks using the Mongolian gerbil model. Animals were challenged with H. pylori B128 (WT, or an isogenic B128DeltacagY mutant-strain that produces CagA, but is unable to translocate it into gastric cells. H. pylori colonization density was quantified in antrum and corpus mucosa separately. Paraffin sections were graded for inflammation and histological changes verified by immunohistochemistry. Physiological and inflammatory markers were quantitated by RIA and RT-PCR, respectively. An early cag-T4SS-dependent inflammation of the corpus mucosa (4-8 weeks occurred only in WT-infected animals, resulting in a severe active and chronic gastritis with a significant increase of proinflammatory cytokines, mucous gland metaplasia, and atrophy of the parietal cells. At late time points only WT-infected animals developed hypochlorhydria and hypergastrinemia in parallel to gastric ulcers, gastritis cystica profunda, and focal dysplasia. The early cag-PAI-dependent immunological response triggers later physiological and histopathological alterations towards gastric malignancies.

  4. Study on the correlation of helicobacter pylori infection with proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis molecules in gastric cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sa-Mei Lv; Jian Zhang; You-Wei Wu; Jian Zhou; Li-Ping Shi

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the correlation of helicobacter pylori infection with proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis molecules in gastric cancer tissue.Methods: A total of 60 cases of cancer tissue samples and 60 cases of normal tissue samples more than 5 cm away from cancer tissue edge were collected for study from gastric cancer patients treated in our hospital, and according to the testing results of helicobacter pylori (Hp), gastric cancer tissue was divided into Hp-L(+) and Hp-L(-), and the levels of proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis molecules were determined.Results:Bcl-2, Survivin, KLK8, N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, Twist, VEGFR, COX-2 and HIF-1α protein levels in gastric cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in normal tissue, and E-cadherin protein level was significantly lower than that in normal tissue; Bcl-2, Survivin, KLK8, N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, Twist, VEGF, VEGFR, COX-2 and HIF-1α protein levels in Hp-L(+) gastric cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in Hp-L(-) gastric cancer tissue, and E-cadherin protein level was significantly lower than that in Hp-L(-) gastric cancer tissue.Conclusion:Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric cancer tissue can promote cancer cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenesis.

  5. Characteristics of gastric cancer in peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Jin; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Ae-Ra; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-04-28

    To evaluate the incidence and clinical characteristics of gastric cancer (GC) in peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Between January 2003 and December 2013, the medical records of patients diagnosed with GC were retrospectively reviewed. Those with previous gastric ulcer (GU) and H. pylori infection were assigned to the HpGU-GC group (n = 86) and those with previous duodenal ulcer (DU) disease and H. pylori infection were assigned to the HpDU-GC group (n = 35). The incidence rates of GC in the HpGU-GC and HpDU-GC groups were analyzed. Data on demographics (age, gender, peptic ulcer complications and cancer treatment), GC clinical characteristics [location, pathological diagnosis, differentiation, T stage, Lauren's classification, atrophy of surrounding mucosa and intestinal metaplasia (IM)], outcome of eradication therapy for H. pylori infection, esophagogastroduodenoscopy number and the duration until GC onset were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors influencing GC development. The relative risk of GC was evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model. The incidence rates of GC were 3.60% (86/2387) in the HpGU-GC group and 1.66% (35/2098) in the HpDU-GC group. The annual incidence was 0.41% in the HpGU-GC group and 0.11% in the HpDU-GC group. The rates of moderate-to-severe atrophy of the surrounding mucosa and IM were higher in the HpGU-GC group than in the HpDU-GC group (86% vs 34.3%, respectively, and 61.6% vs 14.3%, respectively, P < 0.05). In the univariate analysis, atrophy of surrounding mucosa, IM and eradication therapy for H. pylori infection were significantly associated with the development of GC (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the prognosis of GC patients between the HpGU-GC and HpDU-GC groups (P = 0.347). The relative risk of GC development in the HpGU-GC group compared to that of the HpDU-GC group, after correction for age and gender, was 1.71 (95%CI

  6. Immune Reactions Against Elongation Factor 2 Kinase: Specific Pathogenesis of Gastric Ulcer from Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Ayada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a definite causative factor for gastric ulcers (GUs. In the present study we detected a specific antigen of gastric epithelial cells (HGC-27 using cell ELISA, which was recognized by the sera of GU patients (n=20 but not in patients with chronic gastritis (CG; n=20 or in healthy volunteers (HC; n=10. This antigen was over-expressed by a stressful (heat-stressed environment, and was identified as elongation factor 2 kinase (EF-2K by western blotting. The GU patients' lymphocytes stimulated by H. pylori specifically disrupted heat-stressed HGC-27 cells in a cytotoxic assay. In flow cytometry, the effector cells (lymphocytes from GU patients were significantly differentiated to T helper type 1 lymphocyte (Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL as opposed to those from CG patients. The target cells (HGC-27 expressed EF-2K and MHC-class I together with costimulatory molecules from heat stress. This antigen specific immune mechanism could have a prominent role in the pathogenesis of GU.

  7. Acute effects of Helicobacter pylori extracts on gastric mucosal blood flow in the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johanna Henriksn(a)s; Christer Atuma; Mia Phillipson; Stellan Sandler; Lars Engstrand; Lena Holm

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the reduction in gastric blood flow induced by a luminal water extract of Helicobacter pylori (HPE). METHODS: The stomachs of isoflurane-anesthetized mice were exteriorized, and the mucosal surface exposed. Blood flow was measured with the laser Doppler technique, and systemic arterial blood pressure monitored. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to water extract produced from H pylori strain 88-23. To investigate the role of a nerve- or iNOS-mediated pathway, we used intraluminal lidocaine and iNOS-/-mice. Blood flow response to the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) was also assessed. RESULTS: In wild-type mice, HPE decreased mucosal blood flow by approximately 30%. This reduction was abolished in iNOS-deficient mice, and by pre-treatment with lidocaine. Luminally applied ADMA resulted in reduction in blood flow similar to that observed in wildtype mice exposed to HPE. CONCLUSION: A H pylori water extract reduces gastric mucosal blood flow acutely through iNOS- and nerve-mediated pathways.

  8. Polymorphisms of the DNA methyltransferase 1 associated with reduced risks of Helicobacter pylori infection and increased risks of gastric atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jiang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: DNA methyltransferase-1(DNMT1 is an important enzyme in determining genomic methylation patterns in mammalian cells. We investigated the associations between SNPs in the DNMT1 gene and risks of developing H. pylori seropositivity, gastric atrophy and gastric cancer in the Chinese population. METHODS: The study consisted of 447 patients with gastric cancer; 111 patients with gastric atrophy; and 961 healthy controls. Five SNPs, rs10420321, rs16999593, rs8101866, rs8111085 and rs2288349 of the DNMT1 gene were genotyped. Anti-H.pylori IgG was detected by ELISA. Gastric atrophy was screened by the level of serum pepsinogen Ι and II and then confirmed by endoscopy and histopatholgical examinations. RESULTS: The age- and sex-adjusted OR of H. pylori seropositivity was 0.67 (95%CI: 0.51-0.87 for rs8111085 TC/CC genotypes, significantly lower than the TT genotype in healthy controls. The adjusted OR of H.pylori seropositivity was 0.68 (95%CI: 0.52-0.89 for rs10420321 AG/GG genotypes. In addition, patients carrying rs2228349 AA genotype have a significantly increased risk for H.pylori seropositivity (OR=1.67; 95%CI: 1.02-2.75. Further haplotype analyses also showed that the ATTTG and ATCTA are significantly associated with increased risks in H.pylori infection compared to the GTCCG haplotype (OR=1.38, 95%CI: 1.08-1.77; OR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.09-1.80. The adjusted ORs of gastric atrophy were 1.66 (95%CI: 1.06-2.61 for rs10420321 GG genotype, and 1.67 (95%CI 1.06-2.63, P=0.03 for rs8111085 CC genotype, but no association was found between SNPs in the DNMT1 gene and risk of developing gastric cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with rs10420321 GG and rs8111085 CC genotype of the DNMT1 gene were associated with reduced risks for H.pylori infection. On the other hand, higher risks of gastric atrophy were found in the carriers with these two genotypes compared to other genotypes. Our results suggested that SNPs of DNMT1 could be used as genotypic

  9. H. pylori infection increases gastric mucosal COX2 and mTOR expression in chronic gastritis: Implications for cancer progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badary, Dalia M; Rahma, Mohammed Zakaria Ali Abu; Ashmawy, Ahmed M; Hafez, Mohamed Z

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter Pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects the human stomach and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis. H. pylori associated chronic gastritis affects various molecular markers related to gastric cancer development. The aim of this study to assess the effect of H. pylori infection on gastric mucosa and to explore its role in gastric carcinogenesis via COX2 and mTOR mucosal expression. This study comprised archival blocks from 60 dyspeptic patients who underwent gastric endoscopic biopsies for histopathological examination. The blocks were cut at 4 μm thicknesses, stained with hematoxylin and eosin to score, using updated Sydney system, and subjected to Giemsa stain to assess H. pylori infection. Then, immunohistochemical method was carried out to determine the expression of COX2 and mTOR. Increased H. pylori colonization was significantly correlated with increased severity of inflammation, activity, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and the presence of high-grade dysplasia. Also, studied molecular markers were significantly associated with increased H. pylori colonization and presence of severe metaplasia, atrophy, and dysplasia. These findings suggest that there is a positive feedback loop between H. pylori infection and the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal changes. Also, mTOR and COX2 over expression cause premalignant changes and subsequent tumor occurrence. This may help in providing innovative approaches for the detection of patients-with a higher chance of cancer development, and in trying to introduce effective therapy preventing tumor occurrence, or even using these molecular markers as potential targets for tumors treatment strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Human and Helicobacter pylori Interactions Determine the Outcome of Gastric Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Alain P.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune response is a critical hallmark of Helicobacter pylori infection. Epithelial and myeloid cells produce effectors, including the chemokine CXCL8, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and nitric oxide (NO), in response to bacterial components. Mechanistic and epidemiologic studies have emphasized that dysregulated and persistent release of these products leads to the development of chronic inflammation and to the molecular and cellular events related to carcinogenesis. Moreover, investigations in H. pylori-infected patients about polymorphisms of the genes encoding CXCL8 and inducible NO synthase, and epigenetic control of the ROS-producing enzyme spermine oxidase, have further proven that overproduction of these molecules impacts the severity of gastric diseases. Lastly, the critical effect of the crosstalk between the human host and the infecting bacterium in determining the severity of H. pylori-related diseases has been supported by phylogenetic analysis of the human population and their H. pylori isolates in geographic areas with varying clinical and pathologic outcomes of the infection. PMID:28124148

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastric cancer? A review of the epidemiological, meta-analytic, and experimental evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guy D Eslick

    2006-01-01

    Since the discovery of Campylobacter-like organisms (Helicobacter pylori) more than two decades ago the possibility of a relationship with gastric cancer has been postulated, tested and supposedly proven. There have been numerous human studies of various designs from many countries around the world. Several meta-analyses have been published and more recently a small number of experimental animal studies were reported looking at the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer. Over the years, the human epidemiological studies have produced conflicting results; the metaanalyses have as one would expect produced similar pooled estimates; while the early experimental animal studies require replication. The exact mechanisms by which H pylori might cause gastric cancer are still under investigation and remain to be elucidated.

  12. Early Attempts to Eradicate Helicobacter pylori after Endoscopic Resection of Gastric Neoplasm Significantly Improve Eradication Success Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Cheal Wung; Youn, Young Hoon; Jung, Da Hyun; Park, Jae Jun; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose After endoscopic resection (ER) of gastric tumors, eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is advised to reduce metachronous recurrence. Optimal timing of such therapy (yet to be established) was investigated herein, examining early active and late scarring stages of post-ER iatrogenic ulcers. Materials and Methods Analysis included 514 patients who received proton-pump inhibitor (PPI)-based triple therapy for H. pylori eradication after ER for gastric neoplasms between January 2008 and June 2015. Clinicopathologic characteristics, particularly the timing of triple therapy, were used to compare eradication rates, assigning patients to early- (≤2 weeks), intermediate- (2–8 weeks), and late-phase (≥8 weeks) treatment groups. Results H. pylori eradication rates differed significantly by timing of triple therapy after ER (early, 90.0%; intermediate, 76.2%, late, 72.4%; p ulcer, and duration of therapeutic regimen. Early initiation of H. pylori eradication was also identified as a significant independent predictor of eradication success in multivariate analysis (Odds ratio = 3.67, 95% CI 2.18–6.16; p <.001). Conclusion In patients undergoing ER of gastric tumors, early post-ER attempts at eradication of H. pylori offer the best chance of eradication success. PMID:27588679

  13. Changes with aging in gastric biomarkers levels and in biochemical factors associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in asymptomatic Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jin-Hua; Bai, Xiao-Juan; Han, Lu-Lu; Yuan, Yuan; Sun, Xue-Feng

    2017-08-28

    To observe changes in gastric biomarker levels with age and effects of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in a healthy population, and explore factors associated with gastric biomarkers. Three hundred and ninety-five subjects were selected and underwent physical examinations, biochemical tests, and measurement of serum pepsinogen (PG) I and II, gastrin-17 (G-17) and H. pylori antibody levels. Analyses were made by Student's t-test, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation and multiple linear regressions. PGII levels were higher in the ≥ 65-years-old age group (P pylori-infected subjects that were male. LDL-C levels were higher in 55-74-years-old age group (P pylori-infected subjects and 45-64-years-old age group (P pylori infection had an effect on raising LDL-C levels to increase the risk of atherosclerosis in males, especially those of elderly age. Age, H. pylori infection, levels of renal function and FBG were associated with levels of pepsinogens and gastrin.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer%幽门螺杆菌感染与胃癌

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时昭红; 刘浩

    2011-01-01

    2005年的诺贝尔生理学和医学奖授予了幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter pylori,H.pylori)的发现人巴里·马歇尔和罗宾·沃伦教授.迄今有大量的流行病学、临床和实验研究支持H.pylori是胃癌的致病因素,但其具体致病机制尚不完全明了.本文就H.pylori感染和胃癌的流行病学研究,H.pylori感染致胃癌的动物实验模型研究,H.pylori毒力基因与胃癌的关系,H.pylori感染与胃癌相关基因的关系和H.pylori感染与胃上皮细胞增殖和凋亡的关系等方面,系统阐述H.pylori感染和胃癌之间的关系.%The 2005 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine was awarded to Barry Marshall and Robin Warren for their discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori). Now numerous epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies and reports emphasized the crucial role of H. Pylori in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer (GC), but the specific mechanism is still unknown. In this paper, we undertake a systematic review of H. Pylori infection-related GC epidemiological studies, animal models of H. Pylori infection-induced GC, the relationship between the virulence genes of H. Pylori and GC, the links between H. Pylori infection and genes related to GC, and the correlation of H. Pylori infection with gastric epithelial proliferation and apoptosis.

  15. PCR detection of clarithromycin-susceptible and -resistant Helicobacter pylori from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded gastric biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Bryan H; Regner, Maryann; Mangold, Kathy A; Thomson, Richard B; Kaul, Karen L

    2013-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance to clarithromycin is a growing concern in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori and is associated with three major point mutations of the 23S rRNA, A2142C, A2142G, and A2143G. The use of traditional culture-based methods for determination of clarithromycin resistance in H. pylori are time consuming and lack sensitivity. We implemented a real-time PCR with melt curve analysis to detect and characterize H. pylori in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded gastric biopsy specimens to assess the frequency of clarithromycin resistance mutations in our study population. One hundred and fifty-three formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded gastric biopsies were chosen on the basis of positive immunohistochemical staining for H. pylori and an accompanying histopathological diagnosis of Helicobacter-associated gastritis. New adjacent sections were taken for immunohistochemical staining and DNA extraction with subsequent testing by PCR assay and melt curve analysis using a primer and probe combination first described by Oleastro et al.(12) One hundred and forty-six samples demonstrated adequate amplification of a human DNA control target. Of these, there were 122 H. pylori immunohistochemistry-positive samples. In all, 103 out of 122 (84%) immunohistochemistry-positive samples demonstrated amplifiable H. pylori 23S rRNA gene target and 19 (16%) demonstrated no amplification of H. pylori. Twenty-two samples were negative for H. pylori by immunohistochemistry and PCR. Two were negative for H. pylori by immunohistochemistry, but were positive for H. pylori by PCR. In all, 52 out of 105 (50%) PCR-positive samples demonstrated resistance mutations, and it was determined that a heterogeneous population of mutated and unmutated organisms was present in 11 out of 52 samples. The use of PCR assays allows for a timely assessment of clarithromycin resistance status without the disadvantages of culture-based methods, and may lead to a decrease in treatment failure rates.

  16. Prospective study of Helicobacter pylori antigens and gastric noncardia cancer risk in the nutrition intervention trial cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gwen; Freedman, Neal D; Michel, Angelika; Fan, Jin-Hu; Taylor, Philip R; Pawlita, Michael; Qiao, You-Lin; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M

    2015-10-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the strongest known risk factor for gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA). We used multiplex serology to determine whether seropositivity to 15 H. pylori proteins is associated with the subsequent development of noncardia gastric cancer in Linxian, China. We included 448 GNCA cases and 1242 controls from two time points within the Linxian General Population Nutrition Intervention Trial, Linxian. H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was defined as positivity to ≥4 of the 15 included antigens. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were adjusted for major GNCA risk factors. In addition, we undertook a meta-analysis combining H. pylori multiplex serology data from both time points. H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was associated with a significant increase in risk of GNCA at one time point (1985; OR: 3.44, 95% CI: 1.91, 6.19) and this association remained significant following adjustment for H. pylori or CagA ELISA seropositivity (OR: 2.92, 95% CI: 1.56, 5.47). Combining data from both time points in a meta-analysis H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of GNCA, as were six individual antigens: GroEL, HP0305, CagA, VacA, HcpC and Omp. CagM was inversely associated with risk of GNCA. We identified six individual antigens that confer an increase in risk of GNCA within this population of high H. pylori seroprevalence, as well as a single antigen that may be inversely associated with GNCA risk. We further determined that the H. pylori multiplex assay provides additional information to the conventional ELISA methods on risk of GNCA.

  17. Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa of dead children Helicobacter pylori en la mucosa gástrica de cadáveres de niños

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jairo Duque Alzate

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available 23 children under the age of 12 years who died violently without receiving any treatment, had their gastric mucosa studied by means of he Warthin-Starry stain and immunohistochemistry in search for Helicobacter pylori. It was found that 60.9% (14 cases were positive; of them 64,3% belonged to a low social class and 35,7% to the middle one. Of the positive cases, 9 had acute gastritis, 1 had chronic gastritis and only 4 had normal gastric mucosa. A clear association between Helicobacter pylory and changes in gastritis was observed. En 23 niños menores de 12 años que murieron en forma violenta sin haber recibido tratamiento, se estudiaron para Helicobacter pylori las mucosas gástricas con las coloraciones de hematoxilina eosina, Warthin Starry e inmunohistoquímica. Se encontró que 14 casos (60,9% fueron positivos para esta bacteria, de los cuales 9 (64,3% pertenecían a un estrato social bajo y 5 (35,7% a uno medio. De los casos positivos para H. pylori, 9 tenían gastritis aguda, 1 gastritis crónica y sólo en 4 la mucosa gástrica era normal. Se observó una clara asociación entre H. pylori y cambios de gastritis.

  18. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori outer membrane vesicles by gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Heather; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Hampton, Mark B; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2010-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori bacteria colonize the human stomach where they stimulate a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori is considered noninvasive; however, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-enriched outer membrane vesicles (OMV), continuously shed from the surface of this bacterium, are observed within gastric epithelial cells. The mechanism of vesicle uptake is poorly understood, and this study was undertaken to examine the roles of bacterial VacA cytotoxin and LPS in OMV binding and cholesterol and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in vesicle uptake by gastric epithelial cells. OMV association was examined using a fluorescent membrane dye to label OMV, and a comparison was made between the associations of vesicles from a VacA(+) strain and OMV from a VacA(-) isogenic mutant strain. Within 20 min, essentially all associated OMV were intracellular, and vesicle binding appeared to be facilitated by the presence of VacA cytotoxin. Uptake of vesicles from the VacA(+) strain was inhibited by H. pylori LPS (58% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS), while uptake of OMV from the VacA(-) mutant strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS). Vesicle uptake did not require cholesterol. However, uptake of OMV from the VacA(-) mutant strain was inhibited by a reduction in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (42% with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine), while uptake of OMV from the VacA(+) strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine). We conclude that VacA toxin enhances the association of H. pylori OMV with cells and that the presence of the toxin may allow vesicles to exploit more than one pathway of internalization.

  19. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Vesicles by Gastric Epithelial Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Heather; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Hampton, Mark B.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori bacteria colonize the human stomach where they stimulate a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori is considered noninvasive; however, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-enriched outer membrane vesicles (OMV), continuously shed from the surface of this bacterium, are observed within gastric epithelial cells. The mechanism of vesicle uptake is poorly understood, and this study was undertaken to examine the roles of bacterial VacA cytotoxin and LPS in OMV binding and cholesterol and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in vesicle uptake by gastric epithelial cells. OMV association was examined using a fluorescent membrane dye to label OMV, and a comparison was made between the associations of vesicles from a VacA+ strain and OMV from a VacA− isogenic mutant strain. Within 20 min, essentially all associated OMV were intracellular, and vesicle binding appeared to be facilitated by the presence of VacA cytotoxin. Uptake of vesicles from the VacA+ strain was inhibited by H. pylori LPS (58% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS), while uptake of OMV from the VacA− mutant strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS). Vesicle uptake did not require cholesterol. However, uptake of OMV from the VacA− mutant strain was inhibited by a reduction in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (42% with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine), while uptake of OMV from the VacA+ strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine). We conclude that VacA toxin enhances the association of H. pylori OMV with cells and that the presence of the toxin may allow vesicles to exploit more than one pathway of internalization. PMID:20876296

  20. [Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the expression level of SATB1 and c-Myc genes in gastric mucosa of patients with family history of gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracz, Adam F; Peczek, Łukasz; Zuk, Karolina; Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Nawrot, Barbara

    2013-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a class 1 gastric carcinogen with the proved influence on gastric cancer development. The products of SATB1 and c-Myc genes play important role in cancer development and their levels are elevated in gastric cancer tissues. The aim of the study was to analyze an effect of H. pylori eradication on the expression of the SATB1 and c-Myc genes in the gastric mucosa of dyspeptic patients with family history of gastric cancer. Twenty patients enrolled to the studies were divided into two groups: nine patients (group I) without the family history of gastric cancer, and eleven patients with the family history of gastric cancer (group II). Endoscopic biopsies of gastric mucosa were taken from the antrum and corpus of H. pylori-infected subjects before and after bacteria eradication. The corresponding levels of expression were determined by analysis of the respective mRNA levels with the use of the real-time RT-PCR method. The level of each mRNA was normalized to the levels of mRNA of two reference genes, RPL29 and GAPDH. Independently of stomach topography, the antrum versus corpus, in the group I patients the levels of mRNA of SATB1 and c-Myc after eradication were higher in the following cases: SATB1/ GAPDH p = 0.017914 (antrum); SATB1/RPL29 p = 0.046400 (corpus); SATB1/GAPDH p = 0.027709 (corpus). For group II patients no statistically significant increase of the level of the c-Myc and SATB1 genes was observed. Patients with the family history of gastric cancer and H. pylori infection, with reversible histopathological changes of the gastric mucosa, have significantly higher levels of SATB1 and c-Myc genes expression as compared to the patients without family history of gastric cancer, regardless of the topography of the stomach. After successful eradication, the SATB1 mRNA level in samples of patients with the family history of gastric cancer did not increase, in contrast to the control group of patients. Presumably, the observed effect

  1. Anti-Helicobacter pylori Antibody Profiles in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-Positive and EBV-Negative Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, M Constanza; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Torres, Javier; Liao, Linda M; Morgan, Douglas R; Michel, Angelika; Waterboer, Tim; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Dominguez, Ricardo L; Yatabe, Yasushi; Kim, Sung; Rocha-Guevara, Erick R; Lissowska, Jolanta; Pawlita, Michael; Rabkin, Charles S

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the primary cause of gastric cancer, but about 9% of cases harbor Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the tumor cells. There is limited evidence on the possible interaction or antagonism between these infectious agents in gastric carcinogenesis. We compared H. pylori serologic profiles of EBV-positive (n = 58) and EBV-negative (n = 111) noncardia gastric cancer patients from the United States National Cancer Institute's International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium. EBV positivity of tumors was assessed by in situ hybridization. Serum levels of 15 antibodies to immunogenic proteins of H. pylori (Cad, CagA, Cagδ, CagM, Catalase, GroEL, HcpC, HP0231, HP0305, HpaA, HyuA, NapA, Omp, UreA, VacA) were assessed using bead-based multiplex serology. Logistic regression models were used to adjust odds ratios (OR) for country, age, sex, and year of diagnosis. Seropositivity to individual proteins ranged up to 90% overall. Antibodies to Catalase were borderline associated with tumor EBV positivity (adjusted OR = 3.15, p = .0024, Bonferroni corrected p = .036). Distributions of other antibodies did not vary by tumor EBV status. Similarity of host-response indicates the essential etiological role of H. pylori in EBV-positive gastric cancer. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Gene expression profiling in human gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Véronique J; Moreilhon, Chimène; Brest, Patrick D; Lassalle, Sandra; Le Brigand, Kevin; Sicard, Dominique; Raymond, Josette; Lamarque, Dominique; Hébuterne, Xavier A; Mari, Bernard; Barbry, Pascal Jp; Hofman, Paul M

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms associated with Helicobacter pylori infection enhance susceptibility of the gastric epithelium to carcinogenic conversion. We have characterized the gene expression profiles of gastric biopsies from 69 French Caucasian patients, of which 43 (62%) were infected with H. pylori. The bacterium was detected in 27 of the 42 antral biopsies examined and in 16 of the 27 fundic biopsies. Infected biopsies were selected for the presence of chronic active gastritis, in absence of metaplasia and dysplasia of the gastric mucosa. Infected antral and fundic biopsies exhibited distinct transcriptional responses. Altered responses were linked with: (1) the extent of polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, (2) bacterial density, and (3) the presence of the virulence factors vacA, babA2, and cagA. Robust modulation of transcripts associated with Toll-like receptors, signal transduction, the immune response, apoptosis, and the cell cycle was consistent with expected responses to Gram-negative bacterial infection. Altered expression of interferon-regulated genes (IFITM1, IRF4, STAT6), indicative of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II-mediated and Th1-specific responses, as well as altered expression of GATA6, have previously been described in precancerous states. Upregulation of genes abundantly expressed in cancer tissues (UBD, CXCL13, LY96, MAPK8, MMP7, RANKL, CCL18) or in stem cells (IFITM1 and WFDC2) may reveal a molecular switch towards a premalignant state in infected tissues. Tissue microarray analysis of a large number of biopsies, which were either positive or negative for the cag-A virulence factor, when compared to each other and to noninfected controls, confirmed observed gene alterations at the protein level, for eight key transcripts. This study provides 'proof-of-principle' data for identifying molecular mechanisms driving H. pylori-associated carcinogenesis before morphological evidence of changes along the neoplastic progression pathway.

  3. Gastric atrophy, diagnosing and staging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hala MT El-Zimaity

    2006-01-01

    H pylori is now accepted as the cause of gastritis and gastritis-associated diseases, such as duodenal ulcer,gastric ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and gastric MALT lymphoma. The natural history of H pylori gastritis includes inflammation progressing from the antrum into the adjacent corpus resulting in an atrophic front of advancing injury leading to a reduction in acid secretion and eventual loss of parietal cells and development of atrophy. Sub-typing intestinal metaplasia has no clinical value to the patient, the pathologist, or the endoscopist.The pattern, extent, and severity of atrophy, with or without intestinal metaplasia, is a far more important predictor than is intestinal metaplasia subtype. The challenge remains to identify a reliable marker that relates to pre-malignant potential.

  4. Lactobacillus acidophilus ameliorates H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inactivating the Smad7 and NFκB pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yao-Jong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background H. pylori infection may trigger Smad7 and NFκB expression in the stomach, whereas probiotics promote gastrointestinal health and improve intestinal inflammation caused by pathogens. This study examines if probiotics can improve H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inactivating the Smad7 and NFκB pathways. Results Challenge with H. pylori increased IL-8 and TNF-α expressions but not TGF-β1 in MKN45 cells. The RNA levels of Smad7 in AGS cells increased after H. pylori infection in a dose-dependent manner. A higher dose (MOI 100 of L. acidophilus pre-treatment attenuated the H. pylori-induced IL-8 expressions, but not TGF-β1. Such anti-inflammatory effect was mediated via increased cytoplasmic IκBα and depletion of nuclear NFκB. L. acidophilus also inhibited H. pylori-induced Smad7 transcription by inactivating the Jak1 and Stat1 pathways, which might activate the TGF-β1/Smad pathway. L. acidophilus pre-treatment ameliorated IFN-γ-induced Smad7 translation level and subsequently reduced nuclear NF-κB production, as detected by western blotting. Conclusions H. pylori infection induces Smad7, NFκB, IL-8, and TNF-α production in vitro. Higher doses of L. acidophilus pre-treatment reduce H. pylori-induced inflammation through the inactivation of the Smad7 and NFκB pathways.

  5. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotype diversity and interferon gamma expression in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Carrillo, D N; Atrisco-Morales, J; Hernández-Pando, R; Reyes-Navarrete, S; Betancourt-Linares, R; Cruz-del Carmen, I; Illades Aguiar, B; Román-Román, A; Fernández-Tilapa, G

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main risk factor for the development of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer. In H. pylori-infected individuals, the clinical result is dependent on various factors, among which are bacterial components, the immune response, and environmental influence. To compare IFN-γ expression with the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer. Ninety-five patients diagnosed with chronic gastritis and 20 with gastric cancer were included in the study. Three gastric biopsies were taken; one was used for the molecular detection and genotyping of H. pylori; another was fixed in absolute alcohol and histologic sections were made for determining IFN-γ expression through immunohistochemistry. No differences were found in the cells that expressed IFN-γ between the patients with chronic gastritis (median percentage of positive cells: 82.6% in patients without H. pylori and 82% in infected persons) and those with gastric cancer (70.5% in H. pylori-negative patients and 78.5% in infected persons). IFN-γ expression was 69% in chronic gastritis patients infected with H. pylori vacAs2m2/cagA⁻ it was 86.5% in patients infected with H. pylori vacAs1m2/cagA⁻, 86.5% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁻, and 82% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁺. Similar data were found in the patients with gastric cancer. IFN-γ expression varied depending on the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotype, but not in accordance with the presence of chronic gastritis or gastric cancer.

  6. Comparative genomic study of gastric epithelial cells co-cultured with Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fen Wang; Li-Dan Luo; Jian-Hua Pan; Li-Hua Huang; Hong-Wei Lv; Qin Guo; Can-Xia Xu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To identify genes potentially involved in Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori)-induced gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS:GES-1 cells were co-cultured with H.pylori strains isolated from patients with gastric carcinoma (GC,n =10) or chronic gastritis (CG,n =10) for in vitro proliferation and apoptosis assays to identify the most and least virulent strains.These two strains were cagA-genotyped and used for further in vivo carcinogenic virulence assays by infecting Mongolian gerbils for 52 wk,respectively; a broth free of H.pylori was lavaged as control.Genomic profiles of GES-1 cells cocultured with the most and least virulent strains were determined by microarray analysis.The most differentially expressed genes were further verified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in GES-1 cells infected with the most and least virulent strains,and by immunohistochemistry in H.pylori positive CG,precancerous diseases,and GC biopsy specimens in an independent experiment.RESULTS:GC-derived H.pylori strains induced a potent proliferative effect in GES-1 cells in co-culture,whereas CG-derived strains did not.The most (from a GC patient) and least (from a CG patient) virulent strains were cagA-positive and negative,respectively.At week 52,CG,atrophy,metaplasia,dysplasia,and GC were observed in 90.0%,80.0%,80.0%,90%,and 60.0%,respectively,of the animals lavaged with the most virulent strain.However,only mild CG was observed in 90% of the animals lavaged with the least virulent strain.On microarray analysis,800 differentially expressed genes (49 up-and 751 down-regulated),involving those associated with cell cycle regulation,cell apoptosis,cytoskeleton,immune response,and substance and energy metabolisms,were identified in cells co-cultured with the most virulent strain as compared with those co-cultured with the least virulent strain.The six most differentially expressed genes (with a betweenness centrality of 0.1-0.2) were identified among the significant

  7. Grb2-associated binder 1 polymorphism was associated with the risk of Helicobactor pylori infection and gastric atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Goto, Takafumi Ando, Kazuko Nishio, Sayo Kawai, Yoshiko Ishida, Mariko Naito, Hidemi Goto, Nobuyuki Hamajima

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have explained the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and gastric atrophy and cancer. This study investigated the associations of Grb2 associated binder 1 (Gab1 polymorphism and the combination of PTPN11 gene encoding src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2 and Gab1 gene with gastric cancer and gastric atrophy among H. pylori seropositive subjects. Methods: A single nucleotide polymorphism at intron 2 of Gab1 (JST164345 was examined for 454 Japanese health checkup examinees (126 males and 328 females aged 35 to 85 without a history of gastric cancer and 202 gastric cancer patients (134 males and 68 females aged 33 to 94 with pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma. Results: The decreased OR of the Gab1 A/A for H. pylori seropositivity was 0.25 (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.08-0.71. Among seropositive healthy controls, the OR of the Gab1 G/A+A/A for gastric atrophy was significant (OR=1.95, 95% CI: 1.12 -3.40. Seropositive individuals with PTPN11 G/G and Gab1 G/A+A/A demonstrated the highest risk of gastric atrophy with significance (OR=3.49, 95% CI: 1.54-7.90 relative to PTPN11 G/A+A/A and Gab1 G/G, the lowest risk combination, as a reference. However, the gene-gene interaction between PTPN11 and Gab1 was not observed (OR=1.39, 95% CI: 0.41-4.66. Compared to gastric cancer case, the Gab1 did not influence the step of atrophy/metaplasia-gastric cancer sequence. Conclusions: This study represents that the Gab1 polymorphism was associated with the low risk of H. pylori infection and the high risk of gastric atrophy among seropositive healthy controls, and that seropositive individuals with PTPN11 G/G and Gab1 G/A+G/G were associated with the greatest risk of gastric atrophy. These findings require confirmation in much larger studies.

  8. Overexpression of c-fos in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric precancerosis of Mongolian gerbil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Li Yang; Bo Xu; Yu-Gang Song; Wan-Dai Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore dysregulation of c-fos in several human malignancies, and to further investigate the role of c-fos in Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori)-induced gastric precancerosis.METHODS: Four-week-old male Mongolian gerbils were H. pyloriNCTC 11 637 in Brucella broth were inoculated orally into 20 Mongolian gerbils. Another 20 gerbils were inoculated with Brucella broth as controls. 10 of the infected gerbils and 10 of the non- infected control gerbils were sacrificed at 25 and 45 weeks after infection. The stomach of each gerbil was removed and opened for macroscopic observation. The expression of c-fos was analyzed by RTPCR and immunohistochemical studies in H. pylori-induced gastric precancerosis of Mongolian gerbil. Half of each gastric antrum mucosa was dissected for RNA isolation and RTPCR. β-actin was used as the housekeeping gene and amplified with c-fos as contrast. PCR products of c-fos were analyzed by gel image system and the level of c-fos was reflected with the ratio of c-fos/β-actin. The immunostaining for c-foswas conducted using monoclonal antibody of c-fosand the StreptAvidin-Biotin-enzyme Complex kit.RESULTS: H. pyloriwas constantly found in all infected animals in this study. After infection of H. Pylorifor 25 weeks,ulcers were observed in the antral and the body of stomach of 60 % infected animals (6/10). Histological examination showed that all animals developed severe inflammation, especially in the area close to ulcers, and multifocal lymphoid follicles appeared in the lamina propria and submucosa. After infection of H. Pylorifor 45 weeks, severe atrophic gastritis in all infected animals, intestinal metaplasia in 80 % infected animals (8/10) and dysplasia in 60 % infected animals (6/10) could be observed. C-fos mRNA levels were significantlyhigher after infection of H. pylorifor 25 weeks (1.84±0.79),and for 45 weeks (1.59±0.37) than those in control-animals (0.74±0.22, P<0.01). C-fos mRNA levels were increased 2.5-fold by 25th

  9. 胃MALT淋巴瘤中API2-MALT1的检测及其临床病理意义%Detection of API2-MALT1 fusion transcript in gastric MALT lymphoma and its clinicopathological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严青; 陶琨; 侯英勇; 朱雄增

    2004-01-01

    目的检测t(11;18)所致API2-MALT1融合转录本的发生率,探讨其对胃MALT淋巴瘤(extranodal marginal zone B-celllymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue,MALTlymphoma)病理诊断的意义.方法收集原发性胃MALT淋巴瘤手术切除、石蜡包埋标本26例为实验组;含MALT成分的胃弥漫性大B细胞淋巴瘤(diffuse large B-cell lymphoma,DLBCL)和单纯的胃DLBCL手术切除、石蜡包埋标本各10例及慢性胃炎活检石蜡包埋标本10例作为对照组.采用半嵌套式PCR检测B细胞IgH基因重排;采用RT-PCR检测API2-MALT1融合转录本,并通过形态学、免疫组化及分子生物学方法的比较,研究API2-MALT1融合转录本的检测在MALT淋巴瘤诊断中的意义.结果IgH基因重排的阳性率在胃MALT淋巴瘤中为76.9%(20/26),在含MALT成分的胃DLBCL中为100%(10/10),在胃DLBCL中为80%(8/10),在慢性胃炎中为0(0/10);API2-MALT1融合转录本在胃MALT淋巴瘤中的检出率为19.2%(5/26),在含MALT成分的胃DLBCL、胃DLBCL和胃炎中均未检出.结论API2-MALT1是胃MALT淋巴瘤特异性的诊断指标,但其阳性率相对较低,通过与形态学、免疫组化及B细胞IgH基因重排检测的结合,对胃MALT淋巴瘤的诊断和鉴别诊断具有重要价值.

  10. Study of T-lymphocyte subsets, nitric oxide, hexosamine and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with chronic gastric diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhang; Shu Lin Jiang; Xi Xian Yao

    2000-01-01

    Chronic gastritis ( CG ) and peptic ulcer ( PU ) are frequently-occurring diseases. It is now well recognized that Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is a major factor that leads to CG and PU[1-8] In order to study the relationship among T lymphocyte subsets, NO, Hexosamine and Hp infection in patients with chronic gastric diseases, the levelsof blood T lymphocyte subsets, plasma NO and hexosamine in gastric mucosa were measured respectively in 30 patients with CG and 32 patients of PU + CG.

  11. Helicobacter pylori induces vascular endothelial growth factor production in gastric epithelial cells through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Jung; Song, Eun-Jung; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-12-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori have been known to induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in gastric epithelial cells, the precise mechanism for cellular signaling is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of bacterial virulence factor and host cellular signaling in VEGF production of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. We evaluated production of VEGF, activation of nuclear factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stabilization in gastric epithelial cells infected with H. pylori WT or isogenic mutants deficient in type IV secretion system (T4SS). H. pylori induced VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells via both T4SS-dependent and T4SS-independent pathways, although T4SS-independent pathway seems to be the dominant signaling. The inhibitor assay implicated that activation of NF-κB and MAPKs is dispensable for H. pylori-induced VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells. H. pylori led to HIF-1α stabilization in gastric epithelial cells independently of T4SS, NF-κB, and MAPKs, which was essential for VEGF production in these cells. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor, treatment impaired H. pylori-induced HIF-1α stabilization and VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells. We defined the important role of ROS-HIF-1α axis in VEGF production of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells, and bacterial T4SS has a minor role in H. pylori-induced VEGF production of gastric epithelial cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The influence of duodeno-gastric reflux on frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection at patients with ulcer gastric; Wplyw refluksu dwunastniczo-zoladkowego na czestosc wystepowania zakazenia Helicobacter pylori u chorych z wrzodem zoladka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopanski, Z.; Niziol, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Cienciala, A.; Lasa, J. [Kliniczny Oddzial Chirurgii Ogolnej, Pracownia Medycyny Nuklearnej, Szpital Wojskowy, Cracow (Poland)]|[Wydzial Fizyki i Techniki Jadrowej AGH, Cracow (Poland)]|[Pracownia Chromatografii Gazowej, Instytut Fizyki Jadrowej, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    To estimate the correlation between frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and intensity of duodeno-gastric reflux it was analysed 61 species with ulcer gastric. Bacterial infection was diagnosed by the breath test with {sup 14}C-labelled urea, whereas presence and intensity of the reflux was found with dynamic scintigraphy with {sup 99}Tm MBrIDA support. The H. pylori infection was present at 42 (68.9%) patients. The presence of throwing back the duodenal liquid was found at 32 (52.5%) diagnosed patients. At 19 (31.2%) of them the reflux has intensity of 1%, at 11 (18%)-2{sup o} and 2 (3.3%)-3{sup o}.The investigations which were carried out, showed that at patients with ulcer gastric disease, duodeno-gastric reflux is an agent which slows down H. pylori infection, however it is easily seen not earlier than at 2{sup o} of its intensity. (author) 33 refs, 1 tab

  13. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factors in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar Is Related to Gastric Cancer Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thi Huyen Trang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a significant health problem in Asia. Although the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is similar in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar, the incidence of gastric cancer is highest in Bhutan, followed by Vietnam and Myanmar. We hypothesized that H. pylori virulence factors contribute to the differences. The status of cagA, vacA, jhp0562, and β-(1,3galT(jhp0563 was examined in 371 H. pylori-infected patients from Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar. Each virulence factor could not explain the difference of the incidence of gastric cancer. However, the prevalence of quadruple-positive for cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3galT-negative was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Vietnam and Myanmar and correlated with gastric cancer incidence. Moreover, gastritis-staging scores measured by histology of gastric mucosa were significantly higher in quadruple-positive strains. We suggest that the cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3galT-negative genotype may play a role in the development of gastric cancer.

  14. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factors in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar Is Related to Gastric Cancer Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Shiota, Seiji; Matsuda, Miyuki; Binh, Tran Thanh; Suzuki, Rumiko; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Mahachai, Varocha; Tshering, Lotay; Dung, Ho D Q; Uchida, Tomohisa; Matsunari, Osamu; Myint, Thein; Khien, Vu Van; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a significant health problem in Asia. Although the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is similar in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar, the incidence of gastric cancer is highest in Bhutan, followed by Vietnam and Myanmar. We hypothesized that H. pylori virulence factors contribute to the differences. The status of cagA, vacA, jhp0562, and β-(1,3)galT(jhp0563) was examined in 371 H. pylori-infected patients from Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar. Each virulence factor could not explain the difference of the incidence of gastric cancer. However, the prevalence of quadruple-positive for cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3)galT-negative was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Vietnam and Myanmar and correlated with gastric cancer incidence. Moreover, gastritis-staging scores measured by histology of gastric mucosa were significantly higher in quadruple-positive strains. We suggest that the cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3)galT-negative genotype may play a role in the development of gastric cancer.

  15. Immunohistochemical Expressions of MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC6 in Normal, Helicobacter pylori Infected and Metaplastic Gastric Mucosa of Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung-Sook; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang; Jun, Jin-Su; Park, Ji-Hoe; Ko, Gyung-Hyuck; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate expression of gastric mucins in children and adolescents and to assess their relations with age and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Gastric biopsies were collected from 259 pediatric and adulthood patients with gastrointestinal symptoms among all of patients undergone gastroduodenoscopy from 1990 to 2004 at Gyeongsang National University hospital and assorted based on H. pylori infection, age, and intestinal metaplasia as follows; H. pylori infection before 5 years of age or not, H. pylori infection between 5 and 9 years of age or not, H. pylori infection between 10 and 14 years of age or not, H. pylori infection between 20 and 29 years of age or not and intestinal metaplasia between 21 and 35 years of age. Total 810 tissue slides from the subjects were examined regarding expressions of Mucin2 (MUC2), Mucin5AC (MUC5AC), and Mucin6 (MUC6) in nine groups using immunohistochemical stains. A semiquantitative approach was used to score the staining extent of tissue slide. Increased expressions of MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC6 were noted in intestinal metaplasia compared with subjects infected with H. pylori between 20 and 29 years. Gastric expressions of MUC5AC were decreased in older than 5 years with H. pylori compared with in older than 5 years without H. pylori (p pylori status. Some nuclear expressions of MUC2 and MUC6 were noted in children without intestinal metaplasia. MUC5AC might be affected by chronic H. pylori infection. In addition to biomarkers for intestinal metaplasia or prognostic factors for gastric cancer in adults, MUC2 and MUC6 in children might have an another role, based on ectopic gastric nuclear expressions of MUC2 and MUC6 in children without intestinal metaplasia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effect of Helicobacter pylori's vacuolating cytotoxin on the autophagy pathway in gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terebiznik, Mauricio R; Raju, Deepa; Vázquez, Cristina L; Torbricki, Karl; Kulkarni, Reshma; Blanke, Steven R; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Colombo, María I; Jones, Nicola L

    2009-04-01

    Host cell responses to Helicobacter pylori infection are complex and incompletely understood. Here, we report that autophagy is induced within human-derived gastric epithelial cells (AGS) in response to H. pylori infection. These autophagosomes were distinct and different from the large vacuoles induced during H. pylori infection. Autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy, conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, GFP-LC3 recruitment to autophagosomes, and depended on Atg5 and Atg12. The induction of autophagy depended on the vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) and, moreover, VacA was sufficient to induce autophagosome formation. The channel-forming activity of VacA was necessary for inducing autophagy. Intracellular VacA partially co-localized with GFP-LC3, indicating that the toxin associates with autophagosomes. The inhibition of autophagy increased the stability of intracellular VacA, which in turn resulted in enhanced toxin-mediated cellular vacuolation. These findings suggest that the induction of autophagy by VacA may represent a host mechanism to limit toxin-induced cellular damage.

  17. Novel epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mediates release of human β-defensin 3 from Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Jibran S; Zaidi, Syed F; Zhou, Yue; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in hostile gastric mucosa can result in gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori induces to express antimicrobial peptides from gastric epithelial cells, especially human β-defensin 3 (hBD3), as an innate immune response, and this expression of hBD3 is mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of a serine residue of EGFR via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and subsequent p38α activation is essential for H. pylori-induced hBD3 release from gastric epithelial cells. We showed that this pathway was dependent on H. pylori type IV secretion system and was independent of H. pylori-derived CagA or peptidoglycan. H. pylori infection induced phosphorylation of serine residue of EGFR, and this phosphorylation was followed by internalization of EGFR; consequently, hBD3 was released at an early phase of the infection. In the presence of TAK1 or p38α inhibitors, synthesis of hBD3 was completely inhibited. Similar results were observed in EGFR-, TAK1- or p38α-knockdown cells. However, NOD1 knockdown in gastric epithelial cells did not inhibit hBD3 induction. Our study has firstly demonstrated that this novel EGFR activating pathway functioned to induce hBD3 at an early phase of H. pylori infection.

  18. Host Epithelial Interactions with Helicobacter Pylori: A Role for Disrupted Gastric Barrier Function in the Clinical Outcome of Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre G Buret

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori may develop into gastritis, ulceration, adenocarcinoma and mucosal lymphomas. The pathogenic mechanisms that determine the clinical outcome from this microbial-epithelial interaction remain poorly understood. An increasing number of reports suggests that disruptions of epithelial barrier function may contribute to pathology and postinfectious complications in a variety of gastrointestinal infections. The aim of this review is to critically discuss the implications of H pylori persistence on gastric disease, with emphasis on the role of myosin light chain kinase, claudins and matrix metalloproteinases in gastric permeability defects, and their contribution to the development of cancer. These mechanisms and the associated signalling events may represent novel therapeutic targets to control disease processes induced by H pylori, a microbial pathogen that colonizes the stomach of over 50% of the human population.

  19. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL/Lcn2) is upregulated in gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpízar-Alpízar, Warner; Laerum, Ole Didrik; Illemann, Martin

    2009-01-01

    characterized here the pattern of expression of NGAL/Lcn2 in gastric mucosa (45 non-neoplastic and 38 neoplastic tissue samples) and explored the connection between NGAL/Lcn2 expression and H. pylori infection. Immunohistochemical analysis showed high NGAL/Lcn2 expression in normal and gastritis-affected mucosa...... compared to low expression in intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and gastric cancer. In normal and gastritis-affected mucosa (n=36 tissue samples), NGAL/Lcn2 was more frequently seen in epithelial cells located at the neck and base of the glands in H. pylori-positive cases than in similar epithelial cells...... of noninfected cases (Fisher's exact test, p=0.04). In conclusion, the high expression of NGAL/Lcn2 in normal and gastritis-affected mucosa infected with H. pylori suggests that NGAL/Lcn2 is upregulated locally in response to this bacterial infection. It is discussed whether this may have a causal relation...

  20. The need for using fluoroscopic guidance to obtain gastric biopsies when in search of Helicobacter pylori with a nonendoscopic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Greg N.; Mullins, Daniel J.; Makuch, Richard S

    1999-12-01

    Purpose: Nonendoscopic, fluoroscopic biopsy of the gastric mucosa, following barium examination of the stomach, has gained attention with its ease of performance and cost savings potential over endoscopy. Endoscopic research concerning the efficacy of biopsy sites has revealed an increased sensitivity of antral biopsies over greater curvature biopsies for the detection of Helicobacter pylori. Fluoroscopically guided biopsies of the gastric mucosal are studied to determine whether such a difference between site sensitivity held true. If not, blind biopsy through a nasogastric tube, which traditionally samples only the greater curvature, might prove an even less expensive alternative. Materials and methods: Seventy-two patients underwent nonendoscopic, fluoroscopically guided, mucosal biopsy of both the gastric antrum and the greater curvature of the stomach. Pathologic reports from both sites, using each patient as their own control, are compared to assess site sensitivity in the diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis. Results: The sensitivity for the detection of H. pylori gastritis by antral biopsy is 89% whereas the sensitivity of greater curvature biopsy is 62%. The difference is considered clinically significant at P{<=}0.05. Conclusions: This study confirms the need for antral biopsies when desiring a nonendoscopic approach to gastric mucosal sampling, in order to obtain a reasonable yield of data in dyspeptic patients with H. pylori gastritis. Blind techniques cannot reliably reach the antrum. Fluoroscopy can, and remains a less expensive alternative to endoscopy.

  1. Rapid interaction of Helicobacter pylori with microvilli of the polar human gastric epithelial cell line NCI-N87.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Nossol, Constanze; Faber-Zuschratter, Heidi; Zuschratter, Werner; Renner, Lydia; Sokolova, Olga; Naumann, Michael; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef

    2013-12-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori results often in chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers or even gastric tumor development. Little is known about the initial interaction between gastric epithelial cells and H. pylori. The aim of the present study was to analyze the initial host contact to the bacteria. Monolayers of the human gastric epithelial cell line NCI-N87 grown on porous membranes were used and the apical side of the epithelium was exposed to the H. pylori wild-type strain P1 for 1 hr. Many epithelial cells were colonized by bacteria within the period of 60 min. Using scanning electron microscopy we detected that the bacteria were in close contact with the epithelia via microvilli. Further, transmission electron microscopy of the contact sites revealed no difference in the morphology of the microvilli in comparison to those not attached to the bacteria. The present study demonstrates the importance of microvilli on apical epithelial cells during the initial contact of the host by colonizing H. pylori.

  2. Piperine treatment suppresses Helicobacter pylori toxin entry in to gastric epithelium and minimizes β-catenin mediated oncogenesis and IL-8 secretion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Park, Min; Lee, Min Ho; Woo, Hyun Jun; Kim, Hyun Woo; Yang, Ji Yeong; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer initiation has been studied widely. The objective of our present study was to evaluate the effect of a single compound piperine on H. pylori infection and its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects in vitro. Cytotoxicity was tested by Ez-cytox cell viability assay kit. Effects of piperine on H. pylori toxin gene expression and IL-8 expression in mammalian cells during infection were assessed by RT-PCR. Effects of piperine on toxin entry into host cells, E-cadherin cleavage by H. pylori, and the changes in H. pylori mediated β-catenin expression and IL-8 secretion were determined by immunoblotting. Piperine treatment restrained the entry of CagA and VacA into AGS cells. Piperine administration in H. pylori infection reduced E-cadherin cleavage in stomach epithelium. In addition, H. pylori induced β-catenin up-regulation was reduced. Piperine administration impaired IL-8 secretion in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. As we reported previously piperine restrained H. pylori motility. The possible reason behind the H. pylori inhibition mechanism of piperine could be the dwindled motility, which weakened H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. The reduced adhesion decreased the toxin entry thereby secreting less amount of IL-8. In addition, piperine treatment suppressed H. pylori protease led to reduction of E-cadherin cleavage and β-catenin expression resulting in diminished β-catenin translocation into the nucleus thus decreasing the risk of oncogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the preliminary report of piperine mediated H. pylori infection control on gastric epithelial cells in-vitro.

  3. Two distinct etiologies of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma: interactions among pH, Helicobacter pylori, and bile acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi eMukaisho

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer can be classified as cardia and noncardia subtypes according to the anatomic site. Although the gastric cancer incidence has decreased steadily in several countries over the past 50 years, the incidence of cardia cancers and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC continue to increase. The etiological factors involved in the development of both cardia cancers and EACs are associated with high animal fat intake, which causes severe obesity. Central obesity plays roles in cardiac-type mucosa lengthening and partial hiatus hernia development. There are two distinct etiologies of cardia cancer subtypes: one associated with gastroesophageal reflux (GER, which predominantly occurs in patients without Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and resembles EAC, and the other associated with H. pylori atrophic gastritis, which resembles noncardia cancer. The former can be developed in the environment of high volume duodenal content reflux, including bile acids and a higher acid production in H. pylori–negative patients. N-nitroso compounds, which are generated from the refluxate that includes a large volume of bile acids and are stabilized in the stomach (which has high levels of gastric acid, play a pivotal role in this carcinogenesis. The latter can be associated with the changing colonization of H. pylori from the distal to the proximal stomach with atrophic gastritis because a high concentration of soluble bile acids in an environment of low acid production is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori in the distal stomach with H. pylori infection. The manuscript introduces new insights in causative factors of adenocarcinoma of the cardia about the role of bile acids in gastro-esophageal refluxate based upon robust evidences supporting interactions among pH, H. pylori, and bile acids.

  4. Elevated levels of adaption in Helicobacter pylori genomes from Japan; a link to higher incidences of gastric cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Girón, Maria Juliana; Ospina, Oscar E; Massey, Steven Edward

    2015-03-18

    Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium that lives in the human stomach and is a major risk factor for gastric cancer and ulcers. H.pylori is host dependent and has been carried with human populations around the world after their departure from Africa. We wished to investigate how H.pylori has coevolved with its host during that time, focusing on strains from Japanese and European populations, given that gastric cancer incidence is high in Japanese populations, while low in European. A positive selection analysis of eight H.pylori genomes was conducted, using maximum likelihood based pairwise comparisons in order to maximize the number of strain-specific genes included in the study. Using the genic Ka/Ks ratio, comparisons of four Japanese H.pylori genomes suggests 25-34 genes under positive selection, while four European H.pylori genomes suggests 16-21 genes; few of the genes identified were in common between lineages. Of the identified genes which were annotated, 38% possessed homologs associated with pathogenicity and / or host adaptation, consistent with their involvement in a coevolutionary 'arms race' with the host. Given the efficacy of identifying host interaction factors de novo, in the absence of functionally annotated homologs our evolutionary approach may have value in identifying novel genes which H.pylori employs to interact with the human gut environment. In addition, the larger number of genes inferred as being under positive selection in Japanese strains compared to European implies a stronger overall adaptive pressure, potentially resulting from an elevated immune response which may be linked to increased inflammation, an initial stage in the development of gastric cancer.

  5. High Diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori Genotypes in Patients with and without Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vidal, Yolanda; Ponce-de-León, Sergio; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Barreto-Zúñiga, Rafael; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biopsy specimens were obtained from tumor centers and margins; among these samples, the presence of H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes was evaluated. Positive H. pylori was 38% and 26% in biopsies obtained from the gastric cancer and non-cancer groups, respectively (p = 0.008), and 36% in tumor sites. In cancer patients, we found a preferential distribution of H. pylori in the fundus and corpus, whereas, in the non-cancer group, the distribution was uniform (p = 0.003). A majority of the biopsies were simultaneously cagA gene-positive and -negative. The fundus and corpus demonstrated a higher positivity rate for the cagA gene in the non-cancer group (p = 0.036). A mixture of cagA gene sizes was also significantly more frequent in this group (p = 0.003). Ninety-two percent of all the subjects showed more than one vacA gene genotype; s1b and m1 vacA genotypes were predominantly found in the gastric cancer group. The highest vacA-genotype signal-sequence diversity was found in the corpus and 5 cm from tumor margins. Conclusion/Significance High H. pylori colonization diversity, along with the cagA gene, was found predominantly in the fundus and corpus of patients with gastric cancer. The genotype diversity observed across systematic whole-organ and tumor sampling was remarkable. We find that there is insufficient evidence to support the association of one isolate with a specific disease, due to the multistrain nature of H. pylori infection shown in this work. PMID:19050763

  6. High diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda López-Vidal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biopsy specimens were obtained from tumor centers and margins; among these samples, the presence of H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes was evaluated. Positive H. pylori was 38% and 26% in biopsies obtained from the gastric cancer and non-cancer groups, respectively (p = 0.008, and 36% in tumor sites. In cancer patients, we found a preferential distribution of H. pylori in the fundus and corpus, whereas, in the non-cancer group, the distribution was uniform (p = 0.003. A majority of the biopsies were simultaneously cagA gene-positive and -negative. The fundus and corpus demonstrated a higher positivity rate for the cagA gene in the non-cancer group (p = 0.036. A mixture of cagA gene sizes was also significantly more frequent in this group (p = 0.003. Ninety-two percent of all the subjects showed more than one vacA gene genotype; s1b and m1 vacA genotypes were predominantly found in the gastric cancer group. The highest vacA-genotype signal-sequence diversity was found in the corpus and 5 cm from tumor margins. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High H. pylori colonization diversity, along with the cagA gene, was found predominantly in the fundus and corpus of patients with gastric cancer. The genotype diversity observed across systematic whole-organ and tumor sampling was remarkable. We find that there is insufficient evidence to support the association of one isolate with a specific disease, due to the multistrain nature of H. pylori infection shown in this work.

  7. Detection and evaluation of antibodies against neutrophil-activating protein of Helicobacter pylori in patients with gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Long; Jun Luo; Yan Li; Fang-Yin Zeng; Ming Li

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To detect and evaluate the antibodies against Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) in patients with gastric cancer and other gastroduodenal diseases.METHODS: Recombinant HP-NAP was prepared from a prokaryotic expression system in Escherichia coli. Serum positivity and level of HP-NAP-specific antibodies in sera from 43 patients with gastric cancer, 28 with chronic gastritis, 28 with peptic ulcer, and 89 healthy controls were measured by rHP-NAP-based ELISA. rHP-NAP-stimulated production of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and growth-related oncogene (GROα) cytokines in the culture supernatant of SGC7901 gastric epithelial cells was also detected. RESULTS: The serum positivity and mean absorbance value of HP-NAP-specific antibodies in the gastric cancer group (97.7% and 1.01 ± 0.24) were significantly higher than those in the chronic gastritis group (85.7% and 0.89 ± 0.14, P < 0.005) and healthy control group (27.7% and 0.65 ± 0.18, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA for the detection of HP-NAP-specific antibodies were 95.5% and 91.5%, respectively. HP-NAP could slightly upregulate IL-8 production in gastric epithelial cell lines but had no effect on GROα production. CONCLUSION: Infection with virulent H pylori strains secreting HP-NAP is associated with severe gastroduodenal diseases, and HP-NAP may play a role in the development of gastric carcinoma. rHP-NAPbased ELISA can be used as a new method to detect H pylori infection. The direct effect of HP-NAP on gastric epithelial cells may be limited, but HP-NAP may contribute to inflammatory response or carcinogenesis by activating neutrophils.

  8. Interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms in chronic gastritis patients infected with Helicobacter pylori as risk factors of gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatyszyn, Andrzej; Wielgus, Karolina; Kaczmarek-Rys, Marta; Skrzypczak-Zielinska, Marzena; Szalata, Marlena; Mikolajczyk-Stecyna, Joanna; Stanczyk, Jerzy; Dziuba, Ireneusz; Mikstacki, Adam; Slomski, Ryszard

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicated association of the Helicobacter pylori infections with the occurrence of inflammatory conditions of the gastric mucosa and development of chronic gastritis and intestinal type of gastric cancer. IL1A and IL1B genes have been proposed as key factors in determining risk of gastritis and malignant transformation. The aim of this paper was to evaluate association of interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms with chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and intestinal type of gastric cancer in H. pylori-infected patients. Patients subjected to analysis represent group of 144 consecutive cases that suffered from dyspepsia with coexisting infection of H. pylori and chronic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia or gastric cancer. Molecular studies involved analysis of -889C>T polymorphism of IL1A gene and +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene. Statistical analysis of association of polymorphism -889C>T of gene IL1A with changes in gastric mucosa showed lack of significance, whereas +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene showed significant association. Frequency of allele T of +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene was higher in group of patients with chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia or intestinal type of gastric cancer (32.1 %) as compared with population group (23 %), χ(2) = 4.61 and p = 0.03. This corresponds to odds ratio: 1.58, 95 % CI: 1.04-2.4. Our results indicate that +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene increase susceptibility to inflammatory response of gastric mucosa H. pylori-infected patients and plays a significant role in the development of chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and the initiation of carcinogenesis.

  9. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in patients without gastric symptoms suffering from recurrent aphthous stomatitis: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latković Marina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Helicobacter (H. pylori is a widespread bacterium and its involvement in pathogenesis of gastric diseases is well-known. However, H. pylori role in etiology of other histologically similar conditions, especially recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is still controversial. Research regarding H. pylori and its association with RAS, as well as the treatment options were always conducted on patients with diagnosed gastric problems. The aim of this study was to determine whether H. pylori is present in the oral cavity of patients suffering from RAS but without any symptoms or medical history of gastric disease. Methods. A total of 15 patients with RAS participated in the study. None of the participants suffered from any gastrointestinal disorders. Two dental plaque samples from each participant were collected. The first was analyzed using rapid urease test and the second one was put in transport medium and sent for cultivation. The sensitivity of H. pylori to antibiotics was established using disk diffusion method of sensitivity testing for every patient individually and adequate therapy was prescribed. Results. Before the treatment the mean annual recurrence rate of RAS was 8.1 ± 2.1, with the average number of lesions being 3.9 ± 1.9. During the 12-month observation period after the eradication therapy, none of the patients reported recurrence of aphthous lesions. The treatment was successful in all cases. Conclusion. This study shows that RAS can be effectively treated by successful eradication of oral H. pylori, and that RAS could be possibly considered as an early warning sign of potential gastric infection by H. pilory.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backert Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA/B, SabA, AlpA/B, OipA and HopZ and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS. The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Backert, Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA\\/B, SabA, AlpA\\/B, OipA and HopZ) and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes) pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA\\/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  12. Increased Helicobacter pylori-associated Gastric Cancer Risk in the Andean Region of Colombia Is Mediated by Spermine Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; de Sablet, Thibaut; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Barry, Daniel P.; Verriere, Thomas G.; Sierra, J. Carolina; Hardbower, Dana M.; Delgado, Alberto G.; Schneider, Barbara G.; Israel, Dawn A.; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Nagy, Toni A.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Bravo, Luis E.; Peek, Richard M.; Fox, James G.; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.; Correa, Pelayo; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastric cancer, the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. More than half of the world’s population is infected, making universal eradication impractical. Clinical trials suggest that antibiotic treatment only reduces gastric cancer risk in patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG), and is ineffective once preneoplastic lesions of multifocal atrophic gastritis (MAG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) have occurred. Therefore, additional strategies for risk stratification and chemoprevention of gastric cancer are needed. We have implicated polyamines, generated by the rate limiting enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), in gastric carcinogenesis. During H. pylori infection, the enzyme spermine oxidase (SMOX) is induced, which generates hydrogen peroxide from the catabolism of the polyamine spermine. Herein, we assessed the role of SMOX in the increased gastric cancer risk in Colombia associated with the Andean mountain region when compared to the low risk region on the Pacific coast. When co-cultured with gastric epithelial cells, clinical strains of H. pylori from the high risk region induced more SMOX expression and oxidative DNA damage, and less apoptosis than low risk strains. These findings were not attributable to differences in the CagA oncoprotein. Gastric tissues from subjects from the high risk region exhibited greater levels of SMOX and oxidative DNA damage by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, and this occurred in NAG, MAG, and IM. In Mongolian gerbils, a prototype colonizing strain from the high risk region induced more SMOX, DNA damage, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma than a colonizing strain from the low risk region. Treatment of gerbils with either α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an inhibitor of ODC, or MDL 72527, an inhibitor of SMOX, reduced gastric dysplasia and carcinoma, as well as apoptosis-resistant cells with DNA damage. These data indicate that aberrant activation of polyamine-driven oxidative

  13. Microarray analysis of Long non-coding RNA expression profiles in human gastric cells and tissues with Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Wang, Qiang; Yao, Yizheng; Fang, Jian; Sun, Fengying; Ni, Ying; Shen, Yixin; Wang, Hua; Shao, Shihe

    2015-12-21

    Although Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is the dominant gastrointestinal pathogen, the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying H.pylori-related diseases have not been fully elucidated. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in eukaryotic cells, many of which play important roles in regulating biological processes and pathogenesis. However, the expression changes of lncRNAs in human infected by H.pylori have been rarely reported. This study aimed to identify the dysregulated lncRNAs in human gastric epithelial cells and tissues infected with H.pylori. The aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs and mRNAs in GES-1 cells with or without H.pylori infection were explored by microarray analysis. LncRNA-mRNA co-expression network was constructed based on Pearson correlation analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG Pathway analyses of aberrantly expressed mRNAs were performed to identify the related biological functions and pathologic pathways. The expression changes of target lncRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR to confirm the microarray data in both cells and clinical specimens. Three hundred three lncRNAs and 565 mRNAs were identified as aberrantly expressed transcripts (≥2 or ≤0.5-fold change, P microarray. These dysregulated lncRNAs might contribute to the pathological processes during H.pylori infection.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection and expressions of EGF, EGFR and c-erbB-2 proteins in gastric carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kemona

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The family of epidermal growth factor (EGF, EGFR, c-erbB-2 plays a pivotal role in gastric cancer progression, invasion and metastasizing. Helicobacter pylori infection is known to contribute significantly to the formation and progression of gastric cancer. However, the mechanisms responsible for this process have not been yet elucidated. We analysed the relationship between H. pylori infection and expression of proteins belonging to the family of epidermal growth factor (EGF, EGFR, c-erbB-2. Fifty-five patients with gastric cancer were analysed for Helicobacter pylori infection. The expressions of EGF, EGFR, c-erbB-2 proteins were determined using an immunohistochemical method. No statistically significant correlation was found between the degree of H. pylori infection and the expressions of EGF, EGFR and c-erbB-2 in gastric cancer. However, c-erbB-2 expression in the main mass of tumour correlated with tumour expression of EGF and EGFR and with c-erbB-2 expression in local lymph nodes. The expression of c-erbB-2 in lymph nodes was statistically significantly related to the expressions of EGF and EGFR both in the main mass of tumour and in lymph nodes. The expression of EGF was found to correlate with EGFR in the main mass of tumour and the expression of EGF in lymph nodes was related to lymph node EGFR level. Our study did not confirm the relationship between H. pylori infection and the expression of epidermal growth factor in gastric cancer.

  15. Follow up through Endoscopical – Histological Studies and Helicobacter Pylori Infections in Patients Suffering from Gastric Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endoscopic follow up of gastric ulcers until healing has a great important due to the possibility of a new proliferation. The commonest chronic infection worldwide is caused by Helicobacter pylori and it is associated to gastro duodenal diseases. Objective: To determine the endoscopic-biopsic follow up and to set the frequency of infection due to Helicobacter pylori in those patients who suffer from gastric ulcers. Methods: observational, descriptive and prospective study carried out at the University Hospital “Arnaldo Milián Castro”. It included 96 gastric ulcer sufferers diagnosed endoscopically and who fulfilled with the selection criteria. Endoscopy and biopsy of the gastric mucosa was done for the histological study of the gastric ulcers and for the diagnosis of infection due to Helicobacter pylori through hematoxiline-eosine and giemsa stains respectively. Results: 89 patients (92,7 % healed their ulcers in the first three months of follow up and 5 patients underwent a histological diagnosis of malignant ulcers (5,2 %. Surgery was done on the two patients whose ulcers did not heal. (2,1 %. 67,7 % had been infected with the bacteria. There was a greater frequency of patients infected with Helicobacter pylori, either with benign or malignant ulcus (93,8 % y 6,2 % respectively. Conclusions: the follow up of benign ulcers was good , almost all of them healed in a three-month follow up. 5 patients suffered from malignant ulcers, being 2 of them diagnosed in their second endoscopy. More than half of the patients were infected with Helicobacter pylori.

  16. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Helicobacter pylori Eradication for the Prevention of Gastric Neoplasia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;7:CD005583].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libãnio, Diogo; Azevedo, Luís Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma. Identification of individuals with this infection and its eradication may be considered as a primary prevention strategy to reduce the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma; however, the magnitude of benefit and the effectiveness of this strategy are still unclear. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials was conducted comparing the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma in infected individuals submitted to Helicobacter pylori eradication and individuals not submitted to this therapy. The results of the six included randomized clinical trials (all conducted in countries with high gastric cancer incidence) suggest that Helicobacter pylori eradication is associated with a relative risk reduction of 34% in gastric cancer incidence. However, generalization of the results to countries with lower gastric cancer incidence should be cautious and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in this context remains uncertain.

  17. Relationship between caga-positive Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of gastric cancer: a case control study in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmara Coelho Meine

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Although Helicobacter pylori has been classified as a class I carcinogen, the presence of infection is not a factor that alone is able to lead to gastric cancer, and one of the possible explanations for this is the existence of different strains of H. pylori with different degrees of virulence. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between cagA-positive H. pylori and gastric cancer, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the detection of this bacterial strain. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with gastric cancer were matched by sex and age (± 5 years with 58 patients without gastric cancer, submitted to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. All patients were evaluated for the status of infection by H. pylori (through urease test, histological analysis and PCR for the genes ureA and 16SrRNA and by cagA-positive strain (through PCR for cagA gene. RESULTS: Evaluating the presence of infection by cagA-positive H. pylori, it was verified that the rate of infection was significantly higher in the group with gastric cancer when compared with the matched controls, occurring in 62.1% and 29.3%, respectively (OR = 3.95; CI 95% 1.543-10.096. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between cagA-positive H. pylori strain and risk of gastric cancer.

  18. Preliminary Study Suggests Low Incidence of Gastric Carcinoma in Kelantan Relates To Low Rate of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurjeet; Raj, S. Mahendra

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric carcinoma is generally more common in the antrum/body and is of the intestinal type. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of gastric carcinoma in an area known to have a low prevalence of H. pylori. Pathology records of gastric carcinoma diagnosed at Hospital University Sains Malaysia between 1995 and 1999 were retrieved and studied. There were a total of 23 cases. The median age was 60 years. Eighteen patients were Malay and 5 were Chinese. The most common location of the tumour was the cardia/gastrooesophageal junction (61%, 14/23 patients). The majority was of the intestinal type (69.6%, 16/23). The frequency of gastric carcinoma appears to be exceptionally low in the area of study. The Chinese population was over-represented. The higher frequency of tumour in the cardia/gastro-oesophageal junction as compared to the antrum and body is in sharp contrast to most other studies. This reaffirms the notion that Helicobacter pylori infection is a causative agent for non-cardia gastric carcinomas. PMID:22973153

  19. Assessment of p21, p53 expression, and Ki-67 proliferative activities in the gastric mucosa of children with Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saf, Coskun; Gulcan, Enver Mahir; Ozkan, Ferda; Cobanoglu Saf, Seyhan Perihan; Vitrinel, Ayca

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori that is generally acquired in childhood and infects the gastric mucosa is considered to be responsible for many pathobiological changes that are linked to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. Although the majority of studies on the subject have been carried out in adults, there are a limited number of studies on children that reflect the early period of infection and may be of greater significance. We aimed to determine the role of H. pylori infection and/or gastritis in several histopathological changes, p53, p21, and cell proliferation-associated Ki-67 antigen expression in the gastric mucosa. We studied 60 patients with a mean age of 7.5 ± 4.5 years at referral. On the basis of endoscopic appearance and the evaluation of the gastric antral specimens, the patients were divided into three groups: patients without gastritis, patients with H. pylori-positive gastritis, and patients with H. pylori-negative gastritis. To determine the expression of p53, Ki-67, and p21 in gastric biopsy specimens, immunohistochemical stains were performed. The incidence of neutrophil activity, which was one of our histopathologic parameters, was significantly higher in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the other two groups. The presence of lymphoid aggregate was more frequent in H. pylori ± gastritis groups than the nongastritis group. p53 expression was found to be significantly higher in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the nongastritis group. Ki-67 and p21 expressions were significantly more frequent in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the other two groups. When we evaluated the density of H. pylori, as the density of bacteria increases, we found that the expressions of p53, p21, and Ki-67 increased significantly. Expression of the studied precancerous markers in significant amounts indicates the importance of childhood H. pylori infection in the constitution of gastric cancer in adulthood.

  20. Topography Of Helicobacter Pylori Gastritis In Different Biopsy Sites Of Gastric Mucosa Of Residents Of A High Risk Area For Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaeili J

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many recent studies have examined potential risk factors of H. pylori gastritis to improve our understanding of the early events in gastric carcinogenesis. We evaluated the extent and topography of chronic gastritis in a high risk area for gastric cardia cancer and investigated the critical role of H.pylori, risk index and age in its pathogenesis. Materials and Methods: During a national population-based endoscopic survey, we enrolled 508 participants aged ≥40 from urban and rural areas of Meshkin-Shahr, Ardebil province of Iran. After informed consent, all underwent complete upper GI endoscopy. At least one mucosal biopsy was obtained from 6 standard sites: three of antrum (sites 1, 2, 3, two of corpus (sites 4, 5 and one of cardia (site 6. Severity, activity and combined inflammatory scores (CIS of chronic gastritis and H.pylori infection status were assessed according to modified Sydney Classification of Gastritis. Statistical effects of H.pylori, age, gender, and residency place on mean gastritis severity, activity and CIS were separately calculated in each site. Results: Total of 508 participants with mean age (±SD of 54.6(±SD were enrolled. 234(46.1% were male and 274(53.9% were female. Histologically 80.5% of cases were H.pylori positive. Mean activity scores of all sites except for site 5 are significantly (P<0.01 higher in H.pylori + cases. Mean CIS of all sites was significantly (P<0.01 higher in H.pylori + patients. In 44% of infected subjects, CIS of the corpus was at least equally as severe as that in antrum. Also in 54% of H.pylori + cases, cardia’s CIS was ≥ than antral CIS. Age had a significant (P<0.01 negative relationship with CIS of antral site, but this relationship in cardia was positive and more potent. Conclusion: H.pylori is the main cause of gastritis activity in all sites of stomach; this causality is more potent in antrum and cardia. Continuous cardia inflammation in advanced age may contribute to

  1. Is the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the Dental Plaque of Patients with Chronic Periodontitis a Risk Factor for Gastric Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al Asqah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is considered to be a pathogen responsible for gastritis and peptic ulcers, and a risk factor for gastric cancer. A periodontal pocket in the teeth of individuals with chronic periodontitis may function as a reservoir for H pylori.

  2. Regulatory B Cell Function Is Suppressed by Smoking and Obesity in H. pylori-Infected Subjects and Is Correlated with Elevated Risk of Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanggang; Wulan, Hasi; Song, Zongchang; Paik, Paul A; Tsao, Ming L; Goodman, Gary M; MacEachern, Paul T; Downey, Robert S; Jankowska, Anna J; Rabinowitz, Yaron M; Learch, Thomas B; Song, David Z; Yuan, Ji J; Zheng, Shihang; Zheng, Zhendong

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in more than half of the world's population and is the main cause for gastric cancer. A series of lifestyle and nutritional factors, such as tobacco smoking and obesity, have been found to elevate the risk for cancer development. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological aspects during H. pylori infection and gastric cancer development. We found that B cells from H. pylori-infected patients presented altered composition and function compared to uninfected patients. IL-10-expressing CD24+CD38+ B cells were upregulated in H. pylori-infected patients, contained potent regulatory activity in inhibiting T cell pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and responded directly to H. pylori antigen stimulation. Interestingly, in H. pylori-infected smoking subjects and obese subjects, the number of IL-10+ B cells and CD24+CD38+ B cells were reduced compared to H. pylori-infected asymptomatic subjects. Regulatory functions mediated by CD24+CD38+ B cells were also impaired. In addition, gastric cancer positive patients had reduced IL-10-producing B cell frequencies after H. pylori-stimulation. Altogether, these data suggest that in H. pylori-infection, CD24+CD38+ B cell is upregulated and plays a role in suppressing pro-inflammatory responses, possibly through IL-10 production, a feature that was not observed in smoking and obese patients.

  3. Regulatory B Cell Function Is Suppressed by Smoking and Obesity in H. pylori-Infected Subjects and Is Correlated with Elevated Risk of Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanggang Li

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in more than half of the world's population and is the main cause for gastric cancer. A series of lifestyle and nutritional factors, such as tobacco smoking and obesity, have been found to elevate the risk for cancer development. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological aspects during H. pylori infection and gastric cancer development. We found that B cells from H. pylori-infected patients presented altered composition and function compared to uninfected patients. IL-10-expressing CD24+CD38+ B cells were upregulated in H. pylori-infected patients, contained potent regulatory activity in inhibiting T cell pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and responded directly to H. pylori antigen stimulation. Interestingly, in H. pylori-infected smoking subjects and obese subjects, the number of IL-10+ B cells and CD24+CD38+ B cells were reduced compared to H. pylori-infected asymptomatic subjects. Regulatory functions mediated by CD24+CD38+ B cells were also impaired. In addition, gastric cancer positive patients had reduced IL-10-producing B cell frequencies after H. pylori-stimulation. Altogether, these data suggest that in H. pylori-infection, CD24+CD38+ B cell is upregulated and plays a role in suppressing pro-inflammatory responses, possibly through IL-10 production, a feature that was not observed in smoking and obese patients.

  4. Association of NOD1 and NOD2 genes polymorphisms with Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer in a Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang; Chun-Jie Liu; Li Zhang; Jian-Ming Jiang; Dan Ma; Hao-Xia Tao; Sheng-Ling Yuan; Yan-Chun Wang; Ling-Chun Wang; Hao Liang

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between the tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (TagSNPs) of NOD1 and NOD2 and the risk of developing gastric cancer.METHODS:We conducted a hospital-based case-control study including 296 incident gastric cancer patients and 160 gastritis controls.Eight TagSNPs in the NOD1 and NOD2 genes were selected from the Hapmap database using the haploview software and genotyped by the Sequenom MassArray system.The serum levels of anti-Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) IgG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to indicate H.pylori infection.The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by unconditional logistic regression,including sex and age as confounding factors.RESULTS:The NOD1 rs2907749 GG genotype showed a decreased risk for gastric cancer (OR 0.50,95% CI:0.26-0.95,P =0.04) while the rs7789045 TT genotype showed an increased risk (OR 2.14,95% CI:1.20-3.82,P =0.01).An elevated susceptibility to gastric cancer was observed in the subjects with H.pylori infection and the NaOD1 rs7789045 TT genotype (OR 2.05,95% CI:1.07-3.94,P =0.03) or the NOD2 rs7205423 GC genotype (OR 2.52,95% CI:1.05-6.04,P =0.04).Haplotype analysis suggested that the distribution of AGT (rs2907749,rs2075820 and rs7789045) in NOD1 between the cases and control groups was significantly different (P corrected:0.04),and the diplotype AGT/AGT was associated with an elevated gastric cancer risk (OR 1.98,95%CI:1.04-3.79,P =0.04).The association of the NOD1 rs7789045 Tr genotype and the diplotype AGT/AGT was significant with H.pylori-related diffuse-type gastric cancer (OR 3.00,95% CI:1.38-6.53,P =0.01; OR 4.02,95% CI:1.61-10.05,P < 0.01,respectively).CONCLUSION:Genetic polymorphisms in NOD1 and NOD2 may interact with H.pylori infection and may play important roles in promoting the development of gastric cancer in the Chinese population.

  5. Indistinguishable cellular changes in gastric mucosa between helicobacter pylori infected asymptomatic tribal and duodenal ulcer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dhira Rani Saha; Simanti Datta; Santanu Chattopadhyay; Rajashree Patra; Ronita De; Krishnan Rajendran; Abhijit Chowdhury; Thandavaryan Ramamurthy; Asish Kumar Mukhopadhyay

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the changing pattern of different histological parameters occurring in the stomach tissue of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infected tribal populations and duodenal ulcer patients among ethnic Bengalis and correlation of the genotypes of H pylori with different histological parameters.METHODS: One hundred and twelve adult individuals were enrolled into this study between 2002 and 2004. Among them, 72 had clinical features of duodenal ulcer (DU) from ethnic Bengali population and 40 were asymptomatic ethnic tribals. Endoscopic gastric biopsy samples were processed for histology, genotyping and rapid urease test. Histologically,haematoxylin and eosin staining was applied to assess the pathomorphological changes and a modified Giemsa staining was used for better detection of Hpylori. For intestinal metaplasia, special stainings, i.e.AIcian blue periodic acid-Schiff and high iron diamineAIcian blue staining, were performed. PCR was performed on bacterial DNA to characterize the presence or absence of virulence-associated genes, like cagA, and distribution of different alleles of vacA and iceA .RESULTS: Intraglandular neutrophil infiltration, a hallmark of activity of gastritis, was present in 34 (94%) of tribals (TRs) and 42 (84%) of DU individuals infected with Hpylori. Lymphoid follicles and aggregates, which are important landmarks in H pylori infection, were positive amongst 15 (41%) of TRs and 20 (40%) of DU subjects. Atrophic changes were observed in 60% and 27.7%, respectively, among DU cases and tribals (P > 0.003). Metaplastic changes were detected in low numbers in both groups. Moderate to severe density distribution of Hpylori in the gastric mucosa was 63% among TRs, whereas it was 62% in DU subjects. There were no significant differences in the distribution of virulence-associated genes like cagA, vacA and iceA of Hpylori strains carried by these two populations.CONCLUSION: Our study showed almost similar distribution of inflammatory

  6. Clinical significance of infection with cag A and vac A positive helicobacter pylori strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical relevance of infection with different Helicobacter pylori strains was reviewed in this paper. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection most probably include acne rosacea and chronic urticaria, while the importance of H. pylori infection for pathogenesis of growth retardation in children, iron deficiency anemia, coronary heart disease, stroke and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura remains vague. The expression of two H. pylori proteins, cytotoxin associated protein (cag A and vacuolization cytotoxin (vac A is considered to be related with pathogenicity of the bacterium. It is clear that presence of cag A+ strains is important for development of peptic ulcer; nevertheless, it is also protective against esophageal reflux disease. On the other hand, cag A+ strains are common in gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma patients, but it seems that certain subtypes of vac A cytotoxin are more important risk factors. Infection with cag A+ strains is more common in patients with acne rosacea, stroke and coronary heart disease.

  7. Concentrations of gastric mucosal cytokines in children with food allergy and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    El(z)bieta Maciorkowska; Anatol Panasiuk; Maciej Kaczmarski

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To measure the concentrations of chosen cytokines in the antrum mucosa depending on the kind of harmful pathogenic factors and to compare the concentrations with the values of controls without allergy and coexisting Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection.METHODS: The patients (97 children) were divided into three groups according to the data obtained from the case history, to the main cause of the disease and to the dominant clinical symptoms. Group Ⅰ: children with food allergy (Fa); group Ⅱ: children infected with H pylori; group Ⅲ (control group): children with functional disorders of the alimentary tract (without Fa and Hp infection). H pylori infection was determined by the presence of anti-Hp antibodies in serum (ELISA method) and urease test performed during endoscopic examination. Cytokine concentration in homogenates of gastric mucosa was detected by ELISA method.RESULTS: The IL-2 concentration in gastric mucosa bioptates was the highest in children with Hp infection (116.5±179.5 pg/mg of the protein) and Fa and Hp infection (98.1±101.0 pg/mg), while decreased in children with Fa (44.8±50.3 pg/mg) and controls (45.7±23.5 pg/mg). The lowest mean concentration of IFN-y was observed in children with Hp infection (18.9±16.4 pg/mg), with Fa and Hp infection (25.5±27.7 pg/mg), with Fa (40.6±39.7 pg/mg)and controls (49.9±33.4 pg/mg). The highest IL-4concentrations were observed in children with Hp infection (35.3±52.8 pg/mg) and in children with Fa and Hp infection (37.2±51.7 pg/mg), while lower IL-4concentration (23.6±35.8 pg/mg) was found in children with Fa compared to the controls (22.7±13.8 pg/mg).The analysis of IL-4 concentrations in children with Hp infection regarding the intensity of gastritis showed the highest value (62.2±61.2 pg/mg) in mild and moderate gastritis. The concentrations of IL-5 in the gastric mucosa of children with or without Fa did not differ significantly and were comparable to the control group. The highest

  8. Proinflammatory cytokines and thrombomodulin in patients with peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, infected with Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Haghazali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Helicobacter pylori infect more than half of the global population. It is suggested to be related with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (PUD, and gastric cancer. Aims: The aim of this present study was to evaluate proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin 1, 6, 8, 10, and thrombomodulin in H. pylori-infected patients with PUD and gastric cancer. Patients: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Taleghani Hospital on 111 patients with H. pylori infection. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided into three groups of PUD, cancer, and control (normal on endoscopy, according to the results of endoscopy. The serum levels of interleukins 1, 6, 8, and 10 and thrombomodulin was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA technique. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by histological examination of the endoscopic biopsy. Results: One hundred eleven patients were included in the study; 30 as PUD group, 30 as gastric cancer group, and 51 as controls. There was no significant difference between the means of IL-1 and IL-10 levels among the three groups (P = 0.744 and 0.383, respectively. IL-6, IL-8, and thrombomodulin levels were found to be statically different among the three groups (P < 0.05. The level of IL-6, IL-8, and thrombomodulin in cancer group was significantly higher than PUD and control groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: There is a significant association between H. pylori infection and serum IL-6, IL-8, and thrombomodulin but such relation is not present between H. pylori and IL-1 and IL-10. Immunity response (IL-6, IL-8 and thrombomodulin is more severe in cancer patient than PUD.

  9. INDUCTION OF GASTRIC INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA OF GLANDULAR STOMACH OF MONGOLIAN GERBILS BY ELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Pin; GU Lian-kun; ZHOU Jing; WANG Ru-ming; ZHAO Zi-hou; DENG Da-jun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To setup an animal model of gastric carcinogenesis by Helicobacter pylori (Hp) for basic, prevention and therapeutic research of Hp-related diseases. Methods: 22 young male Mongolian gerbils were administrated with suspension of Hp strain TN2 by intragastric gavage for 5 consecutive times (4×108 CFU/time, 1 time/4 days). 10 male gerbils were used as negative control. Two infected gerbils were killed at 10, 20, and 30 weeks, respectively, after inoculation to monitor the development of gastric lesions. Other animals were killed at 40 experimental weeks.Pathological changes of glandular stomach were examined histologically. Results: Gastric intraepithelial neoplasias (GIN) and low-grade dysplasias were observed only in the pyloric antrum of Hp-treated gerbils (3 and 2 ones,respectively), but not in control group (5/13 vs. 0/10, P<0.04). High incidence of chronic active gastritis and chronic atrophic gastritis were observed in Hp-treated animals (10/13, 76.9%). Low incidence of chronic atrophic gastritis was also detected in negative control gerbils (3/10, 30%; P<0.04). Conclusion: Hp inoculation could induce chronic inflammation and malignant lesions of the glandular stomach of Mongolian gerbils conveniently.

  10. Detection of apoptotic cells and immunohistochemical study of bcl-2 and p53 gene protein in primary gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To identify the apoptotic cells in gastric MALT lymphoma and its relationship between bcl-2 and p53 gene expression. Methods: TdT-mediated dUTP biotin Nick End labeling (TUNEL) and immuno-histochemistry ABC method were used to display apoptotic cells and the gene protein expression of bcl-2 and p53 independently. Results: Apoptotic indices (AI) in high-grade MALT lymphomas were significantly higher than in mixed-grade group and low-grade group (P<0.05). Bcl-2 was expressed in 83% of low-grade tumors, 61.6% of the median-grade tumors and 43.7% of high-grade tumors. An inverse correlation was observed between the expression of bcl-2 and apoptotic indices. Only 27 cases were p53 positive. The frequency of p53 positivity was significantly increased as the histologic grade advanced (P<0.05). There was also an inverse correlation between the expression of bcl-2 and p53. Conclusion: Apoptosis may be important in tumors development and transmission. P53 and bcl-2 were important regulatory genes of apoptosis and may be associated with transformation from low-grade to high-grade lymphomas.

  11. [Helicobacter pylori infection in the gastric mucosa of patients with HIV/AIDS in different clinical stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong-Bin; Hu, Zhong-Wei; Guo, Jia-Wei

    2009-07-01

    To analyze Helicobacter pylori infection in the gastric mucosa of patients with HIV/AIDS in different clinical stages. This study involved 170 patients with HIV/AIDS and 34 HIV-negative patients. All the patients underwent upper endoscopy and antral gastric biopsy to determine the status of Helicobacter pylori infection using aniline red staining and rapid urease test. The patients with HIV/AIDS were stratified based on CD4(+)T lymphocyte counts and clinical setting into asymptomatic HIV infection (A1, A2) group, symptomatic HIV infection (B1, B2) group and AIDS (A3, B3, C1-3) group. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in HIV/AIDS patients was 16.5% (28/170), and in the 3 groups classified, the infection rates were 23.4% (11/47), 14.0% (8/57), and 13.6% (9/66), respectively; the infection rate was 47.1% (16/34) in the control group. Helicobacter pylori infection rate in the gastric mucosa of the patients with HIV/AIDS in different clinical stages was significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.05); the infection rates in symptomatic HIV-infected (B1, B2) group and AIDS (A3, B3, C1-3) group were significantly lower than that in asymptomatic HIV-infected (A1, A2) group (P<0.05). The low Helicobacter pylori infection rate in HIV/AIDS patients may result from severe immunodeficiency in the gastric mucosa.

  12. Novel effects of Helicobacter pylori CagA on key genes of gastric cancer signal transduction: a comparative transfection study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Farzam; Peerayeh, Shahin N; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Maghsoudi, Nader; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Siadat, Seyed D; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is now recognized as a worldwide problem. Helicobacter pylori CagA is the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified in relation to human cancer. Helicobacter pylori CagA is noted for structural diversity in its C-terminal region (contains EPIYA motifs), with which CagA interacts with numerous host cell proteins. Deregulation of host signaling by translocated bacterial proteins provides a new aspect of microbial-host cell interaction. The aim of this study is to compare the cellular effects of two different CagA EPIYA motifs on identified signaling pathways involve in gastric carcinogenesis. To investigate the effects of CagA protein carboxyl region variations on the transcription of genes involved in gastric epithelial carcinogenesis pathways, the eukaryotic vector carrying the cagA gene (ABC and ABCCC types) was transfected into gastric cancer cell line. The 42 identified key genes of signal transduction involved in gastric cancer were analyzed at the transcription level by real-time PCR. The results of real-time PCR provide us important clue that the ABCCC oncoprotein variant can change the fate of the cell completely different from ABC type. In fact, these result proposed that the ABCCC type can induce the intestinal metaplasia, IL-8, perturbation of Crk adaptor proteins, anti-apoptotic effect and carcinogenic effect more significantly than ABC type. These data support our hypothesis of a complex interaction of host cell and these two different H. pylori effector variants that determines host cellular fate.

  13. Association of Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer in Saudi Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Taisir; Ghonaim, Mabrouk M; Yousef, Amany R; Khalifa, Amany; Al Qurashi, Hesham; Shaqhan, Mohammad; Samaha, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship between occurrence of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer, and the presence of H. pylori cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG, and to estimate the value of these antibodies in detecting infection by cagA gene-positive H. pylori strains in Saudi patients. The study included 180 patients who were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in Taif province and Western region of Saudi Arabia (60 gastric cancer, 60 peptic ulcer, and 60 with non-ulcer dyspepsia). Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained and tested for H. pylori infection by rapid urease test and culture. PCR was performed on the isolated strains and biopsy specimens for detection of the cagA gene. Blood samples were collected and tested for CagA IgG by ELISA. H. pylori infection was detected among 72.8% of patients. The cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG were found in 63.4% and 61.8% of H. pylori-infected patients, respectively. They were significantly (p ulcer compared with those with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Detection of the CagA IgG was 91.6% sensitive, 89.6% specific, and 90.8% accurate compared with detection of the cagA gene. Its positive and negative predictive values were 93.8% and 86%, respectively. The study showed a significant association between the presence of the cagA gene and gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease, and between anti-CagA IgG and the cagA gene in Saudi patients. However, a further larger study is required to confirm this finding.

  14. Helicobacter pylori promotes invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer cells through activation of AP-1 and up-regulation of CACUL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ying; Ma, Li-qing; Bai, Pei-song; Da, Rong; Sun, Hong; Qi, Xiao-gai; Ma, Jie-qun; Zhao, Ru-ming; Chen, Nan-zheng; Nan, Ke-jun

    2013-11-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is important in the development and progression of gastric cancer. However, the mechanisms that regulate this activation in gastric tumors remain elusive. CACUL1 has been cloned and identified as a novel gene that is expressed in many types of cancer and is involved in cell cycle regulation and tumor growth. The current study aimed to examine the expression of CACUL1 in gastric cancer samples and analyze its correlation with H. pylori infection. We found that CACUL1 was highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues and negatively correlated with gastric cancer differentiation and TNM stage. In addition, CACUL1 expression was high in H. pylori-infected tissues compared with H. pylori non-infected tissue. We found that H. pylori could up-regulate CACUL1 expression through activating protein 1. The up-regulation of CACUL1 expression could promote matrix metalloproteinase 9 and Slug expression to increase invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. These results suggested that H. pylori-triggered CACUL1 production occurred in an activating protein 1-dependent manner and regulated matrix metalloproteinase 9 and Slug expression to affect the invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. Therefore, CACUL1 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of aggressive gastric cancer.

  15. Gene expression profiling in gastric mucosa from Helicobacter pylori-infected and uninfected patients undergoing chronic superficial gastritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Min Yang

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection reprograms host gene expression and influences various cellular processes, which have been investigated by cDNA microarray using in vitro culture cells and in vivo gastric biopsies from patients of the Chronic Abdominal Complaint. To further explore the effects of H. pylori infection on host gene expression, we have collected the gastric antral mucosa samples from 6 untreated patients with gastroscopic and pathologic confirmation of chronic superficial gastritis. Among them three patients were infected by H. pylori and the other three patients were not. These samples were analyzed by a microarray chip which contains 14,112 cloned cDNAs, and microarray data were analyzed via BRB ArrayTools software and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA website. The results showed 34 genes of 38 differentially expressed genes regulated by H. pylori infection had been annotated. The annotated genes were involved in protein metabolism, inflammatory and immunological reaction, signal transduction, gene transcription, trace element metabolism, and so on. The 82% of these genes (28/34 were categorized in three molecular interaction networks involved in gene expression, cancer progress, antigen presentation and inflammatory response. The expression data of the array hybridization was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR assays. Taken together, these data indicated that H. pylori infection could alter cellular gene expression processes, escape host defense mechanism, increase inflammatory and immune responses, activate NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, disturb metal ion homeostasis, and induce carcinogenesis. All of these might help to explain H. pylori pathogenic mechanism and the gastroduodenal pathogenesis induced by H. pylori infection.

  16. Mucosal patterns of Helicobacter pylori-related gastritis without atrophy in the gastric corpus using standard endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shwu-Tzy; Wu; Chien-Hua; Chen; Yeh-Huang; Hung; Tsung-Hsun; Yang; Vun-Siew; Pang; Yung-Hsiang; Yeh

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To identify the mucosal patterns of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori )-related gastritis in the gastric corpus using standard endoscopy and to evaluate their reproducibility.METHODS:A total of 112 consecutive patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.The endoscopists classified the endoscopic findings into 4 patterns.In the second part of the study,90 images were shown to 3 endoscopists in order to evaluate the inter-observer and intra-observer variability in image assessment.RESULTS:The mucosal p...

  17. Towards Fluorescence In Vivo Hybridization (FIVH) Detection of H. pylori in Gastric Mucosa Using Advanced LNA Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Leite, Marina; Guimarães, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    acid (LNA)/ 2' O-methyl RNA (2'OMe) probe using standard phosphoramidite chemistry and FISH hybridization was then successfully performed both on adhered and suspended bacteria at 37°C. In this work we simplified, shortened and adapted FISH to work at gastric pH values, meaning that the hybridization......In recent years, there have been several attempts to improve the diagnosis of infection caused by Helicobacter pylori. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a commonly used technique to detect H. pylori infection but it requires biopsies from the stomach. Thus, the development of an in vivo...

  18. Detection of Helicobacter pylori carriers by discriminant analysis of urea and pH levels in gastric juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameglio, F; Abbolito, M R; Giannarelli, D; Citarda, F; Grassi, A; Gandolfo, G M; Casale, V

    1991-08-01

    An alternative approach to the problems inherent in current methods for detecting Helicobacter pylori carriers--that of being generally time-consuming, expensive, and not sufficiently sensitive--was devised by using the urea concentration and pH levels of gastric juices. A linear discriminant analysis of these variables, measured in 54 patients submitted to digestive endoscopy for gastritis, provided a mathematical formula for assigning the subjects (previously classified by other standard methods) to groups of either positive or negative H pylori carriers. The results obtained showed a correct classification in 52 out of 54 cases with only one false negative and one false positive case.

  19. Virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori vacA increase markedly gastric mucosal TGF-β1 mRNA expression in gastritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Sanei, Mohammad Hosein; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Taghikhani, Afshin; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Bagheri, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the main cause of gastric inflammation. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) suppress the activation and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells and mediate immunologic tolerance. TGF-β1 was shown to be secreted in a subset of Treg cells known as 'Th3 cells'. These cells have not been sufficiently studied in context to H. pylori-induced inflammation in human gastric mucosa. In this study we therefore, aimed to investigate the expression of TGF-β1 in the context of H. pylori colonization in chronic gastritis, to examine the relationship between it and histopathologic findings and to compare it with virulence factors. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 48 H. pylori-infected patients and 38 H. pylori-negative patients with gastritis. Mucosal TGF-β1 mRNA expression in H. pylori-infected and uninfected gastric biopsies was determined by real-time PCR. Presence of vacA, cagA, iceA, babA2 and oipA virulence factors was evaluated using PCR. TGF-β1 mRNA expression was significantly increased in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients. There was association between virulence factors and TGF-β1 mRNA expression. TGF-β1 mRNA expression in mucosa was significantly higher in patients with vacA s1 and s1m1. TGF-β1 may play an important role in the inflammatory response and promote the chronic and persistent inflammatory changes in the gastric. This may ultimately influence the outcome of H. pylori-associated diseases that arise within the context of gastritis and vacA may suffice to induce expression of TGF-β1 mRNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Differences in interleukin 8 expression in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric mucosa tissues from patients in Bhutan and the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Iwatani, Shun; Cruz, Modesto; Jiménez Abreu, José A; Tronilo, Lourdes; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Disla, Mildre; Terao, Hideo; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Tshering, Lotay; Mitsui, Takahiro; Shiota, Seiji; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of Helicobacter pylori infection vary geographically. H pylori strains, disease presentation, and environments differ markedly in Bhutan and Dominican Republic. The aims were to compare the strains, histology, and expression of interleukin (IL) 8 and IL-10 from gastric mucosa from the 2 countries. H pylori status was assessed by the combination of rapid urease test, culture, and histology. Histology was evaluated using the updated Sydney System, and cytokines in gastric biopsies were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were 138 subjects from Bhutan and 155 from Dominican Republic. The prevalence of H pylori infection was 65% and 59%, respectively. The genotype of cagA was predominantly East Asian type in Bhutan versus Western type in Dominican Republic. Gastritis severity was significantly higher in H pylori-infected subjects from Bhutan than those from Dominican Republic. IL-8 expression by H pylori infection was 5.5-fold increased in Bhutan versus 3-fold in Dominican Republic (P < .001); IL-10 expression was similar. IL-8 expression levels among H pylori-infected cases tended to be positively correlated with polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte infiltration scores in both countries. IL-8 expression among those with grade 2 and 3 polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte infiltration was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Dominican Republic. The difference in IL-8 expression in the 2 countries is reflected in the different disease pattern between them. Whether the dominant factor is differences in H pylori virulence, in host-H pylori-environmental interactions, genetic factors or all remains unclear. However, severity of inflammation appears to be a critical factor in disease pathogenesis. We compared IL-8 messenger RNA levels between the high gastric cancer risk country, Bhutan (mainly East Asian-type H pylori), and the lower gastric cancer risk country, Dominican Republic (mainly Western-type H pylori).

  1. Successful treatment of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in a patient with gastric and rectal lesions with metachronous and ectopic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Umezu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old female, who had an abnormal stomach x-ray finding, was admitted to the hospital for further examination and therapy. Upper GI endoscopy showed reddish and swollen folds on the greater curvature of the gastric body and a biopsy was of this lesion revealed malignant lymphoma (small cell type or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma suspected. The patient was infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, however, in response to the patient’s wishes, a total gastrectomy, omentectomy and splenectomy were performed and the histological diagnosis was gastric MALT lymphoma. Two courses of CHOP therapy (cyclophosphamide (CPM 750 mg/m2/day, day 1, adriamycin (ADM 50 mg/m2/day, day 1, vincristine sulfate (VCR 1.4 mg/m2/day, day 1, prednisolone 100 mg/body, day 1-5 were administered as adjuvant chemotherapy. A colonoscopic examination performed about 4.5 yr after the operation revealed rectal submucosal tumors and the biopsied specimens were diagnosed as malignant lymphoma. A transanal focal resection was performed and the histological diagnosis was metachronous and ectopic development of MALT lymphoma. The histological finding was similar to the gastric lesion. About 4 and 7 yr after the first development of rectal MALT lymphoma, MALT lymphomas developed repeatedly in the rectal lesion, however, these were resected repeatedly and no developmenthas occurred during the past two years. This report presents a very rare case of metachronous and ectopic MALT lymphoma de

  2. Heat Shock Protein: Hard Worker or Bad Offender for Gastric Diseases

    <