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Sample records for pwb surface finishes

  1. NCMS PWB Surface Finishes Team project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokas, J.; DeSantis, C. [United Technologies Corp., Farmington, CT (United States). Hamilton Standard Div.; Wenger, G. [AT and T, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The NCMS PWB Surface Finishes Consortium is just about at the end of the five year program. Dozens of projects related to surface finishes and PWB solder-ability were performed by the team throughout the program, and many of them are listed in this paper. They are listed with a cross reference to where and when a technical paper was presented describing the results of the research. However, due to time and space constraints, this paper can summarize the details of only three of the major research projects accomplished by the team. The first project described is an ``Evaluation of PWB Surface Finishes.`` It describes the solderability, reliability, and wire bondability of numerous surface finishes. The second project outlined is an ``Evaluation of PWB Solderability Test Methods.`` The third project outlined is the ``Development and Evaluation of Organic Solderability Preservatives.``

  2. Solder flow over fine line PWB surface finishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    The rapid advancement of interconnect technology has stimulated the development of alternative printed wiring board (PWB) surface finishes to enhance the solderability of standard copper and solder-coated surfaces. These new finishes are based on either metallic or organic chemistries. As part of an ongoing solderability study, Sandia National Laboratories has investigated the solder flow behavior of two azole-based organic solderability preservations, immersion Au, immersion Ag, electroless Pd, and electroless Pd/Ni on fine line copper features. The coated substrates were solder tested in the as-fabricated and environmentally-stressed conditions. Samples were processed through an inerted reflow machine. The azole-based coatings generally provided the most effective protection after aging. Thin Pd over Cu yielded the best wetting results of the metallic coatings, with complete dissolution of the Pd overcoat and wetting of the underlying Cu by the flowing solder. Limited wetting was measured on the thicker Pd and Pd over Ni finishes, which were not completely dissolved by the molten solder. The immersion Au and Ag finishes yielded the lowest wetted lengths, respectively. These general differences in solderability were directly attributed to the type of surface finish which the solder came in contact with. The effects of circuit geometry, surface finish, stressing, and solder processing conditions are discussed.

  3. New trends for PWB surface finishes in mobile phone applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Würtz; Ambat, Rajan; Rasmussen, Anette Alsted

    2005-01-01

    pads in terminals from Nokia with positive impact on solder joint reliability. Theoretical electrochemical studies, experimental work and full scale high volume production has now demonstrated that Carbon surface finish for Key- and spring contact-pads, combined with the right concept design will make...... use of Imm. Ni/Au unnecessary in the near future. The end result is higher reliability with less expensive and simpler processes. This paper will discuss the various considerations for choice of surface finish and results from the extensive feasibility studies performed by Nokia Mobile Phones...

  4. Capillary flow of solder on chemically roughened PWB surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Stevenson, J.O.; Yost, F.G.

    1996-02-01

    The Center for Solder Science and Technology at Sandia National Laboratories has developed a solderability test for evaluating fundamental solder flow over PWB (printed wiring boards) surface finishes. The work supports a cooperative research and development agreement between Sandia, the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), and several industrial partners. An important facet of the effort involved the ``engineering`` of copper surfaces through mechanical and chemical roughening. The roughened topography enhances solder flow, especially over very fine features. In this paper, we describe how etching with different chemical solutions can affect solder flow on a specially designed ball grid array test vehicle (BGATV). The effects of circuit geometry, solution concentration, and etching time are discussed. Surface roughness and solder flow data are presented to support the roughening premise. Noticeable improvements in solder wettability were observed on uniformly etched surfaces having relatively steep peak-to-valley slopes.

  5. NCMS PWB program report surface finishes team task WBS No. 3.1.1: Phase 1, Etching Studies: Chemical etching of copper for improved solderability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.O.; Guilinger, T.R.; Hosking, F.M.; Yost, F.G.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1995-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with consortium members of the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) to develop fundamental generic technology in the area of printed wiring board materials and surface finishes. Improved solderability of copper substrates is an important component of the Sandia-NCMS program. We are investigating the effects of surface roughness on the wettability and solderability behavior of several different types of copper board finishes. In this paper, we present roughness and solderability characterizations for a variety of chemically-etched copper substrates. Initial testing on six chemical etches demonstrate that surface roughness can be greatly enhanced through chemical etching. Noticeable improvements in solder wettability were observed to accompany increases in roughness. A number of different algorithms and measures of roughness were used to gain insight into surface morphologies that lead to improved solderability.

  6. Reduced oxide soldering activation (ROSA) PWB solderability testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Physical and Joining Metallurgy Dept.; Reed, J. [Texas Instruments, Austin, TX (United States); Tench, D.M.; White, J. [Rockwell Science Center, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The effect of ROSA pretreatment on the solderability of environmentally stressed PWB test coupons was investigated. The PWB surface finish was an electroplated, reflowed solder. Test results demonstrated the ability to recover plated-through-hole fill of steam aged samples with solder after ROSA processing. ROSA offers an alternative method for restoring the solderability of aged PWB surfaces.

  7. New trends for PWB surface finishes in mobile phone applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Würtz; Ambat, Rajan; Rasmussen, Anette Alsted

    2005-01-01

    resistance are heavily increasing to keep a high reliability of the terminal. A paradigm shift to avoid use of Immersion Ni/Au is ongoing nowadays because the thin and porous Imm. Ni/Au can't address these challenges in a satisfactory way. Already some years ago OSP has replaced Immersion Ni/Au on solder...... has become a necessity that is brought with them in any activity they practice. These changes in user behaviour have heavily changed the impact from moisture, sweat, corrosive atmospheres and mechanical drop. As a result of this the requirement to solder joint reliability, corrosion stability and wear...

  8. Surface finish measurement studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of stylus instruments for measuring the topography of National Transonic Facility (NTF) model surfaces both for monitoring during fabrication and as an absolute measurement of topography was evaluated. It was found that the shop-grade instruments can damage the surface of models and that their use for monitoring fabrication procedures can lead to surface finishes that are substantially out of range in critical areas of the leading edges. The development of a prototype light-scattering instrument which would allow for rapid assessment of the surface finish of a model is also discussed.

  9. PWB solder wettability after simulated storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.

    1996-03-01

    A new solderability test method has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories that simulates the capillary flow physics of solders on circuit board surfaces. The solderability test geometry was incorporated on a circuit board prototype that was developed for a National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) program. The work was conducted under a cooperative research and development agreement between Sandia National Laboratories, NCMS, and several PWB fabricators (AT&T, IBM, Texas Instruments, United Technologies/Hamilton Standard and Hughes Aircraft) to advance PWB interconnect technology. The test was used to investigate the effects of environmental prestressing on the solderability of printed wiring board (PWB) copper finishes. Aging was performed in a controlled chamber representing a typical indoor industrial environment. Solderability testing on as-fabricated and exposed copper samples was performed with the Sn-Pb eutectic solder at four different reflow temperatures (215, 230, 245 and 260{degrees}C). Rosin mildly activated (RMA), low solids (LS), and citric acid-based (CA) fluxes were included in the evaluation. Under baseline conditions, capillary flow was minimal at the lowest temperatures with all fluxes. Wetting increased with temperature at both baseline and prestressing conditions. Poor wetting, however, was observed at all temperatures with the LS flux. Capillary flow is effectively restored with the CA flux.

  10. OTOMATISASI PENGECEKAN PWB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Ihsanto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Di PT. LG Electronics Indonesia Tangerang, yang salah satu produknya adalah refrigerator atau kulkas, sering ditemukan defect PWB (Printed Wire Board baik dalam proses perakitan maupun setelah sampai ke customer. Pengecekan PWB masih menggunakan alat manual sehingga membuka peluang terjadinya human error. Pada alat manual ini hanya terdapat LED indikator, bagus tidaknya PWB yang dicek hanya mengandalkan pengamatan operator. Pada tulisan ini  dipaparkan perancangan dan pengujian alat pengecek PWB yang bekerja secara otomatis termasuk bisa mendeteksi error yang terjadi selama proses pengecekan berlangsung. Diharapkan alat ini dapat mengurangi peluang terjadinya human error dalam pengecekan PWB dan meningkatkan efisiensi kerja bagi operator. Pembuatan alat ini terdiri dari beberapa tahap di antaranya pembuatan hardware dan sofware. Alat ini dikendalikan dengan dua buah mikrokontroler dan sebuah LCD display dan LED indikator. Alat ini digunakan untuk mengecek 4 PWB sekaligus. PWB ini  digunakan untuk mengendalikan kerja refrigerator, yaitu ON/OFF kompresor, defrost dan mengatur temperatur. Alat ini dirancang untuk mengecek fungsi-fungsi PWB tersebut. Setelah dilakukan pengujian beberapa kali, dapat dibuktikan bahwa alat ini dapat mengecek dengan benar. Jika ada PWB yang tidak beres, buzzer  berbunyi dan baik tidaknya keempat PWB yang sedang dicek ditampilkan di LCD.

  11. Assessment of circuit board surface finishes for electronic assembly with lead-free solders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, U.; Artaki, I.; Finley, D.W.; Wenger, G.M. [Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States). Lucent Technologies; Pan, T.; Blair, H.D.; Nicholson, J.M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States); Vianco, P.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The suitability of various metallic printed wiring board surface finishes was assessed for new technology applications that incorporate assembly with Lead-free solders. The manufacture of a lead-free product necessitates elimination of lead (Pb) from the solder, the circuit board as well as the component lead termination. It is critical however for the selected interconnect Pb-free solder and the corresponding printed wiring board (PWB) and component lead finishes to be mutually compatible. Baseline compatibility of select Pb-free solders with Pb containing PWB surface finish and components was assessed. This was followed by examining the compatibility of the commercially available CASTIN{trademark} (SnAgCuSb) Pb-free solder with a series of PWB metallic finishes: Ni/Au, Ni/Pd, and Pd/Cu. The compatibility was assessed with respect to assembly performance, solder joint integrity and long term attachment reliability. Solder joint integrity and mechanical behavior of representative 50 mil pitch 20I/O SOICs was determined before and after thermal stress. Mechanical pull test studies demonstrated that the strength of SnAgCuSb solder interconnections is notably greater than that of SnPb interconnections.

  12. Corrosion of RoHS-Compliant Surface Finishes in Corrosive Mixed Flowing Gas Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, K.; Reid, M.; Collins, M. N.; Dalton, E.; Xu, C.; Wright, B.; Demirkan, K.; Opila, R. L.; Reents, W. D.; Franey, J. P.; Fleming, D. A.; Punch, J.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, the corrosion resistance of printed wiring board (PWB) finishes has generated considerable interest due to field failures observed in various parts of the world. This study investigates the corrosion issues associated with the different lead-free PWB surface finishes. Corrosion products on various PWB surface finishes generated in mixed flowing gas (MFG) environments were studied, and analysis techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray, x-ray diffraction, focused ion beam, and scanning Auger microscopy were used to quantify the corrosion layer thickness and determine the composition of corrosion products. The corrosion on organic solderability preservative samples shows similar corrosion products to bare copper and is mainly due to direct attack of copper traces by corrosive gases. The corrosion on electroless nickel immersion gold occurs primarily through the porosity in the film and is accelerated by the galvanic potential between gold and copper; similar results were observed on immersion silver. Immersion tin shows excellent corrosion resistance due to its inherent corrosion resistance in the MFG environment as well as the opposite galvanic potential between tin and copper compared with gold or silver and copper.

  13. Innovative Deterministic Optical Surface Finishing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Increasing the optical surface finishing precision and reducing surface roughness will greatly benefit astronomy telescope and other optical systems. Conventional...

  14. Thermomechanical Behaviour of a PWB by Speckle Interferometry Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomeo Trentadue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The speckle interferometry technique has been used in this work in order to determine the thermomechanical behaviour of Printed Wiring Board (PWB (circuits of a radio integrated with tape player and speakers. A preliminary experiment of such technique has been carried out on a single electronic component (silicon transistor, during the thermal transient and at the steady state. The thermal deformation and stresses on PWB have been obtained through related experimental analyses on both cases. The results showed a very good applicability of speckle technique on the irregular object surface as PWB.

  15. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  16. Effects of cast gold surface finishing on plaque retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, M P; Shillingburg, H T; Duncanson, M G; Wade, C K

    1980-02-01

    The relationship between the surface finish on cast gold restorations and the amount of plaque deposited on that surface was examined. Six different finishes were tested. The rough finish was found to accumulate significantly less plaque than the other finishes. Every finish exhibited some plaque accumulation, even after the first 24 hours. Each finish accumulated progressively more plaque at each successive time interval.

  17. Parametric study on the solderability of etched PWB copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Stevenson, J.O.; Hernandez, C.L.

    1996-10-01

    The rapid advancement of interconnect technology has resulted in a more engineered approach to designing and fabricating printed wiring board (PWB) surface features. Recent research at Sandia National Laboratories has demonstrated the importance of surface roughness on solder flow. This paper describes how chemical etching was used to enhance the solderability of surfaces that were normally difficult to wet. The effects of circuit geometry, etch concentration, and etching time on solder flow are discussed. Surface roughness and solder flow data are presented. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of surface roughness on the solderability of fine PWB surface mount features.

  18. Effect of Burnishing Parameters on Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirsat, Uddhav; Ahuja, Basant; Dhuttargaon, Mukund

    2017-08-01

    Burnishing is cold working process in which hard balls are pressed against the surface, resulting in improved surface finish. The surface gets compressed and then plasticized. This is a highly finishing process which is becoming more popular. Surface quality of the product improves its aesthetic appearance. The product made up of aluminum material is subjected to burnishing process during which kerosene is used as a lubricant. In this study factors affecting burnishing process such as burnishing force, speed, feed, work piece diameter and ball diameter are considered as input parameters while surface finish is considered as an output parameter In this study, experiments are designed using 25 factorial design in order to analyze the relationship between input and output parameters. The ANOVA technique and F-test are used for further analysis.

  19. Effect of Burnishing Parameters on Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirsat, Uddhav; Ahuja, Basant; Dhuttargaon, Mukund

    2016-06-01

    Burnishing is cold working process in which hard balls are pressed against the surface, resulting in improved surface finish. The surface gets compressed and then plasticized. This is a highly finishing process which is becoming more popular. Surface quality of the product improves its aesthetic appearance. The product made up of aluminum material is subjected to burnishing process during which kerosene is used as a lubricant. In this study factors affecting burnishing process such as burnishing force, speed, feed, work piece diameter and ball diameter are considered as input parameters while surface finish is considered as an output parameter In this study, experiments are designed using 25 factorial design in order to analyze the relationship between input and output parameters. The ANOVA technique and F-test are used for further analysis.

  20. Surface-finish measurement with interference microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladky, R. E.

    1977-02-01

    Diamond turning copper and other metals, to produce mirror surfaces with reflectivities generally higher than can be obtained by lapping and polishing, has become an important new technology. Evaluation of the finish of these surfaces requires careful examination, using optical instruments. This document provides background information about the theory and equipment involved in this program. Data from several specimens have been acquired that show the type of surface finish that is obtained. Mirrors have been fabricated that show the state of the art that has been achieved in diamond turning copper and nickel.

  1. Modelling Surface Finish in WEDM using RSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Joshi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM is a specialized thermal machining process capable of accurately machining parts with varying hardness or complex shapes, which have sharp edges that are very difficult to be machined by the conventional machining processes. This practical technology of the WEDM process is based on the conventional EDM sparking phenomenon utilizing the widely accepted non-contact technique of material removal. Since the introduction of the process, WEDM has evolved from a simple means of making tools and dies to the best alternative of producing micro-scale parts with the highest degree of dimensional accuracy and surface finish quality. The effect of various parameters of WEDM like pulse on time (TON, pulse off time (TOFF, gap voltage (SV have been investigated to reveal their impact on output parameter i.e., surface roughness of high carbon and high chromium steel using response surface methodology. Experimental plan is performed by standard RSM design called a BOX-BEHKEN DESIGN. The optimal set of process parameter has also been predicted to maximize the surface finish.

  2. The surface finish of light-cured composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, S K; Henderson, L J

    1993-01-01

    A necessity for any dental restorative material is its ability to take and maintain a smooth surface finish. Composite resin restorative materials with fillers and matrix of differing hardness are difficult to finish and polish. The use of aluminum trioxide discs is a popular and acceptable method of finishing composite restorative materials where the material is accessible. Burs and stones are used for finishing and polishing inaccessible areas. This study was undertaken to compare the surface finish of composite resin restorative material when finished with white stones, superfine diamond burs and aluminum trioxide discs. The finished surface was measured with a profilometer and the roughness average value used to compare the surfaces. The aluminum trioxide discs gave the best and most consistent results. It was possible to attain similar results with the superfine diamond bur. However, the results were highly variable. None of the methods used achieved the smoothness of composite resin cured against a transparent matrix.

  3. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Finish of surface joints. 18.33 Section 18.33... Requirements § 18.33 Finish of surface joints. Flat surfaces between bolt holes that form any part of a flame... § 18.31(a)(6). All metal surfaces forming a flame-arresting path shall be finished during the...

  4. Optimizing parameters for magnetorheological finishing supersmooth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Haobo; Feng, Zhijing; Wang, Yingwei

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a reasonable approach to this issue, i.e., computer controlled magnetorheological finishing (MRF). In MRF, magnetically stiffened magnetorheological (MR) abrasive fluid flows through a preset converging gap that is formed by a workpiece surface and a moving rigid wall, to create precise material removal and polishing. Tsinghua University recently completed a project with MRF technology, in which a 66 mm diameter, f/5 parabolic mirror was polished to the shape accuracy of λ/17 RMS (λ=632.8nm) and the surface roughness of 1.22 nm Ra. This was done on a home made novel aspheric computer controlled manufacturing system. It is a three-axis, self-rotating wheel machine, the polishing tool is driven with one motor through a belt. This paper presents the manufacturing and testing processes, including establish the mathematics model of MRF optics on the basis of Preston equation, profiler test and relative coefficients, i.e., pressure between workpiece and tool, velocity of MR fluid in polishing spot, tolerance control of geometrical parameters such as radius of curvature and conic constant also been analyzed in the paper. Experiments were carried out on the features of MRF. The results indicated that the required convergent speed, surface roughness could be achieved with high efficiency.

  5. Enhancing Surface Finish of Additively Manufactured Titanium and Cobalt Chrome Elements Using Laser Based Finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, Wojciech S.; Tian, Yingtao; Cabo, Aldara Pan; Ardron, Marcus; Maier, Robert R. J.; Prangnell, Philip; Weston, Nicholas J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers the possibility of creating a complex free form object as a single element, which is not possible using traditional mechanical machining. Unfortunately the typically rough surface finish of additively manufactured parts is unsuitable for many applications. As a result AM parts must be post-processed; typically mechanically machined and/or and polished using either chemical or mechanical techniques (both of which have their limitations). Laser based polishing is based on remelting of a very thin surface layer and it offers potential as a highly repeatable, higher speed process capable of selective area polishing, and without any waste problems (no abrasives or liquids). In this paper an in-depth investigation of CW laser polishing of titanium and cobalt chrome AM elements is presented. The impact of different scanning strategies, laser parameters and initial surface condition on the achieved surface finish is evaluated.

  6. Tool steel quality and surface finishing of plastic molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Agnelli Mesquita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic industry is today in a constant growth, demanding several products from other segments, which includes the plastic molds, mainly used in the injection molding process. Considering all the requirements of plastic molds, the surface finishing is of special interest, as the injected plastic part is able to reproduce any details (and also defects from the mold surface. Therefore, several aspects on mold finishing are important, mainly related to manufacturing conditions - machining, grinding, polishing and texturing, and also related to the tool steel quality, in relation to microstructure homogeneity and non-metallic inclusions (cleanliness. The present paper is then focused on this interrelationship between steel quality and manufacturing process, which are both related to the final quality of plastic mold surfaces. Examples are discussed in terms of surface finishing of plastic molds and the properties or the microstructure of mold steels.

  7. Hardness of celluloid strip-finished or polished composite surfaces with time

    OpenAIRE

    Park, S. H.; KREJCI,Ivo; Lutz, F

    2000-01-01

    An in-vitro study revealed that a celluloid strip-finished composite surface discolored more than the polished composite surface. Thus, the celluloid strip-finished composite surface may not cure enough compared with the polished composite surface.

  8. Electrodeposition and surface finishing fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Djokic, Stojan

    2014-01-01

    This volume of Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry has contributions from significant individuals in electrochemistry. This 7 chapter book discusses electrodeposition and the characterization of alloys and composite materials, the mechanistic aspects of lead electrodeposition, electrophoretic deposition of ceramic materials onto metal surfaces and the fundamentals of metal oxides for energy conversion and storage technologies. This volume also has a chapter devoted to the anodization of aluminum, electrochemical aspects of chemical and mechanical polishing, and surface treatments prior to metal

  9. Surface finishing of resin-modified glass ionomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liporoni, Priscila; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Dos Santos Dias, Carlos Tadeu; Paradella, Thais Cachute

    2003-01-01

    This study utilized spectrophotometry to evaluate in vitro superficial dye deposition on resin-modified glass ionomer, following different surface finishing and polishing treatments. Materials that were photocured adjacent to the mylar strip produced the surfaces with the lowest mean after superficial staining. A restorative technique without excesses resulted in a smoother surface and prolonged the life of the restoration. The resin-modified glass ionomers tested offer adequate clinical performance.

  10. Polishing Metal Mirrors to 0,025 Micron Surface Finish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    A research program undertaken by the Danish Atomic Energy Commission required the fabrication of metal mirrors measuring 1 m long by 53 mm wide, which had to be finished to extremely tight tolerances on thickness, plane-parallelism and surface characteristics. Progressively finer diamond compounds...

  11. Effect of panel alignment and surface finish on bond strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Baker, W.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The flexural strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of panel alignment and bond surface finish. Bond strength was shown to be highly dependent on both parameters with only a narrow range of values yielding a high strength bond. This study was performed for the heavy water-containing acrylic vessel for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector.

  12. Surface roughness of composite resins after finishing and polishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagem Filho Halim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of surface finishing methods on the average surface roughness of resin composites. Seven composites and two polishing systems were used. One hundred and twenty-six conical specimens of each material were prepared in stainless steel molds against a polyester strip. Forty-two of them remained intact and were used as controls. Each half of the remaining samples was polished with either diamond burs or diamond burs + aluminum oxide discs. The results showed no statistical difference in average surface roughness (Ra, mm between the polyester strip and aluminum oxide discs (p>0.05. However, finishing with diamond burs showed a statistically higher average roughness for all composites (p<0.05. Statistical differences were detected among materials (p<0.05 in the use of diamond burs.

  13. RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY IN FINISH TURNING INCONEL 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aruna,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Machining of hard materials used in aerospace applications require hard and tough cutting tools. Ceramic tools and cermets are used in machining of nickel alloys for such applications. In this study finish turning of Inconel 718 is carried out with cermet tools. Cutting parameters are designed using Taguchi’s DOE and the experiments are conducted for the designed parameters. The surface finish measurement is carried for the various conditions and data obtained are used to build up the mathematical surface model using response surface methodology. The adequacy of the developed mathematical model is proved by ANOVA. The findings of this study show new results and the second order model was quite adequate.

  14. The importance of surface finish to energy performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Geoff B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Power generation in solar energy systems, thermal control in buildings and mitigation of the Urban Heat Island problem, are all sensitive to directional response to incoming radiation. The radiation absorption and emission profile also plays a crucial role in each system's response and depends strongly on surface finish. This important sensitivity needs wider recognition in materials data sheets, system modeling, plus in materials and environmental engineering. The impact of surface roughness on thermal response of natural and man-made external environments is examined. Important examples will be given of the role of surface finish within each class. Total emittance links to the way surface finish influences directional emittance E(θ. Smooth surface thermal emittance on PV module covers, many solar absorbers, some roof paints, polished concrete, and glass windows can be up to 15% different from insulator results based on fully diffuse models of the same material. Widespread evidence indicates smooth metals and low-E solar absorber surfaces cool faster, and smooth insulators slower than previously thought. Matt paint is cooler than low sheen paint under the same solar heating impacts and normal concrete cooler than polished. Emittance for water is the prime environmental example of oblique impacts as it reflects strongly at oblique incidence, which leads to a significant drop in E(θ. Ripples or waves however raise water's average emittance. A surprise in this work was the high sensitivity of total E and its angular components to roughness in the depth range of 0.1–0.8 μm, which are well under ambient thermal IR wavelengths of 3–30 μm but common in metal finishing. Parallel energy flows such as evaporation and convective cooling vary if emittance varies. Thermal image analysis can provide insights into angular radiative effects.

  15. Effects of surface finish and mechanical training on Ni-Ti sheets for elastocaloric cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Tusek, Jaka; Sanna, Simone

    2016-01-01

    and acceptable durability. We study the effects of surface finish and training techniques on dog bone shaped polycrystalline samples of NiTi. The fatigue life of several samples with four different surface finishes was measured and it was shown that a smooth surface, especially at the edges, greatly improved...... of the material was weakly influenced by the surface finish....

  16. Surface profiling in mating parts by combined nonabrasive finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolentsev, EV; Fedonin, ON; Smolentsev, VP

    2017-02-01

    Nonabrasive finishing of precision mating surfaces in locking devices with the use of a combined erosion-chemical process at the first stage of the processing and with the use of anodic dissolution by alternating low-voltage current at the final stage of a refinement operation till gapless joints obtaining is considered. It is shown that the application of electro-erosion, electrochemical and combined nonabrasive finishing in mating parts opens up a possibility to ensure stable impermeability in locking devices on a macro- and micro-level through the method of a substantiated purpose of technological modes. A procedure is created for the development of such modes, and on their basis technological processes for the obtaining of gapless mating surfaces meeting the performance requirements for locking devices are developed. For this purpose, qualitative devices resistant to hostile environment are manufactured that is urgent for the mechanical engineering including repetition work for the equipment of petrochemical industry, transport and household machinery.

  17. Polymer micromolds with near optical quality surface finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Pun-Pang; Knopf, George K.; Nikumb, Suwas

    2012-03-01

    Disposable microfluidic systems are used to avoid sample contamination in a variety of medical and environmental monitoring applications. A contactless hot intrusion (HI) process for fabricating reusable polymer micromolds with near "optical quality" surface finishes is described in this paper. A metallic hot intrusion mask with the desired microchannels and related passive components is first machined using a tightly focused beam from a diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser. The polymer mold master is then created by pressing the 2D metallic mask onto a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate. Since it is a contactless fabrication process the resultant 3D micro-reliefs have near optical quality surface finishes. Unfortunately, the desired micro-relief dimensions (height and width) are not easily related to the hot intrusion process parameters of pressure, temperature, and time exposure profile. A finite element model is introduced to assist the manufacturing engineer in predicting the behavior of the PMMA substrate material as it deforms under heat and pressure during micromold manufacture. The FEM model assumes that thermo-plastics like PMMA become "rubber like" when heated to a temperature slightly above the glass transition temperature. By controlling the material temperature and maintaining its malleable state, it is possible to use the stress-strain relationship to predict the profile dimensions of the imprinted microfeature. Examples of curved microchannels fabricated using PMMA mold masters are presented to illustrate the proposed methodology and verify the finite element model. In addition, the non-contact formation of the micro-reliefs simplifies the demolding process and helps to preserve the high quality surface finishes.

  18. Specification And Control Of Surface Finish: Empiricism Versus Dogmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, K. J.; Obray, C.; Jungles, J.

    1985-06-01

    This paper reviews the development of the analysis of surface finish from the early attempts in the 1930s to the present day. The development of parameters used in surface analysis is shown in context with the instrumental techniques available at the time, and it is argued that characterization based on graphical and experimental convenience has influenced industrial practice. As the requirements of manufacture and functional performance have been stretched by advancing technology, many industrialists have been forced to accept the fact that existing specification practices are limited and have sought alternative descriptions based on well-established techniques; but these techniques themselves are limited, their suitability to in-process measurement being practically nonexistent. It is shown that attempts have been made recently to develop optical methods of assessing surface finish using traditional parameters such as Ra. This paper suggests that it may be time to look toward a new form of specification that is more suited to assessment by optical transducers, and some methods of assessment are proposed. To support this view, a simple low-cost device is discussed that can be calibrated to give Ra but that also presents information in a more relevant empirical way that may be more valid than the existing parameter specification.

  19. Comparison of hole surface finishing processes with roller burnishing method applied in copper materials

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan AKKURT; Kurt, Abdullah; Ahmet ÖZDEMİR; ŞEKER, Ulvi

    2014-01-01

    Surface finishing processes such as drilling, turning, reaming, grinding, honing and roller burnishing etc. are widely used in manufacturing as hole surface finishing process. In addition to the characteristics of hole such as the surface roughness, the surface hardness and the wear resistance, the circularity and cylindricality of hole are also effective on the performance of hole. In this paper, it is presented that different hole surface finishing processes were applied to the samples made...

  20. Finishing systems on the final surface roughness of composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Richard; Neiva, Gisele; Dennison, Joseph; Yaman, Peter

    2008-02-01

    This study evaluated differences in surface roughness of a microhybrid (Gradia Direct, GC America) and a nanofil (Filtek Supreme, 3M ESPE) composite using four polishing systems: PoGo/Enhance (DENTSPLY/Caulk), Sof-Lex (3M ESPE), Astropol (Ivoclar Vivadent), and Optidisc (KerrHawe). An aluminum mold was used to prepare 2 X 60 composite disks (10 mm X 2 mm). Composite was packed into the mold, placed between two glass slabs, and polymerized for 40 seconds from the top and bottom surfaces. Specimens were finished to a standard rough surface using Moore's disks with six brushing strokes. Specimens were rinsed and stored in artificial saliva in individual plastic bags at 36 degrees C for 24 hours prior to testing. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the four polishing systems and were polished for 30 seconds (10 seconds per grit) with brushing strokes according to the manufacturer's instructions. Mean surface roughness (Ra) was recorded with a surface-analyzer 24 hours after storage in artificial saliva, both before and after polishing. Means were analyzed using two-way and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey multiple comparison tests at p composites for individual polishing systems (p=0.3991). Filtek specimens were smoother than Gradia specimens after baseline roughening. Sof-Lex provided the smoothest final surface when used with either composite. Astropol provided a rough surface for Gradia specimens.

  1. Surface finish mechanics explain different clinical survivorship of cemented femoral stems for total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beksac, Burak; Taveras, Nicole A; Valle, Alejandro Gonzalez Della; Salvati, Eduardo A

    2006-01-01

    The ability of bone cement to adhere to the implant surface is dependent on the surface finish. Stems with a rough surface finish require greater force to disrupt their interface with the cement than do stems with a smooth or polished surface. However, if micromotion occurs at the cement-metal interface, the fretting of a smoother surface implant results in less cement and metallic abrasion than an implant with a rough surface finish. Today, surgeons implant femoral stems with a wide variety of surface finish and textures that are supported by the previously mentioned contrasting philosophy of fixation. This article presents the micro and macro surface finish mechanics, history, and rationale for changes in surface finish, the clinical and operative implications of changes in surface finish, the retrieval analysis, and the clinical evidence that examine the consequences of changes in surface finish in the outcome of cemented femoral stems for total hip arthroplasty. Current data and our own experience support the use of cemented femoral stems with a smooth or polished surface finish.

  2. The topographic development and areal parametric characterization of a stratified surface polished by mass finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Karl; Blunt, Liam; Fleming, Leigh

    2015-09-01

    Mass finishing is amongst the most widely used finishing processes in modern manufacturing, in applications from deburring to edge radiusing and polishing. Processing objectives are varied, ranging from the cosmetic to the functionally critical. One such critical application is the hydraulically smooth polishing of aero engine component gas-washed surfaces. In this, and many other applications the drive to improve process control and finish tolerance is ever present. Considering its widespread use mass finishing has seen limited research activity, particularly with respect to surface characterization. The objectives of the current paper are to; characterise the mass finished stratified surface and its development process using areal surface parameters, provide guidance on the optimal parameters and sampling method to characterise this surface type for a given application, and detail the spatial variation in surface topography due to coupon edge shadowing. Blasted and peened square plate coupons in titanium alloy are wet (vibro) mass finished iteratively with increasing duration. Measurement fields are precisely relocated between iterations by fixturing and an image superimposition alignment technique. Surface topography development is detailed with ‘log of process duration’ plots of the ‘areal parameters for scale-limited stratified functional surfaces’, (the Sk family). Characteristic features of the Smr2 plot are seen to map out the processing of peak, core and dale regions in turn. These surface process regions also become apparent in the ‘log of process duration’ plot for Sq, where lower core and dale regions are well modelled by logarithmic functions. Surface finish (Ra or Sa) with mass finishing duration is currently predicted with an exponential model. This model is shown to be limited for the current surface type at a critical range of surface finishes. Statistical analysis provides a group of areal parameters including; Vvc, Sq, and Sdq

  3. Surface morphology changes of acrylic resins during finishing and polishing phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Serra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The finishing and polishing phases are essential to improve smoothness and shining on the surface of acrylic resins used to make removable orthodontic appliances. A good surface finishing reduces roughness, which facilitates hygiene, prevents staining and provides greater comfort to the patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to analyze the changes on surface morphology of acrylic resins during finishing and polishing phases. METHODS: Thirty discs (10 mm in diameter and 5 mm in length were made with acrylic resin and randomly divided into ten groups. The control group did not receive any treatment while the other groups received gradual finishing and polishing. The last group received the entire finishing and polishing procedures. Surface morphology was qualitatively analyzed through scanning electron microscopy and quantitatively analyzed through a laser profilometer test. RESULTS: The acrylic resin surfaces without treatment showed bubbles which were not observed in the subsequent phases. Wearing out with multilaminated burs, finishing with wood sandpaper and finishing with water sandpaper resulted in surfaces with decreasing irregularities. The surfaces that were polished with pumice and with low abrasive liquids showed high superficial smoothness. CONCLUSION: Highly smooth acrylic resin surfaces can be obtained after mechanical finishing and polishing performed with multilaminated burs, wood sandpaper, water sandpaper, pumice and low abrasive liquids.

  4. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Walid; Songmene, Victor; Bocher, Philippe

    2014-02-28

    The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling). For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE) formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  5. Study for Reduction of Outgassing Property of Adsorbed Water Gas for Improved Surface Finished Titanium Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Masatoshi; Kurisu, Hiroki; Uchida, Takashi; Yamamoto, Setsuo; Ishizawa, Katsunobu; Nomura, Takeru; Eda, Takahiro; Murashige, Nobuyuki

    This paper addresses the development of the surface finishing for a titanium material and the study for the reduction of outgassing property of adsorbed water (H2O) molecules. Developed surface finishing is composed of the buffing for the reduction of the surface roughness and improved chemical polishing for the thick surface oxide layer compared with the chemical polishing so far. The surface roughness of the surface finished titanium material is reduced 35% and the thickness of the surface oxide layer increases by 30%. The total amount of thermal desorbed H2O gas for the new surface finished titanium is reduced 30%. It is considered that the origin for the decrease of the amount of desorption H2O gas is the reduction of the adsorption sites due to the decrease of the surface roughness and the reduction of adsorption energy of H2O gas due to the strong surface oxidation for a titanium material.

  6. Wear analysis and finishing of bioceramic implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkena, Berend; Reichstein, Martin; van der Meer, Marijke; Ostermeier, Sven; Hurschler, Christof

    2008-01-01

    A primary cause for revision operations of joint replacements is the implant loosening, due to immune reactions resulting from the agglomeration of polyethylene wear debris. Motivated by the successful application of bioceramic materials in hip joint prostheses, a trend towards the development of hard implant materials has occurred. Nonetheless in the area of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), modern efforts have still utilized polyethylene as the tibial-inlay joint component. The use of bioceramic hard-hard-pairings for total knee arthroplasty has been prevented by the complex kinematics and geometries required. Ceramics cannot cope with non-uniform loads, which suggests the need for new designs appropriate to the material. Furthermore, biomechanical requirements should be considered. A rolling-gliding wear simulator, which reproduces the movements and stresses of the knee joint on specimens of simplified geometry, has therefore been developed. High-precision machining processes for free formed bioceramic surfaces, with suitable grinding and polishing tools which adjust to constantly changing contact conditions, are essential. The goal is to put automated finishing in one clamping with five simultaneous controlled axes into practice. The developed manufacturing technologies will allow the advantageous bioceramic materials to be applied and accepted for more complex joint replacements such as knee prostheses.

  7. Surface Fatigue Lives of Case-Carburized Gears With an Improved Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, T. L.; Alanou, M. P.; Evans, H. P.; Snidle, R. W.; Krantz, T. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Previous research provides qualitative evidence that an improved surface finish can increase the surface fatigue lives of gears. To quantify the influence of surface roughness on life, a set of AISI 93 10 steel gears was provided with a nearmirror finish by superfinishing. The effects of the superfinishing on the quality of the gear tooth surfaces were determined using data from metrology, profilometry, and interferometric microscope inspections. The superfinishing reduced the roughness average by about a factor of 5. The superfinished gears were subjected to surface fatigue testing at 1.71 -GPa (248-ksi) Hertz contact stress, and the data were compared with the NASA Glenn gear fatigue data base. The lives of gears with superfinished teeth were about four times greater compared with the lives of gears with ground teeth but with otherwise similar quality.

  8. Hydrophilic modification of polyester fabric by applying nanocrystalline cellulose containing surface finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Masuduz; Liu, Hongbin; Xiao, Huning; Chibante, Felipe; Ni, Yonghao

    2013-01-16

    In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabric was modified by applying a hydrophilic surface finishing agent that contains nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC). To impart superior hydrophilicity, NCC was further cationically modified through quaternization by grafting glycidyl tri-methyl ammonium chloride (GTMAC). A textile binder, PrintRite595(®), was added to the finishing system. The surface finish was applied on the fabric using a rolling-drying-curing process. The modified fabric was characterized in terms of coating durability, moisture regain, and wettability. The durability of the surface finish was tested by six repeated washing steps. The surface properties of the fabric changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic after heat treatment with the NCC-containing surface finishing agent. The results from the washing fastness, SEM, FTIR, and EDX analyses confirmed that the cationic NCC-containing textile surface finish showed superior adhesion onto the cationic dyeable (anionic) PET surface over the un-modified NCC. Furthermore, the cationic textile surface finish was capable of withstanding multiple washing cycles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of the influence of electrolyte on surface finish in electropolished stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, M.; Núñez, P. J.; García, E.; Trujillo, R.

    2012-04-01

    Electropolishing is a surface finishing process of metals and alloys that enhances brilliant surface finishes with low surface roughness values. The most widely used electrolytes for the electropolishing of stainless steel are varying concentrations of phosphoric and sulphuric acid, and occasionally additives such as chromic acid. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of three commonly used industrial electrolytes in terms of the surface finish of electropolished stainless steel AISI 316L. Each electrolyte had varying sulphuric-phosphoric acid combinations with or without chromic acid. The following electropolishing conditions were assessed: current density, bath temperature, electropolishing time, and initial surface texture. The results revealed that adding chromic acid to the electrolyte did not significantly enhance surface finish, and electropolishing ranges were quite similar for all three electrolytes.

  10. An Expert System for the Prediction of Surface Finish in Turning Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    U; S; Dixit; K; Acharyya; A; D; Sahasrabudhe

    2002-01-01

    Prediction of surface finish in turning process is a difficult but important task. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) can reliably pred ict the surface finish but require a lot of training data. To overcome this prob lem, an expert system approach is proposed, wherein it will be possible to predi ct the surface finish from limited experiments. The expert system contains a kno wledge base prepared from machining data handbooks and number of experiments con ducted by turning steel rods, over a wide range of c...

  11. Minimum 10-year survival of Kerboull cemented stems according to surface finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadouche, Moussa; Baqué, François; Lefevre, Nicolas; Kerboull, Marcel

    2008-02-01

    The optimal surface finish for a cemented THA stem is still debated. We hypothesized surface finish would influence survival of Kerboull cemented hip arthroplasties and a matte finish would have lower survival. We reviewed survival of 433 total hip arthroplasties in 395 patients: 284 consecutive patients (310 hips) were enrolled in a prospective, randomized study of polished (165 hips) or matte finish stems (145 hips) and compared to a historical series of satin stems (123 hips) in 111 patients. The satin and matte finish implants had similar geometry but the polished was quadrangular rather than oval. Finish roughnesses were: polished (radius, 0.04 microm), satin (radius, 0.9 microm), and matte (radius, 1.7 microm). The mean age of the patients at the time of the index arthroplasty was 63.6 years. The survival rate at 13 years, using radiographic loosening as the end point, was 97.3%+/-2.6% for polished stems, 97.1%+/-2.1% for satin stems, and 78.9%+/-5.8% for matte stems. The data suggest survival of Kerboull stems was higher with a polished or satin surface finish than with a matte finish. Level II, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  12. Effects of Wet and Dry Finishing and Polishing on Surface Roughness and Microhardness of Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Nasoohi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of wet and dry finishing and polishing on microhardness and roughness of microhybrid and nanohybrid composites.Materials and Methods: Thirty samples were fabricated of each of the Polofil Supra and Aelite Aesthetic All-Purpose Body microhybrid and Grandio and Aelite Aesthetic Enamel nanohybrid composite resins. Each group (n=30 was divided into three subgroups of D, W and C (n=10. Finishing and polishing were performed dry in group D and under water coolant in group W. Group C served as the control group and did not receive finishing and polishing. Surface roughness of samples was measured by a profilometer and their hardness was measured by a Vickers hardness tester. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (P<0.05.Results: The smoothest surfaces with the lowest microhardness were obtained under Mylar strip without finishing/polishing for all composites (P<0.0001. The highest surface roughness was recorded for dry finishing/polishing for all composites (P<0.0001. Dry finishing/polishing increased the microhardness of all composites (P<0.0001.Conclusions: Dry finishing and polishing increases the microhardness and surface roughness of microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. Keywords: Composite Resins; Dental Polishing; Hardness

  13. Investigating Effect of Machining Parameters of CNC Milling on Surface Finish by Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Joshi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available CNC End milling is a unique adaption of the conventional milling process which uses an end mill tool for the machining process. CNC Vertical End Milling Machining is a widely accepted material removal process used to manufacture components with complicated shapes and profiles. During the End milling process, the material is removed by the end mill cutter. The effects of various parameters of end milling process like spindle speed, depth of cut, feed rate have been investigated to reveal their Impact on surface finish using Taguchi Methodology. Experimental plan is performed by a Standard Orthogonal Array. The results of analysis of variance (ANOVA indicate that the feed Rate is most influencing factor for modeling surface finish. The graph of S-N Ratio indicates the optimal setting of the machining parameter which gives the optimum value of surface finish. The optimal set of process parameters has also been predicted to maximize the surface finish.

  14. Investigating Effect of Machining Parameters of CNC Milling on Surface Finish by Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Joshi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available CNC End milling is a unique adaption of the conventional milling process which uses an end mill tool for the machining process. CNC Vertical End Milling Machining is a widely accepted material removal process used to manufacture components with complicated shapes and profiles. During the End milling process, the material is removed by the end mill cutter. The effects of various parameters of end milling process like spindle speed, depth of cut, feed rate have been investigated to reveal their Impact on surface finish using Taguchi Methodology. Experimental plan is performed by a Standard Orthogonal Array. The results of analysis of variance (ANOVA indicate that the feed Rate is most influencing factor for modelling surface finish. The graph of S-N Ratio indicates the optimal setting of the machining parameter which gives the optimum value of surface finish. The optimal set of process parameters has also been predicted to maximize the surface finish.

  15. Low-Stress Silicon Cladding for Surface Finishing Large UVOIR Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I research, ZeCoat Corporation demonstrated a low-stress silicon cladding process for surface finishing large UVOIR mirrors. A polishable cladding is...

  16. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Jomaa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling. For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  17. Effect of Plasma Surface Finish on Wettability and Mechanical Properties of SAC305 Solder Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Koike, Junichi; Yoon, Jeong-Won; Yoo, Sehoon

    2016-12-01

    The wetting behavior, interfacial reactions, and mechanical reliability of Sn-Ag-Cu solder on a plasma-coated printed circuit board (PCB) substrate were evaluated under multiple heat-treatments. Conventional organic solderability preservative (OSP) finished PCBs were used as a reference. The plasma process created a dense and highly cross-linked polymer coating on the Cu substrates. The plasma finished samples had higher wetting forces and shorter zero-cross times than those with OSP surface finish. The OSP sample was degraded after sequential multiple heat treatments and reflow processes, whereas the solderability of the plasma finished sample was retained after multiple heat treatments. After the soldering process, similar microstructures were observed at the interfaces of the two solder joints, where the development of intermetallic compounds was observed. From ball shear tests, it was found that the shear force for the plasma substrate was consistently higher than that for the OSP substrate. Deterioration of the OSP surface finish was observed after multiple heat treatments. Overall, the plasma surface finish was superior to the conventional OSP finish with respect to wettability and joint reliability, indicating that it is a suitable material for the fabrication of complex electronic devices.

  18. SURFACE FINISHES ON STAINLESS STEEL REDUCE BACTERIAL ATTACHMENT AND EARLY BIOFILM FORMATION: SCANNING ELECTRON AND ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three common finishing treatments of stainless steel that are used for equipment during poultry processing were tested for resistance to bacterial contamination. Methods were developed to measure attached bacteria and to identify factors that make surface finishes susceptible or ...

  19. The Formation of the Surface during AN Abrasive Finishing at Constant and Variable Clamping Forces: Finishing at Constant and Variable Clamping Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, Karim Ravilevich; Muratov, Ravil Arifovich; Ablyaz, Timur Rizovich; Gashev, Evgeniy Anatolyevich

    2017-06-01

    In this work the flat abrasive finishing process is reported. The mechanical and chemical phenomena taking place during the finishing process are described. The most common forming process schemes observed during abrasive treatment are reviewed. The schemes of pulsed, geometrical and energetic models are discussed. On the basis of the energetic hypothesis and Preston hypothesis, the rational law of clamping force variation during the finishing is established. This law allowed for the stabilization of the contact pressure and an increase of the treatment efficiency. An exponential dependence of a boundary contact area variation during the finishing of planes with different initial profiles of the macro-topography is developed. An experimental confirmation of the Preston hypothesis during the abrasive finishing is carried out with the plane-finishing machine “Rastr 220”. The comparison experiments are carried out at constant and variable clamping forces of the treated surface towards the tool. It is found that by varying the forces according to the exponential law (i.e. similar to the changing of the boundary contact area during the abrasive finishing) the process efficiency is increasing by a factor of 2.5-3. It is shown that the changes of the root mean square deviation σ of the roughness Ra of a treated surface in the beginning of the process (at time t=1 min) during the finishing at a constant clamping force is two times higher compared to the treatment at a variable clamping force in the same time period.

  20. Effects of surface finish and mechanical training on Ni-Ti sheets for elastocaloric cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Engelbrecht

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Elastocaloric cooling has emerged as a promising alternative to vapor compression in recent years. Although the technology has the potential to be more efficient than current technologies, there are many technical challenges that must be overcome to realize devices with high performance and acceptable durability. We study the effects of surface finish and training techniques on dog bone shaped polycrystalline samples of NiTi. The fatigue life of several samples with four different surface finishes was measured and it was shown that a smooth surface, especially at the edges, greatly improved fatigue life. The effects of training both on the structure of the materials and the thermal response to an applied strain was studied. The load profile for the first few cycles was shown to change the thermal response to strain, the structure of the material at failure while the final structure of the material was weakly influenced by the surface finish.

  1. Surface roughness of microparticulated and nanoparticulated composites after finishing and polishing procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Arai Sadami Shinkai

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluated the surface roughness of one microparticulate resin composite Durafill (Heraeus Kulzer Weihrheim, Germany andfour nanoparticulate resins 4 Seasons (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein Esthet x (Dentsply, Milford, DE, USA, Point 4 and Supreme (3M-ESPE, Dental Products,St. Paul, MN, USA. Methods: After finishing with a diamond bur point (F, and polishing with silicone points of gray, green and pink color Politipit (Ivoclar Vivadent,Schaan, Liechtenstein, four stages of completion were performed, simulating one of finishing and three of polishing a resin restoration. Ten samples of each composite resin were measured for surface roughness with surface profilometer (Mitutoyo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan after each of finishing and polishing sequence.Results: The results showed that nanoparticulate and microparticulate resins presented a significant difference in the surface roughness values, in all finishing and polishing steps. Conclusion: Of the the nanoparticulate resins 4 Seasons (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein, Point 4 (Kerr CO, Orange, CA, USA, and also microparticulate Durafill (Heraeus Kulzer Weihrheim, Germany presented significantly lower surface roughness values after completing all the finishing and polishing stages.

  2. Multi-Parameter Analysis of Surface Finish in Electro-Discharge Machining of Tool Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Victoria Anghel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a multi- parameter analysis of surface finish imparted to tool-steel plates by electro-discharge machining (EDM is presented. The interrelationship between surface texture parameters and process parameters is emphasized. An increased number of parameters is studied including amplitude, spacing, hybrid and fractal parameters,, as well. The correlation of these parameters with the machining conditions is investigated. Observed characteristics become more pronounced, when intensifying machining conditions. Close correlation exists between certain surface finish parameters and EDM input variables and single and multiple statistical regression models are developed.

  3. Surface roughness and staining susceptibility of composite resins after finishing and polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Palialol, Alan Rodrigo Muniz; Cavalli, Vanessa; Giannini, Marcelo

    2011-02-01

    The study aims to investigate the influence of filler size and finishing systems on the surface roughness and staining of three composite resins. Three composites, classified according to their filler size, were selected: Filtek Supreme Plus/nanofill (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), Esthet-X/minifill (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA), and Renamel Microfill/microfill (Cosmedent Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Composite specimens were made in stainless steel split molds and polished with Sof-Lex (3M ESPE), Enhance+PoGo (Dentsply Caulk), or FlexiDiscs+Enamelize (Cosmedent Inc.). Finishing systems were used according to the manufacturers' instructions and polished surfaces were evaluated with a profilometer and then immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 hours. Specimens were then prepared for spectrophotometric analysis and results were statistically analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test. No significant differences in surface roughness among the composites were found when the surfaces were treated with Enhance+PoGo. In addition, no differences were observed when the Filtek Supreme Plus composite was submitted to surface staining evaluation. In general, the composites polished with the finishing systems from the same company demonstrated lower surface roughness and staining. The results of this study recommend that composite resins could be finished and polished with finishing systems supplied by the composite's manufacturer. The surface roughness and staining of composite resins were not influenced solely by filler size. Dentists should finish and polish composite resin with the polishing agent supplied by the same manufacturer. The smallest filler size does not necessarily result in a low surface roughness and staining susceptibility. © 2011, COPYRIGHT THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2011, WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  4. Dielectric measurements on PWB materials at microwave frequencies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Tanwar; K K Gupta; P J Singh; Y K Vijay

    2006-04-01

    In quest of finding new substrate for printed wiring board (PWB) having low dielectric constant, we have made PSF/PMMA blends and evaluated the dielectric parameters at 8.92 GHz frequency and at 35°C temperature. Incorporating PMMA in PSF matrix results in reduced dielectric constant than that of pure PSF. The dielectric parameters of pure PMMA and PSF films of different thicknesses have also been obtained at microwave frequencies. We have used dielectric data at microwave frequencies as a tool to evaluate optical constants, absorption index `’ and refractive index `’. The blends of PSF/PMMA may be used as base materials for PWBs.

  5. Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on composite resin surfaces after different finishing and polishing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, C A; Eskelson, E; Cavalli, V; Liporoni, P C S; Jorge, A O C; do Rego, M A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on the surface of three composite resins (nanofilled, Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; nanohybrid, Vit-1-escence, Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA; and microhybrid, Esthet X, Dentsply, Milford, DE, USA) following different finishing and polishing techniques. Sixty standardized samples (6 × 3 mm) of each composite were produced and randomly divided into three finishing and polishing treatments (n=20): 1) control group: composite resin surface in contact with Mylar matrix strips with no finishing or polishing performed, 2) Sof-Lex aluminum oxide disc technique (3M ESPE, and 3) carbide bur finishing and Astrobrush polishing technique (Ultradent). Half the samples of each group were incubated in human saliva for 1 hour, and all the samples were subjected to S mutans (ATCC 35688) biofilm development. The mean log of CFU/mL present in the S mutans biofilm was calculated, and data were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (pcomposites' surfaces, regardless of the polishing treatment performed (pcomposite (Filtek Z350) had the lowest bacterial adherence with each of the finishing and polishing techniques despite the presence or absence of human saliva (padhesion on the surface of the microhybrid and nanofilled composites in the absence of human saliva.

  6. Effect of machining parameters on surface finish of Inconel 718 in end milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Bapi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface finish is an important criteria in machining process and selection of proper machining parameters is important to obtain good surface finish. In the present work effects of the machining parameters in end milling of Inconel 718 were investigated. Central composite design was used to design the total number of experiments. A Mathematical model for surface roughness has been developed using response surface methodology. In this study, the influence of cutting parameters such as cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut on surface roughness was analyzed. The study includes individual effect of cutting parameters on surface roughness as well as their interaction. The analysis of variance (ANOVA was employed to find the validity of the developed model. The results show that depth of cut mostly affected the surface roughness. It is also observed that surface roughness values are comparable in both dry and wet machining conditions.

  7. Chemical milling solution produces smooth surface finish on aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, H. C.

    1966-01-01

    Elementary sulfur mixed into a solution of caustic soda and salts produces an etchant which will chemically mill end-grain surfaces on aluminum plate. This composition results in the least amount of thickness variation and pitting.

  8. Effects of finishing on the surface quality of precision castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patejuk A.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some manufacturing problems concerning leaded brass casting using the precision casting method. It shows that the quality of the alloy depends on the intermetalic phase compounds known as hard inclusions that are formed in the alloy. The intrusions, composed mainly of iron, have also negative influence on obtaining good quality i.e. smooth surfaces of products. One of the methods to improve surface smoothness proposed by authors is to apply additional copper plating and fine polishing.

  9. Surface roughness and hardness of a composite resin: influence of finishing and polishing and immersion methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luísa Botta Martins de Oliveira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the finishing and polishing effect on the surface roughness and hardness of the Filtek Supreme XT, in fluoride solutions. Specimens were prepared (n = 140 with half of the samples finished and polished with Super-Snap® disks. The experimental groups were divided according to the presence or absence of finishing and polishing and immersion solutions (artificial saliva, sodium fluoride solution at 0.05% - manipulated, Fluordent Reach, Oral B, Fluorgard. The specimens remained immersed in artificial saliva for 24 hours and were then subjected to initial analysis (baseline of surface roughness and Vickers microhardness. Next, they were immersed in different fluoride solutions for 1 min/day, for 60 days. Afterwards, a new surface roughness and microhardness reading was conducted. The data were submitted to a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5% significance level. For the comparison of mean roughness and hardness at baseline and after 60 days, the paired Student t test was used. The results showed that the surface roughness and microhardness of the Filtek Supreme XT were influenced by the finishing and polishing procedure, independently of the immersion methods.

  10. Effects of surface finishing conditions on the biocompatibility of a nickel-chromium dental casting alloy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Emma Louise

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effects of surface finishing condition (polished or alumina particle air abraded) on the biocompatibility of direct and indirect exposure to a nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) d.Sign®10 dental casting alloy on oral keratinocytes. Biocompatibility was performed by assessing cellular viability and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity and presence of inflammatory cytokine markers.

  11. Surface roughness and removal rate in magnetorheological finishing of a subsurface damage free surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Haobo; WANG Yingwei; FENG Zhijing; CHENG Kai

    2005-01-01

    Based on computer-controlled optical surfacing, a new technique called magnetorheological finishing (MRF), is presented. The new technique combines the features of conventional loose abrasive machining with a wheel shaped polishing tool. The tool incorporates a host of features and has unprecedented fabricating versatility. The pre-polishing and fine polishing processes can be performed only by adjusting different parameters. The material removal function is studied theoretically and the results of simulation present a Gaussian distribution feature. Based on the established theoretical model, material removal rate experiments involving a parabolic mirror are designed and carried out to determine the effect of controllable parameters on size of the gap between the workpiece and the polishing wheel,rotating speed of the polishing wheel, concentration of volume fraction of non-magnetic particles and polishing time. Further experiments are carried out on the surface microstructure of the workpiece, the final surface roughness with an initial value of 10.98 nm reaches 1.22 nm root mean square (RMS) after 20 min of polishing. The subsurface damage experiment and the atomic force microscopy (AFM)measurement on the polished surface can also verify the feasibility of the MRF technique.

  12. Phenomenological Anisotropic Study of Surface Finish in Pack Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A phenomenological anisotropic model has been presented for the surface roughness modeling of pack rolling. The model is an assembly of grains in different orientations and sizes. The grain size is assumed to be in log-normal distribution. To model the macro anisotropic mechanical behavior of the grains induced by the slip deformation, the grains are assumed as isolated anisotropic units. The units have different mechanic behavior, and depend on the crystallographic orientations and the external loading as well as the interaction of the adjunctive grains. In the paper,the material properties of the grains are assumed as uniform distributions. The roughness of the contact surfaces depends on the distribution types and the scatters of the distributions. It is found that the initial roughness of the contact surfaces has a little influence on the surface roughness when the rolling deformation is large. The comparison between the phenomenological model and crystallographic model shows that the phenomenological model can also give out a reasonable result, while it only takes much less CPU time. The agreement between the single sheet model and the pack rolling model shows that in a certain degree the pack rolling model can be replaced by the single sheet model to decrease the CPU time.

  13. 77 FR 12227 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Uncovered Finished Water Reservoirs; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is hosting a public meeting on April 24, 2012, concerning information that may inform the regulatory review of the uncovered finished water reservoir requirement in the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2 rule). At this meeting, EPA will provide background information on the LT2 rule's uncovered finished water reservoir requirement and the agency's Six Year Review process. EPA also plans to discuss and solicit public input on data and information related to microbial occurrence of Cryptosporidium, Giardia, viruses, and other pathogens/indicators in uncovered finished water reservoirs; public health risks; strategies to control or remove contaminants in uncovered finished water reservoirs; and potential assessment approaches to determine the effectiveness of these control and/or removal strategies. The primary focus of this meeting is to have a scientific and technical discussion related to uncovered finished water reservoirs. EPA will consider the data and/or information discussed at this meeting during the agency's review of the LT2 rule, which the agency announced as part of EPA's Retrospective Review Plan under Executive Order (E.O.) 13563 in August 2011.

  14. Influence of surface finish on the plasma formation at the skin explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datsko, I. M.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rybka, D. V.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper reports on experiments to investigate how the quality of surface finish, i.e., surface roughness, influences the plasma formation in a skin explosion of conductors. The experiments were performed on a MIG terawatt generator with a current amplitude of up to 2.5 MA and current rise time of 100 ns. The plasma formation at the conductor surface and the evolution of the plasma boundary was recorded using a four-frame optical camera with an exposure time of 3 ns per frame. It is shown that the quality of surface finish little affects the onset of plasma formation in a skin explosion of stainless steel and St3 steel conductors at a magnetic field of up to 400 T.

  15. Performance Improvement of Friction Stir Welds by Better Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Sam; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The as-welded friction stir weld has a cross section that may act as a stress concentrator. The geometry associated with the stress concentration may reduce the weld strength and it makes the weld challenging to inspect with ultrasound. In some cases, the geometry leads to false positive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) indications and, in many cases, it requires manual blending to facilitate the inspection. This study will measure the stress concentration effect and develop an improved phased array ultrasound testing (PAUT) technique for friction stir welding. Post-welding, the friction stir weld (FSW) tool would be fitted with an end mill that would machine the weld smooth, trimmed shaved. This would eliminate the need for manual weld preparation for ultrasonic inspections. Manual surface preparation is a hand operation that varies widely depending on the person preparing the welds. Shaving is a process that can be automated and tightly controlled.

  16. Effect finishing and polishing procedures on the surface roughness of IPS Empress 2 ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Juliana Maria Capelozza; Nishida, Rodrigo; Elossais, André Afif; Lima, Darlon Martins; Reis, José Mauricio Santos Nunes; Campos, Edson Alves; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the surface roughness of IPS Empress 2 ceramic when treated with different finishing/polishing protocols. Sixteen specimens of IPS Empress 2 ceramic were made from wax patterns obtained using a stainless steel split mold. The specimens were glazed (Stage 0-S0, control) and divided into two groups. The specimens in Group 1 (G1) were finished/polished with a KG Sorensen diamond point (S1), followed by KG Sorensen siliconized points (S2) and final polishing with diamond polish paste (S3). In Group 2 (G2), the specimens were finished/polished using a Shofu diamond point (S1), as well as Shofu siliconized points (S2) and final polishing was performed using Porcelize paste (S3). After glazing (S0) and following each polishing procedure (S1, S2 or S3), the surface roughness was measured using TALYSURF Series 2. The average surface roughness results were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Tukey post-hoc tests (α = 0.01) RESULTS: All of the polishing procedures yielded higher surface roughness values when compared to the control group (S0). S3 yielded lower surface roughness values when compared to S1 and S2. The proposed treatments negatively affected the surface roughness of the glazed IPS Empress 2 ceramic.

  17. Effect of surface finishing on the oxidation behaviour of a ferritic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardigo-Besnard, M. R.; Popa, I.; Heintz, O.; Chassagnon, R.; Vilasi, M.; Herbst, F.; Girardon, P.; Chevalier, S.

    2017-08-01

    The corrosion behaviour and the oxidation mechanism of a ferritic stainless steel, K41X (AISI 441), were evaluated at 800 °C in water vapour hydrogen enriched atmosphere. Mirror polished samples were compared to as-rolled K41X material. Two different oxidation behaviours were observed depending on the surface finishing: a protective double (Cr,Mn)3O4/Cr2O3 scale formed on the polished samples whereas external Fe3O4 and (Cr,Fe)2O3 oxides grew on the raw steel. Moreover, isotopic marker experiments combined with SIMS analyses revealed different growth mechanisms. The influence of surface finishing on the corrosion products and growth mechanisms was apprehended by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and residual stress analyses using XRD at the sample surfaces before ageing.

  18. The influence of surface finishing methods on touch-sensitive reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhta, M. S.; Sokolov, A. P.; Krauinsh, P. Y.; Kozlova, A. D.; Bouchard, C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes the modern technological development trends in jewelry design. In the jewelry industry, new trends, associated with the introduction of updated non-traditional materials and finishing techniques, are appearing. The existing information-oriented society enhances the visual aesthetics of new jewelry forms, decoration techniques (depth and surface), synthesis of different materials, which, all in all, reveal a bias towards positive effects of visual design. Today, the jewelry industry includes not only traditional techniques, but also such improved techniques as computer-assisted design, 3D-prototyping and other alternatives to produce an updated level of jewelry material processing. The authors present the specific features of ornamental pattern designing, decoration types (depth and surface) and comparative analysis of different approaches in surface finishing. Identifying the appearance or the effect of jewelry is based on proposed evaluation criteria, providing an advanced visual aesthetics basis is predicated on touch-sensitive responses.

  19. Surface roughness of flowable and packable composite resin materials after finishing with abrasive discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçtaşli, M B; Bala, O; Güllü, A

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare surface roughness of flowable (Admira Flow, Filtek Flow, Tetric Flow) and packable (Admira, Filtek P60, Tetric HB) composite resin restorative materials finishing with Sof-Lex discs by means of average surface roughness (Ra) measurement using a surface profilometer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For each test group five specimens were prepared and roughness was measured in five different positions using a profilometer with a traversing distance of 4 mm and a cut-off value of 0.8 mm. The radius of the tracing diamond tip was 5 microm and measuring force and speed was 4 mN and 0.5 mm/s, respectively. The surface roughness of each individual disk was taken as the arithmetic mean of the Ra values measured in five different positions. Additionally, one specimen of each test group after finishing was observed under SEM with the magnification of x800 and x2500. Before finishing with Sof-Lex discs, flowable composite materials showed a smoother surface than packable composites restoratives (P 0.05).

  20. Evaluation of the surface roughness in dental ceramics submitted to different finishing and polishing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alex C; Oliveira, Mario C S; Lima, Emilena M C X; Rambob, Isabel; Leite, Mariana

    2013-09-01

    Ceramic restorations have been widely used in dentistry. These restorations often require intraoral adjustment with diamond burs after their cementation causing increasing roughness of the ceramic surface. Consequently some finishing and polishing methods have been used to minimize this occurrence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the roughness of the ceramic surfaces submitted to different finishing and polishing methods. 144 specimens of VITAVM(®)7, VM(®)9 and VM(®)13 (VITA Zahnfabrik) ceramics were fabricated and submitted to grinding using diamond burs. They were then divided into 15 groups (five of each ceramic type). Groups 1, 6 and 11-positive control (Glaze); Groups 2, 7 and 12-negative control (no polishing); Groups 3, 8 and 13-polished with abrasive rubbers (Edenta), felt disc and diamond polishing past; Groups 4, 9 and 14-polished with abrasive rubbers (Shofu), felt disc and diamond polishing past; Groups 5, 10 and 15-polished with aluminum oxide discs (Sof-Lex, 3M-ESPE), felt disc and diamond polishing paste. The roughness of the samples surfaces were measured using the rugosimeter Surfcorder SE 1700 and the data were submitted to statistical analysis using ANOVA and Tukey test at a level of significance of 5 %. There was statistically significance difference between the positive control groups and the other groups in all the ceramic types. Mechanical finishing and polishing methods were not able to provide a surface as smooth as the glazed surface for the tested ceramics. To assist dental practitioners to select the best finishing and polishing methods for the final adjustment of the ceramic restorations.

  1. Online application of automatic surface quality inspection system to finishing line of cold rolled strips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Sun; Ke Xu; Jinwu Xu

    2003-01-01

    An autonatic surface quality inspection system installed on a finishing line of cold rolled strips is introduced. The system is able to detect surface defects on cold rolled strips, such as scratches, coil breaks, rusts, roll imprints, and so on. Multiple CCD area scan canteras were equipped to capture images of strip surface simultaneously. Defects were detected through "Dark-field illumination' which is generated by LED illuminators. Parallel computation technique and fast processing algorithms were developed for real-time data processing. The application to the production line shows that the system is able to detect defects effectively.

  2. In-vitro characteristics of cemented titanium femoral stems with a smooth surface finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Koji; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Tadami; Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In cemented total hip arthroplasty (THA), a polished tapered femoral stem with a design based on the taper-slip concept enables extremely reliable and durable fixation. In contrast, cemented femoral stems made from titanium alloys are not favored because of reports describing insufficient clinical outcomes. However, we have reported excellent clinical and radiological outcomes for cemented titanium stems made using the composite-beam concept. This study examines the characteristics of cemented titanium femoral stems with a smooth surface. The bonding strength between titanium alloys with different surface finishes and bone cement was evaluated by use of push-out and detachment tests. Torsional stability tests were performed to evaluate the initiation and propagation of disruption of the fixation of cemented stems at the cement-implant interface. The wear resistance was investigated by use of wear-friction tests performed using a multidirectional pin-on-disc machine. The bone strain loaded on to the femoral cortex was measured by use of an implanted Sawbone and analyzed by use of the finite element method. The push-out and detachment tests revealed increasing cement adhesion strength with increasing degree of roughness of the metal surface. The torsional stability tests indicated that a load >1,000 N led to progressive debonding between the cement and the implant with a smooth surface finish. Interestingly, wear-friction tests revealed the wear rate for polished titanium surfaces was clearly higher than for smooth surfaces. In addition, the greater elasticity of titanium stems compared with cobalt-chromium stems transmitted the external load to the proximal side of the femur more effectively. The smooth surface finish of the stems is an important factor for the satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes of cemented titanium femoral stems. The greater elasticity of a titanium stem effectively transmits the external load to the medial side of the femur.

  3. Effect of finishing and polishing procedures on biofilm adhesion to composite surfaces: An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Vyavahare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface roughness allows plaque accumulation resulting in gingival inflammation, superficial staining and secondary caries. Proper surface finishing and polishing are critical clinical procedures which enhance esthetics and longevity of restorations. This study evaluated adhesion of Streptococcus mutans biofilm on the surface of composite resin discs (nanofilled, Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE, Salt Lake City, UT, USA after finishing and polishing by different techniques. Methodology: Sixty samples of nanofilled composite resin were prepared in a circular shaped disc- 6 mm × 2 mm and divided randomly in three groups (n = 20 for surface treatments. Control group: composite resin surface in contact with Mylar matrix strips with no finishing or polishing performed, Sof-Lex aluminum oxide disc technique and 30-blade tungsten carbide burs and silicon carbide brushes, Astrobrush. The samples were subjected to biofilm adhesion by inoculation in suitable media. The response variable was the mean CFU/mL present in the Streptococcus mutans biofilms formed on the composite resin surface. Data was statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The Mean adhesion found in Mylar matrix strip group at 10 dilution was 74.7 ± 3.5, in Sof-Lex group was 147.3 ± 7.0 and in Astrobrush group was 149.4 ± 8.1. This difference in the mean values between the groups was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.01. Conclusion: Mylar matrix strips promoted the least bacterial adhesion, polishing with Sof-Lex aluminium oxide discs provided a smoother surface than Astrobrush and hence less bacterial adhesion than Astrobrush system.

  4. Improvement of Surface Finish by Multiple Piezoelectric Transducers in Fused Deposition Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Additive Manufacturing (AM which embrace as a new range technology of creating and producing end user parts in term of adding material layer by layer to create solid object from 3D CAD data. AM in particular Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM used (ABS thermoplastic have shown the most popular among the industry as its technology can print complex geometrical part without human intervention and tools. However, FDM fierce enemy whereas the common problem of stair-stepping, which means that seam lines appear between layers and excess material if often left as a residue, cause to lead rough surface and poor quality finish. It is often desirable for an AM model to have aesthetic or functional importance. Hence, reducing layer thickness will generally improve surface roughness but will add to the build time for the model. As an interest investigate the use of ultrasonic for FDM, this experiment will focus on the effect of applying multiple piezoelectric transducer for FDM printer. This paper aims to explore the effect use of multiple piezoelectric with different frequency applied (27, 40, 50 kHz to improve surface finish quality part printed by FDM whereby an ultrasonic transducer firmly attached onto the platform. Optical microscope with the aid of pro VIS software version 2.90 was used to measure the quality of surface roughness of samples printed with vibration in the above stated frequency. Hence, it was found that 1 piezo with 50 kHz frequency applied to the FDM machine achieved improve surface finish due to less layer thickness defect and finer layer thickness produce.

  5. EVALUATION OF SURFACE CONDITION AFTER FINISHING AND POLISHING OF A FLOWABLE COMPOSITE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan MUNTEANU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the surface condition, after finishing and polishing with 3 different systems, of a flowable composite material, starting from the microstructure experimentally analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Materials and method. The material tested in the present study was Filtek Ultimate Flowable Restorative (3M ESPE composite. 20 cylindrical samples, 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick, were prepared by using metallic molds. The samples were randomly divided into 4 groups: a group containing 5 control samples, not subjected to finishing and 3 groups formed, each, of 5 samples for each of the three finishing and polishing systems, respectively system 1: the two-step Sof-Lex (3M ESPE, system 2: multistep Super Snap (Shofu, Inc. Kyoto, Japan and system 3: multi-step OptiDisc (KerrHawe SA, Switzerland. The surfaces of the samples were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. For quantitative evaluations, the rugosity parameter (Ra, and the mean deviation of the determined profile were calculated. Results. All 3 polishing systems determined an increase of the Ra parameter, comparatively with the control samples; the highest mean Ra value, of 1.19 µm, was recorded for system 3, followed by system 2 (mean Ra value = 1.12 µm, while the lowest mean value, of 1.10 µm, was registered for system 1. Conclusions. All three systems under investigation induced increased rugosity on the surfaces of the samples prepared from the Filtek Ultimate Flowable Restorative (3M ESPE composite resin. The most abrasive system appears to be OptiDisc (KerrHawe SA, Switzerland, followed by the Super Snap (Shofu, Inc. Kyoto, Japan system, the one recording the lowest abrasion being SofLex (3M ESPE.

  6. Surface finish effects and the strength-grain size relation in SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, D. C.; Tressler, R. E.; Bradt, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of surface finish on the strength-grain size relation was investigated for dense hot-pressed SiC. Failure initiated predominantly via the propagation of extrinsic machining-induced flaws for the range of grain sizes and machining grit sizes studied. These results are consistent with the region of large-grain-size flaw control as delineated by Prochazka and Charles. The severity of machining-induced flaws, relative to the machining grit size, decreased with increasing machining grit size and decreasing SiC grain size.

  7. Improvement of Surface Roughness Quality for Stainless Steel 420 Plate Using Magnetic Abrasive Finishing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya M. Hamad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was carried out to improve the surface roughness quality of the stainless steel 420 using magnetic abrasive finishing method (MAF. Four independent operation parameters were studied (working gap, coil current, feed rate, and table stroke, and their effects on the MAF process were introduced. A rotating coil electromagnet was designed and implemented to use with plane surfaces. The magnetic abrasive powder used was formed from 33%Fe and 67% Quartz of (250µm mesh size. The lubricant type SAE 20W was used as a binder for the powder contents. Taguchi method was used for designing the experiments and the optimal values of the selected parameters were found. An empirical equation representing the relation between surface roughness with operation parameters have been achieved.

  8. The Effect of Composition on the Surface Finish of PS400: A New High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Stanford, malcolm K.; Thomas, Fransua; Edmonds, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    A new composite, multi-constituent, solid lubricant coating, NASA PS400, developed for high temperature tribological applications, exhibits a smoother surface finish after grinding and polishing than its predecessors PS200 and PS300. In this paper, the baseline composition of PS400 is modified to investigate each individual constituent s role on the achievable surface finish through a series of coating deposition, grinding, and polishing experiments. Furthermore, to explore the limits of compositional tailoring for improved tribological performance, several PS400 coatings were doped with additional solid lubricants (graphite, MoS2 and BN) and tribologically tested. The test results clearly showed that, compared to PS300 coatings, PS400 achieves a smoother surface finish via a reduced lubricant content. Coatings prepared with higher than the baseline level (10 wt%) of lubricants exhibited higher final surface roughness than the earlier generation PS300 coatings. Reducing or eliminating the one or both lubricants (fluorides or silver) did not further improve the surface finish suggesting that the current composition of PS400 is near optimal with respect to surface finish. Lastly, attempts to improve the poor initial room temperature tribological behavior of PS400 via the addition of traditional solid lubricants were unsuccessful. Based upon this work and earlier results it is expected that future research will concentrate on developing methods to produce a lubricious glaze on the rubbing surface during break in to ensure that low friction and wear are rapidly achieved.

  9. The effect of surface finishes on outdoor granite and limestone pavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Martínez, J.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Two types of ornamental stones, namely granite (Blanco Rafaela or Zarzalejo Granite and microcrystalline limestone (marble known commercially as Gris Pulpis, treated for different surface finishes, were tested for suitability as paving slabs. The finishes tested in both stones were polishing, hammering, honing and flaming, while acid treatment and abrasion were applied to limestone only and sawn finishes were only studied in granite.The stones were tested for the three physical properties that determine suitability for use as paving slabs; flexural strength under a concentrated load, and abrasion and slip resistance. Laboratory freeze-thaw cycle ageing tests were also conducted and flexural strength subsequently evaluated. Stone water sorption proved to be substantially unaltered by the type of finish employed. Finish barely affected flexural strength, except in the case of limestone flaming, where it was lower. Hammering was found to provide good slip resistance in both stones. The best slip performance for granite, however, was found for flamed specimens. Finish was shown to have no effect on abrasion resistance in either of the stone materials. Polished limestone suffered the least damage in freeze-thaw cycles, whereas freeze-thaw resistance was similar in all the granite specimens, regardless of the finish used.Se han estudiado, para su utilización como baldosas de pavimentos, granito (Blanco Rafaela o Granito de Zarzalejo y caliza microcristalina (mármol comercial Gris Pulpis con diferentes acabados. Estos acabados son: pulido, apomazado, abujardado y flameado en ambas rocas y además acabado al ácido y amolado en la caliza. Se han determinado mediante ensayos estandarizados las tres propiedades físicas de mayor interés para el uso de la piedra natural como baldosa en pavimentos de exteriores: resistencia a la flexión bajo carga concentrada, a la abrasión y al deslizamiento. Se han realizado ensayos de durabilidad por ciclos de hielo

  10. Surface finish of the Exeter Trauma Stem: a cause for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petheram, T G; Bone, M; Joyce, T J; Serrano-Pedraza, I; Reed, M R; Partington, P F

    2013-02-01

    Recent guidance recommends the use of a well-proven cemented femoral stem for hemiarthroplasty in the management of fractures of the femoral neck, and the Exeter Trauma Stem (ETS) has been suggested as an example of such an implant. The design of this stem was based on the well-proven Exeter Total Hip Replacement stem (ETHRS). This study assessed the surface finish of the ETS in comparison with the ETHRS. Two ETSs and two ETHRSs were examined using a profilometer with a precision of 1 nm and compared with an explanted Exeter Matt stem. The mean roughness average (RA) of the ETSs was approximately ten times higher than that of the ETHRSs (0.235 μm (0.095 to 0.452) versus 0.025 μm (0.011 to 0.059); p finish in 1976 resulted in a high stem failure rate. We do not yet know whether the surface differences between ETS and ETHRS will be clinically significant. We propose the inclusion of hemiarthroplasty stems in national joint registries.

  11. The influence of proximal stem geometry and surface finish on the fixation of a double-tapered cemented femoral stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiorgio, Sophia N; Longjohn, Donald B; Dorr, Lawrence D; Ebramzadeh, Edward

    2011-01-04

    In this study, the in vitro fixation of four otherwise identical double-tapered stem-types, varying only in surface finish (polished or matte) and proximal stem geometry (with or without flanges) were compared under two conditions. First, four specimens of each stem type were tested with initially bonded stem-cement interfaces, representing early post-operative conditions. Then, simulating conditions a few weeks to months later, stems were implanted in unused synthetic femurs, with a thin layer coating the stem to prevent stem-cement adhesion. Per-cycle motions were measured at both cement interfaces throughout loading. Overall, surface finish had the smallest relative effect on fixation compared to flanges. Flanges increased axial fixation by 22 μm per-cycle, regardless of surface finish (P=0.01). Further, all stems moved under dynamic load at the stem-cement interface during the first few cycles of loading, even without a thin film. The results indicate that flanges have a greater effect on fixation than surface finish, and therefore adverse findings about matte surfaces should not necessarily apply to all double-tapered stems. Specifically, dorsal flanges enhance the stability of a tapered cemented femoral stem, regardless of surface finish. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of finishing technique on the microleakage and surface texture of resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, A D; Swift, E J; May, K N; Thompson, J Y; McDougal, R A

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of wet and dry finishing/polishing procedures on the microleakage and surface texture of resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) restorative materials. Class V cavity preparations were made at the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) on the buccal and lingual surface of 30 extracted human molars. The teeth were restored in three groups of 10 (20 preparations in each group) using Fuji II LC and Vitremer, both RMGIs, and Fuji II, a capsulated conventional glass ionomer cement (control). One restoration per tooth was finished/polished with copious applications of water and the other was finished/polished without water. All restorations were finished/polished using a sequence of four abrasive disks. Finishing/polishing was initiated according to manufacturers' instructions-immediately after light-curing Fuji II LC and Vitremer, and 15min after placement for Fuji II. The specimens were thermocycled and subjected to a silver nitrate leakage test. Each tooth was sectioned buccolingually and examined with an optical microscope at 40x to determine the extent of microleakage at enamel and dentin margins. The data were subjected to a non-parametric statistical analysis. To evaluate surface roughness after polishing, three disks each of Vitremer and Fuji II LC were fabricated in Teflon molds. One disk of each material was not finished/polished (control). The others were finished/polished using Sof-Lex abrasive disks. One specimen of each material was kept wet during all finishing/polishing procedures, while the other was kept dry. Atomic force microscopy was used to determine the average roughness (R(a)) of the specimens. For each material, microleakage at the enamel margin was very slight. Leakage of the conventional glass ionomer Fuji II was severe at dentin margins. Statistical analysis indicated that both Vitremer and Fuji II LC had significantly less leakage than Fuji II, and that Vitremer had significantly less leakage than Fuji

  13. Best approximation in quotient spaces with application to the finishing of optical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Therese Lynn

    The finishing of axisymmetric optical surfaces relies upon the use of Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machines. Porsching and Hall developed a mathematical model for a general class of such machines, which can be used to generate material removal rates. These removal rates give the amount of material removed at each radial point on the workpiece per unit time. In this thesis, we use these material removal rates to generate two different material removal strategies for Operator Controlled (OC) finishing. Given an initial error profile which is an element of the quotient space C[a, b]IK where K is the space of constant functions, we seek a best approximation to this error profile by elements of a closed convex set. Some other nonstandard features of this best approximation problem are nonnegativity constraints on the variables, the nondifferentiability of the approximating functions, and the fact that the approximating functions do not form a Haar space. We explore best approximation on a quotient space and show that many of the standard existence and uniqueness theorems can be extended. For the first removal strategy, we solve the best approximation problem using the L2-norm, which leads to a quadratic programming problem (QPP). This QPP is solved after first using a modified Gram-Schmidt process to obtain a set of orthogonal removal rates. Our second strategy employs best minimax approximation. Since we do not have a Haar space, the standard characterizations theorems do not apply, although similar theorems are established. Using two definitions of the infinity norm on the quotient space C[a, b]IK, the problem can be reformulated as both a semi-infinite programming problem and as a convex programming problem. Computer programs which implement the least squares algorithm and two minimax algorithms which solve the related convex programming problems are described. Finally, we generate and discuss numerical examples which illustrate the theory and simulate the

  14. Surface Roughness, Microhardness, and Microleakage of a Silorane-Based Composite Resin after Immediate or Delayed Finishing/Polishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Carvalho Rezende Lins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study evaluated the effect of immediate or delayed finishing/polishing using different systems on the surface roughness, hardness, and microleakage of a silorane-based composite. Material and Methods. Specimens were made with silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE and assigned to the treatments: control (light-cured; aluminum oxide discs (Sof-Lex, 3M ESPE; diamond-impregnated silicone tips (Astropol, Ivoclar Vivadent; aluminum oxide-impregnated silicone tips (Enhance, Dentsply. Half of the specimens were finished/polished immediately and the rest after 7 days. Surface roughness (Ra, μm; n=20 and Vickers microhardness (50 g; 45 s; n=10 were measured. Cavities were prepared in bovine incisors and filled with Filtek P90. The fillings received immediate or delayed finishing/polishing (n=10 and were subjected to dye penetration test (0.5% basic fuchsin, 24 h. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Scheffe, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests (p<0.05. Results. The finishing/polishing system significantly influenced roughness and microhardness (p<0.0001. For enamel, microleakage was not affected by the finishing/polishing system (p=0.309. For dentin, Sof-Lex discs and Astropol points promoted greater microleakage than Enhance points (p=0.033. Conclusion. Considering roughness, microhardness, and microleakage together, immediate finishing/polishing of a silorane-based composite using aluminum oxide discs may be recommended.

  15. Adherence of Candida albicans to denture base acrylics and silicone-based resilient liner materials with different surface finishes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nevzatoglu, Erdem U.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Kulak-Ozkan, Yasemin; Kadir, Tanju

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness and Candida albicans adherence on denture base acrylic resins and silicone-based resilient liners with different surface finishes. Four commercial denture base acrylic resins ( three heat polymerized and one room temperature polymerized) and five silicone-b

  16. Effects of surface finish and treatment on the fatigue behaviour of vibrating cylinder block using frequency response approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of surface finish and treatment on the high cycle fatigue behaviour of vibrating cylinder block of a new two-stroke free piston engine at complex variable amplitude loading conditions using frequency response approach,Finite element modelling and frequency response analysis was conducted using finite element analysis software Package MSC.PATRAN/MSC.NASTRAN and fatigue life prediction was carried out using MSC.FATIGUE software. Based on the finite element results, different frequency response approach was applied to predict the cylinder block fatigue life. Results for different load histories and material combinations are also discussed. Results indicated great effects for all surface finish and treatment. It is concluded that polished and cast surface finish conditions give the highest and lowest cylinder block lives, respectively; and that Nitrided treatment leads to longest cylinder block life. The results were used to draw contour plots of fatigue life and damage in the worst or most damaging case.

  17. The influence of surface finishing of Paulownia Siebold et Zucc. on the mechanical properties of lacquered surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaić Milan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research of influence of sanding, staining and the use of polyurethane and acrylic coating on the adhesion, scratch resistance and abrasion resistance of the coating. Objective was to determine the most important mechanical properties of lacquered surfaces, considering the application of Paulownia elongata and Paulownia fortunei, by using different systems of surface finishing. Cross cut method was used for measurement of adhesion. More accurate view of coating adhesion was obtained by measuring the scratch resistance. Abrasion resistance was tested by the method of free falling of abrasive particles. The applied system of sanding had no effect on the examined mechanical properties. Stained samples lacquered with PU coating showed better adhesion to the non-stained samples. Impact of staining on scratch resistance is not established. Stained samples showed greater resistance to abrasion for both wood species. Samples lacquered with PU coating showed the higher values of mechanical properties compared with samples lacquered with UV acrylic coating. Application of PU coating for surface finishing of Paulownia elongata and Paulownia fortunei is more adequate than the application of UV acrylic coatings, from the point of scratch resistance and abrasion resistance.

  18. Control of formaldehyde and TVOC emission from wood-based flooring composites at various manufacturing processes by surface finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sumin

    2010-04-15

    This paper assesses the reproducibility of testing formaldehyde and TVOC emission behavior from wood flooring composites bonded by urea-formaldehyde resin at various manufacturing steps for surface finishing materials. The surface adhesion step of laminate flooring for this research was divided into two steps; HDF only and HDF with LPMs. In the case of engineered flooring, the manufacturing steps were divided into three steps; plywood only, fancy veneer bonded on plywood and UV coated on fancy veneer with plywood. Formaldehyde and VOCs emission decreased at the process of final surface finishing materials; LPMs were applied on the surface of HDF for laminate flooring. Although emissions increased when fancy veneer was bonded onto plywood in the case of engineered flooring, emission was dramatically reduced up to similar level with plywood only when final surface finishing; UV-curable coating was applied on fancy veneer. This study suggests that formaldehyde and VOCs emission from floorings can be controlled at manufacturing steps for surface finishing. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Surface Finish of Thermally Aged Carbon Fibre Reinforced Composites Using E-glass as a Surface Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, M. L.; Fox, B. L.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigated the effect of woven E-glass mass (25 g/m2, 50 g/m2, 85 g/m2, 135 g/m2) on the painted surface finish of various thermoset (EPIKOTETM RIM935, EPIKOTETM 04434, Ultratec LpTM ES300, Ultratec LpTM SPV6035) carbon fibre composite laminates, before and after aging at 95 °C for 168 h. The as-moulded laminate surfaces were evaluated using surface profilometry techniques and the painted and aged surfaces were evaluated using a wave-scan distinctness of image (DOI) instrument. It was found that the 25 g/m2 E-glass surface layer assisted with reducing the roughness of the as-moulded surfaces and the long-term waviness of the painted surfaces due to the increase in resin-richness at the surface. The EPIKOTETM 04434 resin system that contained diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) epoxy had the least change in long-term waviness with thermal aging due to the rigid fluorene-based backbone in comparison to the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) systems.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE FINISH AND DIMENSIONAL ACCURACY OF TOOLS MANUFACTURED BY METAL CASTING IN RAPID PROTOTYPING SAND MOULDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyembwe, K.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an initial assessment of the quality parameters of the surface finish and dimensional accuracy of tools made by metal casting in rapid prototyping (RP sand moulds is undertaken. A case study from a local tool room, dealing with the manufacturing of an aluminium die for the lost wax process, is employed. Modern techniques, including surface roughness analysis and three dimensional scanning, are used to determine and understand how each manufacturing step influences the final quality of the cast tool. The best surface finish obtained for the cast die had arithmetic average roughness (Ra and mean average roughness (Rz respectively equal to 3.23m and 11.38m. In terms of dimensional accuracy, 82% of cast-die points coincided with the Computer Aided Design (CAD data, which is within the typical tolerances of sand cast products. The investigation shows that mould coating contributes slightly to the improvement of the cast tool surface finish. The study also found that the additive manufacturing of the sand mould was the chief factor responsible for the loss of dimensional accuracy. These findings indicate that machining will always be required to improve the surface finish and the dimensional accuracy of cast tools in RP sand moulds.

  1. Leg lesions and cleanliness of finishing bulls kept in housing systems with different lying area surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze Westerath, H; Gygax, L; Mayer, C; Wechsler, B

    2007-07-01

    The influence of the quality of different lying surfaces on lesions and swellings at the joints as well as on the cleanliness of finishing bulls throughout the fattening period was studied. On 17 farms (623 bulls), pens with fully slatted concrete floors (CONCRETE), with rubber coated slats (RUBBER), with cubicles (CUBICLES, provided with five different types of soft lying mat) and with a littered lying area (STRAW) were compared. Bulls kept on STRAW developed the smallest lesion scores at the joints. In CUBICLES, there was a huge variability in the lesion scores depending on the type of lying mat, ranging from values comparable to STRAW up to and greater than the values for CONCRETE. The highest lesion scores at the carpal joints were found on CONCRETE, with intermediate values on RUBBER and in CUBICLES. At the tarsal joints, lesion scores were similar on CONCRETE and RUBBER and in the same range or worse on most mats in the CUBICLES. Swelling scores were highest on CONCRETE and intermediate on RUBBER and in CUBICLES compared to STRAW. In general, there was a steady increase in the lesion scores of the leg joints throughout the fattening period on CONCRETE, RUBBER and STRAW, whereas on some of the mats in CUBICLES these scores were at a high level from early on in the fattening period. Animals in all the housing systems were clean over the whole fattening period. Littering the lying area in CUBICLES affected neither the lesion scores nor the swelling scores at the joints nor animal cleanliness. In conclusion, both rubber coated slats and cubicles provided with soft lying mats were favourable with regard to the levels of lesions and swellings of the leg joints of finishing bulls compared to concrete slats. However, these levels were even lower in pens with a straw bedded lying area.

  2. Research of polishing process to control the iron contamination on the magnetorheological finished KDP crystal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoshan; Li, Shengyi; Peng, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Hao; Tie, Guipeng

    2015-02-20

    A new nonaqueous and abrasive-free magnetorheological finishing (MRF) method is adopted for processing a KDP crystal. MRF polishing is easy to result in the embedding of carbonyl iron (CI) powders; meanwhile, Fe contamination on the KDP crystal surface will affect the laser induced damage threshold seriously. This paper puts forward an appropriate MRF polishing process to avoid the embedding. Polishing results show that the embedding of CI powders can be avoided by controlling the polishing parameters. Furthermore, on the KDP crystal surface, magnetorheological fluids residua inevitably exist after polishing and in which the Fe contamination cannot be removed completely by initial ultrasonic cleaning. To solve this problem, a kind of ion beam figuring (IBF) polishing is introduced to remove the impurity layer. Then the content of Fe element contamination and the depth of impurity elements are measured by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The measurement results show that there are no CI powders embedding in the MRF polished surface and no Fe contamination after the IBF polishing process, respectively. That verifies the feasibility of MRF polishing-IBF polishing (cleaning) for processing a KDP crystal.

  3. Experimental and theoretical analysis of defocused CO2 laser microchanneling on PMMA for enhanced surface finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Shashi; Kumar, Subrata

    2017-02-01

    The poor surface finish of CO2 laser-micromachined microchannel walls is a major limitation of its utilization despite several key advantages, like low fabrication cost and low time consumption. Defocused CO2 laser beam machining is an effective solution for fabricating smooth microchannel walls on polymer and glass substrates. In this research work, the CO2 laser microchanneling process on PMMA has been analyzed at different beam defocus positions. Defocused processing has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally, and the depth of focus and beam diameter have been determined experimentally. The effect of beam defocusing on the microchannel width, depth, surface roughness, heat affected zone and microchannel profile were examined. A previously developed analytical model for microchannel depth prediction has been improved by incorporating the threshold energy density factor. A semi-analytical model for predicting the microchannel width at different defocus positions has been developed. A semi-empirical model has also been developed for predicting microchannel widths at different defocusing conditions for lower depth values. The developed models were compared and verified by performing actual experiments. Multi-objective optimization was performed to select the best optimum set of input parameters for achieving the desired surface roughness.

  4. Improvement of the surface finish obtained by laser ablation with a Nd: YAG laser on pre-ablated tool steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface finish is an important requirement for tool and die makers and remains a challenge with conventional machining technologies. Nd: YAG lasers have been utilised for many years in the area of laser marking, engraving and micro machining...

  5. Printed Circuit Board Surface Finish and Effects of Chloride Contamination, Electric Field, and Humidity on Corrosion Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conseil-Gudla, Hélène; Jellesen, Morten S.; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-02-01

    Corrosion reliability is a serious issue today for electronic devices, components, and printed circuit boards (PCBs) due to factors such as miniaturization, globalized manufacturing practices which can lead to process-related residues, and global usage effects such as bias voltage and unpredictable user environments. The investigation reported in this paper focuses on understanding the synergistic effect of such parameters, namely contamination, humidity, PCB surface finish, pitch distance, and potential bias on leakage current under different humidity levels, and electrochemical migration probability under condensing conditions. Leakage currents were measured on interdigitated comb test patterns with three different types of surface finish typically used in the electronics industry, namely gold, copper, and tin. Susceptibility to electrochemical migration was studied under droplet conditions. The level of base leakage current (BLC) was similar for the different surface finishes and NaCl contamination levels up to relative humidity (RH) of 65%. A significant increase in leakage current was found for comb patterns contaminated with NaCl above 70% to 75% RH, close to the deliquescent RH of NaCl. Droplet tests on Cu comb patterns with varying pitch size showed that the initial BLC before dendrite formation increased with increasing NaCl contamination level, whereas electrochemical migration and the frequency of dendrite formation increased with bias voltage. The effect of different surface finishes on leakage current under humid conditions was not very prominent.

  6. Printed Circuit Board Surface Finish and Effects of Chloride Contamination, Electric Field, and Humidity on Corrosion Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conseil-Gudla, Hélène; Jellesen, Morten S.; Ambat, Rajan

    2016-10-01

    Corrosion reliability is a serious issue today for electronic devices, components, and printed circuit boards (PCBs) due to factors such as miniaturization, globalized manufacturing practices which can lead to process-related residues, and global usage effects such as bias voltage and unpredictable user environments. The investigation reported in this paper focuses on understanding the synergistic effect of such parameters, namely contamination, humidity, PCB surface finish, pitch distance, and potential bias on leakage current under different humidity levels, and electrochemical migration probability under condensing conditions. Leakage currents were measured on interdigitated comb test patterns with three different types of surface finish typically used in the electronics industry, namely gold, copper, and tin. Susceptibility to electrochemical migration was studied under droplet conditions. The level of base leakage current (BLC) was similar for the different surface finishes and NaCl contamination levels up to relative humidity (RH) of 65%. A significant increase in leakage current was found for comb patterns contaminated with NaCl above 70% to 75% RH, close to the deliquescent RH of NaCl. Droplet tests on Cu comb patterns with varying pitch size showed that the initial BLC before dendrite formation increased with increasing NaCl contamination level, whereas electrochemical migration and the frequency of dendrite formation increased with bias voltage. The effect of different surface finishes on leakage current under humid conditions was not very prominent.

  7. Effects of surface-finishing protocols on the roughness, color change, and translucency of different ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Gülcan Coşkun; Pekkan, Gürel; Çal, Ebru; Eskitaşçıoğlu, Gürcan; Özcan, Mutlu

    2014-08-01

    Surface-finishing protocols have a mechanical impact on ceramic surfaces that could eventually affect surface topography and light scattering. An optimum protocol is needed to avoid damaging the optical properties of ceramics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different surface-finishing protocols on the surface roughness, color change, and translucency of ceramic and metal ceramic restorations. Standardized disk-shaped specimens (1.5 × 10 mm, n=128) were fabricated from 3 different ceramic core materials (aluminum oxide [Al2O3]-AL, zirconium oxide [ZrO2]-ZR, lithium disilicate [Li2Si2O5]-LIT), veneered (V) with dentin ceramics (n=32 per group), and placed in the following groups: ALV, ZRV, and LITV. The metal ceramic group acted as the control (n=32). Four different surface-finishing methods were tested. Airborne-particle abrasion with 50 μm Al2O3, polishing with adjustment kit, polishing with adjustment kit plus diamond polishing paste, and autoglazing (n=8 subgroup) were applied on the veneering ceramics. The specimens were analyzed with a profilometer for surface roughness, and color change and translucency were measured with a clinical spectrophotometer. Statistical analyses were performed with 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey honest significant difference tests (α=.05). Specimens treated with the airborne particle abrasion method showed significantly higher mean profilometer for surface roughness values in all groups (P.05). With the diamond polishing paste method, lower surface roughness values were achieved in the ZRV and metal ceramic groups acted as the control groups. Different surface-finishing methods affected the color change of the ceramic systems, except for ZRV. Surface-finishing protocols significantly affected the translucency values of the ALV, LITV, and metal ceramic groups (Pceramics tested. The airborne-particle abrasion protocol created rougher surfaces and decreased translucency, and color change in zirconia was not

  8. Comparison of Roller Burnishing Method with Other Hole Surface Finishing Processes Applied on AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkurt, Adnan

    2011-08-01

    Component surface quality and selection of the optimum material are the main factors determining the performance of components used in machine manufacturing. The level of hole surface quality can be evaluated by the measurements regarding surface roughness, micro-hardness, and cylindricity. In this study, data had been obtained for different hole drilling methods. The characteristics of materials obtained after applications were compared for different hole-finishing processes to identify best hole drilling method. AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel material was used. Surface finishing of holes were performed using drilling, turning, reaming, grinding, honing, and roller burnishing methods. The results of the study show that the roller burnishing method gives the best results for mechanical, metallurgical properties, and hole surface quality of the material. On the other hand, the worst characteristics were obtained in the drilling method.

  9. The influence of the surface finishing on the electrochemical behaviour of austenitic and superaustenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsic, G.; Runje, B.; Alar, Z. [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, Zagreb (Croatia); Alar, V.

    2012-08-15

    The influence of surface roughness on the pitting potential and the corrosion potential of the DIN W.Nr. 1.4541 and DIN W.Nr 1.4465 stainless steels were examined using electrochemical techniques. Roughness and electrochemical tests were performed on samples with various surface finishing. Electrochemical studies were conducted in an electrochemical cell where steel electrodes were immersed in 0.1 M NaCl and 0.1 M NaCl + 0.1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solutions. We found for both materials when immersed in 0.1 M NaCl aqueous solution lower pitting potential than in 0.1 M NaCl + 0.1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The results showed that the electrochemical behaviour of the DIN W.Nr. 1.4465 is better than of DIN W.Nr. 1.4541. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Comparison study of two aldehyde group finishing agents in surface modification of up-conversion luminescence materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Lili; FAN Huili; XIAO Junping; XU Xiaowei

    2008-01-01

    Surface modification of up-conversion luminescence materials (Na[Y0.57Yb0.39Er0.04]F4 modified by amino groups) by grafting and modifying with aldehyde groups was studied by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FFIR),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),thermogravimetric analysis (TGA),and emission spectrum (EM).The surface modification effect was compared using two different finishing agents,p-phthalaldehyde and glutaraldehyde.It was found that the surface of up-conversion luminescence materials could be modified by aldehyde groups of the two finishing agents,the systematic dispersibility and the thermostability of the up-conversion luminescence material modified by p-phthalaldehyde were better than those of the material modified by glutaraldehyde,and the luminous intensity of the material modified by p-phthalaldehyde was increased.The AI (the ratio of the suspended segmental quality in the specimen to the total mass of the specimen) of the material modified by p-phthalaldehyde was higher than that of the material modified by glutaraldehyde.It is obviously seen that the embellishment effect of p-phthalaldehyde as a finishing agent was better than that of glutaraldehyde.In addition,the reasons why p-phthalaldehyde is a good finishing agent are also explained.

  11. The Effect of Surface Finish on Low-Temperature Acetylene-Based Carburization of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yindong; Ernst, Frank; Kahn, Harold; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2014-12-01

    We observed a strong influence of surface finish on the efficacy of low-temperature acetylene-based carburization of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. Steel coupons were prepared with different surface finishes prior to carburization, from P400 SiC grit paper to 1- µm-diameter-diamond-paste. The samples with the finer surface finish developed a thicker "case" (a carbon-rich hardened surface layer) and a larger surface carbon concentration. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the differences arose mainly from the nature of the deformation-induced disturbed layer on the steel surface. A thick (>400 nm) disturbed layer consisting of nano-crystalline grains (≈10 nm diameter) inhibits acetylene-based carburization. The experimental observations can be explained by assuming that during machining or coarse polishing, the surface oxide layer is broken up and becomes incorporated into the deformation-induced disturbed layer. The incorporated oxide-rich films retard or completely prevent the ingress of carbon into the stainless steel.

  12. The effect of a collar and surface finish on cemented femoral stems: a prospective randomised trial of four stem designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, Jonathan; Hazlerigg, Alexandra; Aneel, Ansari; Epie, Geoffrey; Dabis, Husam; Twyman, Roy; Cobb, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    The optimal design for a cemented femoral stem remains a matter of debate. Over time, the shape, surface finish and collar have all been modified in various ways. A clear consensus has not yet emerged regarding the relative merits of even the most basic design features of the stem. We undertook a prospective randomised trial comparing surface finish and the effect of a collar on cemented femoral component subsidence, survivorship and clinical function. One hundred and sixty three primary total hip replacement patients were recruited prospectively and randomised to one of four groups to receive a cemented femoral stem with either a matt or polished finish, and with or without a collar. At two years, although there was a trend for increased subsidence in the matt collarless group, this was not statistically significant (p = 0.18). At a mean of 10.1 years follow-up, WOMAC scores for the surviving implants were good, (Range of means 89-93) without significant differences. Using revision or radiographic loosening as the endpoint, survivorship of the entire cohort was 93 % at 11 yrs, (CI 87-97 %). There were no significant differences in survivorship between the two groups with polished stems or the two groups with matt stems. A comparison of the two collarless stems demonstrated a statistically significant difference in survivorship between polished (100 %) and matt (88 %) finishes (p = 0.02). In the presence of a collar, surface finish did not significantly affect survivorship or function. Between the two collarless groups a polished surface conferred an improved survivorship.

  13. A study of the efficiency of spur gears made of powder metallurgy materials - ground versus super-finished surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xinmin; Sosa, Mario; Andersson, Martin; Olofsson, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Power loss is one of the main concerns in gear transmission systems. In this study a recirculating power back-to-back FZG test rig was used to investigate the efficiency of spur gears made of powder metallurgy (PM) material using two different surface manufacturing methods (ground and super-finished). The results were compared with previously presented results of standard gear material from the same test rig. The influence of the material (Wrought steel or PM) and surface roughness on the gea...

  14. Weathering performance of surface of thermally modified wood finished with nanoparticles-modified waterborne polyacrylate coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklečić, Josip; Turkulin, Hrvoje; Jirouš-Rajković, Vlatka

    2017-06-01

    In this research the samples of thermally modified (TMT) beech wood samples, finished with waterborne polyacrylate clear coatings modified with nano-sized ZnO and TiO2-rutil were naturally and artificially exposed to weathering conditions. To extend the lifetime of wood and maintain its natural look, the research and development of clear coatings with minimal use of harmful chemicals has become very important. Therefore nano-sized inorganic UV absorbers are increasingly used to enhance the durability of the coating and wood substrate, still retaining the transparency of the coating. During exposure the visual inspection was performed, further the changes of colour, gloss and adhesion were recorded. Interaction of the film with the thermally modified substrate surface were studied. Results showed that the addition of TiO2-rutil and ZnO nanoparticles to the waterborne polyacrylate coating improved the colour stability of thermally modified beech-wood. However, nano-sized ZnO increased the cracking and peeling, and caused the loss in adhesion strength of the film on thermally modified beech wood.

  15. Investigation of surface finishing of carbon based coated tools for dry deep drawing of aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, J.; Andreas, K.; Merklein, M.

    2016-11-01

    Global trends like growing environmental awareness and demand for resource efficiency motivate an abandonment of lubricants in metal forming. However, dry forming evokes increased friction and wear. Especially, dry deep drawing of aluminum alloys leads to intensive interaction between tool and workpiece due to its high adhesion tendency. One approach to improve the tribological behavior is the application of carbon based coatings. These coatings are characterized by high wear resistance. In order to investigate the potential of carbon based coatings for dry deep drawing, friction and wear behavior of different coating compositions are evaluated in strip drawing tests. This setup is used to model the tribological conditions in the flange area of deep drawing operations. The tribological behavior of tetrahedral amorphous (ta-C) and hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings with and without tungsten modification (a-C:H:W, a-C:H) is investigated. The influence of tool topography is analyzed by applying different surface finishing. The results show reduced friction with decreased roughness for coated tools. Besides tool topography the coating type determines the tribological conditions. Smooth tools with ta-C and a-C:H coatings reveal low friction and prevent adhesive wear. In contrast, smooth a-C:H:W coated tools only lead to slight improvement compared to rough, uncoated specimen.

  16. Comparison of resistance to corrosion on haz of a ferritic stainless steel by different surface finishings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juvenilson Costa Damascena

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Certain techniques, comprising machining and GTAW dressing, have been used in the weld bead edge (region of the welded joint between the weld metal and the base metal to increase the fillet radius of the region by reducing the stress concentrator factor, decreasing roughness, and increasing the life of weldings. Moreover, TIG Dressing may also provide a smooth change in the radius of the curvature and change the average grain size and promote a microstructural variation through the reflow of this region. Current study analyzes the effect of surface finish of the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ on resistance to corrosion of welded joints of simple deposition under plate by using machining techniques with sandpaper of different particle sizes and GTAW Dressing, comparing the effect of the two techniques in the resistance to corrosion in environments with chloride ions. ACE P410D ferritic stainless steel was employed as base metal and austenitic wire 308L for welding. Results showed that the condition sweetened with GTAW Dressing with pure argon at current 100A generated the lowest mass loss among the conditions under analysis.

  17. Surface Roughness, Microhardness, and Microleakage of a Silorane-Based Composite Resin after Immediate or Delayed Finishing/Polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Fernanda Carvalho Rezende; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Silveira, Rodrigo Richard; Pereira, Carolina Nemésio Barros; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira; Magalhães, Claudia Silami

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study evaluated the effect of immediate or delayed finishing/polishing using different systems on the surface roughness, hardness, and microleakage of a silorane-based composite. Material and Methods. Specimens were made with silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE) and assigned to the treatments: control (light-cured); aluminum oxide discs (Sof-Lex, 3M ESPE); diamond-impregnated silicone tips (Astropol, Ivoclar Vivadent); aluminum oxide-impregnated silicone tips (Enhance, Dentsply). Half of the specimens were finished/polished immediately and the rest after 7 days. Surface roughness (Ra, μm; n = 20) and Vickers microhardness (50 g; 45 s; n = 10) were measured. Cavities were prepared in bovine incisors and filled with Filtek P90. The fillings received immediate or delayed finishing/polishing (n = 10) and were subjected to dye penetration test (0.5% basic fuchsin, 24 h). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Scheffe, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests (p polishing system significantly influenced roughness and microhardness (p polishing system (p = 0.309). For dentin, Sof-Lex discs and Astropol points promoted greater microleakage than Enhance points (p = 0.033). Conclusion. Considering roughness, microhardness, and microleakage together, immediate finishing/polishing of a silorane-based composite using aluminum oxide discs may be recommended.

  18. An Overview of Surface Finishes and Their Role in Printed Circuit Board Solderability and Solder Joint Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianco, P.T.

    1998-10-15

    A overview has been presented on the topic of alternative surface finishes for package I/Os and circuit board features. Aspects of processability and solder joint reliability were described for the following coatings: baseline hot-dipped, plated, and plated-and-fused 100Sn and Sn-Pb coatings; Ni/Au; Pd, Ni/Pd, and Ni/Pd/Au finishes; and the recently marketed immersion Ag coatings. The Ni/Au coatings appear to provide the all-around best option in terms of solderability protection and wire bondability. Nickel/Pal ftishes offer a slightly reduced level of performance in these areas that is most likely due to variable Pd surface conditions. It is necessmy to minimize dissolved Au or Pd contents in the solder material to prevent solder joint embrittlement. Ancillary aspects that included thickness measurement techniques; the importance of finish compatibility with conformal coatings and conductive adhesives; and the need for alternative finishes for the processing of non-Pb bearing solders were discussed.

  19. Can We Improve the Tolerance of an Ocular Prosthesis by Enhancing Its Surface Finish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Andre S; Worrell, Emma; Roos, Jonathan C P; Edwards, Barry; Malhotra, Raman

    2017-03-07

    Patients who wear an ocular prosthesis frequently suffer with dry eye symptoms and socket discharge, often on a daily basis. The aim of the study was to determine whether a smoother, optical quality polish of the prosthesis' surface could improve symptoms and wear tolerance. The study was designed as single-center, single-masked, prospective randomized controlled trial. Eighty-eight consecutive patients undergoing annual ocular prosthesis maintenance review were approached from the prosthesis clinic. Forty-one out of 49 eligible patients were recruited. Participants were randomized to either a standard or a higher "optical quality" polish of their prosthesis. At entry to the trial, at 1 month, and 12 months they completed a questionnaire covering cleaning, lubricant use, inflammation, discomfort, and discharge. Lower scores indicated better tolerance of the prosthesis. At each visit, the prosthesis was stained and photographed against a standard background to assess deposit build up. Primary outcome measures were 1) a subjective questionnaire score and 2) an objective assessment of surface deposit build-up on prosthetic eyes by standardized photographic grading. Forty-one patients participated in the study. The median age of their prosthesis was 36 months (range 9 months-40 years). There was no statistically significant difference in questionnaire scores or deposit build up between the 2 groups at baseline. By 12-months, the higher optical quality polish showed a statistically significant reduction in symptoms and frequency of discharge (2.19 vs. 3.85; p = 0.05-lower scores better). Scoring of the prosthesis' deposit build-up showed a significant difference at 1 month, but this was not sustained at 12 months. Creating an optical quality finish to an ocular prosthesis reduces deposit build up on artificial eyes. The authors found this modification improved patient tolerance at 12 months.

  20. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite-enamel and composite-dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part II: roughness with diamond finishing and differences between enamel composite vs body composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The following study asks three principle questions relative to composite finishing and composite polishing: 1) Will the superficial roughness of different restoration surfaces have different values, utilizing the same polishing system (multistep), after finishing with the tungsten carbide or diamond bur? 2) Under the same conditions of finishing and polishing sequences, will the composite surfaces (C), the composite-enamel (CE) and composite-dentin (CD) interfaces show different roughness values? 3) Will the surface roughness of composites of different translucency in the various phases of finishing and polishing, and on different interfaces, have different results? The null hypothesis is represented by the fact that there are no significant differences on roughness of composite restorations when polishing, after finishing with tungsten carbide or diamond burs. Furthermore, the null hypothesis is that there are no significant differences on roughness between polishing on composite surface, composite-enamel and composite-dentin interfaces, and finally there are no differences on roughness after finishing and polishing of two composite with different translucency. For the study, 56 class V cavities were prepared on extracted teeth. Restorations were done in nanofilled composite Filtek XTE (3M Espe) in a standard fashion, and then finished and polished. The 28 buccal cavities were restored on the surface with composite enamel and the 28 palatals with composite body. Finishing was done with fine toothing burs in tungsten carbide (16 blades) or fine grit diamond burs (46 μm), and made by the same manufacturer (Komet). The second phase of finishing was done with burs (with the same form as already mentioned) ultrafine toothing tungsten carbide (30 blades) or with extra and ultrafine grit diamond (25 and 8 μm). The polishing phase for both of the earlier sequences was done with the application of three rubber tips with decreasing abrasiveness and an application with a

  1. Effect of gold immersion time on the electrochemical migration property of electroless nickel/immersion gold surface finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Q V; Yoon, Jeong-Won; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the electrochemical performance of an electroless nickel/immersion gold (ENIG) surface finish was evaluated as a function of the Au immersion time by the water immersion migration test. As the Au plating time increased, the electroless nickel phosphorous (EN-P) changed from amorphous to crystalline and then increased in crystallinity. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to evaluate the crystallinity of the plating layer. The electrical resistance of the electrodes was tracked as the sample was immersed in water with a 5 V bias. The microstructures of the electrodes after the electrochemical migration test were observed by using secondary electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). As the Au immersion time increased, the EN-P's crystallinity and Au thickness increased. This enhanced the electrochemical migration protection of the surface finish layer.

  2. [Survival of the T28 femoral stem. Comparison of polished versus roughed-surface finish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaidez Rosales, Pedro; Younger, Alastair; Renán León, Saúl; Poss, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Femoral stem loosening in total hip arthroplasty has a multifactorial etiology. T28 femoral stems have been made both roughed and polished-finish types, and differences in design are of interest in their effect on survival. One hundred and sixty-seven stems (84 polished and 83 roughed-finish) placed between 1975 and 1982 were evaluated. Gruen zones were used to determine loosening and survival was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Revision was made in 24.8% of the cases. Twenty-year survival rates were of 85.2% for roughed-finish stems and of 64.2% for polished-finish stems. We were able to confirm our hypothesis concerning the longer survival rate of the roughed-finish implant which was of 87.95% at 17 years of follow-up. The survival-time of the implant was independent of diagnosis, cementation, age and positioning. The survival-time of the T28 cemented implant does not only depend on its texture but it has a multifactorial origin.

  3. Magnetic Electrochemical Finishing Machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    How to improve the finishing efficiency and surface roughness have been all along the objective of research in electrochemical polishing. However, the research activity, i.e. during electrochemical polishing, directly introduce the magnetic field to study how the magnetic field influences on the finishing efficiency, quality and the electrochemical process in the field of finishing machining technology, is insufficient. When introducing additional magnetic field in the traditional electrochemical pol...

  4. DOD Initiatives to Rapidly Transition Advanced Coating and Surface Finishing Technologies for Military Turbine Engine Manufacture and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-21

    of PEWG Projects Involving Plating, Coating, and Surface Finishing • Advanced thermal spray coatings (HVOF) • Electrospark deposition • Laser...EWI, GEAE, P&W, Rolls-Royce FUNDING SOURCES RTOC STATUS OC-ALC request for FY06 Funding 3/21/2005 22 Other Technologies • Electrospark Deposition for...Aircraft Engines PEWG MANAGER Chuck Alford, Anteon Corp TECHNOLOGY OPPORTUNITY ADVANTAGES: Kinetic spray technologies deposit thick coatings with a

  5. Printed Circuit Board Surface Finish and Effects of Chloride Contamination, Electric Field, and Humidity on Corrosion Reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Corrosion reliability is a serious issue today for electronic devices, components, and printed circuit boards (PCBs) due to factors such as miniaturization, globalized manufacturing practices which can lead to process-related residues, and global usage effects such as bias voltage and unpredictable...... probability under condensing conditions. Leakage currents were measured on interdigitated comb test patterns with three different types of surface finish typically used in the electronics industry, namely gold, copper, and tin. Susceptibility to electrochemical migration was studied under droplet conditions...

  6. In vitro influence of stem surface finish and mantle conformity on pressure generation in cemented hip arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Gavin E; Murray, David W; Beard, David J

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Under physiological loads, debonded cemented femoral stems have been shown to move within their cement mantle and generate a fluid pump that may facilitate peri-prosthetic osteolysis by pressurizing fluid and circulating wear debris. The long-term physiological loading of rough and polished tapered stems in vitro has shown differences in performance, with greater interface pressures generated by the rough stems. In this study we investigated the individual effects of stem surface finish, degree of mantle wear, and mode of loading on the stem pump mechanism. Method Rough and polished stems were loaded under different regimes in artificially worn cement mantles that permitted either 2 or 5 degrees of rotational stem movement, and the interface pressures were compared. Results The pressures generated by the rough and polished stems were similar in either type of mantle. The pattern of pressure generation in the 2-degree mantles was similar to the pressures generated by rough stems after long-term loading, but the high posterior wall pressures fell and the tip pressures increased in the 5-degree mantles. The torsional loads were principal drivers of pressure generation in all areas of the interface other than the implant tip, where axial loading predominated. Interpretation Femoral stems with rotational instability under cyclic torsional loads generate elevated interface fluid pressures and flows independently of stem surface finish. The rough surface finish is only important in creating this instability in tapered stems. PMID:19404792

  7. Effects of Aging Treatment on Mechanical Properties of Sn-58Bi Epoxy Solder on ENEPIG-Surface-Finished PCB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsoo; Myung, Woo-Ram; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2016-11-01

    The mechanical properties of Sn-58Bi epoxy solder were evaluated by low-speed shear testing as functions of aging time and temperature. To determine the effects of epoxy, the interfacial reaction and mechanical properties of both Sn-58Bi and Sn-58Bi epoxy solder were investigated after aging treatment. The chemical composition and growth kinetics of the intermetallic compound (IMC) formed at the interface between Sn-58Bi solder and electroless nickel electroless palladium immersion gold (ENEPIG) surface finish were analyzed. Sn-58Bi solder paste was applied by stencil-printing on flame retardant-4 substrate, then reflowed. Reflowed samples were aged at 85°C, 95°C, 105°C, and 115°C for up to 1000 h. (Ni,Pd)3Sn4 IMC formed between Sn-58Bi solder and ENEPIG surface finish after reflow. Ni3Sn4 and Ni3P IMCs formed at the interface between (Ni,Pd)3Sn4 IMC and ENEPIG surface finish after aging at 115°C for 300 h. The overall IMC growth rate of Sn-58Bi solder joint was higher than that of Sn-58Bi epoxy solder joint during aging. The shear strength of Sn-58Bi epoxy solder was about 2.4 times higher than that of Sn-58Bi solder due to the blocking effect of epoxy, and the shear strength decreased with increasing aging time.

  8. Laser damage initiation and growth of antireflection coated S-FAP crystal surfaces prepared by pitch lap and magnetorheological finishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, C J; Menapace, J A; Schaffers, K I; Bibeau, C; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

    2005-10-31

    Antireflection (AR) coatings typically damage at the interface between the substrate and coating. Therefore the substrate finishing technology can have an impact on the laser resistance of the coating. For this study, AR coatings were deposited on Yb:S-FAP [Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F] crystals that received a final polish by both conventional pitch lap finishing as well as magnetorheological finishing (MRF). SEM images of the damage morphology reveals laser damage originates at scratches and at substrate coating interfacial absorbing defects. Previous damage stability tests on multilayer mirror coatings and bare surfaces revealed damage growth can occur at fluences below the initiation fluence. The results from this study suggest the opposite trend for AR coatings. Investigation of unstable HR and uncoated surface damage morphologies reveals significant radial cracking that is not apparent with AR damage due to AR delamination from the coated surface with few apparent cracks at the damage boundary. Damage stability tests show that coated Yb:S-FAP crystals can operate at 1057 nm at fluences around 20 J/cm{sup 2} at 10 ns; almost twice the initiation damage threshold.

  9. Characterization of load bearing metrological parameters in reptilian exuviae in comparison to precision finished cylinder liner surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Aal, H A

    2014-01-01

    Design of precise functional surfaces is essential for many future applications. In the technological realm, the accumulated experience with the construction of such surfaces is not sufficient. Nature provides many examples of dynamic surfaces worthy of study and adoption, at least as a concept, within human engineering. In this work, we probe load-bearing features of the ventral skin of snake surfaces. We examine the structure of two snake species that mainly move by rectilinear locomotion. These are Python regius (pythonidae) and Bittis gabonica (Vipridae). To this end, we focus on the load bearing characteristics of the ventral skin surface (i.e. the Rk family of parameters). Therefore, we draw detailed comparison between the reptilian surfaces and two sets of technological data. The first set pertains to an actual commercial cylinder liner, whereas, the second set is a summary of recommended surface finish metrological values for several commercial cylinder liner manufacturers. The results highlight sever...

  10. The Effects of Burnishing and Conventional Finishing Processes on Surface Roughness and Roundness of the Al 6061 Aluminum Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan AKKURT

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Burnishing is used increasingly as a finishing operation which gives additional advantages such as increased hardness and optimum surface roughness and becoming more popular in satisfying the increasing demands of machine component performance. It is very difficult getting rounded surfaces which are desired where hole machining process (turning, honing, reaming and burnishing. In this study, surface characterizations of getting surface with burnishing and other machining process was evaluated. Especially, inner surface of hole was examined and machining process compared. In the present work, Al 6061 aluminum alloy is selected as work piece material. The experimental results showed that burnishing process must be used where roundness is important. In addition, advantage of burnishing process for Al 6061 aluminum alloy material come out when comparing hardness of hole surface.

  11. The Effect of Surface Finish on Sculptured Shape Utilizing Scanned Data – Reversed Engineering (CATIA V5 & DELCAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahrul Azwan Sundi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate aim of this study was to investigate the effect of surface finish for a machined part which was programmed by two popular CAD/CAM software namely Catia V5 and Delcam using scanned data obtained from one of the Reverse Engineering methods namely Three-Dimensional (3D scanning process. A gaming mouse was chosen as the physical part to be scanned and machined because of its sculptured shape and wavy looks. In this study, simultaneous three-axis machining programs were created and machined using three-axis Computer Numerical Control (CNC Milling machine. Initially, the physical gaming mouse gone through the first process called scanning process using a 3D scanner; model 700 CX in order to capture the 3D CAD data in points cloud form. The raw scanning data then gone through editing process to obtain better surfaces. Moreover, the stable and edited CAD model then undergone CAD/CAM programming process for both mentioned software respectively. There were ten random points chosen to be analyzed for the surface roughness analysis. The arithmetic mean value (Ra was used as the roughness value reference. The results reveal that the average surface roughness for the ten points was 0.232 μm for Catia V5 whilst for Delcam was around 0.274 μm. Ultimately, Catia V5 producing better surface finish compared to Delcam software concluded from the analysis carried out as presented in this paper.

  12. Surface integrity of GH4169 affected by cantilever finish grinding and the application in aero-engine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available GH4169 is the main material for aero-engine blades and integrated blisks. Because GH4169 has a poor milling performance, the profile precision and surface integrity of blades and integrated blisks are difficult to be met by utilizing the conventional milling process, which directly influence the global performance and reliability of aero-engines. Through grinding experiments on parameters and surface integrity optimization, the helical cantilever grinding process utilizing a 300# CBN RB wheel is presented and applied in finish machining of GH4169 blades. The profile errors of the blade surface are within ±0.01 mm, the roughness is less than 0.4 μm, the residual compressive stresses and the hardening rate are appropriate, there are no phenomena of burr and smearing with the grinding chips, and the leading/trailing edge can be smoothly connected with the suction/pressure surface. All the experimental results indicate that this grinding process is greatly suitable for the profile finish machining of GH4169 blades.

  13. Surface integrity of GH4169 affected by cantilever finish grinding and the application in aero-engine blades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xun; Ma Shuang; Meng Fanjun

    2015-01-01

    GH4169 is the main material for aero-engine blades and integrated blisks. Because GH4169 has a poor milling performance, the profile precision and surface integrity of blades and integrated blisks are difficult to be met by utilizing the conventional milling process, which directly influence the global performance and reliability of aero-engines. Through grinding experiments on parameters and surface integrity optimization, the helical cantilever grinding process utilizing a 300# CBN RB wheel is presented and applied in finish machining of GH4169 blades. The profile errors of the blade surface are within ±0.01 mm, the roughness is less than 0.4 lm, the residual compressive stresses and the hardening rate are appropriate, there are no phenomena of burr and smearing with the grinding chips, and the leading/trailing edge can be smoothly connected with the suction/pressure surface. All the experimental results indicate that this grinding process is greatly suitable for the profile finish machining of GH4169 blades.

  14. Evaluation of the Effect of Surface Finish on High-Cycle Fatigue of SLM-IN718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, D. M.

    2016-01-01

    The surface finish of parts produced by additive manufacturing processes is much rougher than the surface finish generated by machining processes, and a rougher surface can reduce the fatigue strength of a part. This paper discusses an effort to quantify that reduction of strength in high-cycle fatigue for selective laser melt (SLM) coupons. A high-cycle fatigue (HCF) knockdown factor was estimated for Inconel 718, manufactured with the SLM process. This factor is the percentage reduction from the maximum stress in fatigue for low-stress ground (LSG) specimens to the maximum stress of those left with the original surface condition at the same fatigue life. Specimens were provided by a number of vendors, free to use their "best practice"; only one heat treat condition was considered; and several test temperatures were characterized, including room temperature, 800F, 1000F, and 1200F. The 1000F data had a large variance, and was omitted from consideration in this document. A first method used linear approximations extracted from the graphs, and only where data was available for both. A recommended knockdown factor of the as-built surface condition (average roughness of approximately 245 micro-inches/inch) versus low-stress ground condition (roughness no more than 4 micro-inches/inch) was established at approximately 1/3 or 33%. This is to say that for the as-built surface condition, a maximum stress of 2/3 of the stress for LSG can be expected to produce a similar life in the as-built surface condition. In this first evaluation, the knockdown factor did not appear to be a function of temperature. A second approach, the "KP method", incorporated the surface finish measure into a new parameter termed the pseudo-stress intensity factor, Kp, which was formulated to be similar to the fracture mechanics stress intensity factor. Using Kp, the variance seemed to be reduced across all sources, and knockdown factors were estimated using Kp over the range where data occurred. A

  15. Influence of finishing/polishing on color stability and surface roughness of composites submitted to accelerated artificial aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Da Col dos Santos Pinto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of finishing/polishing procedure on color stability (ΔE and surface roughness (Ra of composites (Heliomolar and Tetric - color A2 submitted to accelerated artificial aging (AAA. Materials and Methods : Sixty test specimens were made of each composite (12 mm × 2 mm and separated into six groups (n = 10, according to the type of finishing/polishing to which they were submitted: C, control; F, tip 3195 F; FF, tip 3195 FF; FP, tip 3195 F + diamond paste; FFP, tip 3195 FF + diamond paste; SF, Sof-Lex discs. After polishing, controlled by an electromechanical system, initial color (spectrophotometer PCB 6807 BYK GARDNER and Ra (roughness meter Surfcorder SE 1700, cut-off 0.25 mm readings were taken. Next, the test specimens were submitted to the AAA procedure (C-UV Comexim for 384 hours, and at the end of this period, new color readings and R a were taken. Results: Statistical analysis [2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Bonferroni, P < 0.05] showed that all composites demonstrated ΔE alteration above the clinically acceptable limits, with the exception of Heliomolar composite in FP. The greatest ΔE alteration occurred for Tetric composite in SF (13.38 ± 2.10 statistically different from F and FF (P < 0.05. For Ra , Group F showed rougher samples than FF with statistically significant difference (P < 0.05. Conclusion: In spite of the surface differences, the different finishing/polishing procedures were not capable of providing color stability within the clinically acceptable limits.

  16. Effect of surface mechanical finishes on charging ability of electron irradiated PMMA in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondot, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.rondot@univ-reims.fr [Groupe de Recherche en Sciences pour l' Ingenieur, EA4301, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Jbara, Omar [Groupe de Recherche en Sciences pour l' Ingenieur, EA4301, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Fakhfakh, Slim [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 1171, C.P 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Belkorissat, Redouane; Patat, Jean Marc [Groupe de Recherche en Sciences pour l' Ingenieur, EA4301, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-10-01

    Charging of Polymethyl Methacrylate insulators (PMMA), in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is studied owing to a time resolved current method. This method allows the evolution of trapped charge versus time and the charging time constant to be deduced. The effect of surface roughness change on the ability of PMMA to trapped charge is highlighted. The results show that the trapped charge at the steady state decreases when the roughness increases in the micrometer range while the time constant of charging increases with surface roughness. This behaviour is due to the increase of leakage current and/or enhanced secondary electron emission (SEE). On the one hand, surface mechanical finishes allows, the build up charge in insulators submitted to an electron bombardment to be lowered. On the other hand this treatment allows the secondary electron emission to be raised for some specific applications.

  17. Improvement of finishing antifriction treatment without abrasive of the rubbing parts surfaces of agricultural machineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Shepelenk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The wear of machines and mechanisms after rubbing is a major concern. The costs of manufacturing and restoration parts for agricultural machinery are enormous such as the trunnions pinions of hydraulic pumps. Finishing treatment antifriction without abrasive (FTAA is the existing method of manufacturing and restoration, but it has disadvantages like low work efficiency and the frequent replacement of the instrument. That is why a new method of FTAA parts type ''tree'' has been developed called vibratory finishing treatment antifriction without abrasive, (VFTAA method. The study was conducted at the laboratory of the State Technical University of Kirovograd (Ukraine where turn 16K20, the profilograph-profilometer "Talysurf-5", the scanning electron microscope REM-106I, friction machine MI-1M and the stand KI-28097-02M were used respectively for machining, study of micro relief before and after the VFTAA, microstructure, wear resistance and the determination of the break-in period of parts. The results showed that the VFTAA helped reduce the roughness Ra of the samples studied by half compared to the samples processed by polishing and 1.3 times compared to those treated with the FTAA, the break-in period has been reduced four times , this leads to an increase in the life of the hydraulic pump. This technology can be recommended for manufacturing and repair of hydraulic units of agricultural machineries.

  18. The influence of finishing/polishing time and cooling system on surface roughness and microhardness of two different types of composite resin restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminedi, Raja Rajeswari; Penumatsa, Narendra Varma; Priya, Tulasi; Baroudi, Kusai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of finishing time and polishing time on surface roughness and microhardness of nanofilled and hybrid resin composites. Materials and Methods: Hundred disk composite specimens from micro hybrid composite and nanohybrid composite were prepared, 50 for each type of composite. The specimens were divided into five groups according to the time of finishing and polishing (immediate, 15 min, 24 h and dry). Composite under the Mylar strip wit...

  19. Compatibility of lead-free solders with lead containing surface finishes as a reliability issue in electronic assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianco, P.; Rejent, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Artaki, I.; Ray, U.; Finley, D.; Jackson, A. [AT and T Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Enhanced performance goals and environmental restrictions have heightened the consideration for use of alternative solders as replacements for the traditional tin-lead (Sn-Pb) eutectic and near-eutectic alloys. However, the implementation of non-Pb bearing surface finishes may lag behind solder alloy development. A study was performed which examined the effect(s) of Pb contamination on the performance of Sn-Ag-Bi and Sn-Ag-Cu-Sb lead-free solders by the controlled addition of 63Sn-37Pb solder at levels of 0.5 {minus} 8.0 wt.%. Thermal analysis and ring-in-plug shear strength studies were conducted on bulk solder properties. Circuit board prototype studies centered on the performance of 20I/O SOIC gull wing joints. Both alloys exhibited declines in their melting temperatures with greater Sn-Pb additions. The ring-in-plug shear strength of the Sn-Ag-Cu-Sb solder increased slightly with Sn-Pb levels while the Sn-Ag-Bi alloy experienced a strength loss. The mechanical behavior of the SOIC (Small Outline Integrated Circuit) Sn-Ag-Bi solder joints reproduced the strength levels were insensitive to 10,106 thermal cycles. The Sn-Ag-Cu-Sb solder showed a slight decrease in the gull wing joint strengths that was sensitive to the Pb content of the surface finish.

  20. Nanometric Finishing on Biomedical Implants by Abrasive Flow Finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kavithaa Thirumalai; Balashanmugam, Natchimuthu; Shashi Kumar, Panaghra Veeraiah

    2016-01-01

    Abrasive flow finishing (AFF) is a non-conventional finishing technique that offers better accuracy, efficiency, consistency, economy in finishing of complex/difficult to machine materials/components and provides the possibility of effective automation as aspired by the manufacturing sector. The present study describes the finishing of a hip joint made of ASTM grade Co-Cr alloy by Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM) process. The major input parameters of the AFF process were optimized for achieving nanometric finishing of the component. The roughness average (Ra) values were recorded during experimentation using surface roughness tester and the results are discussed in detail. The surface finished hip joints were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and residual stress analysis using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The discussion lays emphasis on the significance, efficacy and versatile nature of the AFF process in finishing of bio-medical implants.

  1. Drop Reliability of Epoxy-contained Sn-58 wt.%Bi Solder Joint with ENIG and ENEPIG Surface Finish Under Temperature and Humidity Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Woo-Ram; Kim, Yongil; Kim, Kyung-Yeol; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2016-07-01

    The influence of two kinds of surface finish, namely electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) and electroless nickel electroless palladium immersion gold (ENEPIG), on the interfacial reactions and drop reliability of epoxy-enhanced Sn-58 wt.%Bi solder has been investigated after temperature-humidity storage tests. The chemical composition and morphology of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. Also, the mechanical reliability of solder joints was evaluated using board-level drop tests. The Sn-Bi epoxy solder/ENEPIG joint exhibited higher IMC growth rate than the Sn-Bi epoxy solder/ENIG joint. After 500 h at 85°C/85% RH storage condition, new IMCs were formed on the Ni3Sn4 layer in samples with both surface finishes. The results of board-level drop tests showed that the number of drops was higher for the ENIG than the ENEPIG surface finish. Solder joint fracture occurred along the interface between the solder and IMC layer for the ENIG surface finish. However, with the ENEPIG surface finish, the crack propagated between the IMCs.

  2. Effect of surface finishing on friction and wear of Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone (PEEK under oil lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Fontoura de Andrade

    Full Text Available Abstract The tribological properties of poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK containing 30% of carbon fiber were studied in an oil-lubricated environment and different surface finishing of the metallic counterbody. Four different finishing processes, commonly used in the automotive industry, were chosen for this study: turning, grinding, honing and polishing. The test system used was tri-pin on disc with pins made of PEEK and counterbody made of steel; they were fully immersed in ATF Dexron VI oil. Some test parameters were held constant, such as the apparent pressure of 2 MPa, linear velocity of 2 m/s, oil temperature at 85 °C, and the time - 120 minutes. The lubrication regime for the apparent pressure of 1 MPa to 7 MPa range was also studied at different sliding speeds. A direct correlation was found between the wear rate, friction coefficient and the lubrication regime, wherein wear under hydrodynamic lubrication was, on average, approximately 5 times lower, and the friction coefficient 3 times lower than under boundary lubrication.

  3. Surface roughness and cutting forces modeling for optimization of machining condition in finish hard turning of AISI 52100 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azizi, Mohamed Walid; Belhadi, Salim; Yallese, Mohamed Athmane [Univ. of Guelma, Guelma (Algeria); Mabrouki, Tarek; Rigal, Jean Francois [Univ. of Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2012-12-15

    An experimental investigation was conducted to analyze the effect of cutting parameters (cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut) and workpiece hardness on surface roughness and cutting force components. The finish hard turning of AISI 52100 steel with coated Al2O3 + TiC mixed ceramic cutting tools was studied. The planning of experiment were based on Taguchi's L27 orthogonal array. The response table and analysis of variance (ANOVA) have allowed to check the validity of linear regression model and to determine the significant parameters affecting the surface roughness and cutting forces. The statistical analysis reveals that the feed rate, workpiece hardness and cutting speed have significant effects in reducing the surface roughness; whereas the depth of cut, workpiece hardness and feed rate are observed to have a statistically significant impact on the cutting force components than the cutting speed. Consequently, empirical models were developed to correlate the cutting parameters and workpiece hardness with surface roughness and cutting forces. The optimum machining conditions to produce the lowest surface roughness with minimal cutting force components under these experimental conditions were searched using desirability function approach for multiple response factors optimization. Finally, confirmation experiments were performed to verify the pertinence of the developed empirical models.

  4. Study on silk anti-crease finishing with polycarboxyl-terminated trichlorotriazine derivatives by surface analysis methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiaoshan [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Polymer Design and Application, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Xing Tieling [College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Xu Dongmei, E-mail: xdm.sd@163.com [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Polymer Design and Application, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Chen Guoqiang [College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silk fabric was modified with polycarboxyl-terminated trichlorotriazine derivatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The treated fabric exhibited high wet resiliency and strength retention rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The treated fabric showed good whiteness and washing durability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The modification process could be carried out at lower temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface analysis methods were employed to study the anticreasing mechanism. - Abstract: The natural silk fabric was finished with polycarboxyl-terminated trichlorotriazine derivatives for anticreasing purpose. The treated fabric exhibited better wet resiliency, higher strength retention rate and whiteness than those treated with 1,2,3,4-butane tetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) under the same conditions, and they also have similar good washing durability to those treated with BTCA. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated the crosslinking reaction between the chlorine atom, the carboxyl in the trichlorotriazine derivatives and the amino, the hydroxyl on the surface of the silk fabric. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation showed that the surface of the treated fabric became a little rough. The chlorine atom and the carboxyl in the trichlorotriazine derivatives, and the surface roughness of the treated silk fabric were all contributive to the wrinkle resistance of silk.

  5. Effect of Surface Finish on Fatigue Properties at Elevated Temperatures I : Low-carbon N-155 with Grain Size of A.S.T.M. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Robert R

    1951-01-01

    Effect of three surface finishes of roughness 4 to 5, 20 to 25, and 70 to 80 micro inches rms on fatigue properties were determined for low-carbon N-155 alloy of grain size A.S.T.M. 1 at temperatures of 80 , 1000, 1350, and 1500 F. The fatigue properties for the various finishes differed appreciably at room temperature; however, after short periods at 1000 F and for all periods investigated at temperatures above 1000 F, the specimen finishes had the same fatigue strength. It was concluded that the primary cause of the difference in room-temperature strength was due to compressive stresses set up in the surface and that at elevated temperatures these compressive stresses were relieved by annealing. Apparently, roughness alone did not significantly affect fatigue strength.

  6. Optimization of Surface Finish in Turning Operation by Considering the Machine Tool Vibration using Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Munawar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of surface roughness has been one of the primary objectives in most of the machining operations. Poor control on the desired surface roughness generates non conforming parts and results into increase in cost and loss of productivity due to rework or scrap. Surface roughness value is a result of several process variables among which machine tool condition is one of the significant variables. In this study, experimentation was carried out to investigate the effect of machine tool condition on surface roughness. Variable used to represent machine tool\\'s condition was vibration amplitude. Input parameters used, besides vibration amplitude, were feed rate and insert nose radius. Cutting speed and depth of cut were kept constant. Based on Taguchi orthogonal array, a series of experimentation was designed and performed on AISI 1040 carbon steel bar at default and induced machine tool\\'s vibration amplitudes. ANOVA (Analysis of Variance, revealed that vibration amplitude and feed rate had moderate effect on the surface roughness and insert nose radius had the highest significant effect on the surface roughness. It was also found that a machine tool with low vibration amplitude produced better surface roughness. Insert with larger nose radius produced better surface roughness at low feed rate.

  7. Relevance of roughness parameters of surface finish in precision hard turning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouini, Nabil; Revel, Philippe; Bigerelle, Maxence

    2014-01-01

    Precision hard turning is a process to improve the surface integrity of functional surfaces. Machining experiments are carried out on hardened AISI 52100 bearing steel under dry condition using c-BN cutting tools. A full factorial experimental design is used to characterize the effect of cutting parameters. As surface topography is characterized by numerous roughness parameters, their relative relevance is investigated by statistical indices of performance computed by combining the analysis of variance, discriminant analysis and the bootstrap method. The analysis shows that the profile Length ratio (Lr) and the Roughness average (Ra) are the relevant pair of roughness parameters which best discriminates the effect of cutting parameters and enable the classification of surfaces which cannot be distinguished by one parameter: low profile length ratio Lr (Lr = 100.23%) is clearly distinguished from an irregular surface corresponding to a profile length ratio Lr (Lr = 100.42%), whereas the roughness average Ra values are nearly identical.

  8. Surface finishing in hydroelectric power plants; Veredeln von Laufrad-Oberflaechen in Wasserkraftanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Marion

    2010-07-01

    Flow optimized high performance surfaces of the rotor disks are prerequisite to reach high conversion efficiencies in hydroelectric power plants. The surface treatment can be performed using cold metal transfer (CMT) arc welding techniques developed by Fronius International GmbH, Wels, Austria. This technique yields significantly improved results with respect to energy, time and material savings compared to MIG welding or thermal spraying. Water-contact components, sealing and sliding surfaces are cladded using high-performance stainless materials. The CMT process is mainly used by Andritz Hydro Ravensburg for cladding purposes.

  9. Evaluation of magnesium alloys with alternative surface finishing for the proliferation and chondro-differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinidad, J; Arruebarrena, G; De Argandona, E Saenz; De Eguino, G Ruiz; Infante, A; RodrIguez, C I, E-mail: jtrinidad@eps.mondragon.edu

    2010-11-01

    Articular cartilage has little capacity for self-repair. As a result, continuous mechanical stress can lead to the degradation of articular cartilage, culminating in progressive damage and joint degeneration. Tissue engineering has arisen as a promising therapeutic approach to cartilage repair. Magnesium alloys are one of the most important metallic biomaterials emerging in this area due to their biocompatibility, bio-absorbability and especially to their mechanical properties. These properties make magnesium alloys a promising biomaterial in the regeneration of cartilage tissue. Objective. This study was undertaken to analyze the influence of surface characteristics of magnesium alloys in the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Methods. Two commercial magnesium alloys (AZ31B and ZM21) were subjected to different treatments in order to obtain four different surfaces in each alloy. Human MSCs were seeded into the magnesium alloys and analyzed for their proliferation and chondrogenesis differentiation ability. Results. Human MSCs showed a greater proliferation and chondro-differentiation when cultured in the ZM21 magnesium alloy with a surface finishing of fine sanding, polishing, and etching.

  10. Plasma-deposited fluorocarbon polymer films on titanium for preventing cell adhesion: a surface finishing for temporarily used orthopaedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, B.; Testrich, H.; Rebl, H.; Walschus, U.; Schlosser, M.; Zietz, C.; Staehlke, S.; Nebe, J. B.; Weltmann, K. D.; Meichsner, J.; Polak, M.

    2016-06-01

    The design of a titanium implant surface should ideally support its later application in clinical use. Temporarily used implants have to fulfil requirements different from permanent implants: they should ensure the mechanical stabilization of the bone stock but in trauma surgery they should not be integrated into the bone because they will be removed after fracture healing. Finishing of the implant surface by a plasma-fluorocarbon-polymer (PFP) coating is a possible approach for preventing cell adhesion of osteoblasts. Two different low pressure gas-discharge plasma processes, microwave (MW 2.45 GHz) and capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF 13.56 MHz) plasma, were applied for the deposition of the PFP film using a mixture of the precursor octafluoropropane (C3F8) and hydrogen (H2). The thin films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurements. Cell culture experiments show that cell adhesion and spreading of MG-63 osteoblasts were clearly reduced or nonexistent on these surfaces, also after 24 h of storage in the cell culture medium. In vivo data demonstrated that the local inflammatory tissue response for the PFP films deposited in MW and RF plasma were comparable to uncoated controls.

  11. Modeling of Surface Geometric Structure State After Integratedformed Milling and Finish Burnishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczyński, Stefan; Grochała, Daniel; Grządziel, Zenon

    2017-06-01

    The article deals with computer-based modeling of burnishing a surface previously milled with a spherical cutter. This method of milling leaves traces, mainly asperities caused by the cutting crossfeed and cutter diameter. The burnishing process - surface plastic treatment - is accompanied by phenomena that take place right in the burnishing ball-milled surface contact zone. The authors present the method for preparing a finite element model and the methodology of tests for the assessment of height parameters of a surface geometrical structure (SGS). In the physical model the workpieces had a cuboidal shape and these dimensions: (width × height × length) 2×1×4.5 mm. As in the process of burnishing a cuboidal workpiece is affected by plastic deformations, the nonlinearities of the milled item were taken into account. The physical model of the process assumed that the burnishing ball would be rolled perpendicularly to milling cutter linear traces. The model tests included the application of three different burnishing forces: 250 N, 500 N and 1000 N. The process modeling featured the contact and pressing of a ball into the workpiece surface till the desired force was attained, then the burnishing ball was rolled along the surface section of 2 mm, and the burnishing force was gradually reduced till the ball left the contact zone. While rolling, the burnishing ball turned by a 23° angle. The cumulative diagrams depict plastic deformations of the modeled surfaces after milling and burnishing with defined force values. The roughness of idealized milled surface was calculated for the physical model under consideration, i.e. in an elementary section between profile peaks spaced at intervals of crossfeed passes, where the milling feed fwm = 0.5 mm. Also, asperities after burnishing were calculated for the same section. The differences of the obtained values fall below 20% of mean values recorded during empirical experiments. The adopted simplification in after

  12. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite enamel and composite dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part I: roughness after treatments with tungsten carbide vs diamond burs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate different instruments for finishing composite restorations, as well as examining different surfaces and interfaces of the same restoration. The null hypothesis is represented by the fact that there are no significant differences on roughness of composite restorations finishing between tungsten carbide and diamond burs, furthermore the null hypothesis is that there are no significant differences on roughness between finishing on composite surfaces (C), compositeenamel (CE) and composite-dentin (CD) interfaces. The study was performed on 28 teeth, and class V cavities were prepared on the extracted teeth. Restorations were done in Filtek XTE nanofilled composite (3M Espe) in a standardized method, to then be finished. A comparison was made in the phase 1 between tungsten carbide burs (16 blades), diamond burs (46 μm), with a similar shape by the same manufacturer (Komet). Each surface received 5 bur applications. Consequently, an analysis with a profilometer was performed. Phase 2 involved further confrontation of ulterior finishing with ultrafine tungsten carbide burs (30 blades) and with extra and ultrafine diamond burs (25 and 8 μm) (the same shape as previously mentioned). A second analysis was then performed with a profilometer. All measurements were taken on C surfaces, CE and CD interfaces. Statistical analyses were carried out with c2 test (a = 0.05). The finishing procedures with fine grit or toothing burs gave a better smoothness with tungsten carbide burs compared to diamond burs. While with the ultrafine grit no significant differences were noted between tungsten carbide and diamond burs on the CE and CD interfaces, the diamond bur left less superficial roughness on the C surfaces. With regards to the superficial roughness of the different areas of restoration, it can be concluded that: minor roughness was detected on C surfaces, while the CD interface had the most superficial roughness, regardless of whether the

  13. Appearance of anodised aluminium: Effect of alloy composition and prior surface finish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerbeck, Martin; Canulescu, Stela; Dirscherl, Kai

    2014-01-01

    prior to anodising were analysed using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The optical appearance of the anodised surface with and without sealing was investigated using a photography setup, photospectrometry and bidirectional reflectance distribution function. It was found...... appearance was kept for alloys of high purity. Sealing made the specular reflection of the mechanically polished specimens more distinct....

  14. Influence of the surface finishing on electrochemical corrosion characteristics of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Dundeková

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steels from 316 group are very often and successfully uses for medical applications where the good mechanical and chemical properties in combination with non-toxicity of the material assure its safe and long term usage. Corrosion properties of AISI 361L stainless steel are strongly influenced by surface roughness and treatment of the engineering parts (specimens and testing temperature. Electrochemical characteristics of ground, mechanically polished and passivated AISI 316L stainless steel specimens were examined with the aim to identify the polarization resistance evolution due to the surface roughness decrease. Results obtained on mechanically prepared specimens where only natural oxide layer created due to the exposure of the material to the corrosion environment was protecting the materials were compared to the passivated specimens with artificial oxide layer. Also the influence of temperature and stabilization time before measurement were taken into account when discussing the obtained results. Positive influence of decreasing surface roughness was obtained as well as increase of polarization resistance due to the chemical passivation of the surface. Increase of the testing temperature and short stabilization time of the specimen in the corrosion environment were observed negatively influencing corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel.

  15. Surface finish quality of the outer AXAF mirror pair based on X-ray measurements of the VETA-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John P.; Schwartz, Daniel; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Van Speybroeck, Leon; Zhao, Ping

    1993-01-01

    We employ the X-ray measurements of the VETA-I taken at the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to extract information about the surface finish quality of the outermost pair of AXAF mirrors. The particular measurements we consider are 1D scans of the core of the point response function (PRF) (FWHM scans), the encircled energy as a function of radius, and 1D scans of the wings of the PRF. We discuss briefly our raytrace model which incorporates the numerous effects present in the VETA-I test, such as the finite source distance, the size and shape of the X-ray source, the residual gravitational distortions of the optic, the despace of the VETA-I, and particulate contamination. We show how the data constrain the amplitude of mirror surface deviations for spatial frequencies greater than about 0.1/mm. Constraints on the average amplitude of circumferential slope errors are derived as well.

  16. Surface finish quality of the outer AXAF mirror pair based on x ray measurements of the VETA-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John P.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Vanspeybroeck, Leon; Zhao, Ping

    1992-01-01

    We employ the X-ray measurements of the VETA-I taken at the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to extract information about the surface finish quality of the outermost pair of AXAF mirrors. The particular measurements we consider are one dimensional scans of the core of the point response function (PRF) (full width half maximum (FWHM) scans), the encircled energy as a function of radius, and one dimensional scans of the wings of the PRF. We discuss briefly our ray trace model which incorporates the numerous effects present in the VETA-I test, such as the finite source distance, the size and shape of the X-ray source, the residual gravitational distortions of the optic, the despace of the VETA-I, and particulate contamination. We show how the data constrain the amplitude of mirror surface deviations for spatial frequencies greater than about 0.1 mm(exp -1). Constraints on the average amplitude of circumferential slope errors are derived as well.

  17. The pH effect on black spots in surface finish: Electroless nickel immersion gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yong Sun; Park, Sung Soo; Lee, Jinuk; Kim, Jong-Yun; Lee, Seong-Jae

    2010-10-01

    In order to understand the black spot generation after electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) plating, we investigated the pH effect with a combined approach of experiments and computer aided engineering (CAE). As the pH is increased in IG plating solution, the deprotonation of citric acid as chelating agent is enhanced to stabilize the solution by producing Ni-citrate complex ion. For the substitution reaction between nickel and gold, excess citrate ions (deprotonated citric acids) are adsorbed along nodal boundaries of Ni-P layer to decrease the surface reactivity. Since the low reactivity decreases the overall growth rate, the resulting homogeneous Au layer growth avoids the unfavorable galvanic cell corrosion to control black spot. Based on molecular orbital method and kinetic Monte Carlo calculation, our computational approach well explained the capability of citric acid as chelating agent and the Au growth rate along the nodal boundaries of Ni-P layer depending on the surface reactivity.

  18. Surface finishing of ZnGeP2 single crystal by diamond tool turning method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiaobin; Xu, Min; Du, Wenhao; Chu, Chong

    2017-09-01

    In this work, diamond tool turning of vertical gradient freeze (VGF) grown single crystal ZnGeP2 (ZGP) was investigated. The flatness of machined ZGP surface was measured with a Zygo interferometry to be less than λ/10 and the roughness was measured with a Taloy profilermeter to be 0.7-0.9 nm. The laser-induced damage threshold was measured with a 2.07 μm wavelength pulsed laser to be >3 J/cm2.

  19. CAPSULE REPORT - MANAGING CYANIDE IN METAL FINISHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to surface finishing manufacturers, metal finishing decision maker and regulators on management practices and control technologies for managing cyanide in the workplace. This information can benefit key industry stakeholder gro...

  20. Solar absorption characteristics of several coatings and surface finishes. [for solar energy collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Solar absorption characteristics are established for several films potentially favorable for use as receiving surfaces in solar energy collectors. Included in the investigation were chemically produced black films, black electrodeposits, and anodized coatings. It was found that black nickel exhibited the best combination of selective optical properties of any of the coatings studied. A serious drawback to black nickel was its high susceptibility to degradation in the presence of high moisture environments. Electroplated black chrome generally exhibited high solar absorptivities, but the emissivity varied considerably and was also relatively high under some conditions. The black chrome had the greatest moisture resistance of any of the coatings tested. Black oxide coatings on copper and steel substrates showed the best combination of selective optical properties of any of the chemical conversion films studied.

  1. Ion beam technology applications study. [ion impact, implantation, and surface finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Zafran, S.; Komatsu, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    Specific perceptions and possible ion beam technology applications were obtained as a result of a literature search and contact interviews with various institutions and individuals which took place over a 5-month period. The use of broad beam electron bombardment ion sources is assessed for materials deposition, removal, and alteration. Special techniques examined include: (1) cleaning, cutting, and texturing for surface treatment; (2) crosslinking of polymers, stress relief in deposited layers, and the creation of defect states in crystalline material by ion impact; and (3) ion implantation during epitaxial growth and the deposition of neutral materials sputtered by the ion beam. The aspects, advantages, and disadvantages of ion beam technology and the competitive role of alternative technologies are discussed.

  2. Correlation of metabolic changes of infected paulownia tissue culture with PWB-MLO pathogenic mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田国忠; 黄钦才; 袁巧平; 张锡津

    1995-01-01

    Paulownia sp.tissue culture plantlets infected with paulownia witches’ broom mycoplasma-likeorganism (PWB-MLO) expressed a typical witches’ broom symptom.The results determined by transmissionelectron microscopy and DAPI staining fluorescence microscopy showed that the severity of the symptom wasdirectly related with MLO concentration in the sieve tubes of the phloem.The results of the analysis ofendogenous hormones and phenolic compounds by HPLC revealed that in all cases,the free IAA content ofthe diseased plant apparently lower than that of the healthy,and the free IAA concentration had strikinglypositive correlation with catechol concentration changes (r=0.90,n= 11).The changes of cytokinin (Z +ZR,iPA),GA3 and ABA were shown less relation with MLO infection.The differences of peroxidase andisoenzyme,IAA oxidase and phenylanine ammonia lyase (PAL) between the extract of infected plants andthat of uninfected as well as different effects of NAA and catechol additions on MS media could further re-flect the nature of the relationship and the interaction among MLOs,catechol and the free IAA concentration.

  3. Effect of Surface Finish of Substrate on Mechanical Reliability of in-48SN Solder Joints in Moems Package

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, Ja-Myeong

    2007-01-01

    Interfacial reactions and shear properties of the In-48Sn (in wt.%) ball grid array (BGA) solder joints after bonding were investigated with four different surface finishes of the substrate over an underlying Cu pad: electroplated Ni/Au (hereafter E-NG), electroless Ni/immersion Au (hereafter ENIG), immersion Ag (hereafter I-Ag) and organic solderability preservative (hereafter OSP). During bonding, continuous AuIn2, Ni3(Sn,In)4 and Cu6(Sn,In)5 intermetallic compound (IMC) layers were formed at the solder/E-NG, solder/ENIG and solder/OSP interface, respectively. The interfacial reactions between the solder and I-Ag substrate during bonding resulted in the formation of Cu6(Sn,In)5 and Cu(Sn,In)2 IMCs with a minor Ag element. The In-48Sn/I-Ag solder joint showed the best shear properties among the four solder joints after bonding, whereas the solder/ENIG solder joint exhibited the weakest mechanical integrity.

  4. Effect of surface finishing on early-stage corrosion of a carbon steel studied by electrochemical and atomic force microscope characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan; Cheng, Y. Frank, E-mail: fcheng@ucalgary.ca

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Imaged the topography of steel with various surface roughness. • Monitored the early-stage corrosion of steel by AFM. • Derived the corrosion growth at nano-scale surface features. - Abstract: In this work, the early-stage corrosion of a carbon steel with various surface roughness, which was created by different levels of surface finishing treatment, was characterized by an atomic force microscope and electrochemical measurements. It is found that the resulting surface roughness is at nano-meter scale. As the surface roughness increases, the corrosion activity of the steel is increased. The early-stage corrosion of the steel is featured with two stages of dissolution. While the first stage involves a rapid dissolution and increasing surface roughness of the steel, stage two is in an equilibrium state to have an approximately constant corrosion rate and surface roughness. Generally, the corrosion rate of the steel decreases when the surface finish of the specimen becomes finer. Local preferential corrosion occurs at surface irregularities, resulting in the deepening and widening of the features such as scratches with time.

  5. Optimization of the Ni(P) Thickness for an Ultrathin Ni(P)-Based Surface Finish in Soldering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C. E.; Wang, S. J.; Fan, C. W.; Wu, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the Ni(P) thickness δ Ni(P) on the interfacial reaction between an Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu solder and an Au/Pd(P)/Ni(P)/Cu pad (thickness: 0.05/0.05/0.1-0.3/20 μm) and the resulting mechanical properties were investigated using scanning electron microscopy equipped with an electron backscatter diffraction system, a focused ion beam system, electron probe microanalysis, and high-speed ball shear (HSBS) testing. Regardless of δ Ni(P), all of the Au/Pd(P)/Ni(P) surface finishes examined were completely exhausted in one reflow, exposing the Cu pad underneath the solder. Cu6Sn5 dissolved with various Ni contents, termed (Cu,Ni)6Sn5, was the dominant intermetallic compound (IMC) species at the solder/Cu interface. Additionally, Ni2SnP and Ni3P IMCs might form with the (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 in the thick Ni(P) case, i.e., δ Ni(P) = 0.3 μm, and the two IMCs (Ni2SnP and Ni3P) were gradually eliminated from the interface after multiple reflows. A mass balance analysis indicated that the growth of the Ni-containing IMCs, rather than the dissolution of the metallization pad, played a key role in the Ni(P) exhaustion. The HSBS test results indicated that the mechanical strength of the solder joints was also δ Ni(P) dependent. The combined results of the interfacial reaction and the mechanical evaluation provided the optimal δ Ni(P) value for soldering applications.

  6. 7 CFR 29.3022 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finish. 29.3022 Section 29.3022 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Finish. The reflectance factor in color perception. Finish indicates the sheen or shine of the surface of...

  7. 7 CFR 29.2518 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finish. 29.2518 Section 29.2518 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2518 Finish. The reflectance factor in color perception. Finish indicates the sheen or shine of the surface of a tobacco leaf. (See chart, § 29.2601.) ...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2268 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finish. 29.2268 Section 29.2268 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2268 Finish. The reflectance factor in color perception. Finish indicates the sheen or shine of the surface of a...

  9. Study of the effect of tribo-materials and surface finish on the lubricant performance of new halogen-free room temperature ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurín, N.; Minami, I.; Sanes, J.; Bermúdez, M. D.

    2016-03-01

    The present work evaluates different materials and surface finish in the presence of newly designed, hydrophobic halogen-free room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) as lubricants. A reciprocating tribo-tester was employed with steel-ceramic and steel-thermosetting epoxy resin contacts under boundary lubrication conditions. Four different tetraalkylphosphonium organosilanesulfonate RTILs provided excellent lubricating performance, with friction coefficients as low as 0.057, and non-measurable wear for the higher roughness machine-finish stainless steel flat against sapphire balls, in the case of the lubricants containing the 2-trimethylsilylethanesulfonate anion. Higher friction coefficients of the order of 0.1 and wear volumes of the order of 10-4 mm3 were observed for the lower roughness fine-finished flat stainless steel surface. All RTILs prevent wear of epoxy resin against stainless steel balls, with friction coefficients in the range of 0.03-0.06. EDX analysis shows the presence of RTILs on the stainless steel surfaces after the tribological tests. Under the experimental conditions, no corrosive processes were observed.

  10. Concentration data for anthropogenic organic compounds in groundwater, surface water, and finished water of selected community water systems in the United States, 2002-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Janet M.; Kingsbury, James A.; Hopple, Jessica A.; Delzer, Gregory C.

    2010-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey began implementing Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) in 2001 that focus on characterizing the quality of source water and finished water of aquifers and major rivers used by some of the larger community water systems in the United States. As used in SWQA studies, source water is the raw (ambient) water collected at the supply well before water treatment (for groundwater) or the raw (ambient) water collected from the river near the intake (for surface water), and finished water is the water that has been treated and is ready to be delivered to consumers. Finished-water samples are collected before the water enters the distribution system. The primary objective of SWQAs is to determine the occurrence of more than 250 anthropogenic organic compounds in source water used by community water systems, many of which currently are unregulated in drinking water by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A secondary objective is to understand recurrence patterns in source water and determine if these patterns also occur in finished water before distribution. SWQA studies were conducted in two phases for most studies completed by 2005, and in one phase for most studies completed since 2005. Analytical results are reported for a total of 295 different anthropogenic organic compounds monitored in source-water and finished-water samples collected during 2002-10. The 295 compounds were classified according to the following 13 primary use or source groups: (1) disinfection by-products; (2) fumigant-related compounds; (3) fungicides; (4) gasoline hydrocarbons, oxygenates, and oxygenate degradates; (5) herbicides and herbicide degradates; (6) insecticides and insecticide degradates; (7) manufacturing additives; (8) organic synthesis compounds; (9) pavement- and combustion-derived compounds; (10) personal-care and domestic-use products; (11) plant- or animal-derived biochemicals; (12) refrigerants and

  11. INTERNAL FINISHING OF CYLINDRICAL PIPES USING SINTERED MAGNETIC ABRASIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PALWINDER SINGH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An internal magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF process was proposed to produce highly finished inner surfaces of workpieces used in critical applications. The process principle and the finishing characteristics of magnetic abrasive finishing of cylindrical pipes using sintered magnetic abrasives are described in this research work. Thesintered magnetic abrasive is a mixture of Al2O3 abrasive and ferromagnetic particles. The Al2O3 based sintered magnetic abrasives have been developed in sintering machine. The surface roughness measurements resulting from finishing experiments demonstrate the effects of the abrasive behavior on the surface modifications. Thesurface finish was analysed in terms of percent improvement in surface finish (PISF. Also surface finish was analysed using Response Surface Methodology (RSM. The obtained maximum PISF was 95% and minimum surface roughness was 0.05 μm Ra. To further study the improvement in surface finish, the surface was microscopically examined using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD.

  12. Psychological Well-Being (PWB of School Adolescents Aged 12-18 yr, its Correlation with General Levels of Physical Activity (PA and Socio-Demographic Factors In Gilgit, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin KHAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a critical developmental stage marked by complex transitions. The purpose of study was to assess school adolescents’ PWB, examine the relationship of PA and socio-demographic factors with PWB.Methods: A cross sectional study conducted in five randomly selected schools with 345 adolescents (aged 12-18 from grade 6th-10th. A self-administered Well-Being index was adapted to measure PWB and questionnaire for adoles-cents PA (PAQ-A. Socio-demographic variables determined: age, gender, household income and parental education. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses performed to examine the association between PWB, PA and covariates.Results: Findings indicated the mean age 14.64 (SD=1.275, 55.4% were female. Without gender difference the ma-jority (43.4% of adolescents showed moderate, while (23.2% revealed low level of PWB. Participants with low level likely to have depression but scores were significantly not different between low, moderate and high PWB with PA. Socio-demographic trends of adolescents’ were observed significant (P <0.005 for PWB. In multivariable analysis the mean wellbeing in females adjusted for other covariates was significant (P =0.004 than males. PWB importantly (P <0.001 decreased by 3.36 units as its covariates increased and PA score in boys found 0.05 unit more than girls.Conclusion: The study results are invaluable in addressing low, moderate and high levels of PWB. Inadequate PA and PWB decreasing with some socio-demographic covariates is crucial health issue among female adolescents in Pakistan. Further studies need to find barrier, social indicators of PWB and implication of health among adolescents.

  13. Configuration design and accuracy analysis of a novel magneto rheological finishing machine tool for concave surfaces with small radius of curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Henan; Chen, Mingjun [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Yu, Bo; Zhen, Fang [China Electronics Technology Group Corporation No.26 Research Institute, Chongqing (China)

    2016-07-15

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a computer-controlled deterministic polishing technique that is widely used in the production of high-quality optics. In order to overcome the defects of existing MRF processes that are unable to achieve concave surfaces with small radius of curvature, a configuration method of a novel structured MRF machine tool using small ball-end permanent-magnet polishing head is proposed in this paper. The preliminary design focuses on the structural configuration of the machine, which includes the machine body, motion units and accessory equipment, and so on. Structural deformation and fabrication accuracy of the machine are analyzed theoretically, in which the reasonable structure sizes, manufacturing errors and assembly errors of main structural components are given for configuration optimization. Based on the theoretical analysis, a four-axes linkage MRF machine tool is developed. Preliminary experiments of spot polishing are carried out and the results indicate that the proposed MRF process can achieve stable polishing area which meets requirement of deterministic polishing. A typical small-bore complex component is polished on the developed device and fine surface quality is obtained with sphericity of the finished spherical surfaces 1.3 μm and surface roughness Ra less than 0.018 μm.

  14. Experimental Research on Surface Finish of Cutting Inconel 718%切削Inconel 718表面粗糙度的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄雪红; 季德生

    2013-01-01

    The cutting tests of high speed turning Inconel 718 using coated carbide tool is presented.The influences of cutting parameters and tool abrasion on surface finish are studied.The results show that feeding affected on the surface finish of machined surface has been most,then is cutting depth,cutting speed is minimal.After entering normal wear stage,the surface roughness decreases,and cutting condition is optimum.%利用涂层硬质合金刀具对Inconel 718进行了高速切削试验,对不同切削参数下刀具的切削用量及刀具磨损对工件表面粗糙度的影响进行了研究.分析结果表明进给量对已加工表面的粗糙度影响最大,切削深度次之,切削速度最小;刀具进入正常磨损阶段后,表面粗糙度减小,处于最佳的切削状态.

  15. Does a micro-grooved trunnion stem surface finish improve fixation and reduce fretting wear at the taper junction of total hip replacements? A finite element evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkanfar, Ariyan; Langton, David J; Joyce, Thomas J

    2017-08-10

    The generation of particulate debris at the taper junction of total hip replacements (THRs), can cause failure of the artificial hip. The taper surfaces of femoral heads and trunnions of femoral stems are generally machined to a certain roughness to enhance fixation. However, the effect of the surface roughness of these surfaces on the fixation, wear and consequently clinical outcomes of the design is largely unknown. In this study, we asked whether a micro-grooved trunnion surface finish (1) improves the fixation and (2) reduces the wear rate at the taper junction of THRs. We used 3D finite element (FE) models of THRs to, firstly, investigate the effect of initial fixation of a Cobalt-Chromium femoral head with a smooth taper surface mated with a Titanium (1) micro-grooved and (2) smooth, trunnion surface finishes. Secondly, we used a computational FE wear model to compare the wear evolution between the models, which was then validated against wear measurements of the taper surface of explanted femoral heads. The fixation at the taper junction was found to be better for the smooth couplings. Over a 7 million load cycle analysis in-silico, the linear wear depth and the total material loss was around 3.2 and 1.4 times higher for the femoral heads mated with micro-grooved trunnions. It was therefore concluded that smooth taper and trunnion surfaces will provide better fixation at the taper junction and reduce the volumetric wear rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Develop of ceramic effects: surface finishes, through digital inject technology; Desarrollo de efectos ceramicos como acabados superficiales, mediante tecnologia de inyeccion digital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Ferro Spain SA has tackled the practical viability of tile surfaces decoration by means of applying layers of reduced thickness by means of the use of digital injection technology by ink jet and, specifically, relating to effects and superficial finishes different from colouring. It has been studied several mechanisms which allow to get those effects and the influence of the main variables. It has also been assessed the obtained results dealing with the current regulations as in the case of non-slip effect. (Author)

  17. Synthetic rubber surface as an alternative to concrete to improve welfare and performance of finishing beef cattle reared on fully slatted flooring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brscic, M; Ricci, R; Prevedello, P; Lonardi, C; De Nardi, R; Contiero, B; Gottardo, F; Cozzi, G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a fully slatted concrete floor (concrete slatted (CS)) with the same floor on which synthetic rubber slats were placed on the concrete slats (rubber slatted (RS)) as housing solution for finishing beef cattle. The present study involved five commercial beef cattle farms in which the floor of at least three pens was kept as fully slatted, and in an equal number of pens a rubber cover was placed on the floor, tightly matching the gap profile of the concrete slats to allow the drainage of manure. A total of 326 finishing beef bulls were used (153 on CS and 173 on RS), and regardless of the floor treatment animals were housed in groups of 6 to 12 bulls/pen with a space allowance of 3.1 ± 0.2 m2/bull. Bulls had similar initial live weights (422.3 kg on CS and 425.0 kg on RS), but bulls on RS were heavier at the end of the finishing period with a higher average daily gain than bulls kept on CS (1.53 v. 1.46 kg/day; PRubber covering prevented the occurrence of bursitis, but it increased the odds for hoof overgrowth at end of the finishing period. Hoof overgrowth detected in vivo in bulls on RS was confirmed at the slaughterhouse by the longer dorsal wall and diagonal lengths of the hoof as well as by a more acute toe angle. Compared with bulls on CS, bulls on RS showed less inactivity and resting time, increased social interactions, decreased abnormal lying down and unsuccessful attempts to lie down, as well as shortened the time for lying down. Bulls in RS pens were dirtier compared with those in CS pens, likely due to the draining gaps being reduced to 11.6 ± 1.2% of the total pen surface compared with the 16.9 ± 1.7% in CS pens. This study gave further evidence about the positive effects of the RS floor on growth performance and welfare of finishing beef cattle, although compromising cleanliness and hoof overgrowth.

  18. SWB和PWB:两种幸福感研究取向的分野与整合%SWB & PWB:The Distinction and Integration of Two Well-being Research Orientation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严标宾; 郑雪; 邱林

    2004-01-01

    文章分析了幸福感研究的两种取向主观幸福感 (subjective well-being, SWB)和心理幸福感 (psychological well-being, PWB).文章探讨了SWB和PWB的不同特点,并对两者的相互关系作出了探讨:两者概念上是相关的,但在经验上却是分离的,它们的结合与不同的人口统计学和人格变量有着紧密的联系;并且它们已经表现出一种相互整合的趋势.

  19. Application of a He3Ne infrared laser source for detection of geometrical dimensions of cracks and scratches on finished surfaces of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaryan, Nikolay; Campana, Claudio; Moslehpour, Saeid; Shetty, Devdas

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the authors addressed a new method of measurement for microscratches and cracks on finished metallic surfaces. The technology proposed here can be used in aviation, automobile, machine-tools, bearings, electrical and thermal devices (detection of electrical and thermal contact resistance), and many other industrial fields where finished surfaces have to be inspected for quality before use. The technology is based on the application of He3Ne laser optics. This measurement method allows for the inspection of geometrical parameters such as depth and width of scratches and cracks and consists of a low-energy He3Ne red laser beam (wavelength 633 nm) with a cross-section of 0.48 mm, beam expander with special designed slit, multi-axis stage with sample holder and CCD (charge-coupled device) visual detection system. Using experimental data, a mathematical algorithm was created in order to calculate the depths and widths of the scratches and cracks where the method of center of gravity (centroid) of the imaged area was used. The results showed a good correlation between the experimental and calculated values of the dimensions of the scratches. Future work will deal with the determination of the geometrical dimensions of microcracks.

  20. EFFECT OF LASER INPUT ENERGY ON AuSnx INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS FORMATION IN SOLDER JOINTS WITH DIFFERENT THICKNESS OF Au SURFACE FINISH ON PADS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Liu; C.Q.Wang; Y.H.Tian; M.Y.Li

    2008-01-01

    Formation of AuSnx intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in laser reflowed solder joints was investigated. The results showed that few IMCs formed at the solder/0.1 μm Au interface. Needlelike AuSn4 IMCs were observed at the solder/0.5 μm Au interface.In Sn-2.0Ag-0.75Cu-3.0Bi and Sn-3.5Ag-O.75Cu solder joints, when the laser input energy was increased, AuSn4 IMCs changed from a layer to needlelike or dendritic distribution at the solder/0.9 μm Au interface. As for the solder joints with 4.0 μm thickness of Au surface finish on pads, AuSn4 , AuSn2, AuSn IMCs, and Au2 Sn phases formed at the interface. Moreover, the content of AuSnx IMCs, such as, AuSn4 and AuSn2, which contained high Sn concentration, would become larger as the laser input energy increased. In the Sn-37Pb solder joints with 0.9 μm or 4.0 μm thickness of the Au surface finish on pads, AuSn4 IMCs were in netlike distribution. The interspaces between them were filled with Pb-rich phases.

  1. Investigation of Crystal Surface Finish and Geometry on Single LYSO Scintillator Detector Performance for Depth-of-Interaction Measurement with Silicon Photomultipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Chad; Shao, Yiping

    2012-11-21

    Depth of Interaction (DOI) information can improve quality of reconstructed images acquired from Positron Emission Tomography (PET), especially in high resolution and compact scanners dedicated for breast, brain, or small animal imaging applications. Additionally, clinical scanners with time of flight capability can also benefit from DOI information. One of the most promising methods of determining DOI in a crystal involves reading the signal from two ends of a scintillation crystal, and calculating the signal ratio between the two detectors. This method is known to deliver a better DOI resolution with rough crystals compared to highly polished crystals. However, what is still not well studied is how much of a tradeoff is involved between spatial, energy, temporal, and DOI resolutions as a function of the crystal surface treatment and geometry with the use of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) as the photo detectors. This study investigates the effects of different crystal surface finishes and geometries on energy, timing and DOI resolutions at different crystal depths. The results show that for LYSO scintillators of 1.5×1.5×20 mm(3) and 2×2×20 mm(3) with their surfaces finished from 0.5 to 30 micron roughness, almost the same energy and coincidence timing resolutions were maintained, around 15% and 2.4 ns respectively across different crystal depths, while the DOI resolutions were steadily improved from worse than 5 mm to better than 2 mm. They demonstrate that crystal roughness, with proper surface preparing, does not have a significant effect on the energy and coincidence timing resolutions in the crystals examined, and there does not appear to be a tradeoff between improving DOI resolution and degrading other detector performances. These results will be valuable to guide the selection of crystal surface conditions for developing a DOI measurable PET detector with a full array of LYSO scintillators coupled to SiPM arrays.

  2. Effect of Surface Properties of Tinplating Product on Finishing%镀锡板表面特性对涂饰性的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏烈省; 李秀军; 韦晓

    2014-01-01

    镀锡板在食品包装领域有着广泛的应用。本文采用电子扫描电镜、电化学分析和划痕分析方法,研究了镀锡表面性能对涂饰性的影响。结果表明,镀锡板表面钝化膜含铬量对涂饰性有着重要的影响。当钝化膜含铬量控制10~20 mg/m2范围内,镀锡板表面具有较好的涂饰性。烘烤温度和烘烤时间对镀锡板表面形貌和耐蚀性无明显影响,但对涂饰性有着明显影响。烘烤时间为15 min ,烘烤温度在200℃左右,镀锡板表面与漆膜具有较好的结合力。%Tin plate in the field of food packaging has been widely used . In this paper , effect of the surface properties of tinplating product on finishing is studied by means of scanning electron microscopy ( SEM) , electrochemistry and scratch methods . The results showed that tin plate surface passivation film of chromium coating has an important impact on the finishing properties . When the amount of chromium passivation film containing is fixed at the range of 10mg/m2~ 20mg/m2 , tin plate has a better finishing of the surface . Baking temperature and baking time had no significant effect on the tin plate surface morphology and corrosion resistance , but has a significant effect on the coating properties . When baking time was of 15min and the baking temperature at 200 ℃ , tin plate surface and the film has good adhesion .

  3. Influence of surface finish on fatigue properties of metallic materials: a bibliographic study; Influence de l`etat de surface sur les proprietes de fatigue des materiaux metalliques: etude bibliographique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akamatsu, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    The investigation of a fatigue failed component very often shows that cracks initiated at the surface. It is actually well known that the surface finish notably influences the fatigue strength of a component. We have carried out a bibliographic study in order to clarify the influence of the different surface parameters. The analysis of the literature has shown that most of the data concerns high cycle fatigue. Three aspects of the surface finish have been examined: geometry (roughness), residual stresses and microstructure. In a general way, the influence of geometrical surface finish is tackled either empirically, with a factor assessing the fatigue limit decrease when the roughness and the tensile strength increase, or theoretically, with approaches modelling geometrical irregularities as notches or cracks. In all cases, the effect of roughness on fatigue strength depends on the material, through mechanical properties or microstructural features. The theoretical approaches seem particularly interesting, but their use is not straightforward and requires further development. The creation of residual stresses at the surface of a component can just as well reduce as improve its fatigue strength. In a first approach, these stresses can be regarded as a mean service stress. In fact, mechanical and metallurgical gradients near the surface have to be taken into account, which affect the relaxation of residual stresses during fatigue cycling. Actually, the effect of residual stresses can hardly be isolated, because these stresses are associated with geometrical and microstructural modifications. Microstructural features (metallurgical structure, grain size, inclusions, strain hardening) have an undoubted influence on fatigue strength, but the quantification of the effects remains tricky. The influence of the microstructure of surface layers on fatigue strength generally depends on the mechanical properties of materials. In short, fatigue strength predictions through a

  4. Packaging Reliability Effect of ENIG and ENEPIG Surface Finishes in Board Level Thermal Test under Long-Term Aging and Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chaobo; Hai, Zhou; Zhao, Cong; Zhang, Jiawei; Evans, John L; Bozack, Michael J; Suhling, Jeffrey C

    2017-04-26

    This study illustrates test results and comparative literature data on the influence of isothermal aging and thermal cycling associated with Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu (SAC105) and Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (SAC305) ball grid array (BGA) solder joints finished with ENIG and ENEPIG on the board side and ENIG on the package side compared with ImAg plating on both sides. The resulting degradation data suggests that the main concern for 0.4 mm pitch 10 mm package size BGA is package side surface finish, not board side. That is, ENIG performs better than immersion Ag for applications involving long-term isothermal aging. SAC305, with a higher relative fraction of Ag₃Sn IMC within the solder, performs better than SAC105. SEM and polarized light microscope analysis show cracks propagated from the corners to the center or even to solder bulk, which eventually causes fatigue failure. Three factors are discussed: IMC, grain structure, and Ag₃Sn particle. The continuous growth of Cu-Sn intermetallic compounds (IMC) and grains increase the risk of failure, while Ag₃Sn particles seem helpful in blocking the crack propagation.

  5. Post-machining thermal treatment after surface finishing of hardened steels: Kinetics of XRD line width reduction and improvement in rolling contact lifetime under mixed friction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gegner, Juergen [SKF GmbH, Department of Material Physics, Ernst-Sachs-Str. 5, D-97424 Schweinfurt (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Hard surface finishing represents the final manufacturing step for functional areas of machine elements in state-of-the-art production. Raceways of rolling bearing rings are ground and honed to the required low roughness. Plastic deformation is restricted to a narrow edge zone of the hardened steel. Reheating of the machined components below the martensite tempering or bainite transformation temperature results in a marked decrease of the XRD line width on the surface. The investigated samples are made of through-hardened standard bearing steel 100Cr6 (international denotation: SAE 52100). On the basis of a material model that explains the effect as a complex diffusion process of dislocational carbon segregation, i.e. static strain aging, the measured kinetics of the XRD line width reduction is simulated by an Arrhenius-type equation, which describes the rate-controlling reaction step of temper carbide dissolution. The formation of a small white-etching surface layer of around 1 um thickness by post-machining thermal treatment (PMTT) strongly supports this assumption. First rig tests suggest a considerable increase of the lifetime of Hertzian loaded elements that operate under heavy surface loading. PMTT performed in air leads to a beneficial nanoscaled oxide layer.

  6. Properties of M40J Carbon/PMR-II-50 Composites Fabricated with Desized and Surface Treated Fibers. Characterization of M40J Desized and Finished Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Gosau, Jan M.; Shin, E. Eugene; McCorkle, Linda S.; Sutter, James K.; OMalley, Michelle; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    To increase performance and durability of high temperature composites for potential rocket engine components, it is necessary to optimize wetting and interfacial bonding between high modulus carbon fibers and high temperature polyimide resins. It has been previously demonstrated that the electro-oxidative shear treatments used by fiber manufacturers are not effective on higher modulus fibers that have fewer edge and defect sites in the surface crystallites. In addition, sizings commercially supplied on most carbon fibers are not compatible with polyimides. This study was an extension of prior work characterizing the surface chemistry and energy of high modulus carbon fibers (M40J and M60J, Torray) with typical fluorinated polyimide resins, such as PMR-II-50. A continuous desizing system which utilizes environmentally friendly chemical- mechanical processes was developed for tow level fiber and the processes were optimized based on weight loss behavior, surface elemental composition (XPS) and morphology (FE-SEM) analyses, and residual tow strength of the fiber, and the similar approaches have been applied on carbon fabrics. Both desized and further treated with a reactive finish were investigated for the composite reinforcement. The effects of desizing and/or subsequent surface retreatment on carbon fiber on composite properties and performance including fiber-matrix interfacial mechanical properties, thermal properties and blistering onset behavior will be discussed in this presentation.

  7. X-ray diffraction analysis and metal physics modeling of static strain aging and thermal dislocation recovery in the mechanically affected zone of surface finished hardened steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gegner, Juergen [SKF GmbH, Dept. of Material Physics, Schweinfurt (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    After heat treatment, finish machining of the hardened steel represents the last manufacturing step of machine elements. The practically most important operation of grinding is applied to achieve edge zone compressive residual stresses, best surface quality and dimensional accuracy. Metal removal involves high plastic deformation work. Glide and intersection processes raise the density and produce lower energy substructures of dislocations. The temperature and time behavior of post-machining thermal treatment is analyzed on ground and honed martensitic SAE 52100 rolling bearing steel. Microstructure stabilization is reflected in a large XRD line width decrease on the surface. The kinetics is modeled by rate-controlling carbide dissolution as the carbon source for Cottrell-type segregation at dislocations. This static strain aging is verified by the formation of a slight white etching surface layer. The metal physics model is extended to also consider superimposed thermal dislocation recovery. Both effects are separable. In rolling contact fatigue tests under mixed friction running conditions, air reheating of the samples below the tempering temperature, which avoids hardness loss, leads to a significant lifetime increase. Thermal post-treatment after cold working results in similar changes of the XRD line width in the larger mechanically affected edge zone.

  8. Effects of three different bleaching agents on microhardness and roughness of composite sample surfaces finished with different polishing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yikilgan, İhsan; Akgul, Sinem; Ozcan, Suat; Bala, Oya

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of different polishing methods and whitening agents on surface hardness and roughness of nano-hybrid composite resin. Material and Methods In total, one hundred twenty disc-shaped specimens were prepared to nano-hybrid composite (Charisma Diamond). 60 samples were used for microhardness measurements and the others were used for the evaluation of surface roughness. Samples were divided randomly into two subgroups (n = 30 each). In first group a low-viscosity liquid polishing agent (Biscover LV) was applied. In the second group, nothing was applied. All the samples were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h. After initial measurements were completed, samples were divided randomly into three subgroups for bleaching application. 10% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF), 45% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF Quick), 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Boost) was applied. Then microhardness and surface roughness measurements of samples were repeated and data were recorded as final values for each sample. Results When the polishing techniques were compared, no signicant difference was observed in surface hardness and roughness. When the bleaching agents were compared, the 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide containing bleaching agent groups showed statistically significant differences between pre- and post-procedure hardness values (p<0.05). Conclusions Office-type bleaching agent containing CP was observed to be more secure for composite resins than other bleaching agents. No negative effect of glaze materials on the protection of surface roughness and hardness of composite resin was observed. Key words:Composite resin, bleaching, surface hardness, surface roughness. PMID:28298992

  9. Post Processing Methods used to Improve Surface Finish of Products which are Manufactured by Additive Manufacturing Technologies: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, N. N.; Mulay, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes open the possibility to go directly from Computer-Aided Design (CAD) to a physical prototype. These prototypes are used as test models before it is finalized as well as sometimes as a final product. Additive Manufacturing has many advantages over the traditional process used to develop a product such as allowing early customer involvement in product development, complex shape generation and also save time as well as money. Additive manufacturing also possess some special challenges that are usually worth overcoming such as Poor Surface quality, Physical Properties and use of specific raw material for manufacturing. To improve the surface quality several attempts had been made by controlling various process parameters of Additive manufacturing and also applying different post processing techniques on components manufactured by Additive manufacturing. The main objective of this work is to document an extensive literature review in the general area of post processing techniques which are used in Additive manufacturing.

  10. Peripheral snap-fit locking mechanisms and smooth surface finish of tibial trays reduce backside wear in fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łapaj, Łukasz; Mróz, Adrian; Kokoszka, Paweł; Markuszewski, Jacek; Wendland, Justyna; Helak-Łapaj, Celina; Kruczyński, Jacek

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose - Severe backside wear, observed in older generations of total knee replacements (TKRs), led to redesign of locking mechanisms to reduce micromotions between tibial tray and inlay. Since little is known about whether this effectively reduces backside wear in modern designs, we examined backside damage in retrievals of various contemporary fixed-bearing TKRs. Patients and methods - A consecutive series of 102 inlays with a peripheral (Stryker Triathlon, Stryker Scorpio, DePuy PFC Sigma, Aesculap Search Evolution) or dovetail locking mechanism (Zimmer NexGen, Smith and Nephew Genesis II) was examined. Articular and backside surface damage was evaluated using the semiquantitative Hood scale. Inlays were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine backside wear mechanisms. Results - Mean Hood scores for articular (A) and backside (B) surfaces were similar in most implants-Triathlon (A: 46, B: 22), Genesis II (A: 55, B: 24), Scorpio (A: 57, B: 24), PFC (A: 52, B: 20); Search (A: 56, B: 24)-except the NexGen knee (A: 57, B: 60), which had statistically significantly higher backside wear scores. SEM studies showed backside damage caused by abrasion related to micromotion in designs with dovetail locking mechanisms, especially in the unpolished NexGen trays. In implants with peripheral liner locking mechanism, there were no signs of micromotion or abrasion. Instead, "tray transfer" of polyethylene and flattening of machining was observed. Interpretation - Although this retrieval study may not represent well-functioning TKRs, we found that a smooth surface finish and a peripheral locking mechanism reduce backside wear in vivo, but further studies are required to determine whether this actually leads to reduced osteolysis and lower failure rates.

  11. Peripheral snap-fit locking mechanisms and smooth surface finish of tibial trays reduce backside wear in fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łapaj, Łukasz; Mróz, Adrian; Kokoszka, Paweł; Markuszewski, Jacek; Wendland, Justyna; Helak-Łapaj, Celina; Kruczyński, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — Severe backside wear, observed in older generations of total knee replacements (TKRs), led to redesign of locking mechanisms to reduce micromotions between tibial tray and inlay. Since little is known about whether this effectively reduces backside wear in modern designs, we examined backside damage in retrievals of various contemporary fixed-bearing TKRs. Patients and methods — A consecutive series of 102 inlays with a peripheral (Stryker Triathlon, Stryker Scorpio, DePuy PFC Sigma, Aesculap Search Evolution) or dovetail locking mechanism (Zimmer NexGen, Smith and Nephew Genesis II) was examined. Articular and backside surface damage was evaluated using the semiquantitative Hood scale. Inlays were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine backside wear mechanisms. Results — Mean Hood scores for articular (A) and backside (B) surfaces were similar in most implants—Triathlon (A: 46, B: 22), Genesis II (A: 55, B: 24), Scorpio (A: 57, B: 24), PFC (A: 52, B: 20); Search (A: 56, B: 24)—except the NexGen knee (A: 57, B: 60), which had statistically significantly higher backside wear scores. SEM studies showed backside damage caused by abrasion related to micromotion in designs with dovetail locking mechanisms, especially in the unpolished NexGen trays. In implants with peripheral liner locking mechanism, there were no signs of micromotion or abrasion. Instead, “tray transfer” of polyethylene and flattening of machining was observed. Interpretation — Although this retrieval study may not represent well-functioning TKRs, we found that a smooth surface finish and a peripheral locking mechanism reduce backside wear in vivo, but further studies are required to determine whether this actually leads to reduced osteolysis and lower failure rates. PMID:27781667

  12. Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Plutonium Finishing Plant, also known as PFP, represented the end of the line (the final procedure) associated with plutonium production at Hanford.PFP was also...

  13. Technique of pulse electrochemical finishing in molds and dies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-you; LIU Xiao-mei; JIANG Kai-yong; WANG Hui; ZHOU Jin-jin

    2004-01-01

    Surface finishing is one of the most important processes in mould and die making. This process is necessary not only for smoothing the surface of die or mould, but also for removing the surface layer, which has been damaged by the preceding machining process and finally improve the performances and lifetime of moulds to a large extent. It has been reported that between 30% and 40% of the total time required to manufacture a die or mold is spent on finishing operations, most of which are performed by skilled workers employing traditional techniques. At present, key problems in mould and die finishing technology can improve the finishing efficiency, consistency and quality at reduced costs. A new and high efficiency unconventional finishing technology, pulse electrochemical finishing was introduced. Experiments were done in neutral nitrate electrolytes. The influence of electrolyte composition, intereletrode gap, finishing time, flow quality, current density, compositions of steel materials and pulse parameters on the resulting surface finishing was investigated. Results indicate that pulse parameters have important influence on operations finishing and the proper selection of pulse parameters can lead to both good smoothing efficiency and surface quality at low costs.

  14. Ultrasonic magnetic abrasive finishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ya-ping; MA Ji; ZHANG Jun-qiang; WANG Long-shan

    2006-01-01

    Put forward a new kind of polishing method, ultrasonic magnetic abrasive finishing (UMAF), and studied its mechanism of improving polishing efficiency. By analyzing all kind of forces acting on single abrasive particle in the polishing process and calculating the size of the composition of forces, get the conclusion that UMAF will enhance the efficiency of the normal magnetic abrasive finishing(MAF) due to the ultrasonic vibration increases the cutting force and depth. At last the idea of designing the UMAF system based on numerical control milling machine is put forward which is convenient to setup and will accelerate the practical application of MAF.

  15. 16 CFR 1508.7 - Construction and finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Construction and finishing. 1508.7 Section 1508.7 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.7 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood surfaces...

  16. K9玻璃磁性研磨抛光表面粗糙度试验研究%Research on surface roughness of K9 glass by magnetic abrasive finishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丘永亮; 邱腾雄; 阎秋生

    2015-01-01

    针对 K9光学玻璃研磨抛光过程中存在的问题,将磁性研磨加工方法应用在光学玻璃的研磨抛光上。试验表明,K9玻璃的表面粗糙度值Ra由原来的90 nm 左右下降到40 nm 左右。为进一步研究磁性研磨试验的4个因素,设计了正交试验,最终得出各个因素对于工件表面粗糙度影响的主次顺序,并确定其最优组合为:磁极转速2300 r/min,加工间隙1.5 mm,磁感应强度0.4 T,进给速度200 mm/min。%To study the existing problems of polishing K9 optical glass,magnetic abrasive finishing was put forward in polishing optical glass•Results showed that surface roughness R a of K9 glass decreased from 90 nm to 40 nm•Based on the feasibility study,the magnetic abrasive finishing experiments were performed by orthogonal experiment with 4 parameters•Then various factors of magnetic abrasive finishing were listed in sequence•The optimum combination was that:pole speed of 2300 r∕min,working clearance of 1•5 mm,magnetic flux density of 0•4 T and feed rate of 200 mm∕min.

  17. Flat friction tests applied to austenic stainless steels with several surface finish. Analysis of adhesion conditions in friction; Ensayos de rozamiento plano sobre aceros inoxidables austeniticos con diferente acabado superficial. Determinacion de las condiciones de adhesion en el rozamiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coello, J.; Miguel, V.; Ferrer, C.; Calatatyd, A.; Martinez, A.

    2008-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the tribological behaviour of austenic stainless steels AISI 304 with bright surface finishing (B). The assays have been carried out in flat faced dies system with mineral oil of 200 cts viscosity, S{sub 2}Mo grease and in dry conditions. The relationship between friction coefficient and pressure and velocity has been established for the mineral oil as lubricant. In these conditions, a strong adhesive tendency has been found in boundary lubrication regime. The results obtained here, show us that S{sub 2}Mo grease leads to lowest values for the friction coefficient. A minor adhesive behaviour tendency for AISI 316 steel, harder than 304 grades, has been found. A relevant plowing phenomena has been observed for the more critical friction conditions tried out. A surface hardener is produced as a consequence of that. (Author) 19 refs.

  18. Finish machining of hardened gears wheels using cubic boron nitride (CBN inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Talar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of investigation of finish machining of hardened bearing surfaces of cylindrical gear wheels. Finish machining has been performed with wedges of defined geometry made of CBN. The presented investigation results are related mainly to the wear processes of the cutting wedges. Additional results of quality examination of finish machined gear wheels have been presented, too.

  19. Influence of finishing on the electrochemical properties of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T; Hattori, M; Hasegawa, K; Yoshinari, M; Kawada, E; Oda, Y

    2000-05-01

    Dental alloy surface finishing procedures of may influence their electrochemical behavior, which is used to evaluate their corrosion resistance. We examined the polarization resistance and potentiodynamic polarization profile of the precious-metal alloys, Type 4 gold alloy and silver-palladium alloy, and the base-metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy, cobalt-chromium alloy, and CP-titanium. Three types of finishing procedure were examined: mirror-finishing using 0.05 micron alumina particles, polishing using #600 abrasive paper and sandblasting. Dissolution of the alloy elements in 0.9% NaCl solution was also measured and compared with the electrochemical evaluation. The corrosion resistance of the dental alloys was found to relate to finishing as follows: The polarization resistance and potentiodynamic polarization behavior revealed that the corrosion resistance improved in the order of sandblasting, #600-abrasive-paper polishing, and mirror-finishing. While the corrosion potential, critical current density and passive current density varied depending on the type of finishing, the transpassive potential remained unchanged. The influence of finishing on the corrosion resistance of precious-metal alloys was less significant than on that of base-metal alloys. A mirror-finishing specimen was recommended for use in evaluation of the corrosion resistance of various dental alloys.

  20. Vibratory finishing as a decontamination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, M.W.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; Allen, R.P.

    1980-10-01

    The major objective of this research is to develop vibratory finishing into a large-scale decontamination technique that can economicaly remove transuranic and other surface contamination from large volumes of waste produced by the operation and decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities. The successful development and widespread application of this decontamination technique would substantially reduce the volume of waste requiring expensive geologic disposal. Other benefits include exposure reduction for decontamination personnel and reduced risk of environmental contamination. Laboratory-scale studies showed that vibratory finishing can rapidly reduce the contamination level of transuranic-contaminated stainless steel and Plexiglas to well below the 10-nCi/g limit. The capability of vibratory finishing as a decontamination process was demonstrated on a large scale. The first decontamination demonstration was conducted at the Hanford N-Reactor, where a vibratory finisher was installed to reduce personnel exposure during the summer outage. Items decontaminated included fuel spacers, process-tube end caps, process-tube inserts, pump parts, ball-channel inspection tools and miscellaneous hand tools. A second demonstration is currently being conducted in the decontamination facility at the Hanford 231-Z Building. During this demonstration, transuranic-contaminated material from decommissioned plutonium facilities is being decontaminated to <10 nCi/g to minimize the volume of material that will require geologic disposal. Items that are being decontaminated include entire glove boxes, process-hood structural material and panels, process tanks, process-tank shields, pumps, valves and hand tools used during the decommissioning work.

  1. Influencia del Acabado Superficial en el Digitalizado con Sensores de Triangulación por Láser Influence of Surface Finishing on the Scanning with Laser Triangulation Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Cuesta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo trata sobre la medida de la influencia que los distintos acabados superficiales tienen sobre la precisión y calidad del digitalizado utilizando sensores láser de triangulación. Entre el gran número de parámetros que influyen en la calidad del digitalizado, se analiza la influencia de la rugosidad. Para ello se ha establecido un procedimiento que permite restringir la influencia de otras variables y que, al mismo tiempo, proporciona una excelente repetibilidad y reproducibilidad. Este procedimiento se ha aplicado a distintos procesos de fabricación que dan lugar a muy distintos acabados superficiales. De esta forma se han establecido ciertas correlaciones cuantificando, además de la influencia de la rugosidad en la nube de puntos, la forma espacial que adopta su dispersión y la intensidad optima para cada proceso.The present work deals with the measurement of the influence that surface finishing has on the accuracy and quality of the scanning performed using laser triangulation sensors. Amongst the great number of parameters that influence the scanning quality, the effect of roughness is analysed. To achieve this, a procedure for constraining the variables while providing an excellent repeatability and reproducibility was proposed. This procedure has been applied to several manufacturing processes that produce parts with very different quality of surface finishing. As a result, certain correlations have been extracted that quantify the influence of the roughness on the quality of the cloud-point, the spatial distribution of the cloud-point dispersion and the optimal laser intensity for each manufacturing process.

  2. 织机长轴表面超声波光整技术的开发应用%The Development and the Application of the Ultrasonic Finish of the Surface of the Long Loom Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳芳

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the surface roughness of the parts such as long loom beam,analysis is done to the feature of the warp roller of the rapier loom of big size,in conjunction with the production practice,comparative analysis is done to the excircle grinder and the surface finishing machine with Hauk ultrasonic energy as to the investment cost,machining process and production process.The investment plan is optimized and the green manufacturing realized,and the surface ultrasonic finish technology developed and applicated.Conclusion is made that the substituting the ultrasonic technology for the grinding machining can improve the roughness of the warp roller by 3 degrees,and save the cost by 50%.The new technology not only solves the problem of machining the long beam,but also is applicable for the other parts manufacturing like beams.%为了提高织机长轴类零件的表面粗糙度,分析了宽幅剑杆织机后梁的特点,结合生产实际,对比分析了外圆磨床与豪克能超声波表面加工设备的投资成本、加工工艺及实施工艺,优化了投资方案,实现了绿色制造,开发应用了织机长轴表面超声波光整技术。指出:用超声波光整技术代替磨削加工,可提高织机后梁表面粗糙度3级以上,且节约加工成本约50%;新技术不仅解决了宽幅织机长轴类零件的加工难题,而且可推广至很多轴类零件的加工,提升加工工艺。

  3. Buffered Electropolishing – A New Way for Achieving Extremely Smooth Surface Finish on Nb SRF Cavities to be Used in Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley

    2009-05-01

    Future accelerators require unprecedented cavity performance, which is strongly influenced by interior surface nano-smoothness. Electropolishing (EP) is the technique of choice to be developed for high-field superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and related techniques point to the electropolishing mechanism of Nb in a sulphuric and hydrofluoric acid electrolyte controlled by a compact surface salt film under F- diffusion-limited mass transport control. These and other findings are guiding a systematic characterization to form the basis for cavities process optimization.

  4. Influence of Hole Surface Finish, Cyclic Frequency and Spectrum Severity on the Fatigue Behaviour of Thick Section Aluminium Alloy Pin Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    copies) Qantas Airways Limited SEC of Vic. Herman Research Laboratory, Library Ansett Airlines of Australia, Library BHP, Melbourne Research...11 4.1 Fatigue data ........................................ 11 4 2 Fracture surface analysis ............................. 14...4, while the constant-amplitude data are also presented in the S/N diagrams shown in Fig. 7. Using a least-squares analysis a third-order polynomial

  5. Environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textiles finished with siloxane sulfopropylbetaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Shaojun; Jiang, Song; Xiong, Meiling; Luo, Junxuan; Tang, Jiaoning; Ge, Zaochuan

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a novel environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textile finished with reactive siloxane sulfopropylbetaine(SSPB). The results show that SSPB can be covalently bound onto the cotton textile surface, imparting perdurable antibacterial activity. The textiles finished with SSPB have been investigated systematically from the mechanical properties, thermal stability, hydrophilic properties and antibacterial properties. It is found that the hydrophilicity and breaking strength are improved greatly after the cotton textiles are finished with SSPB. Additionally, the cotton textiles finished with SSPB exhibit good antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus, ATCC 6538), gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E.coli, 8099) and fungi Candida albicans (C.albicans, ATCC 10231). Moreover, SSPB is nonleachable from the textiles, and it does not induce skin stimulation and is nontoxic to animals. Thus, SSPB is ideal candidate for environmentally friendly antibacterial textile applications.

  6. Simulation of Magnetic Field Assisted Finishing (MFAF) Process Utilizing Smart MR Polishing Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Anwesa; Das, Manas

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic field assisted finishing process is an advanced finishing process. This process is capable of producing nanometer level surface finish. In this process magnetic field is applied to control the finishing forces using magnetorheological polishing medium. In the current study, permanent magnet is used to provide the required magnetic field in the finishing zone. The working gap between the workpiece and the magnet is filled with MR fluid which is used as the polishing brush to remove surface undulations from the top surface of the workpiece. In this paper, the distribution of magnetic flux density on the workpiece surface and behaviour of MR polishing medium during finishing are analyzed using commercial finite element packages (Ansys Maxwell® and Comsol®). The role of magnetic force in the indentation of abrasive particles on the workpiece surface is studied. A two-dimensional simulation study of the steady, laminar, and incompressible MR fluid flow behaviour during finishing process is carried out. The material removal and surface roughness modelling of the finishing process are also presented. The indentation force by a single active abrasive particle on the workpiece surface is modelled during simulation. The velocity profile of MR fluid with and without application of magnetic field is plotted. It shows non-Newtonian property without application of magnetic field. After that the total material displacement due to one abrasive particle is plotted. The simulated roughness profile is in a good agreement with the experimental results. The conducted study will help in understanding the fluid behavior and the mechanism of finishing during finishing process. Also, the modelling and simulation of the process will help in achieving better finishing performance.

  7. Dimensioning, Tolerancing, and Machine Finishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, George C.

    Intended for use with the vocational education student interested in technical drawing, this guide provides answers to questions relating to dimensioning and tolerancing machine drawings. It also gives examples of standard dimensioning practices, tolerancing applications, and finish applications. The problems and examples presented are based on…

  8. Laser Window Surface Finishing and Coating Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    and amplified to a level sufficient to control the main switching tube. Both ignitron and thyratron switching tubes have been used (Figs. 14(a...beam. A variety of energy monitors has been used to calibrate and monitor the laser output. The primary standard consists of a Hadron Model 100...measurements by cross checking those calorimeters, thermopiles, and power meters used in this program. The Hadron Model 100 thermopile used

  9. Surface-Finish Measurement with Interference Microscopes,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-01

    5) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Bewley, H. D. 65 Redstone Arsenal Hutcheson, G. J. Union Carbide Corporation • New York Winters, Charles...Singer, S. Sollid, J. E. Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Stief, S. S. Wilcox.W. J.,Jr Oak Ridge National Laboratory Weir.J. R.,Jr OakRidge...February 1977 MIC QUALITY INSPECTED < UNION CARBIDE OAK RIDGE Y-12 PLANT OAK RIDGE. prepared for the U.S. ENERGY RESEARCH AND

  10. 7 CFR 29.3517 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finish. 29.3517 Section 29.3517 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3517 Finish. The reflectance factor in color perception. Finish indicates the sheen or...

  11. 7 CFR 29.1017 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finish. 29.1017 Section 29.1017 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1017 Finish. The reflectance factor in color perception. Finish indicates the sheen or...

  12. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The purchasing...

  13. Application of Plasma finishing on Cotton Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Shankar Joshi,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Plasma” word is derived from the Greek and referring to the “something molded or fabricated”. Plasma treatments are gaining popularity in the textile industry. Plasma treatment has to be controlled carefully to avoid detrimental action of the plasma onto the substrate. Plasma surface treatments show distinct advantages, because they are able to modify the surface properties of inert materials, sometimes with environment friendly devices. For fabrics, cold plasma treatments require the development of reliable and large systems. Application of “Plasma Technology” in chemical processing of textiles is one of the revolutionary ways to boost the textile wet processing right from pre-treatments to finishing.

  14. Manipulating mechanics and chemistry in precision optics finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Jacobs

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Deterministic processing is critical to modern precision optics finishing. Put simply, determinism is the ability to predict an outcome before carrying out an activity. With the availability of computer numerically controlled (CNC equipment and sophisticated software algorithms, it is now possible to grind and polish optics from a variety of materials to surface shape accuracies of ~20 nm peak-to-valley (p–v, with surface roughness values (measured on white light interferometers over 250 μm×350 μm areas to sub-nm root-mean-square (rms levels. In the grinding phase the capability now exists to estimate removal rates, surface roughness, and the depth of subsurface damage (SSD for a previously unprocessed material, knowing its Young's modulus, hardness, and fracture toughness. An understanding of how chemistry aids in the abrasive-driven removal of material from the surface during polishing is also critical. Recent polishing process research reveals the importance of chemistry, specifically slurry pH, for preventing particle agglomeration in order to achieve smooth surface finishes with conventional pad or pitch laps. New sub-aperture polishing processes like magnetorheological finishing (MRF can smooth and shape flat, spherical, aspheric and free-form surfaces within a few process iterations. Difficult to finish optical materials like soft polymer polymethyl methacrylate, microstructured polycrystalline zinc sulfide, and water soluble single-crystal potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP can be finished with MRF. The key is the systematic alteration of MR fluid chemistry and mechanics (i.e. the abrasive to match the unique physical properties of each workpiece.

  15. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Variables associated with odds of finishing and finish time in a 161-km ultramarathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegelin, Jacob A; Hoffman, Martin D

    2011-01-01

    We sought to determine the degree to which age, sex, calendar year, previous event experience and ambient race day temperature were associated with finishing a 100-mile (161-km) trail running race and with finish time in that race. We computed separate generalized linear mixed-effects regression models for (1) odds of finishing and (2) finish times of finishers. Every starter from 1986 to 2007 was used in computing the models for odds of finishing (8,282 starts by 3,956 individuals) and every finisher in the same period was included in the models for finish time (5,276 finishes). Factors associated with improved odds of finishing included being a first-time starter and advancing calendar year. Factors associated with reduced odds of finishing included advancing age above 38 years and warmer weather. Beyond 38 years of age, women had worse odds of finishing than men. Warmer weather had a similar effect on finish rates for men and women. Finish times were slower with advancing age, slower for women than men, and less affected by warm weather for women than for men. Calendar year was not associated with finish time after adjustment for other variables.

  17. SEM Evaluation of Surrounding Enamel after Finishing of Composite Restorations- Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovan, G.; Stoleriu, S.; Solomon, S.; Ghiorghe, A.; Sandu, A. V.; Andrian, S.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the surface characteristics of the enamel adjacent to composite resin after finishing the restoration with different diamond and tungsten carbide burs. The topography of enamel was observed by using a scanning electron microscope. Finishing with extra-/ultra-fine carbide burs, and extra-fine diamond burs resulted in smooth surfaces. In few areas some superficial scratches with no clinical relevance were observed. Deep grooves were observed on the surface of enamel when fine diamond burs were used. Finishing of composite restorations with coarse burs should be avoided when there is a high risk of touching and scratching adjacent enamel during the procedure.

  18. Monitoring and control of fine abrasive finishing processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarev, Ruslan

    In engineering, surfaces with specified functional properties are of high demand in various applications. Desired surface finish can be obtained using several methods. Abrasive finishing is one of the most important processes in the manufacturing of mould and dies tools. It is a principal method...... of this work was to investigate foundations for process monitoring and control methods in application to semi-automated polishing machine based on the industrial robot. The monitoring system was built on NI data acquisition system with two sensors, acoustic emission sensor and accelerometer. Acquired sensory...... signals were analysed in time-frequency domain and specific process features are extracted in relation to machining parameters and processed surface properties. Development and research of the process monitoring was done with background in evaluation of surface roughness parameters. The characterization...

  19. Manipulating mechanics and chemistry in precision optics finishing

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2007-01-01

    Deterministic processing is critical to modern precision optics finishing. Put simply, determinism is the ability to predict an outcome before carrying out an activity. With the availability of computer numerically controlled (CNC) equipment and sophisticated software algorithms, it is now possible to grind and polish optics from a variety of materials to surface shape accuracies of ~20 nm peak-to-valley (p–v), with surface roughness values (measured on white light interferometers over 250 μm...

  20. International innovations in optical finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-10-01

    Every few years new polishing technologies attempt to make the transition from the research laboratory into the commercial sector. Success awaits any process that is well controlled and predictable (e.g., deterministic), rapid, capable of smoothing to sub-nm rms roughness levels while removing damage from grinding, affordable, and easily implemented. Applicability to different optical materials and a variety of part sizes and shapes is extremely important, but may not be required for a new technology to succeed in a niche market. This paper reviews six innovations in polishing of precision optics: Canon"s Super-Smooth Polisher (CSSP) that uses a sub-aperture pitch lap - a relatively mature but important base-line technology; Nikon / Osaka University"s RF Plasma Chemical Vaporization Machining (CVM); Epion"s Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) Process; the IOM University of Leipzig / NTGL Ion Beam Finishing (IBF) Technology; Zeeko"s "Precessions" Process with a sub-aperture section of an inflatable pad; and QED Technology"s Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) with a magnetic fluid ribbon. The removal mechanism and some recent achievements for each process are discussed.

  1. Fundamentals of figure control and fracture-'free' finishing for high aspect ratio laser optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suratwala, Tayyab [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The high level objectives of the this work were to: 1) scientifically understand critical phenomena affecting the surface figure during full aperture finishing; 2) utilize these fundamentals to more deterministically control the surface figure during finishing; 3) successfully polish under rogue particle-‘free’ environments during polishing by understanding/preventing key sources of rogue particles.

  2. Print Finishing: From Manual to Automated Print Finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Ward

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Meeting the demand for faster turnrounds and shorter print runs goes beyond making the printing press easier to set up and change. There is little point in producing plates and then sheets from a press if the post press area does not change to keep abreast of developments in prepress and the print room. The greatest impact is going to come from JDF, the end to end production data format which is finding wide spread acceptance in print areas. To date finishing equipment manufacturers are not as well represented within the CIP4 organisation as prepress and press vendors, but the major manufacturers are members. All are working to the goal of complete connectivity.The idea of JDF is that if the format of a print product like a magazine is known during the creation phases, the information can be used to preset machinery that is going to be used to produce it, so avoiding input errors and saving manufacturing time.A second aspect to JDF is that information about performance and progress is gathered and can be retrieved from a central point or made available to a customer. Production scheduling and costing becomes more accurate and customer relationships are deepened. However JDF to its fullest extent is not yet in use in connecting the finishing area to the rest of the printing plant. Around the world different companies are testing the idea of JDF to connect saddle stitchers, guillotines and binders with frantic work underway to be able to show results soon.

  3. A comparative evaluation of fluidized bed assisted drag finishing and centrifugal disk dry finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barletta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drag finishing of brass (Cu-30 wt.% Zn rings using fluidized abrasives, which is a new finishing technology, is comparatively evaluated with centrifugal disk finishing. The comparison was performed by selecting the same abrasive granulates of two different sizes and operating the equipment for the same processing time or at their respective maximum speeds. The experimental analysis investigated the change in workpiece morphology, material removal during finishing and dimensional accuracy. The results showed that each of the types of equipment investigated in the study were capable of a high finishing performance with a relatively short processing time. However, fluidized bed assisted drag finishing was more effective than centrifugal disk finishing in both the achievable quality of the processed parts and reduced processing time. In contrast, centrifugal disk finishing was preferable whenever low erosion and stringent dimensional tolerances were demanded.

  4. Roughness Analysis on Composite Materials (Microfilled, Nanofilled and Silorane) After Different Finishing and Polishing Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettini, Francesco; Corsalini, Massimo; Savino, Maria Grazia; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Venere, Daniela Di; Pappalettere, Carmine; Monno, Giuseppe; Boccaccio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The finishing and polishing of composite materials affect the restoration lifespan. The market shows a variety of finishing and polishing procedures and the choice among them is conditioned by different factors such as the resulting surface roughness. In the present study, 156 samples were realized with three composite materials, -microfilled, nanofilled and silorane-, and treated with different finishing and polishing procedures. Profilometric analyses were carried out on the samples' surface, the measured roughness values were submitted to statistical analysis. A complete factorial plan was drawn up and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate whether the following factors affect the values of roughness: (i) material; (ii) polishing/finishing procedure. Tukey post-hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant differences between the material/procedure combinations. The results show that the tested materials do not affect the resulting surface quality but roughness values depend on the finishing/polishing procedure adopted. The procedures that involve: (a) the finishing with medium Sof-Lex discs and (b) the finishing with two tungsten carbide multi-blade milling cutters Q series and UF series are those that allow the lowest values of roughness to be obtained.

  5. New finishing possibilities for producing durable multifunctional cotton/wool and viscose/wool blended fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, N A; El-Zairy, M R; Eid, B M; El-Zairy, E M R; Emam, E M

    2015-03-30

    This research work focuses on the development of a one-bath functional finishing procedure for imparting durable multifunctional properties such as easy care, soft-hand, antibacterial and/or ultra violet (UV) protection to cotton/wool and viscose/wool blends using diverse finishing combinations and formulations. In this study finishing agents such as reactant resin, silicon softeners, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, triclosan, and pigment colorant were selected using magnesium chloride/citric acid as a mixed catalyst and the pad-dry microwave fixation technique. The results reveal that enhancement in the imparted functional properties are governed by type of the finished substrate as well as nature and concentration of finishing formulation components. The finished fabrics still retained high level of functionalities even after 15 consecutive laundering. Surface morphology and composition of selected samples were investigated using scan electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The mode of interactions was also investigated. Practical applications for multifunctionlization of cellulose/wool blended fabrics are possible using these sorts of proper finishing formulations and unique finishing application method.

  6. Study on ultra-precision magnetic abrasive finishing process using low frequency alternating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jinzhong, E-mail: wjz.0926@163.com; Zou, Yanhua, E-mail: yanhua@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Sugiyama, Hitoshi, E-mail: sugiyama@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

    2015-07-15

    We proposed a new ultra-precision magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF) process using low frequency alternating magnetic field in this paper. Magnetic cluster themselves may produce the up and down movement change under alternating magnetic force. The movement may not only promote the dispersion of micro-magnetic particles, but also improve stirring effect and cross-cutting effects of the abrasives, achieving circulation and update to ensure the stability of grinding tools. This process is considered to be able to efficiently apply in ultra-precision finishing of plane and complicated micro-surfaces. In this study, we investigated the effects of alternating magnetic field on magnetic field distribution, finishing force and abrasive behavior. Furthermore, a set of experimental devices have been designed for finishing SUS304 stainless steel plate. The present work is aimed at understanding finishing particularity of this process and studying impacts of important process parameters namely grinding fluid, rotational speed of magnetic pole, current frequency on change in finish surface and material removal. Experimental results indicate that the process can realize ultra-precision finishing of plane by using oily grinding fluid. In the present research, the surface roughness of SUS304 stainless steel plate was improved from 240.24 nm to 4.38 nm by this process. - Highlights: • We investigated magnetic field distribution in processing region. • Magnetic cluster can produce a fluctuating finishing force in alternating magnetic field. • Oily grinding fluid is more applicable to this process. • Few nanometer finish surface can be obtained by this process.

  7. Marketing Strategy Formulation for the Introduction of Eukula Strato German Wood Finishes in Local Market of Emerging Indian Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Suraj Kushe Shekhar; Mehaboob P K

    2013-01-01

    Wood finishing relates to the process of embellishing or protecting the surface of the wood. The paper aimed at formulating a marketing strategy for introducing water borne German based Wood Finishes named Eukula Strato into local market of northern Kerala, India. Multiple cross sectional descriptive research with judgmental sampling technique elicited responses from Finishers, Furniture manufacturers and Interior designers. Findings revealed that Eukula Strato had a distinct advantage when c...

  8. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished. ...

  9. 精轧和吐丝温度对焊丝钢盘条表面红锈影响研究%Effect of finish rolling and wire rod laying temperature on surface red rust of wire rod for welding wire steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭大勇; 任玉辉; 王秉喜; 高航; 韩立涛; 车安

    2013-01-01

    对不同精轧和吐丝温度条件下焊丝钢盘条表面红锈情况进行对比分析.通过盘条氧化铁皮成分分析发现,出现红锈的铁皮中Fe3O4、Fe2O3含量较高.通过热力学分析发现,盘条与空气和水等介质反应,在高温条件下,有利于FeO的形成,较低的精轧和吐丝温度易于导致氧化铁皮Fe3O4、Fe2O3含量较高.同时,在较低精轧和吐丝温度条件下,盘条表面氧化铁皮的破裂,使FeO不断被氧化成Fe3O4、Fe2O3.在2种因素作用下,盘条表面易出现红锈.提高精轧和吐丝温度,可消除盘条表面红锈.%To analyze the surface red rust of wire rod for welding wire steel in different finish rolling and wire rod laying temperature conditions. It is found that red rust has higher content of Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 after wire rod scale composition is analyzed. It is found through thermomechanical analysis that FeO is easy to form in high temperature through reaction between wire rod and medium such as air and water, lower finish rolling and wire rod laying temperature cause higher content of Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 in scale. At the same time, cracks of wire rod surface scale cause FeO oxidized to Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 in condition of lower finish rolling and wire rod laying temperature. Red rust occurs easily on wire rod surface in two factors. Red rust can be prevented by increasing finish rolling and wire rod laying temperature.

  10. Marketing Strategy Formulation for the Introduction of Eukula Strato German Wood Finishes in Local Market of Emerging Indian Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj Kushe Shekhar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wood finishing relates to the process of embellishing or protecting the surface of the wood. The paper aimed at formulating a marketing strategy for introducing water borne German based Wood Finishes named Eukula Strato into local market of northern Kerala, India. Multiple cross sectional descriptive research with judgmental sampling technique elicited responses from Finishers, Furniture manufacturers and Interior designers. Findings revealed that Eukula Strato had a distinct advantage when compared to any other Wood Finish that was available in the local market. Findings and suggestions were reported as per 4P’s of marketing mix. Percentage analysis, Chi square analysis etc were used to interpret the results

  11. STEP based Finish Machining CAPP system

    OpenAIRE

    A Arivazhagan; Mehta, NK; Jain, PK

    2012-01-01

    This research paper presents various methodologies developed in a STEP based Computer Aided Process Planning (CAPP) system named "Finish Machining – CAPP" (FM-CAPP). It is developed to generate automatic process plans for finish machining prismatic parts. It is designed in a modular fashion consisting of three main modules, namely (i) Feature Recognition module (FRM) (ii) Machining Planning Module (MPM) and (iii) Setup Planning Module (SPM). The FRM Module analyses the geometrical and topolog...

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF FINISHING PARAMETERS OF ANTI-FRICTION LAYERS BY FINPLAST ON BEHAVIOR AT THE IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru DASCALU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available FINPLAST is original proceedings propose for f inishing antifriction surfaces of sledding bearings. FINPLAST is an original method proposed for anti -friction surface finish of the sliding bearings. The process extends cold plastic deformation technology, for finishing antifriction surfaces of the sliding bearings. In this paper presents the results of the evaluation of the state of stresses and strains obtained by simulation using the finite element method.

  13. High precision optical finishing of lightweight silicon carbide aspheric mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, John; Young, Kevin

    2010-10-01

    Critical to the deployment of large surveillance optics into the space environment is the generation of high quality optics. Traditionally, aluminum, glass and beryllium have been used; however, silicon carbide becomes of increasing interest and availability due to its high strength. With the hardness of silicon carbide being similar to diamond, traditional polishing methods suffer from slow material removal rates, difficulty in achieving the desired figure and inherent risk of causing catastrophic damage to the lightweight structure. Rather than increasing structural capacity and mass of the substrate, our proprietary sub-aperture aspheric surface forming technology offers higher material removal rates (comparable to that of Zerodur or Fused Silica), a deterministic approach to achieving the desired figure while minimizing contact area and the resulting load on the optical structure. The technology performed on computer-controlled machines with motion control software providing precise and quick convergence of surface figure, as demonstrated by optically finishing lightweight silicon carbide aspheres. At the same time, it also offers the advantage of ideal pitch finish of low surface micro-roughness and low mid-spatial frequency error. This method provides a solution applicable to all common silicon carbide substrate materials, including substrates with CVD silicon carbide cladding, offered by major silicon carbide material suppliers. This paper discusses a demonstration mirror we polished using this novel technology. The mirror is a lightweight silicon carbide substrate with CVD silicon carbide cladding. It is a convex hyperbolic secondary mirror with 104mm diameter and approximately 20 microns aspheric departure from best-fit sphere. The mirror has been finished with surface irregularity of better than 1/50 wave RMS @632.8 nm and surface micro-roughness of under 2 angstroms RMS. The technology has the potential to be scaled up for manufacturing capabilities of

  14. Numerical simulation of the combination effect of external magnetic field and rotating workpiece on abrasive flow finishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kheradmand, Saeid; Esmailian, Mojtaba; Fatahy, A. [Malek-Ashtar University of Technology (MUT), Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Finishing of a workpiece is a main process in the production. This affects the quality and lifetime. Finishing in order of nanometer, nowadays, is a main demand of the industries. Thus, some new finishing process, such as abrasive flow finishing, is introduced to respond this demand. This may be aided by rotating workpiece and imposing a magnetic field. Numerical simulation of this process can be beneficial to reduce the expense and predict the result in a minimum time. Accordingly, in this study, magnetorheological fluid finishing is numerically simulated. The working medium contains magnetic and abrasive particles, blended in a base fluid. Some hydrodynamic parameters and surface roughness variations are studied. It is found that combination of rotating a workpiece and imposing a magnetic field can improve the surface roughness up to 15 percent.

  15. Finishing of additively manufactured titanium alloy by shape adaptive grinding (SAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucamp, Anthony T.; Namba, Yoshiharu; Charlton, Phillip; Jain, Samyak; Graziano, Arthur A.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, rapid prototyping of titanium alloy components for medical and aeronautics application has become viable thanks to advances in technologies such as electron beam melting (EBM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). However, for many applications the high surface roughness generated by additive manufacturing techniques demands a post-finishing operation to improve the surface quality prior to usage. In this paper, the novel shape adaptive grinding process has been applied to finishing titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) additively manufactured by EBM and SLS. It is shown that the micro-structured surface layer resulting from the melting process can be removed, and the surface can then be smoothed down to less than 10 nm Ra (starting from 4-5 μm Ra) using only three different diamond grit sizes. This paper also demonstrates application of the technology to freeform shapes, and documents the dimensional accuracy of finished artifacts.

  16. The optimal parameters in a magnetically assisted finishing system using Taguchi's method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pa, P.S., E-mail: myhow@seed.net.t

    2010-11-01

    An intelligent design system was created that efficiently uses magnetic force to assist in the discharge of dregs from the electrode gap during the electrochemical step of a surface finishing process. In this electrochemical finishing experiment, the author used an electrode mated to the shape of the workpiece and supplied with continuous or pulsed direct current. The study used Taguchi's Method to analyze the combination of optimal parameters. The experimental parameters include four factors at three levels for the evaluation of surface roughness after the magnetically assisted electrochemical finishing process. These four factors are voltage, magnetic field strength, the distance between the two magnets and the electrode rotation speed. For this design a higher rotation speed of the electrode produced a better finish. A higher voltage with magnetic assistance can alleviate the difficulties of dregs discharge and also reduce the finishing time. Smaller distances between the two magnets, or a larger magnetic field intensity provides more magnetic force, improved discharge and results in a better finish. The average effect of magnetic assistance was greater than that of pulsed current and there is no need to prolong machining time to compensate for off-time.

  17. Glazed Tiles as Floor Finish in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyin Emmanuel AKINDE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tile is no doubt rich in antiquity; its primordial  show, came as mosaic with primary prospect in sacred floor finish before its oblivion, courtesy of, later consciousness towards wall finish in banquets, kitchens, toilets, restaurants and even bars. Today, its renaissance as floor finish is apparent in private and public architectural structures with prevalence in residential, recreational, commercial, governmental and other spaces. In Nigeria, the use of glazed tiles as floor finish became apparent, supposedly in mid-twentieth century; and has since, witnessed ever increasing demands from all sundry; a development that is nascent and has necessitated its mass  production locally with pockets of firms in the country. The latter however, is a resultant response to taste cum glazed tiles affordability, whose divergent sophistication in design, colour, size and shape is believed preferred to terrazzo, carpet and floor flex tile. Accessible as glazed tile and production is, in recent times; its dearth of a holistic literature in Nigeria is obvious. In the light of the latter, this paper examine glazed tiles as floor finish in Nigeria, its advent, usage, production, challenge, benefit and prospect with the hope of opening further frontier in discipline specifics.

  18. Improvements in Sand Mold/Core Technology: Effects on Casting Finish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prof. John J. Lannutti; Prof. Carroll E. Mobley

    2005-08-30

    In this study, the development and impact of density gradients on metal castings were investigated using sand molds/cores from both industry and from in-house production. In spite of the size of the castings market, almost no quantitative information about density variation within the molds/cores themselves is available. In particular, a predictive understanding of how structure and binder content/chemistry/mixing contribute to the final surface finish of these products does not exist. In this program we attempted to bridge this gap by working directly with domestic companies in examining the issues of surface finish and thermal reclamation costs resulting from the use of sand molds/cores. We show that these can be substantially reduced by the development of an in-depth understanding of density variations that correlate to surface finish. Our experimental tools and our experience with them made us uniquely qualified to achieve technical progress.

  19. Finishing of the cold mass assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 1 Technicians are putting in order the instrumentation wires. The prototype magnets were equipped with numerous sensors to monitor key parameters during the performance tests at cold conditions. Photo 2 The cold mass assembly is resting on special supports in order to allow the finishing operations. Technicians are putting in order the instrumentation wires. The prototype magnets were equipped with numerous sensors to monitor key parameters during the performance tests at cold conditions. Photo 3 View of the lyre-side end of the active part assembly. The extremity of the shrinking cylinder has been bevelled in view of welding the end cover. Photo 4 General view of the finishing station showing the special supporting structures (blue and yellow structures) needed for the geometric measurements and for the alignment operations. One can also see the light building surrounding the finishing station, which purpose is to isolate the laser measuring machines from disturbances. Photo 5 The extremity of the shri...

  20. Effect of Finishing Time on Microleakage at the Composite-Repair Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Berahman, Nazanin; Niazi, Elmira

    2016-01-01

    Repair is a conservative treatment of defective composite restoration. Sealing the repair interface is a critical factor to achieve successful repaired restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluatethe effect of three finishing times on the microleakage at the composite-repair interface. Eighty composite specimens (Z250) were made and aged for eight weeks in water. They were randomly divided into four groups. In the control group, repairing was done with no surface treatment and using bonding agent. In groups 2 to 4, the specimens were repaired following roughening, etching and use of Adper Single Bond, and finished immediately, after 20 minutes and after 24 hours, respectively. After thermocycling, the microleakage at the repair interface was assessed using dye-penetration technique. The results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). There was a significant difference among the four groups (P<0.001). The control group with the highest leakage showed a significant difference with the other groups (P<0.05). Immediate finishing showed a significantly higher leakage compared to 20-minute and 24-hour delayed finishing time (P<0.001). The two latter groups had no difference. Immediate finishing of the repaired restorations negatively affect the sealing at the repair interface, while 20-minute and 24-hour delayed finishing had no adverse effect on the interface sealing.

  1. FINISHING FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS WITH ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report provides a technical and economic evaluation of a polyester powder coating system applied to the exterior and interior surfaces of metal boxes fabricated for the telephone and cable industries. This evaluation summarized many of the requirements and benefits of a clean technology that effectively eliminates the use of hazardous solvents and prevents the generation of volatile organic emissions and hazardous solid waste. publish information

  2. Foam Finishing%发泡涂饰

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dr. W. Wenzel; K. Pisaric; W. Schwaiger

    2006-01-01

    介绍了发泡剂在制革中的应用.详细给出了发泡剂的生产工艺以及需要不同成革的涂饰配方.结果表明,发泡涂饰对成革性能有明显改善.%The article introduced the application of foam in leather-making. The rules and production process of foam were supplied indetails. It also discussed the finish formulation and possible methods of application for different leather. The foam finishing can evidently improve the properties of leather.

  3. Finishing technologies for processing of optical microelectronic items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, K. R.; Ablyaz, T. R.; Gashev, E. A.; Khanov, A. M.; Varlamov, N. V.

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses comparative studies of the influence of specific pressure and speed of relative motion of tool and item on polishing capacity and quality of processed surface of lithium niobate single crystal. The equation for calculation of total depth of layer destroyed upon finishing and time of polishing required for its removal. Analysis of polishing tool has accounted for strength properties of the polishing material, removal capacity, and quality of processed surface of lithium niobate single crystal. It is experimentally established that upon basic pressure both for woven and unwoven polishers with the highest capacity the lower limit of grain coarseness of polishing suspension is 1/0.5 μm. A reserve of increase in shape accuracy and polishing quality is the use of polishers with equal thickness and structure of working surface.

  4. Why Do Photo Finish Images Look Weird?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorcic, Bor; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with effects that appear on photographs of rotating objects when taken by a photo finish camera, a rolling shutter camera or a computer scanner. These effects are very similar to Roget's palisade illusion. A simple quantitative analysis of the images is also provided. The effects are explored using a computer scanner in a way that…

  5. Transport Phenomena in Textile Finishing Equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Wassink, J.

    1985-01-01

    The application of transport phenomena to textile finishing processes is emphasised. By combination of the predominant transfer processes (momentum, mass and heat/mass transfer) and the engineering objective (operation, design and innovation), three cases are selected dealing with (a) momentum trans

  6. Pneumonia outbreaks in calves and finishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-19

    Pneumonia in calves and finishers. Ovarian tumour in a calf . Abortion associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 in a suckler herd. Parasitic gastroenteritis causing illthrift and death in sheep. Outbreaks of acute fasciolosis in sheep. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for December 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). British Veterinary Association.

  7. Evaluation of Some Finishing Properties of Oil Palm Particleboard for Furniture Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasingam, J.; Nyugen, V.; Ioras, F.

    The finishing properties of particleboard made from the Empty-Fruit Bunch (EFB) of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) were evaluated for its suitability for furniture applications, using different coating and overlay materials. The results found that the thick plastic-formica overlay provided the best surface finish, in terms of surface smoothness, adhesion strength and impact resistance. Although the polyurethane lacquer provided an acceptable finish, its quality and performance is not comparable to that of the thick plastic overlay. Despite the fact that the use of such overlay material may render the material not aesthetically appealing and limit it to concealed applications or where the thick overlay material is tolerated, its cost competitiveness and environmental friendliness may be able to position the oil palm particleboard as a substitute for the conventional wood-based particleboard in the furniture manufacturing industry.

  8. Finishing procedures in orthodontic-surgical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    To ensure optimal results, we must do our utmost to achieve targets based on order, symmetry and precision, our ultimate aim being to strive towards the desired harmony, planned contrast and exact proportions. Orthodontic-surgical treatments require specific finishing procedures, which most often call for multidisciplinary, or even transdisciplinary, collaboration. Finishing will involve the dental arches just as much as the orofacial environment. Above all, treatment of this kind demands a highly targeted approach in combination with well-defined and perfectly executed techniques. To finish a case satisfactorily, reasonable targets should be aimed for to ensure they are achieved. One must be ambitious and yet wise. A tight alliance of surgeon and orthodontist will nurture convincing and achievable projects and good, lifelong outcomes. Following the consolidation phase, roughly 4 to 6 weeks post-surgery, we can initiate the final orthodontic treatment, which, in effect, constitutes a mini-treatment in its own right. "Details make perfection, but perfection is not a detail" (Leonardo Da Vinci). "A lucid mind is the ante-chamber of intelligence" (Léo Ferré). In the order of life, every form of unity is always unique, and if each of us is unique, it is because everyone else is too. Ambition, wisdom, lucidity and efficiency will guarantee a successful result, the successful result. We must not be mere observers of our treatments, but the architect, project manager and site foreman at one and the same time. One could talk ad infinitum about finishing orthodontic-surgical cases because everything else leads up to the case-finishing and even the fullest description could never be exhaustive. Copyright © 2015 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Flame retardant finishing of cotton fabric based on synergistic compounds containing boron and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kongliang; Gao, Aiqin; Zhang, Yongsheng

    2013-10-15

    Boric acid and compound containing nitrogen, 2,4,6-tri[(2-hydroxy-3-trimethyl-ammonium)propyl]-1,3,5-triazine chloride (Tri-HTAC) were used to finish cotton fabric. The flame retardant properties of the finished cotton fabrics and the synergetic effects of boron and nitrogen elements were investigated and evaluated by limited oxygen index (LOI) method. The mechanism of cross-linking reaction among cotton fiber, Tri-HTAC, and boric acid was discussed by FTIR and element analysis. The thermal stability and surface morphology of the finished cotton fabrics were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The finishing system of the mixture containing boron and nitrogen showed excellent synergistic flame retardancy for cotton fabric. The cotton fabric finished with mixture system had excellent flame retardancy. The LOI value of the treated cotton fabric increased over 27.5. Tri-HTAC could form covalent bonds with cellulose fiber and boric acid. The flame retardant cotton fabric showed a slight decrease in tensile strength and whiteness. The surface morphology of flame retardant cotton fiber was smooth.

  10. Effect of Workpiece Orientation, Lubrication and Media Geometry on the Effectiveness of Vibratory Finishing of Al6061

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibratory Finishing is a commonly used process for deburring and polishing. The process effectiveness is difficult to quantify due to a nexus of variables relating to workpiece, media, compound and machine. In this paper, effect of orientation of rectangular Al6061 workpieces is considered with respect to the motion of ceramic media using water as lubricant. It is found that parallel orientation of workpiece to media motion and higher lubrication level lead to higher degree of sliding, thereby leading to smoother finish. Experiments with different ceramic media showed smoother finish with the geometry more susceptible to rounding. The aforesaid findings can be employed in applications requiring superpolished surfaces.

  11. Evaluating and modeling the effects of surface sampling factors on the recovery of organic chemical attribution signatures using the accelerated diffusion sampler and solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Kai-For; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Fraga, Carlos G.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an experimental design matrix was created and executed in order to test the effects of various real-world factors on the ability of the (1) accelerated diffusion sampler with solid phase micro-extraction (ADS-SPME) and (2) solvent extraction to capture organic chemical attribution signatures (CAS) from dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) spiked onto painted wall board (PWB) surfaces. The DMMP CAS organic impurities sampled by ADS-SPME and solvent extraction were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The number of detected DMMP CAS impurities and their respective GC/MS peak areas were determined as a function of DMMP stock, DMMP spiked volume, exposure time, SPME sampling time, and ADS headspace pressure. Based on the statistical analysis of experimental results, several general conclusions are made: (1) ADS-SPME with vacuum (i.e., reduced pressure) increased the amount of detected CAS impurity, as measured by GC/MS peak area, by a factor of 1.7 to 1.9 for PWB under certain experimental conditions, (2) the amount of detected CAS impurity was most influenced by spiked volume, stock, and ADS headspace pressure, (3) the ADS had no measurable effect on the number of detected DMMP impurities, that is, the ADS (with and without reduced pressure) had no practical effect on the DMMP impurity profile collected from spiked PWB, and (4) solvent extraction out performed ADS-SPME in terms of consistently capturing all or most of the targeted DMMP impurities from spiked PWB.

  12. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in farrow-to-finish and specialised finishing herds in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, W L A; Hunneman, W A; Quak, J; Verheijden, J H M; Stegeman, J A

    2009-05-28

    Influenza virus infections with subtypes H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2 are very common in domestic pigs in Europe. Data on possible differences of population dynamics in finishing pigs in farrow-to-finish herds and in specialised finishing herds are, however, scarce. The presence of sows and weaned piglets on the same premises may, however, affect the exposure of finishing pigs to influenza viruses. In a longitudinal study on 14 farrow-to-finish herds and 15 finishing herds, groups of pigs were followed by repeatedly testing the same animals for antibodies against all three influenza virus subtypes (H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2). At the end of the finishing period, the seroprevalences in farrow-to-finish and specialised finishing herds were 44.3% and 62.0%, respectively for H1N1, 6.6% and 19.3%, respectively for H3N2, and 57.2% and 25.6%, respectively for H1N2. For all three subtypes, the incidence of influenza virus infections was highest at the beginning of the finishing period in farrow-to-finish herds, while the incidence of influenza virus infections was highest at the end of the finishing period in finishing herds. Respiratory disease, probably related to the influenza infections, was observed in five of these herds only, but also occurred at the beginning of the finishing period in farrow-to-finish herds and at the end of the finishing period in finishing herds. The observed differences of population dynamics of influenza virus may affect choice and timing of intervention measures.

  13. 9 CFR 381.309 - Finished product inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... Finished product inspection. (a) Finished product inspections must be handled according to: (1) A HACCP.... (b)-(c) (d) Procedures for finished product inspections where the HACCP plan for thermally...

  14. Viscosity behavior of magnetic suspensions in fluid-assisted finishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic fluid-assisted finishing has been verified both theoretically and experimentally as an effective fabrication technology for optical mirrors and lenses. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a novel design of polishing tool and demonstrate the possible applications of this technology. The work includes studying the viscosity of the magnetic suspensions of micrometer-sized Carbonyl iron particles under the influence of a magnetic field. Both the cases of magnetizable suspension with and without abrasive cerium oxide particles are studied for their ensuing polishing effectiveness. Determination of material removal function is conducted using a Wyko Nat1100 interferometer. Experiments to reduce surface roughness with the proposed tool are also performed using a K9 mirror as the work-piece. Results show that the surface accuracy is improved over three times to less than 0.5 nm after two cycles of polishing.

  15. Sequence finishing and mapping of Drosophila melanogasterheterochromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Kennedy, Cameron; Acevedo,David; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Dimitri,Patrizio; Karpen, Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2007-06-15

    Genome sequences for most metazoans are incomplete due tothe presence of repeated DNA in the pericentromeric heterochromatin. Theheterochromatic regions of D. melanogaster contain 20 Mb of sequenceamenable to mapping, sequence assembly and finishing. Here we describethe generation of 15 Mb of finished or improved heterochromatic sequenceusing available clone resources and assembly and mapping methods. We alsoconstructed a BAC-based physical map that spans approximately 13 Mb ofthe pericentromeric heterochromatin, and a cytogenetic map that positionsapproximately 11 Mb of BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds in specificchromosomal locations. The integrated sequence assembly and maps greatlyimprove our understanding of the structure and composition of this poorlyunderstood fraction of a metazoan genome and provide a framework forfunctional analyses.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FRICTION CONDITIONS IN THE FINISHING STANDS OF A HOT STRIP MILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Augusto Gorni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The decrease in hot strength or even rolling load as strain increases in some stands of the finishing hot strip mill with no metallurgical reasons is a relatively common event. Apparently this fact is associated with modification in the tribological conditions between rolling stock and work roll surfaces due to unexpected interactions with scale. The aim of this work is to determine the values of the friction coefficient in the several stands of the finishing hot strip mill at Usiminas-Cubatão, as well to determine quantitative relationships between this coefficient and relevant process parameters, like strain degree and peripherical work roll speed.

  17. Au microstructure and the functional properties of Ni/Au finishes on ceramic IC packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, E.D.; Baxter, W.K. [Coors Electronic Package Co., Chattanooga, TN (United States); Braski, D.N.; Watkins, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Ni/Au plated finishes used on thick-film metallized multilayer ceramic packages for integrated circuits must meet functional requirements such as bondability, sealability, and solderability. Their ability to do so is dependent, among other things, on the ability of the Au deposit to inhibit the grain boundary diffusion and subsequent surface oxidation of Ni. In this study, the relation between functional performance, Ni diffusionr ate, and Au microstructure was examined. Extent of Ni diffusion during heating was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy for several electrolytic and electroless Ni/Au finishing processes. Results were correlated with differences in Au microstructures determined by SEM, atomic force microscopy, and XRD.

  18. Agile robotic edge finishing system research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a new project undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories to develop an agile, automated, high-precision edge finishing system. The project has a two-year duration and was initiated in October, 1994. This project involves re-designing and adding additional capabilities to an existing finishing workcell at Sandia; and developing intelligent methods for automating process definition and for controlling finishing processes. The resulting system will serve as a prototype for systems that will be deployed into highly flexible automated production lines. The production systems will be used to produce a wide variety of products with limited production quantities and quick turnaround requirements. The prototype system is designed to allow programming, process definition, fixture re-configuration, and process verification to be performed off-line for new products. CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing) models of the part will be used to assist with the automated process development and process control tasks. To achieve Sandia`s performance goals, the system will be employ advanced path planning, burr prediction expert systems, automated process definition, statistical process models in a process database, and a two-level control scheme using hybrid position-force control and fuzzy logic control. In this paper, we discuss the progress and the planned system development under this project.

  19. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in farrow-to-finish and specialised finishing herds in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.; Hunneman, W.A.; Quak, J.; Verheijden, J.H.M.; Stegeman, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Influenza virus infections with subtypes H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2 are very common in domestic pigs in Europe. Data on possible differences of population dynamics in finishing pigs in farrow-to-finish herds and in specialised finishing herds are, however, scarce. The presence of sows and weaned piglets on

  20. Performance evaluation of minimum quantity lubrication by vegetable oil in terms of cutting force, cutting zone temperature,tool wear, job dimension and surface finish in turning AISI-1060 steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KHAN M.M.A.; DHAR N.R.

    2006-01-01

    In all machining processes, tool wear is a natural phenomenon and it leads to tool failure. The growing demands for high productivity of machining need use of high cutting velocity and feed rate. Such machining inherently produces high cutting temperature, which not only reduces tool life but also impairs the product quality. Metal cutting fluid changes the performance of machining operations because of their lubrication, cooling and chip flushing functions, but the use of cutting fluid has become more problematic in terms of both employee health and environmental pollution. The minimization of cutting fluid also leads to economical benefits by way of saving lubricant costs and workpiece/tool/machine cleaning cycle time. The concept of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) has been suggested since a decade ago as a means of addressing the issues of environmental intrusiveness and occupational hazards associated with the airborne cutting fluid particles on factory shop floors. This paper deals with experimental investigation on the role of MQL by vegetable oil on cutting temperature, tool wear, surface roughness and dimensional deviation in turning AISI-1060 steel at industrial speed-feed combinations by uncoated carbide insert. The encouraging results include significant reduction in tool wear rate, dimensional inaccuracy and surface roughness by MQL mainly through reduction in the cutting zone temperature and favorable change in the chip-tool and work-tool interaction.

  1. The chamfer finish line: preclinical student performance using different bur designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansueto, Michael A; Abdulkarim, Hatem A; Thabet, Walid R; Haney, Stephan J

    2010-06-01

    The primary purposes of this investigation were to evaluate sophomore dental student performance in the production of a chamfer finish line using two diamond bur types-a round-ended bur and a torpedo-shaped bur-and to gain student feedback about their preferences for bur type. Fifty students took part in the study, each of whom prepared the buccal surfaces of two mandibular molar typodont teeth, producing chamfer finish lines. Students prepared both teeth in the same laboratory session and were randomly assigned to two groups that were required to prepare the first of the two molars with a specific bur type. The prepared chamfer finish lines were scored and the data analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Student performance was significantly better when the round-ended bur was used (p=0.005). Student feedback was collected with a survey that consisted of four questions and the opportunity to provide write-in comments. In response to the question "Overall, was one bur type better?" 58 percent of the students preferred the round-ended bur for creating a chamfer finish line. The most frequent write-in comment, made by twelve of the fifty students, criticized the torpedo-shaped bur for creating finish lines that were too shallow or too long.

  2. Effect of finishing and polishing on the color stability of a composite resin immersed in staining solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Justo Polli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of finishing/polishing methods and staining solutions using different immersion periods on the color stability of a microhybrid composite resin. Materials and Methods: Ninety specimens were fabricated using a stainless steel mold and polyester strips. The samples were randomly divided into five groups according to the finishing and polishing performed: Control group (no surface treatment was performed, Diamond Pro group, Diamond burs group, Enhance group, and SiC paper group. After finishing and polishing, six samples from each group were immersed in coffee, red wine, or water for 30 days. The color measurements were obtained using digital photography before immersion and after 7, 15, and 30 days of immersion. The red, green, and blue values provided by the Adobe Photoshop software were converted into CIELab values. A three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test were used for statistical analysis (P ≤ 0.05. Results: The finishing and polishing methods, staining solutions, immersion times, and their interaction had statistically significant effects on the color change (P = 0.00. Coffee and red wine caused intense staining. Among the polishing methods, the highest color change value was observed in the control group (P < 0.05 and the Diamond Pro disks provided the most stain-resistant surfaces (P ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: The finishing and polishing method, staining solution, and immersion time influences the color stability. Finishing and polishing should be applied to obtain a more stain-resistant surface.

  3. Cost benefit of patch testing with textile finish resins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hamann, K

    1982-01-01

    Eleven years experience of textile finish resin patch testing of suspected textile dermatitis patients revealed 15 cases of allergic textile dermatitis among 428 patients tested. Ten of the 15 patients had a relevant positive patch test to one or more of a limited series of textile finishes; 1...... was negative and 4 were not tested with textile finishes. All 15 patients were formaldehyde sensitive. No unexpected, relevant, positive textile finish resin patch test was found. In this study a negative patch test to formaldehyde virtually excluded allergic contact dermatitis from textile finishes....

  4. Subjective qualitative assessment of the finish line of prosthetic preparations submitted to different finishing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Tallita Foglietto; de Melo, Murilo Pereira; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Ceribelli, Bruno Mafra; Vessoni Iwaki, Lilian Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Different instruments have been developed to improve crown finish lines after conventional preparation with diamond rotary instruments. However, more evidence on the effectiveness of these instruments is required. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effectiveness of 4 different instruments used for cervical margin finishing in regard to the external line angle (ELA). Forty-eight freshly extracted third molar teeth with similar dimensions were conventionally prepared for crowns and randomly allocated into 4 groups (n=12) according to the finishing instrument: hand trimmer (HT), tungsten carbide bur (TCB), ultrasonic instrument (UI), and diamond rotary instrument (DRI) mounted in a contra angle handpiece with reduced speed. Photomicrographs from the margin profiles of each tooth were obtained with scanning electron microscopy (×40) before and after finishing procedures. The images were qualitatively analyzed (scores 1-4) by 9 experienced dental professionals. Average results were assessed with the paired t test and repeated measures ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test (α=.05). HT, TCB, and UI demonstrated no significant differences between unfinished and finished mean ELA scores. DRI was the only group to demonstrate a significantly improved ELA (Pfinishing instrument capable of significantly improving the ELA, while TCB and UI produced nonsignificant improvement, and HT was detrimental to the ELA. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Economics of finishing Tanzania Shorthorn Zebu cattle in feedlot and optimum finishing period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asimwe, L.; Kimambo, A E; Laswai, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Economic potential of finishing Tanzania Shorthorn Zebu (TSZ) cattle in feedlot was analysed using data obtained from two feedlot experiments carried out at Kongwa ranch in Tanzania. The experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of feeding agro-processing by products and length of feedlot...... finishing for TSZ cattle. The biological data collected from the two experiments were used as basis for deriving the economic scenarios. The range of days steers were kept in feedlot was set at 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 days. The dietary metabolisable energy intake (MEI) levels used in the study were 55 MJ...... in feedlot. Non-feed costs per kg extra meat were higher for short stays (4,500 TSh.) than long stays (2,630 TSh.) If meat prices were independent on finishing period length, high MEI was profitable with increment of (81%) profit per kg extra meat for an increase from 50 to 75 days in feedlot. Assuming a 10...

  6. Economics of finishing Tanzania Shorthorn Zebu cattle in feedlot and optimum finishing period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asimwe, L.; Kimambo, A E; Laswai, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Economic potential of finishing Tanzania Shorthorn Zebu (TSZ) cattle in feedlot was analysed using data obtained from two feedlot experiments carried out at Kongwa ranch in Tanzania. The experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of feeding agro-processing by products and length of feedlot...... finishing for TSZ cattle. The biological data collected from the two experiments were used as basis for deriving the economic scenarios. The range of days steers were kept in feedlot was set at 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 days. The dietary metabolisable energy intake (MEI) levels used in the study were 55 MJ...... in feedlot. Non-feed costs per kg extra meat were higher for short stays (4,500 TSh.) than long stays (2,630 TSh.) If meat prices were independent on finishing period length, high MEI was profitable with increment of (81%) profit per kg extra meat for an increase from 50 to 75 days in feedlot. Assuming a 10...

  7. Tribological impact of the finishing technology onto meso- and microforming processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn Stephan F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tribological conditions between workpiece and tool have a major impact onto forming processes. Besides lubrication, temperature, and material, they are mainly influenced by the tool surface characteristics, especially by its topography, which is a result of finishing technology. Thereby formed lubricant pockets are of prime importance for the tribosystem due to its ability to separate the tribopartners by storing lubricant. The influence of four different tool finishing processes and their according surface topographies onto frictional behaviour have been investigated and quantified by the barrel compression test, in dry and lubricated tribosystems. The tool steel surfaces were stochastically microstructured by grinding and spark erosion as well as deterministic structured with micro calottes, applied by jet electrochemical machining and compared to a polished reference tool. The allocation of open and closed lubricant pockets over tool surfaces before and after the forming process was analysed by a self-made MATLAB tool.

  8. Tribological impact of the finishing technology onto meso- and microforming processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn Stephan F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tribological conditions between workpiece and tool have a major impact onto forming processes. Besides lubrication, temperature, and material, they are mainly influenced by the tool surface characteristics, especially by its topography, which is a result of finishing technology. Thereby formed lubricant pockets are of prime importance for the tribosystem due to its ability to separate the tribopartners by storing lubricant. The influence of four different tool finishing processes and their according surface topographies onto frictional behaviour have been investigated and quantified by the barrel compression test, in dry and lubricated tribosystems. The tool steel surfaces were stochastically microstructured by grinding and spark erosion as well as deterministic structured with micro calottes, applied by jet electrochemical machining and compared to a polished reference tool. The allocation of open and closed lubricant pockets over tool surfaces before and after the forming process was analysed by a self-made MATLAB tool.

  9. The effects of stainless steel finish on Salmonella Typhimurium attachment, biofilm formation and sensitivity to chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Yaron, Sima

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS) surfaces can be sources for cross contamination in food processing facilities, possessing a great threat to public health and food quality. Here the aim was to demonstrate the influence of surface finish of AISI 316 SS on colonization, biofilm formation and susceptibility of Salmonella Typhimurium to disinfection. Initial attachment of S. Typhimurium on surfaces of SS was four times lower, when surface was polished by Bright-Alum (BA) or Electropolishing (EP), as compared to Mechanical Sanded (MS) or the untreated surface (NT). The correlation between roughness and initial bacterial attachment couldn't account on its own to explain differences seen. Biofilms with similar thickness (15-18 μm) were developed on all surfaces 1-day post inoculation, whereas EP was the least covered surface (23%). Following 5-days, biofilm thickness was lowest on EP and MS (30 μm) and highest on NT (62 μm) surfaces. An analysis of surface composition suggested a link between surface chemistry and biofilm development, where the higher concentrations of metal ions in EP and MS surfaces correlated with limited biofilm formation. Interestingly, disinfection of biofilms with chlorine was up to 130 times more effective on the EP surface (0.005% surviving) than on the other surfaces. Overall these results suggest that surface finish should be considered carefully in a food processing plant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Research on reducing the edge effect in magnetorheological finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Dai, Yifan; Peng, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jianmin

    2011-03-20

    The edge effect could not be avoided in most optical manufacturing methods based on the theory of computer controlled optical surfacing. The difference between the removal function at the workpiece edge and that inside it is also the primary cause for edge effect in magnetorheological finishing (MRF). The change of physical dimension and removal ratio of the removal function is investigated through experiments. The results demonstrate that the situation is different when MRF "spot" is at the leading edge or at the trailing edge. Two methods for reducing the edge effect are put into practice after analysis of the processing results. One is adopting a small removal function for dealing with the workpiece edge, and the other is utilizing the removal function compensation. The actual processing results show that these two ways are both effective on reducing the edge effect in MRF.

  11. Utilizing a Magnetic Abrasive Finishing Technique (MAF Via Adaptive Nero Fuzzy(ANFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer A. Moosa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted for measuring the quality of surface finishing roughness using magnetic abrasive finishing technique (MAF on brass plate which is very difficult to be polish by a conventional machining process where the cost is high and much more susceptible to surface damage as compared to other materials. Four operation parameters were studied, the gap between the work piece and the electromagnetic inductor, the current that generate the flux, the rotational Spindale speed and amount of abrasive powder size considering constant linear feed movement between machine head and workpiece. Adaptive Neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS was implemented for evaluation of a series of experiments and a verification with respect to specimen roughness change has been optimized and usefully achieved by obtained results were an average of the error between the surface roughness predicted by model simulation and that of direct measure is 2.0222 %.

  12. [Experimental analysis of finishing lines in ceramometal restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascón, F; Gil, J A; Fons, A; Badal, R

    1990-11-01

    The preparation is the first step of any tooth reconstruction. The biological integration of the protesis is depending on the marginal adaptation (finish line of the preparation), occlusal adaptation (occlusal reduction), longevity of the restoration (retention and luting) and esthetics. The effect the two finish line of the preparation is studied using experimental design. In porcelain-fused-to-metal the finish line of the preparation in chanfer is superior at the beveled shoulder, because proportioning better marginal adaptation.

  13. Detection of Protozoa in Surface and Finished Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humans are known to be the host to approximately 1500 infectious agents, out of which 66 are protozoa and 287 are helminths. Therefore, from a global perspective helminths and protozoan parasites account for approximately one fourth of the total infectious diseases of humans. A s...

  14. Detection of Protozoa in Surface and Finished Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humans are known to be the host to approximately 1500 infectious agents, out of which 66 are protozoa and 287 are helminths. Therefore, from a global perspective helminths and protozoan parasites account for approximately one fourth of the total infectious diseases of humans. A s...

  15. Subaperture approaches to finishing and testing astronomical optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Gregory W.; Tricard, Marc

    2004-07-01

    We describe the application of both stitching interferometry and magneto-rheological finishing (MRF) to the surface metrology and final figure correction of large optics. These particular subaperture technologies help to address the need for flexible systems that improve both overall manufacturing time and cost effectiveness. MRF can achieve high volumetric removal rates with a small-footprint tool that is perfectly conformable and highly stable. This tool is therefore well suited to finishing large optics (including aspheres) and correcting mid-spatial frequency errors. The system does not need vacuum, reduces microroughness to below one nm rms on most materials, and is able to meet the figure tolerance specs for astronomical optics. Such a technology is ideally complemented by a system for the stitching of interferometric subaperture data. Stitching inherently enables the testing of larger apertures with higher resolution and, thanks to the inbuilt calibration, even to higher accuracy in many situations. Moreover, given the low-order character of the dominant residual uncertainties in the stitched full-aperture data, such an approach is well suited to adaptive mirrors because the actuators correct precisely these deformations. While this approach enables the non-null testing of parts with greater aspheric departure and can lead to a significantly reduced non-common air path in the testing of long-radius concave parts, it is especially effective for convex optics. That is, stitching is particularly well suited to the testing of secondary mirrors and, alongside the testing of the off-axis primary segments, these are clearly critical challenges for extremely large telescope (ELT) projects.

  16. Prophylometric and SEM analyses of four different finishing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHIODERA, G.; CERUTTI, F.; CERUTTI, A.; PUTIGNANO, A.; MANGANI, F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Adhesion is the pivot of the modern restorative dentistry. Inlays, onlays and veneers have become a valid alternative to the traditional prosthetic treatments even in the rehabilitation of extremely damaged teeth, allowing a consistent saving of sound tooth tissues. Composite resins and dental adhesive are continously investigated and improved, nevertheless the optimization of the tooth-adhesive interface has to be considered: in fact, the long-term stability of adhesion between tooth and composite material depends on the treatment of the amelo-dentinal surfaces. This study investigated the quality of the occlusal walls of a cavity prepared to receive an inlay and finished with four different systems: thin and extra-thin diamond coated burs, a 12-blades carbide burs and a diamond-coated tip driven by sonic instrument. Consequently, prophylometric and SEM analyses were performed on the samples. The average roughness values recorded by the prophylometer were expressed by the parameters Ra and RZ: there is a correspondence between the numeric values and the pictures of the SEM. The results show a better quality (low roughness values) of the surface treated with multi-blade burs, followed by the this and extra-thin diamond coated burs. The 25 micron diamond-coated tip of the sonic instrument obtains the roughest surface and a sensibly higher amount of smear layer than the other tested systems. PMID:23741601

  17. Finishing of the cold mass assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2001-01-01

    Photo 1 The connection-side end of the active part assembly. This view shows the electrical connections between the poles and the curved bus ended with flanges for the connection with the protection diode. Photo 2 The connection-side end of the active part assembly. This view shows the electrical connections between the poles, the auxiliary bus bars and the instrumentation wires. Photo 3 Lyre-side end of the active part assembly. One can see the mechanical support of the corretor magnets that are to be installed around the cold bore tubes. Photo 4 General view of the finishing station showing the special supporting structures (blue and yellow structures) needed for the geometric measurements and for the alignment operations. Around the magnet, there are datum points (on the tripodes) needed to build up the coordinates system for the measurements.

  18. Finishing of the cold mass assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2001-01-01

    Photo 1 Zoom of the lyre-side end of the active part assembly. The extremity of the shrinking cylinder has been bevelled in view of welding the end cover. Photo 2 General view of the finishing station showing the special supporting structures (blue and yellow structures) needed for the geometric measurements and for the alignment operations. Photo 3 Zoom of the lyre-side end of the active part assembly. One can also see the auxiliary bus bars needed to power the corrector magnets that are installed in the dipole cold mass assembly. Photo 4 Technicians are putting in order the instrumentation wires. The prototype magnets were equipped with numerous sensors to monitor key parameters during the performance tests at cold conditions.

  19. Occurrence of neonicotinoid insecticides in finished drinking water and fate during drinking water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarich, Kathryn L.; Pflug, Nicholas C.; DeWald, Eden M.; Hladik, Michelle; Kolpin, Dana W.; Cwiertny, David M.; LeFevre, Gergory H.

    2017-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are widespread in surface waters across the agriculturally-intensive Midwestern US. We report for the first time the presence of three neonicotinoids in finished drinking water and demonstrate their general persistence during conventional water treatment. Periodic tap water grab samples were collected at the University of Iowa over seven weeks in 2016 (May-July) after maize/soy planting. Clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam were ubiquitously detected in finished water samples and ranged from 0.24-57.3 ng/L. Samples collected along the University of Iowa treatment train indicate no apparent removal of clothianidin and imidacloprid, with modest thiamethoxam removal (~50%). In contrast, the concentrations of all neonicotinoids were substantially lower in the Iowa City treatment facility finished water using granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Batch experiments investigated potential losses. Thiamethoxam losses are due to base-catalyzed hydrolysis at high pH conditions during lime softening. GAC rapidly and nearly completely removed all three neonicotinoids. Clothianidin is susceptible to reaction with free chlorine and may undergo at least partial transformation during chlorination. Our work provides new insights into the persistence of neonicotinoids and their potential for transformation during water treatment and distribution, while also identifying GAC as an effective management tool to lower neonicotinoid concentrations in finished drinking water.

  20. 16 CFR 1509.8 - Construction and finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Construction and finishing. 1509.8 Section 1509.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.8 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood...

  1. Plutonium finishing plant safety systems and equipment list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergquist, G.G.

    1995-01-06

    The Safety Equipment List (SEL) supports Analysis Report (FSAR), WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), WHC-SD-CP-OSR-010. The SEL is a breakdown and classification of all Safety Class 1, 2, and 3 equipment, components, or system at the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex.

  2. Salmonella infection and immune response in finishing pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and the immunological alterations that occur in Salmonella-carrier pigs, by longitudinally com...

  3. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in finishing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza virus infections in swine were first noticed in the US in 1918, during the human pandemic of the Spanish flu. In Europe, seroprevalences for the three most common swine influenza strains at the moment, H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2, range from 20-80% in finishing pigs at the end of the finishing per

  4. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in finishing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza virus infections in swine were first noticed in the US in 1918, during the human pandemic of the Spanish flu. In Europe, seroprevalences for the three most common swine influenza strains at the moment, H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2, range from 20-80% in finishing pigs at the end of the finishing

  5. Phosphorus requirement of finishing feedlot calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Milton, C T; Brink, D; Orth, M W; Whittet, K M

    2002-06-01

    Dietary P supplied to feedlot cattle is important because an inadequate supply will compromise performance, whereas excess P may harm the environment. However, P requirements of feedlot cattle are not well documented. Therefore, 45 steer calves (265.2+/-16.6 kg) were individually fed to determine the P required for gain and bone integrity over a 204-d finishing period. The basal diet consisted of 33.5% high-moisture corn, 30% brewers grits, 20% corn bran, 7.5% cottonseed hulls, 3% tallow, and 6% supplement. Treatments consisted of 0.16 (no supplemental inorganic P), 0.22, 0.28, 0.34, and 0.40% P (DM basis). Supplemental P was provided by monosodium phosphate top-dressed to the daily feed allotment. Blood was sampled every 56 d to assess P status. At slaughter, phalanx and metacarpal bones were collected from the front leg to determine bone ash and assess P resorption from bone. Dry matter intake and ADG did not change linearly (P > 0.86) or quadratically (P > 0.28) due to P treatment. Feed efficiency was not influenced (P > 0.30) by P treatment and averaged 0.169. Plasma inorganic P averaged across d 56 to 204 responded quadratically, with calves fed 0.16% P having the lowest concentration of plasma inorganic P. However, plasma inorganic P concentration (5.7 mg/dL) for steers fed 0.16% P is generally considered adequate. Total bone ash weight was not influenced by dietary P for phalanx (P = 0.19) or metacarpal bones (P = 0.37). Total P intake ranged from 14.2 to 35.5 g/d. The NRC (1996) recommendation for these calves was 18.7 g/d, assuming 68% absorption. Based on performance results, P requirements for finishing calves is < 0.16% of diet DM or 14.2 g/d. Based on these observations, we suggest that typical grain-based feedlot cattle diets do not require supplementation of inorganic mineral P to meet P requirements.

  6. A comparative study of precision finishing of rebuild engine valve faces using micro-grinding and ECH

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Harpreet; Jain, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of process performance of micro-grinding and electrochemical honing, with the aim to achieve higher precision and surface quality of rebuild surfaces of the engine valve face. The discarded engine valve face was rebuilt using plasma transferred arc cladding technique and its surface finish was evaluated in terms of average roughness and maximum roughness value. The improvement in profile error and total run-out were used to evaluate the optimum proce...

  7. Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals: nonaqueous fluids development, optical finish, and laser damage performance at 1064 nm and 532 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menapace, J A; Ehrmann, P R; Bickel, R C

    2009-11-05

    Over the past year we have been working on specialized MR fluids for polishing KDP crystals. KDP is an extremely difficult material to conventionally polish due to its water solubility, low hardness, and temperature sensitivity. Today, KDP crystals are finished using single-point diamond turning (SPDT) tools and nonaqueous lubricants/coolants. KDP optics fabricated using SPDT, however, are limited to surface corrections due to tool/method characteristics with surface quality driven by microroughness from machine pitch, speed, force, and diamond tool character. MRF polishing offers a means to circumvent many of these issues since it is deterministic which makes the technique practical for surface and transmitted wavefront correction, is low force, and is temperature independent. What is lacking is a usable nonaqueous MR fluid that is chemically and physically compatible with KDP which can be used for polishing and subsequently cleaned from the optical surface. In this study, we will present the fluid parameters important in the design and development of nonaqueous MR fluid formulations capable of polishing KDP and how these parameters affect MRF polishing. We will also discuss requirements peculiar to successful KDP polishing and how they affect optical figure/finish and laser damage performance at 1064 nm and 532 nm.

  8. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  9. Finishing of the cold mass assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2001-01-01

    Photo 1 General view of the finishing station showing the special supporting structures (blue and yellow structures) needed for the geometric measurements and for the alignment operations. Around the magnet, there are datum points (on the tripodes) needed to build up the coordinates system for the measurements. Photo 2 The corrector magnets that are sextupoles are prepared for a plug-in fixation on their mechanical support. Photo 3 A corretor magnet has been installed on the left cold bore tube. The second one is waiting on the table for installation. Photo 4 The mechanical mole holding the corner cube reflector of the 3-D measuring machine is introduced in the cold bore tube (the right one on the picture). This will allow to pick up the X-Y-Z coordinates of the centre of the cold bore tube on its entire length. Photo 5 This picture shows the driving system that is completely computer controlled to pull the mechanical mole inside the cold bore tube. Photo 6 This picture shows details of the driving system...

  10. Don’t get (sun) burned : exposing exterior wood to the weather prior to painting contributes to finish failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Sam Williams

    2005-01-01

    Contrary to what might be called popular myth, research shows that allowing exterior wood surfaces to weather before applying paint does not help the cause of long-term coating performance. Instead, weathering prior to painting has been shown to contribute significantly to premature failure of the finish due to loss of adhesion.

  11. Effect of Eco-finishing on Naturally Colored Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英; 宋心远

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies desizing and polishing of naturally colored cotton with different enzyme. The reactivity of cellulases was measured. The percentage of decrement, bulkiness and color difference of fabrics both before and after eco-finishing were tested. The reasons were analyzed. The results indicates that the desizing of amylase can be applied on naturally colored cotton, and cellulases have polishing effect on it. Moreover eco-finishing with enzyme can provide many better properties to naturally colored cotton than that of normal finishing. Also this process has no pollution as enzyme can be degraded by bioreaction.

  12. Relevance of microbial finished product testing in food safety management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwietering, Marcel H.; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Membré, Jeanne Marie

    2016-01-01

    -active way by implementing an effective food safety management system. For verification activities in a food safety management system, finished product testing may however be useful. For three cases studies; canned food, chocolate and cooked ham, the relevance of testing both of finished products...... and the production environment is discussed. Since the level of control of different processes can be largely different it is beneficial if the frequency of sampling of finished products and production environments would be related to the associated human health risk, which can be assessed on the basis of risk...

  13. An overview of plastic optical fiber end finishers at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, M.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Korienek, J.

    1993-11-01

    Several years ago the need for equipment to precisely finish the ends of plastic optical fibers was recognized. Many high energy physics experiments use thousands of these fibers which must be polished on one or both ends. A fast, easy-to-operate machine yielding repeatable finishes was needed. Three types of machines were designed and constructed that are in daily use at Fermilab, all finish the fiber ends by flycutting with a diamond tool. Althrough diamond flycutting of plastic is not new, the size and fragility of plastic optical fibers present several challenges.

  14. Evaluation of Rheological Properties of Gel Abrasive in Magnetic Abrasive Finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-Cheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was aimed at the evaluation of the mechanism of magnetic finishing with gel abrasive (MFGA, during which the performance of MFGA was compared to that of magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF. Of importance is that MFGA performs better than MAF based on the polishing-efficiency criterion. Silicone gels, however, are semisolid polymer gels with deforming properties that are temperature dependent, ultimately influencing significantly the polishing efficiency in MFGA. Therefore, taking as examples cylindrical rods which were polished using silicone gels with different plasticities to determine the corresponding temperatures of abrasive media in the working area, this study evaluated the MFGA mechanism to elucidate the properties of silicone gels and attain both the finished effect and effective gel abrasives in MFGA to produce a highly efficient polished surface. Next, circulating effects of abrasive media were identified to ensure the efficiency in MFGA and establish the relation between the concentrations of abrasive media and circulating effects in the working area. Experimental results show that silicone gels with low plasticity produce high temperature of abrasive media in MFGA; high temperature of abrasive medium makes excellent circulating effects in the working area, inducing high material removal and fine surface roughness.

  15. Improved Soft Abrasive Flow Finishing Method Based on Turbulent Kinetic Energy Enhancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, Jun; JI, Shiming; TAN, Dapeng

    2017-03-01

    Soft abrasive flow(SAF) finishing can process the irregular geometric surfaces, but with the matter of low processing efficiency. To address the issue, an improved SAF finishing method based on turbulent kinetic energy enhancing is proposed. A constrained flow passage with serration cross-section is constructed to increase the turbulence intensity. Taking the constrained flow passage as the objective, a two-phase fluid dynamic model is set up by using particle trajectory model and standard k-ɛ turbulence model, and the flow field characteristics of the flow passage are acquired. The numerical results show that the serration flow passage can enhance the turbulence intensity, uniform the particles distribution, and increase the particle concentration near the bottom wall. The observation results by particle image velocimetry(PIV) show that the internal vortex structures are formed in flow passage, and the abrasive flow takes on turbulence concentrating phenomenon in near-wall region. The finishing experiments prove that the proposed method can obtain better surface uniformity, and the processing efficiency can be improved more 35%. This research provides an abrasive flow modeling method to reveal the particle motion regulars, and can offer references to the technical optimization of fluid-based precision processing.

  16. Biotreatment on cellulose fluff pulp: quaternary ammonium salts finish and grafting with beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghemati, Djamila; Oudia, Atika; Aliouche, Djamel; Lamouri, Saad

    2009-11-01

    For its potential performances to be expanded, cellulose needs to be processed in different ways. Therefore, an object of the present work was to provide a chemical modification of cellulose through: a specific finish with two quaternary ammonium salts (namely Aliquat 336 and Aliquat 1529, respectively). Chemical grafting of beta-cyclodextrin derivative (beta-CD) onto fibers followed by the inclusion of benzoic acid in the grafted CD cavities as a probe chemical. Physicochemical properties and performances of the untreated and treated fibers have been determined with infrared spectra, microscopy, swelling measurements, antimicrobial finishing tests, and dye adsorption. Our results show that cellulose fibers can be efficiently modified with no significant changes in its structural and surface properties; the treated fibers show an attractive behavior in swelling, dye adsorption and antibacterial activity.

  17. Classification and storage of wastewater from floor finish removal operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Charles E. [Univ. of San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This study evaluates the wastewater generated from hard surface floor finish removal operations at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in order to determine if this wastewater is a hazardous waste, either by statistical evaluation, or other measurable regulatory guidelines established in California Regulations. This research also comparatively evaluates the 55 gallon drum and other portable tanks, all less than 1,000 gallons in size in order to determine which is most effective for the management of this waste stream at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The statistical methods in SW-846 were found to be scientifically questionable in their application to hazardous waste determination. In this statistical evaluation, the different data transformations discussed in the regulatory guidance document were applied along with the log transformation to the population of 18 samples from 55 gallon drums. Although this statistical evaluation proved awkward in its application, once the data is collected and organized on a spreadsheet this statistical analysis can be an effective tool which can aid the environmental manager in the hazardous waste classification process.

  18. Chemical and morphological features of nanofilled composite resin: influence of finishing and polishing procedures and fluoride solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Ana Luísa Botta Martins; Domingos, Patrícia Aleixo Dos Santos; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Garcia, Patrícia Petromilli Nordi Sasso

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of finishing and polishing procedures and different fluoride solutions on superficial morphology and chemistry of the nanofilled composite resin Supreme XT (3M) through the EDX analysis and SEM evaluation. Circular specimens (n = 30) of 10 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness were prepared, with half of the sample assays finished and polished with Super-Snap® sandpaper. The experimental groups were divided according to the presence or absence of finishing and polishing and solutions (artificial saliva, 0.05% of manipulated sodium fluoride solution, Fluordent Reach, Oral B, Fluorgard). Specimens were immersed in each respective solution for 1 min per day, during 60 days and stored in artificial saliva at 37 ± 1°C between immersion periods. Topography and chemical analysis was qualitative. It was observed that specimens submitted to finishing and polishing procedures had lower superficial degradation. Fluoride solutions promoted superficial alterations on specimens, being the highest degradation obtained with Fluordent Reach. It can be concluded that finishing and polishing procedures and the immersion media influence the superficial morphology of composite resin tested; the Fluordent Reach was the fluoride solution that most affected the material's surface.

  19. Performance and carcass traits of finishing heifers fed crude glycerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, G L; Shelor, M K; Drouillard, J S

    2009-02-01

    Crossbred heifers (n = 373; 421.6 kg +/- 28.9) were fed finishing diets containing 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16% crude glycerin (DM basis). Diets consisted of steam-flaked corn with 6% alfalfa hay and 1.2% urea and provided 300 mg of monensin, 90 mg of tylosin, and 0.5 mg of melengestrol acetate per animal daily. Cattle were stratified by BW and allocated randomly, within strata, to concrete-surfaced feedlot pens each containing 6 to 7 heifers, with 9 pens per dietary treatment. Cattle were transitioned from the control diet to diets containing increasing proportions of glycerin over a period of 10 d. Cattle had ad libitum access to feed, and diets were delivered once daily throughout the 85-d trial period. As the concentration of glycerin increased, DMI decreased linearly (P glycerin had ADG of 1.19, 1.34, 1.29, 1.25, 1.17, and 1.03 kg, respectively (linear, P = 0.013; quadratic, P = 0.010). Feeding glycerin had a quadratic effect on G:F, and G:F was optimal when glycerin was fed at 2% of the diet (quadratic, P = 0.046). Glycerin increased the final BW by 12.7, 8.1, and 5.3 kg when fed at 2, 4, and 8% of the diet, respectively, but reduced the final BW by 1.9 and 14.3 kg when included at 12 and 16% of the diet (linear, P = 0.009; quadratic, P = 0.006). Similarly, HCW increased by 8.1, 5.1, and 3.3 kg when glycerin was fed at 2, 4, and 8% of the diet, respectively, but were 1.2 and 9.1 kg less than controls when glycerin was fed at 12 and 16%, respectively (linear, P = 0.009; quadratic, P = 0.006). Longissimus muscle area decreased linearly as glycerin concentrations increased (P glycerin resulted in linear decreases in subcutaneous fat over the 12th rib and marbling scores (P = 0.045). Glycerin tended to decrease the percentage of cattle grading USDA Choice (P = 0.084) and increase the percentage of cattle grading USDA Select. Adding glycerin to cattle-finishing diets improved BW gain and feed efficiency, particularly when added at concentrations of 8% or less on a DM

  20. Role of alginate in antibacterial finishing of textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiwei; He, Jinmei; Huang, Yudong

    2017-01-01

    Antibacterial finishing of textiles has been introduced as a necessary process for various purposes especially creating a fabric with antimicrobial activities. Currently, the textile industry continues to look for textiles antimicrobial finishing process based on sustainable biopolymers from the viewpoints of environmental friendliness, industrialization, and economic concerns. This paper reviews the role of alginate, a sustainable biopolymer, in the development of antimicrobial textiles, including both basic physicochemical properties of alginate such as preparation, chemical structure, molecular weight, solubility, viscosity, and sol-gel transformation property. Then different processing routes (e.g. nanocomposite coating, ionic cross-linking coating, and Layer-by-Layer coating) for the antibacterial finishing of textiles by using alginate are revised in some detail. The achievements in this area have increased our knowledge of alginate application in the field of textile industry and promoted the development of green textile finishing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Moringa oleifera leaf meal on finisher pig growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science ... meal on finisher pig growth performance, meat quality, shelf life and fatty acid composition of pork ... Feed intake was measured daily, pig liveweight was measured weekly, and average daily gains ...

  2. CHARACTERISTICS OF KLEBSIELLA FROM TEXTILE FINISHING PLANT EFFLUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebsiella strains are found in abnormally high numbers in a stream receiving wastewater from a textile finishing plant. Representative strains are randomly selected to determine biochemical, serotype, and virulence patterns. All strains conform to the commonly accepted biochemic...

  3. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Dangerous Waste Training Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENTROP, G.E.

    1999-12-03

    This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the plutonium finishing plant (PFP) waste generation facilities, permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, and the 90-Day Accumulation Areas.

  4. Exposure to organic solvents during cosmetic finishing of cars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bråtveit, M; Moen, B E

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the exposure to organic solvents during degreasing, washing and polishing of cars, and to obtain information about acute health symptoms in car-finishing workers...

  5. Equipments for Dyeing & Finishing are Facing Low Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shimiao

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dyeing & finishing industry makes it possible for textile products to present colorful world on them.When it beautifies human's life immensely,it also makes great consumption of energy and resources,and causes environmental pollution.

  6. 40 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart Tttt of... - Example Logs for Recording Leather Finish Use and HAP Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Finish Use and HAP Content 1 Figure 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Finishing Operations Part 63, Subpt. TTTT, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Example Logs for Recording Leather Finish Use and HAP Content Month:______Year:______ Finish Inventory Log Finish type Finish...

  7. Surface and Interface Characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2006-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilomet...

  8. Experimental investigation on shore hardness of barrel-finished FDM patterns

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RUPINDER SINGH; ALOK TRIVEDI; SUNPREET SINGH

    2017-09-01

    Barrel finishing (BF) process is widely used to improve the surface finish and dimensional features of metallic and non-metallic parts using different types of media. As a matter of fact the change in shore hardness (SH) features of fused deposition modelling (FDM)-based master pattern is one of the important considerations from its service point of view. The main objective of present research work is to investigate the effect of BF process on SH of acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene (ABS)-based master patterns prepared by FDM. Six controllable parameters of FDM and BF, namely, geometry of prototype, layer density, part orientation, types of BF media, weight of media and finish cycle time, were studied using Taguchi’s L18 orthogonal array in order to find their effect on SH of master pattern. Results indicated that process parameters significantly affectthe SH of master patterns. It has been found that FDM part layer density contributed the maximum (about 67.52%) for SH of master patterns

  9. 40 CFR 425.90 - Applicability; description of the retan-wet finish-splits subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... retan-wet finish-splits subcategory. 425.90 Section 425.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Retan-Wet Finish-Splits Subcategory § 425.90 Applicability; description of the retan-wet finish...

  10. 40 CFR 425.40 - Applicability; description of the retan-wet finish-sides subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... retan-wet finish-sides subcategory. 425.40 Section 425.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Retan-Wet Finish-Sides Subcategory § 425.40 Applicability; description of the retan-wet finish...

  11. Orthodontic treatment outcomes obtained by application of a finishing protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Carvajal-Flórez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the results of a finishing protocol implemented in patients treated in the Orthodontics graduate program at Universidad de Antioquia. Evaluation was carried out by means of the criteria set by the Objective Grading System (OGS of the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO. Methods: Cast models and panoramic radiographs of 34 patients were evaluated. The intervention group (IG consisted of 17 patients (19.88 ± 4.4 years old treated under a finishing protocol. This protocol included training in finishing, application of a finishing guide, brackets repositioning and patient's follow-up. Results of the IG were compared to a control group of 17 patients (21.88 ± 7.0 years old selected by stratified randomization without finishing intervention (CG. Results: The scores for both CG and IG were 38.00 ± 9.0 and 31.41 ± 9.6 (p = 0.048, respectively. The score improved significantly in the IG group, mainly regarding marginal ridges (CG: 5.59 ± 2.2; IG: 3.65 ± 1.8 (p = 0.009 and root angulation (CG: 7.59 ± 2.8; IG: 4.88 ± 2.6 (p = 0.007. Criteria that did not improve, but had the highest scores were: alignment (CG: 6.35 ± 2.7; IG: 6.82 ± 2.8 (p = 0.62 and buccolingual inclination (CG: 3.6 ± 5.88; IG: 5.29 ± 3.9 (p = 0.65. Conclusions: Standardization and implementation of a finishing protocol contributed to improve clinical performance in the Orthodontics graduate program, as expressed by occlusal outcomes. Greater emphasis should be given on the finishing phase to achieve lower scores in the ABO grading system.

  12. WEAR ANALYSIS OF CERAMIC CUTTING TOOLS IN FINISH TURNING OF INCONEL 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. ARUNA,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The demand for heat resistant Nickel based super alloys are increasing because of their excellent mechanical properties. Nickel based alloy, Inconel 718 is useful in aerospace applications. In this work, finish turning of Inconel 718 using ceramic tools is carried out under high pressure coolant supply. The approach is based on Taguchi’s method and the analysis of variance (ANOVA. A series of experiments are conducted by varying the process parameters and their effects on surface finish and tool wear are measured. It is found that the surface roughness is well below the rejection criteria. The experimental results indicate that the cutting speed is the most significant factor to the overall performance. The correlation etween cutting speed and feed with the tool wear and surface roughness are obtained by multi-variable linear regression and is compared with the experimental results. In addition, SEM analysis is carried out to study the wear of ceramic tools under varying processparameters. The results of the work provide recommendations to give the best quality surface combined with less tool wear.

  13. Evaluating and modeling the effects of surface sampling factors on the recovery of organic chemical attribution signatures using the accelerated diffusion sampler and solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Kai-For; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Fraga, Carlos G

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an experimental design matrix was created and executed to test the effects of various real-world factors on the ability of (1) the accelerated diffusion sampler with solid phase micro-extraction (ADS-SPME) and (2) solvent extraction to capture organic chemical attribution signatures (CAS) from dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) spiked onto painted wall board (PWB) surfaces. The DMMP CAS organic impurities sampled by ADS-SPME and solvent extraction were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The number of detected DMMP CAS impurities and their respective GC/MS peak areas were determined as a function of DMMP stock, DMMP spiked volume, exposure time, SPME sampling time, and ADS headspace pressure. Based on the statistical analysis of experimental results, several general conclusions are made: (1) the amount of CAS impurity detected using ADS-SPME and GC/MS was most influenced by spiked volume, stock, and ADS headspace pressure, (2) reduced ADS headspace pressure increased the amount of detected CAS impurity, as measured by GC/MS peak area, by up to a factor of 1.7-1.9 compared to ADS at ambient headspace pressure, (3) the ADS had no measurable effect on the number of detected DMMP impurities, that is, ADS (with and without reduced pressure) had no practical effect on the DMMP impurity profile collected from spiked PWB, and (4) solvent extraction out performed ADS-SPME in terms of consistently capturing all or most of the targeted DMMP impurities from spiked PWB.

  14. Finishing aeronautical planetary herringbone gear wheels in container vibrating smoothing machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek MICHALSKI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the technological process of abrasive-chemical machining wheel bearing surface of the cylindrical herringbone gears planetary gear in vibrating container smoothing machine according to Isotropic Finishing ISF® technology of the REM Chemicals Inc. company. Gear wheels are made of stainless Pyrowear 53 and subjected to carburizing, hardening, cold working and low tempering. The change in value of deviation indicators for the kinematic accuracy, smoothness and geometric structure of the machined surfaces of the gear teeth after smoothing compared with the contoured grinding were analyzed. The findings are different a characteristic performance on the surface of the tooth side along the outline, especially with a higher value at the head of the tooths. This creates a need for appropriate modification of the lateral surface of the teeth in the process of contoured grinding. The results of the mechanical strength of the samples gear wheel after the smoothing process and evaluating the hydrogen embrittlement are presented.

  15. Studies on Application of Aroma Finish on Silk Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipparagi, Sanganna Aminappa; Srinivasa, Thirumalappa; Das, Brojeswari; Naik, Subhas Venkatappa; Purushotham, Serampur Parappa

    2016-10-01

    Aromatic treatments on textiles have gained importance in the recent years. In the present article work has been done on fragrance finish application on silk material. Silk is an expensive natural fibre used for apparel purpose and known for its feel and appeal. Incorporation of fragrance material in silk product, will add more value to it. Present work focuses to impart durable aroma finish for silk products to be home washed or subjected to dry cleaning. Microencapsulated aroma chemical has been used for the treatment. Impregnation method, Exhaust method, Dip-Pad-Dry method and Spray method have been used to see the influence of application method on the uptake and performance. Evaluation of the aroma treated material has been done through subjective evaluation as per Odor Intensity Reference Scaling (OIRS). Effect of the aroma finishing on the physical properties of the fabric has also been studied. No adverse effect has been observed on the stiffness of the fabric after the aroma treatment.

  16. Multifunctional finishing of cotton with 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid: functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Aiqin; Sun, Gang

    2013-07-25

    3,3',4,4'-Benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid (BPTCA) can directly react with hydroxyl groups on cotton cellulose to form ester bonds, which could crosslink cellulose and provide wrinkle-free functions to the cotton fabrics. BPTCA, as a derivative of photo-active benzophenone, can absorb ultraviolet lights and offer ultraviolet (UV) protective and photo-sensitive functions on the treated materials. Finishing conditions such as agent concentration, curing temperature and time, could affect ester bond formation and crosslinking of cellulose. Wrinkle-free and UV protective functions in relationship to the functional agent, as well as surface morphology of BPTCA treated cotton were investigated as well.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Different Finishing and Polishing Devices on Nanofilled, Microfilled, and Hybrid Composite: A Scanning Electron Microscopy and Profilometric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rishi D; Raisingani, Deepak; Jindal, Divya; Mathur, Rachit

    2016-01-01

    The continuous development of esthetically acceptable adhesive restorative material has made a variety of tooth-colored materials available for clinical use. The advent of visible light polymerizing resin and the use of finer filler particles permit resin composites to be polished to higher degree. The effect of polishing systems on surface finish has been reported to be material-dependent, and the effectiveness of these systems was mostly product-dependent. Hence, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of finishing and polishing systems on the surface roughness of nanofilled, microfilled, and hybrid composite restorative materials available in the market.

  18. Reliability Study of Solder Paste Alloy for the Improvement of Solder Joint at Surface Mount Fine-Pitch Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nizam Ab. Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The significant increase in metal costs has forced the electronics industry to provide new materials and methods to reduce costs, while maintaining customers’ high-quality expectations. This paper considers the problem of most electronic industries in reducing costly materials, by introducing a solder paste with alloy composition tin 98.3%, silver 0.3%, and copper 0.7%, used for the construction of the surface mount fine-pitch component on a Printing Wiring Board (PWB. The reliability of the solder joint between electronic components and PWB is evaluated through the dynamic characteristic test, thermal shock test, and Taguchi method after the printing process. After experimenting with the dynamic characteristic test and thermal shock test with 20 boards, the solder paste was still able to provide a high-quality solder joint. In particular, the Taguchi method is used to determine the optimal control parameters and noise factors of the Solder Printer (SP machine, that affects solder volume and solder height. The control parameters include table separation distance, squeegee speed, squeegee pressure, and table speed of the SP machine. The result shows that the most significant parameter for the solder volume is squeegee pressure (2.0 mm, and the solder height is the table speed of the SP machine (2.5 mm/s.

  19. Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America's Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, William G.; Chingos, Matthew M.; McPherson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The United States has long been a model for accessible, affordable education, as exemplified by the country's public universities. And yet less than 60 percent of the students entering American universities today are graduating. Why is this happening, and what can be done? "Crossing the Finish Line" provides the most detailed exploration…

  20. Finished Genome Sequence of Collimonas arenae Cal35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Je-Jia; de Jager, Victor; Deng, Wen-ling; Leveau, Johan

    2015-01-01

    We announce the finished genome sequence of soil forest isolate Collimonas arenae Cal35, which comprises a 5.6-Mbp chromosome and 41-kb plasmid. The Cal35 genome is the second one published for the bacterial genus Collimonas and represents the first opportunity for high-resolution comparison of geno

  1. Finished Genome Sequence of Collimonas arenae Cal35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Je-Jia; de Jager, Victor; Deng, Wen-ling; Leveau, Johan

    2015-01-01

    We announce the finished genome sequence of soil forest isolate Collimonas arenae Cal35, which comprises a 5.6-Mbp chromosome and 41-kb plasmid. The Cal35 genome is the second one published for the bacterial genus Collimonas and represents the first opportunity for high-resolution comparison of geno

  2. 9 CFR 318.309 - Finished product inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... be handled according to: (1) A HACCP plan for canned product that addresses hazards associated with... this section. (b)-(c) (d) Procedures for handling finished product inspections where the HACCP plan...

  3. Relevance of microbial finished product testing in food safety management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwietering, M.H.; Jacxsens, L.; Membre, J.M.; Nauta, M.; Peterz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Management of microbiological food safety is largely based on good design of processes, products and procedures. Finished product testing may be considered as a control measure at the end of the production process. However, testing gives only very limited information on the safety status of a food.

  4. Relevance of microbial finished product testing in food safety management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwietering, M.H.; Jacxsens, L.; Membre, J.M.; Nauta, M.; Peterz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Management of microbiological food safety is largely based on good design of processes, products and procedures. Finished product testing may be considered as a control measure at the end of the production process. However, testing gives only very limited information on the safety status of a food.

  5. Graphic Arts: The Press and Finishing Processes. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crummett, Dan

    This document contains teacher and student materials for a course in graphic arts concentrating on printing presses and the finishing process for publications. Seven units of instruction cover the following topics: (1) offset press systems; (2) offset inks and dampening chemistry; (3) offset press operating procedures; (4) preventive maintenance…

  6. Perceptual Orientation for Housing Interior Walls Finishes Choice and Preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. ZINAS, Bako Zachariah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Housing interior walls are decorated and finished with various decorative materials of paints of varying properties ranging from texture to coloration. In choosing the preferred finishing and decorative materials, housing owners, users and prospective owners have attendant underlying factors and reasons for their choices. These choice activities usually provoke and invoke certain perceptual orientations that underlie the choices. These perceptual orientations are normally very complex and can only be disentangled by elicitation. This paper presents perceptual orientations of prospective house owners‟ choice and preference for interior walls finishes in Yola, Nigeria. The study was conducted within the theoretical and conceptual framework of means-end chain (MEC model. 15 prospective house owners were interviewed using the laddering interviewing technique after a structured questionnaire survey was carried out. The results showed that twelve (12 identified unique perceptual orientation pathways were established, motivated by four (4 user values, and intervened by four (4 expected functional affordances. The findings disentangled the design expectations of housing users/owners for finishing their housing interiors which can be pointers for designers and Architects for their design processes and decisions.

  7. Performance and cost implication of finisher turkeys fed varying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance and cost implication of finisher turkeys fed varying levels of rice millingwaste. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... 50% rice milling waste produced enhanced performance that was next to the control in terms ...

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Different Finishing and Polishing Devices on Nanofilled, Microfilled, and Hybrid Composite: A Scanning Electron Microscopy and Profilometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rishi D; Raisingani, Deepak; Mathur, Rachit

    2016-01-01

    The continuous development of esthetically acceptable adhesive restorative material has made a variety of tooth-colored materials available for clinical use. The advent of visible light polymerizing resin and the use of finer filler particles permit resin composites to be polished to higher degree. The effect of polishing systems on surface finish has been reported to be material-dependent, and the effectiveness of these systems was mostly product-dependent. Hence, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of finishing and polishing systems on the surface roughness of nanofilled, microfilled, and hybrid composite restorative materials available in the market. How to cite this article Yadav RD, Raisingani D, Jindal D, Mathur R. A Comparative Analysis of Different Finishing and Polishing Devices on Nanofilled, Microfilled, and Hybrid Composite: A Scanning Electron Microscopy and Profilometric Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):201-208. PMID:27843250

  9. Water/oil repellent property of polyester fabrics after supercritical carbon dioxide finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yan-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong permeability and driving force of supercritical carbon dioxide renders it an ideal medium for fabrics finishing. This paper is to use supercritical carbon dioxide medium with a solution of organic fluorine to fabricate water/oil repellent polyester fabrics. A series of characterization methods including Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, energy dispersive spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy were carried out to evaluate the fabrics finishing. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry showed that the transmittance peak appeared at 1202.4 and 1147.4 cm-1, indicating the presence of -CF2- group on the surface of polyester fabrics. The results of energy dispersive spectrometer and scanning electron microscopy showed that the fluorine was evenly distributed on the fibers surface. In addition, a series of physical properties were detected, including contact angel, air permeability, breaking strength, and wearing resistance. The average water and hexadecane contact angles were 147.58° and 143.78°, respectively. Compared with the initial fabrics, the treated one has little change in air permeability, while its strength increased greatly. The treated fabrics gained good water/oil repellent properties while keeping good air permeability and improving mechanical property.

  10. Comparison of nitrate levels in raw water and finished water from historical monitoring data on Iowa municipal drinking water supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Peter J; Smith, Brian J; Feng, Zhen-Fang; Kantamneni, Jiji R; Riley, David G

    2006-05-01

    Nitrate contamination of water sources is a concern where large amounts of nitrogen fertilizers are regularly applied to soils. Ingested nitrate from dietary sources and drinking water can be converted to nitrite and ultimately to N-nitroso compounds, many of which are known carcinogens. Epidemiologic studies of drinking water nitrate and cancer report mixed findings; a criticism is the use of nitrate concentrations from retrospective drinking water data to assign exposure levels. Residential point-of-use nitrate data are scarce; gaps in historical data for municipal supply finished water hamper exposure classification efforts. We used generalized linear regression models to estimate and compare historical raw water and finished water nitrate levels (1960s-1990s) in single source Iowa municipal supplies to determine whether raw water monitoring data could supplement finished water data to improve exposure assessment. Comparison of raw water and finished water samples (same sampling date) showed a significant difference in nitrate levels in municipalities using rivers; municipalities using other surface water or alluvial groundwater had no difference in nitrate levels. A regional aggregation of alluvial groundwater municipalities was constructed based on results from a previous study showing regional differences in nitrate contamination of private wells; results from this analysis were mixed, dependent upon region and decade. These analyses demonstrate using historical raw water nitrate monitoring data to supplement finished water data for exposure assessment is appropriate for individual Iowa municipal supplies using alluvial groundwater, lakes or reservoirs. Using alluvial raw water data on a regional basis is dependent on region and decade.

  11. Immunological, physiological and behavioral effects of Salmonella enterica carriage and shedding in experimentally infected finishing pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. This study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and associated immunological, physiological, and behavioral alterations, by longitudinally ...

  12. 76 FR 19182 - Petition for Rulemaking-Classification of Polyurethane Foam and Certain Finished Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Polyurethane Foam and Certain Finished Products Containing Polyurethane Foam as Hazardous Materials AGENCY... of State Fire Marshals (NASFM). The NASFM petitioned PHMSA to classify polyurethane foam and certain finished products containing polyurethane foam as hazardous material for purposes of transportation...

  13. Super-smooth processing x-ray telescope application research based on the magnetorheological finishing (MRF) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xianyun; Hou, Xi; Yang, Jinshan

    2016-09-01

    Nickel is the unique material in the X-ray telescopes. And it has the typical soft material characteristics with low hardness high surface damage and low stability of thermal. The traditional fabrication techniques are exposed to lots of problems, including great surface scratches, high sub-surface damage and poor surface roughness and so on. The current fabrication technology for the nickel aspheric mainly adopt the single point diamond turning(SPDT), which has lots of advantages such as high efficiency, ultra-precision surface figure, low sub-surface damage and so on. But the residual surface texture of SPDT will cause great scattering losses and fall far short from the requirement in the X-ray applications. This paper mainly investigates the magnetorheological finishing (MRF) techniques for the super-smooth processing on the nickel optics. Through the study of the MRF polishing techniques, we obtained the ideal super-smooth polishing technique based on the self-controlled MRF-fluid NS-1, and finished the high-precision surface figure lower than RMS λ/80 (λ=632.8nm) and super-smooth roughness lower than Ra 0.3nm on the plane reflector and roughness lower than Ra 0.4nm on the convex cone. The studying of the MRF techniques makes a great effort to the state-of-the-art nickel material processing level for the X-ray optical systems applications.

  14. 40 CFR 63.1347 - Standards for raw and finish mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for raw and finish mills. 63... and Operating Limits § 63.1347 Standards for raw and finish mills. The owner or operator of each new or existing raw mill or finish mill at a facility which is a major source subject to the provisions...

  15. 40 CFR 63.5390 - How do I measure the HAP content of a finish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... finish? 63.5390 Section 63.5390 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5390 How do I measure the HAP content of a finish? (a) To determine...

  16. Protecting wood decks from biodegradation and weathering : evaluation of deck finish systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. J. Morrell; P. F. Schneider; R. Sam Williams

    2001-01-01

    Mildew resistance, water repellency, and overall finish appearance were evaluated for 32 deck finishes on western redcedar (Thuja plicata D. Donn.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) after 12, 21, and 39 months of outdoor exposure in western Oregon. The finishes were either solvent-borne or waterborne; were ei- ther clear, tinted, or lightly...

  17. 46 CFR 116.422 - Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Fire Protection § 116.422 Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish... Commandant. (b) Bulkheads, linings and ceilings may be covered by a combustible interior finish provided that...

  18. 77 FR 60897 - Safety Zone: America's Cup World Series Finish-Line, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone: America's Cup World Series Finish-Line, San... race finishes that will occur in vicinity of San Francisco West Yacht Harbor Light 2. Unauthorized... to finish the races in the subject location on September 18, 2012, and the event would occur before...

  19. 40 CFR 63.5395 - How do I measure the density of a finish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... finish? 63.5395 Section 63.5395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5395 How do I measure the density of a finish? (a) To determine the...

  20. Wrinkle Resistant Finishing of Cotton Fabrics with the Complex System of PBTCA/CA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋海涛; 隋淑英; 朱平; 董朝红; 张林

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the wrinkle resistant finishing of cotton fabric with the complex system of PBTCA and CA was mainly discussed.The influence of finishing conditions such as the amount of finishing agent and catalyst,curing temperature and curing time were st

  1. 40 CFR 427.80 - Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. 427.80 Section 427.80 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Coating or Finishing of Asbestos Textiles Subcategory § 427.80 Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  2. Manufacturing aspheric mirrors made of zero thermal expansion cordierite ceramics using Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Jun; Maloney, Chris

    2016-07-01

    NEXCERATM cordierite ceramics, which have ultra-low thermal expansion properties, are perfect candidate materials to be used for light-weight satellite mirrors that are used for geostationary earth observation and for mirrors used in ground-based astronomical metrology. To manufacture the high precision aspheric shapes required, the deterministic aspherization and figure correction capabilities of Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) are tested. First, a material compatibility test is performed to determine the best method for achieving the lowest surface roughness of RMS 0.8nm on plano surfaces made of NEXCERATM ceramics. Secondly, we will use MRF to perform high precision figure correction and to induce a hyperbolic shape into a conventionally polished 100mm diameter sphere.

  3. Preliminary study on atmospheric-pressure plasma-based chemical dry figuring and finishing of reaction-sintered silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinmin; Deng, Hui; Zhang, Xiaonan; Peng, Kang; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2016-10-01

    Reaction-sintered silicon carbide (RS-SiC) is a research focus in the field of optical manufacturing. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-based chemical dry figuring and finishing, which consist of plasma chemical vaporization machining (PCVM) and plasma-assisted polishing (PAP), were applied to improve material removal rate (MRR) in rapid figuring and ameliorate surface quality in fine finishing. Through observing the processed RS-SiC sample in PCVM by scanning white-light interferometer (SWLI), the calculated peak-MRR and volume-MRR were 0.533 μm/min and 2.78×10-3 mm3/min, respectively. The comparisons of surface roughness and morphology of the RS-SiC samples before and after PCVM were obtained by the scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. It could be found that the processed RS-SiC surface was deteriorated with surface roughness rms 382.116 nm. The evaluations of surface quality of the processed RS-SiC sample in PAP corresponding to different collocations of autorotation speed and revolution speed were obtained by SWLI measurement. The optimal surface roughness rms of the processed RS-SiC sample in PAP was 2.186 nm. There were no subsurface damages, scratches, or residual stresses on the processed sample in PAP. The results indicate that parameters in PAP should be strictly selected, and the optimal parameters can simultaneously obtain high MRR and smooth surface.

  4. Dietary starch types affect liver nutrient metabolism of finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chen; Li, Yanjiao; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Guanghong; Gao, Feng

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different starch types on liver nutrient metabolism of finishing pigs. In all ninety barrows were randomly allocated to three diets with five replicates of six pigs, containing purified waxy maize starch (WMS), non-waxy maize starch (NMS) and pea starch (PS) (the amylose to amylopectin ratios were 0·07, 0·19 and 0·28, respectively). After 28 d of treatments, two per pen (close to the average body weight of the pen) were weighed individually, slaughtered and liver samples were collected. Compared with the WMS diet, the PS diet decreased the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 in liver (P0·05). Compared with the WMS diet, the PS diet reduced the expressions of glutamate dehydrogenase and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 in liver (Pliver compared with the WMS diet (Pliver of finishing pigs.

  5. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents.

  6. Method and system for processing optical elements using magnetorheological finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menapace, Joseph Arthur; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene; Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A

    2012-09-18

    A method of finishing an optical element includes mounting the optical element in an optical mount having a plurality of fiducials overlapping with the optical element and obtaining a first metrology map for the optical element and the plurality of fiducials. The method also includes obtaining a second metrology map for the optical element without the plurality of fiducials, forming a difference map between the first metrology map and the second metrology map, and aligning the first metrology map and the second metrology map. The method further includes placing mathematical fiducials onto the second metrology map using the difference map to form a third metrology map and associating the third metrology map to the optical element. Moreover, the method includes mounting the optical element in the fixture in an MRF tool, positioning the optical element in the fixture; removing the plurality of fiducials, and finishing the optical element.

  7. Farmer and Public Attitudes Toward Lamb Finishing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Grahame; Jongman, Ellen; Greenfield, L; Hemsworth, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To develop research and policy on the welfare of lambs in intensive finishing systems, it is important to understand public and sheep farmers' attitudes. The aim of this research was to identify and compare farmer and community attitudes relevant to the intensification of lamb finishing. The majority of respondents in the community sample expressed concern about all listed welfare issues, but particularly about feedlotting of lambs and the associated confinement. These attitudes correlated with community views on the importance of welfare issues including social contact and freedom to roam. Farmers expressed much lower levels of concern than did the general public except with regard to the health of lambs, disease control, access to shade, and lack of access to clean water.

  8. Marginal Fit of CEREC Crowns at Different Finish Line Curvatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    that can mimic the optical prope11ies of enamel and dentin, with a high flexural strength of 150MPa. These materials are machinable and contain...heat-polymerized resin composite inlays, he had the new idea of tooth colored inlays inserted adhesively with resin-based composite as a luting...human enamel . Journal of American Dental Association, 127 (1), 74-80. Tao, J., & Han, D. (2009). The effect of finish line curvature on marginal fit

  9. Hybrid machining processes perspectives on machining and finishing

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Kapil; Laubscher, R F

    2016-01-01

    This book describes various hybrid machining and finishing processes. It gives a critical review of the past work based on them as well as the current trends and research directions. For each hybrid machining process presented, the authors list the method of material removal, machining system, process variables and applications. This book provides a deep understanding of the need, application and mechanism of hybrid machining processes.

  10. Preliminary design and thermal analysis of device for finish cooling Jaffa biscuits in a.d. 'Jaffa'- Crvenka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salemović Duško R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper preliminary design of device for finish cooling chocolate topping of biscuits in A.D. 'Jaffa'- Crvenka was done. The proposed preliminary design followed by the required technological process of finish cooling biscuits and required parameters of process which was supposed to get and which represented part of project task. Thermal analysis was made and obtained percentage error between surface contact of the air and chocolate topping, obtained from heat balance and geometrical over proposed preliminary design, wasn't more than 0.67%. This is a preliminary design completely justified because using required length of belt conveyor receive required temperature of chocolate topping at the end of the cooling process.

  11. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  12. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  13. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  14. Fundamental studies of tin whiskering in microelectronics finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinol, Lesly Agnes

    Common electronics materials, such as tin, copper, steel, and brass, are ambient reactive under common use conditions, and as such are prone to corrosion. During the early 1940s, reports of failures due to electrical shorting of components caused by 'whisker' (i.e., filamentary surface protrusion) growth on many surface types---including the aforementioned metals---began to emerge. Lead alloying of tin (3--10% by weight, typically in the eutectic proportion) eliminated whiskering risk for decades, until the July 2006 adoption of the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) directive was issued by the European Union. This directive, which has since been adopted by California and parts of China, severely restricted the use of lead (market, imposing the need for developing reliable new "lead-free" alternatives to SnPb. In spite of the abundance of modern-day anecdotes chronicling whisker-related failures in satellites, nuclear power stations, missiles, pacemakers, and spacecraft navigation equipment, pure tin finishes are still increasingly being employed today, and the root cause(s) of tin whiskering remains elusive. This work describes a series of structured experiments exploring the fundamental relationships between the incidence of tin whiskering (as dependent variable) and numerous independent variables. These variables included deposition method (electroplating, electroless plating, template-based electrochemical synthesis, and various physical vapor deposition techniques, including resistive evaporation, electron beam evaporation, and sputtering), the inclusion of microparticles and organic contamination, the effects of sample geometry, and nanostructuring. Key findings pertain to correlations between sample geometry and whisker propensity, and also to the stress evolution across a series of 4"-diameter silicon wafers of varying thicknesses with respect to the degree of post-metallization whiskering. Regarding sample geometry, it was found that smaller

  15. Finishing of display glass for mobile electronics using 3M Trizact diamond tile abrasive pads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lianbin; Fletcher, Tim; Na, Tee Koon; Sventek, Bruce; Romero, Vince; Lugg, Paul S.; Kim, Don

    2010-10-01

    This paper will describe a new method being used during the finishing of glass displays for mobile electronics including mobile hand held devices and notebook computers. The new method consists of using 3M TrizactTM Diamond Tile Abrasive Pads. TrizactTM Diamond Tile is a structured fixed abrasive grinding technology developed by 3M Company. The TrizactTM Diamond Tile structured abrasive pad consists of an organic (polymeric binder) - inorganic (abrasive mineral, i.e., diamond) composite that is used with a water-based coolant. TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology can be applied in both double and single side grinding applications. A unique advantage of TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology is the combination of high stock removal and low sub-surface damage. Grinding results will be presented for both 9 micron and 20 micron grades of TrizactTM Diamond Tile abrasive pads used to finish several common display glasses including Corning GorillaTM glass and Soda Lime glass.

  16. Performance, behaviour and physiological responses of finishing pigs under different lighting programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ivo Sodré Amaral

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Technologies that improve productivity are essentials for competitiveness in the pork market. The consumer market is always requiring information about the technologies applied in swine production, mainly from the perspective of animal welfare. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of lighting on performance, behavioral and physiological characteristics in finishing pigs. Thirty-six pigs were distributed in a completely randomized design with three treatments and six replications. The animals were subjected to three light programs: natural light (NL, 16 hours of light and eight hours of dark (16L:8D and 23 hours of light and one hour of dark (23L:1D for 28 days. Daily feed intake (DFI, average daily gain (ADG and feed conversion (FC were evaluated. The physiological parameters evaluated were rectal temperature (RT, respiratory rate (RR and surface temperature (ST. The behavioral standards observed were: standing, lying, eating, drinking, sniffing, interacting, sitting, urinating and defecating. The lighting programs did not affect animal performance. However, pigs that received 23L:1D, showed, in the afternoon, ST upper than others treatments. Providing supplemental light promoted the elevation of RR, also in the afternoon. The RT was not influenced by treatments. The extended light program altered the behavior of the animals, which animals were most active, especially at night. Anyway, there was no improvement or reduction of the performance with the use of different lighting programs for finishing pigs.

  17. FEM analysis of front axle vertical finishing process and mold development%前轴垂直整形工艺模拟与模具开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾琦; 蒋鹏

    2013-01-01

    Front axle is one of the important load parts in automobiles, the possibility of the front axle vertical finishing process was analyzed, the process parameters and mold structure of vertical finishing process were simulated and optimized with the help of computer numerical simulation technology. A kind of vertical finishing mold with hydraulic clamping system was designed on the basis of simulations. After vertical finishing process in the vertical finishing mold, the upper and lower surfaces of the spring seat are flattening, which can be drilled bolt holes and mounted directly. It is benefit for reducing the subsequent processing amount and meeting, which mounting requirements of spring seat.%前轴是汽车重要的承载件之一,本文分析了前轴锻件垂直整形工艺的可行性,通过计算机数值模拟技术模拟并优化垂直整形的工艺参数和模具结构,在模拟分析基础上设计出液压夹紧式垂直整形模.经垂直整形后,锻件弹簧座的上下表面基本压平,可以直接加工螺栓孔并进行安装,减少了后续加工量,并保证了弹簧座的安装要求.

  18. 棉型织物的三防和易去污整理%Water-, oil-, stain proofing and soil release finish of cotton fabric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨俊文

    2012-01-01

    前处理、染色和后整理等工艺处理对棉型织物的三防和易去污整理效果都有影响.试验结果表明,为保证氟化物三防和易去污双效整理的效果,前处理时要将织物上的各种杂质去除干净,以保证毛效合格;染色后布面pH值保持在5~7,整理工作液中不能添加与三防和易去污功效机理相反的助剂.%The finishing results of water-, oil- and stain- proof and soil release finish of cotton fabric are affected by pretreat-ment, dyeing and finishing processes. The results show that in order to ensure the finishing results, impurities should be removed completely to obtain good capillary effect, the pH value of fabric surface should be controlled at 5 ~7 after dyeing, and auxiliaries that have reversed behaviors should not be added into the finishing liquor.

  19. Effects of Fiber Finish on the Performance of Asphalt Binders and Mastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Putman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of finishes applied to polyester fibers on the properties of asphalt binders and mastics. Asphalt binders were mixed with finishes that were extracted from the fibers, and mastics were also made with binder and fibers (with and without finish to isolate the effects of the finish. The results indicated that crude source plays a significant role in how the fiber finish affects the binders and mastics. Additionally different finishes had different effects on binder properties. The major finding of this study is that different polyester fibers, even from the same manufacturer, may not necessarily perform the same in an asphalt mixture. It is important to use fibers that are compatible with the particular asphalt binder that is being used because of the significance of the binder source on the interaction between the finish and the binder.

  20. Surface Modification of Exfoliated Graphite Nano-Reinforcements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I results showed that two surface treatments, oxidative plasma and reactive finishes, are effective means of modifying the surface chemistry of exfoliated...

  1. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis) to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA). Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n = 10) according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing), NF (Nealon technique and finishing), NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing), MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing), and MP (3 : 1 ratio...

  2. Phenotypic and Genotypic Diversity of Salmonella in Finishing Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Alda F A; Funk, Julie A; Habing, Greg G; Bolin, Carole

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella enterica (nontyphoidal) is one of the major causes of foodborne diseases in the United States and worldwide. Molecular typing methods are significant tools used to better understand the transmission and ecology of Salmonella in order to implement pre-harvest control measures. The objectives of this study were to describe the Salmonella genotypes, the distribution of isolate subtypes from different ecological niches (i.e., barn environment, nursery, and individual pigs) and their evolution over time in a longitudinal study conducted in three finishing sites (housing pigs from 10 weeks of age until slaughter at 24-26 weeks of age). Among the 107 Salmonella isolates submitted for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, there were 25 distinct subtypes. PFGE genotyping results were consistent with the serotype findings. A large number of distinguishable PFGE patterns (i.e., within the same serovar) were observed and different combinations of subtypes were identified within and across sites and cohorts. New subtypes may result of the introduction of new strains, genetic changes, or ongoing transmission of evolved strains within the production system. The same subtypes were detected intermittently during the study period, which suggests the persistence of indistinguishable subtypes in this production system. In addition, this study suggests persistence of the same subtype over several cohorts of pigs and potential residual contamination from the barn. Factors affecting adaptation and transmission of Salmonella within and among ecological systems (e.g., finishing pigs, nursery, and environment) should be further investigated. Understanding genotypic diversity of Salmonella in different ecological niches during pre-harvest may contribute to the development of more targeted and cost effective control programs during nursery and finishing phases.

  3. Recovery of Salmonella enterica from seropositive finishing pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Dahl, J.; van der Wolf, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    , apparent 'false-positive' serological results may well represent real infections not detected by bacteriological testing. For screening purposes, serological testing provides an indication of exposure to Salmonella, which forms the basis for targeted sampling, intervention and logistic slaughter procedures....... by the blood-sampling of 50 finishing pigs. Bacteriological sampling was performed by 20 pen faecal samples per herd. Over-all, 47% of the blood samples had an OD% larger than 10 and 23% larger than 40. Salmonella was isolated from 135 (9.3%) pen faecal samples in 32 herds (42%). Twenty-eight of these herds...

  4. Determination of heavy metal toxicity of finished leather solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Ahmet

    2009-05-01

    This paper investigates the toxicity in leather products of heavy metals known to be detrimental to the ecosystem. Heavy metal concentrations in leather samples were identified with ICP-OES, and toxicity was determined using a MetPLATE bioassay. Chromium and aluminium were found to constitute 98% of the total concentration of heavy metals in finished leather tanned with chromium and aluminium salts, while in some vegetable-tanned leather, zirconium was the only heavy metal identified. The average inhibition values for chromium, aluminium and vegetable tanned leather were 98.08%, 97.04% and 62.36%, respectively.

  5. THE MOISTURE METER OF THE DOUGH SEMI-FINISHED PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Kvasnikov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In the article a new method and device of measuring of humidity of semi-finished products isoffered from a test which is based on measuring of free falling time of purveyance from a dough in an airenvironment under the action of gravity. The basic factors of external environment, influencing on humidityof purveyances of tests - pressure and temperature, are marked. By a mathematical design the analysis ofinfluencing of atmospheric pressure and temperature is conducted on humidity of purveyances from thedough.Keywords: humidity meters, oscillation transformer, products from a dough, simulation.

  6. EFFECT OF OXYGEN PLASMA PRETREATMENT AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE OVERLAY COATING ON FLAME RETARDANT FINISHED COTTON FABRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Ling Lam

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Flammability properties of plasma pretreated cotton fabrics subjected to flame-retardant treatment were studied. Plasma pretreatment, using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ, was applied to cotton fabrics to enhance material properties, while retaining inherent advantages of the substrates. An organic phosphorus compound (flame-retardant agent, FR together with a melamine resin (crosslinking agent, CL and phosphoric acid (catalyst, PA were used. Titanium dioxide (TiO2 or nano-TiO2 was used as a co-catalyst for cotton fabrics to improve treatment effectiveness and minimize side effects. Surface morphology of plasma pretreated cotton specimens subjected to flame-retardant treatment showed a roughened and wrinkled fabric surface with high deposition of the finishing agent, caused by an etching effect of plasma and attack of acidic FR. Combustibility of FR-CL-PA-TiO2 and FR-CL-PA-Nano-TiO2 treated fabrics was evaluated by a 45° flammability test. FR-CL-PA-treated specimens showed superior flame-retardancy, which was further improved by plasma pretreatment and addition of metal oxide as a co-catalyst. However, in comparison with the control sample, flame-retardant-treated cotton specimens had lower breaking load and tearing strength, resulting from side effects of the crosslinking agent used, while plasma pretreatment might compensate for the reduction in tensile strength caused by flame-retardant agents. In addition, both plasma pretreatment and metal oxide co-catalyst added in the flame-retardant finishing improved the crosslinking process between FR and cotton fabric, minimizing formation of free formaldehyde and allowing the use of FR in industry.

  7. Application of Acid Dyestuffs with Different Molecule Structure in Combined Dyeing and Finishing of Cotton Fabric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yong-chun

    2005-01-01

    Simultaneous dyeing and durable press finishing of cotton fabrics with acid dyes bearing the different molecule structure and durable press finishing agent (DP agent abbr. ) based on modified DMDHEU were investigated by using the pad-dry-cure process. Some factors affecting the process, such as structure of acid dyes, DP agent, catalysts and curing temperature were discussed. The dyed and finished fabrics were evaluated with respect to color strength, fixation, crease recovery angle, breaking strength and fastness properties. The results indicate that structure of acid dyes has a striking effect on the color strength of dyed and finished cotton fabric. The color strength and dry crease recovery angle of dyed and finished cotton fabric increases, whereas breaking strength decreases with increasing concentration of DP agent. It is necessary for ammonium nitrate to serve as catalyst. It is found that relatively satisfactory properties of dyed and finished cotton fabric can be obtained with appropriate adjustment of treating conditions.

  8. Investigation into the Application of Polymer Finishes on Textiles by Inkjet Printing

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Digital finishing of textiles involves the application of polymer finishes onto the textile substrates in controllable quantities and at prescribed locations that gives the substrate multiple functionalities and performance characteristics. In this study, piezoelectric Drop-on-Demand inkjet printing of shrink resist finishes onto textiles was investigated with a view to imparting dimensional stability and potentially could produce sculptured textural effects with subsequent laundering felting...

  9. Herd-level risk factors for antimicrobial demanding gastrointestinal diseases in Danish herds with finisher pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybschmann, G. K.; Ersbøll, A.K.; Vigre, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    quarter per herd. Three potential herd-level risk factors were evaluated: herd size (number of finishers delivered for slaughter); herd health status (herds in the Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) System, conventional herds); and herd type (herds including only finishers, integrated herds). Data were analyzed...... using general linear mixed models with repeated measurements. Smaller herds had a larger AMU per finisher than larger herds. Integrated herds had lower AMU as compared with herds with only finishers. Herds within the SPF System had a larger decrease in AMU with increasing herd size compared...

  10. Utilization of Magnetorheological Finishing as a Diagnostic Tool for Investigating the Three-Dimensional Structure of Fractures in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menapace, J A; Davis, P J; Steele, W A; Wong, L L; Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E

    2005-11-11

    We have developed an experimental technique that combines magnetorheological finishing (MRF) and microscopy to examine fractures and/or artifacts in optical materials. The technique can be readily used to provide access to, and interrogation of, a selected segment of a fracture or object that extends beneath the surface. Depth slicing, or cross-sectioning at selected intervals, further allows the observation and measurement of the three-dimensional nature of the sites and the generation of volumetric representations that can be used to quantify shape and depth, and to understand how they were created, how they interact with surrounding material, and how they may be eliminated or mitigated.

  11. Research concerning optimum cutting parameters according with tool path strategy for finishing procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, A. E.; Anania, F. D.; Zapciu, M.

    2015-11-01

    Optimization of cutting parameters in NC milling needs to be studied because of its influence on machining time and cost. Today, any CAM software offers many tool path strategies to milling free form geometries. However, the users must have the know-how to choose the strategies according to geometry complexity, cutting tool geometry and its contact on the machined surface. Choosing the right strategy with the right cutting parameter is a rather difficult task to do on the machine tool. In this paper we try to take into account the influence of the toolpath over the surface quality for finishing operation. The main goal is to establish a direct link between machining parameters and toolpath in order to obtain the same surface quality for different trajectories. The first step consist in making a series of experiments for standards toolpaths (which can be found in any CAM software) like one-way, zig-zag, spiral from outside to inside, zig-zag at 45 dgr on a milling center. Based on the results, a correction coefficient for the feed rate was established.

  12. Influence of cervical finish line type on the marginal adaptation of zirconia ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comlekoglu, Muharrem; Dundar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gungor, Mehmet; Gokce, Bulent; Artunc, Celal

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of different cervical finish line designs on the marginal adaptation of a zirconia ceramic. Four different marginal finish lines (c: chamfer, mc: mini-chamfer, fe: feather-edge and s: rounded shoulder) were prepared on phantom incisors. Die models for each preparation group (N = 28, n = 7 per finish line design group) were made of epoxy resin. Y-TZP (ICE Zirkon) frameworks were manufactured by a copy-milling system (Zirconzahn) using prefabricated blanks and tried on the master models for initial adaptation of the framework; they were then sintered, followed by veneering (Zirconzahn). The finished crowns were cemented with a polycarboxylate cement (Poly F) under 300 g load and ultrasonically cleaned. The specimens were sliced and the marginal gap was measured, considering absolute marginal opening (AMO) and marginal opening (MO) for each coping under a stereomicroscope with image processing software (Lucia). The measurements were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests at a significance level of alpha = 0.01. Means of AMO measurement (microm) for the feather-edge finish line (87 +/- 10) was significantly lower than that of the chamfer (144 +/- 14), shoulder (114 +/- 16) and mini-chamfer finish line types (114 +/- 11) (p finish line (68 +/- 9) (p finish line type had an influence on the marginal adaptation of the tested zirconia ceramic. Although the feather-edge finish line resulted in lower AMO and MO values, with its proven mechanical disadvantage, it cannot be recommended in clinical applications of zirconia crowns. This type of finish line has acted solely as a control group to test the null hypothesis in the current study. For better marginal adaptation, both shoulder and mini-chamfer finish line types could be suggested for zirconia crowns.

  13. Analysis of Failure to Finish a Race in a Cohort of Thoroughbred Racehorses in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Jasmine; Rogers, Chris; Bolwell, Charlotte; Cogger, Naomi; Gee, Erica; Mcllwraith, Wayne

    2016-05-25

    The objective was to describe the incidence of failure to finish a race in flat-racing Thoroughbreds in New Zealand as these are summary indicators of falls, injuries and poor performance. Retrospective data on six complete flat racing seasons (n = 188,615 race starts) of all Thoroughbred flat race starts from 1 August 2005 to 31 July 2011 were obtained. The incidence of failure to finish events and binomial exact 95% confidence intervals were calculated per 1000 horse starts. The association between horse-, rider- and race-level variables with the outcomes failure to finish, pulled-up/fell and lost rider were examined with a mixed effects Poisson regression model. A total of 544 horses failed to finish in 188,615 race starts with an overall incidence of 2.88 per 1000 horse starts (95% CI 2.64-3.12). The incidence of failure to finish horses across each race year showed little variability. In the univariable analysis race distance, larger field size, season, and ratings bands showed association with failing to finish a race. The overall failure to finish outcome was associated with season, race distance and ratings bands (horse experience and success ranking criteria). In the multivariable analysis, race distance and ratings bands were associated with horses that pulled-up/fell; season, apprentice allowances and ratings bands were associated with the outcome lost rider. The failure to finish rate was lower than international figures for race day catastrophic injury. Racing and environmental variables were associated with failure to finish a race highlighting the multifactorial nature of race-day events. Further investigation of risk factors for failure to finish is required to better understand the reasons for a low failure to finish rate in Thoroughbred flat races in New Zealand.

  14. Analysis of Failure to Finish a Race in a Cohort of Thoroughbred Racehorses in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Tanner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to describe the incidence of failure to finish a race in flat-racing Thoroughbreds in New Zealand as these are summary indicators of falls, injuries and poor performance. Retrospective data on six complete flat racing seasons (n = 188,615 race starts of all Thoroughbred flat race starts from 1 August 2005 to 31 July 2011 were obtained. The incidence of failure to finish events and binomial exact 95% confidence intervals were calculated per 1000 horse starts. The association between horse-, rider- and race-level variables with the outcomes failure to finish, pulled-up/fell and lost rider were examined with a mixed effects Poisson regression model. A total of 544 horses failed to finish in 188,615 race starts with an overall incidence of 2.88 per 1000 horse starts (95% CI 2.64–3.12. The incidence of failure to finish horses across each race year showed little variability. In the univariable analysis race distance, larger field size, season, and ratings bands showed association with failing to finish a race. The overall failure to finish outcome was associated with season, race distance and ratings bands (horse experience and success ranking criteria. In the multivariable analysis, race distance and ratings bands were associated with horses that pulled-up/fell; season, apprentice allowances and ratings bands were associated with the outcome lost rider. The failure to finish rate was lower than international figures for race day catastrophic injury. Racing and environmental variables were associated with failure to finish a race highlighting the multifactorial nature of race-day events. Further investigation of risk factors for failure to finish is required to better understand the reasons for a low failure to finish rate in Thoroughbred flat races in New Zealand.

  15. Thermal Properties of Anionic Polyurethane Composition for Leather Finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga KOVTUNENKO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal properties of anionic polyurethane composition mixed with collagen product and hydrophilic sodium form of montmorillonite for use in the finishing of leather were studied by thermogravimetric method. The thermal indices of processes of thermal and thermo-oxidative destruction depending on the polyurethane composition were determined. The influence of anionic polyurethane composition on thermal behavior of chromium tanned gelatin films that imitate the leather were studied. APU composition with natural compounds increases their thermal stability both in air and in nitrogen atmosphere due to the formation of additional bonds between active groups of APU, protein and chrome tanning agent as the result of chemical reactions between organic and inorganic parts with the new structure formation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10043

  16. Thermal Properties of Anionic Polyurethane Composition for Leather Finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga KOVTUNENKO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal properties of anionic polyurethane composition mixed with collagen product and hydrophilic sodium form of montmorillonite for use in the finishing of leather were studied by thermogravimetric method. The thermal indices of processes of thermal and thermo-oxidative destruction depending on the polyurethane composition were determined. The influence of anionic polyurethane composition on thermal behavior of chromium tanned gelatin films that imitate the leather were studied. APU composition with natural compounds increases their thermal stability both in air and in nitrogen atmosphere due to the formation of additional bonds between active groups of APU, protein and chrome tanning agent as the result of chemical reactions between organic and inorganic parts with the new structure formation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10043

  17. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  18. Microencapsulated citronella oil for mosquito repellent finishing of cotton textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specos, M M Miró; García, J J; Tornesello, J; Marino, P; Vecchia, M Della; Tesoriero, M V Defain; Hermida, L G

    2010-10-01

    Microcapsules containing citronella essential oil were prepared by complex coacervation and applied to cotton textiles in order to study the repellent efficacy of the obtained fabrics. Citronella released from treated textiles was indirectly monitored by the extractable content of its main components. Repellent activity was assessed by exposure of a human hand and arm covered with the treated textiles to Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Fabrics treated with microencapsulated citronella presented a higher and longer lasting protection from insects compared to fabrics sprayed with an ethanol solution of the essential oil, assuring a repellent effect higher than 90% for three weeks. Complex coacervation is a simple, low cost, scalable and reproducible method of obtaining encapsulated essential oils for textile application. Repellent textiles were achieved by padding cotton fabrics with microcapsules slurries using a conventional pad-dry method. This methodology requires no additional investment for textile finishing industries, which is a desirable factor in developing countries.

  19. Nutrition behaviors, perceptions, and beliefs of recent marathon finishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patrick B

    2016-09-01

    To describe the nutrition behaviors, perceptions, and beliefs of marathoners. A survey-based study was conducted with 422 recent marathon finishers (199 men, 223 women). Participants reported their running background, demographics, diets followed, supplements used, and food/fluid intake during their most recent marathon (median 7 days prior), as well as beliefs about hydration, fueling, and sources of nutrition information. Median finishing times were 3:53 (3:26-4:35) and 4:25 (3:50-4:59) h:min for men and women during their most recent marathon. Most participants (66.1%) reported typically following a moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-fat diet, while 66.4% carbohydrate-loaded prior to their most recent marathon. Among 139 participants following a specific diet over the past year, the most common were vegetarian/vegan/pescatarian (n = 39), Paleolithic (n = 16), gluten-free (n = 15), and low-carbohydrate (n = 12). Roughly 35% of participants took a supplement intended to improve running performance over the past month. Women were more likely to follow specific diets (39.0% vs. 26.1%), while men were more likely to recently use performance-enhancing supplements (40.2% vs. 30.0%). Most participants (68.3%) indicated they were likely or very likely to rely on a structured plan to determine fluid intake, and 75% were confident in their ability to hydrate. At least 35.6% of participants thought they could improve marathon performance by 8% or more with nutrition interventions. Scientific journals ranked as the most reliable source of nutrition information, while running coaches ranked as the most likely source to be utilized. Findings from this investigation, such as diets and supplements utilized by marathoners, can be used by practitioners and researchers alike to improve the dissemination of scientifically-based information on nutrition and marathon running.

  20. SECTION 6.2 SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seah, M. P.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilomet...

  1. 40 CFR 35.4180 - Must my group keep financial records after we finish our TAG?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must my group keep financial records after we finish our TAG? 35.4180 Section 35.4180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Managing Your Tag § 35.4180 Must my group keep financial records after we finish our TAG? (a) You must keep...

  2. A system response to an outbreak of enzootic pneumonia in grow/finish pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Abstract A Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae-negative commercial swine production system broke with enzootic pneumonia at their grow/finish site in southern Manitoba in October, 2003. System responses included feed medication, depopulation, delayed shipment of pigs to the infected site, vaccination of at risk sow herds, and disinfection when grow/finish site depopulation was completed. PMID:15532888

  3. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced... my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  4. 21 CFR 181.26 - Drying oils as components of finished resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) shall include: Chinawood oil (tung oil). Dehydrated castor oil. Linseed oil. Tall oil. [42 FR 14638, Mar... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Drying oils as components of finished resins. 181... Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.26 Drying oils as components of finished resins. Substances...

  5. Novel Mycoplasma hyosynoviae vaccination of one herd failed to prevent lameness in finishing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll; Nielsen, Elisabeth Okholm; Christensen, Dennis;

    difference in the prevalence of lameness was found (P=0.157). All lame finishers were treated with Lincosin® and Flunixin® by injection for three days. In conclusion, this novel M. hyosynoviae vaccine could not successfully prevent the development of lameness in finishing pigs presumed to have been caused...

  6. Effects of roughage inclusion and particle size on performance and rumination behavior of finishing beef steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughage is mechanically processed to increase digestibility, and handling and mixing characteristics in finishing diets. Roughage is fed to promote rumen health and decrease digestive upset, but inclusion in finishing diets is limited due to the cost per unit of energy. Rumination behavior may be a...

  7. 40 CFR 410.20 - Applicability; description of the wool finishing subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the wool finishing subcategory. 410.20 Section 410.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wool Finishing Subcategory § 410.20 Applicability; description...

  8. Relationship between residual feed intake, performance, and carcass parameters of pasture finished cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2009 and 2010, Angus-crossbred steers (n = 39) were used to evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI), pasture-finishing performance and carcass parameters. During RFI determinations prior to pasture finishing initiation in mid-April, animals were fed an alfalfa hay cube diet....

  9. Effects of individual aerobic performance on finish time in mountain running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Dieter; Burtscher, Johannes; Burtscher, Martin

    2012-06-01

    It was hypothesized that for each mountain running competition, there is a certain individual performance level below which running times increase dramatically. The running times of 869 finishers of 3 international mountain running competitions have been analysed. A hyperbolic association was demonstrated between finish times in mountain running competitions and individual performance at the anaerobic threshold (VO2AT(Race)). Due to the non-linear association, there is an increasing effect on both the finish time and the change of finish time with decreasing aerobic performance. In all three competitions, the change of finish time is about 7 times more pronounced in mountain runners with the lowest VO2ATL,, compared to those with the highest values of VO2AT(Race). Both athletes and organizers should keep in mind these effects of decreasing aerobic performance on running times and potentially associated risks.

  10. 牛仔面料的染整加工%Dyeing and finishing of denim fabric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭志忠

    2011-01-01

    介绍了牛仔面料和成衣的印染深加工和后整理,包括拔染印花、风格涂层整理、丝光免烫整理工艺、成衣涂料染色、激光刻蚀和立体压皱整理.介绍了各整理工艺的处方和流程,并指出了工艺中的注意事项.%Dyeing and finishing processes of denim fabric and garments are introduced, including discharge printing, coating finishing, mercerizing and easy-care finishing, pigment garment dyeing, laser engraving and 3-dimensional crease memory finishing. Recipes and procedures of finishing processes are discussed, and precautions are put forward.

  11. Temperature Control of Hot Strip Finishing Mill with Inter Stand Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Kunio; Anbe, Yoshiharu; Imanari, Hiroyuki

    It is important for hot strip mill to keep finishing mill delivery temperature to it’s target value because of yield strength and tensile strength of rolled strip. We propose a new method for finishing mill delivery temperature control (FDTC) of a hot strip mill using inter stand strip coolant (ISC). FDTC consists of initial setting (before threading) values calculation of ISC flow rate and finishing mill speed, feed forward FDTC (FF-FDTC) and feedback FDTC (FB-FDTC). The mathematical strip temperature model of finishing mill was identified using normal operating data and some tests. Actual mill application with 7 stands finishing mill showed good FDTC results and also it made possible to increase rolling speed which increase production rate.

  12. Mortality on grower/finisher-only swine operations in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Losinger W.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available For 53 grower/finisher-only swine operations that participated in the United States National Animal Health Monitoring System 1995 National Swine Study, mortality among finisher pigs ranged from 0 to 12.0% over a 6-month period. Twenty-six (49.1% had 2% mortality. Nine (17.0% operations experienced >4% mortality. Fisher's exact test revealed that operations with all-in all-out management were significantly more likely to have 1 grower/finisher pig came from another source. Larger operations (where >900 pigs entered the grower/finisher phase practiced all-in, all-out management more frequently than smaller operations, and had a lower mean percent mortality than smaller operations. Diagnosis of Salmonella in finisher pigs performed at a laboratory or by a veterinarian in the 12 months prior to interview was associated with both increased percent mortality and increased percent mortality per day.

  13. A study on the applications of AI in finishing of additive manufacturing parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima Patham, K.

    2017-06-01

    Artificial intelligent and computer simulation are the technological powerful tools for solving complex problems in the manufacturing industries. Additive Manufacturing is one of the powerful manufacturing techniques that provide design flexibilities to the products. The products with complex shapes are directly manufactured without the need of any machining and tooling using Additive Manufacturing. However, the main drawback of the components produced using the Additive Manufacturing processes is the quality of the surfaces. This study aims to minimize the defects caused during Additive Manufacturing with the aid of Artificial Intelligence. The developed AI system has three layers, each layer is trying to eliminate or minimize the production errors. The first layer of the AI system optimizes the digitization of the 3D CAD model of the product and hence reduces the stair case errors. The second layer of the AI system optimizes the 3D printing machine parameters in order to eliminate the warping effect. The third layer of AI system helps to choose the surface finishing technique suitable for the printed component based on the Degree of Complexity of the product and the material. The efficiency of the developed AI system was examined on the functional parts such as gears.

  14. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  15. An experimental analysis of strontium titanate ceramic substrates polished by magnetorheological finishing with dynamic magnetic fields formed by rotating magnetic poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jisheng; Yu, Peng; Yan, Qiusheng; Li, Weihua

    2017-05-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) ceramic substrate is an incipient ferroelectric material with a perovskite structure and which has a wide range of applications in the fields of microwave, millimetre wave, and optic fibre. This paper reports on a system of experiments carried out on STO substrates using a new magnetorheological (MR) finishing process where dynamic magnetic fields are formed by magnetic poles rotate. The results show that a circular ring shaped polishing belt with a stability evaluation zone appears on the surface after being polished by MR finishing with a single-point dynamic magnetic field. The dynamic magnetic fields are stronger when the revolutions of magnetic pole increase and eccentricity of pole enlarge, with the surface finish is smoother and more material is removed. The optimum machining times, machining gap, oscillation distance, eccentricity of pole, revolutions of the workpiece and magnetic pole are 60 min, 0.8 mm, 0 mm, 7 mm, and 350 r min-1 and 90 r min-1, respectively, and the best MR fluid consists of 6 wt% of diamond abrasives in W1 particle size and 18 wt% of carbonyl iron powder in W3.5 particle size. A surface roughness of Ra and a material removal rate of 8 nm and 0.154 μm min-1 can be obtained in these optimum process conditions. Finally, the polishing mechanism for dynamic magnetic fields and the mechanism for removing material from STO ceramic substrates are discussed in detail.

  16. The Effect of Different Finishing Lines on the Marginal Fitness of Full Contour Zirconia and Glass Ceramic CAD/CAM Crowns (An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAK Al-Zubaidi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two gingival finishing lines (90° shoulder and deep chamfer on the marginal fitness of two types of full anatomic all-ceramic crowns; zirconia crowns (Zikonzhan and glass ceramic crowns (IPS e-max CAD milled with CAD/CAM system. Materials and Methods: Two dentoform teeth of left maxillary first molar were prepared with chamfer finishing line (CFL and shoulder finishing line (SFL, respectively and duplicated to Nickel-Chromium master dies. Thirty two crowns were fabricated and grouped as follows: Group I: 8 zirconia crowns on CFL; Group II: 8 zirconia crowns on SFL; Group III: 8 glass ceramic crowns on CFL and Group IV: 8 glass ceramic crowns on SFL. Marginal gaps were measured at 4 indentations, each one was at center of each tooth surface and collectively 16 points were measured by using stereomicroscope (160X. The data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and student t-tests. Results: Group I produced the least marginal gap (73.55µm; followed by Group II (92.60µm, and Group III (151.45µm and the highest marginal gap was recorded by Group IV (162.34µm. Statistical analysis of the data showed that SFL produced significantly greater marginal gap on zirconia crowns in comparison with CFL. However, in glass ceramic crowns, CFL revealed less marginal gap compared to SFL but statistically was not significant. On the other hand, glass ceramic crowns significantly produced a greater marginal gap in comparison to zirconia crowns regardless type of finishing line. Conclusions: deep chamfer margin could be more preferable finishing line than 90° shoulder especially for zirconia full crowns. Furthermore, zirconia crowns could be more advisable than glass ceramic crowns in respect to marginal adaptation.

  17. Provenance of the oil in par-fried French fries after finish frying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khusaibi, Mohammed; Gordon, Michael H; Lovegrove, Julie A; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2012-01-01

    Frozen par-fried French fries are finish-fried either by using the same type of oil used for par frying, or a different type. The nutritive quality of the final oil contained in the product depends on the relative amounts and the fatty acid (FA) composition of the oils used for par frying and finish frying. With the aim of understanding the provenance of the oil in the final product, par-fried French fries-either purchased ready or prepared in the laboratory-were finish fried in oils different from the ones used for par frying. The moisture content, oil content, and FA compositions of the par-fried and finish-fried products were experimentally determined, and the relative amounts of each of the oils present in the final product were calculated using the FAs as markers and undertaking a mass balance on each component FA. The results demonstrate that 89% to 93% of the total oil in the final product originates from the finish-frying step. The study also shows that a significant proportion of the oil absorbed during par frying is expelled from the product during finish frying. Further, the expulsion of par-frying oil was found to occur in the early stages of the finish-frying step. Experiments involving different combinations of par-frying and finish-frying oils showed that the relative proportions of the 2 oils did not depend on the individual fatty acid profiles. This study concludes that any positive health benefits of using an oil having a favorable FA profile for par frying, can potentially be lost, if the oil used for finish frying has a less favorable composition. This paper estimates the relative amounts of oil in French fries that have been fried in 2 stages-a par-frying step and a finish-frying step-which is commonly practiced in food service establishments as well as homes. The 2 key conclusions are: (1) nearly 90% of the oil content of the final product is the one used for finish frying; that is, a processor may use very good oil for par frying but if the

  18. A hybrid approach for the automated finishing of bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Ali; Klammer, Aaron A; Robins, William P; Chin, Chen-Shan; Webster, Dale; Paxinos, Ellen; Hsu, David; Ashby, Meredith; Wang, Susana; Peluso, Paul; Sebra, Robert; Sorenson, Jon; Bullard, James; Yen, Jackie; Valdovino, Marie; Mollova, Emilia; Luong, Khai; Lin, Steven; LaMay, Brianna; Joshi, Amruta; Rowe, Lori; Frace, Michael; Tarr, Cheryl L; Turnsek, Maryann; Davis, Brigid M; Kasarskis, Andrew; Mekalanos, John J; Waldor, Matthew K; Schadt, Eric E

    2012-07-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology have improved our ability to characterize most genomic diversity. However, accurate resolution of large structural events is challenging because of the short read lengths of second-generation technologies. Third-generation sequencing technologies, which can yield longer multikilobase reads, have the potential to address limitations associated with genome assembly. Here we combine sequencing data from second- and third-generation DNA sequencing technologies to assemble the two-chromosome genome of a recent Haitian cholera outbreak strain into two nearly finished contigs at >99.9% accuracy. Complex regions with clinically relevant structure were completely resolved. In separate control assemblies on experimental and simulated data for the canonical N16961 cholera reference strain, we obtained 14 scaffolds of greater than 1 kb for the experimental data and 8 scaffolds of greater than 1 kb for the simulated data, which allowed us to correct several errors in contigs assembled from the short-read data alone. This work provides a blueprint for the next generation of rapid microbial identification and full-genome assembly.

  19. Evaluation of different finish line designs in base metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghandeh R

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was performed according to the widespread application of base metal alloys"nand few articles published about the marginal integrity of restorations fabricated by these metals."nThree standard dies of a maxillary first premolar were prepared with a flat shoulder finish line in buccal"naspect and chamfer in palatal. One of them left with no change. On the buccal aspect of the second and"nthird dies 135?and 1607 bevel were added respectively"nUsing dual wax technique, nine wax patterns were formed on each die and casting procedure of selected"nnon precious alloy was performed by centrifugal method. Marginal gaps of each copping seated on dies"nwere measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM with X500 magnification. Measurements were"ndone on three areas of marked dies on buccal aspect. Measurement son palatal aspect was done on"nmarked midpalatal point as control."nResults and statistical analysis showed no significant difference among marginal gaps in lingual aspect."nBut on the buccal aspect there were statistically significant differences among the groups (P<0.001. Flat"nshoulder had the best marginal integrity (mean 4 micron. Shoulder with 160' bevel had the most marginal"ngap (mean 26.5 micron and shoulder with 1357 bevel was between two other groups (mean 15.7 micron.

  20. BEEF TALLOW AND EMULSIFIER IN GROWING-FINISHING PIG DIETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KASSIA M. SANTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Two trials were aimed to evaluate beef tallow in diets with and without emulsifier on performance of pigs at growing-finishing phases. In the first trial, 15 barrows (22.03±0.62 kg were distributed among three treatments: reference diet; test diet 1 (5% beef tallow and test diet 2 (10% beef tallow. Beef tallow presented average value of 7130.97 kcal ME/kg. For the performance trail, 30 barrows (24.85±1.18 kg were distributed among five treatments: T1 - diet with soybean oil and 3230 kcal ME /kg; T2 - diet with beef tallow and 3230 kcal ME/kg; T3 - diet with beef tallow and 3080 kcal ME/kg; T4 - diet with beef tallow, 3080 kcal/kg and 0.1% emulsifier; T5 - diet with beef tallow, 2930 kcal ME/kg and 0.1% emulsifier. Feed conversion was worse in animals fed diet with 3080 kcal ME/kg containing beef tallow and with 2930 kcal ME/kg with beef tallow and emulsifier. For economic availability, animals fed diet with beef tallow and 3230 kcal ME/kg and those fed diet with 3080 kcal ME/kg containing beef tallow and emulsifier, did not differ from animals fed diet with soybean oil, which enables the reduction up to 150 kcal ME/kg be compensated by emulsifier addition.

  1. Maintenance implementation plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meldrom, C.A.

    1996-03-01

    This document outlines the Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located at the Hanford site at Richland, Washington. This MIP describes the PFP maintenance program relative to DOE order 4330.4B. The MIP defines the key actions needed to meet the guidelines of the Order to produce a cost-effective and efficient maintenance program. A previous report identified the presence of significant quantities of Pu-bearing materials within PFP that pose risks to workers. PFP`s current mission is to develop, install and operate processes which will mitigate these risks. The PFP Maintenance strategy is to equip the facility with systems and equipment able to sustain scheduled PFP operations. The current operating run is scheduled to last seven years. Activities following the stabilization operation will involve an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to determine future plant activities. This strategy includes long-term maintenance of the facility for safe occupancy and material storage. The PFP maintenance staff used the graded approach to dictate the priorities of the improvement and upgrade actions identified in Chapter 2 of this document. The MIP documents PFP compliance to the DOE 4330.4B Order. Chapter 2 of the MIP follows the format of the Order in addressing the eighteen elements. As this revision is a total rewrite, no sidebars are included to highlight changes.

  2. Fire hazard analysis for Plutonium Finishing Plant complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCKINNIS, D.L.

    1999-02-23

    A fire hazards analysis (FHA) was performed for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The scope of the FHA focuses on the nuclear facilities/structures in the Complex. The analysis was conducted in accordance with RLID 5480.7, [DOE Directive RLID 5480.7, 1/17/94] and DOE Order 5480.7A, ''Fire Protection'' [DOE Order 5480.7A, 2/17/93] and addresses each of the sixteen principle elements outlined in paragraph 9.a(3) of the Order. The elements are addressed in terms of the fire protection objectives stated in paragraph 4 of DOE 5480.7A. In addition, the FHA also complies with WHC-CM-4-41, Fire Protection Program Manual, Section 3.4 [1994] and WHC-SD-GN-FHA-30001, Rev. 0 [WHC, 1994]. Objectives of the FHA are to determine: (1) the fire hazards that expose the PFP facilities, or that are inherent in the building operations, (2) the adequacy of the fire safety features currently located in the PFP Complex, and (3) the degree of compliance of the facility with specific fire safety provisions in DOE orders, related engineering codes, and standards.

  3. Regalzier: study of a typical historical plaster finish in Venice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Remotto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Regalzier is one of the most common types of plasterwork on medieval buildings in Venice until the 15th century but remained popular also during the next centuries in the north of Italy. Despite the widespread occurrence of this kind of finishing treatment, the information about the materials and the techniques used to create it is still scarce. For this reason and thanks to growing interest in traditional building construction techniques, a set of 21 samples were collected from a number of decorative elements and brick walls belonging to historical buildings of the 15th century in Venice. The samples were investigated by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy–Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Thermal Analysis (TG-DSC and Raman spectroscopy. The results allowed the characterization of the materials, contributing to the knowledge of traditional building construction techniques. This information is also important when considering the choice of proper restoration treatments, according to the recent concepts of sustainability, compatibility and use of local materials.

  4. Finishing procedures in Orthodontics: dental dimensions and proportions (microesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Carlos Bodart Brandão

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present article is to describe procedures that can be performed to achieve excellence in orthodontic treatment finishing. The content is limited to microesthetics, which comprises the concept of ideal dental dimensions and proportions (white esthetics and its correlation with the periodontium (pink esthetics. Standards of normality are described both in their real dimensions (dental height and width, and in those effectively perceived by the observer, the virtual dimensions. METHODS: The best scientific evidence was sought in the literature to support the clinical procedures that must guide the professional to obtain maximum esthetic quality on their treatments. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate what the other specialties in Dentistry expect from Orthodontics and, specially, what they have to offer. Clinical cases will be used to illustrate the dental movement that might maximize treatment outcome and to confront the ideal standards with the current state of the art. CONCLUSION: Treatment quality is directly related to the amount of procedures implemented by the orthodontist, associated with concepts and resources from Periodontics and Dental Prosthesis. Microesthetics cannot be seen in isolation, but rather as the key to establish a pleasant smile (miniesthetics in addition to a harmonious face (macroesthetics and a human being with high self-esteem (hyper-esthetics.

  5. Optimum selection of high performance mirror substrates for diamond finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Kenneth S.; Comstock, Lovell E.; Wamboldt, Leonard; Sutherland, James S.

    2016-05-01

    Due to advances in manufacturing processes, the substrate options for high performance diamond machined mirrors are expanding. Fewer compromises have to be made to achieve the needed weight, stiffness and finish while maintaining reasonable costs. In addition to the traditional mirror materials like aluminum and beryllium, there are some less common materials that can now be included in the trade space that fill the cost and performance continuum between wrought aluminum and beryllium mirrors. Aluminum and beryllium, respectively, had been the low cost/fair performance and very high cost/very high performance bounds for substrate selection. These additional substrates provide multiple near net shape blank options and processes, mostly within these bounds, that can be considered in a mirror cost versus performance trade analysis. This paper will include a summary of some advances in manufacturing processes that provide more substrate options for diamond machined mirrors with some sample performance analysis and data. This is merged with the traditional substrate options to illustrate the now larger mirror substrate trade space. Some benchmark structural analysis is provided to back up a generic mirror design trade study.

  6. Wall finish selection in hospital design: a survey of facility managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavy, Sarel; Dixit, Manish K

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to analyze healthcare facility managers' perceptions regarding the materials used for interior wall finishes and the criteria used to select them. It also examines differences in wall finish materials and the selection process in three major hospital spaces: emergency, surgery, and in-patient units. These findings are compared with healthcare designers' perceptions on similar issues, as currently documented in the literature. Hospital design and the materials used for hospital construction have a considerable effect on the environment and health of patients. A 2002 survey revealed which characteristics healthcare facility designers consider when selecting materials for healthcare facilities; however, no similar study has examined the views of facility managers on building finish selection. A 22-question survey questionnaire was distributed to 210 facility managers of metropolitan, for-profit hospitals in Texas; IRB approval was obtained. Respondents were asked to rank 10 interior wall finish materials and 11 selection criteria for wall finishes. Data from 48 complete questionnaires were analyzed using descriptive statistics and nonparametric statistical analysis methods. The study found no statistically significant differences in terms of wall finish materials or the characteristics for material selection in the three major spaces studied. It identified facility managers' four most-preferred wall finish materials and the five-most preferred characteristics, with a statistical confidence level of greater than 95%. The paper underscores the importance of incorporating all perspectives: facility designers and facility managers should work together toward achieving common organizational goals.

  7. 40 CFR 425.20 - Applicability; description of the hair save, chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... save, chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory. 425.20 Section 425.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hair Save, Chrome Tan, Retan-Wet Finish Subcategory § 425.20 Applicability...

  8. 40 CFR 63.5385 - How do I measure the quantity of finish applied to the leather?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I measure the quantity of finish... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5385 How do I measure the quantity of finish applied to the...

  9. 78 FR 3900 - Generic Drug User Fee-Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient and Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... drug active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and finished dosage form (FDF) facilities user fees for... applications in the backlog as of October 1, 2012, on finished dosage form (FDF) and active pharmaceutical... Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2013 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration,...

  10. Associations between feed and water antimicrobial use in farrow-to-finish swine herds and antimicrobial resistance of fecal Escherichia coli from grow-finish pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Leigh B; Waldner, Cheryl L; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Dowling, Patricia M; Harding, John C S

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli (n = 1439), isolated from the feces of apparently healthy grow-finish pigs in 20 herds, were tested for susceptibility to 16 antimicrobials. Logistic regression models were developed for each resistance that was observed in more than 5% of the isolates. Each production phase's (suckling, nursery, grow-finish pigs or sows) antimicrobial exposure rate, through feed or water, was considered as a risk factor. Management variables were evaluated as potential confounders. Six resistance outcomes were associated with an antimicrobial use risk factor and four included exposures of pigs outside the grow-finish phase. In the case of sulfamethoxazole, the odds of resistance increased 2.3 times for every 100,000 pig-days of nursery pig exposure to sulfonamides. Thus, swine producers and veterinarians must be aware that antimicrobial use in pigs distant from market could have food safety repercussions. Five resistance outcomes were associated with exposure to an unrelated antimicrobial class. Most notably, the odds of sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol resistance were each six times higher in herds reporting high (more than 500/1,000 pig-days) grow-finish pig, macrolide exposure compared to herds with no macrolide use in grow-finish pigs. Therefore, the potential for co-selection should be considered in antimicrobial use decisions. This study emphasizes the importance of judicious antimicrobial use in pork production.

  11. Experimental analysis on semi-finishing machining of Ti6Al4V additively manufactured by direct melting laser sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrogno, Stano; Bordin, Alberto; Bruschi, Stefania; Umbrello, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    The Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques are particularly appealing especially for titanium aerospace and biomedical components because they permit to achieve a strong reduction of the buy-to-fly ratio. However, finishing machining operations are often necessary to reduce the uneven surface roughness and geometrics because of local missing accuracy. This work shows the influence of the cutting parameters, cutting speed and feed rate, on the cutting forces as well as on the thermal field observed in the cutting zone, during a turning operation carried out on bars made of Ti6Al4V obtained by the AM process called Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS). Moreover, the sub-surface microstructure alterations due to the process are also showed and commented.

  12. Design and Feasibility Testing of the truth FinishIt Tobacco Countermarketing Brand Equity Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Douglas; Rath, Jessica; Pitzer, Lindsay; Hair, Elizabeth C; Snider, Jeremy; Cantrell, Jennifer; Vallone, Donna

    2016-07-01

    The original truth campaign was a branded, national smoking prevention mass media effort focused on at-risk youth ages 12-17. Today the truth brand focuses on the goal of finishing tobacco (truth FinishIt). There have been significant changes in the tobacco control landscape, leading FinishIt to focus on 15- to 21-year-olds. The present article reports on formative research and media monitoring data collected to pilot test a new truth FinishIt brand equity scale. The goals of this study were to (a) content analyze truth FinishIt mass media ads, (b) assess truth's social media and followers' perceptions of truth's digital brand identity, and (c) develop and feasibility test a new version of the truth FinishIt brand equity scale using data from an existing Truth Initiative media monitoring study. Through factor analysis, we identified a brand equity scale, as in previous research, consisting of 4 main constructs: brand loyalty, leadership/satisfaction, personality, and awareness. Targeted truth attitudes and beliefs about social perceptions, acceptability, and industry-related beliefs were regressed on the higher order factor and each of the 4 individual brand equity factors. Ordinary least squares regression models generally showed associations in the expected directions (positive for anti-tobacco and negative for pro-tobacco) between targeted attitudes/beliefs and truth FinishIt brand equity. This study succeeded in developing and validating a new truth FinishIt brand equity scale. The scale may be a valuable metric for future campaign evaluation. Future studies should examine the effects of truth FinishIt brand equity on tobacco use behavioral outcomes over time.

  13. Fixed dental prostheses with vertical tooth preparations without finish lines: A report of two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Solá-Ruíz, María Fernanda; Chust, César; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Tooth abutments can be prepared to receive fixed dental prostheses with different types of finish lines. The literature reports different complications arising from tooth preparation techniques, including gingival recession. Vertical preparation without a finish line is a technique whereby the abutments are prepared by introducing a diamond rotary instrument into the sulcus to eliminate the cementoenamel junction and to create a new prosthetic cementoenamel junction determined by the prosthetic margin. This article describes 2 patients whose dental abutments were prepared to receive ceramic restorations using vertical preparation without a finish line. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A New Catalyst in the Crease Recovery Finishing of Silk Fabrics with Epoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-ming; SHEN Gan-qing

    2004-01-01

    The paper here intends to discuss silk crease recovery finishing behavior with ED GE (ethylene diglycidal ether) in the presence of a new catalyst WSH. The results show that ED GE reacts with silk fibroin and forms cross linkages through ether bond. The formation of cross linking was examined by FITR spectroscopy, soluble time in acid solution and changes of amino acids. Handle of treated silk with catalyst WSH is better than that of silk treated with the traditional catalysts such as thiosulfates and thiocyanates. Finishing technique, physical properties of the finished silk fabrics and evaluation of cross linkages are discussed.

  15. Synthesis of Fluorocyclotriphosphazene Derivatives and Their Fire-Retardant Finishing on Cotton Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhanxiong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel fire-retardant agents, fluorocyclotriphosphazene derivatives with the substitution groups of 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy groups were synthesized using hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene and 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropyl alcohol as starting materials. The synthesized fire-retardant agent was emulsified and applied on the cotton fabric finishing to reduce the flammability and afford water/oil repellency simultaneously. The optimum finishing process was achieved according to the test of cotton finishing with fluorocyclotriphosphazene. The treated cotton showed not only excellent fire-retardant performance, but also water and oil repellency with little change in strength and whiteness.

  16. Interaction of dispersed polyvynil acetate with silicate in finishing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runova, R. F.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the processes of interaction between calcium silicate hydrates and dispersed polyvinyl acetate in tight films with the aim of developing compounds meant for restoration and finishing works. The basis of this development relies on the concept concerning the determining role of the crystal-chemical factor of the silicate phase in the formation of organic-mineral compounds of increased durability. The characteristics of dispersed calcium silicate hydrates are portrayed. The preparation conditions, accounting for the synthesis of the product of submicrocrystalline structure, conforming with the stoichiometry CaO∙SiO2 =0.8-2.0 have been determined. The interaction has been studied for compounds achieved by mixing ingredients in a rapid whirling mixer, and subjected to hardening at T=20+2 T. With the aid of XRD, DTA and Infra-Red Spectrometry methods the formation process of the sophisticated polymer silicate phase in the material was observed for a period of 90 days. The properties of the film were investigated and its high resistance against the influence of external factors was established. On this basis a conclusion concerning the quite high effectiveness of substituting portland cement with dispersed calcium silicate hydrate in polymer cement compounds has been made. White colour and other various special properties determine the suitability for repair and finishing works on facades of buildings.

    Este artículo está orientado a estudiar los procesos de interacción entre los silicatos cálcicos hidratados y el acetato de polivinilo disperso en capas impermeables, con el objeto de desarrollar compuestos destinados para la restauración. El fundamento de estos estudios es determinar el papel que los factores cristaloquímicos de las fases silicato tienen en la formación de compuestos órganominerales de elevada durabilidad. Se han descrito las características de los silicatos cálcicos hidratados

  17. A novel photo-grafting of acrylamide onto carboxymethyl starch. 1. Utilization of CMS-g-PAAm in easy care finishing of cotton fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Manal A

    2016-11-05

    The photosensitized grafting of vinyl monomers onto a range of polymeric substrates has been the subject of particular interest in the recent past. Carboxymethyl starch (CMS)-poly acrylamide (PAAm) graft copolymer (CMS-g-PAAm) with high graft yield was successfully prepared by grafting of acrylamide onto CMS using UV irradiation in the presence of the water soluble 4-(trimethyl ammoniummethyl) benzophenone chloride photoinitiator. CMS-g-PAAm with nitrogen content of 8.3% and grafting efficiency up to 98.9% was obtained using 100% AAm, a material: liquor ratio of 1:14 and 1% photinitiator at 30°C for 1h of UV irradiation. The synthesis of CMS-g-PAAm was confirmed by FTIR and Nitrogen content (%). Surface morphology of CMS and surface morphological changes of CMS after grafting with AAm were studied using SEM. Thermal properties of both CMS and CMS-g-PAAm were studied using TGA and DSC. To impart easy care finishing to cotton fabrics, aqueous formulations of: CMS-g-PAAm, dimethylol dihydroxy ethylene urea (DMDHEU), CMS-g-PAAm-DMDHEU mixture or methylolated CMS-g-PAAm were used. Cotton fabrics were padded in these formulations, squeezed to a wet pick up 100%, dried at 100°C for 5min, cured at 150°C for 5min, washed at 50°C for 10min and air-dried. CRA (crease recovery angle) of untreated fabrics and fabrics finished with a mixture of 2% CMS-g-PAAm and 10% DMDHEU or methylolated CMS-g-PAAm (10% formaldehyde) were: 136°, 190°, 288° respectively. Increasing the number of washing cycles up to five cycles results in an insignificant decrease in the CRA and a significant decrease in RF (releasable formaldehyde) of finished fabric samples. The morphologies of the finished and unfinished cotton fabrics were performed by SEM.

  18. Fluid jet polishing of optical surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fähnle, O.W.; Brug, H. van; Frankena, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    We present a new finishing process that is capable of locally shaping and polishing optical surfaces of complex shapes. A fluid jet system is used to guide a premixed slurry at pressures less than 6 bars to the optical surface. We used a slurry comprising water and 10% #800 SiC abrasives (21.8 μm to

  19. Traceable surface characterization using replica moulding technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasparin, Stefania; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tosello, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of ultra-finely finished surfaces (e.g. mirrored surfaces or polished specimens) is nowadays challenging due to possible part damage if a contact instrument is used or due to scattered light if the measurements are performed with optical instruments. In order to prevent these pro...

  20. The Affordable Pre-Finishing of Silicon Carbide for Optical Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Creare proposes to develop a novel, laser-assisted, pre-finishing process for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coated silicon-carbide ceramics. Our innovation will...

  1. Conservation of filtering in manufacturing systems with unreliable machines and finished goods buffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingshan Li

    2006-01-01

    nature of manufacturing systems, this law offers a tool for selecting the smallest, that is, lean, finished goods buffering, which is necessary and sufficient to ensure the desired level ofcustomer demand satisfaction.

  2. DESIGN OF FILL AND FINISH FACILITY FOR ACTIVE PHARMACEUTICAL INGREDIENTS (API

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUUR LAILA KHAIRUDDIN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fill and finish operations continue to be one of the most heavily outsourced activities in the biopharmaceutical manufacturing market today. There are a few aspects that need to be consider in outsource activities like logistic, storage condition, facility certification and audit as regulations and standards which the manufacturer should adhere. Risk would be greater and extra care should be taken when outsource from foreign fill and finish facility. Thus, the internal aseptic fill and finish facility with audit checklist will help to minimize the risk during logistic and storage and also minimize the cost for outsource fill and finish facility. The data collections are through survey and conceptual design with simulation as the execution part.

  3. Field tests of the first complete solar heating successfully finished; Feldtests erster Solarkomplettheizung erfolgreich abgeschlossen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranich, Kerstin [Westfa, Hagen (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    Recently, the field tests of a new complete solar heating system could successfully be finished. The heating system obtains a primary energy saving of up to 60 % by means of a covering degree of 85 % by renewable energy sources. The effective combination of new hybrid solar heat collectors, a heat pump, a combination buffer memory and an ice latent heat storage finished the test phase and comes to the market in a few weeks.

  4. Machining of Complex Sculptured Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The machining of complex sculptured surfaces is a global technological topic in modern manufacturing with relevance in both industrialized and emerging in countries particularly within the moulds and dies sector whose applications include highly technological industries such as the automotive and aircraft industry. Machining of Complex Sculptured Surfaces considers new approaches to the manufacture of moulds and dies within these industries. The traditional technology employed in the manufacture of moulds and dies combined conventional milling and electro-discharge machining (EDM) but this has been replaced with  high-speed milling (HSM) which has been applied in roughing, semi-finishing and finishing of moulds and dies with great success. Machining of Complex Sculptured Surfaces provides recent information on machining of complex sculptured surfaces including modern CAM systems and process planning for three and five axis machining as well as explanations of the advantages of HSM over traditional methods ra...

  5. Finishing genomes with limited resources: lessons from an ensemble of microbial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishop-Lilly Kimberly A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While new sequencing technologies have ushered in an era where microbial genomes can be easily sequenced, the goal of routinely producing high-quality draft and finished genomes in a cost-effective fashion has still remained elusive. Due to shorter read lengths and limitations in library construction protocols, shotgun sequencing and assembly based on these technologies often results in fragmented assemblies. Correspondingly, while draft assemblies can be obtained in days, finishing can take many months and hence the time and effort can only be justified for high-priority genomes and in large sequencing centers. In this work, we revisit this issue in light of our own experience in producing finished and nearly-finished genomes for a range of microbial species in a small-lab setting. These genomes were finished with surprisingly little investments in terms of time, computational effort and lab work, suggesting that the increased access to sequencing might also eventually lead to a greater proportion of finished genomes from small labs and genomics cores.

  6. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of finishing techniques on IRM and EBA retrofillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, E L; Steiman, H R

    1997-07-01

    Various techniques have been advocated for finishing retrofilling materials. This study evaluated marginal interfaces between tooth structure and the retrofilling material following three techniques of finishing IRM and EBA. This interface was evaluated for the presence of flash and for adaptation to the prepared canal walls. Thirty-one teeth were divided into six groups of five and one control. The teeth were instrumented to a minimum of a 35 K-file, obturated with gutta-percha, resected perpendicular to their long axes and ultrasonically prepared to receive a retrofilling. The teeth were filled with either IRM or EBA cement and finished by ball burnishing, burnishing with a moistened cotton pellet, or with a carbide finishing bur in a high-speed handpiece with air/water spray. Photomicrographs were made and examined by four evaluators. Retrofillings finished with a finishing bur displayed significantly better marginal adaptation and little evidence of flash when compared to the other techniques (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between ball burnished or moistened cotton pellet techniques or between retrofilling materials used in this study (p < 0.05).

  7. EUROMET SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON - SURFACE TEXTURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenders, L.; Andreasen, Jan Lasson; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    At the length meeting in Prague in Oct. 1999 a new comparison was suggested on surface texture. The last comparison on this field was finished in 1989. In the meantime the instrumentation, the standards and the written standards have been improved including some software filters. The pilot...... laboratories for this supplementary comparison on surface texture are the Centre for Geometrical Metrology at the Technical University of Denmark and the Micro- and Nanotopography laboratory at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany....

  8. The use of gluten adhesive and removable surface finishes in recyclable furniture panels

    OpenAIRE

    Trischler, Johann; Sandberg, Dick; Noszkowski, Calle

    2015-01-01

    A general problem in the recycling of furniture is that different materials and components areincluded within a single piece of furniture. Not only is the furniture built of components such as wood,leather, textiles, foams, steel and others but the wood component is also very often a composite madeof wood, adhesives and functional additives such as water repellents or chemical substances assurface treatments. Sometimes these additives make cost-effective recycling of the composite wooddifficu...

  9. Low-Stress Silicon Cladding for Surface Finishing Large UVOIR Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I research, ZeCoat Corporation will develop an affordable, low-stress silicon cladding process which is super-polishable for large UVOIR mirrors. The...

  10. Biomaterial-Associated Infection : Locating the Finish Line in the Race for the Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Jutte, Paul C.; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Grainger, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections occur on both permanent implants and temporary devices for restoration or support of human functions. Despite increasing use of biomaterials in an aging society, comparatively few biomaterials have been designed that effectively reduce the incidence of biomaterial-a

  11. Factors Influencing Material Removal And Surface Finish Of The Polishing Of Silica Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    autoclave . The growth is typically in the z-direction, and the bars are lumbered to generate the appropriate crystal orientation blanks, although the...liquid state. Thus, it does not crystallize , and forms a material with no long range crystalline order. Glasses are generally considered supercooled...e.g. coesite, cristobalite , stishovite, and tridymite) and is optically uni-axial along the z-axis (growth axis) [15]. The silica tetrahedrons are

  12. Effect of sow history features on growth and feed intake in grow-finish pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell-Kubiak, E; Knol, E F; Bijma, P

    2012-01-01

    The sow provides a specific environment to her offspring during gestation and lactation. Certain features in the early life of the sow (sow history features) may affect her ability to deliver and feed a healthy litter. In genetic analyses of grow-finish traits, these effects are estimated as common litter or permanent sow effects. The objective of this research was to identify sow history features that affect the growth rate (GR) and feed intake (FI) of her offspring during the grow-finish stage. Data from 17,743 grow-finish pigs, coming from 604 sires and 681 crossbred sows, were recorded between May 2001 and February 2010 at the experimental farm of the Institute for Pig Genetics (Beilen, the Netherlands). The grow-finish stage was divided into 2 phases (phase 1: 26 to 75 kg; phase 2: 75 to 115 kg). The sow history features were birth litter size, birth year and season, birth farm, weaning age, age of transfer to the experimental farm, and age at first insemination. The sow features were added to the basic model one at a time to study their effect on the grow-finish traits of the pigs. Subsequently, significant sow features (P finish pigs by 0.1 g/d. The heritability estimates for GR and FI (only in phase 2 of the grow-finish stage) decreased after adding the sow features to the model. No differences were found in estimates of the common litter effects between the basic model and the model with all significant sow features. The estimates of the permanent sow effect changed for FI from 0.03 (basic model) to 0.00 (model with sow features), and for FI in phase 1, the permanent sow effect decreased from 0.03 (basic model) to 0.01 (model with sow features). In conclusion, selected sow features do affect the grow-finish traits of the pigs, but their estimates are small and explain only a small proportion of the differences in the GR and FI of grow-finish pigs. The sow features partially explained the permanent sow effect of FI-related traits and did not explain the

  13. SECTION 6.2 SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seah, M. P.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilometry...... representing some average property of the surface under examination. Measurement methods, as well as their application and limitations, are briefly reviewed, including standardisation and traceability issues....

  14. Experimental evaluation of the growth rate of mould on finishes for indoor housing environments: Effects of the 2002/91/EC directive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Orazio, Marco; Palladini, Marco [Department of Architecture Construction and Structures - DACS, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Aquilanti, Lucia; Clementi, Francesca [Department of Food Science, Agricultural-Engineering, Physics, Agricultural Economics and Landscape Science - SAIFET, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2009-08-15

    We report the results of a study to evaluate the growth rate of three species of mould on plasters, finishes and paints typically used in structures with heavy weight building envelopes. The aim was to determine the influence of the chemical composition (in terms of organic fraction of the materials) on the growth rate of moulds. The study was carried out in the following steps: - characterization of materials; - inoculation of mould spores (3 species) on 7 types of material (2 plasters, 3 finishes, 2 paints); - growth in a climatic chamber (23 C and 90% RH); - analysis of the mould growth rate using various experimental techniques (fluorescence microscopy analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, etc.). Results show a clear correlation between the organic substances contained in paints, plasters and finishes and the growth rate of the mould. This study is part of a more general research program which addresses the effects on indoor environment air quality based on the European directive 2002/91/EC. This directive specifically indicates that energy consumption in buildings should be limited and sets threshold values for the thermal resistance of the building walls and windows. As a consequence window manufacturers are improving the thermal property of windows by reducing the air permeability, which may increase the indoor and surface relative humidity percentage (RH%) and lead to the development of mould in the indoor environments. (author)

  15. 40 CFR 425.30 - Applicability; description of the hair save or pulp, non-chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... save or pulp, non-chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory. 425.30 Section 425.30 Protection of... FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hair Save or Pulp, Non-Chrome Tan, Retan-Wet Finish Subcategory § 425.30 Applicability; description of the hair save or pulp, non-chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory. The...

  16. Effects of PCB Pad Metal Finishes on the Cu-Pillar/Sn-Ag Micro Bump Joint Reliability of Chip-on-Board (COB) Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsoon; Lee, Seyong; Shin, Ji-won; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2016-06-01

    While solder bumps have been used as the bump structure to form the interconnection during the last few decades, the continuing scaling down of devices has led to a change in the bump structure to Cu-pillar/Sn-Ag micro-bumps. Cu-pillar/Sn-Ag micro-bump interconnections differ from conventional solder bump interconnections in terms of their assembly processing and reliability. A thermo-compression bonding method with pre-applied b-stage non-conductive films has been adopted to form solder joints between Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps and printed circuit board vehicles, using various pad metal finishes. As a result, various interfacial inter-metallic compounds (IMCs) reactions and stress concentrations occur at the Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps joints. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the influence of pad metal finishes on the structural reliability of fine pitch Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps flip chip packaging. In this study, four different pad surface finishes (Thin Ni ENEPIG, OSP, ENEPIG, ENIG) were evaluated in terms of their interconnection reliability by thermal cycle (T/C) test up to 2000 cycles at temperatures ranging from -55°C to 125°C and high-temperature storage test up to 1000 h at 150°C. The contact resistances of the Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bump showed significant differences after the T/C reliability test in the following order: thin Ni ENEPIG > OSP > ENEPIG where the thin Ni ENEPIG pad metal finish provided the best Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bump interconnection in terms of bump joint reliability. Various IMCs formed between the bump joint areas can account for the main failure mechanism.

  17. Fatigue and fracture resistance of zirconia crowns prepared with different finish line designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of finish line design on the fatigue, fracture resistance, and failure type of veneered zirconia restorations. A CAD/CAM system (Cercon) was used to prepare zirconia frameworks (0.5 mm thick) for a maxillary central incisor. Three finish line designs were evaluated: a complete narrow chamfer, a narrow chamfer with a lingual ledge, and a complete ledge. The prepared frameworks were veneered using a press-on ceramic (Ceram Press) and were cemented on the corresponding prepared teeth using a resin cement (Panavia F2.0). The cemented specimens were thermocycled, subjected to dynamic fatigue, and finally loaded till fracture. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to assess fracture type. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used to analyze the data (α= 0.05). The finish line design did not have any significant statistical influence on the fracture resistance (F = 1.9, p= 0.346) or on the failure type of the tested specimens. Adjusted R squared value (R = 0.049) indicated a weak correlation between finish line design and fracture load of the tested specimens. All specimens failed due to cracking and fracture of the veneer ceramic. Meanwhile, the framework remained entirely intact. Three narrow chamfer finish line specimens demonstrated adhesive fracture of the veneer ceramic during dynamic fatigue testing, related to overextension of the veneer ceramic during the layering procedure. Within the limitations of this study, the finish line design did not influence the fatigue or the fracture resistance of veneered zirconia crowns. Selection of any of the finish line designs should be based on the clinical condition of the restored tooth. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Influence of way of finishing furniture segments on amount emissions VOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Čech

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the influence of way of finishing furniture segments on amount emissions VOCs (volatile organic compounds. The so-called Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC are among the largest pollution sources of both the internal and external environments.VOC is defined as emission of any organic compound or a mixture thereof, with the exception of methane, whereby the compound exerts the pressure of 0.01 kPa or more at the temperature of 20 °C (293.15 K and reaches the corresponding volatility under the specific conditions of its use and can undergo photochemical reactions with nitrogen oxides when exposed to solar radiation. The effects of VOC upon environment can be described by equation: VOC + NOx + UV radiation + heat = tropospheric ozone (O3In this work there were tested MDF (medium density fibreboard coated by resin impregnated paper was used for the furniture components’ production. Next were tested compressed wood, which was used as a second material of furniture components. These both chosen materials was covered by resin impregnated paper and than sequentially finished by regular coat of finish.An attention of this study is especially put on mentioned factors and on quantity of instant and long-term VOCs emissions emitted from furniture components.The amount of emissions from furniture components, in different phases of the preparation including the resin impregnated paper coating finish, was monitored within the time intervals of 24 hours and 720 hours starting after the time of the finish preparation.The MDF (medium density fibreboard coated by resin impregnated paper was used for the furniture components´ production.A compressed wood was used as a second material of furniture components. This alternative material was covered by resin impregnated paper and than sequentially finished by regular coat of finish.

  19. Distribution of Salmonella serovars in breeding, nursery, and grow-to-finish pigs, and risk factors for shedding in ten farrow-to-finish swine farms in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Wendy; Rajić, Andrijana; Waldner, Cheryl; McFall, Margaret; Chow, Eva; Muckle, Anne; Rosengren, Leigh

    2010-04-01

    The study objectives were to investigate Salmonella prevalence, serovar distribution, and risk factors for shedding in 10 purposively selected farrow-to-finish farms in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Pooled fecal samples from the breeding and grow-finish phases and individual fecal samples from breeding, nursery, and grow-finish pigs were cultured for Salmonella; serotyping of isolates was performed. Pig and pen characteristics were recorded for each pig and pen sampled.Overall, 407/1143 (36%) of samples were Salmonella positive; within-farm prevalence ranged from 1% to 79%. Sows, nursery, and grow-finish pigs accounted for 43%, 29%, and 28% of positive samples, respectively. More Salmonella were detected in pooled pen than individual pig samples (P finisher (OR 2.9, P finish farms and should be targeted in control efforts. The latter might also apply to the use of pelleted feed, which remains the most consistently reported significant risk factor for Salmonella shedding in pigs.

  20. The Effect of Various Finish Line Configurations on the Marginal Seal and Occlusal Discrepancy of Cast Full Crowns After Cementation - An In-vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemane, Vaishali; Akulwar, Ravikumar Suryakanth; Meshram, Suresh

    2015-08-01

    The marginal fit of crowns is of clinical importance. It is found that marginal and occlusal discrepancies are commonly increased following cementation. The resistance of cementing materials is a factor that prevents cast restorations from being correctly seated. Different finish lines behave differently in facilitating the escape of the cement. When the escape path of the cement decreases, the crown fails to seat further. This study was planned with an aim to evaluate the effect of various finish lines on the marginal seal and occlusal seat of full crown preparations. Six stainless steel metal dies were machined to simulate molar crown preparations. The diameter was 10 mm and height was 6mm. The occlusal surface was kept flat and a small circular dimple was machined for reorientation of the wax pattern and metal copings, margins of various designs were machined accurately. The margins prepared were Group A- 90(0)C shoulder, Group B- Rounded shoulder, Group C- 45 degree sloped shoulder, Group D- Chamfer, Group E- Long chamfer, Group F- Feather edge. Full cast metal crowns of base metal alloy were fabricated over the metal dies. Zinc phosphate luting cement was used for the cementation. After twenty four hours, the cemented crown and die assembly were embedded in clear acrylic resin so as to hold the assembly together while sectioning. Twenty four hours later, all the samples were sectioned sagitally. The sectioned halves were focused under a stereomicroscope and the cement spaces were measured to the nearest micron. The cement thickness was measured at two points on the occlusal surface and one at each margin. Significant differences were observed in the occlusal seat and marginal seal of all the finish line configurations. The rounded shoulder had the best occlusal seat, followed by 90(0)C shoulder. The occlusal seat and marginal seal afforded by the shoulder finish lines were similar whereas there was a vast difference in the seating and sealing of long chamfer

  1. Investigation of Surface Preparations to Enhance Photon Doppler Velocimetry Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Illustration depicting differences between a specular reflector (left) and a diffuse reflector (right). Solid blue arrows portray incident light rays and...explain the results obtained. When a surface is finished with a smooth, flat finish the reflection pattern tends toward that of a specular reflector...between a specular reflector (left) and a diffuse reflector (right). Solid blue arrows portray incident light rays and dashed red arrows portray

  2. The effects of scaling and root planing on the marginal gap and microleakage of indirect composite crowns prepared with different finish lines: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angerame, D; Sorrentino, R; Cettolin, D; Zarone, F

    2012-01-01

    The present in vitro study aimed to assess the effects of root surface mechanical instrumentation on the marginal integrity and adaptation of resin composite crowns. The following null hypotheses were tested: no differences exist between finish line and 1) marginal gap or 2) marginal microleakage before and after manual mechanical periodontal maintenance. A total of 56 intact human mandibular molars were randomly distributed into four groups and subjected to standardized tooth preparations for indirect composite crowns with different marginal finish lines (90° shoulder, beveled 90° shoulder, feather edge, chamfer). One-half of the specimens was used as a control and remained untreated, and the remaining half was subjected to root surface procedures simulating five years of semestral mechanical supportive periodontal treatment. The marginal gap and microleakage were evaluated and statistically analyzed. The specimens used as controls showed lower mean marginal gaps than those subjected to the simulated periodontal treatment, whereas the latter showed lower microleakage than the control crowns. Statistically significant differences were recorded for both the experimental variables. The root surface procedures resulted in altered surfaces of the composite crowns. The marginal gap increased after the treatment, whereas the marginal microleakage was reduced. The 90° shoulder and the chamfer preparation could be considered a viable option to fabricate composite crowns, but the beveled 90° shoulder and the feather edge should not be recommended.

  3. Finisher and performance trends in female and male mountain ultramarathoners by age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüst CA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Christoph Alexander Rüst,1 Beat Knechtle,1,2 Evelyn Eichenberger,1 Thomas Rosemann,1 Romuald Lepers31Institute of General Practice and for Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 3French Institute of Health and Medical Research, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Burgundy, Dijon, FranceBackground: This study examined changes according to age group in the number of finishers and running times for athletes in female and male mountain ultramarathoners competing in the 78 km Swiss Alpine Marathon, the largest mountain ultramarathon in Europe and held in high alpine terrain.Methods: The association between age and performance was investigated using analysis of variance and both single and multilevel regression analyses.Results: Between 1998 and 2011, a total of 1,781 women and 12,198 men finished the Swiss Alpine Marathon. The number of female finishers increased (r2 = 0.64, P = 0.001, whereas the number of male finishers (r2 = 0.18, P = 0.15 showed no change. The annual top ten men became older and slower, whereas the annual top ten women became older but not slower. Regarding the number of finishers in the age groups, the number of female finishers decreased in the age group 18–24 years, whereas the number of finishers increased in the age groups 30–34, 40–44, 45–49, 50–54, 55–59, 60–64, and 70–74 years. In the age groups 25–29 and 35–39 years, the number of finishers showed no changes across the years. In the age group 70–74 years, the increase in number of finishers was linear. For all other age groups, the increase was exponential. For men, the number of finishers decreased in the age groups 18–24, 25–29, 30–34, and 35–39 years. In the age groups 40–44, 45–49, 50–54, 55–59, 60–64, 70–74, and 75–79 years, the number of finishers increased. In the age group 40–44 years, the increase was linear. For all other age groups, the

  4. Cross-Cultural Consumer Acceptability and Purchase Intent of Forage-Finished Rib-Eye Steaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrico, Damir Dennis; Wardy, Wisdom; Pujols, Kairy Dharali; Carabante, Kennet Mariano; Jirangrat, Wannita; Scaglia, Guillermo; Janes, Marlene E; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon

    2015-10-01

    Rib-eye steaks, from 3 forage-finished systems (S1, S2, and S3) and 1 commercial steak (C), either cooked by 1-sided-grilling or 2-sided-grilling, were evaluated for sensory acceptability [overall appearance (ORA) and overall appearance of fat (OAF) for raw steaks; overall appearance (OCA), overall beef aroma (OBA), overall beef flavor (OBF), juiciness, tenderness and overall liking (OL) for cooked steaks] and purchase intent by Hispanic, Asian and U.S. consumers. They also indicated preferred degree of doneness and cooking methods. Cross-cultural differences in preferences and consumer acceptability of rib-eye steaks were observed. Grilling was the most preferred cooking method. Hispanics and Asians preferred medium and/or medium well, while U.S. consumers preferred medium and/or medium rare. For cooked steaks, the population effect was significant for all sensory attributes; Asians generally scored lower than did Hispanics and U.S. consumers. C and S3 generally had higher scores for all sensory attributes across 3 populations. Purchase intent for all forage-finished steaks was higher for Hispanics and U.S. consumers compared to Asians (50.0% to 77.8% compared with 43.2% to 65.9%). Attributes influencing purchase intent of forage-finished steaks differed among populations: tenderness (odds ratio = 1.4) for Hispanics, OCA (odds ratio = 1.5) for Asians, and OBF (odds ratio = 1.3) for U.S. consumers. Overall, this study demonstrated that the type of forage-finished system and ethnic differences influenced sensory acceptability and purchase intent of forage-finished rib-eye steaks. Demand for forage-finished beef has increased worldwide due to its potential health benefits. Little is known regarding the cross-cultural effects on the consumer acceptance of forage-finished beef. We evaluated sensory acceptance and purchase intent of raw and cooked forage-finished rib-eye steaks using Hispanic, Asian, and U.S. (White and African American) populations. This study

  5. Surface treatment method for cladding tube of LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suda, Yoshitaka; Matsumoto, Kunio; Ito, Kenji.

    1994-06-07

    Upon surface finishing by polishing, shot peening or blasting is applied on the outer surface of a cladding tube to eliminate orientation of residual stresses on the surface layer in order to eliminate residual stresses formed on the outer surface in the circumferential direction. This can suppress occurrence of cracks in oxide membranes formed on the outer surface to suppress development of corrosion on the outer surface irrespective of the ingredient composition of fuel cladding tube made of zircaloy. (T.M.).

  6. Durable Nanolayer Graft Polymerization of Functional Finishes Using Atmospheric Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloumpour, Maryam

    Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma were investigated in conjunction with different chemistries on nonwoven materials including spunbond polyester (PET) and spunbod polypropylene for fuel separation and antimicrobial functionalities. Hydrophobic/Oleophobic properties were conferred on nonwoven polyester (PET) via plasma-induced graft polymerization of different hydrophobic non-C8 perfluorocarbon chemistry including perfluorohexylethylmethacrylate, perfluorohexylethylacrylate, allylpentafluorobenzene, pentafluorostyrene, or 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane in the vapor form using both in-situ and down-stream plasma configurations. Different nanolayers of the grafted polymer were furnished on nonwovens to generate surfaces with different level of wettabilities for medical applications and water/fuel separation. The effect of various hydrophobic chemistry, different plasma conditions, and plasma device parameters including plasma power and plasma exposure time were studied and the performance was characterized by measuring the contact angle and the wettability rating against liquids with broad range of surface tensions. Vapor deposition of 2-(perfluorohexyl)ethyl methacrylate and pentafluorostyrene on nonwoven PET followed by plasma-induced graft polymerization was investigated for possible use in water/fuel separation. Different nanolayer thicknesses (80-180nm) of the grafted polymer were achieved to generate surfaces with different wettabilities for water/fuel separation of different fuel compositions. The effect of different plasma conditions and device parameters including the flow rate of monomers, power of the device, and time of plasma exposure on the separation of different fuels was studied and characterized by measuring the surface energy of the treated substrates. The surface chemistry and morphology of the treated samples were characterized using XPS, SEM and TOF-SIMS techniques which confirmed the grafting of monomer onto the substrate

  7. A European longitudinal study in Salmonella seronegative and seropositive-classified finishing pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Dahl, J.; Wingstrand, Anne;

    2004-01-01

    in pig herds. For this purpose, 17 finishing pig herds initially classified as seropositive and 15 as seronegative, were followed for a 2-year period through serological and bacteriological sampling. The study included 10 herds from Denmark, 13 from The Netherlands, 4 from Germany and 5 from Sweden...... and was performed between October 1996 and May 1999. The Salmonella status of finishing pig herds was determined by an initial blood sampling of approximately 50 finishing pigs close to market weight per herd. The development of the Salmonella status of the selected herds was assessed at seven subsequent sampling.......0, 95 % CI 3.2-32.8). When Salmonella was isolated from pen faecal samples, the herd was more likely to be classified seropositive in the same sampling round, compared to no Salmonella being detected (OR 4.0, 95 % CI 1.1-14.6). The stability of an initially allocated Salmonella status was found to vary...

  8. Ultrasounds: an industrial solution to optimise costs, environmental requests and quality for textile finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouters, Moïse; Rumeau, Pascal; Tierce, Pascal; Costes, Sandrine

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasounds are widely used at industrial scale for cleaning of mechanical pieces for example. Potential applications exist for finishing of textiles. This work aimed to improve traditional textile finishing processes thanks to ultrasound. The technical objective was to develop specific applicators of ultrasonic energy which could be adapted on jigger, a widespread textile finishing machine. Laboratory studies have allowed to define the conditions for application of ultrasounds and check their effects on fibre structure, validated by trials in dynamic conditions. Ultrasound technology makes it possible to intensify the phenomena of diffusion and washing by the effect of cavitation and improves effectiveness of traditional washing treatments. Industrial ultrasound processes need further optimisation on industrial machines.

  9. Effects of finishing rolling temperatures and reduction on the mechanical properties of hot rolled multiphase steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhuang; WU Di

    2007-01-01

    Effects of finishing rolling temperatures and reduction on the mechanical properties of hot rolled multiphase steel were investigated. Thermo-mechanical control processing (TMCP) was conducted by using a laboratory hot rolling mill, in which three different kinds of finishing rolling temperatures and reduction and various austempering times were applied. The results showed that polygonal ferrite, granular bainite and larger amount of stabilized retained austenite can be obtained by controlled rolling processes, and that the strain-induced transformation to martensite from the retained austenite can occur gradually when the steel is deformed during tensile test. Mechanical properties increase with decreasing finishing rolling temperature and increasing amount of deformation. The most TRIP (transformation induced plasticity) effect, and ultimate tensile strength (UTS), total elongation (TEL) and the product of ultimate tensile strength and total elongation (UTS× TEL) are obtained at 20 min.

  10. Growing and slaughtering performance of Apennine heavy lamb finished at pasture in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Cestola

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-six Apennine male lambs were allotted into 2 groups, under different finishing systems: group P (maximum pasture allowance and group S (intensive finishing. Lambs were slaughtered either at 30 kg of weight or at 110 days of age (in case they couldn’t reach final weight because of a sharp decline in pasture productivity in summer. Post-weaning ADG were significantly higher in the S group (about 77 g/d and P lambs had lower weights, dressing percentage (due to higher gastro-intestinal apparatus content and SEUROP conformation scores. Finishing lambs at pasture could have better results after an early weaning or using different mating strategies to escape the dramatic fall in pasture dry matter availability during summer.

  11. Influence of Edge Rolling Reduction on Plate-Edge Stress Distribution During Finish Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hai-liang; LIU Xiang-hua; CHEN Li-qing; LI Chang-sheng; ZHI Ying; LI Xin-wen

    2009-01-01

    Dimensions of one kind of stainless steel plate before finish rolling were obtained through analysis of the rough rolling processes by finite element method and updated geometrical method.The FE models of finish rolling process with a front edge roll were built,and influences of the edge rolling reduction on-the stress change in the plate edge during finish roiling were analyzed.The results show that when the edge rolling reduction is increased from 0 mm to 2 ram,the compressive stress in plate corner clearly increases in edge rolling process,and the zone of tensile stress during whole rolling decreases;when the edge rolling reduction is increased from 2 mm to 5 mm,the compressive stress in the plate corner seldom changes,and the compressive stress decreases after the horizontal rolling.

  12. The association between measurements of antimicrobial use and resistance in the faeces microbiota of finisher batches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff Andersen, Vibe; de Knegt, Leonardo; Munk, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were to present three approaches for calculating antimicrobial (AM) use in pigs that take into account the rearing period and rearing site, and to study the association between these measurements and phenotypical resistance and abundance of resistance genes in faeces samples from 10...... finisher batches. The AM use was calculated relative to the rearing period of the batches as (i) 'Finisher Unit Exposure' at unit level, (ii) 'Lifetime Exposure' at batch level and (iii) 'Herd Exposure' at herd level. A significant effect on the occurrence of tetracycline resistance measured by cultivation...... effect was observed on the occurrence of genes coding for the AM resistance classes: aminoglycoside, lincosamide, macrolide, β-lactam, sulfonamide and tetracycline. No effect was observed for Finisher Unit Exposure. Overall, the study shows that Lifetime Exposure is an efficient measurement of AM use...

  13. Experimental Study on Surface Roughness by Using Abrasive Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K.Chaitanya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available New advancement of technology and never satisfying demands of the civilization are putting huge pressure on the natural fuel resources and these resources are at a constant threat to its sustainability. Surface finish has a vital influence on functional properties such as wear resistance and power loss due to friction on most of the engineering components. Voltage, mesh number, revolutions per minute (rpm of electromagnet, and percentage weight of abrasives has been identified as important process parameters affecting surface roughness. The experiments were planned using response surface methodology and percentage change in surface roughness (ΔRa was considered as response. Analysis of experimental data showed that percentage change in surface roughness (ΔRa was highly influenced by mesh number followed by percentage weight of abrasives, rpm of electromagnet, and voltage. The process has been investigated extensively in the finishing of cylindrical surfaces. The surface finish was found to improve significantly with an increase in the grain size, relative size of abrasive particles vis-à-vis the iron particles, feed rate and current. Super finishing is a micro-finishing process that produces a controlled and smooth surface condition on work pieces. It is not primarily a sizing operation, its major purpose is to produce a surface on a work piece capable of sustaining uneven distribution of a load by improving the geometrical accuracy. The wear life of the parts micro finished to maximum smoothness is extended considerably. According to the design of experimentation, mathematical model for Lapping operation on advance ceramic material is proposed. In order to get minimum values of the surface roughness, optimization of the mathematical model is done and optimal operation of the examined factors is going to be determined. The obtained results will be, according to the experiment plan, valid for the testing of ceramic material by Lapping

  14. Comparison of two feeding finishing treatments on production and quality of organic beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Cozzi

    Full Text Available The study compared growth and slaughter performance and meat quality of organic beef cattle finished with or without pasture grazing. One group of 10 Limousin heifers was finished under confined conditions and fed ad libitum a total mixed ration based on maize silage, hay and cereal grains. A second group of 10 Limousin heifers rotationally grazed two contiguous pasture plots of 1.5 ha each with a daily supplementation of a concentrate mix based on cereal grains and roasted soybeans. Heifers were slaughtered at commercial finishing and meat quality traits were assessed on Longissimus thoracis muscle. The grazing group, due to a lower average daily gain (0.74 vs. 0.95 kg/day; P<0.05, required a prolonged finishing period (172 vs. 155 days; P<0.05 than the confined animals. Meat samples from grazing cattle were less tender (shear force: 3.92 vs. 3.24 kg/cm2; P<0.05 and showed a lower lightness (L*: 33.0 vs. 35.8; P<0.001 and a higher redness (15.4 vs. 13.7; P<0.01 and yellowness (15.6 vs. 14.6; P<0.05. Fatty acid composition of the intramuscular fat was significantly affected by the finishing system. Grazing heifers had a higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (4.06 vs. 3.66% of total fatty acids; P<0.05, conjugated linoleic acids (0.16 vs. 0.10% of total fatty acids; P<0.01 and ω-3 (0.44 vs. 0.30% of total fatty acids; P<0.001 than confined animals. The detrimental effects of pasture grazing on growth performance and on some important meat quality traits explain the limited adoption of this finishing system in organic beef production.

  15. Occurrence of anthropogenic organic compounds and nutrients in source and finished water in the Sioux Falls area, South Dakota, 2009-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogestraat, Galen K.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) in drinking-water sources commonly are derived from municipal, agricultural, and industrial wastewater sources, and are a concern for water-supply managers. A cooperative study between the city of Sioux Falls, S. Dak., and the U.S. Geological Survey was initiated in 2009 to (1) characterize the occurrence of anthropogenic organic compounds in the source waters (groundwater and surface water) to water supplies in the Sioux Falls area, (2) determine if the compounds detected in the source waters also are present in the finished water, and (3) identify probable sources of nitrate in the Big Sioux River Basin and determine if sources change seasonally or under different hydrologic conditions. This report presents analytical results of water-quality samples collected from source waters and finished waters in the Sioux Falls area. The study approach included the collection of water samples from source and finished waters in the Sioux Falls area for the analyses of AOCs, nutrients, and nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in nitrate. Water-quality constituents monitored in this study were chosen to represent a variety of the contaminants known or suspected to occur within the Big Sioux River Basin, including pesticides, pharmaceuticals, sterols, household and industrial products, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, antibiotics, and hormones. A total of 184 AOCs were monitored, of which 40 AOCs had relevant human-health benchmarks. During 11 sampling visits, 45 AOCs (24 percent) were detected in at least one sample of source or finished water, and 13 AOCs were detected in at least 20 percent of all samples. Concentrations of detected AOCs were all less than 1 microgram per liter, except for two AOCs in multiple samples from the Big Sioux River, and one AOC in finished-water samples. Concentrations of AOCs were less than 0.1 microgram per liter in more than 75 percent of the detections. Nutrient concentrations varied seasonally in source

  16. Aerobic Treatability of Waste Effluent from the Leather Finishing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    this section. The conditioning process is a totally physical process of mechanical stretching and tumbling . The conditioning process softens the hides...a moving conveyor belt that travels the length of the warehouse facility in and out of various spray booths and dryers . The first booth sprays an even...coat of water-based primer paint over the surface of the hide. The hide travels through a dryer to the second booth where it receives an even coat of

  17. A GREEN APPLICATION OF NANO SIZED CHITOSAN IN TEXTILE FINISHING

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHAN, Görkem; DEMİR, Aslı

    2016-01-01

    Wool fabrics are subjected to different surface modification methods in order to improve their hydrophilicity, dyeability, antimicrobial, shrinkproofing properties. Especially environmental friendly methods and application of biopolymers are gaining importance instead of conventional processes and textile chemicals. In this study, nanochitosan particles were synthesized, applied on wool fabrics and compared with bulk chitosan in terms of various properties. Ag-loade...

  18. Application of nanotechnology in antimicrobial finishing of biomedical textiles

    OpenAIRE

    Zille, Andrea; Almeida, Luís; Amorim, M. T. Pessoa de; CARNEIRO, Noémia; Esteves, M. de Fátima; Silva, Carla J. S. M.; Souto, A. Pedro

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the antimicrobial nanofinishing of biomedical textiles has become a very active, high-growth research field, assuming great importance among all available material surface modifications in the textile industry. This review offers the opportunity to update and critically discuss the latest advances and applications in this field. The survey suggests an emerging new paradigm in the production and distribution of nanoparticles for biomedical textile applications based on non-tox...

  19. Predicted concentrations in new relocatable classrooms of volatile organic compounds emitted from standard and alternate interior finish materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Fisk, William J.; Shendell, Derek G.; Apte, Michael G.

    2001-07-01

    Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are widely employed by California school districts to satisfy rapidly expanding space requirements due to population growth and class size reduction policies. There is public concern regarding indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in schools, particularly in RCs, but very little data to support or dispel these concerns. Several studies are investigating various aspects of IEQ in California schools. This laboratory-based study focused on evaluating the emissions of toxic and/or odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, from materials used to finish the interiors of new RCs. Furthermore, the study implemented a procedure for VOC source reduction by testing and selecting lower-emitting materials as substitutes for standard materials. In total, 17 standard and alternate floor coverings, wall panels and ceiling panels were quantitatively tested for emissions of VOCs using smallscale environmental chambers. Working with the largest northern California manufacturer of conventional RCs and two school districts, specifications were developed for four new RCs to be produced in early summer 2001. Two of these will be predominantly finished with standard materials. Alternate carpet systems, an alternate wall panel covering and an alternate ceiling panel were selected for the two other RCs based on the results of the laboratory study and considerations of cost and anticipated performance and maintenance. Particular emphasis was placed on reducing the concentrations of VOCs on California agency lists of toxic compounds. Indoor concentrations of toxic and odorous VOCs were estimated for the four classrooms by mass balance using the measured VOC emission factors, exposed surface areas of the materials in the RCs, and three ventilation rate scenarios. Results indicate that reductions in the concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde phenol, di(ethylene glycol) butyl ether, vinyl acetate, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene

  20. An object-oriented Bayesian network modeling the causes of leg disorders in finisher herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Birk; Kristensen, Anders Ringgaard; Toft, Nils

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of an effective control strategy against disease in a finisher herd requires knowledge regarding the disease level in the herd. A Bayesian network was constructed that can estimate risk indexes for three cause-categories of leg disorders in a finisher herd. The cause...... pigs (e.g. results from diagnostic tests) were used to estimate the most likely cause of leg disorders at herd level. As information to the model originated from two different levels, we used an object-oriented structure in order to ease the specification of the Bayesian network. Hence, a Herd class...

  1. Effects of finishing diet and pre-slaughter fasting time on meat quality in crossbred pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. PARTANEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the carbohydrate composition of finishing diet (fed from 80 to 107 kg of body weight and the length of pre-slaughter fasting on pork quality were studied in a 2 × 2 factorial experiment with 80 crossbred pigs. The control finishing diet was based on barley and soybean meal, and the fibrous finishing diet was based on barley, barley fibre, faba beans, and rapeseed cake. These diets contained 465 and 362 g starch and 177 and 250 g dietary fibre per kg, respectively. The fasting times of 25 and 41 h were obtained by giving the pigs their last meal at different times. Longer fasting lowered the glycolytic potential of the longissimus lumborum muscle (P = 0.01, whereas the finishing diet had no effect. Different muscles responded differently to the treatments. Longer fasting increased the ultimate pH of the semimembranosus muscle (P = 0.02, but did not affect that of the longissimus lumborum and semispinalis capitis muscles. The finishing diets did not affect the ultimate pH of the investigated muscles. A diet × fasting time interaction was seen in the lightness of the semimembranosus muscle (P = 0.05. The fibrous diet resulted in darker meat than the control diet did in pigs that were fasted for 25 h (P < 0.05. Longer fasting darkened the meat colour in pigs fed the fibrous diet (P < 0.05 but not in those fed the control diet. The meat from the semispinalis capitis muscle was darker in pigs fed the fibrous than those fed the control diet (P = 0.04. The treatments did not affect the colour of the longissimus lumborum muscle. Longer fasting decreased drip loss from the meat of pigs fed the control diet (P < 0.05. The eating quality of the pork was not influenced by the finishing diets or the fasting time. The pigs also grew equally fast on both finishing diets. In conclusion, a moderate alteration in the carbohydrate composition of a finishing diet or longer pre-slaughter fasting can have some effects on pork quality in crossbred pigs

  2. Digital Restoration from Start to Finish How to repair old and damaged photographs

    CERN Document Server

    Ctein,

    2010-01-01

    Digital Restoration: Start to Finish 2nd edition guides you step-by-step through the entire process of restoring old photographs and repairing new ones using Adobe Photoshop, Picture Window, and now Elements. Nothing is left out, from choosing the right hardware and software and getting the photographs into the computer, to getting the finished photo out of the computer and preserving it for posterity.  LEARN HOW TO: Scan faded and damaged prints or films Improve snapshots with Shadow/Highlight adjustment Correct uneven exposure Fix color and skin tones quickly with Curves, plug-ins, a

  3. Effect of sow history features on growth and feed intake in grow-finish pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Sell-Kubiak, E.B.; Knol, E.F.; Bijma, P

    2012-01-01

    The sow provides a specific environment to her offspring during gestation and lactation. Certain features in the early life of the sow (sow history features) may affect her ability to deliver and feed a healthy litter. In genetic analyses of grow-finish traits, these effects are estimated as common litter or permanent sow effects. The objective of this research was to identify sow history features that affect the growth rate (GR) and feed intake (FI) of her offspring during the grow-finish st...

  4. Feedback control strategy of longitudinal temperature and finished carbonization time for coke oven and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Huo; Zhi Wen; Dong Chen; Yueling Shen; Yongqin Zhang; Xiaoming Zhi

    2004-01-01

    Based on the detailed analysis of the third coke oven in BaoSteel, a feedback control strategy of longitudinal temperature and finished carbonization time of coke ovens was proposed and it was applied to the third coke oven in BaoSteel. As a result, the ratio of the instance that the absolute deviation of the longitudinal temperature is within ±7°C and the finished carbonization time within ± 10 rain is more than 80%, having acquired the patent saving effect of an energy consumption lowered by 2.92%. At the same time, it can provide an example for the same coke ovens inside and outside the nation.

  5. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS FOR MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION IN HOT FINISHING ROLLING OF STEEL STRIPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.D. Qu; S.H. Zhang; D.Z. Li; Z.T. Wang

    2007-01-01

    A computer model that describes the evolution of microstructures during the hot finishing rolling of SS400 steel has been proposed. It has been found that the microstructure strongly depends on processing of materials and on their parameters, which affected the history of the thermomechanical variables, such as temperature, strain, and strain rate. To investigate the microstructural evolutions during the hot finishing rolling process, the rigid-thermoviscoplastic finite element method (FEM)has been combined with dynamic recrystallization, static recrystallization, and grain growth models.The simulation results show a good agreement with those from the prediction software online.

  6. Environmental-friendly wool fabric finishing by some water plant extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šmelcerović Miodrag

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, environmental-friendly finishing of wool fabric were processed with several water extract plants, such as hibiscus, St. John's wort, and marigold. The plant extracts have good basis in the commercial dyeing of wool, for garment and carpet industry. At the same time, the environmental-friendly finishing by water extracts plants shows very good fastness of the antimicrobial properties and coloration of wool fabric. From an ecological viewpoint, the substitution of chemical dyes with "natural products" may represent not only a strategy to reduce risk and pollutants but also an opportunity for new markets and new businesses, which can expend involving of ecology in trade policy.

  7. Establishing Bedding Requirements during Transport and Monitoring Skin Temperature during Cold and Mild Seasons after Transport for Finishing Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McGlone

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The broad aim of this study was to determine whether bedding level in the transport trailer influenced pig performance and welfare. Specifically, the objective was to define the bedding requirements of pigs during transportation in commercial settings during cold and mild weather. Animals (n = 112,078 pigs on 572 trailers used were raised in commercial finishing sites and transported in trailers to commercial processing plants. Dead on arrival (DOA, non-ambulatory (NA, and total dead and down (D&D data were collected and skin surface temperatures of the pigs were measured by infrared thermography. Data were collected during winter (Experiment 1 and fall/spring (Experiment 2. Total D&D percent showed no interaction between bedding level and outside air temperature in any experiments. Average skin surface temperature during unloading increased with outside air temperature linearly in both experiments (P < 0.01. In conclusion, over-use of bedding may be economically inefficient. Pig skin surface temperature could be a useful measure of pig welfare during or after transport.

  8. Application of nanotechnology in antimicrobial finishing of biomedical textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zille, Andrea; Almeida, Luís; Amorim, Teresa; Carneiro, Noémia; Fátima Esteves, Maria; Silva, Carla J.; Souto, António Pedro

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, the antimicrobial nanofinishing of biomedical textiles has become a very active, high-growth research field, assuming great importance among all available material surface modifications in the textile industry. This review offers the opportunity to update and critically discuss the latest advances and applications in this field. The survey suggests an emerging new paradigm in the production and distribution of nanoparticles for biomedical textile applications based on non-toxic renewable biopolymers such as chitosan, alginate and starch. Moreover, a relationship among metal and metal oxide nanoparticle (NP) size, its concentration on the fabric, and the antimicrobial activity exists, allowing the optimization of antimicrobial functionality.

  9. Surface Fatigue Resistance with Induction Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Dennis; Turza, Alan; Chapman, Mike

    1996-01-01

    Induction hardening has been used for some years to harden the surface and improve the strength and service life of gears and other components. Many applications that employ induction hardening require a relatively long time to finish the hardening process and controlling the hardness of the surface layer and its depth often was a problem. Other surface hardening methods, ie., carbonizing, take a very long time and tend to cause deformations of the toothing, whose elimination requires supplementary finishing work. In double-frequency induction hardening, one uses a low frequency for the preheating of the toothed wheel and a much higher frequency for the purpose of rapidly heating the surface by way of surface hardening.

  10. The effects of feeding increasing concentrations of corn oil on energy metabolism and nutrient balance in finishing beef steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of added fat source is common in high-concentrate finishing diets. The objective of our experiment was to determine if feeding increasing concentrations of added dietary corn oil would decrease enteric methane production, increase the ME:DE ratio, and improve recovered energy (RE) in finish...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2-to Subpart Xxxxxx... - Applicability of General Provisions to Metal Fabrication or Finishing Area Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Finishing Area Sources Instructions for Table 2—As required in § 63.11523, “General Provisions Requirements... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability of General Provisions to Metal Fabrication or Finishing Area Sources 2 Table 2-to Subpart XXXXXX of Part 63 Protection...

  12. FORMED SEMI-FINISHED PRODUCTS FROM SQUID FORCEMEAT. INVESTIGATION OF THE FUNCTIONAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF FORCEMEAT MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivchenkova E. N.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of addition of boiled forcemeat of a squid to raw forcemeat on functional and technological properties of forcemeat is investigated. The formulation of forcemeat for formed semi-finished products of squid is presented. Periods of storage of formed semi-finished products of squid are substantiated

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss 2 Table 2 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart TTTT of Part...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits... Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather...), you must meet the appropriate emission limits in the following table: Type of Leather Product...

  15. Logical metonymy in Dutch and German: equivalents of 'begin', 'finish' and 'enjoy'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweep, J.

    2012-01-01

    In sentences such as he began the book or she finished the sandwich some unmentioned activity is metonymically inferred on the basis of the direct object. This phenomenon has been dubbed logical metonymy (Pustejovsky 1989, 1991, 1995). Previous studies on logical metonymy have mainly focussed on

  16. Fatigue and fracture resistance of zirconia crowns prepared with different finish line designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of finish line design on the fatigue, fracture resistance, and failure type of veneered zirconia restorations. Materials and Methods: A CAD/CAM system (Cercon) was used to prepare zirconia frameworks (0.5 mm thick) for a maxillary central

  17. Effect of sow history features on growth and feed intake in grow-finish pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sell-Kubiak, E.B.; Knol, E.F.; Bijma, P.

    2012-01-01

    The sow provides a specific environment to her offspring during gestation and lactation. Certain features in the early life of the sow (sow history features) may affect her ability to deliver and feed a healthy litter. In genetic analyses of grow-finish traits, these effects are estimated as common

  18. Evaluation of marginal fit of two all-ceramic copings with two finish lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasi, Gulce; Ozturk, Nilgun; Inan, Ozgur; Bozogullari, Nalan

    2012-04-01

    This in-vitro study investigated the marginal fit of two all-ceramic copings with 2 finish line designs. Forty machined stainless steel molar die models with two different margin designs (chamfer and rounded shoulder) were prepared. A total of 40 standardized copings were fabricated and divided into 4 groups (n=10 for each finish line-coping material). Coping materials tested were IPS e.max Press and Zirkonzahn; luting agent was Variolink II. Marginal fit was evaluated after cementation with a stereomicroscope (Leica MZ16). Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD test were performed to assess the influence of each finish line design and ceramic type on the marginal fit of 2 all-ceramic copings (α =.05). Two-way analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant differences for marginal fit relative to finish lines (P=.362) and ceramic types (P=.065). Within the limitations of this study, both types of all-ceramic copings demonstrated that the mean marginal fit was considered acceptable for clinical application (⩽120 μm).

  19. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles in textile finish aqueous system and their antimicrobial properties on cotton fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by a simple and environmentally benign procedure using poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) as reducing agent and stabilizer in the textile finish aqueous system, and their antimicrobial properties on greige (mechanically cleaned) and bleached cotton fibers were i...

  20. Fungi as the main factor in the degradation of the floor finish „Lentex"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Milewska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mycological analysis of samples of the floor finish Lentex was performed. The isolation layer from natural fibers and the outer layer of polyvinyl chloride (PVC were analyzed. The mechanism of infection of this material by soil fungi was determined and a considerable risk to human health from thc isolated species was found.

  1. MODELING OF THE FAST ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD-FINISHING PRODUCT -- FLOOR WAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses environmental chamber and full-scale residential house tests conducted to characterize the fast organic emissions from a wood finishing product, floor wax. For the environmental chamber tests, a very small amount (wax was applied to an alumi...

  2. 40 CFR 141.714 - Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities. 141.714 Section 141.714 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS...

  3. Heterogeneity among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Italian pig finishing holdings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battisti, A.; Franco, A.; Merialdi, G.;

    2010-01-01

    A survey for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in finishing pig holdings was carried out in Italy in 2008. MRSA isolates were characterised by spa-. SCCmec- and antimicrobial susceptibility typing. A prevalence of 38% (45/118, 95% CI 29.4-46.9%) positive holdings was observed...

  4. Comparison of two feeding finishing treatments on production and quality of organic beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Gottardo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The study compared growth and slaughter performance and meat quality of organic beef cattle finished with or without pasture grazing. One group of 10 Limousin heifers was finished under confined conditions and fed ad libitum a total mixed ration based on maize silage, hay and cereals grains. A second group of 10 Limousin heifers rotationally grazed two contiguous pasture plots of 1.5 ha each with a daily supplementation of a concentrate mix based on cereal grains and roasted soybeans. Heifers were slaughtered at commercial finishing and meat quality traits were assessed on Longissimus thoracis muscle. The grazing group, due to a lower average daily gain (0.74 vs 0.95 kg/day; Pvs 155 days; Pvs 3.24 kg/cm2; Pvs 35.8; Pvs 13.7; Pvs 14.6; Pvs 3.66 % of total fatty acids; Pvs 0.10 % of total fatty acids; Pvs 0.30 % of total fatty acids; P<0.001 than confined animals. The detrimental effects of pasture grazing on growth performance and on some important meat quality traits explain the limited adoption of this finishing system in organic beef production.

  5. Meat quality of lambs produced in the Mesopotamia region of Argentina finished on different diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlo, F; Bonato, P; Teira, G; Tisocco, O; Vicentin, J; Pueyo, J; Mansilla, A

    2008-07-01

    The meat quality of Corriedale lambs (40kg live weight) produced in the Mesopotamia region (Argentina) was assessed. These lambs had different finishing diets: only native grass pasture, ground alfalfa and alfalfa-linseed pellet (70/30). Carcass yield, longissimus dorsi area, backfat thickness, marbling, pH, meat and subcutaneous fat color, cooking loss, Warner-Bratzler shear force, fat, protein and moisture content were determined. Lambs finished on alfalfa-linseed pellet had the highest carcasses yield and backfat thickness and their meat had a lighter color (higher L(∗) value), higher marbling and tenderness than meat from lambs reared on native grass pasture. Grass-based finishing can lead to the production of leaner meat, with a more reddish color (higher a(∗) value). The ground alfalfa finishing diet seems to be intermediate between native grass pasture and alfalfa-linseed pellet with respect to carcass yield, backfat and meat color. In addition, the animals fed on ground alfalfa showed the highest muscle area.

  6. A simple non destructive method for the determination of the refractive indices of finished lenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ramakrishna Rao

    1962-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid method for the determination of the refractive indices of finished lenses has been described which depends upon immersion refractometry. Observations taken on some lenses of known material to establish the validity of the method have also been reported.

  7. Salmonella surveillance and control for finisher pigs and pork in Denmark — A case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alban, L.; Baptista, F.M.; Møgelmose, V.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella can either be controlled pre-harvest, post-harvest or by a combination of both approaches. This paper describes the lessons learned in Danish Salmonella surveillance and control programme for finisher pigs and pork. Initially, main focus was on pre-harvest initiatives and correct ident...

  8. An object-oriented Bayesian network modeling the causes of leg disorders in finisher herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Birk; Kristensen, Anders Ringgaard; Toft, Niels

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of an effective control strategy against disease in a finisher herd requires knowledge regarding the disease level in the herd. A Bayesian network was constructed that can estimate risk indexes for three cause-categories of leg disorders in a finisher herd. The cause-categories......The implementation of an effective control strategy against disease in a finisher herd requires knowledge regarding the disease level in the herd. A Bayesian network was constructed that can estimate risk indexes for three cause-categories of leg disorders in a finisher herd. The cause...... pigs (e.g. results from diagnostic tests) were used to estimate the most likely cause of leg disorders at herd level. As information to the model originated from two different levels, we used an object-oriented structure in order to ease the specification of the Bayesian network. Hence, a Herd class...... and a Pig class comprised the basic components of the object-oriented structure. The causal structure of the model was based on evidence from published literature. The conditional probabilities used in the model were elicited from experts within the field and from the published literature. To illustrate...

  9. Fatigue and fracture resistance of zirconia crowns prepared with different finish line designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of finish line design on the fatigue, fracture resistance, and failure type of veneered zirconia restorations. Materials and Methods: A CAD/CAM system (Cercon) was used to prepare zirconia frameworks (0.5 mm thick) for a maxillary central inc

  10. Herd-level risk factors for subclinical Salmonella infection in European finishing-pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Dahl, J.; Stege, H.

    2004-01-01

    Our objective was to find herd factors associated with pigs testing seropositive for Salmonella. Data were collected from 359 finishing-pig herds in Germany, Denmark, Greece, The Netherlands and Sweden, between 1996 and 1998. Pigs fed non-pelleted feed (dry or wet) had 2- and 2.5-times lower odds...

  11. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A203. Aircraft Fabric Covering, Painting, and Finishing. Instructor Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on airframe building and repair, including fabric covering, painting, and finishing. The module contains two units that cover the following topics: (1) inspecting, testing, and installing aircraft fabric coverings and (2) applying dope, paint, and trim. Each unit…

  12. Effects of sex and dietary lysine on performances and serum and meat traits in finisher pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Belloch, J; Guada, J A; Latorre, M A

    2015-10-01

    A total of 160 Duroc×(Landrace×Large White) pigs, 50% barrows and 50% gilts, of 28.3 ± 4.52 kg of BW were used to study the effect of lysine (Lys) restriction in the finisher period, on growth performances and serum and carcass and meat quality traits. The grower diet (from 30 to 90 kg BW) was slightly Lys-restricted (7.8 g standardised ileal digestible (SID) Lys/kg) in accordance with results from a previous trial. During the finisher period (90 to 130 kg BW), four experimental diets with decreasing SID Lys contents (6.3, 5.6, 4.2 and 3.2 g/kg) were tested. Each of the eight treatments (two sexes×four levels of Lys) was replicated five times. Each replicate was a pen with four pigs allocated together. When animals achieved 129 ± 2.59 kg were slaughtered and carcass and meat characteristics were evaluated. No significant interaction sex×diet was found. During the finisher period, barrows grew faster (Pdietary Lys restriction during finisher period in pigs impaired growth performances and was not successful to increase the carcass fat deposition, although it could have positive effects on IMF proportion of pork.

  13. A transcript finishing initiative for closing gaps in the human transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogayar, Mari Cleide; Camargo, Anamaria A; Bettoni, Fabiana

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a transcript finishing initiative, undertaken for the purpose of identifying and characterizing novel human transcripts, in which RT-PCR was used to bridge gaps between paired EST clusters, mapped against the genomic sequence. Each pair of EST clusters selected for experi...

  14. Performance and Haematological Characteristics of Broiler Finisher FedMoringa oleifera Leaf Meal Diets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Obakanurhe Oghenebrorhie; Okpara Oghenesuvwe

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects ofMoringa oleifera leaf meal (MOLM) on the performance and haematology of broiler finisher using 120 Cobb chicks of 4 weeks old broiler chicks. The birds were assigned randomly into four dietary treatments containing MOLM at 0, 6%, 8%, and 10% (treatments 1, 2, 3 and 4) inclusion levels, respectively, in a complete randomized design experiment. The effect of the dietary treatments on the growth performance and blood parameters of the broiler finisher was determined. MOLM at a rate of 6% (T2), 8% (T3), and 10% (T4) of the diets (as fed basis) to replace 3.2%, 5.6% and 8.6% of the crude protein (CP) of the control diet. The daily feed, dry matter and CP intake of the chicks fed MOLM diets were higher (p0.05) among treatments. The results indicated that at 10% in the diets of broiler finisher chick, MOLM could be substituted with expensive conventional protein sources without any deleterious effects on performance and blood parameters of broiler finisher chicken.

  15. Risk assessment of finishing beef cattle in feedlot: slaughter weights and correlation amongst input variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Santana Pacheco

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk associated with finishing crossbred Charolais × Nellore steers in feedlot at different slaughter weights (425, 467 or 510 kg, considering or disregarding the correlation amongst random input variables. Data were collected from 2004 to 2010 and used in the simulation of the financial indicator Net Present Value (NPV. Animals slaughtered with 425, 467 or 510 kg were fed diets containing a roughage:concentrate ratio of 60:40 for 30, 65 and 94 days, respectively. In the simulation of NPV, a Latin Hypercube type of sampling was used, running 2000 interactions. An analysis of stochastic dominance of first and second orders was carried out as well as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov asymptotic test (to check for differences between pairs of curves of cumulative distributions, followed by sensitivity analysis using stepwise multivariate regression. Simulations of NPV considering the correlation amongst the input variables produced more consistent estimates of this financial indicator than simulations that disregarded it. The risk analysis showed that 467 kg slaughter weight presented the lowest risk for finishing cattle in feedlots when compared with 425 and 510 kg. The most important variables influencing the NVP are the prices of feeder and finished steers, initial and final weights, concentrate and roughage costs, and minimum rate of attractiveness; therefore, farmers should pay particular attention to these variables when making the decision of whether or not to use feedlot to finish beef cattle.

  16. Relationship of leptin concentrations with feed intake, growth, and efficiency in finishing beef steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the association of serum leptin concentrations with production measures including DMI, ADG, G:F as well as carcass characteristics in genetically diverse finishing beef steers. Three cohorts of steers (n = 473 total) were individually fed a finishin...

  17. Hourly methane production in finishing steers fed at different levels of dry matter intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane (CH4) loss from finishing cattle is important as it represents an energy loss that could be used for maintenance and growth, and CH4 is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 21 to 25 times that of CO2. Our objectives were to determine hourly CH4 production from growing cattle fed...

  18. Mapping carcass and meat quality QTL on Sus Scrofa chromosome 2 in commercial finishing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuven, H.C.M.; van Wijk, R.H.J.; Dibbits, B.; van Kampen, T.A.; Knol, E.F.

    2009-01-01

    Genet Sel Evol. 2009 Jan 5;41:4. Mapping carcass and meat quality QTL on Sus Scrofa chromosome 2 in commercial finishing pigs. Heuven HC, van Wijk RH, Dibbits B, van Kampen TA, Knol EF, Bovenhuis H. Animal Breeding and Genomics Centre, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands. h.c.m.heuven

  19. Enterobacteriaceae levels in finishing pigs subjected to a ractopamine feeding program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food safety concerns regarding potential effects of feed additives are currently at the center of the public/consumer attention. Ractopamine (RAC) has been widely used in the U.S. swine industry for its effects of improving production performance in finishing pigs. Although extensive research has be...

  20. ANTIMICROBIAL REAGENTS AS FUNCTIONAL FINISHING FOR TEXTILES INTENDED FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS. I. SYNTHETIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina Zanoaga

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article offers an overview of some contemporary antimicrobial (biocides and biostatics agents used as functional finishing for textiles intended for biomedical applications. It reviews only synthetic agents, namely quaternary ammonium compounds, halogenated phenols, polybiguanides, N-halamines, and renewable peroxides, as a part of an extensive study currently in progress.