WorldWideScience

Sample records for pw laser interaction

  1. Transition of the BELLA PW laser system towards a collaborative research facility in laser plasma science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Csaba; Evans, Dave; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Magana, Art; Mannino, Greg; Mao, Hann-Shin; Nakamura, Kei; Riley, Joe R.; Steinke, Sven; Sipla, Tyler; Syversrud, Don; Ybarrolaza, Nathan; Leemans, Wim P.

    2017-03-01

    The advancement of Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPA) requires systematic studies with ever increasing precision and reproducibility. A key component of such a research endeavor is a facility that provides reliable, well characterized laser sources, flexible target systems, and comprehensive diagnostics of the laser pulses, the interaction region, and the produced electron beams. The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA), a PW laser facility, now routinely provides high quality focused laser pulses for high precision experiments. A description of the commissioning process, the layout of the laser systems, the major components of the laser and radiation protection systems, and a summary of early results are given. Further scientific plans and highlights of operational experience that serve as the basis for transition to a collaborative research facility in high-peak power laser-plasma interaction research are reviewed.

  2. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros, B., E-mail: brigitte.cros@u-psud.fr [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Paradkar, B.S. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Davoine, X. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Chancé, A. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Desforges, F.G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S. [CEA DSM-IRAMIS-SPAM, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delerue, N. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Ju, J.; Audet, T.L.; Maynard, G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Mora, P. [CPhT, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Di Piazza, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Grech, M. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2014-03-11

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (>15fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  3. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, B.; Paradkar, B. S.; Davoine, X.; Chancé, A.; Desforges, F. G.; Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S.; Delerue, N.; Ju, J.; Audet, T. L.; Maynard, G.; Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L.; Mora, P.; Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O.; Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T.; Di Piazza, A.; Grech, M.; Riconda, C.; Marquès, J. R.; Beck, A.; Specka, A.; Martin, Ph.; Monot, P.; Normand, D.; Mathieu, F.; Audebert, P.; Amiranoff, F.

    2014-03-01

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (> 15 fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  4. Isochoric heating of solid gold targets with the PW-laser-driven ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Sven; Ji, Qing; Bulanov, Stepan; Barnard, John; Schenkel, Thomas; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2016-10-01

    We present an end-to-end simulation for isochoric heating of solid gold targets using ion beams produced with the BELLA PW laser at LBNL: (i) 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are applied to study the ion source characteristics of the PW laser-target interaction at the long focal length (f/#65) beamline at laser intensities of 5x1019W/cm2 at spot size of ω0 = 52 μm on a CH target. (ii) In order to transport the ion beams to an EMP-free environment, an active plasma lens will be used. This was modeled by calculating the Twiss parameters of the ion beam from the appropriate transport matrixes using the source parameters obtained from the PIC simulation. Space charge effects were considered as well. (iii) Hydrodynamic simulations indicate that these ion beams can isochorically heat a 1 mm3 gold target to the Warm Dense Matter state. This work was supported by Fusion Energy Science, and LDRD funding from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, provided by the Director, Office of Science, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  5. High Intensity Particle Physics at PW-class laser facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, Stepan; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Esirkepov, Timur; Kando, Masaki; Rosanov, Nikolay; Korn, Georg; Bulanov, Sergey V.; Leemans, Wim P.

    2015-11-01

    The processes typical for high intensity particle physics, i.e., the interactions of charged particles with strong electromagnetic fields, have attracted considerable interest recently. Some of these processes, previously believed to be of theoretical interest only, are now becoming experimentally accessible. High intensity electromagnetic (EM) fields significantly modify the interactions of particles and EM fields, giving rise to the phenomena that are not encountered either in classical or perturbative quantum theory of these interactions. One of such phenomena is the radiation reaction, which radically influences the electron motion in an electromagnetic standing wave formed by two super-intense counter-propagating laser pulses. Depending on the laser intensity and wavelength, either classical or quantum mode of radiation reaction prevail, or both are strong. When radiation reaction dominates, electron motion evolves to limit cycles and strange attractors. This creates a new framework for high energy physics experiments on an interaction of energetic charged particle beams and colliding super-intense laser pulses. Work supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  6. Selective Deuterium Ion Acceleration Using the Vulcan PW Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Krygier, AG; Kar, S; Ahmed, H; Alejo, A; Clarke, R; Fuchs, J; Green, A; Jung, D; Kleinschmidt, A; Najmudin, Z; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P; Notley, M; Oliver, M; Roth, M; Vassura, L; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M; Freeman, RR

    2015-01-01

    We report on the successful demonstration of selective acceleration of deuterium ions by target-normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) with a high-energy petawatt laser. TNSA typically produces a multi-species ion beam that originates from the intrinsic hydrocarbon and water vapor contaminants on the target surface. Using the method first developed by Morrison, et al., \\cite{Morrison:POP2012} an ion beam with $>$99$\\%$ deuterium ions and peak energy 28 MeV is produced with a 200 J, 700fs, $>10^{20} W/cm^{2}$ laser pulse by cryogenically freezing heavy water (D$_{2}$O) vapor onto the rear surface of the target prior to the shot. The estimated total yield of deuterium ions in an assumed 10$^{\\circ}$ half-angle cone was 3.0 $\\mu$C (1.9 $\\times 10^{13}$ ions) with 6.6$\\%$ laser-to-deuterium ion energy conversion efficiency.

  7. High-contrast 10-fs OPCPA-based Front-End for the Apollon-10PW laser

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios PAPADOPOULOS; Ramirez, Patricia; Pellegrina, A; Lebas, N.; Leblanc, Catherine; Cheriaux, Gilles; ZOU, J-P; Mennerat, G.; Monot, P.; Mathieu, F.; Audebert, P.; Georges, Patrick; Druon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We present a high-contrast 10-fs Front-End for Ti:sapphire PW-lasers within the Apollon-10PW project. This injector uses OPCPA pumped at 100 Hz by Yb-based CPA chain. Combination of OPCPA and XPW permits a >10 12 contrast ratio.

  8. Modeling the Interaction of Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles with the Anticoccidial Peptide PW2 Guided by NMR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Gomes-Neto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are highly dynamic entities that acquire structure upon binding to a membrane interface. To better understand the structure and the mechanism for the molecular recognition of dodecylphosphocholine (DPC micelles by the anticoccidial peptide PW2, we performed molecular dynamics (MD simulations guided by NMR experimental data, focusing on strategies to explore the transient nature of micelles, which rearrange on a millisecond to second timescale. We simulated the association of PW2 with a pre-built DPC micelle and with free-DPC molecules that spontaneously forms micelles in the presence of the peptide along the simulation. The simulation with spontaneous micelle formation provided the adequate environment which replicated the experimental data. The unrestrained MD simulations reproduced the NMR structure for the entire 100 ns MD simulation time. Hidden discrete conformational states could be described. Coulomb interactions are important for initial approximation and hydrogen bonds for anchoring the aromatic region at the interface, being essential for the stabilization of the interaction. Arg9 is strongly attached with phosphate. We observed a helix elongation process stabilized by the intermolecular peptide-micelle association. Full association that mimics the experimental data only happens after complete micelle re-association. Fast micelle dynamics without dissociation of surfactants leads to only superficial binding.

  9. Mineralization of pyrene induced by interaction between Ochrobactrum sp. PW and ryegrass in spiked soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tuo; Wei, Lianshuang; Qiao, Min; Zou, Dexun; Yang, Xiaojin; Lin, Aijun

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the capability of pyrene-degrading bacterium Ochrobactrum sp. PW and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) grown alone and in combination on the degradation of pyrene in soil. After 60 days of ryegrass growth, plant biomass, pyrene-degrading microbial mass, soil enzyme activity (catalase activity and polyphenol oxidase activity) and residual concentration of pyrene in soils were determined. Higher dissipation rates were observed in PW inoculation treatments: ryegrass+PW rhizosphere soil (RP-r) and ryegrass+PW non-rhizosphere soil (RP-nr), than planting of ryegrass alone, rhizosphere (R-r) or non-rhizosphere (R-nr). The inoculation with PW significantly (psoil. Our results suggest that adding of PAHs-degrading bacteria to soil can enhance remediation of PAHs contaminated soil, while improving plant growth.

  10. High Power Laser Science and Engineering Design and current progress of the Apollon 10 PW project

    OpenAIRE

    ZOU, J-P; Le Blanc, C; Dimitrios PAPADOPOULOS; Chériaux, G; Georges, Patrick; Mennerat, G.; Druon, Frédéric; Lecherbourg, L.; Pellegrina, A; Ramirez, Philippe; Giambruno, F; Fréneaux, A; Leconte, F; Badarau, D; Boudenne, J. M

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The objective of the Apollon project is the generation of 10 PW peak power pulses of 15 fs at 1 shot/minute. In this paper the Apollon facility design, the technological challenges and the current progress of the project will be presented.

  11. Optical terminal analysis of a multigrating tiled compressor in a PW-class CPA-laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu-Chuan; Luo Hui; Wang Xiao; Li Fu-Quan; Huang Xiao-Jun; Jing Feng

    2012-01-01

    In the highest-power chirped-pulse amplification lasers,the pulse must be stretched in time,amplified,compressed in a grating compressor and subsequently focused by off-axis parabola to obtain a high peak power.In the optical terminal,the temporal and spatial effects of mismatched multigrating tiled compressor on the far-field pulse axe critical factors to be analysed.In this paper,a k-space raytracing model is proposed for the temporal and spatial analyses of possible errors in a four-grating single-pass tiled compressor.The results show that the last grating affects mainly the partial focal spot,while the middle two gratings affect the temporal waveform,and the partial focal spot needs much higher error control than that in the temporal domain in a picosecond pulse compression.

  12. High efficient ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks by PW-ps laser pulses for producing fusion flames in DT and HB11 of solid state density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustaizis, S.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks in the range of 1020 cm/s2 has been confirmed experimentally after this was long predicted as a non-thermal direct conversion of optical energy into plasma motion due to dominating nonlinear (ponderomotive) forces [1]. The use of laser pulses of more than PW power and ps or shorter duration can ignite a nuclear fusion flame in solid density deuterium tritium because the necessary energy flux of >108J/cm2 according to the theory of Chu [2] is available [3]. For the studies of the necessary velocities of the generated fusion flames above 1000 km/s the detailed processes can be analyzed by using the advanced genuine two-fluid hydrodynamic model [4] where it was surprising that the ignition of the fusion flame by the picosecond interaction needs a comparably long development in the nanosecond range before the thermal processes result in shock fronts similar to the Rakine-Hugoniot theory. For the evaluation of power generation the problem of lateral energy losses was studied by using very high pulsed magnetic fields. The recently produced 10 Kilotesla magnetic fields [5] are very promising for solutions.

  13. xLIPA: Promotion of Electrons from the K-shell to 2 GeV using 10 PW Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-19

    xLIPA : Promotion of electrons from the K-shell to 2 GeV using 10 PW laser pulses D.F. Gordon, J.P. Palastro, B. Hafizi, D. Kaganovich, L. Johnson...20] N. Kumar, K.Z. Hatsagortsyan, and C.H. Keitel. Radiation-reaction-force-induced nonlinear mixing of Raman sidebands of an ultraintense laser...RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT xLIPA: Promotion of

  14. Efficient Spherical Wavefront Correction near the Focus for the 0.89 PW/29.0 fs Ti:Sapphire Laser Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Zhi-Jun; LIANG Xiao-Yan; YU Liang-Hong; LU Xiao-Ming; LENG Yu-Xin; LI Ru-Xin; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a new loop system of the spherical wavefront (SW) correction near the beam focus to effectively improve the focusability of 0.89 PW/29.0 fs Ti:sapphire chirped pulse amplification laser. After wavefront correction, the Strehl ratio is improved to reach 0.91, and the focal spot size using the fl4 off-axis parabola is reduced to 6.34 × 6.94μm2 (corresponding to 1.63 × 1.78 times diffraction limitation). With full peak power of 0.89 PW,the peak intensity of 2.59 × 1021 W/cm2 is obtained. The experimental results show that the SW correction scheme near the beam focus is comparatively simple, economic and high-efficient.%@@ We demonstrate a new loop system of the spherical wavefront (SW) correction near the beam focus to effectively improve the focusability of 0.89 PW/29.0 fs Ti:sapphire chirped pulse amplification laser.After wavefront correction, the Strehl ratio is improved to reach 0.91, and the focal spot size using the f/4 off-axis parabola is reduced to 6.34 x 6.94μm2 (corresponding to 1.63 x 1.78 times diffraction limitation).With full peak power of 0.89 PW, the peak intensity of 2.59 x 1021 W/cm2 is obtained.The experimental results show that the SW correction scheme near the beam focus is comparatively simple, economic and high-efficient.

  15. Laser-surface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the interaction of laser radiation with various surfaces at variable parameters of radiation. As a basic principle of classification we chose the energetic or intensity level of interaction of laser radiation with the surfaces. These two characteristics of laser radiation are the most important parameters defining entire spectrum of the processes occurring on the surfaces during interaction with electromagnetic waves. This is a first book containing a whole spectrum of the laser-surface interactions distinguished by the ranges of used laser intensity. It combines the surface response starting from extremely weak laser intensities (~1 W cm-2) up to the relativistic intensities (~1020 W cm-2 and higher). The book provides the basic information about lasers and acquaints the reader with both common applications of laser-surface interactions (laser-related printers, scanners, barcode readers, discs, material processing, military, holography, medicine, etc) and unusual uses of the processes on t...

  16. Experimental capabilities of 0.4 PW, 1 shot/min Scarlet laser facility for high energy density science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, P L; Willis, C; Daskalova, R L; George, K M; Feister, S; Jiang, S; Snyder, J; Marketon, J; Schumacher, D W; Akli, K U; Van Woerkom, L; Freeman, R R; Chowdhury, E A

    2016-06-10

    We report on the recently completed 400 TW upgrade to the Scarlet laser at The Ohio State University. Scarlet is a Ti:sapphire-based ultrashort pulse system that delivers >10  J in 30 fs pulses to a 2 μm full width at half-maximum focal spot, resulting in intensities exceeding 5×1021  W/cm2. The laser fires at a repetition rate of once per minute and is equipped with a suite of on-demand and on-shot diagnostics detailed here, allowing for rapid collection of experimental statistics. As part of the upgrade, the entire laser system has been redesigned to facilitate consistent, characterized high intensity data collection at high repetition rates. The design and functionality of the laser and target chambers are described along with initial data from commissioning experimental shots.

  17. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, A.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Lifschitz, A.; Shadwick, B. A.; Malka, V.; Specka, A.

    2014-03-01

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 1018 cm-3. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments.

  18. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, A., E-mail: beck@llr.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet – École Polytechnique, CNRS-IN2P3, Palaiseau 91128 (France); Kalmykov, S.Y., E-mail: skalmykov2@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0299 (United States); Davoine, X. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Lifschitz, A. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech-CNRS UMR7639-École Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91762 (France); Shadwick, B.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0299 (United States); Malka, V. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech-CNRS UMR7639-École Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91762 (France); Specka, A. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet – École Polytechnique, CNRS-IN2P3, Palaiseau 91128 (France)

    2014-03-11

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments.

  19. 0.85  PW laser operation at 3.3  Hz and high-contrast ultrahigh-intensity λ = 400  nm second-harmonic beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Shoujun; Rockwood, Alex; Luther, Bradley M; Hollinger, Reed; Curtis, Alden; Calvi, Chase; Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate the generation of 0.85 PW, 30 fs laser pulses at a repetition rate of 3.3 Hz with a record average power of 85 W from a Ti:sapphire laser. The system is pumped by high-energy Nd:glass slab amplifiers frequency doubled in LiB3O5 (LBO). Ultrahigh-contrast λ=400  nm femtosecond pulses were generated in KH2PO4 (KDP) with >40% efficiency. An intensity of 6.5×10(21)  W/cm(2) was obtained by frequency doubling 80% of the available Ti:sapphire energy and focusing the doubled light with an f/2 parabola. This laser will enable highly relativistic plasma experiments to be conducted at high repetition rate.

  20. Laser/tissue interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dederich, D N

    1991-01-01

    When laser light impinges on tissue, it can reflect, scatter, be absorbed, or transmit to the surrounding tissue. Absorption controls to a great degree the extent to which reflection, scattering and transmission occur, and wavelength is the primary determinant of absorption. The CO2 laser is consistently absorbed by most materials and tissues and the Nd-YAG laser wavelength is preferentially absorbed in pigmented tissues. The factors which determine the initial tissue effect include the laser wavelength, laser power, laser waveform, tissue optical properties, and tissue thermal properties. There are almost an infinite number of combinations of these factors possible, many of which would result in unacceptable damage to the tissues. This underscores the need to thoroughly test any particular combination of these factors on the conceptual, in-vitro, and in-vivo level before a treatment is offered.

  1. References: AePW publications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This page is the repository for the publications resulting from the AePW. This includes the special sessions at conferences: AIAA ASM 2012, Grapevine TX; AIAA SDM...

  2. Laser-Material Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    from the spinner to the PL measurement setup, the time lapse before PL data collection being - 2-3 minutes. The deposition of sodium sulfide nano ...limitations of tsig u existing surface-emitting laser designs, particula .rly the I n this paper, we describe implementation of the novel i.diu; *high

  3. Laser tissue interactions: an update for otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Lou

    2000-05-01

    We review the laser, characteristics of laser light, the delivery of laser light, pulse lengths and laser tissue interactions. We review these parameters and how they have changed over the history of the laser and how we expect them to change in the future. This survey of laser use is targeted to the otolaryngologist. Very little background in lasers is necessary to follow the discussion. This is intended to introduce and reintroduce laser technology.

  4. New developments in energy transfer and transport studies in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norreys, P. A.; Green, J. S.; Lancaster, K. L.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Scott, R. H. H.; Perez, F.; Schlenvoight, H.-P.; Baton, S.; Hulin, S.; Vauzour, B.; Santos, J. J.; Adams, D. J.; Markey, K.; Ramakrishna, B.; Zepf, M.; Quinn, M. N.; Yuan, X. H.; McKenna, P.; Schreiber, J.; Davies, J. R.; Higginson, D. P.; Beg, F. N.; Chen, C.; Ma, T.; Patel, P.

    2010-12-01

    Two critical issues related to the success of fast ignition inertial fusion have been vigorously investigated in a co-ordinated campaign in the European Union and the United States. These are the divergence of the fast electron beam generated in intense, PW laser-plasma interactions and the fast electron energy transport with the use of high intensity contrast ratio laser pulses. Proof is presented that resistivity gradient-induced magnetic fields can guide fast electrons over significant distances in (initially) cold metallic targets. Comparison of experiments undertaken in both France and the United States suggests that an important factor in obtaining efficient coupling into dense plasma is the irradiation with high intensity contrast ratio laser pulses, rather than the colour of the laser pulse itself.

  5. RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY ASSESSMENT FOR THE EXPERIMENTAL AREA OF A HYPER-INTENSE LASER WITH PEAK-POWER OF 1PW-CETAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florescu, M G; Duliu, O G; Pantazi, D; Ticos, C M; Sporea, D; Vasilache, R; Ionescu, V; Oane, M

    2016-09-24

    Ultra-high intensity lasers in use are connected with ionizing radiation sources that raise a real concern in relation to installations, personnel, population and environment protection. The shielding of target areas in these facilities has to be evaluated from the conceptual stage of the building design. The sizing of the protective concrete walls was determined using computer codes such as Fluka. For the experiments to be carried out in the facility of the Center for Advanced Laser Technologies (CETAL), both proton beams with the energy of 100 MeV and electron beams with 300 MeV energy were considered to calculate the dimensions of structural shielding and to establish technical solutions fulfilling the radiation protection constraints imposed by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control.

  6. PHYSICS UPDATE: Medical lasers and laser-tissue interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata, F.; Wautelet, M.

    1999-05-01

    Lasers are widely used in medicine today. The applications of medical lasers rely on interdisciplinary concepts. Indeed, the fundamental mechanisms involve physics, chemistry and biology. Nevertheless, the subject is sufficiently important and interesting to be introduced to students and teachers. Here we describe the commercially available medical lasers then discuss the general principles of laser-tissue interactions. Various current medical treatments can then be evaluated quantitatively.

  7. Laser-plasma interactions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Neely, David; Bingham, Robert; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Laser-Plasma Interactions and Applications covers the fundamental and applied aspects of high power laser-plasma physics. With an internationally renowned team of authors, the book broadens the knowledge of young researchers working in high power laser-plasma science by providing them with a thorough pedagogical grounding in the interaction of laser radiation with matter, laser-plasma accelerators, and inertial confinement fusion. The text is organised such that the theoretical foundations of the subject are discussed first, in Part I. In Part II, topics in the area of high energy density physics are covered. Parts III and IV deal with the applications to inertial confinement fusion and as a driver of particle and radiation sources, respectively. Finally, Part V describes the principle diagnostic, targetry, and computational approaches used in the field. This book is designed to give students a thorough foundation in the fundamental physics of laser-plasma interactions. It will also provide readers with knowl...

  8. Laser-Time Interaction XII: Photochemical, Photothermal, and Photomechanical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Donald D.; Jacques, Steven L.; Johnson, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on the following topics: photodynamic therapy, immunotherapy, pulsed laser effects, polarized light interactions, photochemical interactions, occular laser effects,thermal interactions, laser shaping of cartilage.

  9. Quantitative comparison between PW-PSM and PW-TSM Doppler systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.

    1991-01-01

    A simulation-based quantitative comparison between pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler systems using the conventional phase-shift measurement (PSM) technique and the newer time-shift measurement (TSM) technique is presented. A PSM system applying an autocorrelator is compared with a TSM system. The performa...... the relative amount of incorrect detections as a function of velocity. Also, the variance (PW-PSM) and the cross-correlation coefficient (PW-TSM) are found...

  10. Microengineering laser plasma interactions at relativistic intensities

    OpenAIRE

    S. Jiang; Ji,L.L.; Audesirk, H.; George, K M; Snyder, J.; Krygier, A.; Lewis, N. S.; Schumacher, D. W.; Pukhov, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K. U.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on the microscale using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high contrast short pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both total and cut-off energies of the produced electron beam. The self generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microw...

  11. Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

    2013-01-01

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

  12. Microengineering laser plasma interactions at relativistic intensities

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, S; Audesirk, H; George, K M; Snyder, J; Krygier, A; Lewis, N S; Schumacher, D W; Pukhov, A; Freeman, R R; Akli, K U

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on the microscale using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high contrast short pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both total and cut-off energies of the produced electron beam. The self generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microwires as they acquire relativistic energies via direct laser acceleration (DLA).

  13. Microengineering Laser Plasma Interactions at Relativistic Intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Ji, L L; Audesirk, H; George, K M; Snyder, J; Krygier, A; Poole, P; Willis, C; Daskalova, R; Chowdhury, E; Lewis, N S; Schumacher, D W; Pukhov, A; Freeman, R R; Akli, K U

    2016-02-26

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on microscales using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high-contrast short-pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both the total and cutoff energies of the produced electron beam. The self-generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microwires as they acquire relativistic energies via direct laser acceleration.

  14. Comparison of different LIDT testing protocols for PW and multi-PW class high-reflectivity coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durák, Michal; Kramer, Daniel; Velpula, Praveen K.; Meadows, Alexander R.; Cupal, Josef; Rus, Bedrich

    2016-12-01

    Development of state-of-the-art high-power laser systems requires accurate information about the damage resistance of critical optical components. Since damage threshold fluence decreases significantly with decreasing pulse length, highpower systems based on chirped-pulse amplification are usually limited by the damage threshold of the components utilized for the final pulse compression and transport of the compressed beams. Sub-picosecond laser damage is a complex process involving various nonlinear photoionization and relaxation mechanisms, and no current theory can reliably predict damage threshold values for arbitrary combinations of laser parameters, optical coating properties, and ambient conditions. To evaluate the damage resistance of candidate high-reflectivity coatings for the distribution of compressed PW and multi-PW pulses within experimental areas of the ELI beamlines facility, a series of laser damage tests in high vacuum were conducted. In this work, we present threshold values for high-reflectance (HR) dielectric coatings tested according to different protocols in conditions specific to their operation. We compare results acquired using S-on-1, R-on-1, and Raster Scan routines for several samples and discuss their accuracy.

  15. Brilliant petawatt gamma-ray pulse generation in quantum electrodynamic laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H. X.; Qiao, B.; Huang, T. W.; Xu, Z.; Zhou, C. T.; Gu, Y. Q.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.; He, X. T.

    2017-03-01

    We show a new resonance acceleration scheme for generating ultradense relativistic electron bunches in helical motions and hence emitting brilliant vortical γ-ray pulses in the quantum electrodynamic (QED) regime of circularly-polarized (CP) laser-plasma interactions. Here the combined effects of the radiation reaction recoil force and the self-generated magnetic fields result in not only trapping of a great amount of electrons in laser-produced plasma channel, but also significant broadening of the resonance bandwidth between laser frequency and that of electron betatron oscillation in the channel, which eventually leads to formation of the ultradense electron bunch under resonant helical motion in CP laser fields. Three-dimensional PIC simulations show that a brilliant γ-ray pulse with unprecedented power of 6.7 PW and peak brightness of 1025 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1% BW (at 15 MeV) is emitted at laser intensity of 1.9 × 1023 W/cm2.

  16. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  17. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scisciò, M.; Antici, P., E-mail: patrizio.antici@polytechnique.edu [INFN-RM1 and SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INRS-EMT, Université du Québec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [INFN-RM1 and SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Papaphilippou, Y. [CERN, CH 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-03-07

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  18. Dissipative Structures At Laser-Solid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanai, Laszlo

    1989-05-01

    The questions which are discussed in this lecture refer to one of sections of laser-solid interactions, namely: to formation of different dissipative structures on the surface of metals and semiconductors when they are irradiated by intensive laser light in chemically active media (f.e.air). Some particular examples of the development at different spatial and time instabilities, periodic and stochastic structures, auto-wave processes are present-ed using testing materials vanadium metal and semiconducting V205 single crystals and light sources: cw and pulsed CO2 and YAG lasers.

  19. Laser-Material Interaction of Powerful Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komashko, A

    2003-01-06

    Laser-material interaction of powerful (up to a terawatt) ultrashort (several picoseconds or shorter) laser pulses and laser-induced effects were investigated theoretically in this dissertation. Since the ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) duration time is much smaller than the characteristic time of the hydrodynamic expansion and thermal diffusion, the interaction occurs at a solid-like material density with most of the light energy absorbed in a thin surface layer. Powerful USLP creates hot, high-pressure plasma, which is quickly ejected without significant energy diffusion into the bulk of the material, Thus collateral damage is reduced. These and other features make USLPs attractive for a variety of applications. The purpose of this dissertation was development of the physical models and numerical tools for improvement of our understanding of the process and as an aid in optimization of the USLP applications. The study is concentrated on two types of materials - simple metals (materials like aluminum or copper) and wide-bandgap dielectrics (fused silica, water). First, key physical phenomena of the ultrashort light interaction with metals and the models needed to describe it are presented. Then, employing one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics code enhanced with models for laser energy deposition and material properties at low and moderate temperatures, light absorption was self-consistently simulated as a function of laser wavelength, pulse energy and length, angle of incidence and polarization. Next, material response on time scales much longer than the pulse duration was studied using the hydrocode and analytical models. These studies include examination of evolution of the pressure pulses, effects of the shock waves, material ablation and removal and three-dimensional dynamics of the ablation plume. Investigation of the interaction with wide-bandgap dielectrics was stimulated by the experimental studies of the USLP surface ablation of water (water is a model of

  20. Features of femtosecond laser pulses interaction with laser nanoceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestryakov, E. V.; Petrov, V. V.; Trunov, V. I.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Merzliakov, M. A.; Laptev, A. V.

    2007-06-01

    In this work we have performed the experimental researches of features for the generation of supercontinuum in laser materials with identical chemical composition: Yb:YAG crystal and Yb:YAG laser nanoceramics. Dependence of width of supercontinuum spectrum in 515-1100 nm spectral range on femtosecond radiation intensity was investigated. At laser intensity ~1.2•10 14 W/cm2 the short-wave wing of a spectrum for nanoceramics has greater intensity and more flat shape in comparison with crystal. Experiments were made at lens focusing of the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser system radiation with energy up to 0.5 mJ in explored sample that was inside of integrating optical sphere. Also we investigated the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses and the generation of supercontinuum in Nd:Y IIO 3 nanoceramics. The maximum value of laser intensity in experiments was restricted by optical breakdown on target output surface, i.e. was below threshold of ablation of sample substance.

  1. Modeling of Laser Material Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    Irradiation of a substrate by laser light initiates the complex chemical and physical process of ablation where large amounts of material are removed. Ablation has been successfully used in techniques such as nanolithography and LASIK surgery, however a fundamental understanding of the process is necessary in order to further optimize and develop applications. To accurately describe the ablation phenomenon, a model must take into account the multitude of events which occur when a laser irradiates a target including electronic excitation, bond cleavage, desorption of small molecules, ongoing chemical reactions, propagation of stress waves, and bulk ejection of material. A coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD) protocol with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) scheme has been developed which effectively addresses each of these events during the simulation. Using the simulation technique, thermal and chemical excitation channels are separately studied with a model polymethyl methacrylate system. The effects of the irradiation parameters and reaction pathways on the process dynamics are investigated. The mechanism of ablation for thermal processes is governed by a critical number of bond breaks following the deposition of energy. For the case where an absorbed photon directly causes a bond scission, ablation occurs following the rapid chemical decomposition of material. The study provides insight into the influence of thermal and chemical processes in polymethyl methacrylate and facilitates greater understanding of the complex nature of polymer ablation.

  2. Effect of micelle interface on the binding of anticoccidial PW2 peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinoco, Luzineide W. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Nucleo de Pesquisas de Produtos Naturais (Brazil); Gomes-Neto, Francisco; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fabio C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro Nacional de Ressonancia Magnetica Nuclear Jiri Jonas, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Programa de Biologia Estrutural (Brazil)], E-mail: falmeida@cnrmn.bioqmed.ufrj.br

    2007-12-15

    PW2 is an anticoccidial peptide active against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella. We determined the structure of PW2 in dodecylphosphocholine micelles. The structure showed two distinct regions: an amphipathic N-terminal 3{sub 10} helix and an aromatic region containing WWR interface-binding motif. The aromatic region acted as a scaffold of the protein in the interface and shared the same structure in both DPC and SDS micelles. N-terminal helix interacted with DPC but not with SDS interface. Chemical shift change was slow when SDS was added to PW2 in DPC and fast when DPC was added to PW2 in SDS, indicating that interaction with DPC micelles was kinetically more stable than with SDS micelles. Also, DPC interface was able to accommodate PW2, but it maintained the conformational arrangement in the aromatic region observed for SDS micelles. This behavior, which is different from that observed for other antimicrobial peptides with WWR motif, may be associated with the absence of PW2 antibacterial activity and its selectivity for Eimeria parasites.

  3. Femtosecond Laser Interaction with Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E; Benterou, J; Lee, R; Roeske, F; Stuart, B

    2002-03-25

    Femtosecond laser ablation shows promise in machining energetic materials into desired shapes with minimal thermal and mechanical effects to the remaining material. We will discuss the physical effects associated with machining energetic materials and assemblies containing energetic materials, based on experimental results. Interaction of ultra-short laser pulses with matter will produce high temperature plasma at high-pressure which results in the ablation of material. In the case of energetic material, which includes high explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics, this ablation process must be accomplished without coupling energy into the energetic material. Experiments were conducted in order to characterize and better understand the phenomena of femtosecond laser pulse ablation on a variety of explosives and propellants. Experimental data will be presented for laser fluence thresholds, machining rates, cutting depths and surface quality of the cuts.

  4. Ultrashort Pulse (USP) Laser-Matter Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    unlimited 2D electron wavepacket quantum simulation Source: Luis Plaja, U Salamanca 31 Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy in the Extreme...intensity short pulse laser interacting with structured targets yields an enhancement in the number and energy of hot electron. • Monte Carlo

  5. H3PW12O40 Encapsulation by Nanoporous Metal Organic Framework HKUST-1: Synthesis, Characterization, Activity and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Ezzat; Nobakht, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid composite material was obtained through encapsulation of H3PW12O40 (PW) into HKUST-1 (Cu3(BTC)2, BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid), in molar composition of 5 Cu(NO3)2 · 3H2O/2.8 BTC/0.3 PW/0.6 CTAB by adding solutions of PW and copper salts to mixture of BTC and surfactant. The catalyst was characterized by various techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), laser particle size analyzer, Brunauer Emmett-Teller (BET). The acidity of the catalyst was measured by a potentiometric titration with n-butylamine and PW/HKUST-1 presented very strong acidic sites with Ei > 100 mV. This nano catalyst was successfully used for the synthesis of various β-keto enol ethers at 45 °C with 51-98% yield after 5-75 min. The catalyst was easily recycled and reused at least four times without significant loss of its activity (94% yield after forth run). The presence of the PW in PW/HKUST-1 and reused PW/HKUST-1 structure, eliminating any doubt about collapse of the HKUST-1 after catalytic reaction and can be followed by FT-IR, XRD and SEM techniques. Brönsted and Lewis acidity of the PW/HKUST-1 catalyst was distinguished by studying the FT-IR and determined by chemisorption of pyridine. The strength and dispersion of the protons on PW/HKUST-1 was considerably high and active surface protons became more available for reactant.

  6. Enhancement of electron energy to the multi-GeV regime by a dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator pumped by petawatt laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Pae, Ki Hong; Cha, Hyuk Jin; Kim, I Jong; Yu, Tae Jun; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-10-18

    Laser-wakefield acceleration offers the promise of a compact electron accelerator for generating a multi-GeV electron beam using the huge field gradient induced by an intense laser pulse, compared to conventional rf accelerators. However, the energy and quality of the electron beam from the laser-wakefield accelerator have been limited by the power of the driving laser pulses and interaction properties in the target medium. Recent progress in laser technology has resulted in the realization of a petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser, which offers new capabilities for research on laser-wakefield acceleration. Here, we present a significant increase in laser-driven electron energy to the multi-GeV level by utilizing a 30-fs, 1-PW laser system. In particular, a dual-stage laser-wakefield acceleration scheme (injector and accelerator scheme) was applied to boost electron energies to over 3 GeV with a single PW laser pulse. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the multi-GeV electron generation from the dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator driven by PW laser pulses.

  7. Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Osman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Computations are to be performed using the laser driven inertial fusion energy option based on volume ignition with the natural adiabatic self-similarity compression and expansion hydrodynamics [1]. The numerical work includes the establishing of a multi-branch reaction code to be used for simultaneous fusion reactions of D-D, D-T D-He3 and mutual nuclear reaction products. This will permit the studies of neutron lean reactions as well as tritium-rich cases. The D-T reactions will stress the recent new results on one step laser fusion [2] as an alternative to the two-step fast ignitor scheme whose difficulties with new physics phenomena at petawatt laser interaction are more and more evident [3].

  8. Laser interaction with biological material mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the principles of laser interaction with biological cells and tissues of varying degrees of organization. The problems of biomedical diagnostics are considered. Scattering of laser irradiation of blood cells is modeled for biological structures (dermis, epidermis, vascular plexus). An analytic theory is provided which is based on solving the wave equation for the electromagnetic field. It allows the accurate analysis of interference effects arising from the partial superposition of scattered waves. Treated topics of mathematical modeling are: optical characterization of biological tissue with large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the layers, heating blood vessel under laser irradiation incident on the outer surface of the skin and thermo-chemical denaturation of biological structures at the example of human skin.

  9. Controlling Second Harmonic Efficiency of Laser Beam Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method is provided for controlling second harmonic efficiency of laser beam interactions. A laser system generates two laser beams (e.g., a laser beam with two polarizations) for incidence on a nonlinear crystal having a preferred direction of propagation. Prior to incidence on the crystal, the beams are optically processed based on the crystal's beam separation characteristics to thereby control a position in the crystal along the preferred direction of propagation at which the beams interact.

  10. IR Laser Plasma Interaction with Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Qindeel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of laser plasma with respect to glass surface is reported in this paper. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was used as ablation source. Glass material is utilized as target specimen. Aluminum plate is used as a rotating substrate. The dynamic expansion of the plasma was visualized by using CCD video camera and permanently recorded via image processing system. The exposed glass material was examined under photomicroscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The optical radiation from the plasma was observed by using spectrum analyzer. The results obtained show that the plasma is expanded linearly with laser energy. At low level energy symmetrical damage was found. Elongated hole is formed at high level energy. The progressive exposure on glass results in drilling process. The hole diameter is expanded non-linearly while the depth is increased linearly. The glass clusters were uniformly deposited on the aluminum substrate. The size of the glass clusters are in the range of nano and micro meter. The glass-plasma emitted radiation with majority lines of 390 and 450 nm.

  11. Modeling of high power laser interaction with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Kurt; Zahide, Demircioǧlu

    2017-02-01

    Laser matter interaction has been very popular subject from the first recognition of lasers. Laser application in industry or laboratory applications are based on definite interactions of the laser beam with the workpiece. In this paper, an effective model related with high power radiation interaction with metals is presented. In metals, Lorentz-Drude model is used calculate permeability theoretically. The plasma frequency was calculated at various temperatures and using the obtained results the refractive index of the metal (Ag) was investigated. The calculation result revealed that the effect of the temperature need to be considered at reflection and transmission of the laser beam.

  12. Amplification of Short Pulse High Power UV Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    At recent year, with the development of CPA and other amplification technology, laser intensity achieves great increase and laser power can be high to PW(105) now, this ultrashort pulse lasers offer scientists a route to investigate laser-matter interaction in an absolute new regime.So far the researches on ultrashort pulse laser-matter interaction concentrated on infrared regime, yet ultraviolet laser has the advantage in intense field physics and ICF researches for its short wavelength and less nonlinear effects. KrF excimer is the best medium in UV ultrashort pulse amplification for its small saturation energy and high contrast ratio accessible.

  13. Experimental Study on 308nm Laser Interaction with Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A 10 J, 40 ns XeC1 laser interaction with LY12 aluminum and optical glass K9 targets is reported. The properties of laser-produced plasma (LPP) are analyzed. As a result, some parameters such as plasma ignition threshold and plasma plume expansion velocity are obtained. Also, Laser induced pulse on irradiated targets are given.

  14. Mono Energetic Beams from Laser Plasma Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Cameron G; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim; Nieter, Chet; Schröder, Carl B; Toth, Csaba; Van Tilborg, Jeroen

    2005-01-01

    A laser driven wakefield accelerator has been tuned to produce high energy electron bunches with low emittance and energy spread by extending the interaction length using a plasma channel. Wakefield accelerators support gradients thousands of times those achievable in RF accelerators, but short acceleration distance, limited by diffraction, has resulted in low energy beams with 100% electron energy spread. In the present experiments on the L’OASIS laser,* the relativistically intense drive pulse was guided over 10 diffraction ranges by a plasma channel. At a drive pulse power of 9 TW, electrons were trapped from the plasma and beams of percent energy spread containing >200pC charge above 80 MeV and with normalized emittance estimated at < 2 pi -mm-mrad were produced.** Data and simulations (VORPAL***) show the high quality bunch was formed when beam loading turned off injection after initial trapping, and when the particles were extracted as they dephased from the wake. Up to 4TW was g...

  15. Efficient ion generation in laser-foil interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawata S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable improvement is presented on the energy conversion efficiency from laser to protons in a laser-foil interaction by particle simulations. The total laser-proton energy conversion efficiency from laser to protons becomes 16.7%, though a conventional plane foil target serves a rather low efficiency. In our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations the Al multihole structure is also employed, and the laser absorption ratio reaches 71.2%. The main physical reason for the enhancement of the conversion efficiency is a reduction of the laser reflection at the target surface area;

  16. Particle acceleration by ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, K

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of particle acceleration by ultra-increase laser-plasma interaction is explained. Laser light can generate very high electric field by focusing with electromagnetic field matched phase with frequency. 1018 W/cm sup 2 laser light produce about 3 TV/m electric field. Many laser accelerators, which particle acceleration method satisfies phase matching particle and electric field, are proposed. In these accelerators, the Inverse Cherenkov Accelerator, Inverse FEL Accelerator and Laser-Plasma Accelerator are explained. Three laser-plasma acceleration mechanisms: Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator, Laser Wake-Field Accelerator (LWFA) and Self-Modulated LWFA, showed particle acceleration by experiments. By developing a high speed Z pinch capillary-plasma optical waveguide, 2.2 TW and 90 fs laser pulse could be propagated 2 cm at 40 mu m focusing radius in 1999. Dirac acceleration or ultra-relativistic ponderomotive acceleration mechanism can increase energy exponentially. (S.Y.)

  17. Lasers and new trends in laser-tissue interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.

    2004-06-01

    Mid-IR lasers are already used successfully in numerous surgical operations. The Er:YAG and the HF laser, are the main laser sources emitting in the 3.0 μm range of the spectrum, and as this wavelength coincides with the peak of the water and other main soft and hard tissue components absorption curves, it is clear that these lasers would be very useful in numerous medical fields as dentistry, dermatology, angioplasty, ophthalmology etc. Recently, the development of flexible, low loss, able to deliver high power and safe to enter the human body waveguides and fibers for pulsed mid-infrared laser radiation initiated the efforts of the extension of laser surgery in the area of the minimally invasive endoscopy. The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is proposed for diagnosis in several pathologies, as in arterial atherosclerosis, in malignancy or for early dental caries detection. LIF is also investigated as a suitable method for monitoring the on line laser surgery interventions.

  18. Study on the optimum parameters for laser-solid interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liyun Lin(林丽云); Shengbo Wang(王声波); Dahao Guo(郭大浩); Hongxing Wu(吴鸿兴); Xiaoping Xia(夏小平); Yusheng Dai(戴宇生)

    2003-01-01

    The optimum parameters for laser propulsion are discussed, such as laser induced pressure on targets,interaction parameters (Cm, Isp) and optimum laser intensity Is, etc. It is verified that the larger laserpower density will induce higher thrusting force. It is also found that, to drive a 1.010-kg target duringconfined laser ablation in vacuum and a 17.45-g one during direct laser ablation in air at the standardpressure, the needed minimum power intensities are on the same order of magnitude.

  19. Laser-Tissue Interaction in Tattoo Removal by Q-Switched Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) lasers are widely considered the gold standard for tattoo removal, with excellent clinical results, impressive predictability, and a good safety profile. The generation of giant pulses by the method of Q-switching is responsible for the unique laser-tissue interaction that is seen in tattoo removal by QS lasers. The QS lasers work by impaction and dissolution of the tattoo pigments. Mechanical fragmentation of the tattoo pigments encased in intracellular lamellated organelles ...

  20. Tunable degree of localization in random lasers with controlled interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Leonetti, Marco; Lopez, Cefe

    2012-01-01

    We show that the degree of localization for the modes of a random laser (RL) is affected by the inter mode interaction that is controlled by shaping the spot of the pump laser. By experimentally investigating the spatial properties of the lasing emission we infer that strongly localized modes are activated in the low interacting regime while in the strongly interacting one extended modes are found lasing. Thus we demonstrate that the degree o localization may be finely tuned at the micrometer level.

  1. Laser-plasma interactions relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, K.B.

    1998-11-02

    Research into laser-driven inertial confinement fusion is now entering a critical juncture with the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Many of the remaining unanswered questions concerning NIF involve interactions between lasers and plasmas. With the eventual goal of fusion power in mind, laser-plasma interactions relevant to laser fusion schemes is an important topic in need of further research. This work experimentally addresses some potential shortcuts and pitfalls on the road to laser-driven fusion power. Current plans on NIF have 192 laser beams directed into a small cylindrical cavity which will contain the fusion fuel; to accomplish this the beams must cross in the entrance holes, and this intersection will be in the presence of outward-flowing plasma. To investigate the physics involved, interactions of crossing laser beams in flowing plasmas are investigated with experiments on the Nova laser facility at LLNL. It was found that in a flowing plasma, energy is transferred between two crossing laser beams, and this may have deleterious consequences for energy balance and ignition in NIF. Possible solutions to this problem are presented. A recently-proposed alternative to standard laser-driven fusion, the ''fast ignitor'' concept, is also experimentally addressed in this dissertation. Many of the laser-plasma interactions necessary for the success of the fast ignitor have not previously been explored at the relevant laser intensities. Specifically, the transfer of high-intensity laser energy to electrons at solid-target interfaces is addressed. 20-30% conversion efficiencies into forward-propagated electrons were measured, along with an average electron energy that varied with the type of target material. The directionality of the electrons was also measured, revealing an apparent beaming of the highest energy electrons. This work was extended to various intensities and

  2. Interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with metal photocathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yun-Quan; Zhang Jie; Liang Wen-Xi

    2005-01-01

    The features of interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with photocathode are studied theoretically in this paper.The surface temperature of the metal cathode film while femtosecond laser pulses irradiation is studied with twotemperature model. With a simple photoelectric model we obtain the optimum metal film thickness for the backilluminated photocathode. The generated ultrashort photocurrent pulses are strongly dependent on the temperature of the electron gas and the lattice during the femtosecond laser pulse irradiation on the photocathode.

  3. Nonlinear laser-plasma interaction in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, T. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Campbell, M. E.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C.; Kimmel, M. W.; Knapp, P.; Lewis, S. M.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Scoglietti, D. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Smith, I. C.; Speas, C. S.; Vesey, R. A.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. While magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Key LPI processes are determined, and mitigation methods are discussed. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  4. Understanding laser-solid interactions at ultra-high intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C. D.; Gray, R. J.; Carroll, D. C.; MacLellan, D. A.; Powell, H.; Scott, G. G.; Ridgers, C. P.; Brady, C. S.; Neely, D.; Green, J. S.; Booth, N.; McKenna, P.

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of matter with lasers is a subject which has progressed rapidly over the last two decades as higher intensity lasers have opened the door to nonlinear and then relativistic interactions such that applications in ion acceleration and x-ray backlighting sources have become a clear possibility. Until recently, lasers capable of reaching the highest intensities (˜10^21 Wcm-2) have been glass-based systems with a low shot rate making detailed studies prohibitively time consuming. The development of petawatt-class Ti:Sapphire lasers such as Astra Gemini at STFC - Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, has made the systematic studies required to understand such interaction physics feasible. One such experiment on the Astra Gemini laser will be presented. The photon and particle diagnostics used will be explained and their results presented.

  5. Laser-tissue photothermal interaction and tissue temperature change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Andrea K.; Chen, Wei R.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, John A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2000-06-01

    Responses of tissue to laser stimulation are crucial in both disease diagnostics and treatment. In general, when tissue absorbs laser energy photothermal interaction occurs. The most important signature of the photothermal reaction is the tissue temperature change during and after the laser irradiation. Experimentally, the tissue reaction to laser irradiation can be measured by numerous methods including direct temperature measurement and measurement of perfusion change. In this study, a multiple-channel temperature probe was used to measure tissue temperature change during irradiation of lasers with different wavelengths at different power settings. Tissue temperature in chicken breast tissue as well as skin and breast tumor of rats was measured during irradiation of an 805-nm diode laser. The vertical profiles of temperature were obtained using simultaneous measurement at several different locations. The absorption of laser energy by tissue was enhanced by injecting laser-absorbing dye into the tissue. A Nd:YAG laser of 1064-nm wavelength was also used to irradiate turkey breast tissue. Our results showed that both laser penetration ability and photothermal reaction depended on the wavelength of lasers. In the case of 805-nm laser, the temperature increased rapidly only in the region close to the laser source and the thermal equilibrium could be reached within a short time period. The laser absorbing dye drastically enhanced the thermal reaction, resulting in approximately 4-fold temperature increase. On the contrary, the laser beam with 1064-nm wavelength penetrated deeply into tissue and the tissue temperature continued increasing even after a 10-minute laser irradiation.

  6. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coverdale, C.A.

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  7. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coverdale, Christine Ann [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 1016 W/cm2 laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by Lplasma ≥ 2LRayleigh > cτ. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (no ≤ 0.05ncr). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in ω-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  8. High-Intensity Femtosecond Laser Interaction with Rare Gas Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林亚风; 钟钦; 曾淳; 陈哲

    2001-01-01

    With a 45 fs multiterawatt 790 nm laser system and jets of argon and krypton atomic clusters, a study of the interaction of fs intense laser pulses with large size rare gas dusters was conducted. The maximum laser intensity of about 7 × 1016 W/cm2 and dusters composed of thousands of atoms which were determined through Rayleigh scattering measurements were involved inthe experiments. On the one hand, the results indicate that the interaction is strongly cluster size dependent. The stronger the interaction, the larger the clusters are. On the other hand, a saturation followed by a drop of the energy of ions ejected from the interaction will occur when the laser intensity exceeds a definite value for clusters of a certain size.

  9. Investigating Atmospheric Rivers using GPS PW from Ocean Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanza, V.; Foster, J. H.; Businger, S.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric Rivers (AR) can be described as a long narrow feature within a warm conveyor belt where anomalous precipitable water (PW) is transported from low to high latitudes. Close monitoring of ARs is heavily reliant on satellites, which are limited both in space and time, to capture the fluctuations PW particularly over the ocean. Ship-based Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers have been successful in obtaining millimeter PW accuracy within 100 km from the nearest ground-based reference receiver at a 30 second sampling rate. We extended this capability with a field experiment using ship-based GPS PW on board a cargo ship to traverse over the Eastern Pacific Ocean. In one 14-day cruise cycle, between the periods of February 3-16, 2014, the ship-based GPS captured PW spikes >50 mm during the early development of two ARs, which lead to moderate to heavy rainfall events for Hawaii and flood conditions along the West Coast of the United States. Comparisons between PW solutions processed using different GPS reference sites at distances 100-2000 km provided an internal validation for the ship-based GPS PW with errors typically less than 5 mm. Land-based observations provided an external validation and are in good agreement with ship-based GPS PW at distances GPS receivers offer an extremely cost-effective approach for acquiring continuous meteorological observations over the oceans, which can provide important calibration/validation data for satellite retrieval algorithms. Ship-based systems could be particularly useful for augmenting our meteorological observing networks to improve weather prediction and nowcasting, which in turn provide critical support for hazard response and mitigation efforts in coastal regions.

  10. Comparative study on interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-GTA welding and laser-GMA welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghua; Xu, Jiannan; Xin, Lijun; Zhao, Zuofu; Wu, Fufa

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes an investigation on differences in interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-gas tungsten arc (LT) welding and laser-gas metal arc (LM) welding. The characteristics of LT heat source and LM heat source, such as plasma behavior, heat penetration ability and spectral information were comparably studied. Based on the plasma discharge theory, the interactions during plasma discharge were modeled and analyzed. Results show that in both LT and LM welding, coupling discharge between the laser keyhole plasma and arc happens, which strongly enhance the arc. But, the enhancing effect in LT welding is much more sensitive than that in LM welding when parameters are adjusted.

  11. Enhancement of electron energy to multi-GeV regime by a dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator pumped by petawatt laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Cha, Hyuk Jin; Kim, I Jong; Yu, Tae Jun; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration offers the promise of a compact electron accelerator for generating a multi-GeV electron beam using the huge field gradient induced by an intense laser pulse, compared to conventional rf accelerators. However, the energy and quality of the electron beam from the laser wakefield accelerator have been limited by the power of the driving laser pulses and interaction properties in the target medium. Recent progress in laser technology has resulted in the realization of a petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser, which offers new capabilities for research on laser wakefield acceleration. Here, we present a significant increase in laser-driven electron energy to the multi-GeV level by utilizing a 30-fs, 1-PW laser system. In particular, a dual-stage laser wakefield acceleration scheme (injector and accelerator scheme) was applied to boost electron energies to over 3 GeV with a single PW laser pulse. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the multi-GeV electron generation from...

  12. Laser-matter Interaction with Submerged Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariella, R; Rubenchik, A; Norton, M; Donohue, G; Roberts, K

    2010-03-25

    With the long-term goal in mind of investigating if one could possibly design a 'universal solid-sample comminution technique' for debris and rubble, we have studied pulsed-laser ablation of solid samples that were contained within a surrounding fluid. Using pulses with fluences between 2 J and 0.3 J, wavelengths of 351 and 527 nm, and samples of rock, concrete, and red brick, each submerged in water, we have observed conditions in which {micro}m-scale particles can be preferentially generated in a controlled manner, during the laser ablation process. Others have studied laser peening of metals, where their attention has been to the substrate. Our study uses non-metallic substrates and analyzes the particles that are ablated from the process. The immediate impact of our investigation is that laser-comminution portion of a new systems concept for chemical analysis has been verified as feasible.

  13. Fluid-dynamical aspects of laser-metal interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantello, M.; Menin, R.; Donati, V.; Garifo, L.; La Rocca, A. V.; Onorato, M.

    During the interaction of a high-power laser beam with a material surface many fluid-dynamical phenomena arise. The produced flow field interacts with the beam and affects the thermal coupling between the laser energy and the target metal. In this paper the fluid-dynamical aspects of these phenomena are discussed and new experimental results are illustrated. The experiments have been performed in conditions of interest for industrial laser processes with a 15-kW CW CO2 laser. The development and the motion of bright clouds ignited from metal targets at incident laser power up to 11.6 kW, using an f/18 focusing system, have been studied by high speed photographic records. The properties of the cloud have been examined by spectroscopic analysis and absorption measurements.

  14. Laser-Matter Interaction: Classical Regime versus Quantum Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Pálffy, Adriana; Weidenmüller, Hans A

    2016-01-01

    Doppler backscattering of optical laser photons on a "flying mirror" of relativistic electrons promises to yield coherent photons with MeV-range energies. We compare the nuclear interaction of such a laser pulse with the standard atom-laser interaction. The mean-field description of atoms must be replaced by a rate equation and the classical field strength, far too faint in nuclei, by the dipole transition rate. Significant nuclear excitation occurs for photon numbers much smaller than typical for atoms. That drastically reduces the requirements on the experimental realization of a "flying mirror".

  15. Laser--plasma interaction in a theta-pinch geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, W.T.

    1978-06-01

    Prompt stimulated Brillouin scatter (SBS) is studied in an experiment wherein a high power, pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser irradiates an independently produced, theta-pinch plasma. SBS does not significantly affect laser heating of the plasma. Measurements of density profiles and temperature histories permitted examination of laser refraction, local heating and net absorption. Refractive containment of the CO/sub 2/ laser beam by an on-axis density minimum was observed at early times during the laser pulse. However, refractive containment was lost at late times due to the diffusive loss of the density minimum. Classical modeling of the expected heating required ''bleached'' absorption to account for the observed heating. A plasma absorptivity of approximately 46% was inferred from calorimetry measurements at 250 mtorr fill pressure. These results confirm that classical heating and refraction dominated the laser-plasma interaction.

  16. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: The Blood Type Transmutation Induced by Multiple Ultrashort Wavelength Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of ultrashort wavelength multi laser beams with the flowing blood thin films leads to the transmutation of the blood types A, B, and AB into O type. This is a novel mechanism of importance for the transfusion medicine. Laser radiation is in resonance with the eigen-frequency modes of the antigen proteins and forces the proteins to parametrically oscillate until they get kicked out from the surface. The stripping away of antigens is done by the scanning-multiple-lasers of a high repetition rate in the blue-purple frequency domain. The guiding-lasers are in the red-green frequency domain. The laser force, (parametric interaction with the antigen eigen-oscillation), upon the antigen protein molecule must exceed its weight. The scanning laser beam is partially reflected as long as the antigen(s) is not eliminated. The process of the protein detachment can last a few minutes. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  17. Investigation of laser-tissue interaction in medicine by means of laser spectroscopic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, Juergen; Weigmann, Hans-Juergen

    1995-01-01

    Toxic and carcinogenic substances were produced during laser application in medicine for the cutting and evaporation of tissue. The laser smoke presents a danger potential for the medical staff and the patients. The laser tissue interaction process was investigated by means of laser spectroscopic measurements which give the possibility of measuring metastable molecular states directly as a prerequisite to understand and to influence fundamental laser tissue interaction processes in order to reduce the amount of harmful chemicals. Highly excited atomic and molecular states and free radicals (CN, OH, C2, CH, CH2) have been detected applying spontaneous and laser induced fluorescence methods. It was found that the formation of harmful substances in the laser plumes can be reduced significantly by optimization of the surrounding gas atmosphere. A high content of oxygen or water in the interaction zone has been found, in agreement with the results of classical and analytical methods, as a suitable way to decrease pollutant emission. The experimental methods and the principal results are applicable not only in laser medicine but in laser material treatment generally.

  18. MODEL OF LASER INTERACTION WITH LIQUID DROPLET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Volkov,

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. A mathematical model of optical breakdown in the dielectric liquid droplets when exposed to pulsed laser radiation was developed. The process is considered in several stages: heating, evaporation of the particle, forming a steam halo, ionization of the steam halo. Numerical study was carried out on the basis of the mathematical model to determine the threshold characteristics of the laser pulse. Main Results.Distributions of pressure, density and temperature of the particle steam halo were obtained by means of a calculation. The temperature field around the liquid droplet was determined. It has been found that at high energies in the gas bubble, the conditions are provided for thermal gas ionization and start of the electron avalanche, leading to plasma formation. Due to the volumetric heat generation, the droplet is overheated and is in a metastable state. The plasma cloud is almost opaque to radiation that causes an abrupt increase of temperature. As a result, an explosion occurs inside the droplet with the formation of a shock wave that is propagating outward. Practical Relevance.The results can be used to assess the performance of high-power laser scanning (LIDAR under the presence of liquid droplets in the atmosphere and other suspensions. Lasers can be used in fire and explosion aerospace systems. Obtained findings can be applied also in the systems of laser ignition and detonation initiation.

  19. Thermomechanical effects in laser-matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autric, Michel L.

    1998-09-01

    In most of pulsed laser material processing of which drilling, surface treatment, laser cleaning or shock hardening, the incident energy is distributed among several complex phenomena such as reflection, absorption, radiation or hydrodynamic depending on wavelength, polarization, pulse duration, energy end power density, spot size, nature of the material and last but not least the nature and the pressure of the surrounding gas. Experiments were conducted in order to characterize all these phenomena involved in different applications and to contribute in a better understanding of the laser material processing. Experimental data has been obtained from several diagnostic techniques such as integrating sphere, thermocouple probes, ballistic pendulum, pressure gauges, electromagnetic field detectors, spectrographs and high-speed camera over a wide range of energy and power density and gas pressure.

  20. J {psi}, {psi}` and muon pair production in p-W and S-U collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, M.C.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Barriere, C.; Bedjidian, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bussiere, A.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Contardo, D.; Descroix, E.; Devaux, A.; Drapier, O.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Ferreira, R.; Force, P.; Fredj, L.; Gago, J.; Gerschel, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Grosdidier, B.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guichard, A.; Guillaud, J.P.; Haroutunian, R.; Jouan, D.; Kluberg, L.; Kossakowski, R.; Landaud, G.; Lazic, D.; Liaud, P.; Laurenco, C.; Luquin, L.; Malek, F.; Mandry, R.; Mazini, R.; Peralta, L.; Pizzi, J.R.; Racca, C.; Ramos, S.; Romana, A.; Ronceux, B.; Salmeron, R.; Silva, S.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Varela, J.; Vazeille, F. [LAPP, Annecy (France)]|[LPC, Clermont-Ferrand (France)]|[CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)]|[LIP, Lisbon (Portugal)]|[IPN, Orsay (France)]|[LPNHE, Palaiseau (France)]|[CRN, Strasbourg (France)]|[IPN-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); NA38 Collaboration

    1994-01-03

    In this paper we present a study on the production of the J/{psi} and {psi}` resonances, decaying into muon pairs, in S-U collisions, at 200 GeV per incident nucleon. We find that the ratio between {psi}` and J/{psi} yields decreases as E{sub T}, the neutral transverse energy produced in the collision, increases. There is also a clear decrease of this ratio when going from p-W to S-U interactions. Assuming the high mass continuum to be Drell-Yan we discuss the possible understanding of the intermediate dimuon mass region as a superposition of Drell-Yan (extrapolated down in mass) and muon pairs from the semileptonic decays of charmed mesons. The p-W data is found to be explained by this procedure. However, the S-U data seems to be incompatible with a linear extrapolation from the proton-nucleus results. (orig.)

  1. High-Energy Laser-Target Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-06

    Irradtited9B-" aintense Uaser Bea.m (see ref. 6, p. 239). 16. Holt, E. H. and ,askell, R. E. (1365) FoundatioAs of Plasma Dynamics,Macmillar,. 10...the 1973 DoD Laser Effects Hardening Conference (U), Vol. V. Uaser supported absorption waves, mitre Corp, 7. Edwards, A.. Ferriter, N.M., Fleck, J.A

  2. Mathematical Modelling of Laser/Material Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-25

    translated to the model input. Even an experimental mode print can also be digitalised for the model. In trying to describe high order modes matliematically...4. Mazumder J. Steen W.M. "Welding of Ti 6al - 4V by continuous wave CO2 laser". Metal construction Sept. 1980 pp423 - 427. 5. Kogelnik H, Li.T Proc

  3. All-optical radiation reaction in head-on laser electron interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Marija; Grismayer, Thomas; Martins, Joana L.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Silva, Luis O.

    2016-10-01

    Radiation reaction (RR) accounts for the slowdown of a charged particle that occurs when a significant fraction of its kinetic energy is emitted as radiation. Here we show that this effect could be measured in an all-optical setup using a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam colliding with an intense laser pulse. We employ full-scale 3D PIC simulations to show that one can enter a radiation reaction dominated regime with a GeV electron beam and a 30 fs laser of I = 1021W/cm2. The electrons can lose up to 40% of their initial energy, which can be used as an experimental signature in the spectra. Our results indicate that modern laser facilities provide an exciting opportunity to explore classical RR and the near-future laser facilities can be employed to study the RR beyond classical description. By using higher laser intensities (1022-1023W/cm2) , quantum effects such as Compton scattering and Breit-Wheeler pair production become relevant. We have included these quantum effects in our PIC code OSIRIS through a Monte Carlo module, and performed a detailed numerical study of the transition from classical to quantum RR dominated regime. We identified the distinct features in the electron distribution function that could serve as signatures of quantum radiation reaction, and showed that large-scale infrastructures (e.g. NIF and ELI and next generation of PW-class lasers (e. g. CoReLS, Bella-i, Texas Petawatt, Apollon 10 PW) could be employed to test the physics in these extreme scenarios.

  4. Plasma Jet Interaction with Thomson Scattering Probe Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byvank, Tom; Banasek, Jacob; Potter, William; Kusse, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering systems can diagnose plasma temperatures and velocities. When probing a plasma jet with the Thomson scattering laser, we observe a laser-plasma interaction that inputs energy into the plasma jet. The absorbed energy causes a bubble of low density ( 5*1017 cm-2) in the jet (unperturbed 1018 cm-2). A pulsed power machine (1 MA peak current, 100 ns rise time) with a radial foil (15 μm thick Al) configuration generates the plasma jet. We compare the effects of using 10 J and 1 J laser energies, for which the 10 J laser is a larger perturbation. We discuss how the interaction affects the Thomson scattering temperature and velocity measurements. Work supported by National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836 and National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant PHY-1102471.

  5. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  6. Exploring novel structures for manipulating relativistic laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liangliang

    2016-10-01

    The prospect of realizing compact particle accelerators and x-ray sources based on high power lasers has gained numerous attention. Utilization of all the proposed schemes in the field requires the laser-matter-interaction process to be repeatable or moreover, controllable. This has been very challenging at ultra-high light intensities due to the pre-pulse issue and the limitation on target manufacturing. With recent development on pulse cleaning technique, such as XPW and the use of plasma mirror, we now propose a novel approach that leverages recent advancements in 3D nano-printing of materials and high contrast lasers to manipulate the laser-matter interactions on the micro-scales. The current 3D direct laser-writing (DLW) technique can produce repeatable structures with at a resolution as high as 100 nm. Based on 3D PIC simulations, we explored two typical structures, the micro-cylinder and micro-tube targets. The former serves to enhance and control laser-electron acceleration and the latter is dedicated to manipulate relativistic light intensity. First principle-of-proof experiments were carried out in the SCARLET laser facility and confirmed some of our predictions on enhancing direct laser acceleration of electrons and ion acceleration. We believe that the use of the micro-structured elements provides another degree of freedom in LPI and these new results will open new paths towards micro-engineering interaction process that will benefit high field science, laser-based proton therapy, near-QED physics, and relativistic nonlinear optics. This work is supported by the AFOSR Basic Research Initiative (FA9550-14-1-0085).

  7. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong [Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-101, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Tang Zhiping [CAS Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  8. Generation of surface electrons in femtosecond laser-solid interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Miaohua; LI; Yutong; YUAN; Xiaohui; ZHENG; Zhiyuan; LIANG; Wenxi; YU; Quanzhi; ZHANG; Yi; WANG; Zhaohua; WEI; Zhiyi; ZHANG; Jie

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of hot electrons produced by p-polarized femtosecond laser-solid interactions are studied. The experimental results show that the outgoing electrons are mainly emitted in three directions: along the target surface, the normal direction and the laser backward direction. The electrons flowing along the target surface are due to the confinement of the electrostatic field and the surface magnetic field, while the electrons in the normal direction due to the resonant absorption.

  9. Nonlinear Interaction of Transversal Modes in a CO2 Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Ruiz, Ricardo; Mindlin, G. B.; Perez-Garcia, C.; Tredicce, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    We show the possibility of achieving experimentally a Takens-Bogdanov bifurcation for the nonlinear interaction of two transverse modes ($l = \\pm 1$) in a $CO_2$ laser. The system has a basic O(2) symmetry which is perturbed by some symmetry-breaking effects that still preserve the $Z_2$ symmetry. The pattern dynamics near this codimension two bifurcation under such symmetries is described. This dynamics changes drastically when the laser properties are modified.

  10. Interaction physics of multipicosecond Petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, A J; Divol, L

    2012-11-09

    We study the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma over several picoseconds, using two- and three-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. Sustained irradiation with non-diffraction-limited pulses at relativistic intensities yields conditions that differ qualitatively from what is experimentally available today. Nonlinear saturation of laser-driven density perturbations at the target surface causes recurrent emissions of plasma, which stabilize the surface and keep absorption continuously high. This dynamics leads to the acceleration of three distinct groups of electrons up to energies many times the laser ponderomotive potential. We discuss their energy distribution for applications like the fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion.

  11. Interaction of laser radiation with metal island films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditskii, A. A.; Viduta, L. V.; Ostranitsa, A. P.; Tomchuk, P. M.; Iakovlev, V. A.

    1986-08-01

    The emission phenomena arising during the interaction of pulsed laser emission with island films are examined with reference to experimental results obtained for island films of gold irradiated by a CO2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Well reproducible emission pulses that are also accompanied by light pulses are produced at intensities less than 10 to the 5th W/sq cm, with the film structure remaining unchanged. The maximum energy of the electrons emitted under the effect of laser radiation is estimated at 3 eV; the work function is 2.1 eV.

  12. 3d particle simulations on ultra short laser interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishihara, Katsunobu; Okamoto, Takashi; Yasui, Hidekazu [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    1998-03-01

    Two topics related to ultra short laser interaction with matter, linear and nonlinear high frequency conductivity of a solid density hydrogen plasma and anisotropic self-focusing of an intense laser in an overdense plasma, have been investigated with the use of 3-d particle codes. Frequency dependence of linear conductivity in a dense plasma is obtained, which shows anomalous conductivity near plasma frequency. Since nonlinear conductivity decreases with v{sub o}{sup -3}, where v{sub o} is a quivering velocity, an optimum amplitude exists leading to a maximum electron heating. Anisotropic self-focusing of a linear polarized intense laser is observed in an overdense plasma. (author)

  13. Relativistic high-power laser-matter interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamin, Yousef I. [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Physics Department, American University of Sharjah, POB 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Hu, S.X. [Group T-4, Theoretical Division, MS B283, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z. [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Quantum Electronics, Yerevan State University, A. Manoukian 1, Yerevan 375025 (Armenia); Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: keitel@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2006-04-15

    Recent advances in laser technology have pushed the frontier of maximum intensity achieved to about 10{sup 22}W/cm{sup 2} and investigators currently believe even higher intensities may be reached in the near future. This, combined with other breakthroughs on the fronts of short pulse generation and high repetition rates, have stimulated considerable progress, theoretical as well as experimental, in the field of laser-matter interactions. It is now possible to laser-accelerate electrons to a few hundred MeV and laser-induced pair-production and nuclear physics experiments have made significant progress. This article is devoted to a review of the recent advances in the field and stresses quantum phenomena that require laser field intensities in excess of the relativistic threshold of {approx}10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}. Interactions with free electrons, with highly-charged ions and with atoms and clusters, are reviewed. Electron laser acceleration, atomic quantum dynamics, high harmonic generation, quantum electrodynamical effects and nuclear interactions in plasmas and ions, are among the important topics covered in the article.

  14. High power laser-matter interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Mulser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This book intended as a guide for scientists and students who have just discovered the field as a new and attractive area of research, and for scientists who have worked in another field and want to join now the subject of laser plasmas. In the first chapter the plasma dynamics is described phenomenologically by a two fluid model and similarity relations from dimensional analysis. Chapter 2 is devoted to plasma optics and collisional absorption in the dielectric and ballistic model. Linear resonance absorption at the plasma frequency and its mild nonlinearities as well as the self-quenching of high amplitude electron plasma waves by wave breaking are discussed in Chapter 3. With increasing laser intensity the plasma dynamics is dominated by radiation pressure, at resonance producing all kinds of parametric instabilities and out of resonance leading to density steps, self-focusing and filamentation, described in Chapters 4 and 5. A self-contained treatment of field ionization of atoms and related phenomena ar...

  15. Interaction Between K10C4H4FN2O2Sm(PW11O39)2·12.5H2O and Bovine Serum Albumin%有机磷钨多金属氧酸盐FSPW与牛血清白蛋白相互作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王帅帅; 刘霞

    2011-01-01

    利用紫外-可见吸收光谱和荧光光谱法,考查了有机磷钨多金属氧酸盐K10C4H4FN2O2Sm(PW11O39)2·12.5H2O(FSPW)与牛血清白蛋白(BSA)间的相互作用.实验表明,化合物FSPW引起BSA蛋白质荧光强度发生有规律猝灭.结合紫外-可见吸收光谱的结果可以判断,化合物FSPW对BSA的荧光猝灭是与BSA基态分子间发生作用的结果,与BSA结合反应的猝灭机制为静态猝灭.化合物FSPW与BSA相互作用的AG<0,表明它与BSA的结合平衡是一个自发的过程.△H<0、△S<0说明化合物FSPW与BSA的作用过程是一个放热过程,与BSA的相互作用主要是焓驱动的结果.化合物FSPW主要通过氢键和范德华力与BSA发生相互作用.同步荧光光谱表明,化合物FSPW与BSA发生了强结合并进入蛋白质的疏水腔,导致蛋白质的构象发生变化,结合位点接近于色氨酸残基.%The interaction between the polyoxometalate K10C4H4FN2O2Sm(PW11O39)2· 12.5H2O (FSPW) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA)was investigated by using fluorescence and UV/vis. The experimental results show that the regular fluorescence quenching of BSA is caused by the compound FSPW. According to the UV-visible absorption spectra, the fluorescence quenching of BSA is caused by the formation of FSPW-BSA complex, and it is a static quenching. The △G of the process of interaction between the compound FSPW and BSA is less than zero, which indicates that this process is a spontaneous process. The △H and △S are both less than zero, which shows that the binding process of FSPW and BSA is an exothermic molecular interaction, in which the hydrogen bend and van der Waals' force play the major role. The results of synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy show that FSPW is strongly bound with BSA by inserting into the hydmphobic cavity of the protein, and the binding process causes the change of protein conformation. The binding site is close to the tryptophan residue.

  16. Generation of Energetic Particles in Intense Laser Matter Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Muhammad, Tayyab; Bagchi, Suman; Mandal, Tirtha; Chakera, Juzer; Naik, Prasad; Gupta, Parshotam Dass; Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, India. Collaboration; Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna CentreAdvanced Technology, Indore, India. Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The acceleration of high energy ion beams up to several tens of MeV per nucleon following the interaction of an ultra-short (t 1018 W.cm-2. μm-2) laser pulse with solid targets, is one of the burgeoning fields of research in the last few years. Mechanisms leading to forward-accelerated, high quality ion beams, operating at currently accessible laser intensities (up to 1021 W/cm2) in laser-matter interactions, are mainly associated with large electric fields set up at the target rear interface by the laser-accelerated electrons leaving the target. In this paper, we present our recent experimental results on MeV ion generation by mildly relativistic (1019 W / cm - 2) short-pulse (45 fs) laser interaction with foil targets of varying thicknesses, structured / uniform targets (e.g. nano structures on thin metallic foils, sandwich targets). Spectral modification / bunching, and divergence from structured targets will be discussed. DST Ramanujan Fellowship (SR/S2/RJN-25/2012).

  17. Laser-tissue interaction in tattoo removal by q-switched lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Shyamanta

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) lasers are widely considered the gold standard for tattoo removal, with excellent clinical results, impressive predictability, and a good safety profile. The generation of giant pulses by the method of Q-switching is responsible for the unique laser-tissue interaction that is seen in tattoo removal by QS lasers. The QS lasers work by impaction and dissolution of the tattoo pigments. Mechanical fragmentation of the tattoo pigments encased in intracellular lamellated organelles followed by their phagocytosis by macrophages is thought to be the major event in the clearance of pigments by QS lasers. A few novel techniques have been tried in recent times to hasten the clearance of tattoo pigments.

  18. Simulation of intense laser-dense matter interactions. X-ray production and laser absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueshima, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Tajima, Toshiki

    1998-03-01

    The development of short-pulse ultra high intensity lasers will enable us to generate short-pulse intense soft and hard X-rays. Acceleration of an electron in laser field generates intense illuminated located radiation, Larmor radiation, around KeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with 100 TW and 1 {mu}m wave length laser. The Coulomb interaction between rest ions and relativistic electron generates broad energy radiation, bremsstrahlung emission, over MeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with the same condition. These intense radiations come in short pulses of the same order as that of the irradiated laser. The generated intense X-rays, Larmor and bremsstrahlung radiation, can be applied to sources of short pulse X-ray, excitation source of inner-shell X-ray laser, position production and nuclear excitation, etc. (author)

  19. Laser-tissue interaction in tattoo removal by Q-switched lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamanta Barua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Q-switched (QS lasers are widely considered the gold standard for tattoo removal, with excellent clinical results, impressive predictability, and a good safety profile. The generation of giant pulses by the method of Q-switching is responsible for the unique laser-tissue interaction that is seen in tattoo removal by QS lasers. The QS lasers work by impaction and dissolution of the tattoo pigments. Mechanical fragmentation of the tattoo pigments encased in intracellular lamellated organelles followed by their phagocytosis by macrophages is thought to be the major event in the clearance of pigments by QS lasers. A few novel techniques have been tried in recent times to hasten the clearance of tattoo pigments.

  20. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Galow, Benjamin J; Liseykina, Tatyana V; Harman, Zoltan; Keitel, Christoph H

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen plasma cell is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. Feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10^7 particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1 %) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10^21 W/cm^2.

  1. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galow, Benjamin J; Salamin, Yousef I; Liseykina, Tatyana V; Harman, Zoltán; Keitel, Christoph H

    2011-10-28

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen gas target is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. The feasibility of generating ultraintense (10(7) particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1%) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10(21) W/cm(2).

  2. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galow, Benjamin J.; Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Salamin, Yousef I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, American University of Sharjah, POB 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Liseykina, Tatyana V. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Harman, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen gas target is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. Feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10{sup 7} particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1%) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}.

  3. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianxing; Galow, Benjamin J.; Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Salamin, Yousef I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, American University of Sharjah, POB 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Harman, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Interactions of linearly and radially polarized frequency-chirped laser pulses with single protons and hydrogen gas targets are studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. The feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10{sup 7} particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Gaul, E.; Rougk, J.; Aymond, F.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T. [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1–10 mm{sup 3}) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2 × 10{sup 6} and 1.6 × 10{sup 7} neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  5. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Bang, W; Quevedo, H J; Bernstein, A C; Gaul, E; Rougk, J; Aymond, F; Donovan, M; Ditmire, T

    2013-01-01

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1-10 mm^3) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2x10^6 and 1.6x10^7 neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  6. Solitons in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bai-song; DU Shu-cheng

    2007-01-01

    Single or/and multipeak solitons in plasma under relativistic electromagnetic field are reviewed.The incident electromagnetic field iS allowed to have a zero or/and nonzero initial constant amplitude.Some interesting numerical results are obtained that include a high-number multipeak laser pulse and single or/and low-number multipeak plasma wake structures.It is also shown that there exists a combination of soliton and oscillation waves for plasma wake field.Also,the electron density exhibits multi-caviton structure or the combination of caviton and oscillation.A complete eigenvalue spectrum of parameters is given wherein some higher peak numbers of multipeak electromagnetic solitons in the plasma are included.Moreover, some interesting scaling laws are presented for field energy via numerical approaches.Some implications of results are discussed.

  7. Design and current progress of the Apollon 10 PW project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.P.Zou; C.Le Blanc; D.N.Papadopoulos; G.Chériaux; P.Georges; G.Mennerat; F.Druon; L.Lecherbourg; A.Pellegrina; P.Ramirez; F.Giambruno; A.Fréneaux; F.Leconte; D.Badarau; J.M.Boudenne; D.Fournet; T.Valloton; J.L.Paillard; J.L.Veray; M.Pina; P.Monot; J.P.Chambaret; P.Martin; F.Mathieu; P.Audebert; F.Amiranoff

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the Apollon project is the generation of 10 PW peak power pulses of 15 fs at 1 shot/minute. In this paper the Apollon facility design, the technological challenges and the current progress of the project will be presented.

  8. Integrated Laser-Target Interaction Experiments on the RAL Petawatt Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P K; Key, M H; Mackinnon, A J; Berry, R; Borghesi, M; Chambers, D M; Chen, H; Clarke, R; Damian, C; Eagleton, R; Freeman, R; Glenzer, S; Gregori, G; Heathcote, R; Hey, D; Izumi, N; Kar, S; King, J; Nikroo, A; Niles, A; Park, H S; Pasley, J; Patel, N; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R A; Steinman, D; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Town, R; Van Maren, R; Theobald, W; Wilks, S C; Zhang, B

    2006-10-11

    Since the construction of the first Petawatt laser on the Nova laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory we are witnessing the emergence of similar Petawatt-class laser systems at laboratories all around the world. This new generation of lasers, able to deliver several hundred joules of energy in a sub-picosecond pulse, has enabled a host of new discoveries to be made and continues to provide a valuable tool to explore new regimes in relativistic laser-plasma physics--encompassing high energy X-rays and -rays, relativistic electrons, intense ion beams, and superstrong magnetic fields. The coupling in the near-future of multi-kiloJoule Petawatt-class lasers with large-scale fusion lasers.including the NIF and Omega EP (US), LIL (France), and FIREX (Japan)--will further expand opportunities in fast ignition, high energy X-ray radiography, and high energy density physics research. The 500 J Petawatt laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory is currently the highest energy short-pulse laser in the world. In this paper we describe a recent experimental campaign carried out on the facility. The campaign, performed by a large collaborative team from eight different laboratories, was designed to study a variety of relativistic laser-interaction phenomena including laser absorption, fast electron transport, proton heating, and high-brightness x-ray generation. The wide scope of the experiment necessitated the deployment of a very large set of diagnostics--in total twenty-five separate instruments. In order to obtain the most comprehensive set of measurements all twenty-five diagnostics were fielded simultaneously on every shot.

  9. Front surface structured targets for enhancing laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joseph; George, Kevin; Ji, Liangliang; Yalamanchili, Sasir; Simonoff, Ethan; Cochran, Ginevra; Daskalova, Rebecca; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Lewis, Nathan; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    We present recent progress made using front surface structured interfaces for enhancing ultrashort, relativistic laser-plasma interactions. Structured targets can increase laser absorption and enhance ion acceleration through a number of mechanisms such as direct laser acceleration and laser guiding. We detail experimental results obtained at the Scarlet laser facility on hollow, micron-scale plasma channels for enhancing electron acceleration. These targets show a greater than three times enhancement in the electron cutoff energy as well as an increased slope temperature for the electron distribution when compared to a flat interface. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we have modeled the interaction to give insight into the physical processes responsible for the enhancement. Furthermore, we have used PIC simulations to design structures that are more advantageous for ion acceleration. Such targets necessitate advanced target fabrication methods and we describe techniques used to manufacture optimized structures, including vapor-liquid-solid growth, cryogenic etching, and 3D printing using two-photon-polymerization. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-14-1-0085.

  10. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, M A [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.

  11. Interaction of pulsed CO2 laser radiation with optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ruediger; Hugenschmidt, Manfred; Geiss, L.; Stechele, E.

    1995-03-01

    Pulsed high power CO2-laser irradiation can cause damage to optical materials. Some results obtained at ISL with a repetitively pulsed CO2-laser with pulse energies up to 24 J are presented in this paper. In production facilities with CO2-lasers, optics transmitting in the visible spectral range like glass or PMMA are used as protection windows against scattered light. These materials have small skin depths for electromagnetic waves at 10,6 micrometers , typically in the order of some micrometers , so the interaction takes place in thin surface layers. Under high power laser radiation the transparency of the optics is lowered. On the other hand infrared transmitting optics like KCl or ZnSe show a low intrinsic absorption for CO2-laser radiation. Theoretical estimations matching with the experimental observations showed, however, that strong heating occurs, if a thin layer of inhomogeneities, typically some micrometers thick, is included in the surrounding material with slightly higher absorption than the surrounding lowless material. Under these assumptions the thermally induced stress inside the materials can explain the experimentally observed mechanical damage. Besides these thermal damage effects mechanical momenta are transferred by pulsed laser radiation to the optics. Experimental results as obtained by a ballistic pendulum are reported.

  12. Femtosecond laser pulse train interaction with dielectric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Caulier, O Dematteo; Chimier, B; Skupin, S; Bourgeade, A; Léger, C Javaux; Kling, R; Hönninger, C; Lopez, J; Tikhonchuk, V; Duchateau, G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of trains of femtosecond microjoule laser pulses with dielectric materials by means of a multi-scale model. Our theoretical predictions are directly confronted with experimental observations in soda-lime glass. We show that due to the low heat conductivity, a significant fraction of the laser energy can be accumulated in the absorption region. Depending on the pulse repetition rate, the material can be heated to high temperatures even though the single pulse energy is too low to induce a significant material modification. Regions heated above the glass transition temperature in our simulations correspond very well to zones of permanent material modifications observed in the experiments.

  13. Intense terahertz radiation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, G. Q.; Li, Y. T.; Li, C.; Liu, H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. M.; Yuan, X. H.; Nilsen, J.; Ozaki, T.; Wang, W. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    The development of tabletop intense terahertz (THz) radiation sources is extremely important for THz science and applications. This paper presents our measurements of intense THz radiation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions under different experimental conditions. Several THz generation mechanisms have been proposed and investigated, including coherent transition radiation (CTR) emitted by fast electrons from the target rear surface, transient current radiation at the front of the target, and mode conversion from electron plasma waves (EPWs) to THz waves. The results indicate that relativistic laser plasma is a promising driver of intense THz radiation sources.

  14. Quantum beam generations via the laser-cluster interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yuji; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tania; Tampo, Motonobu; Yogo, Akifumi; Kando, Masaki; Hayashi, Yukio; Kameshima, Takeshi; Homma, Takayuki; Pirozhkov, Alexander; Kato, Yoshiaki; Tajima, Toshiki; Daido, Hiroyuki; Bulanov, Sergei

    2008-11-01

    The novel soft X-ray light source using the supersonic expansion of the mixed gas of He and CO2, when irradiated by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulse, is observed to enhance the radiation of soft X-rays from the CO2 clusters. Using this soft X-ray emissions, nanostructure images of 100-nm thick Mo foils in a wide field of view (mm^2 scale) with high spatial resolution (800 nm) are obtained with high dynamic range LiF crystal detectors. We also demonstrate the acceleration of charged particles via the laser-cluster interactions.

  15. 2nd Workshop on Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    1972-01-01

    Paul Harteck Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, New York When the Maser and the Laser Were discovered, people were speculating if this was the beginning of a new page, or even a new chapter, in the Book of Physics. The Second Workshop on "Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena" held in Hartford made it clear that the perspective had changed, that people now question if the consequences of these discoveries constitute a new chapter, or possibly a new era in Physics. While the papers presented were all stimulating and of out­ standing quality, of special interest were the experiments which demonstrated that triggering of thermonuclear fusion by Laser techniques is indeed in the realm of the possible. Along these lines, I enjoy recalling an anecdote concerning the late F. G. Houtermans. I think that all who knew him will agree that he was an unusual genius and at the same time a very amusing colleague.

  16. Interaction of Repetitively Pulsed High Energy Laser Radiation With Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1986-10-01

    The paper is concerned with laser target interaction processes involving new methods of improving the overall energy balance. As expected theoretically, this can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed by using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 kW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminium for example were thereby increased by lore than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements were found for the overall absorptivities that were increased by this method by more than an order of magnitude.

  17. Interplay of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Inertial Fusion Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Moody, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are investigated via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI—specifically stimulated Raman scatter and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)—mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus, modifies laser propagation. This model shows reduced CBET and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling and data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.

  18. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  19. Comparisons between PW Doppler system and enhanced FM Doppler system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Pedersen, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a new implementation of an echo-ranging FM Doppler system with improved performance, relative to the FM Doppler system reported previously. The use of long sweeps provides a significant reduction in peak to average power ratio compared to pulsed wave (PW) emission. A PW Doppler...... system exploits the direct relationship between arrival time of the received signal and range from the transducer. In the FM Doppler systems, a similar relationship exists in the spectral domain of the demodulated received signals, so that range is represented by frequency. Thus, a shift in location...... of moving scatterers between consecutive emissions corresponds to a frequency shift in the spectral signature. The improvement relative to the earlier version of the FM Doppler system is attained by utilizing cross-correlation of real spectra rather than of magnitude spectra for assessing flow velocity...

  20. 75 FR 66796 - Pricewaterhousecoopers LLP (“PwC”), Internal Firm Services Client Account Administrators Group...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Employment and Training Administration Pricewaterhousecoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client... subject firm should read PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client Account... subject firm to read PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client Account...

  1. Nonlinear neutrino-photon interactions inside strong laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Meuren, Sebastian; Di Piazza, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Even though neutrinos are neutral particles and interact only via the exchange of weak gauge bosons, charged leptons and quarks can mediate a coupling to the photon field beyond tree level. Inside a relativistically strong laser field nonlinear effects in the laser amplitude can play an important role, as electrons and positrons interact nonperturbatively with the coherent part of the photon field. Here, we calculate for the first time the leading-order contribution to the axial-vector--vector current-coupling tensor inside an arbitrary plane-wave laser field (which is taken into account exactly by employing the Furry picture). The current-coupling tensor appears in the calculation of various electroweak processes inside strong laser fields like photon emission or trident electron-positron pair production by a neutrino. Moreover, as we will see below, the axial-vector--vector current-coupling tensor contains the Adler-Bell-Jackiw (ABJ) anomaly. This occurrence renders the current-coupling tensor also interest...

  2. Extremely high-intensity laser interactions with fundamental quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Di Piazza, A; Hatsagortsyan, K Z; Keitel, C H

    2011-01-01

    The field of laser-matter interaction traditionally deals with the response of atoms, molecules and plasmas to an external light wave. However, the recent sustained technological progress is opening the possibility of employing intense laser radiation to prompt or substantially influence physical processes beyond atomic-physics energy scales. Available optical laser intensities exceeding $10^{22}\\;\\text{W/cm$^2$}$ can push the fundamental light-electron interaction to the extreme limit where radiation-reaction effects dominate the electron dynamics, can shed light on the structure of the quantum vacuum and can prime the creation of particles like electrons, muons and pions and the corresponding antiparticles. Also, novel sources of intense coherent high-energy photons and laser-based particle colliders can pave the way to nuclear quantum optics and can even allow for potential discovery of new particles beyond the Standard Model. These are the main topics of the present article, which is devoted to a review o...

  3. The radiation reaction effect in ultra intense laser foil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, O.; Jirka, M.; Masek, M.; Limpouch, J.; Bussmann, M.; Korn, G.

    2013-05-01

    Since the radiation reaction effect on electron propagation is very small in most cases, it can be usually neglected and the Lorentz force equation can be applied. However, ultra-intense lasers with normalized vector potential of the order of 100 can accelerate electrons to relativistic velocities with very high gamma factor. When the electron is accelerated to such high velocities the amount of emitted radiation may become large and radiation damping and emission of energetic photons should be considered. This work studies the influence of the radiation reaction force on laser interaction with solid foil targets. It compares different approaches adopted in PIC simulations to take into account the radiation reaction. The simulations of a counter-propagating relativistic electron and an ultra-intense laser beam demonstrate a strong energy loss of electrons due to non-linear Compton scattering. The interaction of ultra-intense laser pulse with solid foil is studied using PIC simulations. It is shown that the effect of radiation reaction strongly depends on the recirculation of high-energy electrons. When the recirculation is efficient, the radiation coming from the target is much more intense and it shows different spectral and angular characteristics.

  4. Interactions between lasers and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junpeng; Liu, Hongwei; Tok, Eng Soon; Sow, Chorng-Haur

    2016-05-03

    The recent increasing research interest in two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has led to an explosion of in the discovery of novel physical and chemical phenomena in these materials. Among the 2D family, group-VI transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), such as represented by MoS2 and WSe2, are remarkable semiconductors with sizable energy band gaps, which make the TMDs promising building blocks for new generation optoelectronics. On the other hand, the specificity and tunability of the band gaps can generate particularly strong light-matter interactions between TMD crystals and specific photons, which can trigger complex and interesting phenomena such as photo-scattering, photo-excitation, photo-destruction, photo-physical modification, photochemical reaction and photo-oxidation. Herein, we provide an overview of the phenomena explained by various interactions between lasers and the 2D TMDs. Characterizations of the optical fundamentals of the TMDs via laser spectroscopies are reviewed. Subsequently, photoelectric conversion devices enabled by laser excitation and the functionality extension and performance improvement of the TMDs materials via laser modification are comprehensively summarized. Finally, we conclude the review by discussing the prospects for further development in this research area.

  5. Two dimensional simulation of high power laser-surface interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, S.R.; Wilke, M.D.; Green, R.E.L.; Johnson, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Busch, G.E. [KMS Fusion, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    For laser intensities in the range of 10{sup 8}--10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, and pulse lengths of order 10 {micro}sec or longer, the authors have modified the inertial confinement fusion code Lasnex to simulate gaseous and some dense material aspects of the laser-matter interaction. The unique aspect of their treatment consists of an ablation model which defines a dense material-vapor interface and then calculates the mass flow across this interface. The model treats the dense material as a rigid two-dimensional mass and heat reservoir suppressing all hydrodynamic motion in the dense material. The computer simulations and additional post-processors provide predictions for measurements including impulse given to the target, pressures at the target interface, electron temperatures and densities in the vapor-plasma plume region, and emission of radiation from the target. The authors will present an analysis of some relatively well diagnosed experiments which have been useful in developing their modeling. The simulations match experimentally obtained target impulses, pressures at the target surface inside the laser spot, and radiation emission from the target to within about 20%. Hence their simulational technique appears to form a useful basis for further investigation of laser-surface interaction in this intensity, pulse-width range. This work is useful in many technical areas such as materials processing.

  6. Integrated Laser-Target Interaction Experiments on the RAL Petawatt Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P. K.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Akli, K.; Berry, R.; Borghesi, M.; Brummit, P. A.; Chambers, D.; Clarke, R. J.; Damian, C.; Chen, H.; Eagleton, R.; Freeman, R.; Glenzer, S.; Gregori, G.; Heathcote, R.; Izumi, N.; Kar, S.; King, J. A.; Kock, J.; Kuba, J.; May, M.; Moon, S.; Neely, D.; Neville, D. R.; Nikroo, A.; Niles, A.; Pasley, J.; Patel, N.; Park, H. S.; Romagnani, L.; Shepherd, R.; Snavely, R. A.; Stephens, R.; Stoeckl, C.; Storm, M.; Theobald, W.; Van Maren, R.; Wilks, S. C.; Zhang, B.

    2005-07-01

    We report on two recent experimental campaigns performed on the new Petawatt laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK.The laser has recently demonstrated performance characteristics of 400 J of laser energy being delivered on target in a sub 400 fs pulse, reaching a peak focal intensity on the order of 10''21 W/cm''2. The experiments covered multiplic areas of investigation including hot electron transport in planar foil and cone focus geometries, relativistic laser-solid interactions proton beam focusing and heating, and high energy K-alpha production and radiography. A somewhat novel approach was taken to the experiments in that all of the diagnostics required for the different areas of study were fielded simultaneously and operated on all shots. Thus, we were able to obtain extensive sets of measurements on a single-shot basis which provides significant benefit to our understanding of the laser-target interaction conditions and plasma properties. (Author)

  7. High Harmonic Inverse Free Electron Laser Interaction at 800 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, C

    2005-03-08

    We demonstrate for the first time an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) operating at 800 nm and observe multiple resonances of the IFEL interaction. The IFEL is tested at half its fundamental resonance electron energy and scanned through multiple harmonics by adjusting the undulator field strength. We obtain a peak modulation of {approx}50 keV FWHM and observe the 4th through 6th harmonics of the IFEL resonance.

  8. Broadband Brillouin Scatter from CO2-Laser-Target Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, G. R.; Grek, B.; Johnston, T. W.; Pépin, H.; Church, P.; Lavigne, P.; Martin, F.; Décoste, R.

    1982-05-01

    Light scattered near the incident wavelength from CO2 laser-solid target interactions in oblique incidence shows the spectral signature of Brillouin scattering both in the backward and in the near specular directions. This instability is apparently seeded by broadband scatter from the critical density surface and then amplified in the underdense plasma. 60% of the incident light is scattered, and the Brillouin contribution to total scatter may be large if the source is also large.

  9. Influence Of Laser-Target Interaction On The Polarization Of A CO2-Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Keming; Herziger, Gerd; Loosen, Peter; Seelig, W.

    1989-03-01

    Laser materials processing shows a special pecularity compared to other customary techniques: the (generally reflecting) target introduces optical feedback into the system. This feedback changes the mode properties of the laser radiation according to the targets dynamics. We report on one of these aspects of laser-target interaction resulting in the change of the polarization of the incident light. Based on rate equations, a theoretical model is presented that allows the calculation of this change with respect of the target properties, yielding a simple relation for the two orthogonal planes of polarization of a laser mode. This relation turns out to be linearly dependent of a function ψ(t) which describes the optical feedback. The relation holds for target reflexions of up to 10% and for times larger than T1 • T2/T1 - T2 (where T1, T2 are the time constants of the passive resonator for the two orthogonal Planes of polarization). Experiments supporting the model are presented. The model offers a method for the modulation of laser radiation without change of frequency or intensity. It might also be of interest for high-power CO2 laser cutting and welding of metals.

  10. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-16

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  11. High Efficiency Electron-Laser Interactions in Tapered Helical Undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph Patrick

    Efficient coupling of relativistic electron beams with high power radiation lies at the heart of advanced accelerator and light source research and development. The inverse free electron laser is a stable accelerator capable of harnessing very high intensity laser electric fields to efficiently transfer large powers from lasers to electron beams. In this dissertation, we first present the theoretical framework to describe the interaction, and then apply our improved understanding of the IFEL to the design and numerical study of meter-long, GeV IFELs for compact light sources. The central experimental work of the dissertation is the UCLA BNL helical inverse free electron laser experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory which used a strongly tapered 54cm long, helical, permanent magnet undulator and a several hundred GW CO2 laser to accelerate electrons from 52 to 106MeV, setting new records for inverse free electron laser energy gain (54MeV) and average accelerating gradient (100MeV/m). The undulator design and fabrication as well as experimental diagnostics are presented. In order to improve the stability and quality of the accelerated electron beam, we redesigned the undulator for a slightly reduced output energy by modifying the magnet gap throughout the undulator, and we used this modified undulator to demonstrated capture of >25% of the injected beam without prebunching. In the study of heavily loaded GeV inverse free electron lasers, we show that a majority of the power may be transferred from a laser to the accelerated electron beam. Reversing the process to decelerate high power electron beams, a mechanism we refer to as tapering enhanced stimulated superradiant amplification, offers a clear path to high power light sources. We present studies of radiation production for a wide range of wavelengths (10mum, 13nm, and 0.3nm) using this method and discuss the design for a deceleration experiment using the same undulator used

  12. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-12-21

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ{sup 2}, where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  13. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedyalkov, N.N., E-mail: nnn_1900@yahoo.com [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Imamova, S.E.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Toshkova, R.A.; Gardeva, E.G.; Yossifova, L.S.; Alexandrov, M.T. [Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Obara, M. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  14. Studies of Positron Generation from Ultraintense Laser-Matter Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gerald Jackson

    Laser-produced pair jets possess unique characteristics that offer great potential for their use in laboratory-astrophysics experiments to study energetic phenomenon such as relativistic shock accelerations. High-flux, high-energy positron sources may also be used to study relativistic pair plasmas and useful as novel diagnostic tools for high energy density conditions. Copious amounts of positrons are produced with MeV energies from directly irradiating targets with ultraintense lasers where relativistic electrons, accelerated by the laser field, drive positron-electron pair production. Alternatively, laser wakefield accelerated electrons can produce pairs by the same mechanisms inside a secondary converter target. This dissertation describes a series of novel experiments that investigate the characteristics and scaling of pair production from ultraintense lasers, which are designed to establish a robust platform for laboratory-based relativistic pair plasmas. Results include a simple power-law scaling to estimate the effective positron yield for elemental targets for any Maxwellian electron source, typical of direct laser-target interactions. To facilitate these measurements, a solenoid electromagnetic coil was constructed to focus emitted particles, increasing the effective collection angle of the detector and enabling the investigation of pair production from thin targets and low-Z materials. Laser wakefield electron sources were also explored as a compact, high repetition rate platform for the production of high energy pairs with potential applications to the creation of charge-neutral relativistic pair plasmas. Plasma accelerators can produce low-divergence electron beams with energies approaching a GeV at Hz frequencies. It was found that, even for high-energy positrons, energy loss and scattering mechanisms in the target create a fundamental limit to the divergence and energy spectrum of the emitted positrons. The potential future application of laser

  15. Ptychographic measurements of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.; Monchocé, S.; Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Kahaly, S.; Quéré, F.

    2016-04-01

    The extreme intensities now delivered by femtosecond lasers make it possible to drive and control relativistic motion of charged particles with light, opening a path to compact particle accelerators and coherent X-ray sources. Accurately characterizing the dynamics of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions as well as the resulting light and particle emissions is an essential step towards such achievements. This remains a considerable challenge, as the relevant scales typically range from picoseconds to attoseconds in time, and from micrometres to nanometres in space. In these experiments, owing to the extreme prevalent physical conditions, measurements can be performed only at macroscopic distances from the targets, yielding only partial information at these microscopic scales. This letter presents a major advance by applying the concepts of ptychography to such measurements, and thus retrieving microscopic information hardly accessible until now. This paves the way to a general approach for the metrology of extreme laser-plasma interactions on very small spatial and temporal scales.

  16. Modeling plasma plumes generated from laser solid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Scott C.; Higginson, D. P.; Link, A. J.; Park, H.-S.; Ping, Y.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Ross, J. S.; Orban, C.; Hua, R.

    2016-10-01

    Laser pulses interacting with solid targets sitting in a vacuum form the basis for a large class of High Energy Density physics experiments. The resulting hydrodynamical evolution of the target during and after this interaction can be modeled using myriad techniques. These techniques range from pure particle-in-cell (PIC) to pure radiation-hydrodynamics, and include a large number of hybrid techniques in between. The particular method employed depends predominately on laser intensity. We compare and contrast several methods relevant for a large range of laser intensities (from Iλ2 1 ×1012W . μm2 /cm2 to Iλ2 1 ×1019W . μm2 /cm2) and energies (from E 100 mJ to E 100 kJ .) Density, temperature, and velocity profiles are benchmarked against recent experimental data. These experimental data include proton radiographs, time resolved x-ray images, and neutron yield and spectra. Methods to self-consistently handle backscatter and detailed energy deposition will also be discussed. LLNL-ABS-697767. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Laser safety evaluation for high-energy laser interaction with solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Jean-François; Pudo, Dominik; Théberge, Francis; Châteauneuf, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Laser safety regulating the deployment of kW-class high-energy laser (HEL) technologies in outdoor applications can rapidly cause significant planning and operations issues due to the ranges involved. Safety templates based on a simplistic approach of assuming a continuous wave laser beam incident on a highly reflective totally flat solid surface of infinite size can easily result in ranges of tens of kilometers for kW-class lasers. Due to the complexity of HEL-matter interactions, the assumptions underlying the aforementioned approach are, however, deemed inappropriate. We identify a more suitable approach, which assumes a time-variant reflection pattern as well as a change in the variance of beam divergence as it reflects from the target's surface. Based on experimental results, we instead propose to assess the nominal ocular hazard distance by applying the American National Standard Institute rules for time-variant multipulse laser exposure and using measured divergence angles from the target's surface. The resulting safety templates, thus, exhibit a higher fidelity with respect to the behavior of the reflection patterns while reducing the hazard zones.

  18. Pump-Controlled Modal Interactions in Microdisk Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Redding, Brandon; Solomon, Glenn S; Cao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an effective control of nonlinear interactions of lasing modes in a semiconductor microdisk cavity by shaping the pump profile. A target mode is selected at the expense of its competing modes either by increasing their lasing thresholds or suppressing their power slopes above the lasing threshold. Despite of strong spatial overlap of the lasing modes at the disk boundary, adaptive pumping enables an efficient selection of any lasing mode to be the dominant one, leading to a switch of lasing frequency. The theoretical analysis illustrates both linear and nonlinear effects of selective pumping, and quantify their contributions to lasing mode selection. This work shows that adaptive pumping not only provides a powerful tool of controlling the nonlinear process in multimode lasers, but also enables the tuning of lasing characteristic after the lasers have been fabricated.

  19. Quantum electron self-interaction in a strong laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Meuren, S

    2011-01-01

    The quantum state of an electron in a strong laser field is altered if the interaction of the electron with its own electromagnetic field is taken into account. Starting from the Schwinger-Dirac equation, we determine the states of an electron in a plane-wave field with inclusion, at leading order, of its electromagnetic self-interaction. On the one hand, the electron states show a pure "quantum" contribution to the electron quasi-momentum, conceptually different from the conventional "classical" one arising from the quiver motion of the electron. On the other hand, the electron self-interaction induces a distinct dynamics of the electron spin, whose effects are shown to be measurable in principle with available technology.

  20. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  1. Laser Ion Acceleration from the Interaction of Ultra-Intense laser Pulse with thi foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Matthew Mark [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-03-12

    The discovery that ultra-intense laser pulses (I > 1018 W/cm2) can produce short pulse, high energy proton beams has renewed interest in the fundamental mechanisms that govern particle acceleration from laser-solid interactions. Experiments have shown that protons present as hydrocarbon contaminants on laser targets can be accelerated up to energies > 50 MeV. Different theoretical models that explain the observed results have been proposed. One model describes a front-surface acceleration mechanism based on the ponderomotive potential of the laser pulse. At high intensities (I > 1018 W/cm2), the quiver energy of an electron oscillating in the electric field of the laser pulse exceeds the electron rest mass, requiring the consideration of relativistic effects. The relativistically correct ponderomotive potential is given by Up = ([1 + Iλ2/1.3 x 1018]1/2 - 1) moc2, where Iλ2 is the irradiance in Wμm2/cm2 and moc2 is the electron rest mass.At laser irradiance of Iλ2 ~ 1018 Wμm2/cm2, the ponderomotive potential can be of order several MeV. A few recent experiments--discussed in Chapter 3 of this thesis--consider this ponderomotive potential sufficiently strong to accelerate protons from the front surface of the target to energies up to tens of MeV. Another model, known as Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA), describes the mechanism as an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the laser target. According to the TNSA model, relativistic hot electrons created at the laser-solid interaction penetrate the foil where a few escape to infinity. The remaining hot electrons are retained by the target potential and establish an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the target.

  2. Abundance analysis of the slow nova PW Vulpeculae 1984

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, G J; Shore, S N; Hauschildt, P H; Schwarz, Greg J.; Shore, Steven N.; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    1997-01-01

    We determine the elemental abundances for the ejecta of the slow nova PW Vul 1984. Our technique uses a minimization of the emission line fits of a photoionization model to available ultraviolet, optical and infrared spectra. We find the following abundances (by number) with respect to solar: He/H = 1.0 $^{+7}_{-2}$. In addition, there is weak evidence for solar Ne and Mg and twice solar Fe. Previous studies (Saizar et al. 1991 and Andreã et al. 1991, 1994) of PW Vul have yielded considerable differences in their derived elemental abundances for the ejecta. Our abundances fall in between the previous studies. To explain the discrepant abundances, we analyze in detail the data and methods used to obtain the previous results. The abundances of Saizar et al. (1991) are significantly smaller then our values because of the lower electron temperature used by Saizar et al. in deriving elemental abundances from ion abundances. Andreã et al. (1991) used an ionization correction method to obtain their abundances and ...

  3. Brilliant gamma-ray emission from near-critical plasma interaction with ultraintense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Bin

    2016-10-01

    γ -ray is the electromagnetic radiation having the highest photon energy and smallest wavelength, which has a broad range of applications in material science, nuclear physics, astrophysics and so on. In this talk, I shall report recent progresses on theoretical and numerical studies of laser-driven brilliant gamma-ray radiation in near critical plasmas at Peking University (PKU), where an intense circularly polarized (CP) lasers. A novel resonant acceleration scheme can be achieved for generating dense relativistic electron bunches and emitting brilliant γ-ray pulses, where the laser frequency matches with that of electron betatron oscillation under quasistatic electromagnetic fields and radiation reaction in plasma. 3D PIC simulations show that brilliant γ-ray radiation with energy of 3J and brightness of 1024photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW (at 3MeV) can be produced by using CP lasers at intensity 1022W/cm2. It is found that the total number of radiated photons scales as a2 /S 1 / 2 and the conversion efficiency scales as a3 / S , where S =(ne /nc) a and a is the laser normalized amplitude. Further studies show that if the laser intensity is increased to 1023W/cm2, the quantum electrodynamic (QED) effects are in favor of trapping and achieving resonance acceleration of electrons, resulting in production of brilliant γ-ray pulses with unprecedented power of 6.7PW and brightness of 1025photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW (at 15MeV). To the best of our knowledge, this is the γ-ray source with the highest peak brightness in tens-MeV regime ever reported in the literature. supported by the NSF, Nos. 11575298 and 1000-Talents Program of China.

  4. Photonics linear and nonlinear interactions of laser light and matter

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, R

    2007-01-01

    This book covers the fundamental properties and the description of single photons and light beams, experimentally and theoretically. It explains the essentials of linear interactions and most nonlinear interactions between light and matter in both the transparent and absorbing cases. It also provides a basic understanding of modern quantum optics and lasers, as well as the principles of nonlinear optical spectroscopy. It is self-consistent and enriched by a large number of calculated illustrations, examples, and descriptive tables. Graduate students in physics and electrical engineering, as well as other sciences, will find this book a thorough introduction to the field, while for lecturers and scientists it is a rich source of useful information and a ready-to-hand reference. The new edition has been thoroughly expanded and revised in all sections

  5. A Warm Fluid Model of Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkenton, G. M.; Shadwick, B. A.; Esarey, E. H.; Leemans, W. P.

    2001-10-01

    Following up on our previous work on modeling intense laser-plasma interactions with cold fluids,(B.A.Shadwick, G. M. Tarkenton, E.H. Esarey, and W.P. Leemans, ``Fluid Modeling of Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions'', in Advanced Accelerator Concepts), P. Colestock and S. Kelley editors, AIP Conf. Proc. 569 (AIP, NY 2001), pg. 154. we are exploring warm fluid models. These models represent the next level in a hierarchy of complexity beyond the cold fluid approximation. With only a modest increase in computation effort, warm fluids incorporate effects that are relevant to a variety of technologically interesting cases. We present a derivation of the warm fluid from a kinetic (i.e. Vlasov) perspective and make a connection with the usual relativistic thermodynamic approach.(S. R. de Groot, W. A. van Leeuwen and Ch. G. van Weert, Relativistic Kinetic Theory: Principles and Applications), North-Holland (1980). We will provide examples where the warm fluids yield physics results not contained in the cold model and discuss experimental parameters where these effects are believed to be important.

  6. Effects of laser intensity on the emission direction of fast electrons in laser-solid interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军; 张杰; 邱阳; 盛政明; 李玉同; 金展; 滕浩

    2003-01-01

    The dependence of emission direction of fast electrons on the laser intensity has been investigated. The experimental results show that, at nonrelativistic laser intensities, the emission of fast electrons is mainly in the polarization plane. With the increase of the laser intensity, fast electrons emit towards the laser propagation direction from laser polarization direction. At relativistic laser intensities, fast electrons move away from the laser polarization plane, closely to the reflection direction of the incident laser beam.

  7. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  8. Investigation of laser-surface interactions and optical damage mechanisms using excitation by pairs of picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Lee, H. W. H.; Hughes, Robert S.

    1990-07-01

    It is demonstrated that laser-surface interactions that cause optical surface damage of nominally transparent materials can be investigated by observing the effects of excitation by pairs of picosecond pulses separated by a variable time delay. Laser-induced emission of neutrals is used as the detection mechanism in the present experiments.

  9. Plasma lenses for ultrashort multi-petawatt laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Hafizi, B; Johnson, L A; Penano, J; Hubbard, R F; Helle, M; Kaganovich, D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal plasma lens can provide the focusing power of a small f-number, solid-state focusing optic at a fraction of the diameter. An ideal plasma lens, however, relies on a steady-state, linear laser pulse-plasma interaction. Ultrashort multi-petawatt (MPW) pulses possess broad bandwidths and extreme intensities, and, as a result, their interaction with the plasma lens is neither steady state nor linear. Here we examine nonlinear and time-dependent modifications to plasma lens focusing, and show that these result in chromatic and phase aberrations and amplitude distortion. We find that a plasma lens can provide enhanced focusing for 30 fs pulses with peak power up to ~1 PW. The performance degrades through the MPW regime, until finally a focusing penalty is incurred at ~10 PW.

  10. Magnus expansion for laser-matter interaction: Application to generic few-cycle laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klaiber, Michael; Dimitrovski, Darko; Briggs, John S.

    2009-01-01

    We treat the interaction of an atom with a short intense few-cycle laser pulse by the use of the Magnus expansion of the time-evolution operator. Terms of the Magnus expansion up to the third order in the pulse duration are evaluated explicitly, and expressions for the transition probability...... of the Magnus approximation are in excellent agreement with time-dependent transition probabilities obtained from accurate ab initio numerical calculations. However, the limitation of the Magnus expansion for pulses having both vanishing momentum and position shifts is demonstrated also....

  11. Simulation study on thermal effect of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Jin, Guangyong; Yuan, Boshi

    2016-10-01

    Laser machining is one of most widely used technologies nowadays and becoming a hot industry as well. At the same time, many kinds of carbon fiber material have been used in different area, such as sports products, transportation, microelectronic industry and so on. Moreover, there is lack of the combination research on the laser interaction with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material with simulation method. In this paper, the temperature status of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP will be simulated and discussed. Firstly, a laser thermal damage model has been built considering the heat conduction theory and thermal-elasto-plastic theory. Then using COMSOL Multiphysics software to build the geometric model and to simulate the mathematic results. Secondly, the functions of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP has been introduced. Material surface temperature increased by time during the laser irradiating time and the increasing speed is faster when the laser fluence is higher. Furthermore, the peak temperature of the center of material surface is increasing by enhanced the laser fluence when the pulse length is a constant value. In this condition, both the ablation depth and the Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) is larger when increased laser fluence. When keep the laser fluence as a constant value, the laser with shorter pulse length is more easier to make the CFRP to the vaporization material. Meanwhile, the HAZ is becoming larger when the pulse length is longer, and the thermal effect depth is as the same trend as the HAZ. As a result, when long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material, the thermal effect is the significant value to analysis the process, which is mostly effect by laser fluence and pulse length. For laser machining in different industries, the laser parameter choose should be different. The shorter pulse length laser is suitable for the laser machining which requires high accuracy, and the longer one is better for the deeper or larger

  12. Spectral and spatial structure of extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser plasma-wall interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Stuik, R.; F. Bijkerk,; Shevelko, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation was observed during the interaction of low-temperature laser plasmas and wall materials. Laser plasmas with electron temperature T-e similar to 40 eV were created on massive solid targets (CF2 and Al) by an excimer KrF laser (248 nm/0.5 J/13 ns/1 Hz). The

  13. Film-substrate hydrodynamic interaction initiated by femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlov, V. A.; Inogamov, N. A.; Zhakhovsky, V. V.; Ilnitsky, D. K.; Migdal, K. P.; Shepelev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Action of an ultrashort single laser pulse onto a thin metal film is considered. Disruption of a plane freestanding film quickly heated by a laser is the simplest model of the laser thermomechanical spallation. There is a sharp spallation (ablation) threshold Fabl dividing dynamics of a freestanding film to two regimes: below or above the threshold Fabl. Problem of significant importance is: how this picture will change when a film is deposited onto a substrate? We have solved this problem. It is found that there are two thresholds Fdelam < F < Fabl and the four regimes of motion relative to the case of a freestanding film. For the range of fluences 0 < F < Fdelam a film oscillates remaining on a substrate. Oscillations decay in time due to irradiation of the sonic waves into substrate. For Fdelam < F < Fabl + ΔF the film delaminates from the substrate because negative pressure (tensile stress) propagating from the vacuum boundary with the rarefaction acoustic wave achieves the film-substrate contact boundary and overcomes adhesion strength of a contact. The addition ΔF to the freestanding case is small in the case when the ratio η of the acoustic impedances of substrate to a film is small. This is the case of the gold or silver films on a glass. The third is the complicated regime with interacting delamination and spallation processes when F ≈ Fabl + ΔF. In the fourth regime Fabl + ΔF < F there is the disruption of a film into two halves. The external half flies away while the internal one remains on substrate.

  14. Electromagnetic Pulses Generated From Laser Target Interactions at Shenguang II Laser Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinwen; Li, Tingshuai; Yi, Tao; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Ming; Yang, Weiming; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-10-01

    Significant electromagnetic pulses (EMP) can be generated by the intensive laser irradiating solid targets in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). To evaluate the EMP intensity and distribution in and outside the laser chamber, we designed and fabricated a discone antenna with ultra-wide bands of over 10 GHz. The return loss (S11 parameter) of this antenna was below -10 dB and could even achieve under -30 dB at 3.1 GHz. The EMP intensity in this study at 80 cm and 40 cm away from the target chamber center (TCC) reached 400 kV/m and 2000 kV/m. The current results are expected to offer preliminary information to study physics regarding laser plasma interactions and will also lay experimental foundation for EMI shielding design to protect various diagnostics. supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. ZYGX2015J108) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575166 and 51581140)

  15. Measuring fast electron spectra and laser absorption in relativistic laser-solid interactions using differential bremsstrahlung photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, R H H; Perez, F; Streeter, M J V; Davies, J R; Schlenvoigt, H -P; Santos, J J; Hulin, S; Lancaster, K L; Baton, S D; Rose, S J; Norreys, P A

    2013-01-01

    A photon detector suitable for the measurement of bremsstrahlung spectra generated in relativistically-intense laser-solid interactions is described. The Monte Carlo techniques used to back-out the fast electron spectrum and laser energy absorbed into fast electrons are detailed. A relativistically-intense laser-solid experiment using frequency doubled laser light is used to demonstrate the effective operation of the detector. The experimental data was interpreted using the 3-spatial-dimension Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Pelowitz 2008), and the fast electron temperature found to be 125 keV.

  16. Measuring fast electron spectra and laser absorption in relativistic laser-solid interactions using differential bremsstrahlung photon detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R H H; Clark, E L; Pérez, F; Streeter, M J V; Davies, J R; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Santos, J J; Hulin, S; Lancaster, K L; Baton, S D; Rose, S J; Norreys, P A

    2013-08-01

    A photon detector suitable for the measurement of bremsstrahlung spectra generated in relativistically intense laser-solid interactions is described. The Monte Carlo techniques used to extract the fast electron spectrum and laser energy absorbed into forward-going fast electrons are detailed. A relativistically intense laser-solid experiment using frequency doubled laser light is used to demonstrate the effective operation of the detector. The experimental data were interpreted using the 3-spatial-dimension Monte Carlo code MCNPX [D. Pelowitz, MCNPX User's Manual Version 2.6.0, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2008], and the fast electron temperature found to be 125 keV.

  17. Testing relativity again, laser, laser, laser, laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einstein, A.

    2015-01-01

    laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser,

  18. Fibrogenic Potential of PW1/Peg3 Expressing Cardiac Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniz-Galende, Elisa; Roux, Maguelonne; Nadaud, Sophie; Mougenot, Nathalie; Bouvet, Marion; Claude, Olivier; Lebreton, Guillaume; Blanc, Catherine; Pinet, Florence; Atassi, Fabrice; Perret, Claire; Dierick, France; Dussaud, Sébastien; Leprince, Pascal; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Marazzi, Giovanna; Sassoon, David; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien

    2017-08-08

    Pw1 gene expression is a marker of adult stem cells in a wide range of tissues. PW1-expressing cells are detected in the heart but are not well characterized. The authors characterized cardiac PW1-expressing cells and their cell fate potentials in normal hearts and during cardiac remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI). A human cardiac sample was obtained from a patient presenting with reduced left ventricular (LV) function following a recent MI. The authors used the PW1(nLacZ+/-) reporter mouse to identify, track, isolate, and characterize PW1-expressing cells in the LV myocardium in normal and ischemic conditions 7 days after complete ligature of the left anterior descending coronary artery. In both human and mouse ischemic hearts, PW1 expression was found in cells that were mainly located in the infarct and border zones. Isolated cardiac resident PW1(+) cells form colonies and have the potential to differentiate into multiple cardiac and mesenchymal lineages, with preferential differentiation into fibroblast-like cells but not into cardiomyocytes. Lineage-tracing experiments revealed that PW1(+) cells differentiated into fibroblasts post-MI. Although the expression of c-Kit and PW1 showed little overlap in normal hearts, a marked increase in cells coexpressing both markers was observed in ischemic hearts (0.1 ± 0.0% in control vs. 5.7 ± 1.2% in MI; p cells that showed cardiogenic potential, c-Kit(+)/PW1(+) cells were fibrogenic. This study demonstrated the existence of a novel population of resident adult cardiac stem cells expressing PW1(+) and their involvement in fibrotic remodeling after MI. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Laser-plasma interactions and implosion symmetry in rugby hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Pierre; Berger, R. L.; Lasinski, B. F.; Ross, J. S.; Divol, L.; Williams, E. A.; Meeker, D.; Langdon, B. A.; Park, H.; Amendt, P.

    2011-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer is studied in the context of ``rugby''-hohlraum experiments at the Omega laser facility in FY11, in preparation for future NIF experiments. The transfer acts in opposite direction between rugby and cylinder hohlraums due to the different beam pointing geometries and flow patterns. Its interaction with backscatter is also different as both happen in similar regions inside rugby hohlraums. We will analyze the effects of non-linearities and temporal beam smoothing on energy transfer using the code pF3d. Calculations will be compared to experiments at Omega; analysis of future rugby hohlraum experiments on NIF will also be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. 60th Scottish Universities Summer School in Physics: 6th Laser-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A; Jaroszinski, D A

    2009-01-01

    Presents diagnostic methods, experimental techniques, and simulation tools used to study and model laser-plasma interactions. This book discusses the basic theory of the interaction of intense electromagnetic radiation fields with matter.

  1. Contrasting the beam interaction characteristics of selected lasers with a partially stabilized zirconia bio-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J.

    2002-08-01

    Differences in the beam interaction characteristics of a CO2 laser, a Nd : YAG laser, a high power diode laser (HPDL) and an excimer laser with a partially stabilized zirconia bio-ceramic have been studied. A derivative of Beer-Lambert's law was applied and the laser beam absorption lengths of the four lasers were calculated as 33.55×10-3 cm for the CO2 laser, 18.22×10-3 cm for the Nd : YAG laser, 17.17×10-3 cm for the HPDL and 8.41×10-6 cm for the excimer laser. It was determined graphically that the fluence threshold values at which significant material removal was effected by the CO2 laser, the Nd : YAG laser, the HPDL and the excimer laser were 52 J cm-2, 97 J cm-2, 115 J cm-2 and 0.48 J cm-2, respectively. The thermal loading value for the CO2 laser, the Nd : YAG laser, the HPDL and the excimer laser were calculated as being 1.55 kJ cm-3, 5.32 kJ cm3, 6.69 kJ cm-3 and 57.04 kJ cm-3, respectively.

  2. 76 FR 40594 - Special Conditions: Pratt and Whitney Canada Model PW210S Turboshaft Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    .... Applicability These special conditions are applicable to the PWC PW210S turbo shaft engine. If PWC applies later... following special conditions as part of the type certification basis for the PWC PW210S turbo shaft engine... Turboshaft Engine AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final special...

  3. Impurity and defect interactions during laser thermal annealing in Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milazzo, R., E-mail: ruggero.milazzo@unipd.it; De Salvador, D.; Carnera, A.; Napolitani, E. [CNR-IMM MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Impellizzeri, G.; Privitera, V. [CNR-IMM MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Piccinotti, D. [CNR-IMM MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); IM2NP, CNRS-Universités d' Aix-Marseille et de Toulon, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); La Magna, A. [CNR-IMM, Z.I. VIII Strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); Fortunato, G. [CNR-IMM, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy); Portavoce, A.; Mangelinck, D. [IM2NP, CNRS-Universités d' Aix-Marseille et de Toulon, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2016-01-28

    The microscopic mechanisms involving dopants, contaminants, and defects in Ge during pulsed melting laser thermal annealing (LTA) are investigated in detail. Samples both un-implanted and implanted with As or B are processed by LTA as well as characterized in terms of chemical (1D and 3D), electrical, and strain profiling. The clustering of As is directly measured by 3D chemical profiling and correlated with its partial electrical activation along with a reduction of the lattice strain induced by As atoms. A semi-quantitative microscopic model involving the interaction with mobile As-vacancy (AsV) complexes is proposed to describe the clustering mechanism. Boron is shown to follow different clustering behavior that changes with depth and marked by completely different strain levels. Oxygen penetrates from the surface into all the samples as a result of LTA and, only in un-implanted Ge, it occupies an interstitial position inducing also positive strain in the lattice. On the contrary, data suggest that the presence of As or B forces O to assume different configurations with negligible strain, through O-V or O-B interactions for the two dopant species, respectively. These data suggest that LTA does not inject a significant amount of vacancies in Ge, at variance with Si, unless As atoms or possibly other n-type dopants are present. These results have to be carefully considered for modeling the LTA process in Ge and its implementation in technology.

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of a target on operation of a pulsed CO2 laser emitting microsecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. Yu; Dolgov, V. A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1987-12-01

    The profile of pulses emitted by a TEA CO2 laser with an unstable resonator changed as a result of interaction of laser radiation with the surface of a metal in the presence of a breakdown plasma. This influence of a target on laser operation and its possible applications in laser processing of materials are analyzed.

  5. Four-color laser irradiation system for laser-plasma interaction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, D.M.; Henesian, M.A.; Wilcox, R.B. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Since 1986, optical smoothing of the laser irradiance on targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has gained increasing attention. Optical smoothing can significantly reduce wavefront aberrations that produce nonuniformities in the energy distribution of the focal spot. Hot spots in the laser irradiance can induce local self focusing of the light, producing filamentation of the plasma. Filamentation can have detrimental consequences on the hydrodynamics of an ICF plasma, and can affect the growth of parametric instabilities, as well as add to the complexity of the study of such instabilities as stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). As experiments approach and exceed breakeven (i.e., where driver energy = fusion yield), the likelihood of significant excitation of these processes increases. As a result, the authors are including a scheme for implementing optical-beam smoothing for target experiments in the baseline design for the proposed next-generation ICF facility--the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To verify the efficacy of this design for the suppression of parametric instabilites in NIF-like indirect-drive targets, the authors successfully modified a Nova beamline to simulate the proposed NIF conditions. In this article, they discuss the laser science associated with a four-color target campaign on Nova to test the effect of f-number (ratio of focal length to beam diameter) and temporal smoothing on the scaling of SBS with a four-segment interaction beam using NIF-like parameters. The results of the target series associated with the four-color configuration are discussed elsewhere.

  6. A Theory of Interaction Mechanism between Laser Beam and Paper Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piili, Heidi

    Paper making and converting industry in Europe is suffering from transfer of basic manufacturing to fast-growing economies, such as China and Brazil. Pulp and paper production volume in Finland, Sweden and France was the same in 2011 as it was in 2000. Meanwhile China has tripled its volume and Brazil doubled. This is a situation where innovative solutions for papermaking and converting industry are needed. Laser can be solution for this, as it is fast, flexible, accurate and reliable. Before industrial application, characteristics of laser beam and paper material interaction has to be understood. When this fundamental knowledge is known, new innovations can be created. Fulfilling the lack of information on interaction phenomena can assist in the way of lasers for wider use of technology in paper making and converting industry. This study was executed by treating dried kraft pulp (grammage 67 g m-2) with different laser power levels, focal point settings and interaction time. Laser equipment was TRUMPF TLF HQ2700 CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 μm). Interaction between laser beam and dried kraft pulp was detected with multi-monitoring system (MMS), which consisted of spectrometer, pyrometer and active illumination imaging system. There is two different dominating mechanisms in interaction between laser beam and paper material. Furthermore, it was noticed that there is different interaction phases within these two interaction mechanisms. These interaction phases appear as function of time and as function of peak intensity of laser beam. Limit peak intensity divides interaction mechanism from one-phase interaction into dual-phase interaction.

  7. Laser equipment development and laser-matter interaction investigations at Havana University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Luis; Garcia, Tupac; Picans, Jose; Arronte, Miguel; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Flores, Teresa; Jimenez, Ernesto

    1999-07-01

    The research projects at the Laser Technology Laboratory of Havana University are devoted to Nd:YAG lasers development and to the implementation of new laser applications in different fields. Relative to the lasers research the objective is the development of compact, light and relative low-cost lasers. This development is based on a vertical integration strategy that establishes the own elements production as pumping cavities, multilayer mirrors and filters, power supplies control units and others. Several investigations are carried out using these lasers: thin film deposition of semiconductor, ferroelectric and magnetic materials by laser ablation, subsurface laser marking of transparent materials, pulse laser surface silicon texturing and laser cleaning of art works.

  8. Relative Nonlinear Electrodynamics Interaction of Charged Particles with Strong and Super Strong Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Avetissian, Hamlet

    2006-01-01

    This book covers a large class of fundamental investigations into Relativistic Nonlinear Electrodynamics. It explores the interaction between charged particles and strong laser fields, mainly concentrating on contemporary problems of x-ray lasers, new type small set-up high-energy accelerators of charged particles, as well as electron-positron pair production from super powerful laser fields of relativistic intensities. It will also discuss nonlinear phenomena of threshold nature that eliminate the concurrent inverse processes in the problems of Laser Accelerator and Free Electron Laser, thus creating new opportunities for solving these problems.

  9. Nonlinear theory of laser-induced dipolar interactions in arbitrary geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmoon, Ephraim

    2013-01-01

    Polarizable dipoles, such as atoms, molecules or nanoparticles, subject to laser radiation, may attract or repel each other. We derive a general formalism in which such laser-induced dipole-dipole interactions (LIDDI) in any geometry and for any laser strength are described in terms of the resonant dipole-dipole interaction (RDDI) between dipoles dressed by the laser. Our expressions provide a physically clear and technically simple route towards the analysis of LIDDI in a general geometry. This approach can treat both mechanical and internal-state interactions between the dipoles. Our general results reveal LIDDI effects due to nonlinear dipole-laser interactions, unaccounted for by previous treatments of LIDDI. We discuss, via several simple approaches, the origin of these nonlinear effects and their absence in previous works.

  10. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Composition and dynamics of an erosion plasma produced by microsecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Grishina, V. G.; Derkach, O. N.; Sebrant, A. Yu; Stepanova, M. A.

    1995-08-01

    The ion and energy compositions were determined and the dynamics was studied of an erosion plume formed by microsecond CO2 laser pulses incident on a graphite target. The ionic emission lines were used to find the electron density and temperature of the plasma on the target surface. The temperature of the plasma source did not change throughout the line emission time (4 μs). At the plasma recombination stage the lines of the C II, C III, and C IV ions were accompanied by bands of the C2 molecule near the target surface and also near the surface of an substrate when a plasma flow interacted with it. Ways were found for controlling the plume expansion anisotropy and for producing plasma flows with controlled parameters by selection of the conditions during formation of a quasisteady erosion plasma flow.

  11. Discrete Variational Approach for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J. Paxon; Shadwick, B. A.

    2014-10-01

    The traditional approach for fluid models of laser-plasma interactions begins by approximating fields and derivatives on a grid in space and time, leading to difference equations that are manipulated to create a time-advance algorithm. In contrast, by introducing the spatial discretization at the level of the action, the resulting Euler-Lagrange equations have particular differencing approximations that will exactly satisfy discrete versions of the relevant conservation laws. For example, applying a spatial discretization in the Lagrangian density leads to continuous-time, discrete-space equations and exact energy conservation regardless of the spatial grid resolution. We compare the results of two discrete variational methods using the variational principles from Chen and Sudan and Brizard. Since the fluid system conserves energy and momentum, the relative errors in these conserved quantities are well-motivated physically as figures of merit for a particular method. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY-1104683.

  12. X-ray diagnostics for laser matter interaction experiments; Diagnostics X pour les experiences d'interaction laser-matiere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troussel, Ph

    2000-07-01

    Advances in the field of laser-driven inertially confined thermonuclear fusion research since the early 1990's are reviewed. It covers the experimental techniques used to study the interaction of laser radiation with matter and high density plasma. A high performance instrumentation (diagnostics) for observation of X radiation (from a few eV to a few keV) will be required to understand the physical processes involved in the interaction. This paper is a three-part: first part, describes diagnostics metrology realized around different X-ray sources (synchrotron, laser plasma...); a second part, synthesizes theoretical and experimental X-ray optics studies and show the interest for direct applications as X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging around laser-produced plasma; a third part, is a review of high resolution X-ray imaging, performances of these optical system were summarized. (author)

  13. Interaction of plasmas in laser ion source with double laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuwa, Y., E-mail: yasuhiro.fuwa@riken.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Tokyo (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Sekine, M. [Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Cinquegrani, D. [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Romanelli, M. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Multiple laser shots could be used to elongate an ion beam pulse width or to intensify beam current from laser ion sources. In order to confirm the feasibility of the multiple shot scheme, we investigated the properties of plasmas produced by double laser shots. We found that when the interval of the laser shots is shorter than 10 μs, the ion current profile had a prominent peak, which is not observed in single laser experiments. The height of this peak was up to five times larger than that of single laser experiment.

  14. The laser-matter interaction. Press conference wednesday 17 november 1999; L'interaction laser-matiere. Conference de presse mercredi 17 novembre 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen-Tannoudji, C. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Dept. de Physique, 75 - Paris (France); Mons, M.; Schmidt, M.; Salieres, P. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules, DRECAM, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chieze, J.P. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee, DAPNIA, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1999-11-01

    During the press conference of wednesday 17 november 1999, scientists of the CEA presented the knowledge and the researches in the domain of the laser-matter interactions. The possibilities of the new ultra-short pulses laser offer to study in real time the molecular dynamic, the molecules and chemical reactions vibrations. The texts of the five speeches form this paper. The CEA missions are also recalled. (A.L.B.)

  15. 75 FR 66797 - PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (“PwC”) Internal Firm Services Client Account Administrators Group...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Employment and Training Administration PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (``PwC'') Internal Firm Services Client... read PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client Account Administrators Group... PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client Account Administrators Group. The amended...

  16. Three-dimensional numerical investigations of the laser-beam interactions in an undulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hai-Xiao; LIN Tang-Yu; YAN Jun; WANG Dong; DAI Zhi-Min

    2011-01-01

    Laser-beam interaction in an undulator is commonly suggested in the development of free electron laser(FEL)schemes. In this paper, a three-dimensional algorithm is developed to assist in laser-beam interaction simulation in an undulator, which is built on the basis of the fundamentals of electrodynamics, i.e.the electron's behavior is determined by the magnetic field and the laser electric field in the time domain. On the basis of the algorithm, the detuning effect in a laser heater, the carrier envelope phase effect of a few-cycle laser in attosecond X-ray FEL schemes and output wavelength tuning in a high gain harmonic generation FEL are numerically discussed.

  17. PIC simulations of the production of high-quality electron beams via laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, C. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and INFN/Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: carlo.benedetti@bo.infn.it; Londrillo, P. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Petrillo, V.; Serafini, L. [INFN/Milano, Via Celoria 14, 10133 Milano (Italy); Sgattoni, A. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and INFN/Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Tomassini, P. [INFN/Milano, Via Celoria 14, 10133 Milano (Italy); Turchetti, G. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and INFN/Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2009-09-01

    We present some numerical studies and parameter scans performed with the electromagnetic, relativistic, fully self-consistent Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code ALaDyn (Acceleration by LAser and DYNamics of charged particles), concerning the generation of a low emittance, high charge and low momentum spread electron bunch from laser-plasma interaction in the Laser WakeField Acceleration (LWFA) regime, in view of achieving beam brightness of interest for FEL applications.

  18. Azimuthal asymmetry in collective electron dynamics in relativistically transparent laser-foil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, B.; Powell, H. W.; Carroll, D. C.; Murphy, C. D.; Stockhausen, L. C.; Rusby, D. R.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, R.; Booth, N.; Symes, D. R.; Hawkes, S. J.; Torres, R.; Borghesi, M.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.

    2014-09-01

    Asymmetry in the collective dynamics of ponderomotively-driven electrons in the interaction of an ultraintense laser pulse with a relativistically transparent target is demonstrated experimentally. The 2D profile of the beam of accelerated electrons is shown to change from an ellipse aligned along the laser polarization direction in the case of limited transparency, to a double-lobe structure aligned perpendicular to it when a significant fraction of the laser pulse co-propagates with the electrons. The temporally-resolved dynamics of the interaction are investigated via particle-in-cell simulations. The results provide new insight into the collective response of charged particles to intense laser fields over an extended interaction volume, which is important for a wide range of applications, and in particular for the development of promising new ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration mechanisms involving ultrathin target foils.

  19. Laser-material interaction during atom probe tomography of oxides with embedded metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, D.; Arnoldi, L.; Devaraj, A.; Vella, A.

    2016-10-01

    Oxide-supported metal nano-particles are of great interest in catalysis but also in the development of new large-spectrum-absorption materials. The design of such nano materials requires three-dimensional characterization with a high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. The laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography (La-APT) presents both these capacities if an accurate understanding of laser-material interaction is developed. In this paper, we focus on the fundamental physics of field evaporation as a function of sample geometry, laser power, and DC electric field for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO. By understanding the laser-material interaction through experiments and a theoretical model of heat diffusion inside the sample after the interaction with laser pulse, we point out the physical origin of the noise and determine the conditions to reduce it by more than one order of magnitude, improving the sensitivity of the La-APT for metal-dielectric composites.

  20. Fast scaling of energetic protons generated in the interaction of linearly polarized femtosecond petawatt laser pulses with ultrathin targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    Laser-driven proton/ion acceleration is a rapidly developing research field attractive for both fundamental physics and applications such as hadron therapy, radiography, inertial confinement fusion, and nuclear/particle physics. Laser-driven proton/ion beams, compared to those obtained in conventional accelerators, have outstanding features such as low emittance, small source size, ultra-short duration and huge acceleration gradient of ∼1 MeV μm-1. We report proton acceleration from ultrathin polymer targets irradiated with linearly polarized, 30-fs, 1-PW Ti:sapphire laser pulses. A maximum proton energy of 45 MeV with a broad and modulated profile was obtained when a 10-nm-thick target was irradiated at a laser intensity of 3.3 × 1020 W/cm2. The transition from slow (I1/2) to fast scaling (I) of maximum proton energy with respect to laser intensity I was observed and explained by the hybrid acceleration mechanism including target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration in the acceleration stage and Coulomb-explosion-assisted free expansion in the post acceleration stage.

  1. Theory and simulation of ultra-short pulse laser interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.; Walling, R.; Price, D.; Guethlein, G.; Stewart, R.; Libby, S.; Graziani, F.; Levatin, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes recent Livermore work aimed at building computational tools to describe ultra-short pulse laser plasmas. We discuss calculations of laser absorption, atomic data for high-charge ions, and a new idea for linear-response treatment of non-equilibrium phenomena near LTE. (author)

  2. The Modeling of Coupled Electromagnetic-Thermo-Mechanical Laser Interactions and Microstructural Behavior of Energetic Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BROWN, JUDITH ALICE. The Modeling of Coupled Electromagnetic- Thermo -Mechanical Laser Interactions and Microstructural Behavior of...Energetic Aggregates. (Under the direction of Dr. Mohammed Zikry). The coupled electromagnetic- thermo -mechanical response of RDX (cyclotrimethylene...frequency electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation, laser heat absorption, thermal conduction, and inelastic dynamic thermo - mechanical deformation in

  3. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Laser Interactions with Atoms, Solids,and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this NATO Advanced Study Institute was to bring together scientists and students working in the field of laser matter interactions in order to review and stimulate developmentoffundamental science with ultra-short pulse lasers. New techniques of pulse compression and colliding-pulse mode-locking have made possible the construction of lasers with pulse lengths in the femtosecond range. Such lasers are now in operation at several research laboratories in Europe and the United States. These laser facilities present a new and exciting research direction with both pure and applied science components. In this ASI the emphasis is on fundamental processes occurring in the interaction of short laser pulses with atoms, molecules, solids, and plasmas. In the case of laser-atom (molecule) interactions, high power lasers provide the first access to extreme high-intensity conditions above 10'8 Watts/em', a new frontier for nonlinear interaction of photons with atoms and molecules. New phenomena observed include ...

  4. Experimental studies of axial magnetic fields generated in ultrashort-pulse laser-plasma interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉同; 张杰; 陈黎明; 赵理曾; 夏江帆; 魏志义; 江文勉

    2000-01-01

    The quasistatic axial magnetic fields in plasmas produced by ultrashort laser pulses were measured by measuring the Faraday rotation angle of the backscattered emission. The spatial distribution of the axial magnetic field was obtained with a peak value as high as 170 Tesla. Theory suggests that the axial magnetic field is generated by dynamo effect in laser-plasma interaction.

  5. Effects of Powder Feeding Rate on Interaction between Laser Beam and Powder Streamin Laser Cladding Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan-lu; LI Jian-guo; LIANG Gong-ying; SU Jun-yi

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical model was presented to calculate the laser intensity distribution and the particle temperatures at different sites of the workpiece in the laser cladding process. By using this model, the effects of the powder feeding rate on the laser intensity distribution and the particle temperatures were investigated, the calculated results under the condition of different injection angles were also plotted. It is shown that with increasing the injection angle, the laser intensity distributions are similar but the peak value of the laser intensity decreases. Simultaneously, the peak value of the particle temperature increases and the distribution of the particle temperatures gets central symmetrical gradually. These tests results should be considered in model of laser cladding due to their subtle effects on the dynamic processes in laser molten pool.

  6. Enhancement of Laser Power Efficiency by Control of Spatial Hole Burning Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Li; Tureci, Hakan E

    2014-01-01

    The laser is an out-of-equilibrium nonlinear wave system where the interplay of the cavity geometry and nonlinear wave interactions, mediated by the gain medium, determines the self-organized oscillation frequencies and the associated spatial field patterns. In the steady state, a constant energy flux flows through the laser from the pump to the far field, with the ratio of the total output power to the input power determining the power-efficiency. While nonlinear wave interactions have been modeled and well understood since the early days of laser theory, their impact on the power-efficiency of a laser system is poorly understood. Here, we show that spatial hole burning interactions generally decrease the power efficiency. We then demonstrate how spatial hole burning interactions can be controlled by a spatially tailored pump profile, thereby boosting the power-efficiency, in some cases by orders of magnitude.

  7. GPU-Accelerated PIC/MCC Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interaction Using BUMBLEBEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaolin; Huang, Tao; Chen, Wenlong; Wu, Huidong; Tang, Maowen; Li, Bin

    2015-11-01

    The research of laser-plasma interaction in its wide applications relies on the use of advanced numerical simulation tools to achieve high performance operation while reducing computational time and cost. BUMBLEBEE has been developed to be a fast simulation tool used in the research of laser-plasma interactions. BUMBLEBEE uses a 1D3V electromagnetic PIC/MCC algorithm that is accelerated by using high performance Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware. BUMBLEBEE includes a friendly user-interface module and four physics simulators. The user-interface provides a powerful solid-modeling front end and graphical and computational post processing functionality. The solver of BUMBLEBEE has four modules for now, which are used to simulate the field ionization, electron collisional ionization, binary coulomb collision and laser-plasma interaction processes. The ionization characteristics of laser-neutral interaction and the generation of high-energy electrons have been analyzed by using BUMBLEBEE for validation.

  8. High Harmonic Inverse Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, Christopher M.S.; Colby, Eric; Cowan, Ben; Siemann, Robert H.; Spencer, James; /SLAC; Byer, Robert L.; Plettner, Tomas; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-05-13

    The inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) interaction has recently been proposed and used as a short wavelength modulator for micro bunching of beams for laser acceleration experiments [1,2]. These experiments utilized the fundamental of the interaction between the laser field and electron bunch. In the current experiment, we explore the higher order resonances of the IFEL interaction from a 3 period, 1.8 centimeter wavelength undulator with a picosecond, 0.5 mJ/pulse laser at 800nm. The resonances are observed by adjusting the gap of the undulator while keeping the beam energy constant. We also compare the experimental results to a simple analytic model that describes coupling to high order harmonics of the interaction.

  9. High-Harmonic Inverse Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, C

    2006-02-17

    The inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) interaction has recently been proposed and used as a short wavelength modulator for micro bunching of beams for laser acceleration experiments [1,2]. These experiments utilized the fundamental of the interaction between the laser field and electron bunch. In the current experiment, we explore the higher order resonances of the IFEL interaction from a 3 period, 1.8 centimeter wavelength undulator with a picosecond, 0.5 mJ/pulse laser at 800nm. The resonances are observed by adjusting the gap of the undulator while keeping the beam energy constant. We also compare the experimental results to a simple analytic model that describes coupling to high order harmonics of the interaction.

  10. Low mass vector-meson production in p-W and S-U high energy collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, N.C. [LIP, Av. Elias Garcia 14, P-1000 Lisbon (Portugal)]|[FCUL, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Barriere, C.; Bedjidian, M.; Borhani, A.; Contardo, D.; Descroix, E.; Devaux, A.; Drapier, O.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Ferreira, R.; Force, P.; Gago, J.; Gerschel, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guichard, A.; Guillaud, J.P.; Guimaraes, J.; Haroutunian, R.; Jouan, D.; Jouan, D.; Kluberg, L.; Kossakowski, R.; Landaud, G.; Lourenco, C.; Luquin, L.; Malek, F.; Mandry, L.; Mazini, R.; Pizzi, J.R.; Racca, C.; Ramos, S.; Romana, A.; Ronceux, B.; Silva, S.; Sonderegger, P.; Rarrago, X.; Varela, J.; NA38 Collaboration

    1995-07-20

    NA 38 results on {rho}+{omega} and {phi} production in p-W and S-U interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon are presented. Transverse mass distributions and slopes are measured. The value of the ratio {ital B}{sub {phi}}{sigma}{sub {phi}}/{ital B}{sub {rho}}{sigma}{sub {rho}}+{ital B}{sub {omega}}{sigma}{sub {omega}} is given for different {ital P}{sub {ital T}} and that it increases with {epsilon} when going from p-W to S-U collisions. Assuming the A dependence {sigma}{sub {ital SU}} ={sigma}{sub 0} ({ital A}{sub {ital beam}} {center_dot} {ital A}{sub {ital target}}){sup {alpha}}, we obtain {alpha}{sub {phi}} values significantly bigger than one and greater than the {alpha}{sub {rho}+{omega}} values in different {ital P}{sub {ital T}} regions. All these results clearly show a {phi} enhancement going from {ital p}{minus}{ital W} to {ital S}{minus}{ital U} interactions independent of {ital P}{sub {ital T}}. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. Non-integer Quantum Transition, a True Non-perturbation Effect in Laser-Atom Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qi-Ren

    2007-01-01

    We show that in the quantum transition of an atom interacting with an intense laser of circular frequencyω, the energy difference between the initial and the final states of the atom is not necessarily an integer multiple of the quantum energy (h)ω. This kind of non-integer transition is a true non-perturbation effect in laser-atom interaction.

  12. Quantum theory analysis on microscopic mechanism of the interaction of laser with cell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lin; ZHANG Can-bang; WANG Sheng-yu; LI Ling; WANG Rui-li; ZHOU Ling-yun

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of liquid crystal model with the electric dipole moment of cell membrane,the microscopic mechanism of the electricity and thermology effects of interaction of laser with cell membrane is researched by electromagnetic, quantum mechanics and quantum statistics. We derive the formulas on the polarization effects and "temperature-rising effect" of laser-cell membrane interaction. The results of the theoretical research can explain some experiments.

  13. On the interaction of the ultrashort laser pulses with human brain matter

    CERN Document Server

    Marciak-Kozlowska, J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the modified Schrodinger equation for attosecond laser pulses interaction with "atoms" of human brain . i.e. neurons is developed and solved. Considering that the mass of the human neuron is of the order of Planck mass =10-5 g the model equation for Planck masses is applied to the laser pulse neuron interaction. Key words: Modified Schr\\"odinger Equation, Planck particles, neurons

  14. Electron Dynamics During High-Power, Short-Pulsed Laser Interactions with Solids and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    PAPER ALSO RECEIVED EXTERNAL MEDIA COVERENCE FROM SIGNAL MAGAZINE : http://www.afcea.org/content/?q=Article-scientists-harness- energy -heat Edited...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0234 Electron Dynamics During High- Power , Short-Pulsed Laser Interactions with Solids and Interfaces Patrick Hopkins...Dynamics During High- Power , Short-Pulsed Laser Interactions with Solids and Interfaces 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0067 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  15. Polarization dependence of laser interaction with carbon fibers and CFRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Christian; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2014-01-27

    A key factor for laser materials processing is the absorptivity of the material at the laser wavelength, which determines the fraction of the laser energy that is coupled into the material. Based on the Fresnel equations, a theoretical model is used to determine the absorptivity for carbon fiber fabrics and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). The surface of each carbon fiber is considered as multiple layers of concentric cylinders of graphite. With this the optical properties of carbon fibers and their composites can be estimated from the well-known optical properties of graphite.

  16. Wakefield evolution and electron acceleration in interaction of frequency-chirped laser pulse with inhomogeneous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Pandari, M.; Niknam, A. R.; Massudi, R.; Jahangiri, F.; Hassaninejad, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of an ultra-short intense frequency-chirped laser pulse with an underdense plasma is studied. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity and laser parameters such as chirp, pulse duration, and intensity on plasma density and wakefield evolutions, and electron acceleration are examined. It is found that a properly chirped laser pulse could induce a stronger laser wakefield in an inhomogeneous plasma and result in higher electron acceleration energy. It is also shown that the wakefield amplitude is enhanced by increasing the slope of density in the inhomogeneous plasma.

  17. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  18. INTERACTION OF FEMTOSECOND LASER RADIATION WITH SKIN: MATHEMATICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Yu. Rogov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of human skin response to the impact of femtosecond laser radiation were researched. The Monte–Carlo method was used for estimation of the radiation penetration depth into the skin cover. We used prevalent wavelength equal to 800 nm (for Ti: sapphire laser femtosecond systems. A mathematical model of heat transfer process was introduced based on the analytical solution of the system of equations describing the dynamics of the electron and phonon subsystems. An experiment was carried out to determine the threshold energy of biological tissue injury (chicken skin was used as a test object. The value of electronic subsystem relaxation time was determined from the experiment and is in keeping with literature data. The results of this work can be used to assess the maximum permissible exposure of laser radiation of different lengths that cause the damage of biological tissues, as well as for the formation of safe operation standards for femtosecond laser systems.

  19. An exploration of laser-sustained plasma interactions with titanium substrates during nitriding without direct irradiation by the laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amber Nalani

    Laser-sustained plasma (LSP) is plasma which can be sustained indefinitely by a laser beam away from any potentially interacting surfaces. LSPs can be sustained at steady state by balancing power input through inverse bremsstrahlung absorption with loss through radiation (continuous and line), convection, and conduction. For many years, plasma has been considered a negative influence in laser materials processing, disrupting the beam path and distorting radiation prior to the beam reaching the surface. New research indicates that LSP can be an opportunity for metallurgical surface treatments and the deposition of coatings with an improvement in properties over conventional coating methods. For the first time, the LSP was used to nitride surfaces independently of the associated laser beam and the resulting specimens were examined to gain new insights into the effects of laser plasmas on surface modification processes. A titanium plate was placed parallel to and at a radial distance from an LSP, rather than perpendicular to it, as is the typical geometry for laser processing. During the exposure of the substrate to the LSP, the process was observed via a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The processed substrates were then examined visually, by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, focused ion beam, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction to elucidate the morphological and microstructural features that are characteristic of this processing method. Results indicated that an LSP is a powerful tool for heating surfaces and simultaneously introducing activated gas species into the melt. The nitrided surfaces exhibited complex and uncommon morphologies, including faceted titanium nitride crystals, which had not been produced by conventional laser nitriding. The underlying microstructure demonstrated that LSP can generate layers similar to those produced by conventional laser nitriding, but to a much greater depth. This

  20. Interaction of UV-Laser Radiation with Molecular Surface Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    physics of organometallics on surfaces and in the gas phase, and the first observation of surface enhanced chemistry . DI ~(B ~ _ __ _ __ _ ___E_ _ 20...reverse if nee~tary an~d Identify by biock number) FIEL GROP SU GR- Laser, Microelectronics, Surface Chemistry 19 ABSTRACT i CoiEIDue on reverset of...eke chmry and iden NlY by bloch numberg -he surface chemistry of Laser Photodeposition has been explored. The findings include the photodissociation

  1. Ultra-intense laser-plasma interaction toward Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Anna; Grech, M.; Amiranoff, F.; Macchi, A.; Riconda, C.

    2016-10-01

    The rapid developments in laser technology will soon offer the opportunity to study in the laboratory the processes driving Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks, typical of various astrophysical scenarii. The interaction of an ultra-intense laser with an overdense plasma has been identified as the preferential configuration. Yet, the experimental requirements still need to be properly investigated. High performance computing simulations are a necessary tool for this study. In this work, we present a series of kinetic simulations performed with the PIC code SMILEI, varying the laser and plasma parameters. In particular, we will study the effect of the laser polarisation and plasma density to obtain the best conditions for the creation of a collisionless shock. The role of the electrons heated at the interaction surface and of particles accelerated via the Hole Boring (laser-piston) mechanism on the generation of the current filamentation instability and the subsequent shock front formation will be highlighted.

  2. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, J. T. [Washington State University

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  3. Simulation for Interaction of Linearly Polarized Relativistic Laser Pulses with Foil Targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shi-Bing; TU Qin-Fen; YU Wei; CHEN Zhi-Hua; ZHANG Jie

    2001-01-01

    One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is presented for the interaction of ultra-short, linearly polarized intense laser pulses with thin foil targets. The results indicate that the strong competition between electromagnetic and electrostatic ponderomotive forces produced, respectively, by the laser and the electrostatic fields leads to novel behaviours of target electrons. It shows that the interaction is dominated by the 2ω (ω is laser frequency) component of the electrostatic ponderomotive force as well as that of the electromagnetic ponderomotive force.

  4. How to optimize ultrashort pulse laser interaction with glass surfaces in cutting regimes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulgakova, Nadezhda M., E-mail: bulgakova@fzu.cz [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics ASCR, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Institute of Thermophysics SB RAS, 1 Lavrentyev Ave., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Zhukov, Vladimir P. [Institute of Computational Technologies SB RAS, 6 Lavrentyev Ave., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marx Ave., 630073 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Collins, Adam R. [NCLA, NUI Galway, Galway (Ireland); Rostohar, Danijela; Derrien, Thibault J.-Y.; Mocek, Tomáš [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics ASCR, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • The factors influencing laser micromachining of transparent materials are analyzed. • Important role of ambient gas in laser processing is shown by numerical simulations. • The large potential of bi-wavelength laser processing is demonstrated. - Abstract: The interaction of short and ultrashort pulse laser radiation with glass materials is addressed. Particular attention is paid to regimes which are important in industrial applications such as laser cutting, drilling, functionalization of material surfaces, etc. Different factors influencing the ablation efficiency and quality are summarized and their importance is illustrated experimentally. The effects of ambient gas ionization in front of the irradiated target are also analyzed. A possibility to enhance laser coupling with transparent solids by bi-wavelength irradiation is discussed.

  5. High Harmonic Inverse Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800 NM

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, Chris M S; Colby, Eric R; Cowan, Benjamin; Plettner, Tomas; Siemann, Robert; Spencer, James

    2005-01-01

    The inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) interaction has recently been proposed and used as a short wavelength modulator forμbunching of beams for laser acceleration experiments*,**. These experiments utilized the fundamental of the interaction between the laser field and electron bunch. In the current experiment, we explore the higher order resonances of the IFEL interaction from a 3 period, 1.8 centimeter wavelength undulator with a picosecond, 0.25 mJ/pulse laser at 800 nm. The resonances are observed by adjusting the gap of the undulator while keeping the beam energy constant. We will also discuss diagnostics for obtaining beam overlap and statistical techniques used to account for machine drifts and analyze the data.

  6. PW Characteristics during the 2013 Colorado Flood using Ground-Based GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsing, H. K.; Wang, J.

    2016-12-01

    During September 9-16, 2013, the Front Range region of Colorado experienced heavy rainfall that resulted in severe flooding. Precipitation totals for the event exceeded 450mm, damages to public and private properties were estimated to be over $2 billion, and 9 lives were lost. This study analyzes the characteristics of precipitable water (PW) surrounding the event using 10-years of high-resolution GPS PW data in Boulder, Colorado, which was located within the region of maximum rainfall. The characteristics examined include the temporal variability and abnormality of PW as well as the sources of moisture for the event. The temporal variability for PW in Boulder is dominated by seasonal variability with an average summertime maximum of 36mm. In 2013, the seasonal PW maximum extended into early September due to the occurrence of the flooding event. A closer examination of the temporal variability of PW surrounding this event showed that PW rapidly increased from 22mm to 32mm over the course of 1 day and values remained around 30mm for the entire event. When examining the abnormality of PW during the event, the atmosphere over Boulder was found to be near to saturation for the duration of the event and the monthly-averaged PW for September of 2013 was 25% higher than the long-term climatology. Also, the frequency distribution of September PW for Boulder is typically Gaussian, or normal, but in 2013 the distribution for September was bimodal, representing a shift in atmospheric conditions from climatology. This shift was the result of large-scale moisture transport into Colorado from the eastern tropical Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico. This moisture transport was the product of a stagnating, cutoff low over the southwestern United States working in conjunction with an anticyclone located over the southeastern United States. A blocking ridge located over the Canadian Rocky Mountains kept both of the synoptic features in place over the course of several days, which helped

  7. Laser plasma interaction in rugby-shaped hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Monteil, M.-C.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Seytor, P.; Teychenne, D.; Loiseau, P.; Freymerie, P.

    2014-10-01

    Rugby shaped-hohlraum has proven to give high performance compared to a classical similar-diameter cylinder hohlraum. Due to this performance, this hohlraum has been chosen as baseline ignition target for the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). Many experiments have therefore been performed during the last years on the Omega laser facility in order to study in details the rugby hohlraum. In this talk, we will discuss the interpretation of these experiments from the point of view of the laser plasma instability problem. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder and elliptical shape rugby hohlraums and we will discuss how the geometry differences will affect the evolution of laser plasma instabilities (LPI). The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques on these instabilities will also be discussed as well as gas filling effect. The experimental results will be compared with FCI2 hydroradiative calculations and linear postprocessing with Piranah. Experimental Raman and Brillouin spectrum, from which we can infer the location of the parametric instabilities, will be compared to simulated ones, and will give the possibility to compare LPI between the different hohlraum geometries.

  8. Selective photothermal interaction using near-infrared laser and laser-absorbing dye in gel phantom and chicken breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Thomas M.; Liu, Guangyu; Simmons, Sarah; Real, Jeremy; Lucroy, Michael D.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2002-06-01

    Photothermal interaction of an 805-nm diode laser with an absorptive dye, indocyanine green (ICG), has been shown to be an efficacious therapy for metastatic breast tumors in a rat model when combined with immunoadjuvant. When ICG solution was injected into the target tissue, selective tissue destruction can be achieved. To study the selective photothermal interaction, temperature change in irradiated tissue was achieved. To study the selective photothermal interaction, temperature change in irradiated tissue was studied using chicken breast tissue and phantom composed of gelatin and intralipid. ICG solution was mixed with gel phantom to simulate dye-enhanced target tissue. The target gel was then embedded in chicken breast tissue. The temperature change of irradiated chicken and gel phantom was measured by needle temperature probes at different tissue depths and radii from the center of the laser beam to construct a two-dimensional array of temperature change in a cylindrical coordinate system. It was shown that it is possible to selectively raise the temperature of deep target tissue while not substantially heating nontargeted tissue. A Nd:YAG laser was also used to irradiate the tissue-gel system and the photothermal results were compared with that using the 805-nm laser.

  9. Relativistic Quasimonoenergetic Positron Jets from Intense Laser-Solid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Bonlie, J.; Chen, C. D.; Chen, S. N.; Courtois, C.; Elberson, L.; Gregori, G.; Kruer, W.; Landoas, O.; Mithen, J.; Myatt, J.; Murphy, C. D.; Nilson, P.; Price, D.; Schneider, M.; Shepherd, R.; Stoeckl, C.; Tabak, M.; Tommasini, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2010-07-01

    Detailed angle and energy resolved measurements of positrons ejected from the back of a gold target that was irradiated with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse reveal that the positrons are ejected in a collimated relativistic jet. The laser-positron energy conversion efficiency is ˜2×10-4. The jets have ˜20 degree angular divergence and the energy distributions are quasimonoenergetic with energy of 4 to 20 MeV and a beam temperature of ˜1MeV. The sheath electric field on the surface of the target is shown to determine the positron energy. The positron angular and energy distribution is controlled by varying the sheath field, through the laser conditions and target geometry.

  10. Slow fragmentation of hydrocarbons after ultrafast laser interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Larimian, Seyedreza; Lötstedt, Erik; Szidarovszky, Tamás; Maurer, Raffael; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus; Xie, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the deprotonation process on nanosecond to microsecond timescale in ethylene and acetylene molecules, following their double ionization by a strong femtosecond laser field. In our experiments we utilized coincidence detection with the reaction microscope technique, and found that both the mean lifetime of the ethylene dication leading to the "slow" deprotonation and the relative channel strength of the slow deprotonation compared to the fast one have no evident dependence on the laser pulse duration and the laser peak intensity. Furthermore, quantum chemical simulations suggest that such slow fragmentation originates from the tunneling of near-dissociation-threshold vibrational states through a dissociation barrier on an electronic dication state. Such vibrational states can be populated through strong field double ionization induced vibrational excitation on an electronically excited state in the case of ethylene, and through intersystem processes from electro...

  11. Photon dose estimation from ultraintense laser-solid interactions and shielding calculation with Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Rui; Li, JunLi; Lu, Wei; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    When a strong laser beam irradiates a solid target, a hot plasma is produced and high-energy electrons are usually generated (the so-called "hot electrons"). These energetic electrons subsequently generate hard X-rays in the solid target through the Bremsstrahlung process. To date, only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this study, extensive literature reviews on the physics and properties of hot electrons have been conducted. On the basis of these information, the photon dose generated by the interaction between hot electrons and a solid target was simulated with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. With some reasonable assumptions, the calculated dose can be regarded as the upper boundary of the experimental results over the laser intensity ranging from 1019 to 1021 W/cm2. Furthermore, an equation to estimate the photon dose generated from ultraintense laser-solid interactions based on the normalized laser intensity is derived. The shielding effects of common materials including concrete and lead were also studied for the laser-driven X-ray source. The dose transmission curves and tenth-value layers (TVLs) in concrete and lead were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations. These results could be used to perform a preliminary and fast radiation safety assessment for the X-rays generated from ultraintense laser-solid interactions.

  12. Interaction of nanosecond ultraviolet laser pulses with reactive dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.; Rabat, H.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Even though UV laser pulses that irradiate a gas discharge are small compared to the plasma volume (≲3%) and plasma-on time (≲6 × 10-6%), they are found to dramatically change the discharge characteristics on a global scale. The reactive argon-acetylene plasma allows the growth of nanoparticles with diameters up to 1 μm, which are formed inside the discharge volume due to spontaneous polymerization reactions. It is found that the laser pulses predominantly accelerate and enhance the coagulation phase and are able to suppress the formation of a dust void.

  13. Ultrafast Laser Dynamics and Interactions in Complex Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patz, Aaron Edward

    The work described in this thesis underscores specific examples of using an ultrafast laser as a materials research tool for studying condensed matter physics in complex materials. The majority of materials studied fall into the iron-pnictide class of unconventional superconductors, which exhibit a multitude of phases that appear to be dependent on each other, or the magnetic semiconductor, GaMnAs. In my work I show various ultrafast laser techniques for studying these complex materials in order to decouple the different properties in the time-domain and gain information about the underlying physics governing the material properties.

  14. Anomalous absorption in CO2-laser-target interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenberger, A. A.; Ng, A.

    1980-10-01

    Efficient absorption of long-pulse CO2-laser radiation is observed to follow a transient phase of stimulated Brillouin backscatter in critical density, laminar oxygen gas target irradiation experiments. Nearly complete energy absorption occurs for not more than 10 nsec following stimulated Brillouin backscatter after which target burnthrough and refraction dominate. Inverse bremsstrahlung and resonance absorption cannot account for the general features observed. Anomalous collisions due to strong ion turbulence produced by the incident laser radiation are postulated to account for the efficient absorption.

  15. Interaction of high-power laser radiation with low-density polymer aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ch; Chaurasia, Sh; Borisenko, N. G.; Orekhov, A. S.; Leshma, P.; Pimenov, V. G.; Sklizkov, G. V.; Akunets, A. A.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-06-01

    The interaction of high-power subnanosecond laser pulses with low-density targets of cellulose triacetate polymer is considered. An Nd-glass laser setup provides a focal spot intensity of over 1014 W cm-2. An investigation is made of absorption of laser radiation, laser-to-X-ray energy conversion, spectra of ions emitted from the plasma, transmission of laser radiation through the target and plasma, as well as volume heating of the target material. It is experimentally determined that the laser energy conversion efficiency to X-rays with photon energies of a few kiloelectronvolts decreases with increasing target material density. With the use of targets of density 10 mg cm-3 this efficiency is two times lower in comparison to 2 mg cm-3 density targets. The duration and amplitude of laser pulses transmitted through the target decreases with increasing column target density (the product of target material density and its thickness). The spectra of ions emitted from low-density target plasmas are recorded using ion collectors positioned at different angles relative to the direction of laser beam propagation as well as a high-resolution Thomson mass spectrometer. The ion flux and ion energies are found to increase with increasing target material density. The peak of the ion energy spectrum is shifted towards higher energies with increasing laser radiation intensity.

  16. Laser-driven γ-ray, positron, and neutron source from ultra-intense laser-matter interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi, E-mail: t-nakamura@fit.ac.jp [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Hayakawa, Takehito [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    In ultra-intense laser-matter interactions, γ-rays are effectively generated via the radiation reaction effect. Since a significant fraction of the laser energy is converted into γ-rays, understanding of the energy transport inside of the target is important. We have developed a Particle-in-Cell code which includes generation of the γ-rays, their energy transport, and photo-nuclear reactions. Using the code, we have investigated the characteristics of the quantum beams generated by the transport of the laser-driven γ-rays. It is shown that collimated, mono-energetic positron beams with hundreds of MeV are generated by using thick targets. Neutron beams are also effectively generated by using beryllium targets via photo-nuclear reactions. These lead to the proposal of quantum beam sources of γ-rays, positrons, and neutrons with distinctive characters, which are selectively generated by choosing target conditions.

  17. Visible and ultraviolet light sources based nonlinear interaction of lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Thalbitzer; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Jain, Mayank;

    Different light sources can be used for optically stimulated luminescence measurements and usually a halogen lamp in combination with filters or light emitting diodes (LED’s) are used to provide the desired stimulation wavelength. However lasers can provide a much more well-defined beam, very...

  18. Laser-plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyon C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the shock ignition scheme, the ICF target is first compressed with a long (nanosecond pulse before creating a convergent shock with a short (∼100 ps pulse to ignite thermonuclear reactions. This short pulse is typically (∼2.1015–1016 W/cm2 above LPI (Laser Plasma Instabilities thresholds. The plasma is in a regime where the electron temperature is expected to be very high (2–4 keV and the laser coupling to the plasma is not well understood. Emulating LPI in the corona requires large and hot plasmas produced by high-energy lasers. We conducted experiments on the LIL (Ligne d'Integration Laser, 10 kJ at 3ω and the LULI2000 (0.4 kJ at 2ω facilities, to approach these conditions and study absorption and LPI produced by a high intensity beam in preformed plasmas. After introducing the main risks associated with the short pulse propagation, we present the latest experiment we conducted on LPI in relevant conditions for shock ignition.

  19. Ultrafast Laser Interaction Processes for LIBS and Other Sensing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    channeled laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on carbon-based samples: Thermochemistry leading to molecular formation in air”; 2010 Winter...based samples: Thermochemistry leading to molecular formation in air”; 2010 Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry; Fort Myers, FL, USA; 01/05...University of Nebraska Wide Teaching Award, 2011 Dr. Alexander: College of Engineering Holling Family Master Teaching Award, 2011

  20. Dynamics of plasma expansion in the pulsed laser material interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Kumar; S Dash; A K Tyagi; Baldev Raj

    2010-08-01

    A pulse Nd: YAG laser with pulse duration 5–10 ns, beam radius at focal point 0·2–0·4 mm, wavelengths 1064 nm, 532 nm and 238 nm with linearly polarized radiation and Gaussian beam profile, was impacted on a thin foil of titanium metal for generating plasma plume. Numerically, the above parameters were linked with average kinetic energy of the electrons and ions in the laser-induced plasma. In the present model, electrons having higher velocities are assumed to escape from plasma, that forms a negatively charged sheath around the plasma. It is seen from present computations that the forward directed nature of the laser evaporation process results from the anisotropic expansion velocities associated with different species. These velocities are mainly controlled by the initial dimension of the expanding plasma. An attempt was undertaken to estimate the length of the plume at different ambient gas pressures using an adiabatic expansion model. The rate of the plasma expansion for various Ar+ ion energies was derived from numerical calculations. A numerical definition of this plasma includes events like collisional/radiative, excitation/de-excitation and ionization/recombination processes involving multiples of energy levels with several ionization stages. Finally, based on a kinetic model, the plasma expansion rate across the laser beam axis was investigated.

  1. Effects of radiation on direct-drive laser target interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombant, D. G.

    1999-11-01

    Radiation may be useful for reducing laser imprint and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in direct-drive target pellets. We will discuss the important role of radiation in a proposed direct-drive X-ray preheated target concept(S.Bodner et al., Phys. Plasmas 5,1901(1998)). In this design, a high-Z coating surrounds a thin plastic coat, over a DT-wicked foam and on top of the DT fuel. Radiation effects will be examined and discussed in the context of this design. The soft X-ray radiation emitted during the foot of the laser pulse - at a few 10^12W/cm^2- preheats the foam ablator which contributes to the reduction of the RT instability. The ablator also stops the radiation, allowing the fuel to stay on a low adiabat. Radiation in the blow-off corona of the target establishes a long scalelength plasma. This separates the ablation region from the laser absorption region where the remaining defects in laser uniformity/pellet surface finish constitute the seed for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, when the pulse intensity rises, the pressure generated by the laser in combination with the changing opacity of the plasma causes the plasma to be pushed back toward the ablator. This is called a Radiative Plasma Structure (RPS)(J.Dahlburg et al., J.Q.S.R.T. 54,113(1995)). These RPS's are a potential problem because they may carry with them the imprint which was present in the low-density corona. We will show and discuss these various effects, as well as some of the experimental work(C.Pawley et al., this conference) under way in connection with this program. These experiments are essential in order to validate both the design concepts and the numerical models, which include on-line state-of-the-art atomic physics modeling(M.Klapisch et al.,Phys. Plasmas 5,1919(1998)).

  2. Isolation and Expression Analysis of PwWDS1 in Picea wilsonii%青杄干旱诱导基因PwWDS1的cDNA分离与表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长江; 崔晓燕; 孙帆; 张凌云

    2014-01-01

    Drought-induced proteins,which are induced or up-regulated by water deficient stress,play an important role in drought resistance process of plants. In this research,full length cDNA of PwWDS1 ( GenBank accession number KJ526353),a drought induced gene,was obtained by RACE PCR method based on the full length cDNA library of Picea wilsonii. Several software and tools such as Expasy,DNAMAN,ClustalX and MEGA were used to analyze the physical and chemical properties of PwWDS1. Then expression pattern of PwWDS1 was identified by RT-qPCR and semi-quantitative RT-PCR under drought,salt stress,abscisic acid ( ABA) and ethrel treatments. We found that the full length cDNA of PwWDS1 was 1 077 bp encoding a protein which consists of 207 amino acids residues. The theoretical molecular weight of PwWDS1 was 22. 76 kDa with isoeletric point of 5. 02. Sequence analysis indicated that C terminal of PwWDS1 had a conserved ABA/WDS domain and N terminal had a strong hydrophilic property. RT-qPCR and semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that PwWDS1 was mainly expressed in needles of P. wilsonii and the expression level of PwWDS1 increased with the growth of cotyledon during seed germination. The PwWDS1 expression was up-regulated by drought,salt stress,ethrel and ABA treatments. PwWDS1 was expressed highly in 6 h under drought and ABA treatments. Under salt and ethrel treatments,PwWDS1 was expressed most in 12 h. These results indicated that PwWDS1 would play a role in response to signals of abiotic stresses and plant hormones in P. wilsonii.

  3. Dynamics of electron bunches at the laser-plasma interaction in the bubble regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, V. I.; Svystun, O. M.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Tkachenko, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The multi-bunches self-injection, observed in laser-plasma accelerators in the bubble regime, affects the energy gain of electrons accelerated by laser wakefield. However, understanding of dynamics of the electron bunches formed at laser-plasma interaction may be challenging. We present here the results of fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of laser wakefield acceleration driven by a short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The trapping and acceleration of three witness electron bunches by the bubble-like structures were observed. It has been shown that with time the first two witness bunches turn into drivers and contribute to acceleration of the last witness bunch.

  4. Investigation of interaction femtosecond laser pulses with skin and eyes mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogov, P. U.; Smirnov, S. V.; Semenova, V. A.; Melnik, M. V.; Bespalov, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    We present a mathematical model of linear and nonlinear processes that takes place under the action of femtosecond laser radiation on the cutaneous covering. The study is carried out and the analytical solution of the set of equations describing the dynamics of the electron and atomic subsystems and investigated the processes of linear and nonlinear interaction of femtosecond laser pulses in the vitreous of the human eye, revealed the dependence of the pulse duration on the retina of the duration of the input pulse and found the value of the radiation power density, in which there is a self-focusing is obtained. The results of the work can be used to determine the maximum acceptable energy, generated by femtosecond laser systems, and to develop Russian laser safety standards for femtosecond laser systems.

  5. A new Monte Carlo code for absorption simulation of laser-skin tissue interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Afshan Shirkavand; Saeed Sarkar; Marjaneh Hejazi; Leila Ataie-Fashtami; Mohammad Reza Alinaghizadeh

    2007-01-01

    In laser clinical applications, the process of photon absorption and thermal energy diffusion in the target tissue and its surrounding tissue during laser irradiation are crucial. Such information allows the selection of proper operating parameters such as laser power, and exposure time for optimal therapeutic. The Monte Carlo method is a useful tool for studying laser-tissue interaction and simulation of energy absorption in tissue during laser irradiation. We use the principles of this technique and write a new code with MATLAB 6.5, and then validate it against Monte Carlo multi layer (MCML) code. The new code is proved to be with good accuracy. It can be used to calculate the total power bsorbed in the region of interest. This can be combined for heat modelling with other computerized programs.

  6. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lippert@psi.ch [General Energy Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Döbeli, Max [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-28

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially {sup 18}O substituted La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  7. Production and dynamics of positrons in ultrahigh intensity laser-foil interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kostyukov, I Yu

    2016-01-01

    The electron-positron pair production accompanying interaction of a circularly polarized laser pulse with a foil is studied for laser intensities higher than $10^{24}$W cm$^{-2}$. The laser energy penetrates into the foil due to the effect of the relativistic hole-boring. It is demonstrated that the electron-positron plasma is produced as a result of quantum-electrodynamical cascading in the field of the incident and reflected laser light in front of the foil. The incident and reflected laser light makes up the circularly polarized standing wave in the reference frame of the hole-boring front and the pair density peaks near the nodes and antinodes of the wave. A model based on the particle dynamics with radiation reaction effect near the magnetic nodes is developed. The model predictions are verified by 3D PIC-MC simulations.

  8. Color-encoded distance for interactive focus positioning in laser microsurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoob, Andreas; Kundrat, Dennis; Lekon, Stefan; Kahrs, Lüder A.; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a real-time method for interactive focus positioning in laser microsurgery. Registration of stereo vision and a surgical laser is performed in order to combine surgical scene and laser workspace information. In particular, stereo image data is processed to three-dimensionally reconstruct observed tissue surface as well as to compute and to highlight its intersection with the laser focal range. Regarding the surgical live view, three augmented reality concepts are presented providing visual feedback during manual focus positioning. A user study is performed and results are discussed with respect to accuracy and task completion time. Especially when using color-encoded distance superimposed to the live view, target positioning with sub-millimeter accuracy can be achieved in a few seconds. Finally, transfer to an intraoperative scenario with endoscopic human in vivo and cadaver images is discussed demonstrating the applicability of the image overlay in laser microsurgery.

  9. Radiation damping effects on the interaction of ultraintense laser pulses with an overdense plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A; Koga, J; Sasaki, A; Uesaka, M

    2002-05-01

    A strong effect of radiation damping on the interaction of an ultraintense laser pulse with an overdense plasma slab is found and studied via a relativistic particle-in-cell simulation including ionization. Hot electrons generated by the irradiation of a laser pulse with a radiance of I lambda(2)>10(22) W microm(2)/cm(2) and duration of 20 fs can convert more than 35% of the laser energy to radiation. This incoherent x-ray emission lasts for only the pulse duration and can be intense. The radiation efficiency is shown to increase nonlinearly with laser intensity. Similar to cyclotron radiation, the radiation damping may restrain the maximal energy of relativistic electrons in ultraintense-laser-produced plasmas.

  10. Electron heating in subpicosecond laser interaction with overdense and near-critical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialfi, L.; Fedeli, L.; Passoni, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we investigate electron heating induced by intense laser interaction with micrometric flat solid foils in the context of laser-driven ion acceleration. We propose a simple law to predict the electron temperature in a wider range of laser parameters with respect to commonly used existing models. An extensive two-dimensional (2D) and 3D numerical campaign shows that electron heating is due to the combined actions of j ×B and Brunel effect. Electron temperature can be well described with a simple function of pulse intensity and angle of incidence, with parameters dependent on pulse polarization. We then combine our model for the electron temperature with an existing model for laser-ion acceleration, using recent experimental results as a benchmark. We also discuss an exploratory attempt to model electron temperature for multilayered foam-attached targets, which have been proven recently to be an attractive target concept for laser-driven ion acceleration.

  11. LATIS3D: The Gold Standard for Laser-Tissue-Interaction Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.A.; Makarewicz, A.M.; Kim, B.M.; Gentile, N.A.; Yang, Y.B.; Brlik, M.; Vincent, L.

    2000-02-29

    The goal of this LDRD project has been to create LATIS3D--the world's premier computer program for laser-tissue interaction modeling. The development was based on recent experience with the 2D LATIS code and the ASCI code, KULL. With LATIS3D, important applications in laser medical therapy were researched including dynamical calculations of tissue emulsification and ablation, photothermal therapy, and photon transport for photodynamic therapy. This project also enhanced LLNL's core competency in laser-matter interactions and high-energy-density physics by pushing simulation codes into new parameter regimes and by attracting external expertise. This will benefit both existing LLNL programs such as ICF and SBSS and emerging programs in medical technology and other laser applications.

  12. Using XFELs for Probing of Complex Interaction Dynamics of Ultra-Intense Lasers with Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Thomas; Huang, Lingen; Metzkes, Josefine; Schramm, Ulrich; Bussmann, Michael; Cowan, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the potential of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) to advancethe understanding of complex plasma dynamics by allowing for the first time nanometer and femtosecond resolution at the same time in plasma diagnostics. Plasma phenomena on such short timescales are of high relevance for many fields of physics, in particular in the ultra-intense ultra-short laser interaction with matter. Highly relevant yet only partially understood phenomena may become directly accessible in experiment. These include relativistic laser absorption at solid targets, creation of energetic electrons and electron transport in warm dense matter, including the seeding and development of surface and beam instabilities, ambipolar expansion, shock formation, and dynamics at the surfaces or at buried layers. We demonstrate the potentials of XFEL plasma probing for high power laser matter interactions using exemplary the small angle X-ray scattering technique, focusing on general considerations for XFEL probing.

  13. LATIS3D The Gold Standard for Laser-Tissue-Interaction Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    London, R A; Gentile, N A; Kim, B M; Makarewicz, A M; Vincent, L; Yang, Y B

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this LDRD project has been to create LATIS3D--the world's premier computer program for laser-tissue interaction modeling. The development was based on recent experience with the 2D LATIS code and the ASCI code, KULL. With LATIS3D, important applications in laser medical therapy were researched including dynamical calculations of tissue emulsification and ablation, photothermal therapy, and photon transport for photodynamic therapy. This project also enhanced LLNL's core competency in laser-matter interactions and high-energy-density physics by pushing simulation codes into new parameter regimes and by attracting external expertise. This will benefit both existing LLNL programs such as ICF and SBSS and emerging programs in medical technology and other laser applications.

  14. A diagnostic for micrometer sensitive positioning of solid targets in intense laser-matter interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Prashant Kumar, E-mail: singh01@ibs.re.kr [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kakolee, K.F. [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, T.W. [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis, E-mail: sargis@ibs.re.kr [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    A target position monitoring diagnostic, relevant to intense laser-solid interaction, is presented. The alignment system, having a sensitivity of few micrometers, consist of an infinity corrected long working distance objective, a broadband illuminating source and a CCD camera. The imaging system, placed along the axis of incident laser pulse, serves the dual purpose of laser focus diagnosis and precise positioning of the target in three dimension axis. By employing this technique, solid targets with thickness varying from opaque micrometer thick foils to few nanometer thin transparent foils can be aligned precisely. The effectiveness of the entire alignment system is demonstrated in enhanced acceleration of ions in intense laser-matter interaction, with very high reproducibility.

  15. Radiation reaction effects on the interaction of an electron with an intense laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravets, Yevgen; Noble, Adam; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2013-07-01

    Radiation reaction effects will play an important role in near-future laser facilities, yet their theoretical description remains obscure. We explore the Ford-O'Connell equation for radiation reaction, and discuss its relation to other commonly used treatments. By analyzing the interaction of a high energy electron in an intense laser pulse, we find that radiation reaction effects prevent the particle from accessing a regime in which the Landau-Lifshitz approximation breaks down.

  16. Interference of Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensate Interacting with Laser Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhao-Xian; JIAO Zhi-Yong; SUN Jin-Zuo

    2004-01-01

    Interference of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate interacting with a laser field in a double-well potential with dissipation is investigated. If properly selecting the laser field and the initial states of the atoms in the two wells,we find that the intensity exhibits revivals and collapses. The fidelity of interference is affected by the total number of atoms in the two wells and dissipation.

  17. Intense Cherenkov-type terahertz electromagnetic radiation from ultrafast laser-plasma interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Qiang-Lin; Liu Shi-Bing; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    A Cherenkov-type terahertz electromagnetic radiation is revealed, which results efficiently from the collective effects in the time-domain of ultrafast pulsed electron current produced by ultrafast intense laser-plasma interaction.The emitted pulse waveform and spectrum, and the dependence of laser pulse parameters on the structure of the radiation field are investigated numerically. The condition of THz radiation generation in this regime and Cherenkov geometry of the radiation field are studied analytically.

  18. Vaporization front in the interaction of a high-energy laser with aerosols - A solitary wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. T.; Miller, T. G.

    1982-06-01

    If a high-energy laser beam were to propagate through highly absorbent aerosols, the aerosols might be subject to extinction by evaporation. This could occur, for instance, if a high-energy CO2 laser beam were to propagate through a medium containing a mist of water droplets. The incident energy would evaporate the droplets, thus increasing the transmission with time. In this paper, solitary waves are obtained as the asymptotic solution to the coupled nonlinear equations describing such an interaction.

  19. A trapped ion with time-dependent frequency interaction with a laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, J M Vargas; Moya-Cessa, H [INAOE, Apartado Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2004-06-01

    We analyse the problem of a trapped ion with time-dependent frequency interacting with a laser field. By using a set of unitary time-dependent transformations we show that this system is equivalent to the interaction between a quantized field and a double level with time-dependent interaction parameters. In passing, we show that in the on-resonance case different vibrational transitions may be achieved by using time-dependent parameters.

  20. Interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with high-Z solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, A.; Sasaki, Akira; Utsumi, Takayuki; Fukumoto, Ichirou; Tajima, Toshiki [Advanced Photon Research Center, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Yoshida, Masatake [National Institute of Material and Chemical Research, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kondo, Kenichi [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    A plasma irradiated by an intense very short pulse laser can be an ultimate high brightness source of incoherent inner-shell X-ray emission of 1-30 keV. The recently developed 100 TW, 20 fs laser facility in JAERI can make considerable enhancement here. To show this a hybrid model combining hydrodynamics and collisional particle-in-cell simulations is applied. Effect of laser prepulse on the interaction of an intense s-polarized femtosecond, {approx}20/40 fs, laser pulse with high-Z solid targets is studied. A new absorption mechanism originating from the interaction of the laser pulse with plasma waves excited by the relativistic component of the Lorentz force is found to increase the absorption rate over 30% even for a very short laser pulse. The obtained hot electron temperature exceeds 0.5-1 MeV at optimal conditions for absorption. Results of the simulation for lower laser pulse intensities are in good agreement with the experimental measurements of the hot electron energy distribution. (author)

  1. Numerical simulation of interactions between pulsed laser and soild targets in an ambient gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterkin, , Jr.

    1998-10-01

    When a GW/cm^2 repetitively pulsed laser strikes a solid target that is immersed in a gas at 1 atm, numerous interesting plasma phenomena are observed. To help us understand these observations, we perform time-dependent numerical simulations of the propagation and partial absorption via inverse bremsstrahlung of a pulsed CO2 laser beam through He and N, and the interaction with a solid copper target aligned at various angles with respect to the incident laser beam. For this numerical study, we use the general-purpose 2 1/2-dimensional finite-volume MHD code uc(mach2.) The early portion of the laser pulses is deposited into the solid target and produces a jet of target material that is almost aligned with the target normal. Most of the subsequent laser energy is deposited into the ambient gas at the critical surface. For a repetitive pulsed laser, we observe a series of laser supported detonation (LSD) waves each of which originates at the instantaneous location of the critical surface. The space- and time-dependent electron number density defines this surface. For the numerical code to reproduce accurately the relevant physics, the overall energy budget must be computed accurately. The solid ejecta interacts with the LSD waves in a complex fashion, allowing the spontaneous generation of a magnetic field via the grad(P) term of a generalized Ohm's law. We illustrate the dynamics with graphical results from uc(mach2) simulations.

  2. Development of the Schrodinger equation for attosecond laser pulse interaction with Planck gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, M; Pilsudski, Josef

    2011-01-01

    The creation of the new particles by the interaction of the ultrarelativistic ions,from Large Hadron Collider(LHC), and attosecond laser pulse open new possibilities for laser physicists community .In this paper we propose the hyperbolic Schr\\"odinger equation (HSE) for gas of the "classical" particles "i.e. particles with mass= Planck mass We discuss the inclusion of the gravity to the HSE The solution of the HSE for a particle in a box is obtained. It is shown that for particles with m greater than Mp the energy spectrum is independent of the mass of particle. Key words: attosecond laser pulses, Schrodinger equation, Planck particles, thermal processes

  3. Particularities of interaction of CO sub 2 -laser radiation with oxide materials

    CERN Document Server

    Salikhov, T P

    2002-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation of vapor phase influence on the interaction parameters of the infrared laser radiation with oxide materials (Al sub 2 O sub 3 , ZrO sub 2 , CeO sub 2) have been presented. A phenomenon of laser radiation by the samples investigated under laser heating has been experimentally discovered for the first time. This phenomenon connected with forming of the stable vapor shell above the irradiated samples was expressed as a sharp drop in temperature on the heating curve and called as an absorption flash. (author)

  4. Terahertz emission from two-plasmon-decay induced transient currents in laser-solid interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, G.-Q.; Li, C. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Y.-T., E-mail: ytli@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: zmsheng@sjtu.edu.cn; Wang, W.-M. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA (CICIFSA), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Mondal, S.; Hafez, H. A.; Fareed, M. A.; Ozaki, T. [INRS-EMT, 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Sheng, Z.-M., E-mail: ytli@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: zmsheng@sjtu.edu.cn [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA (CICIFSA), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, J. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA (CICIFSA), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-01-15

    We have studied the generation of terahertz (THz) radiation via the interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with solid targets at a small incidence angle. It is found that preplasma with a moderate density gradient can enhance the emission. We also observe saturation of the THz output with the driving laser energy. We find that THz emission is closely related to the 3/2 harmonics of the driving laser. Particle-in-cell simulations indicate that under the present experimental conditions, the THz emission could be attributed to the transient currents at the plasma-vacuum interface, mainly formed by the two-plasmon-decay instability.

  5. Reduced Brillouin scattering from multiline CO2 laser interaction with a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, R.; Fedosejevs, R.; Offenberger, A. A.

    1982-08-01

    Experimental verification of reduced stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is reported for multiline CO2 laser radiation interacting with high-density plasma. For long-pulse (40-nsec) irradiation SBS was observed to decrease from 15% to a negligible level when the spectrum of the incident laser pulse was changed from 1 to 2 or more well-separated frequencies. Results for both long- and short-pulse multiline laser conditions are in general accord with the expected behavior for varying Δωγ0, where Δω is the frequency separation and γ0 is the homogeneous growth rate.

  6. Large amplitude electromagnetic solitons in intense laser plasma interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Bai-Wen; Ishiguro S; Skoric M M

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows that the standing, backward- and forward-accelerated large amplitude relativistic electromagnetic solitons induced by intense laser pulse in long underdense collisionless homogeneous plasmas can be observed by particle simulations. In addition to the inhomogeneity of the plasma density, the acceleration of the solitons also depends upon not only the laser amplitude but also the plasma length. The electromagnetic frequency of the solitons is between about half and one of the unperturbed electron plasma frequency. The electrostatic field inside the soliton has a one-cycle structure in space, while the transverse electric and magnetic fields have half-cycle and one-cycle structure respectively.Analytical estimates for the existence of the solitons and their electromagnetic frequencies qualitatively coincide with our simulation results.

  7. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  8. Reduced Brillouin backscatter in CO2 laser-target interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, A.; Offenberger, A. A.; Karttunen, S. J.

    1981-02-01

    A substantially reduced Brillouin reflection has been found for CO2 laser-irradiated high-density gas targets. In contrast to the high reflectivity (60%) previously observed for underdense hydrogen plasma, total backscatter (stimulated plus specular) is found to peak at 30% for incident intensity 5 times 10 to the twelfth W per square centimeter and decrease thereafter to 18% at 10 to the thirteenth W per square centimeter. The ponderomotive effects are postulated to account for these observations.

  9. UV and IR laser radiation's interaction with metal film and teflon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedenev, A. V.; Alekseev, S. B.; Goncharenko, I. M.; Koval', N. N.; Lipatov, E. I.; Orlovskii, V. M.; Shulepov, M. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2003-04-01

    The interaction of Xe ([lambda] [similar] 1.73 [mu]m) and XeCl (0.308 [mu]m) laser radiation with surfaces of metal and TiN-ceramic coatings on glass and steel substrates has been studied. Correlation between parameters of surface erosion versus laser-specific energy was investigated. Monitoring of laser-induced erosion on smooth polished surfaces was performed using optical microscopy. The correlation has been revealed between characteristic zones of thin coatings damaged by irradiation and energy distribution over the laser beam cross section allowing evaluation of defects and adhesion of coatings. The interaction of pulsed periodical CO2 ([lambda] [similar] 10.6 [mu]m), and Xe ([lambda] [similar] 1.73 [mu]m) laser radiation with surfaces of teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene—PTFE) has been studied. Monitoring of erosion track on surfaces was performed through optical microscopy. It has been shown that at pulsed periodical CO2-radiation interaction with teflon the sputtering of polymer with formation of submicron-size particles occurs. Dependencies of particle sizes, form, and sputtering velocity on laser pulse duration and target temperature have been obtained.

  10. Modeling ultrafast shadowgraphy in laser-plasma interaction experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Siminos, E; Sävert, A; Cole, J M; Mangles, S P D; Kaluza, M C

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast shadowgraphy is a new experimental technique that uses few cycle laser pulses to image density gradients in a rapidly evolving plasma. It enables structures that move at speeds close to the speed of light, such as laser driven wakes, to be visualized. Here we study the process of shadowgraphic image formation during the propagation of a few cycle probe pulse transversely through a laser-driven wake using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In order to construct synthetic shadowgrams a near-field snapshot of the ultrashort probe pulse is analyzed by means of Fourier optics, taking into account the effect of a typical imaging setup. By comparing synthetic and experimental shadowgrams we show that the generation of synthetic data is crucial for the correct interpretation of experiments. Moreover, we study the dependence of synthetic shadowgrams on various parameters such as the imaging system aperture, the position of the object plane and the probe pulse delay, duration and wavelength. Fina...

  11. Pulsed Laser Interactions with Space Debris: Target Shape Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Liedahl, D A; Libby, S B; Nikolaev, S; Phipps, C R

    2013-01-01

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes. We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon p...

  12. Model of a laser heated plasma interacting with walls arising in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tix, C.; Simon, G.

    1994-07-01

    In laser welding with laser intensities of approximately 1011 W/m2, a hole, called a keyhole, is formed in the material. In this keyhole a plasma is detected, which is characterized by high pressure as well as being influenced by the boundary of the keyhole. Experimental data on plasma parameters are rare and difficult to obtain [W. Sokolowski, G. Herziger, and E. Beyer, in High Power Lasers and Laser Machining Technology, edited by A. Quenzer, SPIE Proc. Vol. 1132 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1989), pp. 288-295]. In a previous paper [C. Tix and G. Simon, J. Phys. D 26, 2066 (1993)] we considered just a simple plasma model without excited states and with constant ion-neutral-atom temperature. Therefore we neglected radiative transport of excitations and underestimated the ion-neutral-atom temperature and the ionization rate. Here we extend our previous model for a continuous CO2 laser and iron and take into account radiative transfer of excitations and a variable ion-neutral-atom temperature. We consider singly charged ions, electrons, and three excitation states of neutral atoms. The plasma is divided in plasma bulk, presheath, and sheath. The transport equations are solved with boundary conditions mainly determined through the appearance of walls. Some effort is made to clarify the energy transport mechanism from the laser beam into the material. Dependent on the incident laser power, the mean electron temperature and density are obtained to be 1.0-1.3 eV and 2.5×1023-3×1023 m-3. Radiative transport of excitations does not contribute significantly to the energy transport.

  13. MECHANICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF SODIUM METAPERIODATE-IMPREGNATED PLASTICIZED WOOD (PW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md.Rezaur Rahman

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia, especially the Borneo Island state of Sarawak, has a large variety of tropical wood species. In this study, selected raw tropical wood species namely Artocarpus Elasticus, Artocarpus Rigidus, Xylopia spp., Koompassia Malaccensis, and Eugenia spp. were chemically treated with sodium metaperiodate to convert them into plasticized wood (PW. Manufactured plasticized wood samples were characterized using, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and mechanical testing (modulus of elasticity (MOE, modulus of rupture (MOR, static Young’s modulus (Es, decay resistance, and water absorption. MOE and MOR were calculated using a three-point bending test. Es and decay resistance were calculated using the compression parallel to grain test and the natural laboratory decay test, respectively. The manufactured PW yielded higher MOE, MOR, and Es. PW had a lower water content compared to the untreated wood and had high resistance to decay exposure, with Eugenia spp. having the highest resistance compared to the others.

  14. Generation of fast highly charged ions in laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolowski, J [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Badziak, J [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Boody, F P [Ion Light Technologies GmbH, Bad Abbach (Germany); Czarnecka, A [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gammino, S [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Jablonski, S [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Krasa, J [Institute of Physics, ASCR (Czech Republic); Laska, L [Institute of Physics, ASCR (Czech Republic); Parys, P [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Rohlena, K [Institute of Physics, ASCR (Czech Republic); Rosinski, M [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Ryc, L [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Torrisi, L [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Ullschmied, J [IPALS Research Centre ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-12-15

    The nonthermal and nonlinear coupling of strong laser light wave with plasma transfers a part of laser energy into hot electrons and fast ions. The efficiency of these effects depends on the characteristics of a laser pulse, target properties and irradiation geometry. The reported studies were performed with the use of a high-power and high-energy iodine PALS laser system (energy up to 1 kJ in a 0.4 ns pulse at wavelength of 1315 nm and energy up to 250 J at wavelength of 438 nm). The properties of the laser-produced ion streams were determined with the use of ion diagnostics based on the time-of-flight method. The characteristics of x-rays were measured using various semiconductor detectors. The main ion stream characteristics as well as the ion acceleration processes in plasmas of different Z numbers were studied in dependence on laser pulse parameters. The parameters of a fast ion group depend evidently on Z number of the ions. The influence of the electron density scale length on fast ion generation was investigated using a low intensity laser pre-pulses to generate preformed plasmas (pre-plasmas) with which the main laser pulse interacted. The obtained results suggest that ion acceleration processes were most effective at a specific electron density gradient scale length of pre-plasma determined by the pre-pulse parameters.

  15. Specular Reflectivity and Hot-Electron Generation in High-Contrast Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Gregory Elijah [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser (> 1018 W/cm2) interactions with matter are capable of producing relativistic electrons which have a variety of applications in state-of-the-art scientific and medical research conducted at universities and national laboratories across the world. Control of various aspects of these hot-electron distributions is highly desired to optimize a particular outcome. Hot-electron generation in low-contrast interactions, where significant amounts of under-dense pre-plasma are present, can be plagued by highly non-linear relativistic laser-plasma instabilities and quasi-static magnetic field generation, often resulting in less than desirable and predictable electron source characteristics. High-contrast interactions offer more controlled interactions but often at the cost of overall lower coupling and increased sensitivity to initial target conditions. An experiment studying the differences in hot-electron generation between high and low-contrast pulse interactions with solid density targets was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. To date, these hot-electrons generated in the laboratory are not directly observable at the source of the interaction. Instead, indirect studies are performed using state-of-the-art simulations, constrained by the various experimental measurements. These measurements, more-often-than-not, rely on secondary processes generated by the transport of these electrons through the solid density materials which can susceptible to a variety instabilities and target material/geometry effects. Although often neglected in these types of studies, the specularly reflected light can provide invaluable insight as it is directly influenced by the interaction. In this thesis, I address the use of (personally obtained) experimental specular reflectivity measurements to indirectly study hot-electron generation in the context of high-contrast, relativistic

  16. Effect of the Initial Laser Phase on the Interaction Between Relativistic Electron and Ultra-Intense Laser Field in a Strong Uniform Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xin-Kui; SHUAI Bin; GE Xiao-Chun; LI Ru-Xin; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2004-01-01

    @@ We investigate the influence of the initial laser phase on the interaction between relativistic electron and ultraintense linear polarized laser field in a strong uniform magnetic field. It is found that the dynamic behaviour of the relativistic electron and the emission spectrum varies dramatically with different initial laser field phases.The effect of changing initial phase is contrary in the two parameter regions divided by the resonance condition.The phase dependence of the electron energy and velocity components are also studied. Some beat structure is found when the initial laser phase is zero and this structure is absent when the initial laser phase is a quarter of a period.

  17. Spectroscopic investigations of novel pharmaceuticals: Stability and resonant interaction with laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarandache, Adriana; Boni, Mihai; Andrei, Ionut Relu; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Kiec-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Staicu, Angela; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents data about photophysics of two novel thio-hydantoins that exhibit promising pharmaceutical properties in multidrug resistance control. Time stability studies are necessary to establish the proper use of these compounds in different applications. As for their administration as drugs, it is imperative to know their shelf life, as well as storage conditions. At the same time, laser induced modified properties of the two new compounds are valuable to further investigate their specific interactions with other materials, including biological targets. The two new thio-hydantoins under generic names SZ-2 and SZ-7 were prepared as solutions in dimethyl sulfoxide at different concentrations, as well as in deionised water. For the stability assay they were kept in various light/temperature conditions up to 60 days. The stability was estimates based on UV-vis absorption measurements. The samples in bulk shape were exposed different time intervals to laser radiation emitted at 266 nm as the fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. The resonant interaction of the studied compounds with laser beams was analysed through spectroscopic methods UV-vis and FTIR absorption, as well as laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. As for stability assay, only solutions kept in dark at 4 °C have preserved the absorption characteristics, considering the cumulated measuring errors, less than one week. The vibrational changes that occur in their FTIR and modified fluorescence spectra upon laser beam exposure are also discussed. A result of the experimental analysis is that modifications are induced in molecular structures of the investigated compounds by resonant interaction with laser radiation. This fact evidences that the molecules are photoreactive and their characteristics might be shaped through controlled laser radiation exposure using appropriate protocols. This conclusion opens many opportunities both in the biomedical field, but also in other industrial activities

  18. Preparation of Y-H3PW12O40/TiO2 and La-H3PW12O40/TiO2 by hydrothermal method and its photocatalytic activity for dinitrotoluene decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘霞; 尚海茹; 冯长根

    2014-01-01

    A series of mesoporous materials (H3PW12O40/TiO2, Y-H3PW12O40/TiO2 and La-H3PW12O40/TiO2) were prepared by a modified sol-gel-hydrothermal route, which realized the load and modification of H3PW12O40 at the same time. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum (UV-Vis) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD and FT-IR results displayed that the catalysts had uniform anatase phase and the primary Keggin structure of H3PW12O40 remain intact. Nitrogen ad-sorption-desorption analysis suggested that suitable doping of rare earth elements could increase the specific surface area from 177.9 m2/g (H3PW12O40/TiO2) to 229.5 (1 wt.%Y-H3PW12O40/TiO2) or 236.1 m2/g (1 wt.%La-H3PW12O40/TiO2). Results of UV-Vis spectra showed that the band of the 1 wt.%Y-H3PW12O40/TiO2 and 1 wt.%La-H3PW12O40/TiO2 have an obvious redshift compared with the H3PW12O40/TiO2. Additionally, the composites were used as heterogeneous photocatalysts to the degradation of dinitrotoluene (DNT). It is the first time that polyoxometalate (POM) is applied in the degradation of explosive wastewater.

  19. Study of hot electrons generated from intense laser-plasma interaction employing Image Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG WenXi; JIN Zhan; WEI ZhiYi; ZHAO Wei; LI YingJun; ZHANG Jie; LI YuTong; XU MiaoHua; YUAN XiaoHui; ZHENG ZhiYuan; ZHANG Yi; LIU Feng; WANG ZhaoHua; LI HanMing

    2008-01-01

    Image Plate (IP) is convenient to be used and very suitable for radiation detection because of its advantages such as wide dynamic range, high detective quantum efficiency, ultrahigh sensitivity and superior linearity. The function mechanism and characteristics of IP are introduced in this paper. IP was employed in the study of hot electrons generated from intense laser-plasma interaction. The angular distri-bution and energy spectrum of hot electrons were measured with IP in the experi-ments. The results demonstrate that IP is an effective radiation detector for the study of laser-plasma interaction.

  20. Three dimensional Monte-Carlo modeling of laser-tissue interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, N A; Kim, B M; London, R A; Trauner, K B

    1999-03-12

    A full three dimensional Monte-Carlo program was developed for analysis of the laser-tissue interactions. This project was performed as a part of the LATIS3D (3-D Laser-Tissue interaction) project. The accuracy was verified against results from a public domain two dimensional axisymmetric program. The code was used for simulation of light transport in simplified human knee geometry. Using the real human knee meshes which will be extracted from MRI images in the near future, a full analysis of dosimetry and surgical strategies for photodynamic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis will be followed.

  1. Study of hot electrons generated from intense laser-plasma interaction employing Image Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Image Plate (IP) is convenient to be used and very suitable for radiation detection because of its advantages such as wide dynamic range, high detective quantum efficiency, ultrahigh sensitivity and superior linearity. The function mechanism and characteristics of IP are introduced in this paper. IP was employed in the study of hot electrons generated from intense laser-plasma interaction. The angular distri- bution and energy spectrum of hot electrons were measured with IP in the experi- ments. The results demonstrate that IP is an effective radiation detector for the study of laser-plasma interaction.

  2. Hot electrons generated by ultra-short pulse laser interacting with solid targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈黎明; 张杰; 李玉同; 梁天骄; 王龙; 魏志义; 江文勉

    2000-01-01

    Hot electrons produced by ultra-short pulse laser interacting with solid targets were studied systematically. When 800 nm, 8 × 1015 W/cm2 laser pulses interacted with solid targets, hot electron e-mission was found to be collimated in certain directions and the angular distribution of hot electrons depended on the energy absorption. The angular divergence of outgoing hot electrons was inversely proportional to the hot electron energy. The energy spectrum of hot electrons was found to be in a bi-Maxwellian distribution and the maximum energy was over 500 keV.

  3. Hot electrons generated by ultra-short pulse laser interacting with solid targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Hot electrons produced by ultra-short pulse laser interacting with solid targets were studied systematically. When 800 nm, 8×1015 W/cm2 laser pulses interacted with solid targets, hot electron emission was found to be collimated in certain directions and the angular distribution of hot electrons depended on the energy absorption. The angular divergence of outgoing hot electrons was inversely proportional to the hot electron energy. The energy spectrum of hot electrons was found to be in a bi-Maxwellian distribution and the maximum energy was over 500 keV.

  4. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of laser interaction with weakly ionized helium plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huayu; Ki, Hyungson

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a lattice Boltzmann method for laser interaction with weakly ionized plasmas considering electron impact ionization and three-body recombination. To simulate with physical properties of plasmas, the authors' previous work on the rescaling of variables is employed and the electromagnetic fields are calculated from the Maxwell equations by using the finite-difference time-domain method. To calculate temperature fields, energy equations are derived separately from the Boltzmann equations. In this way, we attempt to solve the full governing equations for plasma dynamics. With the developed model, the continuous-wave CO2 laser interaction with helium is simulated successfully.

  5. Mitigating the hosing instability in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceurvorst, L.; Ratan, N.; Levy, M. C.; Kasim, M. F.; Sadler, J.; Scott, R. H. H.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Huang, T. W.; Skramic, M.; Vranic, M.; Silva, L. O.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    A new physical model of the hosing instability that includes relativistic laser pulses and moderate densities is presented and derives the density dependence of the hosing equation. This is tested against two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. These simulations further examine the feasibility of using multiple pulses to mitigate the hosing instability in a Nd:glass-type parameter space. An examination of the effects of planar versus cylindrical exponential density gradients on the hosing instability is also presented. The results show that strongly relativistic pulses and more planar geometries are capable of mitigating the hosing instability which is in line with the predictions of the physical model.

  6. Numerical simulation of filamentation in laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, D.J.; Sajjadi, S.G.

    1986-05-14

    Numerical studies of beam filamentation in laser-produced plasma are presented. This involves the numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation, known as the Schroedinger equation, coupled with the thermal transport equations for both ions and electrons, in two dimensions. The solution of the resulting equation with non-linear refractive index due to thermal and pondermotive forces, shows self-focusing and a variety of strong aberration effects. Intensity amplification at the final focus is found to be between one and two orders of magnitude greater than the initial beam intensity, governed in general by diffraction and aberration effects within the beam.

  7. Effects of laser interaction with living human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanova, O. E.; Protasov, E. A.; Protasov, D. E.; Smirnova, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    With the help of a highly sensitive laser device with the wavelength λ = 0.808 pm, which is optimal for deep penetration of the radiation into biological tissues, the effects associated with the appearance of uncontrolled human infrasonic vibrations of different frequencies were investigated. It was established that the observed fluctuations are associated with the vascular system which is characterized by its own respiratory movements, occurring synchronously with the movements of the respiratory muscles, the operation of the heart muscle, and the effect of compression ischemia. The effect of “enlightenment” of a tissue is observed with stopping of blood flow in vessels by applying a tourniquet on the wrist.

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Transient laser-induced thermochemical processes on metal surfaces and their visualisation with a laser image amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokoshev, V. G.; Galkin, A. F.; Klimovskii, Ivan I.; Danilov, S. Yu; Abramov, D. V.; Arakelyan, S. M.

    1998-04-01

    Laser oxidation of metals and alloys (steel, copper, brass, titanium, etc.) was investigated with a laser image amplifier based on a Cu laser making use of computer image processing. A method was developed for measuring the growth of an oxide film by recording the motion of interference minima (maxima) of the reflectivity for copper laser radiation when the oxide distribution was nonuniform. The results were compared with theoretical models.

  9. Laser interaction with low-density carbon foam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chaurasia; S Tripathi; D S Munda; G Mishra; C G Murali; N K Gupta; L J Dhareshwar; A K Rossall; G J Tallents; Rashmi Singh; D K Kohli; R K Khardekar

    2010-12-01

    Experiments were performed with a 15 J/500 ps Nd:glass laser ( = 1064 nm) focussed to an intensity > 1014 W/cm2 . X-ray emissions from carbon foam and 5 % Pt-doped carbon foam of density 150–300 mg/cc were compared with that of the solid carbon targets. The thickness of the carbon foam was 15 m on a graphite substrate. X-ray emission was measured using semiconductor X-ray diodes covered with various filters having transmissions in different X-ray spectral ranges. It covered X-ray spectrum of 0.8–8.5 keV range. The X-ray emission in the soft X-ray region was observed to increase to about 1.8 times and 2.3 times in carbon foam and Pt-doped foam, respectively with respect to solid carbon. In hard X-rays, there was no measurable difference amongst the carbon foam, Pt-doped carbon foam and solid carbon. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis demonstrates that foam targets smoothens the crater formed by the laser irradiation.

  10. On very short and intense laser-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    We briefly report on some results regarding the impact of very short and intense laser pulses on a cold, low-density plasma initially at rest, and the consequent acceleration of plasma electrons to relativistic energies. Locally and for short times the pulse can be described by a transverse plane electromagnetic travelling-wave and the motion of the electrons by a purely Magneto-Fluido-Dynamical (MFD) model with a very simple dependence on the transverse electromagnetic potential, while the ions can be regarded as at rest; the Lorentz-Maxwell and continuity equations are reduced to the Hamilton equations of a Hamiltonian system with 1 degree of freedom, in the case of a plasma with constant initial density, or a collection of such systems otherwise. We can thus describe both the well-known "wakefield" behind the pulse and the recently predicted "slingshot effect", i.e. the backward expulsion of high energy electrons just after the laser pulse has hit the surface of the plasma.

  11. Electromagnetic Confined Plasma Target for Interaction Studies with Intense Laser Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielbauer, B; Ursescu, U; Trotsenko, S; Spillmann, U; Schuch, R; Stohlker, T; Kuhl, T; Borneis, S; Schenkel, T; McDonald, J; Schneider, D

    2006-08-09

    The paper describes a novel application of an electron beam ion trap as a plasma target facility for intense laser-plasma interaction studies. The low density plasma target ({approx}10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}) is confined in a mobile cryogenic electromagnetic charged particle trap, with the magnetic confinement field of 1-3T maintained by a superconducting magnet. Ion plasmas for a large variety of ion species and charge states are produced and maintained within the magnetic field and the space charge of an energetic electron beam in the ''Electron Beam Ion Trap'' (EBIT) geometry. Intense laser beams (optical lasers, x-ray lasers and upcoming ''X-Ray Free Electron Lasers'' (XFEL)) provide strong time varying electromagnetic fields (>10{sup 12} V/cm in femto- to nano-sec pulses) for interactions with electromagnetically confined neutral/non-neutral plasmas. The experiments are aimed to gain understanding of the effects of intense photon fields on ionization/excitation processes, the ionization balance, as well as photon polarization effects. First experimental scenarios and tests with an intense laser that utilize the ion plasma target are outlined.

  12. Laser-material interaction during atom probe tomography of oxides with embedded metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinde, D.; Arnoldi, L.; Devaraj, A.; Vella, A.

    2016-10-28

    Oxide-supported metal nano-particles are of great interest in catalysis but also in the development of new large-spectrum-absorption materials. The design of such nano materials requires three-dimensional characterization with a high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. The laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography (La-APT) presents both these capacities if an accurate understanding of laser-material interaction is developed. In this paper, we focus on the fundamental physics of field evaporation as a function of sample geometry, laser power, and DC electric field for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO. By understanding the laser-material interaction through experiments and a theoretical model of heat diffusion inside the sample after the interaction with laser pulse, we point out the physical origin of the noise and determine the conditions to reduce it by more than one order of magnitude, improving the sensitivity of the La-APT for metal-dielectric composites. Published by AIP Publishing.

  13. Ion acceleration beyond 100MeV/amu from relativistic laser-matter interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Daniel; Gautier, Cort; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Shah, Rahul; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Shimada, Tsutomu; Fernandez, Juan; Hegelich, Manuel; Yin, Lin; Albright, Brian; Habs, Dieter

    2012-10-01

    In the past 10 years laser acceleration of protons and ions was mainly achieved by laser light interacting with micrometer scaled solid matter targets in the TNSA regime, favoring acceleration of protons. Ion acceleration based on this acceleration mechanism seems to have stagnated in terms of particle energy, remaining too low for most applications. The high contrast and relativistic intensities available at the Trident laser allow sub-micron solid matter laser interaction dominated by relativistic transparency of the target. This interaction efficiently couples laser momentum into all target ion species, making it a promising alternative to conventional accelerators. However, little experimental research has up to now studied conversion efficiency or beam distributions, which are essential for application, such as ion based fast ignition (IFI) or hadron cancer therapy. We here present experimental data addressing these aspects for C^6+ ions and protons in comparison with the TNSA regime. Unique measurements of angularly resolved ion energy spectra for targets ranging from 30 nm to 25 micron are presented. While the measured conversion efficiency for C^6+ reaches up to ˜7%, peak energies of 1 GeV and 120 MeV have been measured for C^6+ and protons, respectively.

  14. Picosecond Neutron Yields from Ultra-Intense Laser-Target Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, C. Leland; Fuchs, Julien

    2009-11-01

    High-flux neutron sources for neutron imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator-based (Spallation Neutron Source) and reactor-based (High Flux Isotope Reactor) neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultra-intense (> 10^18 W/cm^2) laser-target interactions to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons. Here we examine the feasibility of a source based on current (LULI) and upcoming laser facility capabilities. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. The parameters of the deuteron beam are well understood from laser-plasma and laser-target studies relevant to fast-ignition fusion. Expected neutron yields are presented in comparison to conventional neutron sources, previous experimental neutron yields, and within the context of neutron shielding safety requirements.

  15. RADIATION DOSE MEASUREMENTS FOR HIGH-INTENSITY LASER INTERACTIONS WITH SOLID TARGETS AT SLAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Bauer, J; Cimeno, M; Ferrari, A; Galtier, E; Granados, E; Lee, H J; Liu, J; Nagler, B; Prinz, A; Rokni, S; Tran, H; Woods, M

    2016-12-01

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. These laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source's (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 10(18) and 7.1 × 10(19) W cm(-2) are presented.

  16. Experiment on laser interaction with a planar target for conditions relevant to shock ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheut, Y.; Antonelli, L.; Atzeni, S.; Badziak, J.; Baffigi, F.; Batani, D.; Cecchetti, C.; Chodukowski, T.; Consoli, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; De Angelis, R.; Folpini, G.; Gizzi, L. A.; Kalinowska, Z.; Kucharik, M.; Köster, P.; Krousky, E.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Liska, R.; Malka, G.; Marocchino, A.; Nicolaï, P.; O'Dell, T.; Parys, P.; Pisarczyk, T.; Rączka, P.; Renner, O.; Rhee, Y. J.; Ribeyre, X.; Richetta, M.; Rosinski, M.; Ryć, L.; Skala, J.; Schiavi, A.; Schurtz, G.; Smid, M.; Spindloe, C.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Zaraś, A.

    2014-05-01

    We report the experiment conducted on the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) laser facility dedicated to make a parametric study of the laser-plasma interaction under the physical conditions corresponding to shock ignition thermonuclear fusion reactions. Two laser beams have been used: the auxiliary beam, for preplasma creation on the surface of a plastic foil, and the main beam to launch a strong shock. The ablation pressure is inferred from the volume of the crater in the Cu layer situated behind the plastic foil and by shock breakout chronometry. The population of fast electrons is analyzed by Kα emission spectroscopy and imaging. The preplasma is characterized by three-frame interferometry, x-ray spectroscopy and ion diagnostics. The numerical simulations constrained with the measured data gave a maximum pressure in the plastic layer of about 90 Mbar.

  17. High density ultrashort relativistic positron beam generation by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y. J.; Klimo, O.; Weber, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-11-01

    A mechanism of high energy and high density positron beam creation is proposed in ultra-relativistic laser-plasma interaction. Longitudinal electron self-injection into a strong laser field occurs in order to maintain the balance between the ponderomotive potential and the electrostatic potential. The injected electrons are trapped and form a regular layer structure. The radiation reaction and photon emission provide an additional force to confine the electrons in the laser pulse. The threshold density to initiate the longitudinal electron self-injection is obtained from analytical model and agrees with the kinetic simulations. The injected electrons generate γ-photons which counter-propagate into the laser pulse. Via the Breit-Wheeler process, well collimated positron bunches in the GeV range are generated of the order of the critical plasma density and the total charge is about nano-Coulomb. The above mechanisms are demonstrated by particle-in-cell simulations and single electron dynamics.

  18. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Taiee [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  19. Current scaling and plasma heating in relativistic laser-solid interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Thomas; Huang, Lingen; Metzkes, Josefine; Cowan, Thomas E; Schramm, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Intense and energetic electron currents can be generated by ultra-intense lasers interacting with solid density targets. Especially for ultra-short laser pulses their temporal evolution needs to be taken into account for many non-linear processes as instantaneous currents may differ significantly from the average. Hence, a dynamic model including the temporal variation of the electron currents which goes beyond a simple bunching with twice the laser frequency but otherwise constant current is needed. Here we present a new time-dependent model to describe the laser generated currents and obtain simple expressions for the temporal evolution and resulting corrections of averages. To exemplify the model and its predictive capabilities we show the impact of temporal evolution, spectral distribution and spatial modulations on Ohmic heating of the bulk target material.

  20. Prepulse effects on the interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with high-Z solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Sasaki, Akira; Utsumi, Takayuki; Fukumoto, Ichirou; Tajima, Toshiki; Saito, Fumikazu; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Kazutaka G.; Kondo, Ken-ichi; Yoshida, Masatake

    2000-11-01

    K{alpha} emission of high-Z solid targets irradiated by an intense, short (<100 fs) laser pulse in the 10 keV region is shown to be sensitive to the electron energy cutoff, which is strongly dependent on the density gradient of the plasma corona formed by a long prepulse. The absorption rate of short laser pulses, the hot electron distribution, and x-ray emission from a Cu slab target are studied via a hybrid model, which combines the hydrodynamics, collisional particle-in-cell, and Monte Carlo simulation techniques, and via a direct spectroscopic measurement. An absorption mechanism originating from the interaction of the laser pulse with plasma waves is found to increase the absorption rate by over 30% even for a very short, s-polarized laser pulse. Calculated and measured x-ray spectra are in good agreement, confirming the electron energy cutoff.

  1. Electron acceleration mechanisms in the interaction of ultrashort lasers with underdense plasmas: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, J.; Lefebvre, E.; Malka, V.; Marques, J.-R.; Amiranoff, F.; Solodov, A.; Mora, P.

    2002-06-30

    An experiment investigating the production of relativistic electrons from the interaction of ultrashort multi-terawatt laser pulses with an underdense plasma is presented. Electrons were accelerated to tens of MeV and the maximum electron energy increased as the plasma density decreased. Simulations have been performed in order to model the experiment. They show a good agreement with the trends observed in the experiment and the spectra of accelerated electrons could be reproduced successfully. The simulations have been used to study the relative contribution of the different acceleration mechanisms: plasma wave acceleration, direct laser acceleration and stochastic heating. The results show that in low density case (1 percent of the critical density) acceleration by laser is dominant mechanism. The simulations at high density also suggest that direct laser acceleration is more efficient that stochastic heating.

  2. Proton acceleration using doped Argon plasma density gradient interacting with relativistic CO2 -laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash; Ettlinger, Oliver; Hicks, George; Ditter, Emma-Jane; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    We investigate proton and light-ion acceleration driven by the interaction of relativistic CO2 laser pulses with overdense Argon or other heavy-ion gas targets doped with lighter-ion species. Optically shaping the gas targets allows tuning of the pre-plasma scale-length from a few to several laser wavelengths, allowing the laser to efficiently drive a propagating snowplow through the bunching in the electron density. Preliminary PIC-based modeling shows that the lighter-ion species is accelerated even without any significant motion of the heavier ions which is a signature of the Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration mechanism. Some outlines of possible experiments at the TW CO2 laser at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented.

  3. Optical Probing of CO2 Laser-Plasma Interactions at Near Critical Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao

    The interaction of a high-power laser beam with plasma has been explored extensively in the context of laser-driven fusion, plasma-based acceleration of ions and electrons and high energy-density physics. One of the fundamental processes common to all these studies is the penetration of intense light into a dense matter through the hole boring effect and self-induced transparency. Light with a given wavelength lambda will be reflected once the electron density equals the critical electron plasma density nc = 1.1x 1021cm -3 /[lambda(mum)]2. The radiation pressure exerted on the critical density layer is characterized by the ponderomotive force of a focused laser pulse which scales with a laser intensity, I as Ilambda2 Wmum2/cm 2. At Ilambda2 ˜1017 Wmum2/cm2 and above, it becomes possible for the laser pulse not only to steepen the plasma profile but to push the overcritical plasma with ne > nc creating a cavity or a hole in the target. The phenomenon of hole boring, whereby a laser pulse propagates through a reduced density cavity to reach and push the critical density layer, is of importance in fast-ignition fusion because it may allow the laser pulse to deliver its energy closer to the compressed fuel where it can be converted into fast electrons that are needed to ignite a small portion of the fuel. The layer of plasma pushed by the radiation pressure can reflect and accelerate ions via the so called Hole Boring Radiation Pressure Acceleration mechanism. Also the density pile- up in combination with the strong electron heating at the critical density layer can facilitate the formation of a collisionless shock. This shock wave acceleration can produce high energy ion beams with a narrow energy spread. Numerous experiments have been carried out to study dynamics of laser plasma interaction indirectly using solid state targets that are opaque for 1?m laser. However, by using a longer wavelength CO2 laser, lambda = 10.6mum, the critical plasma density is decreased

  4. Study of laser - matter interaction applied to the decontamination of paints; Etude de l'interaction laser - matiere appliquee a la decontamination de peintures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brygo, F

    2005-12-15

    In nuclear industry, the paint layer on the walls must be removed during dismantling or maintenance operation. Laser ablation of the paint layer allows to reduce the generated waste volume, compared to the current techniques. Paints consist of a polymeric base in which fillers and pigments are included. The energy deposition of the laser beam in this scattering medium is studied using a multiple scattering model, and measurements of reflection / transmission of beam through thin layers. The paint ablation is studied with several Nd: YAG lasers and a TEA-CO{sub 2} laser, allowing to modify the fluence, the wavelength, the pulse duration, the repetition rate and the number of shots. Optical benches were carried out, and the parametric tests allow to define the optimal ablation parameters, in term of ablation efficiency. Ablation at high repetition rate is studied using an optical pyrometer and a specifically developed thermal model. Measurements and modelling highlight the heat accumulation that appears at high repetition rate. This accumulation allows to reduce the ablation threshold fluence and to increase the ablation efficiency. Analyses of the interaction and ablation regimes are proposed on the basis of the experimental results and models, and allow to optimise the decontamination process. (author)

  5. Contrasting the beam interaction characteristics of selected lasers with a partially stabilised zirconia (PSZ) bio-ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Differences in the beam interaction characteristics of a CO2 laser, a Nd:YAG laser, a high power diode laser (HPDL) and an excimer laser with a partially stabilised zirconia (PSZ) bio-ceramic have been studied. A derivative of Beer-Lambert’s law was applied and the laser beam absorption lengths of the four lasers were calculated as 33.55 x 10-3 cm for the CO2 laser, 18.22 x 10-3 cm for the Nd:YAG laser, 17.17 x 10-3 cm for the HPDL and 8.41 x 10-6 cm for the excimer laser. It was determined g...

  6. Nonlinear neutrino-photon interactions inside strong laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuren, Sebastian; Keitel, Christoph H.; Di Piazza, Antonino [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    As different neutrino mass eigenstates exist, only the lightest neutrino is absolutely stable. However, due to the small phase space and the GIM suppression mechanism the radiative neutrino lifetime is much larger than the age of the universe. Interestingly, the photon-emission probability by a neutrino is drastically increased in the presence of an external background field. Therefore, it is natural to ask the question whether this so-called ''electromagnetic catalysis'' could be studied in an laboratory experiment using existing and upcoming laser facilities. To shed light on this question, we derive the vector-axialvector coupling tensor in the presence of an arbitrary plane-wave background field, which is needed for the calculation of the radiative neutrino decay. Furthermore, we study the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly associated with this object in detail.

  7. Material decomposition mechanisms in femtosecond laser interactions with metals

    CERN Document Server

    Povarnitsyn, M E; Sentis, M; Khishchenko, K V; Levashov, P R

    2007-01-01

    A numerical hydrodynamic study of femtosecond laser ablation is presented. A detailed analysis of material decomposition is performed using a thermodynamically complete equation of state with separate stable and metastable phase states and phase boundaries. The lifetime of the metastable liquid state is estimated based on the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation. In addition, mechanical fragmentation of the target material is controlled based on available criteria. As a result, several ablation mechanisms are observed. A major fraction of the ablated material, however, is found to originate from the metastable liquid region, which is decomposed either thermally in the vicinity of the critical point into a liquid-gas mixture, or mechanically at high strain rate and negative pressure into liquid droplets and chunks. The calculation results explain available experimental findings.

  8. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  9. Proton acceleration in the interaction of high power laser and cryogenic hydrogen targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2014-10-01

    High intensity laser driven ion acceleration has attracted great interest due to many prospective applications ranging from inertial confinement fusion, cancer therapy, particle accelerators. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed to model and design experiments at MEC for high power laser interaction with cryogenic hydrogen targets of tunable density and thickness. Preliminary 1D and 2D simulations, using fully relativistic particle-in-cell code PICLS, show a unique regime of proton acceleration, e.g. ~ 300 MeV peak energy protons are observed in the 1D run for interaction of ~1020 W/cm2, 110 fs intense laser with 6nc dense (nc = 1021 cm-3) and 2 micron thin target. The target is relativistically under-dense for the laser and we observe that a strong (multi-terawatt) shock electric field is produced and protons are reflected to high velocities by this field. Further, the shock field and the laser field keep propagating through the hydrogen target and meets up with target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) electric field produced at the target rear edge and vacuum interface and this superposition amplifies the TNSA fields resulting in higher proton energy. In addition, the electrons present at the rear edge of the target continue to gain energy via strong interaction with laser that crosses the target and these accelerated electrons maintains higher electric sheath fields which further provides acceleration to protons. We will also present detailed investigation with 2D PICLS simulations to gain a better insight of such physical processes to characterize multidimensional effects and establish analytical scaling between laser and target conditions for the optimization of proton acceleration.

  10. High Harmonic Radiation Generation and Attosecond pulse generation from Intense Laser-Solid Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Alexander Roy [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Krushelnick, Karl [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-09-08

    We have studied ion motion effects in high harmonic generation, including shifts to the harmonics which result in degradation of the attosecond pulse train, and how to mitigate them. We have examined the scaling with intensity of harmonic emission. We have also switched the geometry of the interaction to measure, for the first time, harmonics from a normal incidence interaction. This was performed by using a special parabolic reflector with an on axis hole and is to allow measurements of the attosecond pulses using standard techniques. Here is a summary of the findings: First high harmonic generation in laser-solid interactions at 1021 Wcm-2, demonstration of harmonic focusing, study of ion motion effects in high harmonic generation in laser-solid interactions, and demonstration of harmonic amplification.

  11. Quasi-monoenergetic positron beam generation from ultra-intense laser-matter interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Hayakawa, Takehito

    2016-10-01

    In ultra-intense laser-matter interactions in which the radiation reaction effect plays an important role, γ-rays are effectively generated that are intense, collimated, and of short duration. These γ-rays propagate through the target, which results in the electron-positron pair creation caused by the interaction of the γ-rays with the nuclear electric fields. The positron beam thus generated has several unique features; it is quasi-monoenergetic in nature with a peak energy of hundreds of MeV, well collimated, and of ultra-short duration. Based on the numerical simulations, the dependences of the number and monochromaticity of the positrons on the laser and target parameters are explored, which leads to the proposal of a new type of the laser-driven positron source.

  12. 76 FR 33981 - Special Conditions: Pratt and Whitney Canada Model PW210S Turboshaft Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... for the PW210S engine model was published on February 14, 2011 (76 FR 8321). One comment letter was... unit (APU) mode. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety... novel or unusual design feature, which is engine operation in auxiliary power unit (APU) mode....

  13. Preparation of PVA/ H3PW12O40 Fiber Mats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian GONG; Chang Lu SHAO; Guo Cheng YANG; Yan PAN; Lun Yu QU

    2004-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fiber mats containing 20 and 80 wt% H3PW12O40 were prepared by using electrospinning technique. The fiber mats were characterized by IR, XRD spectra and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The diameter of the fiber mats is ca. 400 nm.

  14. Interaction mechanisms of cavitation bubbles induced by spatially and temporally separated fs-laser pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Tinne

    Full Text Available The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers.

  15. Laser Pointers: Low-Cost, Low-Tech Innovative, Interactive Instruction Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravkovska, Nevenka; Cech, Maureen; Beygo, Pinar; Kackley, Bob

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of laser pointers at the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, University of Maryland, College Park, as a personal response system (PRS) tool to encourage student engagement in and interactivity with one-shot, lecture-based information literacy sessions. Unlike more sophisticated personal response systems like…

  16. Simulation of interaction of oriented J aggregates with resonance laser radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vysotina, N.V.; Malyshev, V. A.; Maslov, V. G.; Nesterov, L. A.; Rosanov, N. N.; Shatsev, A. N.

    The interaction of laser radiation with single J aggregates of cyanine dyes is theoretically analyzed and numerically simulated. The quantum-mechanical calculations of the equilibrium geometry and the energies and intensities of the lowest singlet electronic transitions in pseudoisocyanine chloride

  17. Study of plasma formation in CW CO2 laser beam-metal surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Vasilchenko, Zh V.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Gresev, A. N.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Chubrik, N. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.

    1994-04-01

    An interaction of the cw CO2 laser beam and a moving metal surface has been studied. The pulsed and thermodynamical parameters of the surface plasma were investigated by optical and spectroscopical methods. The subsonic radiation wave propagation in the erosion plasma torch has been studied.

  18. Interaction mechanisms of cavitation bubbles induced by spatially and temporally separated fs-laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers.

  19. Interaction of single-pulse laser energy with bow shock in hypersonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yanji

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sensing and schlieren imaging with high resolution and sensitivity are applied to the study of the interaction of single-pulse laser energy with bow shock at Mach 5. An Nd:YAG laser operated at 1.06 μm, 100 mJ pulse energy is used to break down the hypersonic flow in a shock tunnel. Three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations are solved with an upwind scheme to simulate the interaction. The pressure at the stagnation point on the blunt body is measured and calculated to examine the pressure variation during the interaction. Schlieren imaging is used in conjunction with the calculated density gradients to examine the process of the interaction. The results show that the experimental pressure at the stagnation point on the blunt body and schlieren imaging fit well with the simulation. The pressure at the stagnation point on the blunt body will increase when the transmission shock approaches the blunt body and decrease with the formation of the rarefied wave. Bow shock is deformed during the interaction. Quasi-stationary waves are formed by high rate laser energy deposition to control the bow shock. The pressure and temperature at the stagnation point on the blunt body and the wave drag are reduced to 50%, 75% and 81% respectively according to the simulation. Schlieren imaging has provided important information for the investigation of the mechanism of the interaction.

  20. Simulation of laser-tattoo pigment interaction in a tissue-mimicking phantom using Q-switched and long-pulsed lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, K J; Kim, B J; Cho, S B

    2017-08-01

    Laser therapy is the treatment of choice in tattoo removal. However, the precise mechanisms of laser-tattoo pigment interactions remain to be evaluated. We evaluated the geometric patterns of laser-tattoo pigment particle interactions using a tattoo pigment-embedded tissue-mimicking (TM) phantom. A Q-switched (QS) neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser was used at settings of 532-, 660-, and 1064-nm wavelengths, single-pulse and quick pulse-to-pulse treatment modes, and spot sizes of 4 and 7 mm. Most of the laser-tattoo interactions in the experimental conditions formed cocoon-shaped or oval photothermal and photoacoustic injury zones, which contained fragmented tattoo particles in various sizes depending on the conditions. In addition, a long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser was used at a spot size of 6 mm and pulse widths of 3, 5, and 10 ms. The finer granular pattern of tattoo destruction was observed in TM phantoms treated with 3- and 5-ms pulse durations compared to those treated with a 10-ms pulse. We outlined various patterns of laser-tattoo pigment interactions in a tattoo-embedded TM phantom to predict macroscopic tattoo and surrounding tissue reactions after laser treatment for tattoo removal. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Gamma-ray emission in ultra-intense laser interaction with solid targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, Ondrej; Vyskocil, Jiri; Kumar, Deepak; Limpouch, Jiri; Weber, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Electrons moving in ultra-intense laser fields emit hard radiation due to radiation reaction and non-linear Compton scattering. Multi-MeV γ-rays were measured by scattering of electrons generated from laser wakefield with a focused laser of intensity a0 1 . However, non-linear Compton scattering and radiation reaction is also an efficient mechanism for generating copious amount of γ-rays in laser interaction with solids at intensities approaching 1022 W/cm2. Emission of γ-rays due to radiation reaction and bremsstrahlung are investigated here in the high intensity regime of laser-solid target interaction by using a combination of Particle-in-Cell and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations. The relative contribution of these processes is analyzed as a function of the target parameters. We concentrate on the influence of the target thickness, material, preplasma conditions or a surface structure on the generation of high energy photons and study separately their energy and angular distributions. It is demonstrated that the presence of preplasma or a special surface structure may significantly enhance emission of hard γ photons and their cut-off energy and change their angular distribution. Supported by Czech Science Foundation project 15-02964S.

  2. Effects of radiation damping in ultra-intense laser matter interaction at extreme intensity regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Pandit, Rishi

    2011-10-01

    Effects of the radiation damping in the interaction of extremely intense laser (>1022 W/cm2) with metal targets are studied via a relativistic collisional particle- in-cell simulation, PICLS. We had introduced the Landau-Lifshitz equation, which is the first order term of the Lorentz-Dirac equation to PIC, and also derived the second order term to check its effect. We had implemented these damping terms in the two- dimensional PICLS code, and had studied the laser plasma interaction at >1022 W/cm2 intensities. Hot electrons generated by such extreme-intense laser lights on the target get the relativistic energy with relativistic Lorentz factor γ > 100 , and lose energy strongly by emitting radiations. Especially, we had studied the second term's effect in a comparison with the first order damping term, and found that the second term becomes comparable to the first order term when the laser intensity >1023 W/cm2. With the higher order term, the hot electrons with energies greater than 500 MeV are totally suppressed and hard them to go beyond that energy even increasing the laser intensity >1023 W/cm2. Supported by US DOE DE-PS02-08ER08-16 and DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  3. Effects of radiation damping in extreme ultra-intense laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Rishi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2011-10-01

    Effects of the radiation damping in the interaction of extremely intense laser (>1022 W/cm2) with overdense plasma are studied via a relativistic collisional particle-in-cell simulation, PICLS1D. We had derived the Landau-Lifshitz equation, which is the first order term of the Lorentz-Dirac equation, and also derived the second order term as the first time and implemented in the code. The code had been tested in a single particle motion at the extreme intensity laser. It was found that the first order damping term is reasonable up to the intensity 1022 W/cm2, but the second oder term becomes not negligible and comparable to the first order term beyond 1023 W/cm2. The radiation damping model was introduced to a one- dimensional particle-in-cell code (PIC), and tested in the laser - plasma interaction at extreme intensity. The strong damping of hot electrons in high energy tail was demonstrated in PIC simulations. Hot electrons generated by such extreme-intense laser lights on the plasma get the relativistic energy with gamma factor >100, and lose energy strongly by emitting radiation. The second order term becomes comparable to the first order term when the laser intensity >1023 W/cm2. US DOE DE-PS02-08ER08-16 and DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  4. High Power Laser-Plasma Interaction under a Strong Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Tomohito; Murakami, Masakatsu; Iwata, Natsumi; Hata, Masayasu; Mima, Kunioki

    2016-10-01

    We investigate laser-plasma interactions under a strong magnetic field by one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations. A simple setup is considered in our analysis, in which a thin foil is irradiated by a right-handed circularly polarized laser. A uniform magnetic field is assumed in the direction of the laser propagation. Then the whistler wave can penetrate the overdense plasma when the external field is larger than the critical field strength Bc =meω0 / e . In this situation, key parameters of the system are the plasma density and the size of the external field. We performed various models in the density-field strength diagram, which is actually the so-called CMA diagram, to evaluate the efficiency of the energy conversion from the laser to plasma and the reflectivity and transmittance of the laser. It is found that there are two important processes in the interaction between the whistler wave and overdense plasma, which are the cyclotron resonance of relativistic electrons and the parametric (Brillouin) instability. Because of the high temperature of electrons, ions can be accelerated dramatically by a large sheath field at the target surface.

  5. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Structure of flows due to interaction of CO2 laser pulse pairs with a target in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeev, A. A.; Nikolashina, L. I.; Potashkin, M. N.; Prokopenko, N. V.

    1991-06-01

    An analysis is made of two pulses from an electric-discharge CO2 laser, of 6-12 μs duration and separated in time, incident on a target surrounded by air of normal density. The main attention is concentrated on breakdown of air by the second pulse at a boundary separating the "cold gas" and the plasma generated by the first pulse ("hot gas"). A gasdynamic system of waves is then generated. It consists of an absorption wave traveling along the cold gas opposite to the laser radiation and a wave propagating along the hot gas toward the target. The best agreement between the theory and experiment is obtained employing a model in which an absorption wave travels along the hot gas in an overcompressed detonation regime. The density of the radiation flux needed to maintain such a wave is 20-30% of the average density of the laser radiation flux carried by the second pulse.

  6. Laser-plasma interaction in the context of inertial fusion: experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Bandulet, H.; Depierreux, S.; Hüller, S.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Pesme, D.; Loiseau, P.

    2007-08-01

    Many nonlinear processes may affect the laser beam propagation and the laser energy deposition in the underdense plasma surrounding the pellet. These processes, associated with anomalous and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, are fundamental issues in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion. The work presented in this article refers to laser-plasma interaction experiments which were conducted under well-controlled conditions, and to their theoretical and numerical modeling. Thanks to important diagnostics improvements, the plasma and laser parameters were sufficiently characterized in these experiments to make it possible to carry out numerical simulations modeling the laser plasma interaction in which the hydrodynamics conditions were very close to the experimental ones. Two sets of experiments were carried out with the LULI 2000 and the six beam LULI laser facilities. In the first series of experiments, the interaction between two single hot spots was studied as a function of their distance, intensity and light polarization. In the second series, the intensity distribution of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) inside the plasma was studied by means of a new temporally resolved imaging system. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations were carried out with our code Harmony2D in order to model these experiments. For both series of experiments, the numerical results show a very good agreement with the experimental ones for what concerns the main SBS features, namely the spatial and temporal behavior of the SBS-driven acoustic waves, as well as the average SBS reflectivities. Thus, these well diagnosed experiments, carried out with well defined conditions, make it possible to benchmark our theoretical and numerical modelings and, hence, to improve our predictive capabilities for future experiments.

  7. Laser-matter interaction at high intensity and high temporal contrast; Interaction laser matiere a haut flux et fort contraste temporel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doumy, G

    2006-01-15

    The continuous progress in the development of laser installations has already lead to ultra-short pulses capable of achieving very high focalized intensities (I > 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}). At these intensities, matter presents new non-linear behaviours, due to the fact that the electrons are accelerated to relativistic speeds. The experimental access to this interaction regime on solid targets has long been forbidden because of the presence, alongside the femtosecond pulse, of a pedestal (mainly due to the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) which occurs in the laser chain) intense enough to modify the state of the target. In this thesis, we first characterized, both experimentally and theoretically, a device which allows an improvement of the temporal contrast of the pulse: the Plasma Mirror. It consists in adjusting the focusing of the pulse on a dielectric target, so that the pedestal is mainly transmitted, while the main pulse is reflected by the overcritical plasma that it forms at the surface. The implementation of such a device on the UHI 10 laser facility (CEA Saclay - 10 TW - 60 fs) then allowed us to study the interaction between ultra-intense, high contrast pulses with solid targets. In a first part, we managed to generate and characterize dense plasmas resulting directly from the interaction between the main pulse and very thin foils (100 nm). This characterization was realized by using an XUV source obtained by high order harmonics generation in a rare gas jet. In a second part, we studied experimentally the phenomenon of high order harmonics generation on solid targets, which is still badly understood, but could potentially lead to a new kind of energetic ultra-short XUV sources. (author)

  8. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  9. Electromagnetic cascade in high energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of high energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when 3D effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and...

  10. Laser surgery in otolaryngology: interaction of CO2 laser and soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihashi, S; Jako, G J; Incze, J; Strong, M S; Vaughan, C W

    1976-01-30

    The sequence of histological change induced by CO2 laser irradiation was discussed in terms of two factors: the physiomechanical factor and the physiochemical factor. At sufficiently high heat energy levels, the immediate findings are characterized by crater formation resulting from rapid vaporization of the water and ejection of the solid component. In the immediate vicinity of the crater edge, the maximum tissue temperature rise is 65 degrees C above the 32 degrees C ambient tissue temperature and it decreases to the primary tissue temperature within a distance of 2 mm. The healing process of CO2 laser induced lesions proceeds with minimal delay. The lymphatic and vascular channels are occluded in the marginal area of coagulation resulting in a marked hemostatic effect. This sealing effect increases the margin of safety in preventing possible dissemination of tumor cells. By selecting the appropriate power, time, and focus cone angle, precise destruction of preselected areas of tissue can be achieved with an extraordinary hemostatic effect without damaging the underlying tissue. These advantages are especially helpful in function-preserving surgery.

  11. The Brain Physics: Multi Laser Beam Interaction with the Brain Topions (the Brain Neurocenters)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2015-03-01

    A novel method for the treatment of the neurological diseases is proposed. The multiple-energy laser photons (the blue scanning photons and ultraviolet focusing photons) interact with the specific DNA molecules within the topion (such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's brain topion) via the matching of laser frequency with the oscillation eigen-frequency of a particular molecule within the DNA. In this way, the corrupt molecules (the structure of molecules) can be manipulated so as to treat (eliminate) the neurological disease. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  12. High-Power γ-Ray Flash Generation in Ultraintense Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Koga, James K.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Korn, Georg; Bulanov, Sergei V.

    2012-05-01

    When high-intensity laser interaction with matter enters the regime of dominated radiation reaction, the radiation losses open the way for producing short pulse high-power γ-ray flashes. The γ-ray pulse duration and divergence are determined by the laser pulse amplitude and by the plasma target density scale length. On the basis of theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations with the radiation friction force incorporated, optimal conditions for generating a γ-ray flash with a tailored overcritical density target are found.

  13. Extreme field limits in the interaction of laser light with ultrarelativistic electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J.; Kondo, K.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A.; Bulanov, S. S.; Zhidkov, A.; Chen, P.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Narozhny, N. B.; Korn, G. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching 85748 (Germany) and ELI Beamline Facility, Institute of Physics, CAS, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-11

    The critical electric field of quantum electrodynamics is so strong that it produces electron-positron pairs from vacuum, converting the energy of light into matter. This field has become feasible through the construction of extremely high power lasers or/and with the sophisticated use of nonlinear processes in relativistic plasmas. A feasibility of the experiments on the collision of laser light and high intensity electromagnetic pulses, generated by relativistic flying mirrors, with relativistic electrons for the studying of extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves is discussed.

  14. Motional Quantum State Engineering Via a Single Laser-ion Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shibiao

    2001-01-01

    We propose a scheme to prepare superpositions of several Fock states for the one-dimensional motion of a trapped ion. In the scheme the ion is simultaneously excited by N+1 laser beams, with the nth laser tuned to the nth upper vibrational sideband. After a short interaction time, a measurement of the internal state may project the vibrational motion onto a superposition of the first N+1 Fock states. The scheme can be easily generalized to synthesize entangled states for the two-dimensional ion motion.

  15. Application of norm-conserving pseudopotentials to intense laser-matter interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiao-Min; Wachter, Georg; Sato, Shunsuke A.; Lemell, Christoph; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the applicability of norm-conserving pseudopotentials to intense laser-matter interactions by performing time-dependent density functional theory simulations with an all-electron potential and with norm-conserving pseudopotentials. We find pseudopotentials to be reliable for the simulation of above-threshold ionization over a broad range of laser intensities both for the total ionization probability and the photoelectron energy spectrum. For the simulation of high-order-harmonic generation, pseudopotentials are shown to be applicable for lower-order harmonics in the spectral range in which the one-photon recombination dipole-matrix element can be recovered by the pseudopotential calculation.

  16. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Micro Jets - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for this type of interaction, capable of producing the highest proton energies possible with today’s laser technologies. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis and investigate new, potentially more efficient mechanisms of ion acceleration, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we acheived a pure proton beam with an indiciation of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the

  17. Effect of the laser wavelength: A long story of laser-plasma interaction physics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Teller Medal Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) relies on the use of high-energy laser beams to compress and ignite a the1monuclear fuel with the ultimate goal of producing energy. Fusion is the holy grail of energy sources-combining abundant fuel with no greenhouse gas emissions, minimal waste products and a scale that can meet mankind's long-term energy demands. The quality and the efficiency of the coupling of the laser beams with the target are an essential step towards the success of laser fusion. A long-te1m program on laser-plasma interaction physics has been pursued to understand the propagation and the coupling of laser pulses in plasmas for a wide range of parameters.

  18. Effect of the laser wavelength: A long story of laser-plasma interaction physics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Teller Medal Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labaune Christine

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF relies on the use of high-energy laser beams to compress and ignite a thermonuclear fuel with the ultimate goal of producing energy. Fusion is the holy grail of energy sources–combining abundant fuel with no greenhouse gas emissions, minimal waste products and a scale that can meet mankind's long-term energy demands. The quality and the efficiency of the coupling of the laser beams with the target are an essential step towards the success of laser fusion. A long-term program on laser-plasma interaction physics has been pursued to understand the propagation and the coupling of laser pulses in plasmas for a wide range of parameters.

  19. Enhanced laser absorption from radiation pressure in intense laser plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollar, F.; Zulick, C.; Raymond, A.; Chvykov, V.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2017-06-01

    The reflectivity of a short-pulse laser at intensities of 2× {10}21 {{Wcm}}-2 with ultra-high contrast ({10}-15) on sub-micrometer silicon nitride foils was studied experimentally using varying polarizations and target thicknesses. The reflected intensity and beam quality were found to be relatively constant with respect to intensity for bulk targets. For submicron targets, the measured reflectivity drops substantially without a corresponding increase in transmission, indicating increased conversion of fundamental to other wavelengths and particle heating. Experimental results and trends observed in 3D particle-in-cell simulations emphasize the critical role of ion motion due to radiation pressure on the absorption process. Ion motion during ultra-short pulses enhances the electron heating, which subsequently transfers more energy to the ions.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Subsonic radiation waves in neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loseva, T. V.; Nemchinov, I. V.

    1989-02-01

    Numerical methods are used to investigate the propagation of plane subsonic radiation waves in neon from an obstacle in the direction opposite to the incident radiation of Nd and CO2 lasers. An analysis is made of the influence of the power density of the incident radiation (in the range 10-100 MW/cm2) and of the initial density of neon (beginning from the normal valuep ρ0 up to 10ρ0) on the various characteristics of subsonic radiation waves. It is shown that waves traveling in neon can provide an effective source of radiation with a continuous spectrum and an efficiency of ~ 12-27% in the ultraviolet range (with a characteristic photon energy ~ 5-10 eV).

  1. Study on photocatalytic capacity of PW/MCM-41%PW/MCM-41光催化性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄艳芹; 程玉良; 周建伟

    2011-01-01

    PW/MCM-41 has been prepared and characterized by immersion method. The catalytic activity of the photocatalyst in the degradation reaction of photocatalytic simulated dyeing wastewater methylene blue(MB) solution is investigated. The results show that when the catalyst charge number is 30%, mass concentration of catalyst dosage 3.0 g/L,the concentration of methylene blue 10 mg/L,pH=5,and light application time 100 min.the photocatalytic degradation rate is as high as 91% over. Furthermore,the catalyst could be used repeatedly.%以浸渍法制备了负载型光催化剂PW/MCM-41,并对催化剂进行了表征,考察了催化剂在光催化模拟染料废水亚甲基蓝(MB)溶液降解反应中的催化活性.实验结果表明:催化剂负载量为30%、催化剂投加质量浓度为3.0g/L、MB溶液的初始质量浓度为10 mg/L、pH=5、光照时间100 min时,对亚甲基蓝降解率可达91%以上,且催化剂可重复使用.

  2. Effect of Laser-Plasma Interactions on Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraum Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Strozzi, D J; Michel, P; Divol, L; Sepke, S M; Kerbel, G D; Thomas, C A; Ralph, J E; Moody, J D; Schneider, M B

    2016-01-01

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums is investigated via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI - specifically stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) - mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus modifies the laser propagation. This model shows a reduction of CBET, and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling and data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.

  3. Quantum Statistical Behaviors of Interaction of an Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensate with Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhao-Xian; JIAO Zhi-Yong

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated quantum statistical behaviors of photons and atoms in interaction of an atomic Bose Einstein condensate with quantized laser field. When the quantized laser field is initially prepared in a superposition state which exhibits holes in its photon-number distribution, while the atomic field is initially in a Fock state, it is found that there is energy exchange between photons and atoms. For the input and output states, the photons and atoms may exhibit the sub-Poissonian distribution. The input and output laser fields may exhibit quadrature squeezing, but for the atomic field, only the output state exhibits quadrature squeezing. It is shown that there exists the violation of the Cauchy-Schwartz inequality, which means that the correlation between photons and atoms is nonclassical.``

  4. Analysis of the Interaction of Pulsed Laser with Nanoporous Activated Carbon Cloth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.V. Kalucljerovic; M.S. Trtica; B.B. Radak; J.M. Stasic; S.S. Krstic Musovic; V.M. Dodevski

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of pulsed transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2-1aser radiation at 10.6 μm with nanoporous activated carbon cloth was investigated. Activated carbon cloth of different adsorption characteristics was used. Activated carbon cloth modifications were initiated by laser pulse intensities from 0.5 to 28 MW/cm^2, depending on the cloth adsorption characteristics. CO2 laser radiation was effectively absorbed by the used activated carbon cloth and largely converted into thermal energy. The type of modification depended on laser power density, number of pulses, but mostly on material characteristics such as specific surface area. The higher the surface area of activated carbon cloth, the higher the damage threshold.

  5. Measurement of electromagnetic pulses generated during interactions of high power lasers with solid targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, M.; Krása, J.; Cikhardt, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Krouský, E.; Margarone, D.; Ahmed, H.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Giuffrida, L.; Vrana, R.; Velyhan, A.; Limpouch, J.; Korn, G.; Weber, S.; Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.; Ullschmied, J.

    2016-06-01

    A target irradiated with a high power laser pulse, blows off a large amount of charge and as a consequence the target itself becomes a generator of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) owing to high return current flowing to the ground through the target holder. The first measurement of the magnetic field induced by the neutralizing current reaching a value of a few kA was performed with the use of an inductive target probe at the PALS Laser Facility (Cikhardt et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85 (2014) 103507). A full description of EMP generation should contain information on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the electromagnetic field inside and outside of the interaction chamber. For this reason, we consider the interaction chamber as a resonant cavity in which different modes of EMP oscillate for hundreds of nanoseconds, until the EMP is transmitted outside through the glass windows and EM waves are attenuated. Since the experimental determination of the electromagnetic field distribution is limited by the number of employed antennas, a mapping of the electromagnetic field has to be integrated with numerical simulations. Thus, this work reports on a detailed numerical mapping of the electromagnetic field inside the interaction chamber at the PALS Laser Facility (covering a frequency spectrum from 100 MHz to 3 GHz) using the commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics 5.2. Moreover we carried out a comparison of the EMP generated in the parallelepiped-like interaction chamber used in the Vulcan Petawatt Laser Facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, against that produced in the spherical interaction chamber of PALS.

  6. Contribution to the beam plasma material interactions during material processing with TEA CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschek, Rainer; Konrad, Peter E.; Mayerhofer, Roland; Bergmann, Hans W.; Bickel, Peter G.; Kowalewicz, Roland; Kuttenberger, Alfred; Christiansen, Jens

    1995-03-01

    The TEA-CO2-laser (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) is a tool for the pulsed processing of materials with peak power densities up to 1010 W/cm2 and a FWHM of 70 ns. The interaction between the laser beam, the surface of the work piece and the surrounding atmosphere as well as gas pressure and the formation of an induced plasma influences the response of the target. It was found that depending on the power density and the atmosphere the response can take two forms. (1) No target modification due to optical break through of the atmosphere and therefore shielding of the target (air pressure above 10 mbar, depending on the material). (2) Processing of materials (air pressure below 10 mbar, depending on the material) with melting of metallic surfaces (power density above 0.5 109 W/cm2), hole formation (power density of 5 109 W/cm2) and shock hardening (power density of 3.5 1010 W/cm2). All those phenomena are usually linked with the occurrence of laser supported combustion waves and laser supported detonation waves, respectively for which the mechanism is still not completely understood. The present paper shows how short time photography and spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy can be used to better understand the various processes that occur during laser beam interaction. The spectra of titanium and aluminum are observed and correlated with the modification of the target. If the power density is high enough and the gas pressure above a material and gas composition specific threshold, the plasma radiation shows only spectral lines of the background atmosphere. If the gas pressure is below this threshold, a modification of the target surface (melting, evaporation and solid state transformation) with TEA-CO2- laser pulses is possible and the material specific spectra is observed. In some cases spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy of a plasma allows the calculation of electron temperatures by comparison of two spectral lines.

  7. Optimization of a grating pulse stretcher suitable for kJ class 10PW laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhlídka, Štěpán; Kramer, Daniel; Kepler, Matt; Gaul, Erhard; Rus, Bedřich

    2017-05-01

    A comparison of various pulse stretcher designs accommodating material dispersion for a management. Here, we compare several designs using only one diffraction grating based on either a Perry-Banks or an Offner stretcher types, mostly at the Littrow angle. The target spectral phase profile is achieved through the tuning of the grating position, the angle of incidence on the grating, the radii of curvature of curved mirrors and the line density of the grating.

  8. Skin Depth vs. Relativistics Self-focusing at ps Laser-Plasma Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Heinrich; Peng, Hansheng; Zhang, Weiyan; Osman, Frederick

    2002-03-01

    Highly charged MeV ions from target irradiated by laser longer than 0.1 ns, can be explained by relativistic self-focusing and subsequent acceleration by the nonlinear (ponderomotive) force [1]. In strong contrast to this, same laser intensities of ps pulses produced hundred times less energetic ions if the contrast ratio for suppression of prepulses was sufficiently high [1]. It was remarkable that the number of ions was constant and the ion energy linear on the laser intensity. We developed a model to explain the measurements as interactions within the skin layer of the target in contrast to relativistic self-focusing. However, if there is an appropriate prepulse applied, the MeV ions appear as before with the ns pulses which can be explained by the then possible relativistic self focusing. Consequences for the fast ignitor laser fusion scheme are elaborated. [1] J. Badziak, et al. Laser and Particle Beams 17, 323 (1999); E. Woryna, J. Wolowski, B. Kralikowa, J. Kraska, L. Laska, M. Pfeifer, K. Rohlena, J. Skala, V. Perina, R. Höpfl, & H. Hora, Rev. Scient. Instrum. 71, 949 (2000).

  9. Plume splitting in pico-second laser-material interaction under the influence of shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gacek, Sobieslaw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2010 H. M. Black Engineering Building Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2161 (United States); Wang Xinwei, E-mail: xwang3@iastate.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2010 H. M. Black Engineering Building Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2161 (United States)

    2009-09-07

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study the physics of plume splitting in pico-second laser material interaction in background gas. The velocity distribution shows a clear split into two distinctive components. Detailed atom trajectory track reveals the behavior of atoms within the peaks and uncovers the mechanisms of peak formation. The observed plume velocity splitting emerges from two distinguished parts of the plume. The front peak of the plume is from the faster moving atoms and smaller particles during laser-material ablation. This region experiences strong constraint from the ambient gas and has substantial velocity attenuation. The second (rear) peak of the plume velocity originates from the larger and slower clusters in laser-material ablation. These larger clusters/particles experience very little constraint from the background, but are affected by the relaxation dynamics of plume and appear almost as a standing wave during the evolution. Density splitting only appears at the beginning of laser-material ablation and quickly disappears due to spread-out of the slower moving clusters. It is found that higher ambient pressure and stronger laser fluence favor earlier plume splitting.

  10. Interaction of atomic hydrogen with pico- and femtosecond laser pulses. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J.S.

    1989-12-01

    This thesis presents a theoretical study of the interaction of atomic hydrogen with coherent laser pulses in the 5 femtosecond to 10 picosecond range, in the weak-field limit, and in intense fields. We approach the problem in the weak-field limit by studying the relationship between the Fourier relation of the laser pulse (Delta omega Delta t) and the (Delta E Delta t) relation of the atomic Rydberg wave packet generated by the laser pulse. A derivation of the wave packet based on the WKB approximation is given, permitting the quantity Delta t to be derived for the quantum state, with the conclusion that under certain circumstances a transform-limited laser pulse (satisfying Delta omega Delta t = 1/2) can generate a transform-limited electron (satisfying Delta E Delta t/h = 1/2). A population-trapping effect is found numerically and modeled theoretically. Despite the high field intensities, population representing the excited electron is recaptured from the ionization continuum by bound states during the excitation. Population returns to the atom with just the right phase to strongly inhibit ionization. A theory is presented that models this effect for a variety of laser pulse shapes, with and without the rotating-wave approximation. The numerical integration reveals that a certain amount of above-threshold ionization (ATI) occurs.

  11. Absorption-Ablation-Excitation Mechanisms of Laser-Cluster Interactions in a Nanoaerosol System

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Yihua; Zhang, Yiyang; Tse, Stephen D; Long, Marshall B

    2014-01-01

    The absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism in laser-cluster interactions is investigated by measuring Rayleigh scattering of aerosol clusters along with atomic emission from phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (PS-LIBS). As the excitation laser intensity is increased beyond 0.16GW/cm2, the scattering cross-section of TiO_2 clusters begins to decrease, concurrent with the onset of atomic emission of Ti, indicating a scattering-to-ablation transition and the formation of nanoplasmas. To better clarify the process, time-resolved measurements of scattering signals are examined for different excitation laser intensities. For increasing laser intensities, the cross-sections of clusters decrease during a single pulse, evincing the shorter ablation delay time and larger ratios of ablation clusters. Assessment of the electron energy distribution during the ablation process is conducted by non-dimensionalizing the Fokker-Planck equation, with analogous Strouhal Sl_E, Peclet Pe_E, and Damkohler Da_E n...

  12. Study of interaction of high-power Ar$^+$ laser beam with Ag$^+$-doped glass

    CERN Document Server

    Nahal, A; Payami, M

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the interaction of a high-power Ar$^+$ laser beam, in a continuous multi-line regime, with Ag$^+$-doped glass samples. The samples were subjected to the irradiation after the ion-exchange step. As a result of the irradiation, a peak appears in the absorption spectrum; its evolution depends on both the exposure time and the laser beam power. Interaction of the beam with the clusters causes them break into smaller ones which has been confirmed by optical absorption spectroscopy. Depending on the increment steps of the laser-beam power, different results are obtained. It is found that, in addition to the fragmentations of the nano-clusters, clusters of micro-meter size ($d\\sim 3\\mu m$) are formed in the sample, if the laser power is increased in a fast regime. The fragmentation processes have been explained in the framework of the density-functional theory with stabilized jellium model.

  13. The analysis of damage threshold in the ruby laser interaction with copper and aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katavić Boris T.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive methods are dominant in diagnosing the status and protection of all kinds of contemporary industrial object, as well as object of industrial heritage. Laser methods open wide possibilities of research in the field of diagnosis and metal processing. This paper presents the results of laser radiation interaction (wavelength λ = 694.3 nm, Ruby laser, Q-switch mode with metal samples covered with a deposit. The goal of the examination was to determine the maximum energy density, that can be used in diagnostics purpouses (interferometric methods, 3D scanning, i.e. and as a tool for safe removal of deposits, without interacting with the basic material. Microscopic examination performed with SEM coupled with EDX allowed the determination of the safe laser light energy density levels, which caused the removal of the deposite from the surface of the sample, without degradation of the surface. The energy density up to 20 103 J/m2 is maximum allowed for the diagnosis or deposit removal.

  14. Theoretical Study of Ultra-Relativistic Laser Electron Interaction with Radiation Reaction by Quantum Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Keita; Nagatomo, Hideo; Koga, James; Mima, Kunioki

    In the near future, the intensity of the ultra-short pulse laser will reach to 1022 W/cm2. When an electron is irradiated by this laser, the electron's behavior is relativistic with significant bremsstrahlung. This radiation from the electron is regarded as the energy loss of electron. Therefore, the electron's motion changes because of the kinetic energy changing. This radiation effect on the charged particle is the self-interaction, called the “radiation reaction” or the “radiation damping”. For this reason, the radiation reaction appears in laser electron interactions with an ultra-short pulse laser whose intensity becomes larger than 1022 W/cm2. In the classical theory, it is described by the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac (LAD) equation. But, this equation has a mathematical difficulty, which we call the “run-away”. Therefore, there are many methods for avoiding this problem. However, Dirac's viewpoint is brilliant, based on the idea of quantum electrodynamics. We propose a new equation of motion in the quantum theory with radiation reaction in this paper.

  15. Intra-pulse transition between ion acceleration mechanisms in intense laser-foil interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padda, H.; King, M.; Gray, R. J.; Powell, H. W.; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, B.; Wilson, R.; Dance, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Butler, N. M. H.; Capdessus, R.; McKenna, P., E-mail: paul.mckenna@strath.ac.uk [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Stockhausen, L. C. [Centro de Laseres Pulsados (CLPU), Parque Cientifico, Calle del Adaja s/n. 37185 Villamayor, Salamanca (Spain); Carroll, D. C. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yuan, X. H. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA (CICIFSA), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Neely, D. [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Multiple ion acceleration mechanisms can occur when an ultrathin foil is irradiated with an intense laser pulse, with the dominant mechanism changing over the course of the interaction. Measurement of the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of energetic protons is used to investigate the transition from radiation pressure acceleration to transparency-driven processes. It is shown numerically that radiation pressure drives an increased expansion of the target ions within the spatial extent of the laser focal spot, which induces a radial deflection of relatively low energy sheath-accelerated protons to form an annular distribution. Through variation of the target foil thickness, the opening angle of the ring is shown to be correlated to the point in time transparency occurs during the interaction and is maximized when it occurs at the peak of the laser intensity profile. Corresponding experimental measurements of the ring size variation with target thickness exhibit the same trends and provide insight into the intra-pulse laser-plasma evolution.

  16. Enhancement of the maximum proton energy by funnel-geometry target in laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Dapeng; Li, Yuxiao

    2016-09-01

    Enhancement of the maximum proton energy using a funnel-geometry target is demonstrated through particle simulations of laser-plasma interactions. When an intense short-pulse laser illuminate a thin foil target, the foil electrons are pushed by the laser ponderomotive force, and then form an electron cloud at the target rear surface. The electron cloud generates a strong electrostatic field, which accelerates the protons to high energies. If there is a hole in the rear of target, the shape of the electron cloud and the distribution of the protons will be affected by the protuberant part of the hole. In this paper, a funnel-geometry target is proposed to improve the maximum proton energy. Using particle-in-cell 2-dimensional simulations, the transverse electric field generated by the side wall of four different holes are calculated, and protons inside holes are restricted to specific shapes by these field. In the funnel-geometry target, more protons are restricted near the center of the longitudinal accelerating electric field, thus protons experiencing longer accelerating time and distance in the sheath field compared with that in a traditional cylinder hole target. Accordingly, more and higher energy protons are produced from the funnel-geometry target. The maximum proton energy is improved by about 4 MeV compared with a traditional cylinder-shaped hole target. The funnel-geometry target serves as a new method to improve the maximum proton energy in laser-plasma interactions.

  17. Synthesis, Character and Crystal Structure of the Complex {Er(DMSO)7} PW12O40

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Qiu-Xia; ZHANG Da-Li; MA Jian-Ru; WANG Jing-Ping; NIU Jing-Yang

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, thermal properties and electrochemistry of the new complex formulated as {Er(DMSO)7}PW12O40 are reported. The single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals that the crystal crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/c with a=11.767(2), b=14.909(3), c=34.905(7)(A), β=98.97(3)°, Mr=3591.33, V=6049(2) (A)3, Dc=3.944g/em3, Z=4, GOOF=1.098, F(000)=6340, R=0.0490 and wR=0.1202. Crystal structure analysis indicates that the Er(Ⅲ) is seven-coordinate with a distorted pentagonal bipyramid and combines to the anion [PW12O40]3- via static electric force.

  18. Laser absorption via QED cascades in counter propagating laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Grismayer, Thomas; Martins, Joana L; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2015-01-01

    A model for laser light absorption in electron-positron plasmas self-consistently created via QED cascades is described. The laser energy is mainly absorbed due to hard photon emission via nonlinear Compton scattering. The degree of absorption depends on the laser intensity and the pulse duration. The QED cascades are studied with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations complemented by a QED module and a macro-particle merging algorithm that allows to handle the exponential growth of the number of particles. Results range from moderate-intensity regimes ($\\sim$ 10 PW) where the laser absorption is negligible, to extreme intensities (> 100 PW) where the degree of absorption reaches 80%. Our study demonstrates good agreement between the analytical model and simulations. The expected properties of the hard photon emission and the generated pair-plasma are investigated, and the experimental signatures for near-future laser facilities are discussed.

  19. High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

    2010-12-17

    Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

  20. Complete elimination of nonlinear light-matter interactions with broadband ultrafast laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Dong, Daoyi; Petersen, Ian R.

    2017-01-01

    nonlinear interactions of ultrafast laser pulses with quantum systems. That is, a completely linear response of the system with respect to the spectral energy density of the incident light at the transition frequency can be obtained for all transition probabilities between 0 and 100% in multilevel quantum......The absorption of a single photon that excites a quantum system from a low to a high energy level is an elementary process of light-matter interaction, and a route towards realizing pure single-photon absorption has both fundamental and practical implications in quantum technology. Due to nonlinear...... optical effects, however, the probability of pure single-photon absorption is usually very low, which is particularly pertinent in the case of strong ultrafast laser pulses with broad bandwidth. Here we demonstrate theoretically a counterintuitive coherent single-photon absorption scheme by eliminating...

  1. Structured plasma waveguides and deep EUV generation enabled by intense laser-cluster interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, Brian David

    Using the unique properties of the interaction between intense, short-pulse lasers and nanometer scale van-der-Waals bonded aggregates (or 'clusters'), modulated waveguides in hydrogen, argon and nitrogen plasmas were produced and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light was generated in deeply ionized nitrogen plasmas. A jet of clusters behaves as an array of mass-limited, solid-density targets with the average density of a gas. Two highly versatile experimental techniques are demonstrated for making preformed plasma waveguides with periodic structure within a laser-ionized cluster jet. The propagation of ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulses with intensities up to 2 x1017 W/cm2 has been experimentally demonstrated in waveguides generated using both methods, limited by available laser energy. The first uses a 'ring grating' to impose radial intensity modulations on the channel-generating laser pulse, which leads to axial intensity modulations at the laser focus within the cluster jet target. This creates a waveguide with axial modulations in diameter with a period between 35 mum and 2 mm, determined by the choice of ring grating. The second method creates modulated waveguides by focusing a uniform laser pulse within a jet of clusters with ow that has been modulated by periodically spaced wire obstructions. These wires make sharp, stable voids as short as 50 mum with a period as small as 200 mum within waveguides of hydrogen, nitrogen, and argon plasma. The gaps persist as the plasma expands for the full lifetime of the waveguide. This technique is useful for quasi-phase matching applications where index-modulated guides are superior to diameter modulated guides. Simulations show that these 'slow wave' guiding structures could allow direct laser acceleration of electrons, achieving gradients of 80 MV/cm and 10 MV/cm for laser pulse powers of 1.9 TW and 30 GW, respectively. Results are also presented from experiments in which a nitrogen cluster jet from a cryogenically

  2. Experimental Research of Fast Proton Generation From Ultra-short Intense Laser Pulses Interaction With Different Thickness Al Foils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN; Xiao-fei; LU; Jian-xin; HUANG; Yong-sheng; WANG; Lei-jian; XI; Xiao-feng; TANG; Xiu-zhang

    2012-01-01

    <正>With the development of laser technology, the generation of fast ions by the interaction of ultra-short ultra-intense laser pulses with matters has recently been attracting considerable attention, especially for acceleration of proton. Before performing experiment, we calibrated the CR39 detector using standard proton beams from conventional accelerator. In the field of proton acceleration driven by ultra-short ultra-intense laser pulses,

  3. Magnetic Moment Fields in Dense Relativistic Plasma Interacting with Laser Radiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Ghosh1* , S.N.Paul 1 , S.Bannerjee2 and C.Das3

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Theory of the generation of magnetic moment field from resonant interaction of three high frequency electromagnetic waves in un-magnetized dense electron plasma is developed including the relativistic change of electron mass. It is shown that the inclusion of relativistic effect enhances the magnetic moment field. For high intensity laser beams this moment field may be of the order of a few mega gauss. Such a high magnetic field can considerably affect the transport of electrons in fusion plasma

  4. Broadband Brillouin scatter from CO/sub 2/-laser--target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchel, G.R.; Grek, B.; Johnston, T.W.; Pepin, H.; Church, P.; Lavigne, P.; Martin, F.; Decoste, R.

    1982-05-24

    Light scattered near the incident wavelength from CO/sub 2/ laser--solid target interactions in oblique incidence shows the spectral signature of Brillouin scattering both in the backward and in the near specular directions. This instability is apparently seeded by broadband scatter from the critical density surface and then amplified in the underdense plasma. 60% of the incident light is scattered, and the Brillouin contribution to total scatter may be large if the source is also large.

  5. Micron-Scale Mapping of Megagauss Magnetic Fields in Petawatt Laser-Solid Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Robinson, A P L; Booth, N; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Gizzi, L A; Gray, R J; Green, J S; Koester, P; Kumar, G Ravindra; Labate, L; Lad, Amit D; Lancaster, K L; Pasley, J; Woolsey, N C; Rajeev, P P

    2013-01-01

    We report spatially and temporally resolved measurements of magnetic fields generated by petawatt laser-solid interactions with high spatial resolution, using optical polarimetry. The polarimetric measurements map the megagauss magnetic field profiles generated by the fast electron currents at the target rear. The magnetic fields at the rear of a 50 $\\mu$m thick aluminum target exhibit distinct and unambiguous signatures of electron beam filamentation. These results are corroborated by hybrid simulations.

  6. Numerical modelling of thermal effects on biological tissue during laser-material interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latinovic, Z.; Sreckovic, M.; Janicijevic, M.; Ilic, J.; Radovanovic, J.

    2014-09-01

    Among numerous methods of the modelling of laser interaction with the material equivalent of biological tissue (including macroscopic and microscopic cell interaction), the case of pathogenic prostates is chosen to be studied. The principal difference between the inorganic and tissue equivalent material is the term which includes blood flow. Thermal modelling is chosen for interaction mechanisms, i.e. bio-heat equation. It was noticed that the principal problems are in selecting appropriate numerical methods, available mathematical program packages and finding all exact parameters for performing the needed calculations. As principal parameters, among them density, heat conduction, and specific heat, there are many other parameters which depend on the chosen approach (there could be up to 20 parameters, among them coefficient of time scaling, arterial blood temperature, metabolic heat source, etc). The laser type, including its wavelength which defines the quantity of absorbed energy and dynamic of irradiation, presents the term which could be modulated for the chosen problem. In this study, the program Comsol Multiphysics 3.5 is used in the simulation of prostate exposed to Nd3+:YAG laser in its fundamental mode.

  7. Intra-pulse transition between ion acceleration mechanisms in intense laser-foil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padda, Hersimerjit; King, Martin; Gray, Ross; Powell, Haydn; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; Stockhausen, Luca; Wilson, Robbie; Carroll, David; Dance, Rachel; MacLellan, David; Yuan, Xiaohui; Butler, Nick; Capdessus, Remi; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven sheath acceleration of ions has been widely studied and the recent move to ultra thin foil interactions enables promising new acceleration mechanisms. However, the acceleration dynamics in this regime are complex and over the course of the laser-foil interaction multiple ion acceleration mechanisms can occur, resulting in the dominant mechanism changing throughout the interaction. Measuring the spatial intensity distribution of the accelerated proton beam we investigate the transition from radiation pressure acceleration to transparency-driven processes. Using PIC simulations, the radiation pressure drives an increased expansion of the target ions, which results in a radial deflection of low MeV protons to form an annular distribution. By varying the thickness of the target, the opening angle of the ring is shown to be correlated to the point in time that transparency occurs and is maximised at the peak of the laser intensity profile. Measurements of the ring size as a function of target thickness are found to be in good agreement with the simulation results.

  8. MULTI-fs - A computer code for laser-plasma interaction in the femtosecond regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, R.; Eidmann, K.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Hüller, S.

    2012-03-01

    The code MULTI-fs is a numerical tool devoted to the study of the interaction of ultrashort sub-picosecond laser pulses with matter in the intensity range from 10 11 to 10 17 W cm -2. Hydrodynamics is solved in one-dimensional geometry together with laser energy deposition and transport by thermal conduction and radiation. In contrast to long nanosecond pulses, short pulses generate steep gradient plasmas with typical scale lengths in the order of the laser wavelength and smaller. Under these conditions, Maxwell's equations are solved explicitly to obtain the light field. Concerning laser absorption, two different models for the electron-ion collision frequency are implemented to cover the regime of warm dense matter between high-temperature plasma and solid matter and also interaction with short-wave-length (VUV) light. MULTI-fs code is based on the MULTI radiation-hydrodynamic code [R. Ramis, R. Schmalz, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Comp. Phys. Comm. 49 (1988) 475] and most of the original features for the treatment of radiation are maintained. Program summaryProgram title: MULTI-fs Catalogue identifier: AEKT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 49 598 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 443 771 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN Computer: PC (32 bits and 64 bits architecture) Operating system: Linux/Unix RAM: 1.6 MiB Classification: 19.13, 21.2 Subprograms used: Cat Id: AECV_v1_0; Title: MULTI2D; Reference: CPC 180 (2009) 977 Nature of problem: One-dimensional interaction of intense ultrashort (sub-picosecond) and ultraintense (up to 10 17 W cm -2) laser beams with matter. Solution method: The hydrodynamic motion coupled to laser propagation and

  9. Transverse Dynamics and Energy Tuning of Fast Electrons Generated in Sub-Relativistic Intensity Laser Pulse Interaction with Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, M; Daito, I; Kotaki, H; Hayashi, Y; Yamazaki, A; Ogura, K; Sagisaka, A; Koga, J; Nakajima, K; Daido, H; Bulanov, S V; Kimura, T

    2006-01-01

    The regimes of quasi-mono-energetic electron beam generation were experimentally studied in the sub-relativistic intensity laser plasma interaction. The observed electron acceleration regime is unfolded with two-dimensional-particle-in-cell simulations of laser-wakefield generation in the self-modulation regime.

  10. Acoustic-wave generation in the process of CO2-TEA-laser-radiation interaction with metal targets in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Ileana; Teodorescu, G.; Serbanescu-Oasa, Anca; Dragulinescu, Dumitru; Chis, Ioan; Stoian, Razvan

    1995-03-01

    Laser radiation interaction with materials is a complex process in which creation of acoustic waves or stress waves is a part of it. As a function of the laser radiation energy and intensity incident on steel target surface ultrasound signals were registered and studied. Thermoelastic, ablation and breakdown mechanisms of generation of acoustic waves were analyzed.

  11. Ultra Intense Laser Pulse Interactions with Planer and Spherical Plasmas for Fast Ignitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazuo A.

    1999-11-01

    The fast ignitor concept requires the guiding or penetration of an ultra-intense laser close to a highly compressed (1000 times solid density) core and the generation of energetic electrons (MeV). Ultra-intense laser plasma interactions have been intensively studied using the Peta Watt Module (PWM) laser system synchronized with the GEKKO XII laser system. The ultra-intense laser pulse of 50J energy, 0.5-1 psec pulse width and 1053 nm laser wavelength could be focused onto a preformed plasma created on a solid target at an intensity of 1e19 W/cm2. The preformed plasma had a cut-off density surface at around 100 micron from the surface. Changing the focus position of this 100 TW laser pulse relative to the preformed plasma, we found an anomalous mode. Side view of x-ray pinhole camera showed that there was a local tiny spot almost at the surface of the solid target which indicates the propagation of the pulse in the long scale-length plasma into an over-dense region for over 100 micorn distance. The erergy spectrum and angular distribution of more than MeV electrons were measured. Its energy transport was studied with K-a spectroscopy. The backscattered light of the ultra-intense laser light was spectrally and spatially resolved. The backscattered light image showed several hot spots within the focused region. The spatilally resolved spectra of the backscattered light were totally different at the hot spots and surrounding regions. The details of neutron spectra were measured using ``MANDALA" neutron spectormeters with a total of 841 channel photo-multiplier detectors. The data indicates that deuterium ions were accelerated by the hot electrons up to 100 keV and created beam fusion reactions within solid CD targets. Guiding channels were created utilizing a ponderomotive self-focusing in preformed plasmas created on a solid target. The self-focus channel was measured by both UV and x-ray laser probes. The details of the experiment as well as the theoretical

  12. Ultrashort laser pulse–matter interaction: Implications for high energy materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Venugopal Rao

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of ultrashort [nanosecond (ns)/picosecond (ps)/femtosecond (fs)] pulses with materials is an exhaustive area of research with underlying, and often extremely rich, physics along with a plethora of applications evolving from it. High-energy materials (HEMs) are chemical compounds or mixture of compounds which, under suitable initiation, undergoes a very rapid exothermic and self-propagating decomposition. Herein, we describe the interaction of laser pulses with materials and its implications for studies on HEMs in four parts: (a) ns and fs laserinduced breakdown spectroscopic (LIBS) studies of HEMs towards understanding the molecular dynamics and discrimination, (b) ps/fs pulses interaction with metallic solids towards the production of nanoparticles, nanostructures and their utility in identifying explosive molecules using surface-enhanced Raman scattering studies, (c) interaction of laser pulses with the bulk and surface of glasses and polymers producing micro- and nanostructures for microfluidic/lab-on-a-chip applications, and (d) ultrafast spectroscopic studies for comprehending the excited state dynamics towards elucidation of vibrational dynamics in HEMs. Several applications resulting from these interactions will be discussed in detail.

  13. Size-dependent Fano Interaction in the Laser-etched Silicon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPhoto-excitation and size-dependent Raman scattering studies on the silicon (Si nanostructures (NSs prepared by laser-induced etching are presented here. Asymmetric and red-shifted Raman line-shapes are observed due to photo-excited Fano interaction in the quantum confined nanoparticles. The Fano interaction is observed between photo-excited electronic transitions and discrete phonons in Si NSs. Photo-excited Fano studies on different Si NSs show that the Fano interaction is high for smaller size of Si NSs. Higher Fano interaction for smaller Si NSs is attributed to the enhanced interference between photo-excited electronic Raman scattering and phonon Raman scattering.

  14. Rhizopus sp. PW358 lipase production by solid state fermentation%Rhizopus sp.PW358菌脂肪酶固态发酵生产

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴克; 刘斌; 蔡敬民; 王彪; 杨洁; 潘仁瑞

    2002-01-01

    研究了Rhizopus sp.PW358菌的固态生长和产脂肪酶条件.结果表明:黄豆饼粉为培养基的基本成分,用来生产脂肪酶.培养基中可加入淀粉和蛋白胨作为碳源和氮源,有利于脂肪酶的合成.培养基的含水量以及金属离子Ca2+、Mg2+的浓度也影响Rhizopus sp.PW358茵的脂肪酶产生.在优化条件下,12g豆饼粉中含1.0g淀粉及0.5g蛋白胨、15ml营养盐中Ca2+、Mg2+离子浓度分别为8.o和4.0g/L,培养基含水量为55.6%,在接种后培养48h,酶活力可达最大值320IU/g干培养基.脂肪酶的基本性质研究表明,酶的最适反应温度和pH分别为35℃和7.0,酶的半失活温度为53.5℃,不同的pH环境中,30℃保温1h后酶在pH6.5~8.5范围内较为稳定.

  15. Proceedings of the first JAERI-Kansai international workshop on ultrashort-pulse ultrahigh-power lasers and simulation for laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Records of the First JAERI-Kansai International Workshop, which focused on the subject of `Ultrashort-Pulse Ultrahigh-Power Lasers and Simulation for Laser-Plasma Interactions`, are contained in this issue. The First JAERI-Kansai International Workshop was held as Joint ICFA/JAERI-Kansai International Workshop `97 with International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). This report consists of 24 contributed papers. (J.P.N.)

  16. Mechanism of Laser/light beam interaction at cellular and tissue level and study of the influential factors for the application of low level laser therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of laser therapy it was realized it has useful application of wound healing and reduce pain, but due to the poor understanding of the mechanism and dose response this technique remained to be controversial for therapeutic applications. In order to understand the working and effectiveness different experiments were performed to determine the laser beam effect at the cellular and tissue level. This article discusses the mechanism of beam interaction at tissues and cellular l...

  17. Interaction of ultra-short ultra-intense laser pulses with under-dense plasmas; Interaction d'impulsions laser ultra-courtes et ultra-intenses avec des plasmas sous denses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solodov, A

    2000-12-15

    Different aspects of interaction of ultra-short ultra-intense laser pulses with underdense plasmas are studied analytically and numerically. These studies can be interesting for laser-driven electron acceleration in plasma, X-ray lasers, high-order harmonic generation, initial confinement fusion with fast ignition. For numerical simulations a fully-relativistic particle code WAKE was used, developed earlier at Ecole Polytechnique. It was modified during the work on the thesis in the part of simulation of ion motion, test electron motion, diagnostics for the field and plasma. The studies in the thesis cover the problems of photon acceleration in the plasma wake of a short intense laser pulse, phase velocity of the plasma wave in the Self-Modulated Laser Wake-Field Accelerator (SM LWFA), relativistic channeling of laser pulses with duration of the order of a plasma period, ion dynamics in the wake of a short intense laser pulse, plasma wave breaking. Simulation of three experiments on the laser pulse propagation in plasma and electron acceleration were performed. Among the main results of the thesis, it was found that reduction of the plasma wave phase velocity in the SM LWFA is crucial for electron acceleration, only if a plasma channel is used for the laser pulse guiding. Self-similar structures describing relativistic guiding of short laser pulses in plasmas were found and relativistic channeling of initially Gaussian laser pulses of a few plasma periods in duration was demonstrated. It was shown that ponderomotive force of a plasma wake excited by a short laser pulse forms a channel in plasma and plasma wave breaking in the channel was analyzed in detail. Effectiveness of electron acceleration by the laser field and plasma wave was compared and frequency shift of probe laser pulses by the plasma waves was found in conditions relevant to the current experiments. (author)

  18. Mechanism of Laser/light beam interaction at cellular and tissue level and study of the influential factors for the application of low level laser therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khalid, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of laser therapy it was realized it has useful application of wound healing and reduce pain, but due to the poor understanding of the mechanism and dose response this technique remained to be controversial for therapeutic applications. In order to understand the working and effectiveness different experiments were performed to determine the laser beam effect at the cellular and tissue level. This article discusses the mechanism of beam interaction at tissues and cellular level with different light sources and dosimetry principles for clinical application of low level laser therapy. Different application techniques and methods currently in use for clinical treatment has also been reviewed.

  19. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of surface breakdown on the process of drilling metals with pulsed CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Dolgov, V. A.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.

    1988-03-01

    A report is given of the influence of low-threshold surface optical breakdown, occurring under the action of short (~ 5-μs) radiation pulses from a CO2 laser, on the process of the laser drilling of metals. Data are given on the difference between the interaction of radiation pulses having the same duration but differing in shape. A study was made of the influence of the pressure of the atmosphere surrounding a target on the results of laser drilling of metals. A theoretical explanation is given of the experimental results.

  20. Laser interaction based on resonance saturation (LIBORS): an alternative to inverse bremsstrahlung for coupling laser energy into a plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures, R M; Drewell, N; Cardinal, P

    1979-06-01

    Resonance saturation represents an efficient and rapid method of coupling laser energy into a gaseous medium. In the case of a plasma superelastic collision quenching of the laser maintained resonance state population effectively converts the laser beam energy into translational energy of the free electrons. Subsequently, ionization of the laser pumped species rapidly ensues as a result of both the elevated electron temperature and the effective reduction of the ionization energy for those atoms maintained in the resonance state by the laser radiation. This method of coupling laser energy into a plasma has several advantages over inverse bremsstrahlung and could therefore be applicable to several areas of current interest including plasma channel formation for transportation of electron and ion beams, x-ray laser development, laser fusion, negative ion beam production, and the conversion of laser energy to electricity.

  1. Adaptive-feedback spectral-phase control for interactions with transform-limited ultrashort high-power laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Gregory; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhao, Baozhen; Powers, Nathan; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Umstadter, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Fourier-transform-limited light pulses were obtained at the laser-plasma interaction point of a 100-TW peak-power laser in vacuum. The spectral-phase distortion induced by the dispersion mismatching between the stretcher, compressor, and dispersive materials was fully compensated for by means of an adaptive closed-loop. The coherent temporal contrast on the sub-picosecond time scale was two orders of magnitude higher than that without adaptive control. This novel phase control capability enabled the experimental study of the dependence of laser wakefield acceleration on the spectral phase of intense laser light.

  2. Collisionless absorption, hot electron generation, and energy scaling in intense laser-target interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Liseykina, T; Murakami, M

    2014-01-01

    Among the various attempts to understand collisionless absorption of intense ultrashort laser pulses a variety of models has been invented to describe the laser beam target interaction. In terms of basic physics collisionless absorption is understood now as the interplay of the oscillating laser field with the space charge field produced in the plasma. A first approach to this idea is realized in Brunel's model the essence of which consists in the formation of an oscillating charge cloud in the vacuum in front of the target. The investigation of statistical ensembles of orbits shows that the absorption process is localized at the ion-vacuum interface and in the skin layer: Single electrons enter into resonance with the laser field thereby undergoing a phase shift which causes orbit crossing and braking of Brunel's laminar flow. This anharmonic resonance acts like an attractor for the electrons and leads to the formation of a Maxwellian tail in the electron energy spectrum. Most remarkable results of our inves...

  3. Observation of γ-rays in short-pulse laser interactions by photoneutron reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santala, M.; Clark, E.; Zepf, M.; Watts, I.; Beg, F. N.; Krushelnick, K.; Tatarakis, M.; Dangor, A. E.; Fang, X.; Graham, P.; McCanny, T.; Singhal, R.; Ledingham, K.; Creswell, A.; Sanderson, D.; Magill, J.; Machacek, A.; Wark, J.; Allott, R.; Kennedy, B.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.

    1998-11-01

    The dynamics of electron transport into target has received a lot of attention recently in the context of the Fast Ignitor scheme for Inertial Confinement Fusion. We have observed a directional source of >10 MeV γ-rays behind a solid Pb target irradiated by 10^19 W/cm^2 laser radiation at 1.05 μm wavelength. The γ-rays were produced by bremsstrahlung from energetic electrons generated during the laser interaction, proving that fast electrons are highly directional. The γ-rays were measured using the photoneutron reaction ^63Cu(γ,n)^62Cu. The induced ^62Cu activity was measured by coincidence counting of the positron annihilation γ-rays produced by the decay. Electron temperatures measured from bremsstrahlung spectra as a function of intensity on target are also presented. The laser-induced radioactivity can itself have many industrial and medical applications, and the results suggest that these may be realised with moderate sized laser systems.

  4. Design of an Experiment to Observe Laser-Plasma Interactions on NIKE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L.; Weaver, J.; Manheimer, W.; Zalesak, S.; Schmitt, A.; Fyfe, D.; Afeyan, B.; Charbonneau-Lefort, M.

    2007-11-01

    Recent proposed designs (Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 13 056320 (2006)) for direct-drive ICF targets for energy applications involve high implosion velocities combined with higher laser irradiances. The use of high irradiances increases the likelihood of deleterious laser plasma instabilities (LPI) that may lead, for example, to the generation of fast electrons. The proposed use of a 248 nm KrF laser to drive these targets is expected to minimize LPI; this is being studied by experiments at NRL's NIKE facility. We used a modification of the FAST code that models laser pulses with arbitrary spatial and temporal profiles to assist in designing these experiments. The goal is to design targets and pulseshapes to create plasma conditions that will produce sufficient growth of LPI to be observable on NIKE. Using, for example, a cryogenic DT target that is heated by a brief pulse and allowed to expand freely before interacting with a second, high-intensity pulse, allows the development of long scalelengths at low electron temperatures and leads to a predicted 20-efold growth in two-plasmon amplitude.

  5. Water at the graphene–substrate interface: interaction with short laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, V D; Zavedeev, E V; Pivovarov, P A; Khomich, A A; Konov, V I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Grigorenko, A N [Manchester Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-31

    We have investigated the role of adsorption water in the local transformation of multilayer graphene deposited on an oxidised silicon substrate, which was exposed to nanosecond low-intensity focused laser radiation with a wavelength of 532 nm in the air. Experimental data obtained for a laser energy density E = 0.04 J cm{sup -2} suggest that the formation of micropits (craters) is a consequence of the multipulse removal of the layer of a water adsorbate, which is intercalated between graphene and the substrate, from the zone of laser irradiation of the graphene sheet. The energy threshold of graphene damage in the regions devoid of water was found to be higher in comparison with the initial one (0.058 against 0.048 J cm{sup -2}). According to computer simulations of the heating dynamics of the sample and the heat distribution in the substrate – adsorbate – graphene multilayer system, at energy densities corresponding to the experimental ones the water adsorbate layer heats to a temperature sufficiently high to form an increased-pressure vapour cavity under the graphene film. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  6. Nonlinear modal interactions in parity-time (${\\cal PT}$) symmetric lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Li

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time ($\\cal PT$) symmetric lasers have attracted considerable attention lately due to their promising applications and intriguing properties, such as free spectral range doubling and single-mode lasing. In this work we discuss nonlinear modal interactions in these laser systems under steady state conditions, and we demonstrate that several gain clamping scenarios can occur for lasing operation in the $\\cal PT$-symmetric and $\\cal PT$-broken phases. In particular, we show that, depending on the system's design and the external pump profile, its operation in the nonlinear regime falls into two different categories: in one the system is frozen in the $\\cal PT$ phase space as the applied gain increases, while in the other the system is pulled towards its exceptional point. These features are first illustrated by a coupled mode formalism and later verified by employing the Steady-state Ab-initio Laser Theory (SALT). Our findings shine light on the robustness of single-mode operation in these lasers against ...

  7. A laser-based beam profile monitor for the SLC/SLD interaction region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M. C.; Alley, R.; Arnett, D.; Bong, E.; Colocho, W.; Frisch, J.; Horton-Smith, S.; Inman, W.; Jobe, K.; Kotseroglou, T.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Scheeff, M.; Wagner, S.

    1997-01-01

    Beam size estimates made using beam-beam deflections are used for optimization of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) electron-positron beam sizes. Typical beam sizes and intensities expected for 1996 operations are 2.1×0.6 μm (x,y) at 4.0×1010 particles per pulse. Conventional profile monitors, such as scanning wires, fail at charge densities well below this. Since the beam-beam deflection does not provide single beam size information, another method is needed for interaction point (IP) beam size optimization. The laser-based profile monitor uses a finely focused, 350-nm, wavelength-tripled yttrium-lithium-flouride (YLF) laser pulse that traverses the particle beam path about 29 cm away from the e+/e- IP. Compton scattered photons and degraded e+/e- are detected as the beam is steered across the laser pulse. The laser pulse has a transverse size of 380 nm and a Rayleigh range of about 5 μm. This is adequate for present or planned SLC beams. Design and preliminary results will be presented.

  8. X-ray emissions by inner-shell ionization in laser-cluster interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Y.; Nishiyama, H.; Masaki, T.; Moribayashi, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Li, J. Q.

    2006-10-01

    The dynamics of clusters irradiated by high intensity laser pulse has been interested due to its unique nature of the interaction different from other conventional targets and various applications have been proposed [1]. Specifically, an enhanced electric field that is more than one order of magnitude greater than the applied laser field is found to be produced due to the polarization effect near cluster surface. Generation of anomalously high charge state ions and associated short pulse X-rays were observed [2]. Based on simulation studies utilizing our particle code including atomic and relaxation processes [3] incorporated with a perturbation analyses of inner-shell ionization, we have investigated the properties of X-rays from F,O,N,C,B,Be,Li-like argon ions. With an increase of laser intensity, the X-ray pulse length becomes short, comparable to the order of incident laser pulse. [1] Y. Kishimoto et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 589 (2002) [2] Y. Fukuda et al., Laer and Particle Beams 22, 215 (2004) [3] Y. Fukuda et al., Phys. Rev. A 73, 031201(R) (2006)

  9. Influence of irradiation conditions on plasma evolution in laser-surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, J.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Dubreuil, B.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    1993-09-01

    The plasma plume induced by pulsed CO2 laser irradiation of a Ti target at power densities up to 4×108 W cm-2 was studied by emission spectroscopy. Time- and space-resolved measurements were performed by varying laser intensity, laser temporal pulse shape, ambient gas pressure, and the nature of the ambient gas. Experimental results are discussed by comparison with usual models. We show that shock wave and plasma propagation depend critically on the ratio Ivap/Ii, Ivap being the intensity threshold for surface vaporization and Ii the plasma ignition threshold of the ambient gas. Spectroscopic diagnostics of the helium breakdown plasma show maximum values of electron temperature and electron density in the order of kTe˜10 eV and ne=1018 cm-3, respectively. The plasma cannot be described by local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling. Nevertheless, excited metal atoms appear to be in equilibrium with electrons, hence, they can be used like a probe to measure the electron temperature. In order to get information on the role of the plasma in the laser-surface interaction, Ti surfaces were investigated by microscopy after irradiation. Thus an enhanced momentum transfer from the plasma to the target due to the recoil pressure of the breakdown plasma could be evidenced.

  10. Vapor emissions resulting from Nd:YAG laser interaction with tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelskey, S C; White, J M; Gelskey, D E; Kremers, W

    1998-11-01

    The Neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) dental laser has been cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for marketing in intraoral soft tissue treatment. The efficacy and safety of the Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of hard dental tissue as well as the effects of dental irradiation on the pulp and periodontium have been investigated. Odors resulting from laser irradiation have been reported, but the nature and toxicity of associated decomposition vapors is unknown and the health consequences of their inhalation have not yet been studied. The purpose of this in vitro study was to identify vapors emitted during interaction of the Nd:YAG laser with carious human enamel and dentin and sound enamel and dentin coated with organic ink. Vapor emissions were collected from prepared sections of extracted human teeth receiving laser irradiation of 100 mJ and 10 Hz for a duration of 1, 10, or 60 s. Emissions were collected by means of charcoal absorption tubes, and subsequently analyzed using a Gas Chromatograph equipped with Mass Selective (GC/MS) and Flame Ionization Detectors to identify the chemical constituents of the vapors. No compounds were identified in Nd:YAG laser-treated caries, enamel and dentin. No volatile vapors were identified from samples of tooth materials exposed to the laser for 1 or 10 s. Camphor was positively identified in the test sample which consisted of India ink-coated dentin and the reference sample of India ink-coated glass beads, both exposed to the laser for 60 s. 2,5-norbornadiene was tentatively identified in these samples. The Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of camphor is 2 ppm with a Lethal Dose Level (LDLo) of 50 mg/kg (human oral), while the TLV and LDLo of 2,5-norbornadiene is unknown. Occupational and public health safety measures are discussed in this article. Further research is needed to quantify the compounds produced and to determine their toxicity to patients and to dental care providers.

  11. Controlled synthesis of Pt/CS/PW12-GNs composite as an anodic electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongshui; Lei, Fengling; Ye, Lingting; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Lin, Shen

    2015-04-01

    Controlled assembly in aqueous solution was used to synthesize the well-organized Pt/CS/PW12-GNs composite. By the aid of linear cationic polysaccharide chitosan, 2-D distribution worm-like Pt nanoparticles with their length and width of 15-20 and 3-4 nm, respectively, were formed on the surface of CS/PW12-GNs using HCOOH as a reducing agent at room temperature. The introduction of CS leads to well dispersion of worm-like Pt nanoparticles, the electroactivity of H3PW12O40 (PW12) alleviates CO poisoning toward Pt particles, and graphene nanosheets (GNs) ensure excellent electrical conductivity of the composites. The combined action among different components results in significantly enhanced catalytic activity of Pt/CS/PW12-GNs toward methanol oxidation and better tolerance of CO. The as-synthesized Pt/CS/PW12-GNs exhibit the forward peak current density of 445 mA mg-1, which is much higher than that (220 mA mg-1) for Pt/C-JM (the commercially available Johnson Matthey Hispec4000 catalyst, simplified as Pt/C-JM) and some recently reported Pt/graphene-based nanomaterials. The construction of 2-D distribution worm-like Pt nanoparticles and facile wet chemical synthesis strategy provide a promising way to develop superior performance electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells applications.

  12. Controlled synthesis of Pt/CS/PW{sub 12}-GNs composite as an anodic electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhongshui; Lei, Fengling; Ye, Lingting; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Lin, Shen, E-mail: shenlin@fjnu.edu.cn [Fujian Normal University, College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering (China)

    2015-04-15

    Controlled assembly in aqueous solution was used to synthesize the well-organized Pt/CS/PW{sub 12}-GNs composite. By the aid of linear cationic polysaccharide chitosan, 2-D distribution worm-like Pt nanoparticles with their length and width of 15–20 and 3–4 nm, respectively, were formed on the surface of CS/PW{sub 12}-GNs using HCOOH as a reducing agent at room temperature. The introduction of CS leads to well dispersion of worm-like Pt nanoparticles, the electroactivity of H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (PW{sub 12}) alleviates CO poisoning toward Pt particles, and graphene nanosheets (GNs) ensure excellent electrical conductivity of the composites. The combined action among different components results in significantly enhanced catalytic activity of Pt/CS/PW{sub 12}-GNs toward methanol oxidation and better tolerance of CO. The as-synthesized Pt/CS/PW{sub 12}-GNs exhibit the forward peak current density of 445 mA mg{sup −1}, which is much higher than that (220 mA mg{sup −1}) for Pt/C-JM (the commercially available Johnson Matthey Hispec4000 catalyst, simplified as Pt/C-JM) and some recently reported Pt/graphene-based nanomaterials. The construction of 2-D distribution worm-like Pt nanoparticles and facile wet chemical synthesis strategy provide a promising way to develop superior performance electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells applications.

  13. Chaine laser à base d’OPCPA pour des impulsions de peu de cycles optiques

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Lourdes Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The Apollon-10 PW laser chain is a large-scale project aimed at delivering 10 PW pulses to reach intensities of 10^22 W/cm^2. State of the art, high intensity lasers based solely on chirped pulse amplification (CPA) and titanium sapphire (Ti:Sa) crystals are limited to peak powers reaching 1.3 PW with 30-fs pulses as a result of gain narrowing in the amplifiers. To access the multipetawatt regime, gain narrowing can be suppressed with an alternative amplification technique called optical para...

  14. The Role of Crystalline Water in the Interaction of Excimer Laser Light with Brushite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, M. L.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1998-03-01

    A number of minerals of environmental interest contain waters of hydration, sometimes called crystalline water. Hydrated crystals often show dramatic changes in optical properties as well as mechanical properties, both influencing the response of the material to radiation. From an analytic point of view, very little is known about the influence of hydration regarding laser desorption and ablation phenomena. We explore the interaction of excimer laser light (KrF 248 nm) with single crystal brushite (CaHPO_4.2H_2O), a model biomineral phosphate containing H_2O. We first show that defects dominate the interactions as revealed by high sensitivity detection of Ca^+ at low fluences and that this ion emission predicts ablation thresholds. The most probable ion energy, which occurs at 11 eV, is much higher than the incident photon energy of 5 eV. The ion intensities also display a highly nonlinear fluence dependence, typically 6-8th order, entirely consistent with ion emission models we have recently presented. We show that laser coupling can be enhanced several orders of magnitude by generation of defects, i.e., by mechanical treatment, heating, or exposure to electron beams and that the consequences of crystalline H_2O and HPO_4^2- decomposition play major and related roles in this defect production.

  15. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  16. Effets radiatifs et d'électrodynamique quantique dans l'interaction laser-matière ultra-relativiste

    OpenAIRE

    Lobet, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    This PhD thesis is concerned with the regime of extreme-intensity laser-matter interaction that should be accessed on upcoming multi-petawatt facilities (e.g. CILEX-Apollon, ELI, IZEST). At intensities IL > 1022 Wcm-2, the relativistic dynamics of the laser-driven electrons becomes significantly modified by high-energy radiation emission through nonlinear inverse Compton scattering. For IL > 1023 Wcm-2, the emitted-ray photons can, in turn, interact with the laser field and decay into electro...

  17. Emission of terahertz waves in the interaction of a laser pulse with clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    A theory of generation of terahertz radiation in the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse with a spherical cluster is developed for the case in which the density of free electrons in the cluster plasma exceeds the critical value. The spectral, angular, and energy characteristics of the emitted terahertz radiation are investigated, as well as its spatiotemporal structure. It is shown that the directional pattern of radiation has a quadrupole structure and that the emission spectrum has a broad maximum at a frequency nearly equal to the reciprocal of the laser pulse duration. It is found that the total radiated energy depends strongly on the cluster size. Analysis of the spatiotemporal profile of the terahertz signal shows that it has a femtosecond duration and contains only two oscillation cycles.

  18. Demonstration of Coherent Terahertz Transition Radiation from Relativistic Laser-Solid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Guo-Qian; Li, Yu-Tong; Zhang, Yi-Hang; Liu, Hao; Ge, Xu-Lei; Yang, Su; Wei, Wen-Qing; Yuan, Xiao-Hui; Deng, Yan-Qing; Zhu, Bao-Jun; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Wei-Min; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Chen, Li-Ming; Lu, Xin; Ma, Jing-Long; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Coherent transition radiation in the terahertz (THz) region with energies of sub-mJ/pulse has been demonstrated by relativistic laser-driven electron beams crossing the solid-vacuum boundary. Targets including mass-limited foils and layered metal-plastic targets are used to verify the radiation mechanism and characterize the radiation properties. Observations of THz emissions as a function of target parameters agree well with the formation-zone and diffraction model of transition radiation. Particle-in-cell simulations also well reproduce the observed characteristics of THz emissions. The present THz transition radiation enables not only a potential tabletop brilliant THz source, but also a novel noninvasive diagnostic for fast electron generation and transport in laser-plasma interactions.

  19. Investigation of ion acceleration mechanism through laser-matter interaction in femtosecond domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altana, C., E-mail: altana@lns.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Muoio, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore”, Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Tudisco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Brandi, F. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cristoforetti, G. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Giove, D. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Koester, P. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Labate, L. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); and others

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the ion acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in the femtosecond domain has been carried out at the ILIL facility at a laser intensity of up to 2×10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. A Thomson Parabola Spectrometer was used to identify different ion species and measure the energy spectra and the corresponding temperature parameters. We discuss the dependence of the protons spectra upon the structural characteristics of the targets (thickness and atomic mass) and the role of surface versus target bulk during acceleration process. - Highlights: • Ion acceleration mechanism in TNSA regime was investigated. • The energy spectra and the corresponding temperature parameters were measured. • Dependence of the spectra upon the target structural characteristics was discussed.

  20. Ultrahigh-current proton beams from short-pulse laser-solid interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badziak, J; Jablowski, S; Parys, P; Rosinski, M; Suchanska, R; Wolowski, J [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, EURATOM Association, Warsaw (Poland); Antici, P; Fuchs, J; Lancia, L; Mancic, A [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Szydlowski, A [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: badziak@ifpilm.waw.pl

    2008-05-01

    The results of studies of high-current proton beam generation from thin (1-3{mu}m) solid targets irradiated by 0.35-ps laser pulse of intensity up to 2x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} are reported. It is shown that the proton beams of multi-MA currents and multi-TA/cm{sup 2} current densities at the source can be produced when the laser-target interaction conditions approach the skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration requirements. The current and energy spectrum of protons remarkably depend on the target structure. In particular, using a double-layer Au/PS target (plastic covered by 0.1 - 0.2{mu}m Au front layer) results in two-fold higher proton currents and higher proton energies than in the case of a plastic target.

  1. Heat Transfer Analysis on Laser-tissue Thermal Interaction Using Heterogeneous Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hejie; ZHANG Xuexue; LIU Jing

    2002-01-01

    Considering the heterogeneous thermal properties of living tissues,a multi-layer heat transfer model for laser-tissue thermal interaction is presented in this paper.An analytical solution to the temperature transients within two tissue layers is obtained using the Laplace integral transform method.Heat transfer behaviors inside the tissues before evaporation are investigated.The critical time required to vaporize the surface tissue and the thermal damage depth are numerically predicted.It was shown that there is evident difference in temperature predictions between the uniform model and the heterogeneous one.This study is useful to laser surgery,such as ophthalmology,dermatology and neurosurgery which request high accuracy on temperature prediction and heat deposition.

  2. Comparing Particle-in-Cell QED Models for High-Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedtke, Scott V.; Labun, Lance A.; Hegelich, Björn Manuel

    2016-10-01

    High-intensity lasers, such as the Texas Petawatt, are pushing into new regimes of laser-matter interaction, requiring continuing improvement and inclusion of new physics effects in computer simulations. Experiments at the Texas Petawatt are reaching intensity regimes where new physics-quantum electrodynamics (QED) corrections to otherwise classical plasma dynamics-becomes important. We have two particle-in-cell (PIC) codes with different QED implementations. We review the theory of photon emission in QED-strong fields, and cover the differing PIC implementations. We show predictions from the two codes and compare with ongoing experiments. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's PULSE program (12-63-PULSE-FP014) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-14-1-0045). HPC resources provided by TACC.

  3. The effect of quantum correction on plasma electron heating in ultraviolet laser interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, S.; Yazdani, E.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Anvari, A.; Hora, H.

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of the sub-picosecond UV laser in sub-relativistic intensities with deuterium is investigated. At high plasma temperatures, based on the quantum correction in the collision frequency, the electron heating and the ion block generation in plasma are studied. It is found that due to the quantum correction, the electron heating increases considerably and the electron temperature uniformly reaches up to the maximum value of 4.91 × 107 K. Considering the quantum correction, the electron temperature at the laser initial coupling stage is improved more than 66.55% of the amount achieved in the classical model. As a consequence, by the modified collision frequency, the ion block is accelerated quicker with higher maximum velocity in comparison with the one by the classical collision frequency. This study proves the necessity of considering a quantum mechanical correction in the collision frequency at high plasma temperatures.

  4. The effect of quantum correction on plasma electron heating in ultraviolet laser interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, S.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir; Anvari, A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani, E. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2015-04-14

    The interaction of the sub-picosecond UV laser in sub-relativistic intensities with deuterium is investigated. At high plasma temperatures, based on the quantum correction in the collision frequency, the electron heating and the ion block generation in plasma are studied. It is found that due to the quantum correction, the electron heating increases considerably and the electron temperature uniformly reaches up to the maximum value of 4.91 × 10{sup 7 }K. Considering the quantum correction, the electron temperature at the laser initial coupling stage is improved more than 66.55% of the amount achieved in the classical model. As a consequence, by the modified collision frequency, the ion block is accelerated quicker with higher maximum velocity in comparison with the one by the classical collision frequency. This study proves the necessity of considering a quantum mechanical correction in the collision frequency at high plasma temperatures.

  5. Multi-focal laser surgery: cutting enhancement by hydrodynamic interactions between cavitation bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Toytman, Ilya; Simanovski, Dmitri; Palanker, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Transparent biological tissues can be precisely dissected with ultrafast lasers using optical breakdown in the tight focal zone. Typically, tissues are cut by sequential application of pulses, each of which produces a single cavitation bubble. We investigate the hydrodynamic interactions between simultaneous cavitation bubbles originating from multiple laser foci. Simultaneous expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles can enhance the cutting efficiency by increasing the resulting deformations in tissue, and the associated rupture zone. An analytical model of the flow induced by the bubbles is presented and experimentally verified. The threshold strain of the material rupture is measured in a model tissue. Using the computational model and the experimental value of the threshold strain one can compute the shape of the rupture zone in tissue resulting from application of multiple bubbles. With the threshold strain of 0.7 two simultaneous bubbles produce a continuous cut when applied at the distance 1.35 time...

  6. Theoretical analysis of supercontinuum and colored conical emission produced during ultrashort laser pulse interaction with gases

    CERN Document Server

    Semak, V V

    2013-01-01

    We use a conceptually new approach to theoretical modeling of self-focusing in which we integrated diffractive and geometrical optics in order to explain and predict emission of white light and colored rings observed in ultrashort laser pulse interaction. In our approach laser beam propagation is described by blending solution of linear Maxwell's equation and a correction term that represents nonlinear field perturbation expressed in terms of paraxial ray-optics (eikonal) equation. No attempt is made to create appearance of exhaustive treatment via use of complex mathematical models. Rather, emphasis is placed on elegance of the formulations leading to fundamental understanding of underlying physics and, eventually, to an accurate practical numerical model capable of simulating white light generation and conical emission of colored rings produced around the filament.

  7. Lighting up the Christmas tree: high-intensity laser interactions with a nano-structured target

    CERN Document Server

    Gonoskov, A; Ilderton, A; Mackenroth, F; Marklund, M

    2014-01-01

    We perform a numerical study of the interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with a nano-structured target. In particular, we study a target where the nano-structuring increases the absorption rate as compared to the flat target case. The transport of electrons within the target, and in particular in the nano-structure, is analysed. It is shown that it is indeed possible, using a terawatt class laser, to light up a nano-scale Christmas tree. Due to the form of the tree we achieve very strong edge fields, in particular at the top where the star is located. Such edge fields, as here located at ion rich spots, makes strong acceleration gradients possible. It also results in a nice, warm glow suitable for the holiday season.

  8. Weibel magnetic field competes with Biermann fields in laser-solid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Nitin; Schoeffler, Kevin; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Biermann battery induced magnetic fields caused by non-parallel density and temperature gradients, first investigated experimentally, continue to be measured in many current experiments. A detailed study of Biermann generated magnetic fields in collisionless systems has been carried out, showing that for large system sizes (L /de >= 100) , where de is the electron inertial length, the Weibel instability dominates as the major source of magnetic field. In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of experimentally generating this strong Weibel magnetic field. We model, using ab initio PIC simulations, the interaction of a short (ps) high intensity (a0 >= 1) laser pulse, with a target of sufficiently large gradient scale length, L. The expanding hot energetic electron population generated by the laser produces an anisotropy in the velocity distribution. This anisotropy provides the free energy that drives the Weibel instability that appears on the surfaces of the target and dominates over the Biermann battery field.

  9. Physical interaction between peroxisomes and chloroplasts elucidated by in situ laser analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Kazusato; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Mano, Shoji; Kondo, Maki; Yamada, Kenji; Hayashi, Makoto; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Kadota, Akeo; Sakamoto, Wataru; Higashi, Shoichi; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Shigemasa, Akinori; Iino, Takanori; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Nishimura, Mikio

    2015-03-30

    Life on earth relies upon photosynthesis, which consumes carbon dioxide and generates oxygen and carbohydrates. Photosynthesis is sustained by a dynamic environment within the plant cell involving numerous organelles with cytoplasmic streaming. Physiological studies of chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes show that these organelles actively communicate during photorespiration, a process by which by-products produced by photosynthesis are salvaged. Nevertheless, the mechanisms enabling efficient exchange of metabolites have not been clearly defined. We found that peroxisomes along chloroplasts changed shape from spherical to elliptical and their interaction area increased during photorespiration. We applied a recent femtosecond laser technology to analyse adhesion between the organelles inside palisade mesophyll cells of Arabidopsis leaves and succeeded in estimating their physical interactions under different environmental conditions. This is the first application of this estimation method within living cells. Our findings suggest that photosynthetic-dependent interactions play a critical role in ensuring efficient metabolite flow during photorespiration.

  10. Experimental study of X-ray emission in laser-cluster interaction; Etude experimentale de l'emission X issue de l'interaction laser-agregats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillaud, T

    2004-09-01

    Rare gas cluster jets are an intermediate medium between solid and gas targets. Laser-cluster jets interaction may generate a great number of energetic particles as X-rays, UV, high harmonics, ions, electrons and neutrons. To understand all the mechanisms involved in such an interaction we need to make a complete study of individual cluster response to an ultra-short laser pulse. We studied the laser interaction with our argon cluster gas jet, which is well characterized in cluster size and density, to enlarge the knowledge of this interaction. We measured absorption, heating and X-ray emission spectra versus laser parameters and clusters size ({approx} 15-30 nm). We show that there is a strong refraction effect on laser propagation due to the residual gas density. This effect was confirmed by laser propagation simulation with a cylindrical 2-dimensional particle code WAKE. The role played by refraction was to limit maximum laser intensity on the focal spot and to increase interaction volume. By this way, X-ray emission was observed with laser intensity not so far from the ionization threshold (few 10{sup 14} W.cm{sup -2}). We also studied plasma expansion both at cluster scale and focal volume scale and deduced the deposited energy distribution as a function of time. Thanks to a simple hydrodynamic model, we used these results to study cluster expansion. X-ray emission is then simulated by TRANSPEC code in order to reproduce X-ray spectra and duration. Those results revealed an extremely brief X-ray emission consistent with a preliminary measure by streak camera (on ps scale). (author)

  11. Sludge characterization and treatment of produced water(PW using Tympanotonos Fuscatus coagulant (TFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Menkiti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated coag-flocculation (using TFC of PW and characterization of the post treatment settled sludge (PTSS. Effects of dosage, pH and settling time on treatment efficiency were evaluated. TFC and PTSS were subjected to Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, X–ray diffraction (XRD, Thermogravimetric/Differential scanning calorimetric and Scanning electron microscopic (SEM/Elemental analyses. Optimal treatment efficiency of 91.5% was obtained at 1 g/L and pH 2. It could be concluded that TFC was thermally stable and has potential for application as an effective bio-coagulant.

  12. Catalytic synthesis of acetals and ketals with H3PW12O40/PAn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shuijin; ZHANG Yijun; DU Xinxian; Philippe G.Merle

    2008-01-01

    A new environmental friendly catalyst H3PW12O40/PAn was prepared and identified by means of FT-IR,XRD,and TG/DTA.The optimum conditions have been found;that is,the mass ratio of PAn to H3PW12O40 is 1:1.5,the volume of methanol is 20 mL,and the reflux reaction time is 3 h.The structural identity of Keggin units is preserved after the ineorporation into polyauiline matrix.Catalytic activities of H3PW12O40/PAn in synthesizing 2-methyl-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1,3-dioxolane,2,4-dimethyl-2-ethoxycarbonylmethy;-1,3-dioxolane,cyclohexanone ethylene ketal,cyelohexanone 1,2-propanediol ketal,butanone ethylene ketal,butanone 1,2-propanediol ketal,2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane,4-methyl-2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane,2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane,and 4-methyl-2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane were reported.It has been demonstrated that H3PW12O40/PAn is an excellent catalyst.Various factors concerned in these reactions were investigated.The optimum conditions are as follows:the molar ratio of aldehyde/ketone to glycol (r) is 1:1.5,the mass ratio of the catalyst used to the reactants is 0.6%,and the reaction lime is 1.0 h.Under these conditions,the yield is as follows:2-methyl-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1,3-dioxolane,69.0%;2,4-dimethyl-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1,3-dioxolane,79.5%;cyclohexanene ethylene ketal,78.9%;cyclohexanone 1,2-propanediol ketal,85.3%;butanone ethylene ketal,56.9%;butanone 1,2-propanediol ketal,78.1%;2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane,76.3%;4-methyl-2-phenyl-1,3-dionolane,94.2%;2-propyl-l,3-dioxolane,70.7%;and 4-methyl-2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane,79.2%.

  13. Multi-dimensional simulations of Magnetic Field Seeding of Plasma via Laser Beatwave Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Dale; Thoma, Carsten; Bruner, Nichelle; Hwang, David; Hsu, Scott

    2011-10-01

    Assembling magnetized plasma for inertial fusion permits longer duration and smaller density-radius product fuel implosions by reducing the energy transport significantly. For fusion energy, however, the field must be created with a significant standoff distance. A promising technique for magnetic field production is the beat-wave interaction. Some theoretical results have been confirmed by microwave experiments. Recently, fully-kinetic 2D and 3D simulations of the interaction have been simulated using the LSP particle-in-cell code. We inject 2 CO2 100-micron transverse-extent lasers both with 1013 W/cm2 intensity into a peak 3 × 1016 cm-3 density plasma at various angles. The calculated interaction produces beatwaves at the predicted wavelength and frequency and drives magnetic fields up to 2.5 kG. We will examine the sensitivity of the efficiency of magnetic field production to laser parameters and plasma density scale length and discuss the application to the Plasma Liner eXperiment at LANL. Work supported by US DOE, OFES.

  14. Intense laser-driven ion beams in the relativistic-transparency regime: acceleration, control and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Juan C.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-plasma interactions in the novel regime of relativistically-induced transparency have been harnessed to generate efficiently intense ion beams with average energies exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon (>100 MeV for protons) at ``table-top'' scales. We have discovered and utilized a self-organizing scheme that exploits persisting self-generated plasma electric ( 0.1 TV/m) and magnetic ( 104 Tesla) fields to reduce the ion-energy (Ei) spread after the laser exits the plasma, thus separating acceleration from spread reduction. In this way we routinely generate aluminum and carbon beams with narrow spectral peaks at Ei up to 310 MeV and 220 MeV, respectively, with high efficiency ( 5%). The experimental demonstration has been done at the LANL Trident laser with 0.12 PW, high-contrast, 0.65 ps Gaussian laser pulses irradiating planar foils up to 250 nm thick. In this regime, Ei scales empirically with laser intensity (I) as I 1 / 2. Our progress is enabled by high-fidelity, massive computer simulations of the experiments. This work advances next-generation compact accelerators suitable for new applications. E . g ., a carbon beam with Ei 400 MeV and 10% energy spread is suitable for fast ignition (FI) of compressed DT. The observed scaling suggests that is feasible with existing target fabrication and PW-laser technologies, using a sub-ps laser pulse with I 2.5 ×1021 W/cm2. These beams have been used on Trident to generate warm-dense matter at solid-densities, enabling us to investigate its equation of state and mixing of heterogeneous interfaces purely by plasma effects distinct from hydrodynamics. They also drive an intense neutron-beam source with great promise for important applications such as active interrogation of shielded nuclear materials. Considerations on controlling ion-beam divergence for their increased utility are discussed. Funded by the LANL LDRD program.

  15. Ion Acceleration from the Interaction of Ultra-Intense Lasers with Solid Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Matthew M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The discovery that ultra-intense laser pulses (I > 1018 W/cm2) can produce short pulse, high energy proton beams has renewed interest in the fundamental mechanisms that govern particle acceleration from laser-solid interactions. Experiments have shown that protons present as hydrocarbon contaminants on laser targets can be accelerated up to energies > 50 MeV. Different theoretical models that explain the observed results have been proposed. One model describes a front-surface acceleration mechanism based on the ponderomotive potential of the laser pulse. At high intensities (I > 1018 W/cm2), the quiver energy of an electron oscillating in the electric field of the laser pulse exceeds the electron rest mass, requiring the consideration of relativistic effects. The relativistically correct ponderomotive potential is given by Up = ([1 + Iλ2/1.3 x 1018]1/2 - 1) m{sub o}c2, where Iλ2 is the irradiance in W μm2/cm2 and moc2 is the electron rest mass. At laser irradiance of Iλ2 ~ 1020 W μm2/cm2, the ponderomotive potential can be of order several MeV. A few recent experiments--discussed in Chapter 3 of this thesis--consider this ponderomotive potential sufficiently strong to accelerate protons from the front surface of the target to energies up to tens of MeV. Another model, known as Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA), describes the mechanism as an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the laser target. According to the TNSA model, relativistic hot electrons created at the laser-solid interaction penetrate the foil where a few escape to infinity. The remaining hot electrons are retained by the target potential and establish an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the target. In this thesis we present several experiments that study the accelerated ions by

  16. Graphene mode-lockers for fiber lasers functioned with evanescent field interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Won; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Han, Won-Suk; Bae, Mi-Kyung

    2010-02-01

    Employing graphene as an intracavity passive power modulating element, we demonstrate the efficient laser pulsation in high pulse-energy regime with evanescent field interaction between the propagating light and graphene layer. Graphene is prepared by the solution based reduction of graphene oxide, and dispersed homogeneously into the water for spray onto an all-fiber substrate, side-polished fiber. With the intracavity power up to 21.41 dBm, we ensure the robust high-energy operation without any thermal damage of graphene. Resultant output pulses have center wavelength, spectral width, and repetition rate of 1561.6 nm, 1.96 nm, and 6.99 MHz, respectively.

  17. Laser photolysis of interaction of poly-guanylic acid (5′) with anthraquinone-2-sulfonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马建华; 林维真; 王文峰; 韩镇辉; 姚思德; 林念芸

    2002-01-01

    The electron transfer reaction between triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate and poly- guanylic acid (5′) in CH3CN-H2O (97:3) has been investigated by 248 nm (KrF) laser flash photolysis. The transient absorption spectra and kinetics obtained from the interaction of triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate and poly[G] demonstrate that the primary ionic radical pair, radical cation of poly[G] and radical anion of anthraquinone-2-sulfonate have been detected simultaneously. The free energy changes in the process of the electron transfer were also calculated.

  18. Laser photolysis of interaction of poly-guanylic acid (5’) with anthraquinone-2-sulfonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马建华; 韩镇辉; 林维真; 姚思德; 王文峰; 林念芸

    2002-01-01

    The electron transfer reaction between triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate and poly-guanylic acid (5’) in CH3CN-H2O (97 : 3) has been investigated by 248 nm (KrF) laser flash photolysis. The transient absorption spectra and kinetics obtained from the interaction of triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate and poly[G] demonstrate that the primary ionic radical pair, radical cation of poly[G] and radical anion of anthraquinone-2-sulfonate have been detected simultaneously. The free energy changes in the process of the electron transfer were also calculated.

  19. A focusable, convergent fast-electron beam from ultra-high-intensity laser-solid interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, R H H

    2015-01-01

    A novel scheme for the creation of a convergent, or focussing, fast-electron beam generated from ultra-high-intensity laser-solid interactions is described. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are used to demonstrate the efficacy of this scheme in two dimensions. It is shown that a beam of fast-electrons of energy 500 keV - 3 MeV propagates within a solid-density plasma, focussing at depth. The depth of focus of the fast-electron beam is controlled via the target dimensions and focussing optics.

  20. 10.1142/9781911299660_fmatter years Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena (lirpp Vol. 13)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Heinrich

    2016-10-01

    When these proceedings of 13th international conference LASER INTERACTION AND RELATED PLASMA PHENOMENA (LIRPP) will be circulated in 1998, it is just 30 years that this conference series began. Professor Miley asked me to present some thoughts at this occasion since I am involved from the beginning to 1991 a director and then as emeritus director. The conferences were in the following years 1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1979, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1995 and 1997 and reference to each of the conferences is simply given by the year in brackets...

  1. Series solution to the laser-ion interaction in a Raman-type configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, M

    2001-01-01

    The Raman interaction of a trapped ultracold ion with two travelling wave lasers is studied analytically with series solutions, in the absence of the rotating wave approximation (RWA) and the restriction of both the Lamb-Dicke limit and the weak excitation regime. The comparison is made between our solutions and those under the RWA to demonstrate the validity region of the RWA. As a practical example, the preparation of Schr\\"odinger-cat states with our solutions is proposed beyond the weak excitation regime.

  2. Theoretical study of ultrarelativistic laser-electron interaction with radiation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seto K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available When the laser intensity becomes higher than 1022  W/cm2, the motion of an electron becomes relativistic, and emits large amounts of radiation. This radiation energy loss transferred to the kinetic energy loss of the electron, is treated as an external force, the “radiation reaction force”. We show the new equation of motion including this radiation reaction and the simulation method, as well as results of single electron system or dual electrons system with Liénard-Wiechert field interaction.

  3. Effects of the plasma profiles on photon and pair production in ultrahigh intensity laser solid interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y. X.; Jin, X. L., E-mail: jinxiaolin@uestc.edu.cn; Yan, W. Z.; Li, J. Q.; Li, B. [Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Yu, J. Q. [Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    The model of photon and pair production in strong field quantum electrodynamics is implemented into our 1D3V particle-in-cell code with Monte Carlo algorithm. Using this code, the evolution of the particles in ultrahigh intensity laser (∼10{sup 23} W/cm{sup 2}) interaction with aluminum foil target is observed. Four different initial plasma profiles are considered in the simulations. The effects of initial plasma profiles on photon and pair production, energy spectra, and energy evolution are analyzed. The results imply that one can set an optimal initial plasma profile to obtain the desired photon distributions.

  4. The strong field approximation within a Faddeev-like formalism for laser-matter interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Yu; Mota-Furtado, F; O'Mahony, P F; Piraux, B

    2016-01-01

    We consider the interaction of atomic hydrogen with an intense laser field within the strong-field approximation. By using a Faddeev-like formalism, we introduce a new perturbative series in the binding potential of the atom. As a first test of this new approach, we calculate the electron energy spectrum in the very simple case of a photon energy higher than the ionisation potential. We show that by contrast to the standard perturbative series in the binding potential obtained within the strong field approximation, the first terms of the new series converge rapidly towards the results we get by solving the corresponding time-dependent Schroedinger equation.

  5. Utilizing a Low-Cost, Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS) to Improve Learning in Developing Rural Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes an innovation Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS), utilizing general IWBs (Interactive Whiteboard) didactics, to support student learning for rural and developing regions. LaDIS is a system made to support traditional classroom practices between an instructor and a group of students. This invention effectively transforms a…

  6. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao Jian; Guo Zhixiong [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: guo@jove.rutgers.edu

    2009-07-07

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  7. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jian; Guo, Zhixiong

    2009-07-01

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  8. Plasmoid ejection and secondary current sheet generation from magnetic reconnection in laser-plasma interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Quan-Li; Wang, Shou-Jun; Lu, Quan-Ming; Huang, Can; Yuan, Da-Wei; Liu, Xun; Lin, Xiao-Xuan; Li, Yu-Tong; Wei, Hui-Gang; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Jiang, Shao-En; Ding, Yong-Kun; Jiang, Bo-Bin; Du, Kai; He, Xian-Tu; Yu, M Y; Liu, C S; Wang, Shui; Tang, Yong-Jian; Zhu, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Gang; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2012-05-25

    Reconnection of the self-generated magnetic fields in laser-plasma interaction was first investigated experimentally by Nilson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 255001 (2006)] by shining two laser pulses a distance apart on a solid target layer. An elongated current sheet (CS) was observed in the plasma between the two laser spots. In order to more closely model magnetotail reconnection, here two side-by-side thin target layers, instead of a single one, are used. It is found that at one end of the elongated CS a fanlike electron outflow region including three well-collimated electron jets appears. The (>1 MeV) tail of the jet energy distribution exhibits a power-law scaling. The enhanced electron acceleration is attributed to the intense inductive electric field in the narrow electron dominated reconnection region, as well as additional acceleration as they are trapped inside the rapidly moving plasmoid formed in and ejected from the CS. The ejection also induces a secondary CS.

  9. Laser-plasma interactions in NIF-scale plasmas (HLP5 and HLP6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacGowan, B.; Berger, R.; Fernandez, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The understanding of laser-plasma interactions in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraum targets is important for the success of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The success of an indirect-drive ICF ignition experiment depends on the ability to predict and control the history and spatial distribution of the x-radiation produced by the laser beams that are absorbed by the inside of the hohlraum wall. Only by controlling the symmetry of this x-ray drive is it possible to obtain the implosion symmetry in the fusion pellet necessary for ignition. The larger hohlraums and longer time scales required for ignition-scale targets result in the presence of several millimeters of plasma (electron density n{sub e} {approximately} 0.1 n{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}), through which the 3{omega} (351-nm) laser beams must propagate before they are absorbed at the hohlraum wall. Hydrodynamic simulations show this plasma to be very uniform [density-gradient scalelength L{sub n} = n{sub e}(dn{sub e}/dx){sup {minus}1}{approximately} 2mm] and to exhibit low velocity gradients [velocity-gradient scale-length L{sub v} = c{sub s}(dv/dx){sup {minus}1} > 6 mm].

  10. Transient interaction of a boiling melt with a pulsed Nd:YAG-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarjy, R. S. M.; Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2017-01-01

    The boiling front induced by a pulsed Nd:YAG-laser at very slow translation speed was studied. The purpose is to understand fundamental melt movement mechanisms. The melt was observed by high speed imaging, with and without illumination. When switching on the laser beam a hole is drilled through a bulk of melt. The hole expands and the boiling pressure gradually opens the melt bridge, instead developing an interaction front similar to cutting. These conditions remain in quasi-steady state during the pulse. The ablation pressure from boiling shears waves down the front and keeps the melt downwards in a stable position. When switching off, the waves smoothen and in absence of boiling the surface tension drags the melt back upwards, to semi-torus-like Catenoid shape. Evidence on the large melt pool and its shape was achieved by three-dimensional reconstruction from cross section macrographs. The basic findings how melt can move with and without ablation pressure can enable controlled melt dynamics for various laser processing techniques, like remote cutting, ablation, keyhole welding or drilling.

  11. The interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses with cryogenic He jets

    CERN Document Server

    Shihab, M; Redmer, R

    2016-01-01

    We study the interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses with cryogenic He jets using 2d/3v relativistic Particle-in-Cell simulations (XOOPIC). Of particular interest are laser intensities $(10^{15}-10^{20})$ W/cm$^2$, pulse lengths $\\le 100$ fs, and the frequency regime $\\sim 800$ nm for which the jets are initially transparent and subsequently not homogeneously ionized. Pulses $\\ge 10^{16}$ W/cm$^2$ are found to drive ionization along the jet and outside the laser spot, the ionization-front propagates along the jet at a fraction of the speed of light. Within the ionized region, there is a highly transient field, which may be interpreted as two-surface wave decay and as a result of the charge-neutralizing disturbance at the jet-vacuum interface. The ionized region has solid-like densities and temperatures of few to hundreds of eV, i.e., warm and hot dense matter regimes. Such extreme conditions are relevant for high-energy densities as found, e.g., in shock-wave experiments and inertial confinement fusion...

  12. Radiation from laser-microplasma-waveguide interactions in the ultra-intense regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Shen, Baifei

    2016-07-01

    When a high-contrast ultra-relativistic (>1020 W/cm2) laser beam enters a micro-sized plasma waveguide, the pulse energy is coupled into waveguide modes, which significantly modifies the interaction between the electrons and electromagnetic wave. Electrons pulled out from the walls of the waveguide form a dense helical bunch inside the channel and are efficiently accelerated by the transverse magnetic modes to hundreds of MeV. The asymmetry in the transverse electric and magnetic fields drives strong oscillations, which lead to the emission of bright, well-collimated, hard X-rays. In this paper, we present our study on the underlying physics in the aforementioned process using 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The mechanism of electron acceleration and the dependence of radiation properties on different laser plasma parameters are addressed. An analytic model and basic scalings for X-ray emission are also presented by considering the lowest optical modes in the waveguide, which is adequate to describe the basic phenomenon. In addition, the effects of high-order modes as well as laser polarization are also qualitatively discussed. The considered X-ray source has promising features, potentially making it a competitive candidate for a future tabletop synchrotron source.

  13. Multifocal laser surgery: cutting enhancement by hydrodynamic interactions between cavitation bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toytman, I; Silbergleit, A; Simanovski, D; Palanker, D

    2010-10-01

    Transparent biological tissues can be precisely dissected with ultrafast lasers using optical breakdown in the tight focal zone. Typically, tissues are cut by sequential application of pulses, each of which produces a single cavitation bubble. We investigate the hydrodynamic interactions between simultaneous cavitation bubbles originating from multiple laser foci. Simultaneous expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles can enhance the cutting efficiency, by increasing the resulting deformations in tissue, and the associated rupture zone. An analytical model of the flow induced by the bubbles is presented and experimentally verified. The threshold strain of the material rupture is measured in a model tissue. Using the computational model and the experimental value of the threshold strain one can compute the shape of the rupture zone in tissue resulting from application of multiple bubbles. With the threshold strain of 0.7 two simultaneous bubbles produce a continuous cut when applied at the distance 1.35 times greater than that required in sequential approach. Simultaneous focusing of the laser in multiple spots along the line of intended cut can extend this ratio to 1.7. Counterpropagating jets forming during collapse of two bubbles in materials with low viscosity can further extend the cutting zone-up to approximately a factor of 1.5.

  14. Genome organization and pathogenicity of Corynebacterium diphtheriae C7(-) and PW8 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Masaaki; Komiya, Takako; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Ishiwa, Akiko; Nagata, Noriyo; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Takahashi, Motohide

    2010-09-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is the causative agent of diphtheria. In 2003, the complete genomic nucleotide sequence of an isolate (NCTC13129) from a large outbreak in the former Soviet Union was published, in which the presence of 13 putative pathogenicity islands (PAIs) was demonstrated. In contrast, earlier work on diphtheria mainly employed the C7(-) strain for genetic analysis; therefore, current knowledge of the molecular genetics of the bacterium is limited to that strain. However, genomic information on the NCTC13129 strain has scarcely been compared to strain C7(-). Another important C. diphtheriae strain is Park-Williams no. 8 (PW8), which has been the only major strain used in toxoid vaccine production and for which genomic information also is not available. Here, we show by comparative genomic hybridization that at least 37 regions from the reference genome, including 11 of the 13 PAIs, are considered to be absent in the C7(-) genome. Despite this, the C7(-) strain still retained signs of pathogenicity, showing a degree of adhesion to Detroit 562 cells, as well as the formation of and persistence in abscesses in animal skin comparable to that of the NCTC13129 strain. In contrast, the PW8 strain, suggested to lack 14 genomic regions, including 3 PAIs, exhibited more reduced signs of pathogenicity. These results, together with great diversity in the presence of the 37 genomic regions among various C. diphtheriae strains shown by PCR analyses, suggest great heterogeneity of this pathogen, not only in genome organization, but also in pathogenicity.

  15. Effect of low intensity laser interaction with human skin fibroblast cells using fiber-optic nano-probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Gopalendu; Dutta, Ashim; Mitra, Kunal; Grace, Michael S; Amat, Albert; Romanczyk, Tara B; Wu, Xingjia; Chakrabarti, Kristi; Anders, Juanita; Gorman, Erik; Waynant, Ronald W; Tata, Darrell B

    2007-03-01

    Over the past forty years, many efforts have been devoted to study low power laser light interactions with biological systems. Some of the investigations were performed in-vitro, on bulk cell populations. Our present work was undertaken to apply specially engineered fiber-optic based nano-probes for the precise delivery of laser light on to a single cell and to observe production of low power laser light induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). A normal human skin fibroblast (NHF) cell line was utilized in this investigation and the cells were irradiated under two different schemes of exposure: (1) an entire NHF cell population within a Petri dish using a fan beam methodology, and (2) through the precise delivery of laser energy on to a single NHF cell using fiber-optic nano-probe. Photobiostimulative studies were conducted through variation of laser intensity, exposure time, and the energy dose of exposure. Laser irradiation induced enhancement in the rate of cell proliferation was observed to be dependent on laser exposure parameters and the method of laser delivery. The total energy dose (fluence) had a greater influence on the enhancement in the rate of cellular proliferation than compared to laser intensity. The enhancement in the growth rate was observed to have a finite life-time of several days after the initial laser exposure. Fluorescent life-time imaging of ROS was performed during the nano-based single cell exposure method. The kinetics of ROS generation was found to depend strongly on the laser fluence and not on the laser intensity.

  16. The interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses with cryogenic He planar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihab, M.; Bornath, Th; Redmer, R.

    2017-04-01

    We study the interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses with cryogenic He planar jets, i.e., slabs, using 2D3V relativistic particle-in-cell simulations. Of particular interest are laser intensities ({10}15{--}{10}20) W cm‑2, pulse lengths ≤100 fs, and the wave length regime ∼800 nm for which the slabs are initially transparent and subsequently inhomogeneously ionized. Pulses ≥slant {10}16 W cm‑2 are found to drive ionization along the slab and outside the laser spot, the ionization front propagates along the slab at a considerable fraction of the speed of light. Within the ionized region, there is a highly transient field which is a result of the charge-neutralizing disturbance at the slab-vacuum interface and which may be interpreted in terms of a two-surface-wave decay. The ionized region is predicted to reach solid-like densities and temperatures of few to hundreds of eV, i.e., it belongs to warm and hot dense matter regimes. Such extreme conditions are relevant for high-energy densities as found, e.g., in shock-wave experiments and inertial confinement fusion studies. The temporal evolution of the ionization is studied considering theoretically a pump–probe x-ray Thomson scattering scheme. We observe plasmon and non-collective modes that are generated in the slab, and their amplitude is proportional to the ionized volume. Our theoretical findings could be tested at free-electron laser facilities such as FLASH and the European XFEL (Hamburg) and the LCLS (Stanford).

  17. Laser-Plasma Interactions in Drive Campaign targets on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Moody, J. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meeker, D.; Michel, P. A.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, J. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Storm, E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Williams, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The Drive campaign [D A Callahan et al., this conference] on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] has the focused goal of understanding and optimizing the hohlraum for ignition. Both the temperature and symmetry of the radiation drive depend on laser and hohlraum characteristics. The drive temperature depends on the coupling of laser energy to the hohlraum, and the symmetry of the drive depends on beam-to-beam interactions that result in energy transfer [P. A. Michel, S. H. Glenzer, L. Divol, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010).] within the hohlraum. To this end, hohlraums are being fielded where shape (rugby vs. cylindrical hohlraums), gas fill composition (neopentane at room temperature vs. cryogenic helium), and gas fill density (increase of ∼ 150%) are independently changed. Cylindrical hohlraums with higher gas fill density show improved inner beam propagation, as should rugby hohlraums, because of the larger radius over the capsule (7 mm vs. 5.75 mm in a cylindrical hohlraum). Energy coupling improves in room temperature neopentane targets, as well as in hohlraums at higher gas fill density. In addition cross-beam energy transfer is being addressed directly by using targets that mock up one end of a hohlraum, but allow observation of the laser beam uniformity after energy transfer. Ideas such as splitting quads into “doublets” by re-pointing the right and left half of quads are also being pursued. LPI results of the Drive campaign will be summarized, and analyses of future directions presented.

  18. Far-field resonance fluorescence from a dipole-interacting laser-driven cold atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan; Saint, Reece; Olmos, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the temporal response of the fluorescence light that is emitted from a dense gas of cold atoms driven by a laser. When the average interatomic distance is comparable to the wavelength of the photons scattered by the atoms, the system exhibits strong dipolar interactions and collective dissipation. We solve the exact dynamics of small systems with different geometries and show how these collective features are manifest in the scattered light properties such as the photon emission rate, the power spectrum and the second-order correlation function. By calculating these quantities beyond the weak (linear) driving limit, we make progress in understanding the signatures of collective behavior in these many-body systems. Furthermore, we shed light on the role of disorder and averaging on the resonance fluorescence, of direct relevance for recent experimental efforts that aim at the exploration of many-body effects in dipole-dipole interacting gases of atoms.

  19. Quantum radiation reaction in head-on laser-electron beam interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Vranic, Marija; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the energy spread and the divergence of electron beams while they interact with different laser pulses at intensities where quantum effects and radiation reaction are of relevance. The interaction is modeled with a QED-PIC code and the results are compared with those obtained with a standard PIC code with the addition of a classical radiation reaction module and with theoretical predictions. While classical radiation reaction is a continuous process, in QED, radiation emission is stochastic. The two pictures reconcile in the limit when the emitted photons energy is small compared to the energy of the emitting electrons. The energy spread of the electron distribution function always tends to decrease with classical radiation reaction, whereas the stochastic QED emission can also enlarge it. These two tendencies compete in the QED-dominated regime. Our analysis, supported by the QED module, reveals an upper limit to the maximal attainable energy spread due to stoch...

  20. Atoms and molecules interacting with light atomic physics for the laser era

    CERN Document Server

    Straten, Peter van der

    2016-01-01

    This in-depth textbook with a focus on atom-light interactions prepares students for research in a fast-growing and dynamic field. Intended to accompany the laser-induced revolution in atomic physics, it is a comprehensive text for the emerging era in atomic, molecular and optical science. Utilising an intuitive and physical approach, the text describes two-level atom transitions, including appendices on Ramsey spectroscopy, adiabatic rapid passage and entanglement. With a unique focus on optical interactions, the authors present multi-level atomic transitions with dipole selection rules, and M1/E2 and multiphoton transitions. Conventional structure topics are discussed in some detail, beginning with the hydrogen atom and these are interspersed with material rarely found in textbooks such as intuitive descriptions of quantum defects. The final chapters examine modern applications and include many references to current research literature. The numerous exercises and multiple appendices throughout enable advanc...

  1. Simulation of Interaction of Oriented J Aggregates with Resonance Laser Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Vysotina, N V; Maslov, V G; Nesterov, L A; Rosanov, N N; Fedorov, S V; Shatsev, A N; 10.1134/S0030400X10070180

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of laser radiation with single J aggregates of cyanine dyes is theoretically analyzed and numerically simulated. The quantum mechanical calculations of the equilibrium geometry and the energies and intensities of the lowest singlet electronic transitions in pseudoisocyanine chloride and its linear (chain) oligomers are fulfilled. The data of these calculations can serve as parameters of the analyzed model of interaction of J aggregates with radiation in the oneparticle density matrix approximation. This model takes into account relaxation processes, the annihilation of excitations at neighboring molecules, and inho mogeneous broadening. Assuming that the inhomogeneous broadening is absent, calculations demonstrate the existence of spatial bistability, molecular switching waves, and dissipative solitons. The effect of the inhomogeneous broadening and the radiation intensity on the effective coherence length in linear (chain) J aggregates is analyzed

  2. High-power laser-metal interactions in pressurized gaseous atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitelli, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione; Lugomer, S.; Furic, K.; Ivanda, M. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Stipancic, M. [Electrotechnical faculty, Osijek (Croatia); Stubicar, M. [Faculty of natural sciences and mathematics, Zagreb (Croatia); Gamulin, O. [School of medicine, Univ. of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1996-09-01

    Metal surfaces were irradiated in pressurized gaseous atmospheres by a CO{sub 2} laser beam. The gaseous pressures ranged from 2 atm to 6 atm, the energy density of the light beam was about 20-50 J/cm{sup 2} with a power density {approx} 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2} and a pulse duration p 150 ns. In the above conditions some new effects were observed. The laser-material interaction occurred in a highly absorptive plasma regime, meaning that the metal surface was effectively screened from the beam. The interaction ended either with plasma adiabatic expansion, in the case of Mo (in O{sub 2}), Te (in N{sub 2}) and T{sub i} (in N{sub 2}), or with plasma explosion, in the case of T{sub i} (in O{sub 2}). The metal surface properties were studied by means of optical analysis, microhardness tests, X-ray diffraction and Raman backscattering.

  3. Time-dependent configuration-interaction calculations of laser-driven dynamics in presence of dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Klamroth, Tillmann; Saalfrank, Peter

    2008-08-28

    Correlated, multielectron dynamics of "open" electronic systems within the fixed-nuclei approximation are treated here within explicitly time-dependent configuration-interaction schemes. Specifically, we present simulations of laser-pulse driven excitations of selected electronic states of LiCN in the presence of energy and phase relaxation. The evolution of the system is studied using open-system density matrix theory, which embeds naturally in the time-dependent configuration-interaction singles (doubles) formalism. Different models for dissipation based on the Lindblad semigroup formalism are presented. These models give rise to lifetimes for energy relaxation ranging from a few hundreds of femtoseconds to several nanoseconds. Pure dephasing is treated using a Kossakowski-like Gaussian model, proceeding on similar time scales. The pulse lengths employed range from very short (tens of femtoseconds) to very long (several nanoseconds). To make long-time propagations tractable, the quasiresonant approximation is used. The results show that despite the loss of efficiency, selective dipole switching can still be achieved in the presence of dissipation when using appropriately designed laser pulses.

  4. Characterization of a cryogenically cooled high-pressure gas jet for laser/cluster interaction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. A.; Ditmire, T.; Tisch, J. W. G.

    1998-11-01

    We have developed and carried out detailed characterization of a cryogenically cooled (34-300 K), high-pressure (55 kTorr) solenoid driven pulsed valve that has been used to produce dense jets of atomic clusters for high intensity laser interaction studies. Measurements including Rayleigh scattering and short pulse interferometry show that clusters of controlled size, from a few to >104 atoms/cluster can be produced from a broad range of light and heavy gases, at average atomic densities up to 4×1019 atoms/cc. Continuous temperature and pressure control of the valve allows us to vary mean cluster size while keeping the average atomic density constant, and we find that many aspects of the valves behavior are consistent with ideal gas laws. However, we also show that effects including the build up of flow on milliseconds time scales, the cooling of gas flowing into the valve, and condensation of gas inside the valve body at temperatures well above the liquefaction point need to be carefully characterized in order to decouple the operation of the jet from the laser interaction physics.

  5. Nanosecond CO2 laser interaction with a dense helium Z-pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, D. F.

    A short pulse CO2 laser system was constructed to investigate the interaction of intense electromagnetic radiation with dense plasma. The laser was focused perpendicular to the axis of a linear helium Z-pinch plasma and properties of the transmitted beam were monitored. Transmitted beam intensity and spatial distribution were measured as functions of incident intensity and interaction time. The results of the experiments with the overdense plasma were found to be consistent with plasma hydrodynamic theory. A 40 nanosecond pulse was sufficiently long to burn through the plasma, but a 4 nanosecond pulse was not. The 4 nanosecond pulse was long enough to form a local density depression in the underdense plasma and density gradients steep enough to produce Fresnel diffraction, despite the absence of a critical surface. The resultant change in refractive index could cause thermal self-focusing. The transmission measurement was not found to be consistent with a simple model of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption. At an intensity of 10 to the 12th power W/cu/cm there was a sharp decrease in transmission. This suggests the possibility of either increased absorption due to enhanced ionization or increased reflection due to simulated Brillouin backscatter.

  6. Nonlinear interactions between the pumping kinetics, fluid dynamics and optical resonator of cw fluid flow lasers. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentman, L.H.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1983-12-01

    This research is an integrated theoretical and experimental investigation of the nonlinear interactions which may occur between the chemical kinetics, the fluid dynamics and the unstable resonator of a continuous wave fluid flow laser. The objectives of this grant were to measure the frequency and amplitude of the time dependent pulsations in the power spectral output which have been predicted to occur in cw chemical lasers employing unstable resonators to extract power.

  7. Three Mode Interactions as a Precision Monitoring Tool for Advanced Laser Interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, L; Blair, D G; Susmithan, S; Fang, Q; Blair, C D

    2014-01-01

    Three-mode opto-acoustic interactions in advanced laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors have high sensitivity to thermally excited ultrasonic modes in their test masses. Three mode interaction signal gain can change by 100% for thermally induced radius of curvature variations ~ 10-5, allowing the monitoring of thermal distortions corresponding to wavefront changes ~2 x 10-13m. We show that the three-mode gain for single cavity interactions can be monitored by observing beat signals in the transmitted or reflected light due to the thermal excitation of the many hundreds of detectable acoustic modes. We show that three mode interaction signals can be used at low optical power to predict parametric instabilities that could occur at higher power. In addition, at any power, the observed mode amplitudes can be used to control the interferometer operating point against slow environmental perturbations. We summarize data on an 80m cavity that demonstrates these effects and propose testing on full scale in...

  8. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano eCardinale

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell-cardiomyocyte interactions under defined contact modes on laser-patterned biochips.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Ma

    Full Text Available Understanding how stem cells interact with cardiomyocytes is crucial for cell-based therapies to restore the cardiomyocyte loss that occurs during myocardial infarction and other cardiac diseases. It has been thought that functional myocardial repair and regeneration could be regulated by stem cell-cardiomyocyte contact. However, because various contact modes (junction formation, cell fusion, partial cell fusion, and tunneling nanotube formation occur randomly in a conventional coculture system, the particular regulation corresponding to a specific contact mode could not be analyzed. In this study, we used laser-patterned biochips to define cell-cell contact modes for systematic study of contact-mediated cellular interactions at the single-cell level. The results showed that the biochip design allows defined stem cell-cardiomyocyte contact-mode formation, which can be used to determine specific cellular interactions, including electrical coupling, mechanical coupling, and mitochondria transfer. The biochips will help us gain knowledge of contact-mediated interactions between stem cells and cardiomyocytes, which are fundamental for formulating a strategy to achieve stem cell-based cardiac tissue regeneration.

  10. Autofluorescence spectroscopy for nerve-sparing laser surgery of the head and neck-the influence of laser-tissue interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzle, Florian; Rohde, Maximilian; Riemann, Max; Oetter, Nicolai; Adler, Werner; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Knipfer, Christian

    2017-08-01

    The use of remote optical feedback systems represents a promising approach for minimally invasive, nerve-sparing laser surgery. Autofluorescence properties can be exploited for a fast, robust identification of nervous tissue. With regard to the crucial step towards clinical application, the impact of laser ablation on optical properties in the vicinity of structures of the head and neck has not been investigated up to now. We acquired 24,298 autofluorescence spectra from 135 tissue samples (nine ex vivo tissue types from 15 bisected pig heads) both before and after ER:YAG laser ablation. Sensitivities, specificities, and area under curve(AUC) values for each tissue pair as well as the confusion matrix were statistically calculated for pre-ablation and post-ablation autofluorescence spectra using principal component analysis (PCA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), and receiver operating characteristics (ROC). The confusion matrix indicated a highly successful tissue discrimination rate before laser exposure, with an average classification error of 5.2%. The clinically relevant tissue pairs nerve/cancellous bone and nerve/salivary gland yielded an AUC of 100% each. After laser ablation, tissue discrimination was feasible with an average classification accuracy of 92.1% (average classification error 7.9%). The identification of nerve versus cancellous bone and salivary gland performed very well with an AUC of 100 and 99%, respectively. Nerve-sparing laser surgery in the area of the head and neck by means of an autofluorescence-based feedback system is feasible even after ER-YAG laser-tissue interactions. These results represent a crucial step for the development of a clinically applicable feedback tool for laser surgery interventions in the oral and maxillofacial region.

  11. Acoustic measurements of F100-PW-100 engine operating in hush house NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly AFB Texas during operation of the F100-PW-100 engine to ensure that engine structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F100-PW-100 engine structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an existing F100-PW-100 engine wet-cooled noise suppressor, but were increased over that measured during operation on an open test stand. It was recommended that the acoustic load increases measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for engines which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment.

  12. Preparation and photochromic properties of ultra-fine H3PW11MoO40/PVA fibre mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guo-Cheng; Gong, Jian; Pan, Yan; Cui, Xiu-Jun; Shao, Chang-Lu; Guo, Yi-Hang; Wen, Shang-Bin; Qu, Lun-Yu

    2004-07-01

    Novel photochromic materials, H3PW11MoO40/Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) ultra-fine fibre mats containing different weight percentages of H3PW11MoO40, have been prepared from different H3PW11MoO40/PVA solutions by an electrospinning technique. IR spectroscopy, wide-angle x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscope spectroscopy are used to characterize the fibre mats. Results of viscosity and conductivity measurements of the solutions indicate that lower viscosity and higher conductivity favour the formation of thin fibres without beads. When irradiated with ultraviolet light (313.2 nm), the colour of the fibre mats changes from white to blue, and the mats show reversible photochromism. IR and ESR spectra of the irradiated fibre mats indicate a conceivable photochromic mechanism, i.e. MoVI is reduced under ultraviolet irradiation. Meanwhile, PVA is oxidized to unsaturated ketone or aldehyde.

  13. Collisionless absorption, hot electron generation, and energy scaling in intense laser-target interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liseykina, T., E-mail: tatyana.tiseykina@uni-rostock.de [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, Universitätsplatz 3, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Institute of Computational Technologies SD RAS, Acad. Lavrentjev Ave. 6, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Mulser, P. [Theoretical Quantum Electronics, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Murakami, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Among the various attempts to understand collisionless absorption of intense and superintense ultrashort laser pulses, a whole variety of models and hypotheses has been invented to describe the laser beam target interaction. In terms of basic physics, collisionless absorption is understood now as the interplay of the oscillating laser field with the space charge field produced by it in the plasma. A first approach to this idea is realized in Brunel's model the essence of which consists in the formation of an oscillating charge cloud in the vacuum in front of the target, therefore frequently addressed by the vague term “vacuum heating.” The investigation of statistical ensembles of orbits shows that the absorption process is localized at the ion-vacuum interface and in the skin layer: Single electrons enter into resonance with the laser field thereby undergoing a phase shift which causes orbit crossing and braking of Brunel's laminar flow. This anharmonic resonance acts like an attractor for the electrons and leads to the formation of a Maxwellian tail in the electron energy spectrum. Most remarkable results of our investigations are the Brunel like spectral hot electron distribution at the relativistic threshold, the minimum of absorption at Iλ{sup 2}≅(0.3−1.2)×10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2} in the plasma target with the electron density of n{sub e}λ{sup 2}∼10{sup 23}cm{sup −3}μm{sup 2}, the drastic reduction of the number of hot electrons in this domain and their reappearance in the highly relativistic domain, and strong coupling, beyond expectation, of the fast electron jets with the return current through Cherenkov emission of plasmons. The hot electron energy scaling shows a strong dependence on intensity in the moderately relativistic domain Iλ{sup 2}≅(10{sup 18}−10{sup 20}) Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}, a scaling in vague accordance with current published estimates in the range Iλ{sup 2}≅(0.14−3.5)×10{sup 21}

  14. Role of high-order dispersion on strong-field laser-molecule interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantus, Marcos; Nairat, Muath

    2016-05-01

    Strong-field (1012- 1016 W/ cm2) laser-matter interactions are characterized by the extent of fragmentation and charge of the resulting ions as a function of peak intensity and pulse duration. Interactions are influenced by high-order dispersion, which is difficult to characterize and compress. Fourth-order dispersion (FOD) causes a time-symmetric pedestal, while third-order dispersion (TOD) causes a leading (negative) or following (positive) pedestal. Here, we report on strong-field interactions with pentane and toluene molecules, tracking the molecular ion and the doubly charged carbon ion C2+ yields as a function of TOD and FOD for otherwise transform-limited (TL) 35fs pulses. We find TL pulses enhance molecular ion yield and suppress C2+ yield, while FOD reverses this trend. Interestingly, the leading pedestal in negative TOD enhances C2+ yield compared to positive TOD. Pulse pedestals are of particular importance in strong-field science because target ionization or alignment can be induced well before the main pulse arrives. A pedestal following an intense laser pulse can cause sequential ionization or accelerate electrons causing cascaded ionization. Control of high-order dispersion allows us to provide strong-field measurements that can help address the mechanisms responsible for different product ions in the presence and absence of pedestals. Financial support of this work comes from the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy, DOE SISGR (DE-SC0002325)

  15. Expectativas de inflación en España: la encuesta PwC española

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Herrera, María del Carmen; Sosvilla-Rivero, Simón

    2013-01-01

    Examinamos la capacidad predictiva, las propiedades de consistencia de las expectativas de inflación y sus posibles determinantes usando una encuesta a un panel de expertos y empresarios realizada en España por PwC. Al analizar la tasa de inflación general, nuestros resultados sugieren que el panel de PwC presenta alguna capacidad predictiva para los horizontes temporales desde 3 a 9 meses, mejorando cuando se trata de predecir la tasa de inflación subyacente. Sin embargo, los resultados indi...

  16. A Review of Subsurface Behavior of Plutonium and Americium at the 200-PW-1/3/6 Operable Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Riley, Robert G.

    2008-01-31

    This report begins with a brief summary of the history and current status of 200-PW-1/3/6 OUs in section 2.0. This is followed by a description of our concentual model of Pu/Am migration at the 200-PW-1/3/6 OUs, during both past artificial recharge conditions and current natural recharge condictions (section 3.0). Section 4.0 discusses data gaps and information needs. The final section (section 5.0) provides recommendations for futher work to address the data gaps and information needs identified in section 4.0.

  17. Expectativas de inflación en España: la encuesta PwC española

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Herrera, María del Carmen; Sosvilla Rivero, Simón Javier

    2013-01-01

    Examinamos la capacidad predictiva, las propiedades de consistencia de las expectativas de inflación y sus posibles determinantes usando una encuesta a un panel de expertos y empresarios realizada en España por PwC. Al analizar la tasa de inflación general, nuestros resultados sugieren que el panel de PwC presenta alguna capacidad predictiva para los horizontes temporales desde 3 a 9 meses, mejorando cuando se trata de predecir la tasa de inflación subyacente. Sin embargo, los resultados indi...

  18. Solitonic-type excitations in laser-condensed matter interaction: additional proof by independent publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudriavtsev, Eugene M.

    2000-08-01

    The goal of this report is to discuss (in addition to review) the independent literature works which come to our attention in 2 last years with experimental or theoretical proofs the existence of the solitonic type Wave of Change in Reflection and Conduction (WCRC). WCRC presents a new variety of transfer phenomena in condensed matter. It was excited by a single IR laser pulse with a threshold of more than 10 kW/cm2 and consists of a series of about 30 solitary pulses with propagation velocity of each subsequent pulse decreasing two times comparing with that of preceding one in the range from sound velocity to less than about micron/s. Each pulse has the following solitary wave features: (1) it is all the time of one sign, (2) its velocity Ui is nearly constant, (3) it reflects from sample surfaces without noticeable velocity change. So far the systematic WCRC study was made in Lebedev Physical Institute, grate deal in collaboration with group of Marseilles University (prof. M. Autric) and also with some others groups. Literature analysis showed independent works where WCRC can be seen and which was made in different institutions with different own goals in mind. As example, work on optical monitoring of laser damage in IR materials or thermocouple measurements of temperature non stability in water cooled copper shield stopped the high power e-beam, etc. We will discuss also some details of theoretical work connected with development of Frenkel-Kontorova (1937) topological soliton model. WCRC is rather universal phenomenon, it appears in many laser-condensed matter interactions and so it should be studied for the WCRC mechanism understanding and its effect evaluation for different applications.

  19. ŁPw Steel Arch Support – Designing and Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rotkegel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly difficult geological-mining conditions make it necessary to seek new and effective ways of securing roadways. The new types of support must meet very high strength requirements and must have very high load-bearing capacities. These two conditions were taken into consideration when an ŁPw type steel arch support was designed. High strength of the arches was obtained through using steel of improved mechanical parameters, while high load-bearing parameters were obtained through shaping elements of the support arches. The works were conducted within the framework of the targeted research project no. 6ZR8 2008 C/07012 undertaken by Huta Łabędy SA, Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy and Central Mining Institute between 2010 and 2012.

  20. Study of 2 and 3/2 harmonics in ultrashort high-intensity laser plasma interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Arora; P A Naik; J A Chakera; R A Khan; P D Gupta

    2010-12-01

    An experimental study is presented on measurements of optical spectrum of the laser light scattered from solid surface irradiated by Ti:sapphire laser pulses up to an intensity of 1.2 × 1018 W cm-2. The spectrum has well-defined peaks at wavelengths corresponding to 2 and 3/2 radiations. The spectral features vary with the laser intensity and show blue-shift with increasing laser intensity. At a constant laser fluence, the spectrum is red-shifted with increasing laser pulse duration. The observed results are explained in terms of the density scale length variation of the plasma and laser chirp.

  1. Numerical Analysis of Interaction Between Single-Pulse Laser-Induced Plasma and Bow Shock in a Supersonic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Juan; HONG Yanji; LI Qian

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of laser-induced plasma and bow shock over a blunt body is inves- tigated numerically in an M∞ =6.5 supersonic flow. A ray-tracing method is used for simulating the process of laser focusing. The gas located at the focused zone is ionized and broken down and transformed into plasma. In a supersonic flow the plasma moves downstream and begins to interact with the bow shock when it approaches the surface of the blunt body. The parameters of flowfield and blunt body surface are changed due to the interaction. By analyzing phenomena occurring in the complex unsteady flowfield during the interaction in detail, we can better under- stand the change of pressure on the blunt body surface and the mechanism of drag reduction by laser energy deposition. The results show that the bow shock is changed into an oblique shock due to the interaction of the laser-induced low-density zone with the bow shock, so the wave drag of the blunt body is reduced.

  2. Radiation from laser-microplasma-waveguide interactions in the ultra-intense regime

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    When a high-contrast ultra-relativistic laser beam enters a micro-sized plasma waveguide, the pulse energy is coupled into waveguide modes, which remarkably modifies the interaction of electrons and electromagnetic wave. The electrons that pulled out of walls form a dense helical bunch inside the channel are efficiently accelerated by the transverse magnetic modes to hundreds of MeVs. In the mean time, the asymmetry in the transverse electric and magnetic fields provides significant wiggling that leads to a bright, well-collimated emission of hard X-rays. In this paper, we present our study on the underlying physics in the aforementioned process using 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The mechanism of electron acceleration and the dependence of radiation properties on different laser plasma parameters are addressed. A theoretical analysis model and basic scalings for X-ray emission are also presented by considering the lowest optical modes in the waveguide, which is adequate to describe the basic observed phen...

  3. Front versus rear side light-ion acceleration from high-intensity laser-solid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingale, L.; Petrov, G. M.; Maksimchuk, A.; Davis, J.; Freeman, R. R.; Matsuoka, T.; Murphy, C. D.; Ovchinnikov, V. M.; Van Woerkom, L.; Krushelnick, K.

    2011-01-01

    The source of ions accelerated from high-intensity laser interactions with thin foil targets is investigated by coating a deuterated plastic layer either on the front, rear or both surfaces of thin foil targets. The originating surface of the deuterons is therefore known and this method is used to assess the relative source contributions and maximum energies using a Thomson parabola spectrometer to obtain high-resolution light-ion spectra. Under these experimental conditions, laser intensity of (0.5-2.5) × 1019 W cm-2, pulse duration of 400 fs and target thickness of 6-13 µm, deuterons originating from the front surface can gain comparable maximum energies as those from the rear surface and spectra from either side can deviate from Maxwellian. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations model the acceleration and show that any presence of a proton rich contamination layer over the surface is detrimental to the deuteron acceleration from the rear surface, whereas it is likely to be less influential on the front side acceleration mechanism.

  4. Collisional and collision-less surface heating in intense laser matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andreas; Divol, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    We explore the interaction of high-contrast intense sub-100 fs laser pulses with solid density tar- gets, using numerically converged collisional particle-in-cell simulations in one two and three dimen- sions. We observe a competition between two mechanisms that can lead to plasma heating. Inverse bremsstrahlung at solid density on one hand, and electrons scattering off plasma waves on the other, can both heat the skin layer to keV temperatures on a femtosecond time scale, facilitating a heat wave and a source of MeV electrons that penetrate and heat the bulk target. Collision-less effects heat the surface effectively starting at the relativistic intensity threshold, independent of plasma density. Our numerical results show that a high-contrast 1J/100fs laser can drive a solid target into the warm dense matter regime. This system is suitable to ab-initio modeling and experimental probing. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Applying Boundary Conditions Using a Time-Dependent Lagrangian for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Jonathan; Shadwick, B. A.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling the evolution of a short, intense laser pulse propagating through an underdense plasma is of particular interest in the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Numerical models are typically created by first discretizing the equations of motion and then imposing boundary conditions. Using the variational principle of Chen and Sudan, we spatially discretize the Lagrangian density to obtain discrete equations of motion and a discrete energy conservation law which is exactly satisfied regardless of the spatial grid resolution. Modifying the derived equations of motion (e.g., enforcing boundary conditions) generally ruins energy conservation. However, time-dependent terms can be added to the Lagrangian which force the equations of motion to have the desired boundary conditions. Although some foresight is needed to choose these time-dependent terms, this approach provides a mechanism for energy to exit the closed system while allowing the conservation law to account for the loss. An appropriate time discretization scheme is selected based on stability analysis and resolution requirements. We present results using this variational approach in a co-moving coordinate system and compare such results to those using traditional second-order methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY- 1104683.

  6. Flow Property Measurement Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Porter, Barry J.; Carballo, Julio Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species has been applied to single-point measurements of velocity and static temperature in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet. Excitation spectra of atomic oxygen and nitrogen were recorded while scanning a tunable dye laser over the absorption feature. Thirty excitation spectra were acquired during 8 arc jet runs at two facility operating conditions; the number of scans per run varied between 2 and 6. Curve fits to the spectra were analyzed to recover their Doppler shifts and widths, from which the flow velocities and static temperatures, respectively, were determined. An increase in the number of independent flow property pairs from each as-measured scan was obtained by extracting multiple lower-resolution scans. The larger population sample size enabled the mean property values and their uncertainties for each run to be characterized with greater confidence. The average plus or minus 2 sigma uncertainties in the mean velocities and temperatures for all 8 runs were plus or minus 1.4% and plus or minus 11%, respectively.

  7. Longitudinal Ion Acceleration from High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Underdense Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Willingale, L; Nilson, P M; Clarke, R J; Dangor, A E; Kaluza, M C; Karsch, S; Lancaster, K L; Mori, W B; Schreiber, J; Thomas, A G R; Wei, M S; Krushelnick, K; Najmudin, Z

    2007-01-01

    Longitudinal ion acceleration from high-intensity (I ~ 10^20 Wcm^-2) laser interactions with helium gas jet targets (n_e ~ 0.04 n_c) have been observed. The ion beam has a maximum energy for He^2+ of approximately 40 MeV and was directional along the laser propagation path, with the highest energy ions being collimated to a cone of less than 10 degrees. 2D particle-in-cell simulations have been used to investigate the acceleration mechanism. The time varying magnetic field associated with the fast electron current provides a contribution to the accelerating electric field as well as providing a collimating field for the ions. A strong correlation between the plasma density and the ion acceleration was found. A short plasma scale-length at the vacuum interface was observed to be beneficial for the maximum ion energies, but the collimation appears to be improved with longer scale-lengths due to enhanced magnetic fields in the ramp acceleration region.

  8. The development of laser-plasma interaction program LAP3D on thousands of processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Hu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Modeling laser-plasma interaction (LPI processes in real-size experiments scale is recognized as a challenging task. For explorering the influence of various instabilities in LPI processes, a three-dimensional laser and plasma code (LAP3D has been developed, which includes filamentation, stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBS, stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS, non-local heat transport and plasmas flow computation modules. In this program, a second-order upwind scheme is applied to solve the plasma equations which are represented by an Euler fluid model. Operator splitting method is used for solving the equations of the light wave propagation, where the Fast Fourier translation (FFT is applied to compute the diffraction operator and the coordinate translations is used to solve the acoustic wave equation. The coupled terms of the different physics processes are computed by the second-order interpolations algorithm. In order to simulate the LPI processes in massively parallel computers well, several parallel techniques are used, such as the coupled parallel algorithm of FFT and fluid numerical computation, the load balance algorithm, and the data transfer algorithm. Now the phenomena of filamentation, SBS and SRS have been studied in low-density plasma successfully with LAP3D. Scalability of the program is demonstrated with a parallel efficiency above 50% on about ten thousand of processors.

  9. Hot dense matter creation in short-pulse laser interaction with tamped foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S; Pasley, J; Beg, F; Gregori, G; Evans, R G; Notley, M; Mackinnon, A; Glenzer, S; Hansen, S; King, J; Chung, H; Wilks, S; Stephens, R; Freeman, R; Weber, R; Saiz, E G; Khattak, F; Riley, D

    2006-08-15

    The possibility of producing hot dense matter has important applications for the understanding of transport processes in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) [1] and laboratory astrophysics experiments [2]. While the success of ICF requires the correct solution of a complex interaction between laser coupling, equation-of-state, and particle transport problems, the possibility of experimentally recreating conditions found during the ignition phase in a simplified geometry is extremely appealing. In this paper we will show that hot dense plasma conditions found during ICF ignition experiments can be reproduced by illuminating a tamped foil with a high intensity laser. We will show that temperatures on the order of kiloelectronvolts at solid densities can be achieved under controlled conditions during the experiment. Hydrodynamic tamping by surface coatings allows to reach higher density regimes by enabling the diagnosis of matter that has not yet begun to decompress, thus opening the possibility of directly investigating strongly coupled systems [3]. Our experimental diagnostics is based on K-shell spectroscopy coupled to x-ray imaging techniques. Such techniques have recently become prevalent in the diagnosis of hot dense matter [4]. By looking at the presence, and relative strengths, of lines associated with different ionization states, spectroscopy provides considerable insight into plasma conditions. At the same time, curved crystal imaging techniques allow for the spatial resolution of different regions of the target, both allowing for comparison of heating processes with the results of Particle-In-Cell (PIC) and hybrid simulation codes.

  10. X ray emission: a tool and a probe for laser - clusters interaction; L'emission X: un outil et une sonde pour l'interaction laser - agregats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prigent, Ch

    2004-12-01

    In intense laser-cluster interaction, the experimental results show a strong energetic coupling between radiation and matter. We have measured absolute X-ray yields and charge state distributions under well control conditions as a function of physical parameters governing the interaction; namely laser intensity, pulse duration, wavelength or polarization state of the laser light, the size and the species of the clusters (Ar, Kr, Xe). We have highlighted, for the first time, an intensity threshold in the X-ray production very low ({approx} 2.10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} for a pulse duration of 300 fs) which can results from an effect of the dynamical polarisation of clusters in an intense electric field. A weak dependence with the wavelength (400 nm / 800 nm) on the absolute X-ray yields has been found. Moreover, we have observed a saturation of the X-ray emission probability below a critical cluster size. (author)

  11. Experimental investigation of picosecond dynamics following interactions between laser accelerated protons and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senje, L.; Coughlan, M.; Jung, D.; Taylor, M.; Nersisyan, G.; Riley, D.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Lundh, O.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Zepf, M.; Dromey, B.

    2017-03-01

    We report direct experimental measurements with picosecond time resolution of how high energy protons interact with water at extreme dose levels (kGy), delivered in a single pulse with the duration of less than 80 ps. The unique synchronisation possibilities of laser accelerated protons with an optical probe pulse were utilized to investigate the energy deposition of fast protons in water on a time scale down to only a few picoseconds. This was measured using absorbance changes in the water, induced by a population of solvated electrons created in the tracks of the high energy protons. Our results indicate that for sufficiently high doses delivered in short pulses, intertrack effects will affect the yield of solvated electrons. The experimental scheme allows for investigation of the ultrafast mechanisms occurring in proton water radiolysis, an area of physics especially important due to its relevance in biology and for proton therapy.

  12. Vector rectangular-shape laser based on reduced graphene oxide interacting with long fiber taper

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Lei; Zeng, Jing; Huang, Wei; Liu, Min

    2014-01-01

    A vector dual-wavelength rectangular-shape laser (RSL) based on a long fiber taper deposited with reduced graphene oxide is proposed, where the nonlinearity is enhanced due to large evanescent-field-interacting length and strong field confinement of a 8 mm fiber taper with a waist diameter of 4 micronmeters. Graphene flakes are deposited uniformly on the taper waist with light pressure effect, so this structure guarantees both excellent saturable absorption and high nonlinearity. The RSL with a repetition rate of 7.9 MHz exhibits fast polarization switching in two orthogonal polarization directions, and the temporal and spectral characteristics are investigated. The results suggest that the long taper-based graphene structure is an efficient choice for nonlinear devices.

  13. Study of heat sources interacting in integrated circuits by laser mirage effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perpiñà, X.; Jordà, X.; Vellvehi, M. [Centre Nacional de Microelectrònica IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Altet, J. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electrònica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)

    2014-08-25

    This work exploits the mirage effect to analyze multiple heat sources thermally interacting in an integrated circuit (IC) by means of a probe IR laser beam, which strikes on the die lateral walls and passes through the die substrate. Under such conditions, the criteria for locating such hot spots, as well as their relative power dissipation, are discussed on the basis of a theoretical model inferred in this work. Finally, the technique feasibility is shown in a real application scenario, obtaining 5-μm spatial lateral resolution and an error in power dissipation measurements below 5%. This method may become a practical alternative to usual off-chip techniques for inspecting hot spots in ICs and to experimentally characterize heat flow in the semiconductor substrate.

  14. Fast gated imaging of the collisionless interaction of a laser-produced and magnetized ambient plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, P. V.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Knall, E. N.; Constantin, C. G.; Hofer, L. R.; Vincena, S.; Tripathi, S.; Niemann, C.

    2017-03-01

    The collisionless interaction between a laser-produced carbon plasma (LPP) and an ambient hydrogen plasma in a background magnetic field was studied in a high shot rate experiment which allowed large planar data sets to be collected. Plasma fluorescence was imaged with a fast-gated camera with and without carbon line filters. The resulting images were compared to high-resolution two dimensional (2D) data planes of measured magnetic field and electric potential. Several features in the fluorescence images coincide with features in the field data. Relative intensity was used to determine the initial angular velocity distribution of the LPP and the growth rate of instabilities. These observations may be applied to understand fluorescence images from similar experiments where 2D planes of field data are not available.

  15. Maximizing the Performance of Laser Cut Panel by Interaction of Ceiling Geometries and Different Aspect Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Freewan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between different ceiling geometries with laser cut panels (LCPs is investigated using real experiments and computer simulations to maximize the daylight performance of the LCP. In addition, LCP with different aspect ratios (width to depth ratio is studied using simulation with clear sky conditions in hot climate region. Two main performance parameters are investigated: illuminance level and distribution uniformity in a large space located in a sub-tropical climate region like Jordan. It was found that curved and chamfered ceilings increased the daylight level in the rear part of the studied room by 20% compared to a horizontal flat ceiling and reduce it by 30% in front part that improve the quality of daylight by improving the uniformity. LCP with high aspect ratio of 5:6 performed well in climate with clear sky and high solar angles than LCP with ratio of 4:6.

  16. Classical Dynamics of Harmonic Generation of the Hydrogen Molecular Ion Interacting with Ultrashort Intense Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao-Hong; DUAN Yi-Wu; Wing-Ki Liu; Jian-Min Yuan

    2001-01-01

    Within Born-Oppenheimer approximation, by using the classical trajectory theory, a description for the high order harmonic generation of the hydrogen molecular ion interacting with ultrashort laser pulses has been pre sented. The Coulomb singularities have been remedied by the regularization. The action-angle variables have been used to generate the initial inversion symmetry microcanonical distribution. Within a proper intensity range, a harmonic plateau with only odd harmonics appears. For a larger intensity, because of the existence of chaos, the harmonic spectra become noisier. For a large enough intensity, the ionization takes place and the harmonics disappear. So the chaos causes the noises, the ionization suppresses the harmonic generation, and the onset of the ionization follows the onset of chaos.

  17. Laser-plasma interactions with a Fourier-Bessel Particle-in-Cell method

    CERN Document Server

    Andriyash, Igor A; Lifschitz, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    A new spectral particle-in-cell (PIC) method for plasma modeling is presented and discussed. In the proposed scheme, the Fourier-Bessel transform is used to translate the Maxwell equations to the quasi-cylindrical spectral domain. In this domain, the equations are solved analytically in time, and the spatial derivatives are approximated with high accuracy. In contrast to the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) methods that are commonly used in PIC, the developed method does not produce numerical dispersion, and does not involve grid staggering for the electric and magnetic fields. These features are especially valuable in modeling the wakefield acceleration of particles in plasmas. The proposed algorithm is implemented in the code PLARES-PIC, and the test simulations of laser plasma interactions are compared to the ones done with the quasi-cylindrical FDTD PIC code CALDER-CIRC.

  18. Time-resolved studies of the interactions between pulsed lasers and aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Cindy L; Qian, Jun; Miller, Roger E

    2002-09-20

    Studies of the interaction between a pulsed CO2 laser and micrometer-sized aqueous and organic particles by use of light-scattering methods and step-scan Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy are reported. Visible two-color extinction experiments indicate primary particle shattering, accompanied by a high fraction of vaporization, followed by secondary particle evaporation. The extent of the latter depends on the pulse intensity and particle composition. Angle-resolved light-scattering investigations provide insight into the aerosol size distribution and temperature following the pulsed heating event. The time dependence of the vapor plume, monitored with step-scan FTIR spectroscopy, confirms that a large fraction of the initial particle is quickly evaporated during the shattering event, followed by secondary fragment evaporation and thermal expansion.

  19. The computer simulation of laser proton acceleration for hadron therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykov, Vladimir; Baydin, Grigory

    2008-11-01

    The ions acceleration by intensive ultra-short laser pulses has interest in views of them possible applications for proton radiography, production of medical isotopes and hadron therapy. The 3D relativistic PIC-code LegoLPI is developed at RFNC-VNIITF for modeling of intensive laser interaction with plasma. The LegoLPI-code simulations were carried out to find the optimal conditions for generation of proton beams with parameters necessary for hadrons therapy. The performed simulations show that optimal for it may be two-layer foil of aluminum and polyethylene with thickness 100 nm and 50 nm accordingly. The maximum efficiency of laser energy transformation into 200 MeV protons is achieved on irradiating these foils by 30 fs laser pulse with intensity about 2.10^22 W/cm^2. The conclusion is made that lasers with peak power about 0.5-1PW and average power 0.5-1 kW are needed for generation of proton beams with parameters necessary for proton therapy.

  20. Methylation at the PW71 locus on chromosome 15 in DNA derived from CVS and from amniocytes; implications for the use of the PW71 probe in prenatal diagnosis of the Prader-Willi and Angleman syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telleria, P.; Yu, C.C.; Brown, S. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The probe PW71 spans a HpaII site in the Prader-Willi/Angleman Syndrome critical region on chromosome 15. A single Southern blot with this probe can be used to detect deletion and uniparental disomy. We attempted to determine the methylation state of the PW71 locus in DNA derived from prenatal sources. Southern blots of HindIII and HindIII/HpaII double digests of DNA from cultured amniocytes and CVS specimens were prepared and probed with the PW71 probe. The results from 6 cultured CVS specimens indicate that several HPAII sites recognized by the PW71 probe are not methylated in trophoblast. Four amniotic fluid cultures gave results which were not different from lymphocyte-derived DNA; however, in several cases, amniotic fluid cultures resulted in Southern blots identical to those from CVS. Since we did not have verified prenatal cases of chromosome 15 uniparental disomy, we were unable to determine whether the parent-of-origin specific methylation present in lymphocyte DNA is also present in amniocyte DNA. We conclude that prenatal determination of chromosome 15 uniparental disomy with this probe will be unreliable.

  1. Effect of radiation damping on the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with an overdense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Koga, James; Sasaki, Akira; Ueshima, Yutaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    The effect of radiation damping on the interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with an overdense plasma is studied via relativistic particle-in-cell simulation. The calculation is performed for a Cu solid slab including ionization. We find a strong effect from radiation damping on the electron energy cut-off at about 150 MeV and on the absorption of a laser pulse with an intensity I=5x10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} and duration of 20 fs. Hot electrons reradiate more then 10% of the laser energy during the laser pulse. With the laser intensity, the energy loss due to the radiation damping increases as I{sup 3}. In addition, we observe that the laser pulse may not propagate in the plasma even if {omega}{sub pl}{sup 2}/{omega}{sup 2}{gamma}<1. The increase of skin depth with the laser intensity due to relativistic effects gives rise to the absorption efficiency. (author)

  2. Thermal Investigation of Interaction between High-power CW-laser Radiation and a Water-jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, Christian; Janssen, Henning; Eckert, Markus; Schmidt, Florian

    The technology of a water guided laser beam has been industrially established for micro machining. Pulsed laser radiation is guided via a water jet (diameter: 25-250 μm) using total internal reflection. Due to the cylindrical jet shape the depth of field increases to above 50 mm, enabling parallel kerfs compared to conventional laser systems. However higher material thicknesses and macro geometries cannot be machined economically viable due to low average laser powers. Fraunhofer IPT has successfully combined a high-power continuous-wave (CW) fiber laser (6 kW) and water jet technology. The main challenge of guiding high-power laser radiation in water is the energy transferred to the jet by absorption, decreasing its stability. A model of laser water interaction in the water jet has been developed and validated experimentally. Based on the results an upscaling of system technology to 30 kW is discussed, enabling a high potential in cutting challenging materials at high qualities and high speeds.

  3. Simulation study of radiation enhancement through an interaction between periodically aligned carbon nanotubes and an intense laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Toshihiro; Inoue, Masahiko; Antonsen, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Interaction between ultra-intense laser and solid material has a lot of applications. One is an emission of electromagnetic wave in a wide range of wavelength, which is from THz to X-ray. In order to select the wavelength, one of interesting target materials is single-walled carbon nanotube. Huge number of carbon nanotubes can be grown vertically on a substrate and they can be aligned periodically on the substrate. Once an ultra-intense laser is irradiated on the nanotubes, the strong electric field of the laser forcedly oscillates electrons in each nanotube and they irradiate electromagnetic wave. Waves emitted from periodically aligned nanotubes are expected to interfere each other, and then the amplitude of the output radiation is to be enhanced. In order to analyze such radiation processes from the laser-matter interaction, we have been developing an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code including collisional and ionization processes. We will present recent results about an interaction between strong laser and carbon nanotubes analyzed by the PIC code. In the presentation, we will show the radiation spectrum and its enhancement due to the periodic structure.

  4. [Lasers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploiting multi-scale parallelism for large scale numerical modelling of laser wakefield accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, Ricardo A; Fiúza, Frederico; Davidson, Asher; Tsung, Frank S; Mori, Warren B; Silva, Luís O

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of laser wakefield accelerators, supported by the extreme accelerating fields generated in the interaction of PW-Class lasers and underdense targets, promises the production of high quality electron beams in short distances for multiple applications. Achieving this goal will rely heavily on numerical modeling for further understanding of the underlying physics and identification of optimal regimes, but large scale modeling of these scenarios is computationally heavy and requires efficient use of state-of-the-art Petascale supercomputing systems. We discuss the main difficulties involved in running these simulations and the new developments implemented in the OSIRIS framework to address these issues, ranging from multi-dimensional dynamic load balancing and hybrid distributed / shared memory parallelism to the vectorization of the PIC algorithm. We present the results of the OASCR Joule Metric program on the issue of large scale modeling of LWFA, demonstrating speedups of over 1 order of magni...

  7. Interactive Game for Teaching Laser Amplification Used at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, E

    2009-08-06

    The purpose of this project was to create an interactive game to expose high school students to concepts in laser amplification by demonstrating the National Ignition Facility's main amplifier at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. To succeed, the game had to be able to communicate effectively the basic concepts of laser amplification as accurately as possible and to be capable of exposing as many students as possible. Since concepts need to be communicated in a way that students understand, the Science Content Standards for California Public Schools were used to make assumptions about high school students knowledge of light. Effectively communicating a new concept necessitates the omission on terminology and symbolism. Therefore, creating a powerful experience was ideal for communicating this material. Various methods of reinforcing this experience ranging from color choice to abstractions kept the student focused on the game to maximize concept retention. The program was created in Java to allow the creation of a Java Applet that can be embedded onto a webpage, which is a perfect medium for mass exposure. Because a game requires interaction, the game animations had to be easily manipulated to enable the program to respond to user input. Image sprites, as opposed to image folders, were used in these animations to minimize the number of Hypertext Transfer Protocol connections, and thus, significantly reduce the transfer time of necessary animation files. These image sprites were loaded and cropped into a list of animation frames. Since the caching of large transition animations caused the Java Virtual Machine to run out of memory, large animations were implemented as animated Graphics Interchange Format images since transitions require no interaction, and thus, no frame manipulation was needed. This reduced the animation's memory footprint. The first version of this game was completed during this project. Future work for the project could include the

  8. Multiple One-Dimensional Search (MODS) algorithm for fast optimization of laser-matter interaction by phase-only fs-laser pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan-Sosa, M.; Portilla, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Moreno, L.; Solis, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we have developed and implemented a powerful search strategy for optimization of nonlinear optical effects by means of femtosecond pulse shaping, based on topological concepts derived from quantum control theory. Our algorithm [Multiple One-Dimensional Search (MODS)] is based on deterministic optimization of a single solution rather than pseudo-random optimization of entire populations as done by commonly used evolutionary algorithms. We have tested MODS against a genetic algorithm in a nontrivial problem consisting in optimizing the Kerr gating signal (self-interaction) of a shaped laser pulse in a detuned Michelson interferometer configuration. The obtained results show that our search method (MODS) strongly outperforms the genetic algorithm in terms of both convergence speed and quality of the solution. These findings demonstrate the applicability of concepts of quantum control theory to nonlinear laser-matter interaction problems, even in the presence of significant experimental noise.

  9. Research on quasi-cw and pulse interaction of strong laser radiation with the military technical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycyk, Antoni; CzyŻ, Krzysztof; Sarzyński, Antoni; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Ostrowski, Roman; Strzelec, Marek; Jach, Karol; Świerczyński, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The paper describes work connected to the investigation of the interaction of strong laser radiation with selected metals, constituting typical materials applied in military technology, like aluminum, copper, brass and titanium. A special laser experimental stand was designed and constructed to achieve this objective. The system consisted of two Nd:YAG lasers working in the regime of free generation (quasi-cw) and another Nd:YAG laser, generating short pre-pulses in the Qswitching regime. During the concurrent operation of both quasi-cw systems it was possible to obtain pulse energies amounting to 10 J in a time period (pulses) of 1 ms. The synchronized, serial operation resulted in energy amounting to 5 J over a time period (pulse) of 2 ms. Variations of the target's surface reflection coefficient, caused by the interaction of short pre-pulses with high power density were determined. The experiments were performed using a standard Nd:YAG laser with amplifiers, generating output pulses whose duration amounted to 10 ns and energy to 1 J, with near Gaussian profile. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze the emission spectra of targets under the conditions of the interaction of destructive strong and weak as well as long and short excitation laser pulses. A decay of the spectra in the UV range from 200 to around 350 nm was observed when irradiating the target with a long, quasi-cw destructive pulse. Moreover, in the case of an Al target, some AlO molecular spectra appeared, suggesting a chemical reaction of the aluminum atoms with oxygen.

  10. Hot Electron Diagnostic in a Solid Laser Target by Buried K-Shell Fluorer Technique from Ultra-Intense (3x1020W/cm2,< 500 J) Laser-Plasma Interactions on the Petawatt Laser at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuike, K.; Key, M.H.; Hatchett, S.P.; Snavely, R.A.

    2000-06-29

    Characterization of hot electron production (a conversion efficiency from laser energy into electrons) in ultra intense laser-solid target interaction, using 1.06 {micro}m laser light with an intensity of up to 3 x 10{sup 20}W cm{sup -2} and an on target laser energy of {le}500 J, has been done by observing K{sub {beta}} as well as K{sub {alpha}} emissions from a buried Mo layer in the targets, which are same structure as in the previous 100 TW experiments but done under less laser intensity and energy conditions ({le} 4 x 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2} and {le} 30 J). The conversion efficiency from the laser energy into the energy, carried by hot electrons, has been estimated to be {approx}50%, which are little bit higher than the previous less laser energy ({approx} 20 J) experiments, yet the x-ray emission spectra from the target has change drastically, i.e., gamma flash.

  11. Pattern analysis of laser-tattoo interactions for picosecond- and nanosecond-domain 1,064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers in tissue-mimicking phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Keun Jae; Zheng, Zhenlong; Kwon, Tae Rin; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Hye Sun; Cho, Sung Bin

    2017-05-08

    During laser treatment for tattoo removal, pigment chromophores absorb laser energy, resulting in fragmentation of the ink particles via selective photothermolysis. The present study aimed to outline macroscopic laser-tattoo interactions in tissue-mimicking (TM) phantoms treated with picosecond- and nanosecond-domain lasers. Additionally, high-speed cinematographs were captured to visualize time-dependent tattoo-tissue interactions, from laser irradiation to the formation of photothermal and photoacoustic injury zones (PIZs). In all experimental settings using the nanosecond or picosecond laser, tattoo pigments fragmented into coarse particles after a single laser pulse, and further disintegrated into smaller particles that dispersed toward the boundaries of PIZs after repetitive delivery of laser energy. Particles fractured by picosecond treatment were more evenly dispersed throughout PIZs than those fractured by nanosecond treatment. Additionally, picosecond-then-picosecond laser treatment (5-pass-picosecond treatment + 5-pass-picosecond treatment) induced greater disintegration of tattoo particles within PIZs than picosecond-then-nanosecond laser treatment (5-pass-picosecond treatment + 5-pass-nanosecond treatment). High-speed cinematography recorded the formation of PIZs after repeated reflection and propagation of acoustic waves over hundreds of microseconds to a few milliseconds. The present data may be of use in predicting three-dimensional laser-tattoo interactions and associated reactions in surrounding tissue.

  12. Photocatalytic degradation of imidacloprid by composite catalystsH3PW12O40/La-TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Changgen; XU Gang; LIU Xia

    2013-01-01

    A series of La-doped TiO2 with different mass fractions were prepared by sol-gel method.Composite catalysts H3PW12O40/La-TiO2 with different loading levels were synthesized using impregnation method.The prepared samples were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR),X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis.The Keggin structure of H3PW12O40 (HPW) remained intact on the surface of the composites,they had relatively uniform spherical grains of diameter less than 20 nm.The visible light activity of prepared composites were improved by loading HPW and doping La.The prepared composites were used as photocatalysts in degradation of pesticide imidacloprid.Results revealed that 20%H3PW12O40/0.3%La-TiO2 possessed the best photocatalytic activity.Thus,the degradation conversion of imidacloprid reached 98.17% after 60 min irradiation when 20%H3PW12O40/0.3%La-TiO2 was used as catalysts.The degradation of imidacloprid corresponded with first-order kinetic reaction,and the half life of the degradation of imidacloprid was 9.35 min in the optimal conditions.

  13. [Hmim]3PW12O40: A high-efficient and green catalyst for the acetalization of carbonyl compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan; Lü

    2010-01-01

    [Hmim]3PW12O40 was developed and used in the acetalization of carbonyl compounds in excellent yields. The ionic liquid-heteropoly acid hybrid compound and reaction medium formed temperature-dependent phase-separation system with the ease of product as well as catalyst separation. The catalyst was recycled more than 10 times without any apparent loss of catalytic activity.

  14. On the relative distance of Magellanic Clouds using Cepheid NlR and Optical-NIR PW relations

    CERN Document Server

    Inno, L; Matsunaga, N; Romaniello, M; Primas, F; Buonanno, R; Caputo, F; Genovali, K; Laney, C D; Marconi, M; Pietrinferni, A

    2013-01-01

    We present new estimates of the relative distance of the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) by using NIR and Optical-NIR Cepheid Period Wesenheit (PW) relations. The relative distances are independent of uncertainties affecting the zero-point of the PW relations, but do depend on the adopted pivot periods. We estimated the pivot periods for fundamental (FU) and first overtone (FO) Cepheids on the basis of their period distributions. We found that log P=0.5 (FU) and log P=0.3 (FO) are solid choices, since they trace a main peak and a shoulder in LMC and SMC period distributions. By using the above pivot periods and ten PW relations, we found MC relative distances of 0.53$\\pm$0.06 (FU) and 0.53$\\pm$0.07 (FO) mag. Moreover, we investigated the possibility to use mixed-mode (FU/FO, FO/SO) Cepheids as distance indicators and we found that they follow quite well the PW relations defined by single mode MC Cepheids, with deviations typically smaller than 0.3{\\sigma}.

  15. A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Interactive Laser Disc and Classroom Video Tape for Safety Instruction of General Motors Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, James; Wagner, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Describes evaluation that assessed the effectiveness of the Interactive Laser Disc System (ILDS) Training Program in comparison with classroom instruction with videotape for training of General Motors workers. Topics discussed include achievement test, attitude scales, opinion surveys, user preference questionnaires, interviews, and variables that…

  16. Dynamical and Geometric Phases of a Two Energy-Level Bose-Einstein Condensate Interacting with a Laser Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhao-Xian; JIAO Zhi-Yong; JIN Shuo; WANG Ji-Suo

    2007-01-01

    By using of the invariant theory, we study a two energy-level Bose-Einstein condensate interacting with a timedependent laser field, the dynamical and geometric phases are given respectively. The Aharonov-Anandan phase is also obtained under the cyclical evolution.

  17. Bounds for a domain containing all compact invariant sets of the system describing the laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, Konstantin E. [CITEDI-IPN, Avenue del Parque 1310, Mesa de Otay, Tijuana, BC (Mexico)], E-mail: konst@citedi.mx

    2009-02-28

    In this paper we consider the localization problem of compact invariant sets of the system describing the laser-plasma interaction. We establish that this system has an ellipsoidal localization for simple restrictions imposed on its parameters. Then we improve this localization by applying other localizing functions. In addition, we give sufficient conditions under which the origin is the unique compact invariant set.

  18. Laser-tissue interaction of a continuous-wave 2-μm, 3-μm cascade oscillation fiber laser: sharp incision with controlled coagulation layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Tsunenori; Sumiyoshi, Tetsumi; Naruse, Kyota; Ishihara, Miya; Sato, Shunichi; Kikuchi, Makoto; Kasamatsu, Tadashi; Sekita, Hitoshi; Obara, Minoru

    2000-06-01

    We studied coagulation layer controlled incision with newly developed continuous wave 2 micrometer, 3 micrometer cascade oscillation fiber laser in vitro. Since this laser device simultaneously oscillates 2 micrometer and 3 micrometer radiation, we could change tissue interaction by arranging power ratio of 2 micrometer to 3 micrometer radiation. About one watt of total irradiation power with various power ratios was focused to extracted fresh porcine myocardium or anesthetized rabbit on an automatic moving stage to obtain line incision. Macro photograph and microscopic histology were used to observe tissue interaction phenomenon. The incised specimen showed that precise cutting groove with thin coagulation layer was attained by a 3 micrometer based radiation, meanwhile addition of 2 micrometer radiation to 3 micrometer radiation made coagulation layer thicker. A heat conduction simulator using finite-element method was used to qualitatively explain obtained coagulation layer thickness. This precise incision with controllable side coagulation layer may effective to control bleeding during incision, for instance, for skin, liver, and kidney incisions. Pure continuous wave radiation of 2 micrometer and 3 micrometer may eliminate stress wave induced tissue damage which is frequently found in Ho:YAG and/or Er:YAG tissue interactions. Moreover, sapphire fiber might offer flexible power delivery to this new laser to establish endoscopic application and/or to improved beam handling.

  19. Interactions between soluble dietary fibers and wheat gluten in dough studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Liu, Rui; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Min

    2017-05-01

    Four soluble dietary fiber (SDF) fractions characterized by major components of AXs, relatively narrow molecular weight distribution, different substituted ratio, and structure-sensitive parameter (ρ) were prepared from wheat bran. The fractions were added to wheat dough to determine the interactions between the dough's network and the SDF fractions relative to their physicochemical characteristics. Furthermore, a comprehensive study focusing on the dough texture characteristic, tensile properties, thermodynamic stability, and the microstructure was conducted by performing texture profile analysis (TPA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments. Additionally, an estimation function of the interactions parameters between the dough's network and the SDF fractions related to the factor molecular weight and ρ of the SDFs was established. The results indicated that the SDF fractions exhibiting a medium molecular weight, and a higher substitution degree and di-substituted ratio, were the most suitable fortifier providing benefits to the dough's qualities. Furthermore, the research methodology might support the high potential of SDF fractions as fortifier for flour-based products. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Radiation from high-intensity ultrashort-laser-pulse and gas-jet magnetized plasma interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorranian, Davoud; Starodubtsev, Mikhail; Kawakami, Hiromichi; Ito, Hiroaki; Yugami, Noboru; Nishida, Yasushi

    2003-08-01

    Using a gas-jet flow, via the interaction between an ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse and plasma in the presence of a perpendicular external dc magnetic field, the short pulse radiation from a magnetized plasma wakefield has been observed. Different nozzles are used in order to generate different densities and gas profiles. The neutral density of the gas-jet flow measured with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer is found to be proportional to back pressure of the gas jet in the range of 1 to 8 atm. Strength of the applied dc magnetic field varies from 0 to 8 kG at the interaction region. The frequency of the emitted radiation with the pulse width of 200 ps (detection limit) is in the millimeter wave range. Polarization and spatial distributions of the experimental data are measured to be in good agreement with the theory based on the V(p)xB radiation scheme, where V(p) is the phase velocity of the electron plasma wave and B is the steady magnetic field intensity. Characteristics of the radiation are extensively studied as a function of plasma density and magnetic field strength. These experiments should contribute to the development of a new kind of millimeter wavelength radiation source that is tunable in frequency, pulse duration, and intensity.

  1. MeV electrons accelerated backward along laser axis from low energy, high intensity laser-water interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feister, Scott; Morrison, John T; Frische, Kyle D; Orban, Chris; Ngirmang, Gregory; Handler, Abraham; Schillaci, Mark; Chowdhury, Enam A; Freeman, R R; Roquemore, W M

    2015-01-01

    Direct electron spectrum measurements show MeV energy electrons generated backward along the laser axis by a $\\lambda =$ 780 nm, 40 fs, 2.9 mJ short-pulse laser ($1.5 \\cdot 10^{18}$ W/cm$^2$). Electrons pass through a 3 mm hole in the center of the final off-axis paraboloid (OAP) and are characterized by a magnetic spectrometer. The charge collected at the OAP is hundreds of pC per pulse. A mechanism for this super-ponderomotive backward electron acceleration is discussed in the framework of 3D Particle-in-cell simulations.

  2. Nonstationary plasma-thermo-fluid dynamics and transition in processes of deep penetration laser beam-matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Vladimir S.; Banishev, Alexander F.; Azharonok, V. V.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.

    1994-09-01

    A qualitative analysis of the role of some hydrodynamic flows and instabilities by the process of laser beam-metal sample deep penetration interaction is presented. The forces of vapor pressure, melt surface tension and thermocapillary forces can determined a number of oscillatory and nonstationary phenomena in keyhole and weld pool. Dynamics of keyhole formation in metal plates has been studied under laser beam pulse effect ((lambda) equals 1.06 micrometers ). Velocities of the keyhole bottom motion have been determined at 0.5 X 105 - 106 W/cm2 laser power densities. Oscillatory regime of plate break- down has been found out. Small-dimensional structures with d-(lambda) period was found on the frozen cavity walls, which, in our opinion, can contribute significantly to laser beam absorption. A new form of periodic structure on the frozen pattern being a helix-shaped modulation of the keyhole walls and bottom relief has been revealed. Temperature oscillations related to capillary oscillations in the melt layer were discovered in the cavity. Interaction of the CW CO2 laser beam and the matter by beam penetration into a moving metal sample has been studied. The pulsed and thermodynamic parameters of the surface plasma were investigated by optical and spectroscopic methods. The frequencies of plasma jets pulsations (in 10 - 105 Hz range) are related to possible melt surface instabilities of the keyhole.

  3. 青杄 PwRbcS 基因克隆及对逆境响应分析%Cloning and Stress Response Analysis of PwRbcS in Picea wilsonii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠丹; 胡安妮; 张杰; 张凌云

    2016-01-01

    RbcS 基因编码了植物光合作用中核酮糖1,5二磷酸羧化酶/加氧酶的亚基,这种酶能催化二氧化碳的固定和碳氧化两者之间竞争反应。本实验中通过 RACE-PCR 方法成功获得了青杄 RbcS 的 cDNA 全长,对 PwRbcS 的 cDNA 序列进行了生物信息学分析预测,同时利用实时定量 PCR 技术测定青杄各个组织及非生物胁迫下 PwRbcS 的表达水平。结果表明:PwRbcS 基因cDNA 全长936 bp,编码区共552 bp,共编码186个氨基酸。蛋白质分子量为20.7126 kD,等电点为9.07。组织特异性表达结果发现 PwRbcS 该基因主要在叶片中表达,且成熟叶表达量最高。非生物胁迫实验结果表明,ABA 和 NaCl 以及低温处理处理下响应十分明显。在 NaCl 处理下,表达量先上升后下降,处理6 h 时达到对照的14倍,施加 ABA 时,在处理8 h 时上升至对照的24倍,低温胁迫下,表达量先上升后下降,6 h 达到对照的12倍,而高温胁迫及 PEG(polyethylene glycol)下表达量变化不明显。因此PwRbcS 作为一个在木本植物青杄中发现的新的 RbcS 基因,可能在青杄逆境响应中行使一定的功能。%RbcS gene encodes a subunit of nuclear plant photosynthesis 1,5 two ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase / oxygenase. In this study,PwRbcS cDNA was obtained using RACE -PCR method. Bioinformatics analysis and real-time PCR technique were used to determine the relative expression of PwRbcS. The results showed that the full-length of PwRbcS cDNA was 936 bp,including the ORF of 552 bp encoding 186 amino acids. The theoretical molecular weight of PwRbcS is 20.712 6 kD and the pI value was 9.07. RT-qPCR showed that PwRbcS is mainly expressed in the needles,especially in mature needles. The expression of PwRbcS changed obviously under the treatment of NaCl,ABA and low temperature,respectively. After NaCl treatment,the expression level of PwRbcS changed significantly,reaching to 14 times

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER AND OTHER LASER APPLICATIONS: Changes in the emission properties of metal targets during pulse-periodic laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konov, Vitalii I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1988-02-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser to discover the laws governing the correlation of the modified microrelief of metal surfaces, subjected to the action of multiple laser pulses, with the emission of charged particles and the luminescence of the irradiated zone. It was established that the influence of sorption and laser-induced desorption on the emission signals may be manifested differently depending on the regime of current generation in the "target-vacuum chamber" circuit.

  5. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Thresholds of surface plasma formation by the interaction of laser pulses with a metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1995-04-01

    An analysis is made of a model of the formation of a surface laser plasma which takes account of the heating and vaporisation of thermally insulated surface microdefects. This model is used in an interpretation of experiments in which such a plasma has been formed by irradiation of a titanium target with microsecond CO2 laser pulses. A comparison with the experimental breakdown intensities is used to calculate the average sizes of microdefects and their concentration: the results are in agreement with the published data. The dependence of the delay time of plasma formation on the total energy in a laser pulse is calculated.

  6. Passively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser using evanescent field interaction with gold-nanosphere based saturable absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dengfeng; Mou, Chengbo; Bai, Xuekun; Wang, Shaofei; Chen, Na; Zeng, Xianglong

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate an all-fiber passively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) using a gold-nanosphere (GNS) based saturable absorber (SA) with evanescent field interaction. Using the interaction of evanescent field for fabricating SAs, long nonlinear interaction length of evanescent wave and GNSs can be achieved. The GNSs are synthesized from mixing solution of chloroauricacid (HAuCl4) and sodium citrate by the heating effects of the microfiber's evanescent field radiation. The proposed passively Q-switched EDFL could give output pulses at 1562 nm with pulse width of 1.78 μs, a repetition rate of 58.1 kHz, a pulse energy of 133 nJ and a output power of 7.7 mW when pumped by a 980 nm laser diode of 237 mW.

  7. Simulations of the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with dense Z-pinch plasmas : final report LDRD 39670.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Dale Robert (Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); MacFarlane, Joseph John (Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, WI); Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Campbell, Robert B.

    2004-11-01

    We have studied the feasibility of using the 3D fully electromagnetic implicit hybrid particle code LSP (Large Scale Plasma) to study laser plasma interactions with dense, compressed plasmas like those created with Z, and which might be created with the planned ZR. We have determined that with the proper additional physics and numerical algorithms developed during the LDRD period, LSP was transformed into a unique platform for studying such interactions. Its uniqueness stems from its ability to consider realistic compressed densities and low initial target temperatures (if required), an ability that conventional PIC codes do not possess. Through several test cases, validations, and applications to next generation machines described in this report, we have established the suitability of the code to look at fast ignition issues for ZR, as well as other high-density laser plasma interaction problems relevant to the HEDP program at Sandia (e.g. backlighting).

  8. Laser Shock Processing of Metallic Materials: Coupling of Laser-Plasma Interaction and Material Behaviour Models for the Assessment of Key Process Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, J. L.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J. A.

    2010-10-01

    Profiting by the increasing availability of laser sources delivering intensities above 109 W/cm2 with pulse energies in the range of several Joules and pulse widths in the range of nanoseconds, laser shock processing (LSP) is consolidating as an effective technology for the improvement of surface mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of metals. The main advantage of the laser shock processing technique consists on its capability of inducing a relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly, the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Although significant work from the experimental side has been contributed to explore the optimum conditions of application of the treatments and to assess their ultimate capability to provide enhanced mechanical behaviour to work-pieces of typical materials, only limited attempts have been developed in the way of full comprehension and predictive assessment of the characteristic physical processes and material transformations with a specific consideration of real material properties. In the present paper, a review on the physical issues dominating the development of LSP processes from a high intensity laser-matter interaction point of view is presented along with the theoretical and computational methods developed by the authors for their predictive assessment and practical results at laboratory scale on the application of the technique to different materials.

  9. Laser plasma interaction on rugby hohlraum on the Omega Laser Facility: Comparisons between cylinder, rugby, and elliptical hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Tassin, V.; Philippe, F.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Neuville, C.; Villette, B.; Laffite, S.; Seytor, P.; Fremerye, P.; Seka, W.; Teychenné, D.; Debayle, A.; Marion, D.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.

    2016-02-01

    Gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums have demonstrated high performances compared to a classical similar diameter cylinder hohlraum with a nearly 40% increase of x-ray drive, 10% higher measured peak drive temperature, and an increase in neutron production. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder, and elliptical hohlraums. The impact of these geometry differences on the laser plasma instabilities is examined. Using comparisons with hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the code FCI2 and postprocessed by Piranah, we have been able to reproduce the stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering spectrum of the different beams. Using a methodology based on a statistical analysis for the gain calculations, we show that the behavior of the laser plasma instabilities in rugby hohlraums can be reproduced. The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques to mitigate these instabilities are discussed, and we show that while rugby hohlraums exhibit more laser plasma instabilities than cylinder hohlraum, the latter can be mitigated in the case of an elliptical hohlraum.

  10. Laser induced periodic surface structure formation in germanium by strong field mid IR laser solid interaction at oblique incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Drake R; Kafka, Kyle R P; Trendafilov, Simeon; Shvets, Gennady; Li, Hui; Yi, Allen Y; Szafruga, Urszula B; Wang, Zhou; Lai, Yu Hang; Blaga, Cosmin I; DiMauro, Louis F; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2015-07-27

    Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS or ripples) were generated on single crystal germanium after irradiation with multiple 3 µm femtosecond laser pulses at a 45° angle of incidence. High and low spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL and LSFL, respectively) were observed for both s- and p-polarized light. The measured LSFL period for p-polarized light was consistent with the currently established LIPSS origination model of coupling between surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and the incident laser pulses. A vector model of SPP coupling is introduced to explain the formation of s-polarized LSFL away from the center of the damage spot. Additionally, a new method is proposed to determine the SPP propagation length from the decay in ripple depth. This is used along with the measured LSFL period to estimate the average electron density and Drude collision time of the laser-excited surface. Finally, full-wave electromagnetic simulations are used to corroborate these results while simultaneously offering insight into the nature of LSFL formation.

  11. Improving interaction in navigated surgery by combining a pan-tilt mounted laser and a pointer with triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojdanic, D.; Chen, L.; Peitgen, H.-O.

    2012-02-01

    User interaction during navigated surgery is often a critical issue in the overall procedure, as several complex aspects must be considered, such as sterility, workflow, field of view, and cognitive load. This work introduces a new approach for intraoperative interaction that seamlessly fits the high surgical requirements. A navigation system, typically consisting of a tracking system and a monitor for 3D virtual models, is augmented with a tracked pointer with triggering functionality and a pan-tilt mounted laser. The pointer, which is sterile and can be applied for landmark-based organ registration, is used for wireless interaction with the monitor scene. The laser system enables the calibration of the monitor, which is out of the tracking system's range. Moreover, the laser beam can focus on any organ point defined on the virtual model, which improves targeting or visual feedback during intervention. The calibration of the laser system, monitor, and triggered pointer is achieved by an effective procedure, which can be easily repeated in operating room. The mathematical background of the calibration is based on the Levenberg-Marquardt and Umeyama's algorithms.

  12. Osteoblast interaction with laser cladded HA and SiO{sub 2}-HA coatings on Ti-6Al-4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yuling [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Serpersu, Kaan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); He Wei, E-mail: whe5@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Paital, Sameer R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Dahotre, Narendra B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76207 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    In order to improve the bioactivity and biocompatibility of titanium endosseous implants, the morphology and composition of the surfaces were modified. Polished Ti-6Al-4V substrates were coated by a laser cladding process with different precursors: 100 wt.% HA and 25 wt.% SiO{sub 2}-HA. X-ray diffraction of the laser processed samples showed the presence of CaTiO{sub 3}, Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, and Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} phases within the coatings. From in vitro studies, it was observed that compared to the unmodified substrate all laser cladded samples presented improved cellular interactions and bioactivity. The samples processed with 25 wt.% SiO{sub 2}-HA precursor showed a significantly higher HA precipitation after immersion in simulated body fluid than 100 wt.% HA precursor and titanium substrates. The in vitro biocompatibility of the laser cladded coatings and titanium substrate was investigated by culturing of mouse MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cell line and analyzing the cell viability, cell proliferation, and cell morphology. A significantly higher cell attachment and proliferation rate were observed for both laser cladded 100 wt.% HA and 25 wt.% SiO{sub 2}-HA samples. Compared to 100 wt.% HA sample, 25 wt.% SiO{sub 2}-HA samples presented a slightly improved cellular interaction due to the addition of SiO{sub 2}. The staining of the actin filaments showed that the laser cladded samples induced a normal cytoskeleton and well-developed focal adhesion contacts. Scanning electron microscopic image of the cell cultured samples revealed better cell attachment and spreading for 25 wt.% SiO{sub 2}-HA and 100 wt.% HA coatings than titanium substrate. These results suggest that the laser cladding process improves the bioactivity and biocompatibility of titanium. The observed biological improvements are mainly due to the coating induced changes in surface chemistry and surface morphology. Highlights: {yields} Laser cladding of Ti alloys with bioceramics creates new

  13. Estimations of electron-positron pair production at high-intensity laser interaction with high-Z targets

    CERN Document Server

    Gryaznykh, D A; Lykov, V A

    1998-01-01

    Electron-positron pairs' generation occuring in the interaction of $10^{18}$-$10^{20}$~W/cm$^2$ laser radiation with high-Z targets are examined. Computational results are presented for the pair production and the positron yield from the target with allowance for the contribution of pair production processes due to electrons and bremsstrahlung photons. Monte-Carlo simulations using the PRIZMA code confirm the estimates obtained. The possible positron yield from high-Z targets irradiated by picosecond lasers of power $10^2$-$10^3$~TW is estimated to be $10^9$-$10^{11}$.

  14. 456-mW graphene Q-switched Yb:yttria waveguide laser by evanescent-field interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Amol; Beecher, Stephen J; Dhingra, Shonali; D'Urso, Brian; Parsonage, Tina L; Grant-Jacob, James A; Hua, Ping; Mackenzie, Jacob I; Eason, Robert W; Shepherd, David P

    2015-05-01

    In this Letter, we present a passively Q-switched Yb:Y2O3 waveguide laser using evanescent-field interaction with an atmospheric-pressure-chemical-vapor-deposited graphene saturable absorber. The waveguide, pumped by a broad area diode laser, produced an average output power of 456 mW at an absorbed power of 4.1 W. The corresponding pulse energy and peak power were 330 nJ and 2 W, respectively. No graphene damage was observed, demonstrating the suitability of top-deposited graphene for high-power operation.

  15. Effect of ion mass on pair production in the interaction of an ultraintense laser with overdense plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, F; Jia, M R; Wang, H Y; Xie, B S

    2016-01-01

    The effect of ion mass on pair production in the interaction of an ultraintense laser with overdense plasmas has been explored by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is found that the heavier ion mass excites the higher and broader electrostatic field, which is responsible for the enhancement of backward photon number. The pair yields are also reinforced due to the increase of head-on collision of backwards photon with incoming laser. By examining the density evolution and angle distribution of each particle species the origin of pair yields enhancement has been clarified further.

  16. Tungstophosphoric Acid Supported on Highly Organosoluble Polyamide (PW12/PA): Highly Efficient Catalysts for the Synthesis of Novel 1,3,5-Triaryl-2-pyrazoline Derivatives%Tungstophosphoric Acid Supported on Highly Organosoluble Polyamide (PW12/PA): Highly Efficient Catalysts for the Synthesis of Novel1,3,5-Triaryl-2-pyrazoline Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Razieh FAZAELI; Hamid ALIYAN; Shadpour MALLAKPOUR; Zahra RAFIEE; Maryam BORDBAR

    2011-01-01

    A novel compound constructed from polyoxometalate (H3PW12O40, PW12) and poly(amidoamine) (PA) was prepared at room temperature in an aqueous solution by an impregnation method. A series of novel 1,3,5-triaryl-2-pyrazoline derivatives was synthesized by the reaction between chalcone and phenylhydrazine in the presence of the title compound, PW12/PA, in high yields. The structures of the compounds obtained were determined by IR and 1H NMR spectra.

  17. Effect of Cluster Coulomb Fields on Electron Acceleration in Laser-Cluster Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CANG Yu; DONG Quan-Li; WU Hui-Chun; SHENG Zheng-Ming; YU Wei; ZHANG Jie

    2004-01-01

    @@ Single particle simulations are used to investigate electron acceleration in the laser-clusterinteraction, taking into account the Coulomb fields around individual clusters. These Coulomb fields are induced from the cluster cores with positive charge when electrons escape from the cluster cores through ponderomotive push from the laser field. These Coulomb fields enable some stripped electrons to be stochastically in phases with the laser fields so that they can gain net energy from the laser efficiently. In this heating mechanism, circularly polarized lasers, larger cluster size and higher cluster densities make the acceleration more efficient.

  18. Process optimization for an industrial-scale production of Diphtheria toxin by Corynebacterium diphtheriae PW8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanpatcharakul, Maethichai; Pakdeecharoen, Chompunut; Visuttitewin, Supitcha; Pesirikan, Norapath; Chauvatcharin, Somchai; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, several parameters affecting the toxin production of Corynebacterium diphtheriae Parke Williams 8 (PW8) were investigated in detail. The comparison studies of amino acid profile in NZ Amine A-based medium (NZ medium) and beef digest-based medium (BD medium) suggested that an insufficient supply of amino acids was not responsible for low toxin yield observed in NZ medium. Supplementation of additional amino acids and growth promoting nutrient (in a form of yeast extract) into NZ medium enhanced only cell growth but not toxin production. Thus, BD medium was selected as the most suitable base medium for toxin production as it gave a significantly higher limit of flocculation (93 ± 0 Lf/ml) than NZ medium (46 ± 0 Lf/ml). Interestingly, a supplementation of 0.2% YE into BD medium resulted in a significant increase in growth as well as toxin production (235 ± 5 Lf/ml). In conclusion, consistently high toxin titer (174-239 Lf/ml) could be obtained from BD medium at a 5 L-scale production as long as 1) the protein content of BD medium was at least 24 g/L, 2) the iron content was below 0.15 ppm and 3) 0.2% YE was supplemented into the medium.

  19. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  20. Pair plasma formation in the interaction of a thin plasma with ultra-intense counter-propagating lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade-Lowther, Cody

    2016-10-01

    Next-generation lasers (e.g. ELI) expect to reach peak intensities of 1023 Wcm-2. At such intensities, the electromagnetic field strength is sufficient for non-linear Quantum Electrodynamics effects to become important. The processes of non-linear Compton scattering and Breit-Wheeler Pair production become likely at intensities >=1023 Wcm-2, and have been predicted to lead to prolific pair and γ-ray production via electromagnetic cascades. We present results for the case of two counter-propagating circularly- polarized lasers of intensity I ∈ [1023 ,1025 ] Wcm24 interacting with a plasma of initial density n0 ∈ [1025 ,1035 ] via the Monte-Carlo- particle-in-cell code EPOCH. We show the maximum pair plasma density in I vs n0 space. We further discuss the variation within this space on the plasma characteristics, including laser absorption and field-particle energy distribution.