WorldWideScience

Sample records for pump probe spectroscopy

  1. Use of ultrafast dispersed pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe spectroscopies to explore the light-induced dynamics of peridinin in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papagiannakis, E.; Vengris, M.; Larsen, D.S.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Hiller, R.G.; van Grondelle, R.

    2006-01-01

    Optical pump-induced dynamics of the highly asymmetric carotenoid peridinin in methanol was studied by dispersed pump-probe, pump-dump-probe, and pump-repump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible region. Dispersed pump-probe measurements show that the decay of the initially excited

  2. Pump probe spectroscopy of quasiparticle dynamics in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, Gino P.

    2001-01-01

    Pump probe spectroscopy is used to examine the picosecond response of a BSCCO thin film, and two YBCO crystals in the near infrared. The role of pump fluence and temperature have been closely examined in an effort to clarify the mechanism by which the quasiparticles rejoin the condensate. BSCCO results suggest that the recombination behavior is consistent with the d-wave density of states in that quasiparticles appear to relax to the nodes immediately before they rejoin the condensate. The first substantial investigation of polarized pump probe response in detwinned YBCO crystals is also reported. Dramatic doping dependent anisotropies along the a and b axes are observed in time and temperature resolved studies. Among many results, we highlight the discovery of an anomalous temperature and time dependence of a- axis response in optimally doped YBCO. We also report on the first observation of the photoinduced response in a magnetic field. We find the amplitude of the response, and in some cases, the dynamics considerably changed with the application of a 6T field. Finally, we speculate on two of the many theoretical directions stimulated by our results. We find that the two-fluid model suggests a mechanism to explain how changes at very low energies are visible to a high-energy probe. Also discussed are basic recombination processes which may play a role in the observed decay

  3. Femtosecond Pump-Push-Probe and Pump-Dump-Probe Spectroscopy of Conjugated Polymers: New Insight and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Tak W

    2014-09-18

    Conjugated polymers are an important class of soft materials that exhibit a wide range of applications. The excited states of conjugated polymers, often referred to as excitons, can either deactivate to yield the ground state or dissociate in the presence of an electron acceptor to form charge carriers. These interesting properties give rise to their luminescence and the photovoltaic effect. Femtosecond spectroscopy is a crucial tool for studying conjugated polymers. Recently, more elaborate experimental configurations utilizing three optical pulses, namely, pump-push-probe and pump-dump-probe, have been employed to investigate the properties of excitons and charge-transfer states of conjugated polymers. These studies have revealed new insight into femtosecond torsional relaxation and detrapping of bound charge pairs of conjugated polymers. This Perspective highlights (1) the recent achievements by several research groups in using pump-push-probe and pump-dump-probe spectroscopy to study conjugated polymers and (2) future opportunities and potential challenges of these techniques.

  4. Holography and thermalization in optical pump-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrov, A.; Craps, B.; Galli, F.; Keränen, V.; Keski-Vakkuri, E.; Zaanen, J.

    2018-04-01

    Using holography, we model experiments in which a 2 +1 D strange metal is pumped by a laser pulse into a highly excited state, after which the time evolution of the optical conductivity is probed. We consider a finite-density state with mildly broken translation invariance and excite it by oscillating electric field pulses. At zero density, the optical conductivity would assume its thermalized value immediately after the pumping has ended. At finite density, pulses with significant dc components give rise to slow exponential relaxation, governed by a vector quasinormal mode. In contrast, for high-frequency pulses the amplitude of the quasinormal mode is strongly suppressed, so that the optical conductivity assumes its thermalized value effectively instantaneously. This surprising prediction may provide a stimulus for taking up the challenge to realize these experiments in the laboratory. Such experiments would test a crucial open question faced by applied holography: are its predictions artifacts of the large N limit or do they enjoy sufficient UV independence to hold at least qualitatively in real-world systems?

  5. Pump-probe surface photovoltage spectroscopy measurements on semiconductor epitaxial layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, Dipankar; Porwal, S.; Sharma, T. K.; Oak, S. M.; Kumar, Shailendra

    2014-01-01

    Pump-probe Surface Photovoltage Spectroscopy (SPS) measurements are performed on semiconductor epitaxial layers. Here, an additional sub-bandgap cw pump laser beam is used in a conventional chopped light geometry SPS setup under the pump-probe configuration. The main role of pump laser beam is to saturate the sub-bandgap localized states whose contribution otherwise swamp the information related to the bandgap of material. It also affects the magnitude of Dember voltage in case of semi-insulating (SI) semiconductor substrates. Pump-probe SPS technique enables an accurate determination of the bandgap of semiconductor epitaxial layers even under the strong influence of localized sub-bandgap states. The pump beam is found to be very effective in suppressing the effect of surface/interface and bulk trap states. The overall magnitude of SPV signal is decided by the dependence of charge separation mechanisms on the intensity of the pump beam. On the contrary, an above bandgap cw pump laser can be used to distinguish the signatures of sub-bandgap states by suppressing the band edge related feature. Usefulness of the pump-probe SPS technique is established by unambiguously determining the bandgap of p-GaAs epitaxial layers grown on SI-GaAs substrates, SI-InP wafers, and p-GaN epilayers grown on Sapphire substrates

  6. Effective temporal resolution in pump-probe spectroscopy with strongly chirped pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polli, D.; Lanzani, G.; Brida, D.; Cerullo, G.; Mukamel, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a general theoretical description of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy with chirped pulses whose joint spectral and temporal profile is expressed by Wigner spectrograms. We demonstrate that the actual experimental time resolution intimately depends on the pulse-sample interaction and that the commonly used instrumental response function needs to be replaced by a sample-dependent effective response function. We also show that, using the proper configurations in excitation and/or detection, it is possible to overcome the temporal smearing of the measured dynamics due to chirp-induced pulse broadening and recover the temporal resolution that would be afforded by the transform-limited pulses. We verify these predictions with experiments using broadband chirped pump and probe pulses. Our results allow optimization of the temporal resolution in the common case when the chirp of the pump and/or probe pulse is not corrected and may be extended to a broad range of time-resolved experiments.

  7. Incoherent Manipulation of the Photoactive Yellow Protein Photocycle with Dispersed Pump-Dump-Probe Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Delmar S.; van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Vengris, Mikas; van der Horst, Michael A.; de Weerd, Frank L.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2004-01-01

    Photoactive yellow protein is the protein responsible for initiating the ``blue-light vision¿¿ of Halorhodospira halophila. The dynamical processes responsible for triggering the photoactive yellow protein photocycle have been disentangled with the use of a novel application of dispersed ultrafast pump-dump-probe spectroscopy, where the photocycle can be started and interrupted with appropriately tuned and timed laser pulses. This ``incoherent¿¿ manipulation of the photocycle allows for the d...

  8. Use of ultrafast dispersed pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe spectroscopies to explore the light-induced dynamics of peridinin in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannakis, Emmanouil; Vengris, Mikas; Larsen, Delmar S; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Hiller, Roger G; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2006-01-12

    Optical pump-induced dynamics of the highly asymmetric carotenoid peridinin in methanol was studied by dispersed pump-probe, pump-dump-probe, and pump-repump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible region. Dispersed pump-probe measurements show that the decay of the initially excited S2 state populates two excited states, the S1 and the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) state, at a ratio determined by the excitation wavelength. The ensuing spectral evolution occurs on the time scale of a few picoseconds and suggests the equilibration of these states. Dumping the stimulated emission of the ICT state with an additional 800-nm pulse after 400- and 530-nm excitation preferentially removes the ICT state contribution from the broad excited-state absorption, allowing for its spectral characterization. At the same time, an unrelaxed ground-state species, which has a subpicosecond lifetime, is populated. The application of the 800-nm pulse at early times, when the S2 state is still populated, led to direct generation of the peridinin cation, observed for the first time in a transient absorption experiment. The excited and ground electronic states manifold of peridinin has been reconstructed using target analysis; this approach combined with the measured multipulse spectroscopic data allows us to estimate the spectra and time scales of the corresponding transient states.

  9. Infrared-x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy of the NO molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, F.F.; Felicissimo, V.C.; Kimberg, V.; Gel'mukhanov, F.; Aagren, H.; Cesar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Two color infrared-x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy of the NO molecule is studied theoretically and numerically in order to obtain a deeper insight of the underlying physics and of the potential of this suggested technology. From the theoretical investigation a number of conclusions could be drawn: It is found that the phase of the infrared field strongly influences the trajectory of the nuclear wave packet, and hence, the x-ray spectrum. The trajectory experiences fast oscillations with the vibrational frequency with a modulation due to the anharmonicity of the potential. The dependences of the x-ray spectra on the delay time, the duration, and the shape of the pulses are studied in detail. It is shown that the x-ray spectrum keep memory about the infrared phase after the pump field left the system. This memory effect is sensitive to the time of switching-off the pump field and the Rabi frequency. The phase effect takes maximum value when the duration of the x-ray pulse is one-fourth of the infrared field period, and can be enhanced by a proper control of the duration and intensity of the pump pulse. The manifestation of the phase is different for oriented and disordered molecules and depends strongly on the intensity of the pump radiation

  10. Infrared x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy of the NO molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, F. F.; Kimberg, V.; Felicíssimo, V. C.; Gel'Mukhanov, F.; Cesar, A.; Ågren, H.

    2005-07-01

    Two color infrared x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy of the NO molecule is studied theoretically and numerically in order to obtain a deeper insight of the underlying physics and of the potential of this suggested technology. From the theoretical investigation a number of conclusions could be drawn: It is found that the phase of the infrared field strongly influences the trajectory of the nuclear wave packet, and hence, the x-ray spectrum. The trajectory experiences fast oscillations with the vibrational frequency with a modulation due to the anharmonicity of the potential. The dependences of the x-ray spectra on the delay time, the duration, and the shape of the pulses are studied in detail. It is shown that the x-ray spectrum keep memory about the infrared phase after the pump field left the system. This memory effect is sensitive to the time of switching-off the pump field and the Rabi frequency. The phase effect takes maximum value when the duration of the x-ray pulse is one-fourth of the infrared field period, and can be enhanced by a proper control of the duration and intensity of the pump pulse. The manifestation of the phase is different for oriented and disordered molecules and depends strongly on the intensity of the pump radiation.

  11. Reaction pathways of photoexcited retinal in proteorhodopsin studied by pump-dump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupenyan, Alisa; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Arents, Jos C; van Grondelle, Rienk; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Groot, Marie Louise

    2009-12-17

    Proteorhodopsin (pR) is a membrane-embedded proton pump from the microbial rhodopsin family. Light absorption by its retinal chromophore initiates a photocycle, driven by trans/cis isomerization on the femtosecond to picosecond time scales. Here, we report a study on the photoisomerization dynamics of the retinal chromophore of pR, using dispersed ultrafast pump-dump-probe spectroscopy. The application of a pump pulse initiates the photocycle, and with an appropriately tuned dump pulse applied at a time delay after the dump, the molecules in the initial stages of the photochemical process can be de-excited and driven back to the ground state. In this way, we were able to resolve an intermediate on the electronic ground state that represents chromophores that are unsuccessful in isomerization. In particular, the fractions of molecules that undergo slow isomerization (20 ps) have a high probability to enter this state rather than the isomerized K-state. On the ground state reaction surface, return to the stable ground state conformation via a structural or vibrational relaxation occurs in 2-3 ps. Inclusion of this intermediate in the kinetic scheme led to more consistent spectra of the retinal-excited state, and to a more accurate estimation of the quantum yield of isomerization (Phi = 0.4 at pH 6).

  12. Time-resolved pump-probe X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of Gaq3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicke, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Gallium(tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) (Gaq 3 ) belongs to a class of metal organic compounds, used as electron transport layer and emissive layer in organic light emitting diodes. Many research activities have concentrated on the optical and electronic properties, especially of the homologue molecule aluminum(tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq 3 ). Knowledge of the first excited state S 1 structure of these molecules could provide deeper insight into the processes involved into the operation of electronic devices, such as OLEDs and, hence, it could further improve their efficiency and optical properties. Until now the excited state structure could not be determined experimentally. Most of the information about this structure mainly arises from theoretical calculations. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is a well developed technique to determine both, the electronic and the geometric properties of a sample. The connection of ultrashort pulsed X-ray sources with a pulsed laser system offers the possibility to use XAFS as a tool for studying the transient changes of a sample induced by a laser pulse. In the framework of this thesis a new setup for time-resolved pump-probe X-ray absorption spectroscopy at PETRA III beamline P11 was developed for measuring samples in liquid form. In this setup the sample is pumped into its photo-excited state by a femtosecond laser pump pulse with 343 nm wavelength and after a certain time delay probed by an X-ray probe pulse. In this way the first excited singlet state S 1 of Gaq 3 dissolved in benzyl alcohol was analyzed. A structural model for the excited state structure of the Gaq 3 molecule based on the several times reproduced results of the XAFS experiments is proposed. According to this model it was found that the Ga-N A bond length is elongated, while the Ga-O A bond length is shortened upon photoexcitation. The dynamics of the structural changes were not the focus of this thesis. Nevertheless the excited state lifetime

  13. Ultrafast optical pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy of strongly correlated electron materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averitt, R.D.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Thorsmolle, V.K.; Jia, Quanxi; Lobad, A.I.; Trugman, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    We have used optical-pump far-infrared probe spectroscopy to probe the low energy electron dynamics of high temperature superconductors and colossal magnetoresistance manganites. For the superconductor YBa2Cu3O7, picosecond conductivity measurements probe the interplay between Cooper-pairs and quasiparticles. In optimally doped films, the recovery time for long-range phase-coherent pairing increases from ∼1.5 ps at 4K to ∼3.5 ps near Tc, consistent with the closing of the superconducting gap. For underdoped films, the measured recovery time is temperature independent (3.5 ps) in accordance with the presence of a pseudogap. Ultrafast picosecond measurements of optically induced changes in the absolute conductivity of La0:7M0:3MnO3 thin films (M = Ca, Sr) from 10K to ∼0.9Tc reveal a two-component relaxation. A fast, ∼2 ps, conductivity decrease arises from optically induced modification of the effective phonon temperature. The slower component, related to spin-lattice relaxation, has a lifetime that increases upon approaching Tc from below in accordance with an increasing spin specific heat. Our results indicate that for T<< Tc, the conductivity is determined by incoherent phonons while spin fluctuations dominate near Tc.

  14. Broadband pump-probe spectroscopy with sub-10-fs resolution for probing ultrafast internal conversion and coherent phonons in carotenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polli, D.; Antognazza, M.R.; Brida, D.; Lanzani, G.; Cerullo, G.; De Silvestri, S.

    2008-01-01

    We use pump-probe spectroscopy with broadband detection to study electronic energy relaxation and coherent vibrational dynamics in carotenoids. A fast optical multichannel analyzer combined with a non-collinear optical parametric amplifier allows simultaneous acquisition of the differential transmission dynamics on the 500-700 nm wavelength range with sub-10-fs temporal resolution. The broad spectral coverage enables on the one hand a detailed study of the ultrafast bright-to-dark state internal conversion process; on the other hand, the tracking of the motion of the vibrational wavepacket launched on the ground state multidimensional potential energy surface. We present results on all-trans β-carotene and on a long-chain polyene in solution. The developed experimental setup enables the straightforward acquisition and analysis of coherent vibrational dynamics, highlighting time-frequency domain features with extreme resolution

  15. Femtosecond pump probe spectroscopy for the study of energy transfer of light-harvesting complexes from extractions of spinach leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. van Rensburg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of ultrafast transient processes, of temporal durations in the picosecond and femtosecond regime, are made possible by femtosecond pump probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Such an ultrafast pump probe transient absorption setup has been implemented at the CSIR National Laser Centre and has been applied to investigate energy transfer processes in different parts of photosynthetic systems. In this paper we report on our first results obtained with Malachite green as a benchmark. Malachite green was chosen because the lifetime of its excited state is well known. We also present experimental results of the ultrafast energy transfer of light-harvesting complexes in samples prepared from spinach leaves. Various pump wavelengths in the range 600–680 nm were used; the probe was a white light continuum spanning 420–700 nm. The experimental setup is described in detail in this paper. Results obtained with these samples are consistent with those expected and achieved by other researchers in this field.

  16. Pump-probe differencing technique for cavity-enhanced, noise-canceling saturation laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vine, Glenn; McClelland, David E; Gray, Malcolm B; Close, John D

    2005-05-15

    We present an experimental technique that permits mechanical-noise-free, cavity-enhanced frequency measurements of an atomic transition and its hyperfine structure. We employ the 532-nm frequency-doubled output from a Nd:YAG laser and an iodine vapor cell. The cell is placed in a folded ring cavity (FRC) with counterpropagating pump and probe beams. The FRC is locked with the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. Mechanical noise is rejected by differencing the pump and probe signals. In addition, this differenced error signal provides a sensitive measure of differential nonlinearity within the FRC.

  17. Incoherent manipulation of the photoactive yellow protein photocycle with dispersed pump-dump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Delmar S; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Vengris, Mikas; van Der Horst, Michael A; de Weerd, Frank L; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2004-09-01

    Photoactive yellow protein is the protein responsible for initiating the "blue-light vision" of Halorhodospira halophila. The dynamical processes responsible for triggering the photoactive yellow protein photocycle have been disentangled with the use of a novel application of dispersed ultrafast pump-dump-probe spectroscopy, where the photocycle can be started and interrupted with appropriately tuned and timed laser pulses. This "incoherent" manipulation of the photocycle allows for the detailed spectroscopic investigation of the underlying photocycle dynamics and the construction of a fully self-consistent dynamical model. This model requires three kinetically distinct excited-state intermediates, two (ground-state) photocycle intermediates, I(0) and pR, and a ground-state intermediate through which the protein, after unsuccessful attempts at initiating the photocycle, returns to the equilibrium ground state. Also observed is a previously unknown two-photon ionization channel that generates a radical and an ejected electron into the protein environment. This second excitation pathway evolves simultaneously with the pathway containing the one-photon photocycle intermediates.

  18. Development of an X-ray delay unit for correlation spectroscopy and pump-probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roseker, Wojciech

    2008-07-15

    Probing condensed matter on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds will be one of the key topics for future X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) sources. The accessible time windows are, however, compromised by the intrinsic time structure of the sources. One way to overcome this limitation is the usage of a time delay unit. A prototype device capable of splitting an X-ray pulse into two adjustable fractions, delaying one of them with the aim to perform X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and pump-probe type studies was designed and manufactured. The device utilizes eight perfect crystals in vertical 90 scattering geometry. Its performance has been verified with 8.39 keV and 12.4 keV Xrays at various synchrotron sources. The measured throughput of the device with a Si(333) monochromator at 8.39 keV under ambient conditions is 0.6%. The stability was verified at 12.4 keV and operation without realignment and feedback was possible for more than 30 minutes. Time delays up to 2.95 ns have been achieved. The highest resolution achieved in an experiment was 15.4 ps, a value entirely determined by the diagnostics system. The influence of the delay unit optics on the coherence properties of the beam was investigated by means of Fraunhofer diffraction and static speckle analysis. The obtained high fringe visibility and contrast values larger than 23% indicate the feasibility of performing coherence based experiments with the delay line. (orig.)

  19. Ultra-Broadband Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy and Pump-Probe Microscopy of Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokoyny, Boris M.

    Ultrafast spectroscopy offers an unprecedented view on the dynamic nature of chemical reactions. From charge transfer in semiconductors to folding and isomerization of proteins, these all important processes can now be monitored and in some instances even controlled on real, physical timescales. One of the biggest challenges of ultrafast science is the incredible energetic complexity of most systems. It is not uncommon to encounter macromolecules or materials with absorption spectra spanning significant portions of the visible spectrum. Monitoring a multitude of electronic and vibrational transitions, all dynamically interacting with each other on femtosecond timescales poses a truly daunting experimental task. The first part of this thesis deals with the development of a novel Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy (2DES) and its associated, advanced detection methodologies. Owing to its ultra-broadband implementation, this technique enables us to monitor femtosecond chemical dynamics that span the energetic landscape of the entire visible spectrum. In order to demonstrate the utility of our method, we apply it to two laser dye molecules, IR-144 and Cresyl Violet. Variation of photophysical properties on a microscopic scale in either man-made or naturally occurring systems can have profound implications on how we understand their macroscopic properties. Recently, inorganic hybrid perovskites have been tapped as the next generation solar energy harvesting materials. Their remarkable properties include low exciton binding energy, low exciton recombination rates and long carrier diffusion lengths. Nevertheless, considerable variability in device properties made with nearly identical preparation methods has puzzled the community. In the second part of this thesis we use non-linear pump probe microscopy to study the heterogeneous nature of femtosecond carrier dynamics in thin film perovskites. We show that the local morphology of the perovskite thin films has a

  20. Ultrafast Dynamics of the VO2 Insulator-to-Metal Transition Observed by Nondegenerate Pump-Probe Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haglund R. F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-degenerate pump (1.5 eV-probe (0.4 eV transmission spectroscopy on vanadium dioxide films grown on glass and three different sapphire substrates shows systematic variations with substrate that correlate with VO2 grain size and laser fluence. Temperature dependent measurements showed changes in the electronic response that is proportional to the metallic fraction.

  1. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of Zinc Phthalocynine (ZnPc) and light harvesting complex II (LHC II)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available pump-probe spectroscopy of Zinc Phthalocynine (ZnPc) and light harvesting complex II (LHC II) SAIP 7-10 July 2009, University of Kwazulu Natal. S. Ombinda-Lemboumba1, 2 A. du Plessis1, L. Botha1, D.E. Roberts1, P. Molukanele1, 3, R.W. Sparrow3, E... and phtobiology (2008) Page 12 Conclusion SAIP 7-10 July 2009, University of Kwazulu natal Femto group © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za • Presented our method of correcting chirp induced by white light generation. • Pump...

  2. Theoretical Simulations and Ultrafast Pump-probe Spectroscopy Experiments in Pigment-protein Photosynthetic Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, D. R. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-09-12

    Theoretical simulations and ultrafast pump-probe laser spectroscopy experiments were used to study photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes and antennae found in green sulfur bacteria such as Prosthecochloris aestuarii, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, and Chlorobium tepidum. The work focused on understanding structure-function relationships in energy transfer processes in these complexes through experiments and trying to model that data as we tested our theoretical assumptions with calculations. Theoretical exciton calculations on tubular pigment aggregates yield electronic absorption spectra that are superimpositions of linear J-aggregate spectra. The electronic spectroscopy of BChl c/d/e antennae in light harvesting chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus differs considerably from J-aggregate spectra. Strong symmetry breaking is needed if we hope to simulate the absorption spectra of the BChl c antenna. The theory for simulating absorption difference spectra in strongly coupled photosynthetic antenna is described, first for a relatively simple heterodimer, then for the general N-pigment system. The theory is applied to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) BChl a protein trimers from Prosthecochloris aestuarii and then compared with experimental low-temperature absorption difference spectra of FMO trimers from Chlorobium tepidum. Circular dichroism spectra of the FMO trimer are unusually sensitive to diagonal energy disorder. Substantial differences occur between CD spectra in exciton simulations performed with and without realistic inhomogeneous distribution functions for the input pigment diagonal energies. Anisotropic absorption difference spectroscopy measurements are less consistent with 21-pigment trimer simulations than 7-pigment monomer simulations which assume that the laser-prepared states are localized within a subunit of the trimer. Experimental anisotropies from real samples likely arise from statistical averaging over states with diagonal energies shifted by

  3. Detecting strain wave propagation through quantum dots by pump-probe spectroscopy: A theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huneke, J; Kuhn, T; Axt, V M

    2010-01-01

    The influence of strain waves traveling across a quantum dot structure on its optical response is studied for two different situations: First, a strain wave is created by the optical excitation of a single quantum dot near a surface which, after reflection at the surface, reenters the dot; second, a phonon wave packet is emitted by the excitation of a nearby second dot and then travels across the quantum dot. Pump-probe type excitations are simulated for quantum dots in the strong confinement limit. We show that the optical signals allow us to monitor crossing strain waves for both structures in the real-time response as well as in the corresponding pump-probe spectra. In the time-derivative of the phase of the polarization a distinct trace reflects the instantaneous shifts of the transition energy during the passage while in the spectra pronounced oscillations reveal the passage of the strain waves.

  4. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in bilayer graphene studied by broadband infrared pump-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Thomas; da Como, Enrico; Niggebaum, Alexander; Feldmann, Jochen

    2010-03-01

    Recently, bilayer graphene gained a large interest because of its electrically tunable gap appearing in the middle infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. This feature is expected to open a number of applications of bilayer graphene in optoelectronics. In this communication we report on the first pump-probe experiment on a single bilayer flake with an unprecedented probe photon energy interval (0.25 -- 1.3 eV). Single flakes were prepared by mechanical exfoliation of graphite and transferred to calcium fluoride substrates. When illuminated with 800 nm (1.5 eV) pump pulses the induced change in transmission shows an ultrafast saturation of the interband transitions from 1.3 to 0.5 eV. In this energy range the saturation recovery occurs within 3 ps and is consistent with an ultrafast relaxation of hot carriers. Interestingly, we report on the observation of a resonance at 0.4 eV characterized by a longer dynamics. The results are discussed considering many-body interactions.

  5. Tracking of the nuclear wavepacket motion in cyanine photoisomerization by ultrafast pump-dump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengrong; Nakamura, Takumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2011-06-01

    Understanding ultrafast reactions, which proceed on a time scale of nuclear motions, requires a quantitative characterization of the structural dynamics. To track such structural changes with time, we studied a nuclear wavepacket motion in photoisomerization of a prototype cyanine dye, 1,1'-diethyl-4,4'-cyanine, by ultrafast pump-dump-probe measurements in solution. The temporal evolution of wavepacket motion was examined by monitoring the efficiency of stimulated emission dumping, which was obtained from the recovery of a ground-state bleaching signal. The dump efficiency versus pump-dump delay exhibited a finite rise time, and it became longer (97 fs → 330 fs → 390 fs) as the dump pulse was tuned to longer wavelengths (690 nm → 950 nm → 1200 nm). This result demonstrates a continuous migration of the leading edge of the wavepacket on the excited-state potential from the Franck-Condon region toward the potential minimum. A slowly decaying feature of the dump efficiency indicated a considerable broadening of the wavepacket over a wide range of the potential, which results in the spread of a population distribution on the flat S(1) potential energy surface. The rapid migration as well as broadening of the wavepacket manifests a continuous nature of the structural dynamics and provides an intuitive visualization of this ultrafast reaction. We also discussed experimental strategies to evaluate reliable dump efficiencies separately from other ultrafast processes and showed a high capability and possibility of the pump-dump-probe method for spectroscopic investigation of unexplored potential regions such as conical intersections. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Pump-probe spectroscopy of spin-injection dynamics in double quantum wells of diluted magnetic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishibayashi, K.; Aoshima, I.; Souma, I.; Murayama, A.; Oka, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Dynamics of spin injection has been investigated in a double quantum well (DQW) composed of a diluted magnetic semiconductor by the pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy in magnetic field. The DQW consists of a non-magnetic well (NMW) of CdTe and a magnetic well (MW) of Cd 0.92 Mn 0.08 Te. The MW shows a transient absorption saturation in the exciton band for more than 200 ps after the optical pumping, while the exciton photoluminescence does not arise from the MW. In the NMW, the circular polarization degree of the transient absorption saturation shows an increase with increasing time. The results are interpreted by the individual tunneling of spin-polarized electrons and holes from the MW to the NMW with different tunneling times. Depolarization processes of the carrier spins in the MW and the NMW are also discussed

  7. Light Driven Energy Research at LCLS: Planned Pump-Probe X-ray Spectroscopy Studies on Photosynthetic Water Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2010-02-01

    Arguably the most important chemical reaction on earth is the photosynthetic splitting of water to molecular oxygen by the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex (Mn-OEC) in the protein known as photosystem II (PSII). It is this reaction which has, over the course of some 3.8 billion years, gradually filled our atmosphere with O2 and consequently enabled and sustained the evolution of complex aerobic life. Coupled to the reduction of carbon dioxide, biological photosynthesis contributes foodstuffs for nutrition while recycling CO2 from the atmosphere and replacing it with O2. By utilizing sunlight to power these energy-requiring reactions, photosynthesis also serves as a model for addressing societal energy needs as we enter an era of diminishing fossil hydrocarbon resources. Understanding, at the molecular level, the dynamics and mechanism of how nature has solved this problem is of fundamental importance and could be critical to aid in the design of manufactured devices to accomplish the conversion of sunlight into useful electrochemical energy and transportable fuel in the foreseeable future. In order to understand the photosynthetic splitting of water by the Mn-OEC we need to be able to follow the reaction in real time at an atomic level. A powerful probe to study the electronic and molecular structure of the Mn-OEC is x-ray spectroscopy. Here, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has two crucial qualities for LCLS based time-dependent pump-probe studies of the Mn-OEC: a) it directly probes the Mn oxidation state and ligation, b) it can be performed with wavelength dispersive optics to avoid the necessity of scanning in pump probe experiments. Recent results and the planned time dependent experiments at LCLS will be discussed. )

  8. Ultrafast S1 and ICT state dynamics of a marine carotenoid probed by femtosecond one- and two-photon pump-probe spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Kusumoto, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Ritsuko; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Iinuma, Yoshiro; Oka, Naohiro; Takaesu, Yuki; Taira, Tomonori; Iha, Masahiko; Frank, Harry A.; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafast relaxation kinetics of fucoxanthin in polar and non-polar solvents have been studied by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Transient absorption associated with S 1 or intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) excited state has been observed following either one-photon excitation to the optically allowed S 2 state or two-photon excitation to the symmetry-forbidden S 1 state. The results suggest that the ICT state formed after excitation of fucoxanthin in a polar solvent is a distinct excited state from S 1 .

  9. Ultrafast S{sub 1} and ICT state dynamics of a marine carotenoid probed by femtosecond one- and two-photon pump-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosumi, Daisuke, E-mail: kosumi@sci.osaka-cu.ac.j [CREST/JST and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Kusumoto, Toshiyuki [CREST/JST and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Fujii, Ritsuko; Sugisaki, Mitsuru [CREST/JST and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Osaka City University Advanced Research Institute for Natural Science and Technology (OCARINA), Osaka (Japan); Iinuma, Yoshiro; Oka, Naohiro; Takaesu, Yuki; Taira, Tomonori; Iha, Masahiko [South Product Co. Ltd., 12-75 Suzaki, Uruma-shi, Okinawa 904-2234 (Japan); Frank, Harry A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3060 (United States); Hashimoto, Hideki, E-mail: hassy@sci.osaka-cu.ac.j [CREST/JST and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Osaka City University Advanced Research Institute for Natural Science and Technology (OCARINA), Osaka (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Ultrafast relaxation kinetics of fucoxanthin in polar and non-polar solvents have been studied by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Transient absorption associated with S{sub 1} or intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) excited state has been observed following either one-photon excitation to the optically allowed S{sub 2} state or two-photon excitation to the symmetry-forbidden S{sub 1} state. The results suggest that the ICT state formed after excitation of fucoxanthin in a polar solvent is a distinct excited state from S{sub 1}.

  10. Carrier dynamics in silicon nanowires studied using optical-pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Alexandre; Salem, Bassem; Baron, Thierry; Gentile, Pascal; Morris, Denis

    2014-03-01

    The advance of non-contact measurements involving pulsed terahertz radiation presents great interests for characterizing electrical properties of a large ensemble of nanowires. In this work, N-doped and undoped silicon nanowires (SiNWs) grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on quartz substrate were characterized using optical-pump terahertz probe (OPTP) transmission experiments. Our results show that defects and ionized impurities introduced by N-doping the CVD-grown SiNWs tend to reduce the photoexcited carrier lifetime and degrade their conductivity properties. Capture mechanisms by the surface trap states play a key role on the photocarrier dynamics in theses small diameters' (~100 nm) SiNWs and the doping level is found to alter this dynamics. We propose convincing capture and recombination scenarios that explain our OPTP measurements. Fits of our photoconductivity data curves, from 0.5 to 2 THz, using a Drude-plasmon conductivity model allow determining photocarrier mobility values of 190 and 70 cm2/V .s, for the undoped and N-doped NWs samples, respectively.

  11. Ultrafast pump-probe reflectance spectroscopy: Why sodium makes Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells better

    KAUST Repository

    Eid, Jessica; Usman, Anwar; Gereige, Issam; Duren, Jeroen Van; Lyssenko, Vadim; Leo, Karl; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    Although Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells have the highest efficiency of any thin-film solar cell, especially when sodium is incorporated, the fundamental device properties of ultrafast carrier transport and recombination in such cells remain not fully understood. Here, we explore the dynamics of charge carriers in CIGS absorber layers with varying concentrations of Na by femtosecond (fs) broadband pump-probe reflectance spectroscopy with 120 fs time resolution. By analyzing the time-resolved transient spectra in a different time domain, we show that a small amount of Na integrated by NaF deposition on top of sputtered Cu(In,Ga) prior to selenization forms CIGS, which induces slower recombination of the excited carriers. Here, we provide direct evidence for the elongation of carrier lifetimes by incorporating Na into CIGS.

  12. Ultrafast pump-probe reflectance spectroscopy: Why sodium makes Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells better

    KAUST Repository

    Eid, Jessica

    2015-04-14

    Although Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells have the highest efficiency of any thin-film solar cell, especially when sodium is incorporated, the fundamental device properties of ultrafast carrier transport and recombination in such cells remain not fully understood. Here, we explore the dynamics of charge carriers in CIGS absorber layers with varying concentrations of Na by femtosecond (fs) broadband pump-probe reflectance spectroscopy with 120 fs time resolution. By analyzing the time-resolved transient spectra in a different time domain, we show that a small amount of Na integrated by NaF deposition on top of sputtered Cu(In,Ga) prior to selenization forms CIGS, which induces slower recombination of the excited carriers. Here, we provide direct evidence for the elongation of carrier lifetimes by incorporating Na into CIGS.

  13. In-Situ Probing Plasmonic Energy Transfer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Solar Cells by Ultrabroadband Femtosecond Pump-Probe Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chen; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Li, Jia-Xing; Yabushita, Atsushi; Tang, Shih-Han; Luo, Chih Wei; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2015-12-18

    In this work, we demonstrated a viable experimental scheme for in-situ probing the effects of Au nanoparticles (NPs) incorporation on plasmonic energy transfer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells by elaborately analyzing the lifetimes and zero moment for hot carrier relaxation with ultrabroadband femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The signals of enhanced photobleach (PB) and waned photoinduced absorption (PIA) attributable to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au NPs were in-situ probed in transient differential absorption spectra. The results suggested that substantial carriers can be excited from ground state to lower excitation energy levels, which can reach thermalization much faster with the existence of SPR. Thus, direct electron transfer (DET) could be implemented to enhance the photocurrent of CIGS solar cells. Furthermore, based on the extracted hot carrier lifetimes, it was confirmed that the improved electrical transport might have been resulted primarily from the reduction in the surface recombination of photoinduced carriers through enhanced local electromagnetic field (LEMF). Finally, theoretical calculation for resonant energy transfer (RET)-induced enhancement in the probability of exciting electron-hole pairs was conducted and the results agreed well with the enhanced PB peak of transient differential absorption in plasmonic CIGS film. These results indicate that plasmonic energy transfer is a viable approach to boost high-efficiency CIGS solar cells.

  14. Reaction pathways of photoexcited retinal in proteorhodopsin studied by pump-dump-probe spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rupenyan, A.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Arents, J.C.; van Grondelle, R.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Groot, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Proteorhodopsin (pR) is a membrane-embedded proton pump from the microbial rhodopsin family. Light absorption by its retinal chromophore initiates a photocycle, driven by trans/cis isomerization on the femtosecond to picosecond time scales. Here, we report a study on the photoisomerization dynamics

  15. Gauge invariance in the theoretical description of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freericks, J. K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Sentef, M. A.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-10-01

    Nonequilibrium calculations in the presence of an electric field are usually performed in a gauge, and need to be transformed to reveal the gauge-invariant observables. In this work, we discuss the issue of gauge invariance in the context of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission. If the probe is applied while the pump is still on, one must ensure that the calculations of the observed photocurrent are gauge invariant. We also discuss the requirement of the photoemission signal to be positive and the relationship of this constraint to gauge invariance. We end by discussing some technical details related to the perturbative derivation of the photoemission spectra, which involve processes where the pump pulse photoexcites electrons due to nonequilibrium effects.

  16. Coherent evolution of parahydrogen induced polarisation using laser pump, NMR probe spectroscopy: Theoretical framework and experimental observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halse, Meghan E; Procacci, Barbara; Henshaw, Sarah-Louise; Perutz, Robin N; Duckett, Simon B

    2017-05-01

    We recently reported a pump-probe method that uses a single laser pulse to introduce parahydrogen (p-H 2 ) into a metal dihydride complex and then follows the time-evolution of the p-H 2 -derived nuclear spin states by NMR. We present here a theoretical framework to describe the oscillatory behaviour of the resultant hyperpolarised NMR signals using a product operator formalism. We consider the cases where the p-H 2 -derived protons form part of an AX, AXY, AXYZ or AA'XX' spin system in the product molecule. We use this framework to predict the patterns for 2D pump-probe NMR spectra, where the indirect dimension represents the evolution during the pump-probe delay and the positions of the cross-peaks depend on the difference in chemical shift of the p-H 2 -derived protons and the difference in their couplings to other nuclei. The evolution of the NMR signals of the p-H 2 -derived protons, as well as the transfer of hyperpolarisation to other NMR-active nuclei in the product, is described. The theoretical framework is tested experimentally for a set of ruthenium dihydride complexes representing the different spin systems. Theoretical predictions and experimental results agree to within experimental error for all features of the hyperpolarised 1 H and 31 P pump-probe NMR spectra. Thus we establish the laser pump, NMR probe approach as a robust way to directly observe and quantitatively analyse the coherent evolution of p-H 2 -derived spin order over micro-to-millisecond timescales. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe ultrafast spectroscopy resolves cross section of an early ground state intermediate and stimulated emission in the photoreactions of the Pr ground state of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Ann E; Lincoln, Craig N; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; van Thor, Jasper J

    2012-01-26

    The primary photoreactions of the red absorbing ground state (Pr) of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis PCC 6803 involve C15═C16 Z-E photoisomerization of its phycocyanobilin chromophore. The first observable product intermediate in pump-probe measurements of the photocycle, "Lumi-R", is formed with picosecond kinetics and involves excited state decay reactions that have 3 and 14 ps time constants. Here, we have studied the photochemical formation of the Lumi-R intermediate using multipulse picosecond visible spectroscopy. Pump-dump-probe (PDP) and pump-repump-probe (PRP) experiments were carried out by employing two femtosecond visible pulses with 1, 14, and 160 ps delays, together with a broadband dispersive visible probe. The time delays between the two excitation pulses have been selected to allow interaction with the dominant (3 and 14 ps) kinetic phases of Lumi-R formation. The frequency dependence of the PDP and PRP amplitudes was investigated at 620, 640, 660, and 680 nm, covering excited state absorption (λ(max) = 620 nm), ground state absorption (λ(max) = 660 nm), and stimulated emission (λ(max) = 680 nm) cross sections. Experimental double difference transient absorbance signals (ΔΔOD), from the PDP and PRP measurements, required corrections to remove contributions from ground state repumping. The sensitivity of the resulting ΔΔOD signals was systematically investigated for possible connectivity schemes and photochemical parameters. When applying a homogeneous (sequentially decaying) connectivity scheme in both the 3 and 14 ps kinetic phases, evidence for repumping of an intermediate that has an electronic ground state configuration (GSI) is taken from the dump-induced S1 formation with 620, 640, and 660 nm wavelengths and 1 and 14 ps repump delays. Evidence for repumping a GSI is also seen, for the same excitation wavelengths, when imposing a target connectivity scheme proposed in the literature for the 1 ps repump delay. In

  18. Two-color pump-probe laser spectroscopy instrument with picosecond time-resolved electronic delay and extended scan range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anchi; Ye, Xiong; Ionascu, Dan; Cao, Wenxiang; Champion, Paul M.

    2005-11-01

    An electronically delayed two-color pump-probe instrument was developed using two synchronized laser systems. The instrument has picosecond time resolution and can perform scans over hundreds of nanoseconds without the beam divergence and walk-off effects that occur using standard spatial delay systems. A unique picosecond Ti :sapphire regenerative amplifier was also constructed without the need for pulse stretching and compressing optics. The picosecond regenerative amplifier has a broad wavelength tuning range, which suggests that it will make a significant contribution to two-color pump-probe experiments. To test this instrument we studied the rotational correlation relaxation of myoglobin (τr=8.2±0.5ns) in water as well as the geminate rebinding kinetics of oxygen to myoglobin (kg1=1.7×1011s-1, kg2=3.4×107s-1). The results are consistent with, and improve upon, previous studies.

  19. Pump-flow-probe x-ray absorption spectroscopy as a tool for studying aintermediate states of photocatalytic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Guda, Alexander; Zhang, Xiaoyi

    2013-01-01

    -millimolar concentrations. A continuous wave laser is used for the photoexcitation, with the distance between laser and X-ray beams and velocity of liquid flow determining the time delay, while the focusing of both beams and the flow speed profile define the time resolution. This method is compared with the alternative...... measurement technique that utilizes a 1 kHz repetition rate laser and multiple X-ray probe pulses. Such an experiment was performed at beamline 11ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source. Advantages, limitations, and potential for improvement of the pump-flow-probe setup are discussed by analyzing the photon...... statistics. Both methods with Co K-edge probing were applied to the investigation of a cobaloxime-based photocatalytic reaction. The interplay between optimizing for efficient photoexcitation and time resolution as well and the effect of sample degradation for these two setups are discussed. © 2013 American...

  20. Investigation of the S1/ICT equilibrium in fucoxanthin by ultrafast pump-dump-probe and femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeckas, Kipras; Voiciuk, Vladislava; Vengris, Mikas

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved multi-pulse spectroscopic methods-pump-dump-probe (PDP) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy-were used to investigate the excited state photodynamics of the carbonyl group containing carotenoid fucoxanthin (FX). PDP experiments show that S1 and ICT states in FX are strongly coupled and that the interstate equilibrium is rapidly (<5 ps) reestablished after one of the interacting states is deliberately depopulated. Femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering experiments indicate that S1 and ICT are vibrationally distinct species. Identification of the FSRS modes on the S1 and ICT potential energy surfaces allows us to predict a possible coupling channel for the state interaction.

  1. Ultrafast spin injection from Cd1-x Mn x Te magnetic barriers into a CdTe quantum well studied by pump-probe spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoshima, I.; Nishibayashi, K.; Souma, I.; Murayama, A.; Oka, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Spin injection from diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) barriers of Cd 1- x Mn x Te into a quantum well (QW) of CdTe is studied, by means of pump-probe absorption spectroscopy in magnetic fields. Fast decay characteristics of circularly polarized differential absorbances of spin-polarized excitons in the DMS barrier show the exciton injection time of 6 ps from the barriers into the QW. In accordance with the fast relaxation of the spin-polarized excitons from the barrier, we observe the rise of circular polarization degree for the differential absorption of the CdTe QW in magnetic fields, evidently indicating the spin injection. In addition, the circular polarization degree up to 0.3 is developed in the well immediately after pumping, originating from the fast relaxation of a heavy hole (hh) spin less than 0.2 ps, due to the giant Zeeman effect caused by the penetration of the hh wave function into the DMS barriers

  2. Thin film polycrystalline Si solar cells studied in transient regime by optical pump-terahertz probe spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pikna, Peter; Skoromets, Volodymyr; Becker, C.; Fejfar, Antonín; Kužel, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 23 (2015), "233901-1"-"233901-5" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-12386S Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101216 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : thin film polycrystalline silicon * terahertz spectroscopy * passivation * Suns-Voc method * defects Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015

  3. Phase-Sensitive Control Of Molecular Dissociation Through Attosecond Pump/Strong-Field Mid-IR Probe Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    splitter (consisting of a thin, uncoated, silicon plate at brewsters angle) and the beams were focused onto the OPA crystal. For this work two...experiments in the future. These technologies include • Two-color driven (EUV/mid-IR) ion spectroscopy: we designed an interferometer combining EUV...isolated single-femtosecond EUV pulse generation: combining the use of low ionization threshold gas, an annual near-IR drive beam , polarization

  4. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Göries, D., E-mail: dennis.goeries@desy.de; Roedig, P.; Stübe, N.; Meyer, J.; Warmer, M.; Weckert, E.; Meents, A., E-mail: alke.meents@desy.de [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Dicke, B.; Naumova, M.; Rübhausen, M. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Galler, A.; Gawelda, W.; Geßler, P.; Sotoudi Namin, H.; Beckmann, A. [European XFEL, Albert-Einstein Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Britz, A.; Bressler, C. [European XFEL, Albert-Einstein Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Schlie, M. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy){sub 3}. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM).

  5. Real time observation of the excimer formation dynamics of a gas phase benzene dimer by picosecond pump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki

    2015-10-21

    We observed the real-time excimer (EXC) formation dynamics of a gas phase benzene dimer (Bz2) cluster after photo-excitation to the S1 state by applying an ionization detected picosecond transient absorption method for probing the visible EXC absorption for the first time. The time evolution of the EXC absorption from the S1 0(0) level shows a rise that is well fitted by a single exponential function with a time constant of 18 ± 2 ps. The structure of the Bz dimer has a T-shaped structure in the ground electronic state, and that in the EXC state is a parallel sandwich (SW) structure. Thus, the observed rise time corresponds to the structural change from the T to the SW structures, which directly shows the EXC formation. On the other hand, the EXC formation after excitation of the S1 6(1) vibrational level of the stem site showed a faster rise of the time constant of 10 ± 2 ps. Supposing equilibrium between the EXC and the local excited states, it followed that the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution rate of the 6(1) level is largely enhanced and becomes faster than the EXC formation reaction.

  6. Monte Carlo wave-packet approach to trace nuclear dynamics in molecular excited states by XUV-pump-IR-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Qingli; Bello, Roger Y.; Martín, Fernando; Palacios, Alicia; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2018-04-01

    Recent research interests have been raised in uncovering and controlling ultrafast dynamics in excited neutral molecules. In this work we generalize the Monte Carlo wave packet (MCWP) approach to XUV-pump-IR-probe schemes to simulate the process of dissociative double ionization of H2 where singly excited states in H2 are involved. The XUV pulse is chosen to resonantly excite the initial ground state of H2 to the lowest excited electronic state of 1Σu + symmetry in H2 within the Franck-Condon region. The delayed intense IR pulse couples the excited states of 1Σu + symmetry with the nearby excited states of 1Σg + symmetry. It also induces the first ionization from H2 to H2 + and the second ionization from H2 + to H++H+. To reduce the computational costs in the MCWP approach, a sampling method is proposed to determine in time the dominant ionization events from H2 to H2+. By conducting a trajectory analysis, which is a unique possibility within the MCWP approach, the origins of the characteristic features in the nuclear kinetic energy release spectra are identified for delays ranging from 0 to 140 fs and the nuclear dynamics in the singly excited states in H2 is mapped out.

  7. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications. PMID:27036751

  8. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Martin C., E-mail: Martin.Fischer@duke.edu; Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E. [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Warren, Warren S. [Departments of Chemistry, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications.

  9. Dynamics of Exciton Relaxation in LH2 Antenna Probed by Multipulse Nonlinear Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Cohen Stuart, T.A.; van Grondelle, R.

    2011-01-01

    We explain the relaxation dynamics in the LH2-B850 antenna as revealed by multipulse pump - dump - probe spectroscopy (Th. A. Cohen StuartM. VengrisV. I. NovoderezhkinR. J. CogdellC. N. HunterR. van Grondelle, submitted). The theory of pump - dump - probe response is evaluated using the doorway -

  10. Frequency-resolved pump-probe characterization of femtosecond infrared pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeremenko, S.; Baltuška, A.; Haan, F. de; Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Wiersma, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    A novel method for ultrashort IR pulse characterization is presented. The technique utilizes a frequency-resolved pump-probe geometry that is common in applications of ultrafast spectroscopy, without any modifications of the setup. The experimental demonstration of the method was carried out to

  11. In vivo pump-probe microscopy of melanoma and pigmented lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Mitropoulos, Tanya; Selim, M. Angelica; Zhang, Jennifer Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2012-03-01

    A growing number of dermatologists and pathologists are concerned that the rapidly rising incidence of melanoma reflects not a true 'epidemic' but an increasing tendency to overdiagnose pigmented lesions. Addressing this problem requires both a better understanding of early-stage melanoma and new diagnostic criteria based on more than just cellular morphology and architecture. Here we present a method for in-vivo optical microscopy that utilizes pump-probe spectroscopy to image the distribution of the two forms of melanin in skin: eumelanin and pheomelanin. Images are acquired in a scanning microscope with a sensitive modulation transfer technique by analyzing back-scattered probe light with a lock-in amplifier. Early-stage melanoma is studied in a human skin xenografted mouse model. Individual melanocytes have been observed, in addition to pigmented keratinocytes. Combining the pump-probe images simultaneously with other noninvasive laser microscopy methods (confocal reflectance, multiphoton autofluorescence, and second harmonic generation) allows visualization of the skin architecture, framing the functional pump-probe image in the context of the surrounding tissue morphology. It is found that pump-probe images of melanin can be acquired with low peak intensities, enabling wide field-of-view pigmentation surveys. Finally, we investigate the diagnostic potential of the additional chemical information available from pump-probe microscopy.

  12. Probing spin-vibronic dynamics using femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penfold, T. J.; Pápai, Mátyás Imre; Rozgonyi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy within the X-ray regime is now possible owing to the development of X-ray Free Electrons Lasers (X-FELs) and is opening new opportunities for the direct probing of femtosecond evolution of the nuclei, the electronic and spin degrees of freedom. In this contributi...

  13. Laser spectroscopy probes the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, J.; Billowes, J.

    1998-01-01

    Extremely sensitive optical measurements are shedding new light on the shape and size of nuclei, and the properties of nuclear matter far from stability. Of the 7000 or so isotopes known to nuclear physicists, less than 270 are stable. In general isotopes become more and more unstable as we move away from the so-called valley of stability, and therefore become more difficult to study in experiments. The tests of the theory also become more demanding. Laser spectroscopy is one of the techniques that is helping to explore the properties of these isotopes and improve our understanding of the forces inside the nucleus. High-resolution laser spectroscopy of short-lived radioactive atoms now makes it possible to measure the nuclear charge radius of many elements, including many isotopes far from stability. The method can reveal fine details of the sizes, shapes and structures of nuclei. In addition, laser spectroscopy is making significant contributions to our understanding of the nuclear force in unstable nuclei with unusual, or extreme, proton-neutron ratios. In this article the authors discuss the latest advances in studying heavy nuclei. (author)

  14. Full information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Somnath, Suhas

    2017-04-04

    Apparatus and methods are described for scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy based on acquisition of full probe response. The full probe response contains valuable information about the probe-sample interaction that is lost in traditional scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy methods. The full probe response is analyzed post data acquisition using fast Fourier transform and adaptive filtering, as well as multivariate analysis. The full response data is further compressed to retain only statistically significant components before being permanently stored.

  15. Ultrafast laser pump/x-ray probe experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, J.; Judd, E.; Schuck, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    In an ongoing project aimed at probing solids using x-rays obtained at the ALS synchrotron with a sub-picosecond time resolution following interactions with a 100 fs laser pulse, the authors have successfully performed pump-probe experiments limited by the temporal duration of ALS-pulse. They observe a drop in the diffraction efficiency following laser heating. They can attribute this to a disordering of the crystal. Studies with higher temporal resolution are required to determine the mechanism. The authors have also incorporated a low-jitter streakcamera as a diagnostic for observing time-dependant x-ray diffraction. The streakcamera triggered by a photoconductive switch was operated at kHz repetition rates. Using UV-pulses, the authors obtain a temporal response of 2 ps when averaging 5000 laser pulses. They demonstrate the ability to detect monochromatized x-ray radiation from a bend-magnet with the streak camera by measuring the pulse duration of a x-ray pulse to 70 ps. In conclusion, the authors show a rapid disordering of an InSb crystal. The resolution was determined by the duration of the ALS pulse. They also demonstrate that they can detect x-ray radiation from a synchrotron source with a temporal resolution of 2ps, by using an ultrafast x-ray streak camera. Their set-up will allow them to pursue laser pump/x-ray probe experiments to monitor structural changes in materials with ultrafast time resolution

  16. A new approach for a pump-probe photothermal experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcano O, A.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the signal, observed in a pump-probe photo-thermal experimental, are performed using a close field nonlinear geometrical optics approximation. Dependence of the thermo-optical signal from the position of the detector and magnitude of the beams spots size is studied. It is shown that the possibilities of the thermo-optical experiment, as a highly sensitive technique for light detection, can be substantially improved by increasing the probe beam spot size and varying the position of the detector in the vicinity of the sample cell. preliminary experimental results are shown for the situation of weak absorbing liquids. A good qualitative agreement between theory and experiments is obtained. (author)

  17. Probing Dynamics in Colloidal Crystals with Pump-Probe Experiments at LCLS: Methodology and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastasia Mukharamova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present results of the studies of dynamics in colloidal crystals performed by pump-probe experiments using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL. Colloidal crystals were pumped with an infrared laser at a wavelength of 800 nm with varying power and probed by XFEL pulses at an energy of 8 keV with a time delay up to 1000 ps. The positions of the Bragg peaks, and their radial and azimuthal widths were analyzed as a function of the time delay. The spectral analysis of the data did not reveal significant enhancement of frequencies expected in this experiment. This allowed us to conclude that the amplitude of vibrational modes excited in colloidal crystals was less than the systematic error caused by the noise level.

  18. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glownia, James; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Cryan, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Andreasson, J.; /Uppsala U.; Belkacem, A.; /LBNL, Berkeley; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U.; Blaga, C.L.; /Ohio State U.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; /SLAC; DiMauro, L.F.; /Ohio State U.; Fang, L.; /Western Michigan U.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Gessner, O.; /LBNL; Guhr, M.; /SLAC; Hajdu, J.; /Uppsala U.; Hertlein, M.P.; /LBNL; Hoener, M.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; /LBNL; Marangos, J.P.; /Imperial Coll., London; March, A.M.; /Argonne; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  19. Mid-infrared picosecond pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe experiments to resolve a ground-state intermediate in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Clark, Ian P; Towrie, Michael; van Thor, Jasper J

    2009-12-24

    Multipulse picosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy has been used to study photochemical reactions of the cyanobacterial phytochrome photoreceptor Cph1. Different photophysical schemes have been discussed in the literature to describe the pathways after photoexcitation, particularly, to identify reaction phases that are linked to photoisomerisation and electronic decay in the 1566-1772 cm(-1) region that probes C=C and C=O stretching modes of the tetrapyrrole chromophore. Here, multipulse spectroscopy is employed, where, compared to conventional visible pump-mid-infrared probe spectroscopy, an additional visible pulse is incorporated that interacts with populations that are evolving on the excited- and ground-state potential energy surfaces. The time delays between the pump and the dump pulse are chosen such that the dump pulse interacts with different phases in the reaction process. The pump and dump pulses are at the same wavelength, 640 nm, and are resonant with the Pr ground state as well as with the excited state and intermediates. Because the dump pulse additionally pumps the remaining, partially recovered, and partially oriented ground-state population, theory is developed for estimating the fraction of excited-state molecules. The calculations take into account the model-dependent ground-state recovery fraction, the angular dependence of the population transfer resulting from the finite bleach that occurs with linearly polarized intense femtosecond optical excitation, and the partially oriented population for the dump field. Distinct differences between the results from the experiments that use a 1 or a 14 ps dump time favor a branching evolution from S1 to an excited state or reconfigured chromophore and to a newly identified ground-state intermediate (GSI). Optical dumping at 1 ps shows the instantaneous induced absorption of a delocalized C=C stretching mode at 1608 cm(-1), where the increased cross section is associated with the electronic ground

  20. Dynamics of exciton relaxation in LH2 antenna probed by multipulse nonlinear spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Cohen Stuart, Thomas A; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2011-04-28

    We explain the relaxation dynamics in the LH2-B850 antenna as revealed by multipulse pump-dump-probe spectroscopy (Th. A. Cohen Stuart, M. Vengris, V. I. Novoderezhkin, R. J. Cogdell, C. N. Hunter, R. van Grondelle, submitted). The theory of pump-dump-probe response is evaluated using the doorway-window approach in combination with the modified Redfield theory. We demonstrate that a simultaneous fit of linear spectra, pump-probe, and pump-dump-probe kinetics can be obtained at a quantitative level using the disordered exciton model, which is essentially the same as used to model the spectral fluctuations in single LH2 complexes (Novoderezhkin, V.; Rutkauskas, D.; van Grondelle, R. Biophys. J. 2006, 90, 2890). The present studies suggest that the observed relaxation rates are strongly dependent on the realization of the disorder. A big spread of the rates (exceeding 3 orders of magnitude) is correlated with the disorder-induced changes in delocalization length and overlap of the exciton wave functions. We conclude that the bulk kinetics reflect a superposition of many pathways corresponding to different physical limits of energy transfer, varying from sub-20 fs relaxation between delocalized and highly spatially overlapping exciton states to >20 ps jumps between states localized at the opposite sides of the ring.

  1. Pump-probe study of the formation of rubidium molecules by ultrafast photoassociation of ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, David J.; England, Duncan G.; Martay, Hugo E. L.; Friedman, Melissa E.; Petrovic, Jovana; Dimova, Emiliya; Chatel, Béatrice; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2009-09-01

    An experimental pump-probe study of the photoassociative creation of translationally ultracold rubidium molecules is presented together with numerical simulations of the process. The formation of loosely bound excited-state dimers is observed as a first step toward a fully coherent pump-dump approach to the stabilization of Rb2 into its lowest ground vibrational states. The population that contributes to the pump-probe process is characterized and found to be distinct from a background population of preassociated molecules.

  2. Pump laser-induced space-charge effects in HHG-driven time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oloff, L.-P., E-mail: oloff@physik.uni-kiel.de; Hanff, K.; Stange, A.; Rohde, G.; Diekmann, F.; Bauer, M.; Rossnagel, K., E-mail: rossnagel@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-06-14

    With the advent of ultrashort-pulsed extreme ultraviolet sources, such as free-electron lasers or high-harmonic-generation (HHG) sources, a new research field for photoelectron spectroscopy has opened up in terms of femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments. The impact of the high peak brilliance of these novel sources on photoemission spectra, so-called vacuum space-charge effects caused by the Coulomb interaction among the photoemitted probe electrons, has been studied extensively. However, possible distortions of the energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons caused by the low photon energy pump pulse due to the nonlinear emission of electrons have not been studied in detail yet. Here, we systematically investigate these pump laser-induced space-charge effects in a HHG-based experiment for the test case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Specifically, we determine how the key parameters of the pump pulse—the excitation density, wavelength, spot size, and emitted electron energy distribution—affect the measured time-dependent energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons. The results are well reproduced by a simple mean-field model, which could open a path for the correction of pump laser-induced space-charge effects and thus toward probing ultrafast electron dynamics in strongly excited materials.

  3. Pump-probe study of atoms and small molecules with laser driven high order harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei

    A commercially available modern laser can emit over 1015 photons within a time window of a few tens of femtoseconds (10-15second), which can be focused into a spot size of about 10 mum, resulting in a peak intensity above 1014W/cm2. This paves the way for table-top strong field physics studies such as above threshold ionization (ATI), non-sequential double ionization (NSDI), high order harmonic generation (HHG), etc.. Among these strong laser-matter interactions, high order harmonic generation, which combines many photons of the fundamental laser field into a single photon, offers a unique way to generate light sources in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) or extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region. High order harmonic photons are emitted within a short time window from a few tens of femtoseconds down to a few hundreds of attoseconds (10 -18second). This highly coherent nature of HHG allows it to be synchronized with an infrared (IR) laser pulse, and the pump-probe technique can be adopted to study ultrafast dynamic processes in a quantum system. The major work of this thesis is to develop a table-top VUV(EUV) light source based on HHG, and use it to study dynamic processes in atoms and small molecules with the VUV(EUV)-pump IR-probe method. A Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) apparatus is used for momentum imaging of the interaction products. Two types of high harmonic pump pulses are generated and applied for pump-probe studies. The first one consists of several harmonics forming a short attosecond pulse train (APT) in the EUV regime (around 40 eV). We demonstrate that, (1) the auto-ionization process triggered by the EUV in cation carbon-monoxide and oxygen molecules can be modified by scanning the EUV-IR delay, (2) the phase information of quantum trajectories in bifurcated high harmonics can be extracted by performing an EUV-IR cross-correlation experiment, thus disclosing the macroscopic quantum control in HHG. The second type of high harmonic source

  4. Techniques for Pump-Probe Synchronisation of Fsec Radiation Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Schlarb, Holger

    2005-01-01

    The increasing interest on the production of ultra-short photon pulses in future generations of Free-Electron Lasers operating in the UV, VUV or X-ray regime demands new techniques to reliably measure and control the arrival time of the FEL-pulses at the experiment. For pump-probe experiments using external optical lasers the desired synchronisation is in the order of tens of femtoseconds, the typical duration of the FEL pulse. Since, the accelerators are large scale facilities of the length of several hundred meters or even kilometers, the problem of synchronisation has to be attacked twofold. First, the RF acceleration sections upstream of the magnetic bunch compressors need to be stabilised in amplitude and phase to high precision. Second, the remain electron beam timing jitter needs to be determined with femtosecond accuracy for off-line analysis. In this talk, several techniques using the electron or the FEL beam to monitor the arrival time are presented, and the proposed layout of the synchronisation sy...

  5. High Speed Pump-Probe Apparatus for Observation of Transitional Effects in Ultrafast Laser Micromachining Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Alexeev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A pump-probe experimental approach has been shown to be a very efficient tool for the observation and analysis of various laser matter interaction effects. In those setups, synchronized laser pulses are used to create an event (pump and to simultaneously observe it (probe. In general, the physical effects that can be investigated with such an apparatus are restricted by the temporal resolution of the probe pulse and the observation window. The latter can be greatly extended by adjusting the pump-probe time delay under the assumption that the interaction process remains fairly reproducible. Unfortunately, this assumption becomes invalid in the case of high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser material processing, where the irradiation history strongly affects the ongoing interaction process. In this contribution, the authors present an extension of the pump-probe setup that allows to investigate transitional and dynamic effects present during ultrafast laser machining performed at high pulse repetition frequencies.

  6. User oriented end-station on VUV pump-probe magneto-optical ellipsometry at ELI beamlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Shirly; Neuber, Gerd; Brooks, Christopher D.; Besner, Bastian; Hashemi, Maryam; Rübhausen, Michael; Andreasson, Jakob

    2017-11-01

    A state of the art ellipsometer for user operations is being implemented at ELI Beamlines in Prague, Czech Republic. It combines three of the most promising and exotic forms of ellipsometry: VUV, pump-probe and magneto-optical ellipsometry. This new ellipsometer covers a spectral operational range from the NIR up to the VUV, with high through-put between 1 and 40 eV. The ellipsometer also allows measurements of magneto-optical spectra with a 1 kHz switchable magnetic field of up to 1.5 T across the sample combining ellipsometry and Kerr spectroscopy measurements in an unprecedented spectral range. This form of generalized ellipsometry enables users to address diagonal and off-diagonal components of the dielectric tensor within one measurement. Pump-probe measurements enable users to study the dynamic behaviour of the dielectric tensor in order to resolve the time-domain phenomena in the femto to 100 ns range.

  7. Probing giant magnetoresistance with THz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Tkach, Alexander; Casper, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA.......We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA....

  8. Isolated Gramicidin Peptides Probed by IR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijs, A. M.; Kabelac, M.; Abo-Riziq, A.; Hobza, P.; de Vries, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    We report double-resonant IR/UV ion-dip spectroscopy of neutral gramicidin peptides in the gas phase. The IR spectra of gramicidin A and C, recorded in both the 1000 cm(-1) to 1800 cm(-1) and the 2700 to 3750 cm(-1) region, allow structural analysis. By studying this broad IR range, various local

  9. Isolated Gramicidin Peptides Probed by IR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rijs, A. M.; Kabeláč, Martin; Abo-Riziq, A.; Hobza, Pavel; de Vries, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2011), s. 1816-1821 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR IAA400550808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : density functional calculations * gramicidin * IR spectroscopy * protein folding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.412, year: 2011

  10. Analysis of femtosecond pump-probe photoelectron-photoion coincidence measurements applying Bayesian probability theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumetshofer, M.; Heim, P.; Thaler, B.; Ernst, W. E.; Koch, M.; von der Linden, W.

    2018-06-01

    Ultrafast dynamical processes in photoexcited molecules can be observed with pump-probe measurements, in which information about the dynamics is obtained from the transient signal associated with the excited state. Background signals provoked by pump and/or probe pulses alone often obscure these excited-state signals. Simple subtraction of pump-only and/or probe-only measurements from the pump-probe measurement, as commonly applied, results in a degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio and, in the case of coincidence detection, the danger of overrated background subtraction. Coincidence measurements additionally suffer from false coincidences, requiring long data-acquisition times to keep erroneous signals at an acceptable level. Here we present a probabilistic approach based on Bayesian probability theory that overcomes these problems. For a pump-probe experiment with photoelectron-photoion coincidence detection, we reconstruct the interesting excited-state spectrum from pump-probe and pump-only measurements. This approach allows us to treat background and false coincidences consistently and on the same footing. We demonstrate that the Bayesian formalism has the following advantages over simple signal subtraction: (i) the signal-to-noise ratio is significantly increased, (ii) the pump-only contribution is not overestimated, (iii) false coincidences are excluded, (iv) prior knowledge, such as positivity, is consistently incorporated, (v) confidence intervals are provided for the reconstructed spectrum, and (vi) it is applicable to any experimental situation and noise statistics. Most importantly, by accounting for false coincidences, the Bayesian approach allows us to run experiments at higher ionization rates, resulting in a significant reduction of data acquisition times. The probabilistic approach is thoroughly scrutinized by challenging mock data. The application to pump-probe coincidence measurements on acetone molecules enables quantitative interpretations

  11. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...

  12. Controlling the optical bistability and multistability in a two-level pumped-probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad; Sahrai, Mostafa; Masoumeh Mousavi, Seyede

    2010-01-01

    We study the behavior of the optical bistability (OB) and multistability (OM) in a two-level pumped-probe atomic system by means of a unidirectional ring cavity. We show that the optical bistability in a two-level atomic system can be controlled by adjusting the intensity of the pump field and the detuning between two fields. We find that applying the pumping field decreases the threshold of the optical bistability.

  13. Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with probe-laser-intensity fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloy, K.

    2018-03-01

    We examine the influence of probe-laser-intensity fluctuations on hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy. We assume, as is appropriate for relevant cases of interest, that the probe-laser intensity I determines both the Rabi frequency (∝√{I } ) and the frequency shift to the atomic transition (∝I ) during probe-laser interactions with the atom. The spectroscopic signal depends on these two quantities that covary with fluctuations in the probe-laser intensity. Introducing a simple model for the fluctuations, we find that the signature robustness of the hyper-Ramsey method can be compromised. Taking the Yb+ electric octupole clock transition as an example, we quantify the clock error under different levels of probe-laser-intensity fluctuations.

  14. Probing nanoscale ferroelectricity by ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenne, D A; Bruchhausen, A; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N D; Fainstein, A; Katiyar, R S; Cantarero, A; Soukiassian, A; Vaithyanathan, V; Haeni, J H; Tian, W; Schlom, D G; Choi, K J; Kim, D M; Eom, C B; Sun, H P; Pan, X Q; Li, Y L; Chen, L Q; Jia, Q X; Nakhmanson, S M; Rabe, K M; Xi, X X

    2006-09-15

    We demonstrated that ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique to measure the transition temperature (Tc) in ferroelectric ultrathin films and superlattices. We showed that one-unit-cell-thick BaTiO3 layers in BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices are not only ferroelectric (with Tc as high as 250 kelvin) but also polarize the quantum paraelectric SrTiO3 layers adjacent to them. Tc was tuned by approximately 500 kelvin by varying the thicknesses of the BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 layers, revealing the essential roles of electrical and mechanical boundary conditions for nanoscale ferroelectricity.

  15. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper J. van Thor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/σI must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe” which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ΔF, in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.

  16. Dynamic characterization of silicon nanowires using a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer-based pump-probe scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua; Cleary, C. S.; Dailey, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic phase and amplitude all-optical responses of silicon nanowires are characterized using a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) based pump-probe scheme. Ultra-fast recovery is observed for moderate pump powers....

  17. Pump-probe experiments in atoms involving laser and synchrotron radiation: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuilleumier, F J; Meyer, M

    2006-01-01

    The combined use of laser and synchrotron radiations for atomic photoionization studies started in the early 1980s. The strong potential of these pump-probe experiments to gain information on excited atomic states is illustrated through some exemplary studies. The first series of experiments carried out with the early synchrotron sources, from 1960 to about 1995, are reviewed, including photoionization of unpolarized and polarized excited atoms, and time-resolved laser-synchrotron studies. With the most advanced generation of synchrotron sources, a whole new class of pump-probe experiments benefiting from the high brightness of the new synchrotron beams has been developed since 1996. A detailed review of these studies as well as possible future applications of pump-probe experiments using third generation synchrotron sources and free electron lasers is presented. (topical review)

  18. Femtosecond pump-probe studies of phonons and carriers in bismuth under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasami, M.; Ogino, T.; Mishina, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Nakahara, J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the high-pressure phase of Bi under hydrostatic pressure using pump-probe spectroscopy at pressures up to 3.0 GPa, and we observe coherent phonons signal and relaxation signal of photo-excited carriers at Bi(II) and Bi(III) phases. The pressure dependence of the coherent phonons shows that the amplitude of coherent phonons is extremely small and the frequency of coherent phonons changes at high-pressure phases. As results from our experiment, we obtain its frequencies are 2.5 and 2.2 THz at Bi(II) and Bi(III), respectively. Furthermore, photo-excited carrier relaxation indicates drastic changes near 2.5 GPa. Bismuth transforms from semimetal to semiconductor near 2.5 GPa, and band-overlapping between at L-point and at T-point disappears. We consider that the drastic changes of the photo-excited carrier relaxation are strongly correlated with the band-overlapping disappearing

  19. Versatile ultrafast pump-probe imaging with high sensitivity CCD camera

    OpenAIRE

    Pezeril , Thomas; Klieber , Christoph; Temnov , Vasily; Huntzinger , Jean-Roch; Anane , Abdelmadjid

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A powerful imaging technique based on femtosecond time-resolved measurements with a high dynamic range, commercial CCD camera is presented. Ultrafast phenomena induced by a femtosecond laser pump are visualized through the lock-in type acquisition of images recorded by a femtosecond laser probe. This technique allows time-resolved measurements of laser excited phenomena at multiple probe wavelengths (spectrometer mode) or conventional imaging of the sample surface (ima...

  20. Real-time ultrafast dynamics of dense, hot matter measured by pump-probe Doppler spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lad, Amit D; Mondal, S; Narayanan, V; Ahmed, Saima; Kumar, G Ravindra; Rajeev, P P; Robinson, A P L [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Pasley, J, E-mail: amitlad@tifr.res.i [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    A detailed understanding of the critical surface motion of high intensity laser produced plasma is very crucial for understanding the interaction. We employ the two colour pump-probe technique to report the first ever femtosecond scale ultrafast dynamics measurement of the critical surface of a solid plasma produced by a relativistically intense, femtosecond pump laser beam (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, 30 fs, 800 nm) on an aluminium target. We observe the Doppler shift of a time delayed probe laser beam (10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}, 80 fs, 400 nm) up to delays of 30 ps. Such unravelling of dynamics has not been possible in earlier measurements, which typically used the self reflection of a powerful pump pulse. We observe time dependent red and blue shifts and measure their magnitudes to infer plasma expansion velocity and acceleration and thereby the plasma profile. Our results are very well reproduced by 1D hydrodynamic simulation (HYADES code).

  1. Femtosecond pump–probe spectroscopy of graphene oxide in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Jingzhi; Ma, Lin; Li, Jiewei; Ai, Wei; Yu, Ting; Gurzadyan, Gagik G

    2014-01-01

    Transient absorption properties of aqueous graphene oxide (GO) have been studied by use of femtosecond pump–probe spectroscopy. Excited state absorption and photobleaching are observed in the wide spectral range. The observed fast three lifetime components are attributed to the absorption of upper excited states and localized states, which is confirmed by both laser induced absorption and transmission kinetics. The longest time component is assigned to the lowest excited state of GO, which mainly originates from the sp2 domains. With the increase of the excitation power, two-quantum absorption occurs, which results in an additional rise-time component of the observed transients. (paper)

  2. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    tunneling microscope (STM). Especially at low temperatures the Kondo resonance is used to probe magnetic interaction with ferromagnetic islands and between two atoms. The latter showing a crossover between Kondo screened atoms and antiferromagnetically coupled atoms close to the quantum critical point....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...

  3. Ultrafast carrier thermalization in lead iodide perovskite probed with two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Johannes M; Branchi, Federico; Valduga de Almeida Camargo, Franco; Zhao, Baodan; Friend, Richard H; Cerullo, Giulio; Deschler, Felix

    2017-08-29

    In band-like semiconductors, charge carriers form a thermal energy distribution rapidly after optical excitation. In hybrid perovskites, the cooling of such thermal carrier distributions occurs on timescales of about 300 fs via carrier-phonon scattering. However, the initial build-up of the thermal distribution proved difficult to resolve with pump-probe techniques due to the requirement of high resolution, both in time and pump energy. Here, we use two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with sub-10 fs resolution to directly observe the carrier interactions that lead to a thermal carrier distribution. We find that thermalization occurs dominantly via carrier-carrier scattering under the investigated fluences and report the dependence of carrier scattering rates on excess energy and carrier density. We extract characteristic carrier thermalization times from below 10 to 85 fs. These values allow for mobilities of 500 cm 2  V -1  s -1 at carrier densities lower than 2 × 10 19  cm -3 and limit the time for carrier extraction in hot carrier solar cells.Carrier-carrier scattering rates determine the fundamental limits of carrier transport and electronic coherence. Using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with sub-10 fs resolution, Richter and Branchi et al. extract carrier thermalization times of 10 to 85 fs in hybrid perovskites.

  4. Two-tint pump-probe measurements using a femtosecond laser oscillator and sharp-edged optical filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kwangu; Koh, Yee Kan; Chiritescu, Catalin; Zheng, Xuan; Cahill, David G

    2008-11-01

    We describe a simple approach for rejecting unwanted scattered light in two types of time-resolved pump-probe measurements, time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) and time-resolved incoherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TRIARS). Sharp edged optical filters are used to create spectrally distinct pump and probe beams from the broad spectral output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser oscillator. For TDTR, the diffusely scattered pump light is then blocked by a third optical filter. For TRIARS, depolarized scattering created by the pump is shifted in frequency by approximately 250 cm(-1) relative to the polarized scattering created by the probe; therefore, spectral features created by the pump and probe scattering can be easily distinguished.

  5. Nonlinear Dielectric Spectroscopy as an Indirect Probe of Metabolic Activity in Thylakoid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy (NDS is a non-invasive probe of cellular metabolic activity with potential application in the development of whole-cell biosensors. However, the mechanism of NDS interaction with metabolic membrane proteins is poorly understood, partly due to the inherent complexity of single cell organisms. Here we use the light-activated electron transport chain of spinach thylakoid membrane as a model system to study how NDS interacts with metabolic activity. We find protein modification, as opposed to membrane pump activity, to be the dominant source of NDS signal change in this system. Potential mechanisms for such protein modifications include reactive oxygen species generation and light-activated phosphorylation.

  6. X-Ray Emission Spectrometer Design with Single-Shot Pump-Probe and Resonant Excitation Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoth, Katherine; /SUNY, Buffalo /SLAC

    2012-08-28

    Core-level spectroscopy in the soft X-ray regime is a powerful tool for the study of chemical bonding processes. The ultrafast, ultrabright X-ray pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) allow these reactions to be studied in greater detail than ever before. In this study, we investigated a conceptual design of a spectrometer for the LCLS with imaging in the non-dispersive direction. This would allow single-shot collection of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements with varying laser pump X-ray probe delay or a variation of incoming X-ray energy over the illuminated area of the sample. Ray-tracing simulations were used to demonstrate how the components of the spectrometer affect its performance, allowing a determination of the optimal final design. These simulations showed that the spectrometer's non-dispersive focusing is extremely sensitive to the size of the sample footprint; the spectrometer is not able to image a footprint width larger than one millimeter with the required resolution. This is compatible with a single shot scheme that maps out the laser pump X-ray probe delay in the non-dispersive direction as well as resonant XES applications at normal incidence. However, the current capabilities of the Soft X-Ray (SXR) beamline at the LCLS do not produce the required energy range in a small enough sample footprint, hindering the single shot resonant XES application at SXR for chemical dynamics studies at surfaces. If an upgraded or future beamline at LCLS is developed with lower monochromator energy dispersion the width can be made small enough at the required energy range to be imaged by this spectrometer design.

  7. Synchronized and configurable source of electrical pulses for x-ray pump-probe experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J. P.; Chembrolu, V.; Yu, X. W.; Tyliszczak, T.; Acremann, Y.

    2007-01-01

    A method is described for the generation of software tunable patterns of nanosecond electrical pulses. The bipolar, high repetition rate (up to 250 MHz), fast rise time (<30 ps), square pulses are suitable for applications such as the excitation sequence in dynamic pump-probe experiments. Synchronization with the time structure of a synchrotron facility is possible as well as fine control of the relative delay in steps of 10 ps. The pulse generator described here is used to excite magnetic nanostructures with current pulses. Having an excitation system which can match the high repetition rate of a synchrotron allows for utilization of the full x-ray flux and is needed in experiments which require a large photon flux. The fast rise times allow for picosecond time resolution in pump-probe experiments. All pulse pattern parameters are configurable by software

  8. Heterodyne pump probe measurements of nonlinear dynamics in an indium phosphide photonic crystal cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Mikkel; Combrié, S.; Lehoucq, G.

    2013-01-01

    Using a sensitive two-color heterodyne pump-probe technique, we investigate the carrier dynamics of an InP photonic crystal nanocavity. The heterodyne technique provides unambiguous results for all wavelength configurations, including the degenerate case, which cannot be investigated with the wid......Using a sensitive two-color heterodyne pump-probe technique, we investigate the carrier dynamics of an InP photonic crystal nanocavity. The heterodyne technique provides unambiguous results for all wavelength configurations, including the degenerate case, which cannot be investigated...... with the widely used homodyne technique. A model based on coupled mode theory including two carrier distributions is introduced to account for the relaxation dynamics, which is assumed to be governed by both diffusion and recombination....

  9. Probing new light force-mediators by isotope shift spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berengut, Julian C.; Budker, Dmitry; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Delaunay, Cedric

    2017-04-01

    In this Letter we explore the potential of probing new light force-carriers, with spin-independent couplings to the electron and the neutron, using precision isotope shift spectroscopy. We develop a formalism to interpret linear King plots as bounds on new physics with minimal theory inputs. We focus only on bounding the new physics contributions that can be calculated independently of the Standard Model nuclear effects. We apply our method to existing Ca"+ data and project its sensitivity to possibly existing new bosons using narrow transitions in other atoms and ions (specifically, Sr and Yb). Future measurements are expected to improve the relative precision by five orders of magnitude, and can potentially lead to an unprecedented sensitivity for bosons within the 10 keV to 10 MeV mass range.

  10. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet

    2014-01-01

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing

  11. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet [Terahertz Systems Laboratory (TeSLa) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  12. Probing new light force-mediators by isotope shift spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berengut, Julian C. [New South Wales Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Budker, Dmitry [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Inst. Mainz; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Physics Dept.; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.; Delaunay, Cedric [Savoie Mont Blanc Univ., Annecy-le-Vieux (France). Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Theorique LAPTh; and others

    2017-04-15

    In this Letter we explore the potential of probing new light force-carriers, with spin-independent couplings to the electron and the neutron, using precision isotope shift spectroscopy. We develop a formalism to interpret linear King plots as bounds on new physics with minimal theory inputs. We focus only on bounding the new physics contributions that can be calculated independently of the Standard Model nuclear effects. We apply our method to existing Ca{sup +} data and project its sensitivity to possibly existing new bosons using narrow transitions in other atoms and ions (specifically, Sr and Yb). Future measurements are expected to improve the relative precision by five orders of magnitude, and can potentially lead to an unprecedented sensitivity for bosons within the 10 keV to 10 MeV mass range.

  13. Langmuir probe measurements in the TEXTOR tokamak during ALT-I pump limiter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, D.M.; Campbell, G.A.; Conn, R.W.; Leung, W.K.; Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H.; Thomas, G.J.; Pontau, A.E.

    1986-04-01

    Langmuir probes have been used to characterize the edge plasma of the TEXTOR tokamak and measure the parameters of the plasma incident on the ALT-I pump limiter during ohmic and ICRH heating. Probes mounted directly on the ALT limiter, and a scanning probe located 90 0 toroidally from the limiter, provide data for the evaluation of pump limiter performance and its effect on the edge plasma. The edge plasma is characterized by density and flux e-folding lengths of about 1.8cm when ALT is the main limiter. These scrape-off lengths do not vary significantly as ALT is moved between the normal 42-46cm minor radii, but increase to over 2.2cm when ALT is inserted to 40cm. The flux to probes at a fixed position in the limiter shadow varies by less than 25% for core density changes of a factor of five. This suggests that the global particle confinement time tau/sub p/, scales as the core density. Estimates from the probes indicate that tau/sub p/ is on the order of the energy confinement time, tau/sub E/. The edge electron temperature, T/sub e/, typically decreases by a factor of two when the core density is raised from 1 to 4 x 10 13 cm -3 . The T/sub e/ profile is essentially flat in the limiter shadow, with values of 10-25 eV depending on the core plasma density and ICRH power. ICRH heating increases the electron temperature and flux in proportion to the coupled power. With ALT as the primary limiter and no direct shadowing, the ion side receives 2 to 3 times the flux of the electron side during both ohmic and ICRH heating. The edge plasma is not directly modified by pump limiter operation, but changes with the core plasma density as particle removal lowers the recycling of neutrals in the boundary

  14. Mitochondrial respiratory complex I probed by delayed luminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Irina; Ionescu, Diana; Privitera, Simona; Scordino, Agata; Mocanu, Maria Magdalena; Musumeci, Francesco; Grasso, Rosaria; Gulino, Marisa; Iftime, Adrian; Tofolean, Ioana Teodora; Garaiman, Alexandru; Goicea, Alexandru; Irimia, Ruxandra; Dimancea, Alexandru; Ganea, Constanta

    2013-12-01

    The role of mitochondrial complex I in ultraweak photon-induced delayed photon emission [delayed luminescence (DL)] of human leukemia Jurkat T cells was probed by using complex I targeting agents like rotenone, menadione, and quercetin. Rotenone, a complex I-specific inhibitor, dose-dependently increased the mitochondrial level of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), decreased clonogenic survival, and induced apoptosis. A strong correlation was found between the mitochondrial levels of NADH and oxidized flavin mononucleotide (FMNox) in rotenone-, menadione- and quercetin-treated cells. Rotenone enhanced DL dose-dependently, whereas quercetin and menadione inhibited DL as well as NADH or FMNox. Collectively, the data suggest that DL of Jurkat cells originates mainly from mitochondrial complex I, which functions predominantly as a dimer and less frequently as a tetramer. In individual monomers, both pairs of pyridine nucleotide (NADH/reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) sites and flavin (FMN-a/FMN-b) sites appear to bind cooperatively their specific ligands. Enhancement of delayed red-light emission by rotenone suggests that the mean time for one-electron reduction of ubiquinone or FMN-a by the terminal Fe/S center (N2) is 20 or 284 μs, respectively. All these findings suggest that DL spectroscopy could be used as a reliable, sensitive, and robust technique to probe electron flow within complex I in situ.

  15. Thirteen pump-probe resonances of the sodium D1 line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Vincent; Boyd, Robert W.; Stroud, C. R. Jr.; Bennink, Ryan S.; Marino, Alberto M.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a pump-probe laser spectroscopic investigation of the Doppler-broadened sodium D1 resonance line. We find 13 resonances in the resulting spectra. These observations are well described by the numerical predictions of a four-level atomic model of the hyperfine structure of the sodium D1 line. We also find that many, but not all, of these features can be understood in terms of processes originating in a two-level or three-level subset of the full four-level model. The processes we observed include forward near-degenerate four-wave mixing and saturation in a two-level system, difference-frequency crossing and nondegenerate four-wave mixing in a three-level V system, electromagnetically induced transparency and optical pumping in a three-level lambda system, cross-transition resonance in a four-level double-lambda system, and conventional optical pumping. Most of these processes lead to sub-Doppler or even subnatural linewidths. The dependence of these resonances on the pump intensity and pump detuning from atomic resonance are also studied

  16. Effects of moderate pump and Stokes chirp on chirped-probe pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering thermometry

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Mingming; Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of moderate levels of chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses on chirped-probe-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CPP fs CARS) were investigated. The frequency chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses was introduced

  17. Diagnosis and staging of female genital tract melanocytic lesions using pump-probe microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Selim, Maria A.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-02-01

    Melanoma of the vulva is the second most common type of malignancy afflicting that organ. This disease caries poor prognosis, and shows tendencies to recur locally and develop distant metastases through hematogenous dissemination. Further, there exists significant clinical overlap between early-stage melanomas and melanotic macules, benign lesions that are believed to develop in about 10% of the general female population. In this work we apply a novel nonlinear optical method, pump-probe microscopy, to quantitatively analyze female genitalia tract melanocytic lesions. Pump-probe microscopy provides chemical information of endogenous pigments by probing their electronic excited state dynamics, with subcellular resolution. Using unstained biopsy sections from 31 patients, we find significant differences between melanin type and structure in tissue regions with invasive melanoma, melanoma in-situ and non-malignant melanocytic proliferations (e.g., nevi, melanocytic macules). The molecular images of non-malignant lesion have a well-organized structure, with relatively homogenous pigment chemistry, most often consistent with that of eumelanin with large aggregate size or void of metals, such as iron. On the other hand, pigment type and structure observed in melanomas in-situ and invasive melanomas is typically much more heterogeneous, with larger contributions from pheomelanin, melanins with larger metal content, and/or melanins with smaller aggregate size. Of most significance, clear differences can be observed between melanocytic macules and vulvar melanoma in-situ, which, as discussed above, can be difficult to clinically distinguish. This initial study demonstrates pump-probe microscopy's potential as an adjuvant diagnostic tool by revealing systematic chemical and morphological differences in melanin pigmentation among invasive melanoma, melanoma in-situ and non-malignant melanocytic lesions.

  18. Fiber-based modulated optical reflectance configuration allowing for offset pump and probe beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A.; Folsom, C.; Jensen, C.; Ban, H.

    2016-12-01

    A new fiber-based modulated optical reflectance configuration is developed in this work. The technique maintains the fiber-based heating laser (pump) and detection laser (probe) in close proximity at a fixed separation distance in a ceramic ferrule. The pump beam periodically heats the sample inducing thermal waves into the sample. The probe beam measures the temperature response at a known distance from the pump beam over a range of heating modulation frequencies. The thermal diffusivity of the sample may be calculated from the phase response between the input heat flux and the temperature response of a sample having a reflective surface. The unique measurement configuration is ideal for in situ measurements and has many advantages for laboratory-based systems. The design and development of the system are reported along with theoretical justification for the experimental design. The thermal diffusivities of Ge and SiC are measured and found to be within 10% of reported literature values. The diffusivity for SiO2 is measured with a relative difference of approximately 100% from the literature value when the ferrule is in contact with the sample. An additional measurement was made on the SiO2 sample with the ferrule not in contact resulting in a difference of less than 2% from the literature value. The difference in the SiO2 measurement when the ferrule is in contact with the sample is likely due to a parallel heat transfer path through the dual-fiber ferrule assembly.

  19. Resolution enhancement of pump-probe microscope with an inverse-annular filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kawasumi, Koshi; Miyazaki, Jun; Nakata, Kazuaki

    2018-04-01

    Optical pump-probe microscopy can provide images by detecting changes in probe light intensity induced by stimulated emission, photoinduced absorbance change, or photothermal-induced refractive index change in either transmission or reflection mode. Photothermal microscopy, which is one type of optical pump-probe microscopy, has intrinsically super resolution capability due to the bilinear dependence of signal intensity of pump and probe. We introduce new techniques for further resolution enhancement and fast imaging in photothermal microscope. First, we introduce a new pupil filter, an inverse-annular pupil filter in a pump-probe photothermal microscope, which provides resolution enhancement in three dimensions. The resolutions are proved to be improved in lateral and axial directions by imaging experiment using 20-nm gold nanoparticles. The improvement in X (perpendicular to the common pump and probe polarization direction), Y (parallel to the polarization direction), and Z (axial direction) are by 15 ± 6, 8 ± 8, and 21 ± 2% from the resolution without a pupil filter. The resolution enhancement is even better than the calculation using vector field, which predicts the corresponding enhancement of 11, 8, and 6%. The discussion is made to explain the unexpected results. We also demonstrate the photothermal imaging of thick biological samples (cells from rabbit intestine and kidney) stained with hematoxylin and eosin dye with the inverse-annular filter. Second, a fast, high-sensitivity photothermal microscope is developed by implementing a spatially segmented balanced detection scheme into a laser scanning microscope using a Galvano mirror. We confirm a 4.9 times improvement in signal-to-noise ratio in the spatially segmented balanced detection compared with that of conventional detection. The system demonstrates simultaneous bi-modal photothermal and confocal fluorescence imaging of transgenic mouse brain tissue with a pixel dwell time of 20 µs. The

  20. Picosecond rotationally resolved stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanjaroon, Chakree; Reeve, Scott W.; Ford, Alan; Murry, W. Dean; Lyon, Kevin; Yount, Bret; Britton, Dan; Burns, William A.; Allen, Susan D.; Bruce Johnson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Stimulated emission pumping for nitric oxide was studied using picosecond lasers. ► Weak and tightly focused pulses provide sufficient energy for population transfer. ► Selective excitation at the bandhead yields strong fluorescence depletion signals. ► We observe 19% population transfer to v″ = 2 of the X 2 Π 1/2 ground electronic state. - Abstract: Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) experiments were performed on the nitric oxide molecule in a flow cell environment using lasers with pulse widths of 17–25 ps. A lambda excitation scheme, or ‘‘pump–dump” arrangement, was employed with the pump laser tuned to the T 00 vibronic band origin (λ pump =226.35(1)nm) of the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) ← X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 0, J″) and the dump laser scanned from 246–248 nm within the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) → X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 2, J″) transition. The rotationally resolved SEP spectra were measured by observing the total fluorescence within the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) → X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 1, J″) transition between 235 nm and 237.2 nm while scanning the dump laser wavelengths. Multiple rotational states were excited due to the broad laser bandwidth. Measurements showed that the resolved rotational structure depended on the energy and bandwidth of the applied pump and dump laser pulses. Analysis of the observed fluorescence depletion signals yielded an average percent fluorescence depletion of about 19% when λ pump =226.35(1)nm and λ dump =247.91(1)nm. This value reflects the percent transfer of the NO population from the A 2 Σ + (V′ = 0, J′) excited electronic state to the X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 2, J″) ground electronic state. The maximum expected depletion is 50% in the limit of dump saturation. Selective excitation of NO at the bandhead provides good spectral discrimination from the background emission and noise and unambiguously confirms the identity of the emitter.

  1. Development of a Pump-Probe System using a Non-Coated ZnSe Beam Splitter Cube for an MIR-FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Heya, Manabu; Horiike, Hiroshi; Ishii, Katsonuri; Suzuki, Sachiko

    2004-01-01

    A pump-probe technique is essential for a proper understanding of laser interaction with tissue and material. Our pump-probe system divides the incident mid-infrared Free Electron Laser (MIR-FEL) into two beams with equal intensity, and crosses simultaneously the two incoming beams at the same position. One is for a pump beam, another is for a probe beam. Time-resolved absorption spectroscopy involving this technique gives us information on the vibrational dynamics of molecules. We have developed this system for an MIR-FEL using a non-coating ZnSe beam splitter cube. The beam splitter cube is composed of two ZnSe prisms in the shape like a trapezoid. The two pulses with equal intensity are generated due to Fresnel reflection and transmission at the boundary between two prisms, then are reflected due to total reflection at other side boundaries between each prism and air, and illuminate simultaneously the same spot. We have conducted a proof-of-concept of experiment of this system using an MIR-FEL. We showed t...

  2. The pump-probe coupling of matter wave packets to remote lattice states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob F; Park, Sung Jong; Pedersen, Poul Lindholm

    2012-01-01

    containing a Bose–Einstein condensate. The evolution of these wave packets is monitored in situ and their six-photon reflection at a band gap is observed. In direct analogy with pump–probe spectroscopy, a probe pulse allows for the resonant de-excitation of the wave packet into states localized around...... selected lattice sites at a long, controllable distance of more than 100 lattice sites from the main component. This precise control mechanism for ultra-cold atoms thus enables controlled quantum state preparation and splitting for quantum dynamics, metrology and simulation....

  3. Picosecond rotationally resolved stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanjaroon, Chakree; Reeve, Scott W.; Ford, Alan; Murry, W. Dean; Lyon, Kevin; Yount, Bret; Britton, Dan; Burns, William A.; Allen, Susan D.; Bruce Johnson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) experiments were performed on the nitric oxide molecule in a flow cell environment using lasers with pulse widths of 17-25 ps. A lambda excitation scheme, or ''pump-dump" arrangement, was employed with the pump laser tuned to the T 00 vibronic band origin ( λ=226.35(1)nm) of the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') ← X2Π1/2( v″ = 0, J″) and the dump laser scanned from 246-248 nm within the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') → X2Π1/2( v″ = 2, J″) transition. The rotationally resolved SEP spectra were measured by observing the total fluorescence within the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') → X2Π1/2( v″ = 1, J″) transition between 235 nm and 237.2 nm while scanning the dump laser wavelengths. Multiple rotational states were excited due to the broad laser bandwidth. Measurements showed that the resolved rotational structure depended on the energy and bandwidth of the applied pump and dump laser pulses. Analysis of the observed fluorescence depletion signals yielded an average percent fluorescence depletion of about 19% when λ=226.35(1)nm and λ=247.91(1)nm. This value reflects the percent transfer of the NO population from the A2Σ+( V' = 0, J') excited electronic state to the X2Π1/2( v″ = 2, J″) ground electronic state. The maximum expected depletion is 50% in the limit of dump saturation. Selective excitation of NO at the bandhead provides good spectral discrimination from the background emission and noise and unambiguously confirms the identity of the emitter.

  4. System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Kimura, Shigeru; Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu; Takata, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width (ΔE/E ∼ 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 layers on laser power.

  5. Near shot-noise limited time-resolved circular dichroism pump-probe spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnytskyi, Valentyn; Orf, Gregory S.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Savikhin, Sergei

    2018-03-01

    We describe an optical near shot-noise limited time-resolved circular dichroism (TRCD) pump-probe spectrometer capable of reliably measuring circular dichroism signals in the order of μdeg with nanosecond time resolution. Such sensitivity is achieved through a modification of existing TRCD designs and introduction of a new data processing protocol that eliminates approximations that have caused substantial nonlinearities in past measurements and allows the measurement of absorption and circular dichroism transients simultaneously with a single pump pulse. The exceptional signal-to-noise ratio of the described setup makes the TRCD technique applicable to a large range of non-biological and biological systems. The spectrometer was used to record, for the first time, weak TRCD kinetics associated with the triplet state energy transfer in the photosynthetic Fenna-Matthews-Olson antenna pigment-protein complex.

  6. Vibrational dynamics of adsorbed molecules under conditions of photodesorption: Pump-probe SFG spectra of CO/Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Frédéric; Zheng, Wanquan; Carrez, Serge; Dubost, Henri; Bourguignon, Bernard

    2004-09-01

    Interaction of CO adsorbed on Pt(111) with electrons and phonons is studied experimentally by means of a pump-probe experiment where CO is probed by IR+visible sum frequency generation under a pump laser intensity that allows photodesorption. Vibrational spectra of CO internal stretch are obtained as a function of pump-probe delay. A two-temperature and anharmonic coupling model is used to extract from the spectra the real time variations of CO peak frequency and dephasing time. The main conclusions are the following: (i) The CO stretch is perturbed by two low-frequency modes, assigned to frustrated rotation and frustrated translation. (ii) The frustrated rotation is directly coupled to electrons photoexcited in Pt(111) by the pump laser. (iii) There is no evidence of Pt-CO stretch excitation in the spectra. The implications for the photodesorption dynamics are discussed.

  7. Spin pumping through a topological insulator probed by x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, A.I., E-mail: aifigueg@gmail.com [Magnetic Spectroscopy Group, Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Baker, A.A. [Magnetic Spectroscopy Group, Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Collins-McIntyre, L.J.; Hesjedal, T. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Laan, G. van der [Magnetic Spectroscopy Group, Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    In the field of spintronics, the generation of a pure spin current (without macroscopic charge flow) through spin pumping of a ferromagnetic (FM) layer opens up the perspective of a new generation of dissipation-less devices. Microwave driven ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) can generate a pure spin current that enters adjacent layers, allowing for both magnetization reversal (through spin-transfer torque) and to probe spin coherence in non-magnetic materials. However, standard FMR is unable to probe multilayer dynamics directly, since the measurement averages over the contributions from the whole system. The synchrotron radiation-based technique of x-ray detected FMR (XFMR) offers an elegant solution to this drawback, giving access to element-, site-, and layer-specific dynamical measurements in heterostructures. In this work, we show how XFMR has provided unique information to understand spin pumping and spin transfer torque effects through a topological insulator (TI) layer in a pseudo-spin valve heterostructure. We demonstrate that TIs function as efficient spin sinks, while also allowing a limited dynamic coupling between ferromagnetic layers. These results shed new light on the spin dynamics of this novel class of materials, and suggest future directions for the development of room temperature TI-based spintronics. - Highlights: • X-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance is used to study the spin pumping phenomenon. • We show a powerful way to get information of spin transfer between magnetic layers. • We observe spin pumping through a topological insulators at room temperature. • Topological insulators function as efficient spin sinks.

  8. Spin pumping through a topological insulator probed by x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, A.I.; Baker, A.A.; Collins-McIntyre, L.J.; Hesjedal, T.; Laan, G. van der

    2016-01-01

    In the field of spintronics, the generation of a pure spin current (without macroscopic charge flow) through spin pumping of a ferromagnetic (FM) layer opens up the perspective of a new generation of dissipation-less devices. Microwave driven ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) can generate a pure spin current that enters adjacent layers, allowing for both magnetization reversal (through spin-transfer torque) and to probe spin coherence in non-magnetic materials. However, standard FMR is unable to probe multilayer dynamics directly, since the measurement averages over the contributions from the whole system. The synchrotron radiation-based technique of x-ray detected FMR (XFMR) offers an elegant solution to this drawback, giving access to element-, site-, and layer-specific dynamical measurements in heterostructures. In this work, we show how XFMR has provided unique information to understand spin pumping and spin transfer torque effects through a topological insulator (TI) layer in a pseudo-spin valve heterostructure. We demonstrate that TIs function as efficient spin sinks, while also allowing a limited dynamic coupling between ferromagnetic layers. These results shed new light on the spin dynamics of this novel class of materials, and suggest future directions for the development of room temperature TI-based spintronics. - Highlights: • X-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance is used to study the spin pumping phenomenon. • We show a powerful way to get information of spin transfer between magnetic layers. • We observe spin pumping through a topological insulators at room temperature. • Topological insulators function as efficient spin sinks.

  9. Inference of protein diffusion probed via fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations are an inherent part of single molecule or few particle biophysical data sets. Traditionally, ``noise'' fluctuations have been viewed as a nuisance, to be eliminated or minimized. Here we look on how statistical inference methods - that take explicit advantage of fluctuations - have allowed us to draw an unexpected picture of single molecule diffusional dynamics. Our focus is on the diffusion of proteins probed using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). First, we discuss how - in collaboration with the Bustamante and Marqusee labs at UC Berkeley - we determined using FCS data that individual enzymes are perturbed by self-generated catalytic heat (Riedel et al, Nature, 2014). Using the tools of inference, we found how distributions of enzyme diffusion coefficients shift in the presence of substrate revealing that enzymes performing highly exothermic reactions dissipate heat by transiently accelerating their center of mass following a catalytic reaction. Next, when molecules diffuse in the cell nucleus they often appear to diffuse anomalously. We analyze FCS data - in collaboration with Rich Day at the IU Med School - to propose a simple model for transcription factor binding-unbinding in the nucleus to show that it may give rise to apparent anomalous diffusion. Here inference methods extract entire binding affinity distributions for the diffusing transcription factors, allowing us to precisely characterize their interactions with different components of the nuclear environment. From this analysis, we draw key mechanistic insight that goes beyond what is possible by simply fitting data to ``anomalous diffusion'' models.

  10. Anomalous phase behavior and apparent anharmonicity of the pump-probe signal in a two-dimensional harmonic potential system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taneichi, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2007-01-01

    Discussion on wavelength dependent 'anharmonic' effects in a pump-probe signal for a system of wavepacket on one- and two-dimensional harmonic potentials was given. The Fourier power spectrum of the signal, calculated for a model composed of a three-state electronic system coupled to a set of displaced harmonic oscillators, depends on the pulse duration. Condition under which the wavepacket motion in the harmonic potential substantially deviates from that of the classical point mass is derived. The Fourier power spectrum has enhanced components with frequencies of harmonics even in a system composed of ideally harmonic potentials. Utility of the Fourier analysis of the spectrum for clarification of the squeezed molecular vibrational state is discussed. Calculated oscillatory behavior in phase of a pump-probe signal, as a function of probe frequency, was discussed in terms of a two-dimensional effect on a pump-probe signal

  11. Ultrasonic inspection of primary pump casing by means of focussing probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombret, Ph.; Cermak, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted in laboratory on ultrasonic defect detection capabilities in primary pump casings and welds, in the framework of the joint research programme appointed by Framatome, EdF, CEA and Westinghouse, and devoted to improving the ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel components. Several transducers, including focussing probes and transmitter-receivers, were designed and compared on two 180 mm thick blocks strictly representative of the statically cast casing and of the electroslag welding, and containing various artificial and simulated reflectors. Detection trial results show that focussing probes can achieve fair sensitivity levels even through the full thickness, and appear promising as for on-site applications of this technique. 5 refs

  12. Pump-probe nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustelny, S.; Gawlik, W.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Rochester, S. M.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Budker, D.

    2006-01-01

    Specific types of atomic coherences between Zeeman sublevels can be generated and detected using a method based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light. Linearly polarized, frequency-modulated light is employed to selectively generate ground-state coherences between Zeeman sublevels for which Δm=2 and Δm=4 in 85 Rb and 87 Rb atoms, and additionally Δm=6 in 85 Rb. The atomic coherences are detected with a separate, unmodulated probe light beam. Separation of the pump and probe beams enables independent investigation of the processes of creation and detection of the atomic coherences. With the present technique the transfer of the Zeeman coherences, including high-order coherences, from excited to ground state by spontaneous emission has been observed

  13. Patterning effects in quantum dot amplifiers characterized through pump probe spectroscopy using two pump pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Poel, Mike van der; Laemmlin, M.

    2004-01-01

    Patterning effects at ultrahigh bitrates in quantum dot amplifiers are investigated by a novel experimental technique. Slow carrier dynamics in the excited states and wetting layer are found to limit the potential for ultrahigh-speed signal processing....

  14. Using acoustic levitation in synchrotron based laser pump hard x-ray probe experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Lerch, Jason; Suthar, Kamlesh; Dichiara, Anthony

    Acoustic levitation provides a platform to trap and hold a small amount of material by using standing pressure waves without a container. The technique has a potential to be used for laser pump x-ray probe experiments; x-ray scattering and laser distortion from the container can be avoided, sample consumption can be minimized, and unwanted chemistry that may occur at the container interface can be avoided. The method has been used at synchrotron sources for studying protein and pharmaceutical solutions using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). However, pump-probe experiments require homogeneously excited samples, smaller than the absorption depth of the material that must be held stably at the intersection of both the laser and x-ray beams. We discuss 1) the role of oscillations in acoustic levitation and the optimal acoustic trapping conditions for x-ray/laser experiments, 2) opportunities to automate acoustic levitation for fast sample loading and manipulation, and 3) our experimental results using SAXS to monitor laser induced thermal expansion in gold nanoparticles solution. We also performed Finite Element Analysis to optimize the trapping performance and stability of droplets ranging from 0.4 mm to 2 mm. Our early x-ray/laser demonstrated the potential of the technique for time-resolved X-ray science.

  15. Spin pumping through a topological insulator probed by x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, A. I.; Baker, A. A.; Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; Hesjedal, T.; van der Laan, G.

    2016-02-01

    In the field of spintronics, the generation of a pure spin current (without macroscopic charge flow) through spin pumping of a ferromagnetic (FM) layer opens up the perspective of a new generation of dissipation-less devices. Microwave driven ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) can generate a pure spin current that enters adjacent layers, allowing for both magnetization reversal (through spin-transfer torque) and to probe spin coherence in non-magnetic materials. However, standard FMR is unable to probe multilayer dynamics directly, since the measurement averages over the contributions from the whole system. The synchrotron radiation-based technique of x-ray detected FMR (XFMR) offers an elegant solution to this drawback, giving access to element-, site-, and layer-specific dynamical measurements in heterostructures. In this work, we show how XFMR has provided unique information to understand spin pumping and spin transfer torque effects through a topological insulator (TI) layer in a pseudo-spin valve heterostructure. We demonstrate that TIs function as efficient spin sinks, while also allowing a limited dynamic coupling between ferromagnetic layers. These results shed new light on the spin dynamics of this novel class of materials, and suggest future directions for the development of room temperature TI-based spintronics.

  16. Time zero determination for FEL pump-probe studies based on ultrafast melting of bismuth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. Epp

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A common challenge for pump-probe studies of structural dynamics at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs is the determination of time zero (T0—the time an optical pulse (e.g., an optical laser arrives coincidently with the probe pulse (e.g., a XFEL pulse at the sample position. In some cases, T0 might be extracted from the structural dynamics of the sample's observed response itself, but generally, an independent robust method is required or would be superior to the inferred determination of T0. In this paper, we present how the structural dynamics in ultrafast melting of bismuth can be exploited for a quickly performed, reliable and accurate determination of T0 with a precision below 20 fs and an overall experimental accuracy of 50 fs to 150 fs (estimated. Our approach is potentially useful and applicable for fixed-target XFEL experiments, such as serial femtosecond crystallography, utilizing an optical pump pulse in the ultraviolet to near infrared spectral range and a pixelated 2D photon detector for recording crystallographic diffraction patterns in transmission geometry. In comparison to many other suitable approaches, our method is fairly independent of the pumping wavelength (UV–IR as well as of the X-ray energy and offers a favorable signal contrast. The technique is exploitable not only for the determination of temporal characteristics of the experiment at the interaction point but also for investigating important conditions affecting experimental control such as spatial overlap and beam spot sizes.

  17. Time zero determination for FEL pump-probe studies based on ultrafast melting of bismuth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, S W; Hada, M; Zhong, Y; Kumagai, Y; Motomura, K; Mizote, S; Ono, T; Owada, S; Axford, D; Bakhtiarzadeh, S; Fukuzawa, H; Hayashi, Y; Katayama, T; Marx, A; Müller-Werkmeister, H M; Owen, R L; Sherrell, D A; Tono, K; Ueda, K; Westermeier, F; Miller, R J D

    2017-09-01

    A common challenge for pump-probe studies of structural dynamics at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) is the determination of time zero (T 0 )-the time an optical pulse (e.g., an optical laser) arrives coincidently with the probe pulse (e.g., a XFEL pulse) at the sample position. In some cases, T 0 might be extracted from the structural dynamics of the sample's observed response itself, but generally, an independent robust method is required or would be superior to the inferred determination of T 0 . In this paper, we present how the structural dynamics in ultrafast melting of bismuth can be exploited for a quickly performed, reliable and accurate determination of T 0 with a precision below 20 fs and an overall experimental accuracy of 50 fs to 150 fs (estimated). Our approach is potentially useful and applicable for fixed-target XFEL experiments, such as serial femtosecond crystallography, utilizing an optical pump pulse in the ultraviolet to near infrared spectral range and a pixelated 2D photon detector for recording crystallographic diffraction patterns in transmission geometry. In comparison to many other suitable approaches, our method is fairly independent of the pumping wavelength (UV-IR) as well as of the X-ray energy and offers a favorable signal contrast. The technique is exploitable not only for the determination of temporal characteristics of the experiment at the interaction point but also for investigating important conditions affecting experimental control such as spatial overlap and beam spot sizes.

  18. Heterodyne pump-probe and four-wave mixing in semiconductor optical amplifiers using balanced lock-in detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Mørk, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate a new detection scheme for pump-probe and four-wave mixing heterodyne experiments, using balanced detection and a dual-phase lock-in for spectral filtering. The technique allows the use of low repetition-rate laser systems, as is demonstrated on an InGaAsP/InP bulk optical amplifier...... at 1.53 mym. Ultrafast pump-induced changes in the amplitude and phase of the transmitted probe signal are simultaneously measured, going from small to large signal changes and with no need of an absolute phase calibration, showing the versatility and the sensitivity of this detection scheme....... The results for small perturbations are consistent with previous pump-probe experiments reported in literature. Time-resolved four-wave mixing in the absorption regime of the device is measured, and compared with numerical simulations, indicating a 100 fs dephasing time....

  19. Probing long-range structural order in SnPc/Ag(111) by umklapp process assisted low-energy angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauernik, Stephan; Hein, Petra; Gurgel, Max; Falke, Julian; Bauer, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is performed on tin-phthalocyanine (SnPc) adsorbed on silver Ag(111). Upon adsorption of SnPc, strongly dispersing bands are observed which are identified as secondary Mahan cones formed by surface umklapp processes acting on photoelectrons from the silver substrate as they transit through the ordered adsorbate layer. We show that the photoemission data carry quantitative structural information on the adsorbate layer similar to what can be obtained from a conventional low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) study. More specifically, we compare photoemission data and LEED data probing an incommensurate-to-commensurate structural phase transition of the adsorbate layer. Based on our results we propose that Mahan-cone spectroscopy operated in a pump-probe configuration can be used in the future to probe structural dynamics at surfaces with a temporal resolution in the sub-100-fs regime.

  20. Ultrafast Dynamics of Sb-Corroles: A Combined Vis-Pump Supercontinuum Probe and Broadband Fluorescence Up-Conversion Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Zahn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Corroles are a developing class of tetrapyrrole-based molecules with significant chemical potential and relatively unexplored photophysical properties. We combined femtosecond broadband fluorescence up-conversion and fs broadband Vis-pump Vis-probe spectroscopy to comprehensively characterize the photoreaction of 5,10,15-tris-pentafluorophenyl-corrolato-antimony(V-trans-difluoride (Sb-tpfc-F2. Upon fs Soret band excitation at ~400 nm, the energy relaxed almost completely to Q band electronic excited states with a time constant of 500 ± 100 fs; this is evident from the decay of Soret band fluorescence at around 430 nm and the rise time of Q band fluorescence, as well as from Q band stimulated emission signals at 600 and 650 nm with the same time constant. Relaxation processes on a time scale of 10 and 20 ps were observed in the fluorescence and absorption signals. Triplet formation showed a time constant of 400 ps, with an intersystem crossing yield from the Q band to the triplet manifold of between 95% and 99%. This efficient triplet formation is due to the spin-orbit coupling of the antimony ion.

  1. Collisional Processes Probed by using Resonant Four-Wave Mixing Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, E. F.; Stampanoni, A.; Hemmerling, B.

    2000-06-01

    Collisionally-induced decay processes in excited-state nitric oxide (NO) have been measured by using time-resolved two-color, resonant four-wave mixing (TC-RFWM) spectroscopy and polarization spectroscopy (PS). Markedly different time dependencies were observed in the data obtained by using TC-RFWM when compared to PS. Oscillations in the PS signal as a function of delay between the pump and probe laser pulses were observed and it was determined that their characteristics depend very sensitively on laser polarization. Analysis reveals that the oscillations in the decay curves are due to coherent excitation of unresolved hyperfine structure in the A state of NO. A comparison of beat frequencies obtained by taking Fourier transforms of the time data to the predicted hyperfine structure of the A state support this explanation. Further, based on a time-dependent model of PS as a FWM process, the signal’s dependence as a function of time on polarization configuration and excitation scheme can be predicted. By using the beat frequency values, fits of the model results to experimental decay curves for different pressures allows a study of the quenching rate in the A state due to collisional processes. A comparison of the PS data to laser-induced fluorescence decay measurements reveals different decay rates which suggests that the PS signal decay depends on the orientation and alignment of the excited molecules. The different behavior of the decay curves obtained by using TC-RFWM and PS can be understood in terms of the various contributions to the decay as described by the model and this has a direct bearing on which technique is preferable for a given set of experimental parameters.

  2. A two-parameter nondiffusive heat conduction model for data analysis in pump-probe experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanbao

    2014-12-01

    Nondiffusive heat transfer has attracted intensive research interests in last 50 years because of its importance in fundamental physics and engineering applications. It has unique features that cannot be described by the Fourier law. However, current studies of nondiffusive heat transfer still focus on studying the effective thermal conductivity within the framework of the Fourier law due to a lack of a well-accepted replacement. Here, we show that nondiffusive heat conduction can be characterized by two inherent material properties: a diffusive thermal conductivity and a ballistic transport length. We also present a two-parameter heat conduction model and demonstrate its validity in different pump-probe experiments. This model not only offers new insights of nondiffusive heat conduction but also opens up new avenues for the studies of nondiffusive heat transfer outside the framework of the Fourier law.

  3. Energy transfer in isolated LHC II studied by femtosecond pump-probe technique

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Yi; Liu Yuan; Liu Wei Min; Zhu Rong Yi; Qian Shi Xiong; Xu Chun He

    2003-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl)-a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC II) was studied by the one-colour pump-probe technique with femtosecond time resolution. After exciting Chl-b by 638nm beam, the dynamic behaviour shows that the ultrafast energy transfer from Chl-b at positions of B2, B3, and B5 to the corresponding Chl-a molecules in monomeric subunit of LHC II is in the time scale of 230fs. While with the excitation of Chl-a at 678nm, the energy transfer between excitons of Chl-a molecules has the lifetime of about 370 fs, and two other slow decay components are due to the energy transfer between different Chl-a molecules in a monomeric subunit of LHC II or in different subunits, or due to change of molecular conformation. (20 refs).

  4. Detection of hydrodynamic expansion in ultrashort pulse laser ellipsometric pump-probe experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikami, Hidetoshi; Yoneda, Hitoki; Ueda, Ken-ichi; More, Richard M.

    2004-01-01

    In ultrashort-pulse laser interaction with solid target materials, the target rapidly heats, melts, evaporates, and begins to expand as a vapor or plasma. The onset of hydrodynamic expansion following surface evaporation is a switching point, where the dominant physics changes from temperature dependence of the solid dielectric function to refraction by the dense vapor cloud. We propose and demonstrate a method to analyze reflection data to identify this onset of target expansion. We use two of the Stokes parameters obtained from ellipsometric pump-probe measurements to determine a dielectric function with an assumption of no expansion. We use this dielectric function to predict the full set of reflectivity measurements. If there is a sharply defined target interface, this method reproduces the experimental data. When the plasma expansion is no longer negligible, the prediction deviates from the experimental measurements. This comparison shows when the plasma expansion is no longer negligible

  5. Determination of hot carrier energy distributions from inversion of ultrafast pump-probe reflectivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilpern, Tal; Manjare, Manoj; Govorov, Alexander O; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Gray, Stephen K; Harutyunyan, Hayk

    2018-05-10

    Developing a fundamental understanding of ultrafast non-thermal processes in metallic nanosystems will lead to applications in photodetection, photochemistry and photonic circuitry. Typically, non-thermal and thermal carrier populations in plasmonic systems are inferred either by making assumptions about the functional form of the initial energy distribution or using indirect sensors like localized plasmon frequency shifts. Here we directly determine non-thermal and thermal distributions and dynamics in thin films by applying a double inversion procedure to optical pump-probe data that relates the reflectivity changes around Fermi energy to the changes in the dielectric function and in the single-electron energy band occupancies. When applied to normal incidence measurements our method uncovers the ultrafast excitation of a non-Fermi-Dirac distribution and its subsequent thermalization dynamics. Furthermore, when applied to the Kretschmann configuration, we show that the excitation of propagating plasmons leads to a broader energy distribution of electrons due to the enhanced Landau damping.

  6. Induced modifications on algae photosynthetic activity monitored by pump-and-probe technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbini, R; Colao, F; Fantoni, R; Palucci, A; Ribezzo, S [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione; Tarzillo, G; Carlozzi, P; Pelosi, E [CNR, Florence (Italy). Centro Studi Microorganismi Autotrofi

    1995-12-01

    The lidar fluorosensor system available at ENEA Frascati has been used for a series of laboratory measurements on brackish-water and marine phytoplankton grown in laboratory with the proper saline solution. The system, already used to measure the laser induced fluorescence spectra of different algae species and their detection limits, has been upgraded with a short pulse Nd:YAG laser and rearranged to test a new technique based on laser pump and probe excitation. Results of this new technique for remote monitoring of the in-vivo photosynthetic activity will be presented, as measured during a field campaign carried out in Florence during the Autumn 1993, where the effects of an actinic saturating light and different chemicals have also been checked.

  7. System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Osawa, Hitoshi [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kimura, Shigeru [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro [R and D Division, Panasonic Corporation, 3-4 Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan); Yamada, Noboru [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu [Advanced Optical Storage Development Department, Advanced Device Technology Platform, Sony Corporation, 4-14-1 Asahi-cho, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0014 (Japan); Takata, Masaki [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Advanced Materials Science, School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width ({Delta}E/E {approx} 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers on laser power.

  8. Electron-probe microanalysis: x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The main principles on X-ray, energy and wave length dispersive spectroscopy are reviewed. In order to allow the choice of the best operating conditions, the importance of the regulation and control systems is underlined. Emission theory, X-rays nature and its interaction with matter and electrons in the matter is shown. The structure, operating procedures and necessary electronics (single channel - analysis chain) automatic-control system for the threshold-energies discrimination and the energy distribution visualization) associated to the wavelength dispersive spectroscopy are described. The focusing control, resolution, influence of chemical bonds and multilayer-structure monochromators relaled to wavelength dispersive spectroscopy are studied. Concerning the energy-dispersive spectroscopy, the detector, preamplifier, amplifier, analog-digital converter, as well as the utilization and control of the spectrometer are described. Problems and instrumental progress on energy-dispersive spectroscopy related to the electronic-noise control, charge collection and light-elements detection are discussed [fr

  9. Ischemia monitoring in off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery using intravascular near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerkowski Hans-Reinhard

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery, manipulations on the beating heart can lead to transient interruptions of myocardial oxygen supply, which can generate an accumulation of oxygen-dependent metabolites in coronary venous blood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of intravascular near-infrared spectroscopy as a monitoring method to detect possible ischemic events in off-pump coronary artery bypass procedures. Methods In 15 elective patients undergoing off-pump myocardial revascularization, intravascular near-infrared spectroscopic analysis of coronary venous blood was performed. NIR signals were transferred through a fiberoptic catheter for signal emission and collection. For data analysis and processing, a miniature spectrophotometer with multivariate statistical package was used. Signal acquisition and analysis were performed before and after revascularization. Spectroscopic data were compared with hemodynamic parameters, electrocardiogram, transesophageal echocardiography and laboratory findings. Results A conversion to extracorporeal circulation was not necessary. The mean number of grafts per patient was 3.1 ± 0.6. An intraoperative myocardial ischemia was not evident, as indicated by electrocardiogram and transesophageal echocardiography. Continuous spectroscopic analysis showed reproducible absorption spectra of coronary sinus blood. Due to uneventful intraoperative courses, clear ischemia-related changes could be detected in none of the patients. Conclusion Our initial results show that intravascular near-infrared spectroscopy can reliably be used for an online intraoperative ischemia monitoring in off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. However, the method has to be further evaluated and standardized to determine the role of spectroscopy in off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

  10. Pump-probe studies of travelling coherent longitudinal acoustic phonon oscillations in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Qi, J.; Tolk, Norman [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 37235 (United States); Miller, J. [Naval air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake, CA 93555 (United States); Cho, Y.J.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J.K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Shahbazyan, T.V. [Department of Physics, Jackson State University, MS 39217 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    We report comprehensive studies of long-lived oscillations in femtosecond optical pump-probe measurements on GaAs based systems. The oscillations arise from a photo-generated coherent longitudinal acoustic phonon wave at the sample surface, which subsequently travels from the surface into the GaAs substrate, thus providing information on the optical properties of the material as a function of time/depth. Wavelength-dependent studies of the oscillations near the bandgap of GaAs indicate strong correlations to the optical properties of GaAs. We also use the coherent longitudinal acoustic phonon waves to probe a thin buried Ga{sub 0.1}In{sub 0.9}As layers non-invasively. The observed phonon oscillations experience a reduction in amplitude and a phase change at wavelengths near the bandgap of the GaAs, when it passes through the thin Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As layer. The layer depth and thicknesses can be extracted from the oscillation responses. A model has been developed that satisfactorily characterizes the experimental results. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Ion-atom interactions probed by photofragment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, H.

    1984-01-01

    Photofragment spectroscopy studies energetic and dynamical properties of molecular states interacting with dissociation continuum. So far, data for eighteen diatomic molecular ions have been gathered by this technique. This paper is a review of these investigations, introduced by a discussion of the experimental methods used. The wealth of information accessible by ion photofragment spectroscopy challenges the experimentalist in the application of innovative techniques and the theoretician for less approximate accounts of the Hamiltonian. (Auth.)

  12. Direct and quantitative broadband absorptance spectroscopy with multilayer cantilever probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Tong, Jonathan Kien-Kwok; Liao, Bolin; Chen, Gang

    2015-04-21

    A system for measuring the absorption spectrum of a sample is provided that includes a broadband light source that produces broadband light defined within a range of an absorptance spectrum. An interferometer modulates the intensity of the broadband light source for a range of modulation frequencies. A bi-layer cantilever probe arm is thermally connected to a sample arm having at most two layers of materials. The broadband light modulated by the interferometer is directed towards the sample and absorbed by the sample and converted into heat, which causes a temperature rise and bending of the bi-layer cantilever probe arm. A detector mechanism measures and records the deflection of the probe arm so as to obtain the absorptance spectrum of the sample.

  13. Interfacial structure of soft matter probed by SFG spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shen; Tong, Yujin; Ge, Aimin; Qiao, Lin; Davies, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, an interface-specific technique in contrast to, for example, attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy, which is only interface sensitive, has been employed to investigate the surface and interface structure of soft matter on a molecular scale. The experimental arrangement required to carry out SFG spectroscopy, with particular reference to soft matter, and the analytical methods developed to interpret the spectra are described. The elucidation of the interfacial structure of soft matter systems is an essential prerequisite in order to understand and eventually control the surface properties of these important functional materials. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Probing multiband superconductivity by point-contact spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daghero, D; Gonnelli, R S

    2010-01-01

    Point-contact spectroscopy was originally developed for the determination of the electron-phonon spectral function in normal metals. However, in the past 20 years it has become an important tool in the investigation of superconductors. As a matter of fact, point contacts between a normal metal and a superconductor can provide information on the amplitude and symmetry of the energy gap that, in the superconducting state, opens up at the Fermi level. In this paper we review the experimental and theoretical aspects of point-contact spectroscopy in superconductors, and we give an experimental survey of the most recent applications of this technique to anisotropic and multiband superconductors. (topical review)

  15. Probing deeper by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risterucci, P.; Renault, O., E-mail: olivier.renault@cea.fr; Martinez, E.; Delaye, V. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Detlefs, B. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Zegenhagen, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Gaumer, C. [STMicroelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Crolles (France); Grenet, G. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL), UMR CNRS 5270, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36, avenue Guy de Collongue 69 134 Ecully Cedex (France); Tougaard, S. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2014-02-03

    We report an hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method combining high excitation energy (15 keV) and improved modelling of the core-level energy loss features. It provides depth distribution of deeply buried layers with very high sensitivity. We show that a conventional approach relying on intensities of the core-level peaks is unreliable due to intense plasmon losses. We reliably determine the depth distribution of 1 ML La in a high-κ/metal gate stack capped with 50 nm a-Si. The method extends the sensitivity of photoelectron spectroscopy to depths beyond 50 nm.

  16. Mid-infrared quantum cascade laser spectroscopy probing of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aparajeo Chattopadhyay

    2018-05-07

    May 7, 2018 ... cm3 molecule. −1 s. −1 ... Quantum cascade laser; time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy; transient absorption; peroxy radicals .... peak of the laser emission profile. .... cal with O2 is a termolecular reaction (Eq. 3) and the.

  17. Effects of moderate pump and Stokes chirp on chirped-probe pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering thermometry

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Mingming

    2018-01-08

    The effects of moderate levels of chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses on chirped-probe-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CPP fs CARS) were investigated. The frequency chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses was introduced by placing SF11 glass disks with thicknesses of 10 mm or 20 mm in the optical path for these beams. The magnitude of the chirp in the probe beam was much greater and was induced by placing a 30-cm rod of SF10 glass in the beam path. The temperature measurements were performed in hydrogen/air non-premixed flames stabilized on a Hencken burner at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0. We performed measurements with no disks in pump and Stokes beam paths, and then with disks of 10 mm and 20 mm placed in both beam paths. The spectrum of the nonresonant background four-wave mixing signal narrowed considerably with increasing pump and Stokes chirp, while the resonant CARS signal was relatively unaffected. Consequently, the interference of the nonresonant background with the resonant CARS signal in the frequency-spread dephasing region of the spectrum was minimized. The increased rate of decay of the resonant CARS signal with increasing temperature was thus readily apparent. We have started to analyze the CPP fs CARS thermometry data and initial results indicate improved accuracy and precision are obtained due to moderate chirp in the pump and Stokes laser pulses.

  18. Critical phenomena in magnetic vortex formation probed by noise spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, E.; Harii, K.; Miyajima, H.; Yamaoka, T.

    2004-01-01

    Transition between a vortex magnetic state and a uniform magnetic state in a Ni 81 Fe 19 mesoscopic ring has been investigated in terms of resistive-noise spectroscopy. The observed low-frequency noise exhibits critical enhancement around the magnetization saturation. This noise enhancement can be argued from the viewpoint of the critical phenomena due to the chiral-symmetry breakdown of mesoscopic magnetic-structure, which can present a typical mechanism of symmetry transition of magnetic structure in mesoscopic ferromagnets

  19. Helium nanodroplets. Pump-probe ionization of alkali dopings and spin-echo scattering on undoped drops; Helium-Nanotroepfchen. Pump-Probe-Ionisation von Alkalidotierungen und Spinechostreuung an undotierten Tropfen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droppelmann, G.

    2005-09-15

    In the framework of this thesis several aspects of the properties of helium nanodroplets and their dopings. The formation of the exciplexes RbHe and KHe on helium droplets was studied by means of pump-probe ionization in real time, whereby the main interest lied on the influence of the applied helium isotopes. The experiments with cesium atoms on the droplet surface aimed on the elucidation of the relaxation dynamics of the surface under regardment both of isotope and size effects. From the pump-probe measurements on the formation of the exciplex RbHe on helium nanodroplets performed in the framework of this thesis formation times of 8.5 ps for Rb{sup 4}He and 11.6 ps for Rb{sup 3}He resulted.

  20. PUMPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  1. Spectroscopy and probe diagnostics of dc spherical glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhovtyansky, V.A.; Nazarenko, V.G.; Syrotyuk, R.P.

    2016-01-01

    Probe and spectroscopic investigations of a spherical glow discharge (GD) were done in nitrogen and argon plasma. There were obtained the distributions of electron temperature and electron density in a discharge gap as well as plasma potential distribution. These results were compared with theoretical ones and the conclusion about their convergence was done in the present study. Particular attention was paid to the anode processes role in the formation of self-organized structure in a spherical glow discharge. It was shown the necessity of taking into account the possibility of the anode potential drop forming in this discharge region

  2. Measurement of phytoplankton photosynthesis rate using a pump-and-probe fluorometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras K. Antal

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have studied the possibility of determining the rate of phytoplankton photosynthesis in situ using a submersible pump-and-probe fluorometer in water areas differing in their trophic level, as well as in climatic and hydrophysical characteristics. A biophysical model was used to describe the relationship between photosynthesis, underwater irradiance, and the intensity of phytoplankton fluorescence excited by an artificial light source. Fluorescence intensity was used as a measure of light absorption by phytoplankton and for assessing the efficiency of photochemical energy conversion at photosynthetic reaction centers. Parameters of the model that could not be measured experimentally were determined by calibrating fluorescence and irradiance data against the primary production measured in the Baltic Sea with the radioactive carbon method. It was shown that the standard deviation of these parameters in situ did not exceed 20%, and the use of their mean values to estimate the phytoplankton photosynthetic rate showed a good correlation between the calculated and meas

  3. Picosecond Transient Photoconductivity in Functionalized Pentacene Molecular Crystals Probed by Terahertz Pulse Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegmann, F. A.; Tykwinski, R. R.; Lui, K. P.; Bullock, J. E.; Anthony, J. E.

    2002-11-01

    We have measured transient photoconductivity in functionalized pentacene molecular crystals using ultrafast optical pump-terahertz probe techniques. The single crystal samples were excited using 800nm, 100fs pulses, and the change in transmission of time-delayed, subpicosecond terahertz pulses was used to probe the photoconducting state over a temperature range from 10 to 300K. A subpicosecond rise in photoconductivity is observed, suggesting that mobile carriers are a primary photoexcitation. At times longer than 4ps, a power-law decay is observed consistent with dispersive transport.

  4. Vibrational Spectroscopy on Photoexcited Dye-Sensitized Films via Pump-Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Baxter; Fan, Hao; Galoppini, Elena; Gundlach, Lars

    2018-03-01

    Molecular sensitization of semiconductor films is an important technology for energy and environmental applications including solar energy conversion, photocatalytic hydrogen production, and water purification. Dye-sensitized films are also scientifically complex and interesting systems with a long history of research. In most applications, photoinduced heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) at the molecule/semiconductor interface is of critical importance, and while great progress has been made in understanding HET, many open questions remain. Of particular interest is the role of combined electronic and vibrational effects and coherence of the dye during HET. The ultrafast nature of the process, the rapid intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution, and vibrational cooling present complications in the study of vibronic coupling in HET. We present the application of a time domain vibrational spectroscopy-pump-degenerate four-wave mixing (pump-DFWM)-to dye-sensitized solid-state semiconductor films. Pump-DFWM can measure Raman-active vibrational modes that are triggered by excitation of the sample with an actinic pump pulse. Modifications to the instrument for solid-state samples and its application to an anatase TiO 2 film sensitized by a Zn-porphyrin dye are discussed. We show an effective combination of experimental techniques to overcome typical challenges in measuring solid-state samples with laser spectroscopy and observe molecular vibrations following HET in a picosecond time window. The cation spectrum of the dye shows modes that can be assigned to the linker group and a mode that is localized on the Zn-phorphyrin chromophore and that is connected to photoexcitation.

  5. Pseudogap behavior of RuP probed by photoemission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, K.; Ootsuki, D.; Wakisaka, Y.; Saini, N. L.; Mizokawa, T.; Arita, M.; Anzai, H.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.; Hirai, D.; Takagi, H.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of RuP and related Ru pnictides using photoemission spectroscopy. Ru 3d core-level and valence-band spectra of RuP show that the Ru valence is +3 with t_{2g}^5 configuration. The photoemisson spectral weight near the Fermi level is moderately suppressed in the pseudogap phase of RuP, consistent with the pseudogap opening of 2\\Delta/k_BT_c ~ 3 (gap size \\Delta ~ 50 meV and transition temperature T_c ~ 330 K). The Ru 3d peak remains sharp in the pseudoga...

  6. Probing Spin Crossover in a Solution by Paramagnetic NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Alexander A; Denisov, Gleb L; Kiskin, Mikhail A; Nelyubina, Yulia V; Novikov, Valentin V

    2017-12-18

    Spin transitions in spin-crossover compounds are now routinely studied in the solid state by magnetometry; however, only a few methods exist for studies in solution. The currently used Evans method, which relies on NMR spectroscopy to measure the magnetic susceptibility, requires the availability of a very pure sample of the paramagnetic compound and its exact concentration. To overcome these limitations, we propose an alternative NMR-based technique for evaluating spin-state populations by only using the chemical shifts of a spin-crossover compound; those can be routinely obtained for a solution that contains unknown impurities and paramagnetic admixtures or is contaminated otherwise.

  7. Probing Plasmonic Nanostructures with Electron Energy - Loss Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren

    for nonlocal response. The experimental work comprises the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to excite and study both localized and propagating surface plasmons in metal structures. Following a short introduction, we present the theoretical foundation to describe nonlocal response in Maxwell......, dimer with nanometer-sized gaps, core-shell nanowire with ultrathin metal shell, and a thin metal film. In all cases we compare the nonlocal models with the local-response approximation. Below the plasma frequency, we find that the distance between the induced positive and negative surface charges...

  8. Femtosecond resolution timing jitter correction on a TW scale Ti:sapphire laser system for FEL pump-probe experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csatari Divall, Marta; Mutter, Patrick; Divall, Edwin J; Hauri, Christoph P

    2015-11-16

    Intense ultrashort pulse lasers are used for fs resolution pump-probe experiments more and more at large scale facilities, such as free electron lasers (FEL). Measurement of the arrival time of the laser pulses and stabilization to the machine or other sub-systems on the target, is crucial for high time-resolution measurements. In this work we report on a single shot, spectrally resolved, non-collinear cross-correlator with sub-fs resolution. With a feedback applied we keep the output of the TW class Ti:sapphire amplifier chain in time with the seed oscillator to ~3 fs RMS level for several hours. This is well below the typical pulse duration used at FELs and supports fs resolution pump-probe experiments. Short term jitter and long term timing drift measurements are presented. Applicability to other wavelengths and integration into the timing infrastructure of the FEL are also covered to show the full potential of the device.

  9. Helium nanodroplets. Pump-probe ionization of alkali dopings and spin-echo scattering on undoped drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droppelmann, G.

    2005-09-01

    In the framework of this thesis several aspects of the properties of helium nanodroplets and their dopings. The formation of the exciplexes RbHe and KHe on helium droplets was studied by means of pump-probe ionization in real time, whereby the main interest lied on the influence of the applied helium isotopes. The experiments with cesium atoms on the droplet surface aimed on the elucidation of the relaxation dynamics of the surface under regardment both of isotope and size effects. From the pump-probe measurements on the formation of the exciplex RbHe on helium nanodroplets performed in the framework of this thesis formation times of 8.5 ps for Rb 4 He and 11.6 ps for Rb 3 He resulted

  10. Jitter-correction for IR/UV-XUV pump-probe experiments at the FLASH free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savelyev, Evgeny; Boll, Rebecca; Bomme, Cedric; Schirmel, Nora; Redlin, Harald

    2017-01-01

    In pump-probe experiments employing a free-electron laser (FEL) in combination with a synchronized optical femtosecond laser, the arrival-time jitter between the FEL pulse and the optical laser pulse often severely limits the temporal resolution that can be achieved. Here, we present a pump-probe experiment on the UV-induced dissociation of 2,6-difluoroiodobenzene C 6 H 3 F 2 I) molecules performed at the FLASH FEL that takes advantage of recent upgrades of the FLASH timing and synchronization system to obtain high-quality data that are not limited by the FEL arrival-time jitter. Here, we discuss in detail the necessary data analysis steps and describe the origin of the time-dependent effects in the yields and kinetic energies of the fragment ions that we observe in the experiment.

  11. Collinear laser spectroscopy of manganese isotopes using optical pumping in ISCOOL

    CERN Multimedia

    Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Reponen, M; Campbell, P; Procter, T J

    Recently, optical pumping of ions has been achieved inside an ion beam cooler-buncher. By illuminating the central axis of the cooler with laser light, subsequent decay populates selected ionic metastable states. This population enhancement is retained as the ion beam is delivered to an experimental station. In the case of collinear laser spectroscopy, transitions can then be excited from a preferred metastable level, rather than the ground-state. This proposal seeks to establish and develop the technique for ISCOOL. As a test of efficiency, this will be applied to the study of $^{55-66}$Mn isotopes using collinear laser spectroscopy-expanding an earlier study where the benefit of the technique was demonstrated. This will provide nuclear spins, magnetic-dipole and electric-quadrupole moments and changes in mean-square charge radii across N = 40 shell closure candidate and into a region where an onset of deformation, and a new "island of inversion" is predicted.

  12. Extending the plasmonic lifetime of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Naresh; Spencer, Steve J; Imbraguglio, Dario; Rossi, Andrea M; Wain, Andrew J; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Roy, Debdulal

    2016-01-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is an emerging technique for simultaneous mapping of chemical composition and topography of a surface at the nanoscale. However, rapid degradation of TERS probes, especially those coated with silver, is a major bottleneck to the widespread uptake of this

  13. Label-Free Imaging of Female Genital Tract Melanocytic Lesions With Pump-Probe Microscopy: A Promising Diagnostic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Francisco E; Deb, Sanghamitra; Fischer, Martin C; Warren, Warren S; Selim, Maria Angelica

    2017-04-01

    Melanomas of the female genital tract present a unique clinical challenge. Not only are these lesions in an anatomically sensitive area, but also they tend to be multifocal and have high recurrence rates. Furthermore, several benign melanocytic proliferations resemble early-stage melanoma clinically and/or histopathologically. Thus, there is a significant need for additional tools that can help correctly diagnose and stage these lesions. Here, we quantitatively and nondestructively analyze the chemical composition of melanin in excised pigmented lesions of the female genital tract using pump-probe microscopy, a high-resolution optical imaging technique that is sensitive to many biochemical properties of melanin. Thirty-one thin (~5 μm) tissue sections previously excised from female genital tract melanocytic lesions were imaged with pump-probe microscopy and analyzed. We find significant quantitative differences in melanin type and structure between melanoma and nonmalignant melanocytic proliferations. Our analysis also suggests a link between the molecular signatures of melanins and lesion-specific genetic mutations. Finally, significant differences are found between metastatic and nonmetastatic melanomas. The limitations of this work include the fact that molecular information is restricted to melanin pigment and the sample size is relatively small. Pump-probe microscopy provides unique information regarding the biochemical composition of genital tract melanocytic lesions, which can be used to improve the diagnosis and staging of vulvar melanomas.

  14. PtSi Clustering in Silicon Probed by Transport Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Mongillo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal silicides formed by means of thermal annealing processes are employed as contact materials in microelectronics. Control of the structure of silicide/silicon interfaces becomes a critical issue when the characteristic size of the device is reduced below a few tens of nanometers. Here, we report on silicide clustering occurring within the channel of PtSi/Si/PtSi Schottky-barrier transistors. This phenomenon is investigated through atomistic simulations and low-temperature resonant-tunneling spectroscopy. Our results provide evidence for the segregation of a PtSi cluster with a diameter of a few nanometers from the silicide contact. The cluster acts as a metallic quantum dot giving rise to distinct signatures of quantum transport through its discrete energy states.

  15. Solid state physics: advanced spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, nanostructure fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Aghion, Stefano

    Thin films of hybrid solar cells and metal oxide semiconductors -IGZO in particular– and homogeneous PMMA polymers have been studied at the Positron Laboratory (L-NESS centre, Politecnico di Milano, Polo Territoriale di Como). A slow energy positron beam and a positron lifetime spectrometer have been employed for these studies. The positron spectroscopy information have been correlated with electrical and optical properties of the materials. The chemical composition and the morphology of voids and porosities in hybrid solar cells and thin film metal oxide semiconductors have been studied, and a strong correlation between positronium fraction, S-parameter and the electrical properties of these materials has been found. In PMMA polymers, free volume measurements have shown that the optical properties of the material depend on the presence of monomer residual fraction and even slight changes in the dimensions and concentration of free volumes. Positrons have been also applied to the study of positron to positr...

  16. An electro-optical timing diagnostic for pump-probe experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azima, Armin

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond pump-probe experiments have extensively been used to follow atomic and molecular motion in time. The very intense extreme ultraviolet XUV light of the Free electron LASer in Hamburg FLASH facility allows to investigate fundamental processes such as direct one or few photon inner shell ionizations. A supplementary Ti:Sapphire near infrared femtosecond laser system allows to perform two-color pump-probe experiments with FLASH involving intense laser fields of hugely different photon energies. Within this work a bunch arrival measurement system has been built, which assists these two-color pump-probe experiments to reduce the temporal jitter of FLASH and to increase the temporal resolution. The diagnostic is based upon an electro-optical detection scheme and measures the relative arrival time between the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse and the electron bunch, which generates the self-amplified by stimulated emission SASE XUV pulse in the undulator section of FLASH. Key feature of the diagnostic is a 150 m long glass fiber pulse transport line, which inflicts non-linear dispersion. A dispersion control system to compensate for this higher order dispersion has been developed including the control and programming of a spatial light phase modulator. It was possible to transport a 90 fs FWHM short near infrared femtosecond laser pulse Fourier limited by the dispersion compensated glass fiber. The electro-optical signal induced by the FLASH electron bunch was generated, characterized and optimized. The signal features beside the designated bunch arrival timing capability the additional possibility to measure the longitudinal electron bunch density distribution of an arbitrary bunch of FLASH in a single shot with a temporal resolution of below 100 fs RMS. Timing and bunch analysis capabilities of the developed diagnostic have been cross-checked with other comparable diagnostics at FLASH like the transversal deflecting cavity structure named LOLA. Finally, the

  17. An electro-optical timing diagnostic for pump-probe experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azima, Armin

    2009-07-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe experiments have extensively been used to follow atomic and molecular motion in time. The very intense extreme ultraviolet XUV light of the Free electron LASer in Hamburg FLASH facility allows to investigate fundamental processes such as direct one or few photon inner shell ionizations. A supplementary Ti:Sapphire near infrared femtosecond laser system allows to perform two-color pump-probe experiments with FLASH involving intense laser fields of hugely different photon energies. Within this work a bunch arrival measurement system has been built, which assists these two-color pump-probe experiments to reduce the temporal jitter of FLASH and to increase the temporal resolution. The diagnostic is based upon an electro-optical detection scheme and measures the relative arrival time between the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse and the electron bunch, which generates the self-amplified by stimulated emission SASE XUV pulse in the undulator section of FLASH. Key feature of the diagnostic is a 150 m long glass fiber pulse transport line, which inflicts non-linear dispersion. A dispersion control system to compensate for this higher order dispersion has been developed including the control and programming of a spatial light phase modulator. It was possible to transport a 90 fs FWHM short near infrared femtosecond laser pulse Fourier limited by the dispersion compensated glass fiber. The electro-optical signal induced by the FLASH electron bunch was generated, characterized and optimized. The signal features beside the designated bunch arrival timing capability the additional possibility to measure the longitudinal electron bunch density distribution of an arbitrary bunch of FLASH in a single shot with a temporal resolution of below 100 fs RMS. Timing and bunch analysis capabilities of the developed diagnostic have been cross-checked with other comparable diagnostics at FLASH like the transversal deflecting cavity structure named LOLA. Finally, the

  18. Photoinduced molecular chirality probed by ultrafast resonant X-ray spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy R. Rouxel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed circularly polarized X-ray light sources can probe the ultrafast chiral electronic and nuclear dynamics through spatially localized resonant core transitions. We present simulations of time-resolved circular dichroism signals given by the difference of left and right circularly polarized X-ray probe transmission following an excitation by a circularly polarized optical pump with the variable time delay. Application is made to formamide which is achiral in the ground state and assumes two chiral geometries upon optical excitation to the first valence excited state. Probes resonant with various K-edges (C, N, and O provide different local windows onto the parity breaking geometry change thus revealing the enantiomer asymmetry.

  19. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonios, George [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Dimou, Aikaterini [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Galaris, Dimitrios [Laboratory of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2008-01-07

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  20. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H 2 O 2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo

  1. Cryoprotectant redistribution along the frozen straw probed by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpegina, Yu A; Okotrub, K A; Brusentsev, E Yu; Amstislavsky, S Ya; Surovtsev, N V

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of cryoprotectant (10% glycerol) and ice along the frozen plastic straw (the most useful container for freezing mammalian semen, oocytes and embryos) was studied by Raman scattering technique. Raman spectroscopy being a contactless, non-invasive tool was applied for the straws filled with the cryoprotectant solution and frozen by controlled rate programs commonly used for mammalian embryos freezing. Analysis of Raman spectra measured at different points along the straw reveals a non-uniform distribution of the cryoprotectant. The ratio between non-crystalline solution and ice was found to be increased by several times at the bottom side of the solution column frozen by the standard freezing program. The increase of the cryoprotectant fraction occurs in the area where embryos or oocytes are normally placed during their freezing. Possible effects of the cooling rate and the ice nucleation temperature on the cryoprotectant fraction at the bottom side of the solution column were considered. Our findings highlight that the ice fraction around cryopreserved embryos or oocytes can differ significantly from the averaged one in the frozen plastic straws. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy probed heterogeneous xenon/neon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokapanich, Wandared; Björneholm, Olle; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Tchaplyguine, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    Binary rare gas clusters; xenon and neon which have a significant contrariety between sizes, produced by a co-expansion set up and have been studied using synchrotron radiation based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Concentration ratios of the heterogeneous clusters; 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% were controlled. The core level spectra were used to determine structure of the mixed cluster and analyzed by considering screening mechanisms. Furthermore, electron binding energy shift calculations demonstrated cluster aggregation models which may occur in such process. The results showed that in the case of low mixing ratios of 3% and 5% of xenon in neon, the geometric structures exhibit xenon in the center and xenon/neon interfaced in the outer shells. However, neon cluster vanished when the concentration of xenon was increased to 10%. - Highlights: • Co-expansion setup is suitable for producing binary Xe/Ne clusters. • Appropriate temperature, pressure, and mixing ratios should be strictly controlled. • Low mixing ratio, Xe formed in the core and Xe/Ne interfacing in the outer shell. • High mixing ratio, only pure Xe clusters were detected.

  3. Geothermal probes and heat pump installation at the Gerzensee training centre; EWS-WP des Studienzentrums Gerzensee/BE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, P.

    2004-07-01

    This preliminary report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a refurbishment project at the Swiss National Bank's training centre in Gerzensee, Switzerland. Eight air-water heat pumps with a total heating capacity of 180 kW were replaced by two ground-coupled heat pumps, each with a heating capacity of 120 kW. The geothermal probes are additionally used for free-cooling during the summer season. An oil-fired boiler used for meeting peak-load and back-up purposes, was also replaced for reasons of higher energy efficiency. Both investments and running costs of the heating system are presented along with details on expenses for electrical installations and building adaptations. The improvements in energy-saving, when compared with the former air-water heat pump system, are impressive: Total energy consumption for space heating, hot water and for ventilation systems was lowered by around 54%. The oil consumption has been reduced from 34,800 to 6,600 litres/year, which corresponds to a reduction of 81%. Also, electrical power consumption by the heat pump installation was lowered by around 8%. Figures are given on the proportion of heating supplied by the heat-pump system that now covers 90.6% of total demand.

  4. Comparison of photoacoustic spectroscopy, conventional absorption spectroscopy, and potentiometry as probes of lanthanide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, R.A.; Palmer, C.E.A.; Baisden, P.A.; Russo, R.E.; Silva, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors measured the stability constants of praseodymium acetate and oxydiacetate complexes by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy, conventional UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, and pH titration. For the spectroscopic studies, changes in the free Pr absorption peaks at 468 and 481 nm were monitored at varying ligand concentrations. The total Pr concentration was 1 x 10 -4 M in solutions used for the photoacoustic studies and 0.02 M for conventional spectroscopy. For the pH titrations, we used solutions whose Pr concentrations varied from 5 x 10 -3 to 5 x 10 -2 M, with total ligand-to-metal ratios ranging from 1 to 10. A comparison of the results obtained by the three techniques demonstrates that photoacoustic spectroscopy can give the same information about metal-ligand speciation as more conventional methods. It is particularly suited to those situations where the other techniques are insensitive because of limited metal concentrations

  5. Multimodal fiber-probe spectroscopy as a clinical tool for diagnosing and classifying biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchi, Riccardo; Anand, Suresh; Fantechi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Gacci, Mauro; Conti, Valerio; Nesi, Gabriella; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Carini, Marco; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2017-07-01

    An optical fiber probe for multimodal spectroscopy was designed, developed and used for tissue diagnostics. The probe, based on a fiber bundle with optical fibers of various size and properties, allows performing spectroscopic measurements with different techniques, including fluorescence, Raman, and diffuse reflectance, using the same probe. Two visible laser diodes were used for fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser diode emitting in the NIR was used for Raman spectroscopy, and a fiber-coupled halogen lamp for diffuse reflectance. The developed probe was successfully employed for diagnostic purposes on various tissues, including brain and bladder. In particular, the device allowed discriminating healthy tissue from both tumor and dysplastic tissue as well as to perform tumor grading. The diagnostic capabilities of the method, determined using a cross-validation method with a leave-one-out approach, demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for all the examined samples, as well as a good agreement with histopathological examination performed on the same samples. The obtained results demonstrated that the multimodal approach is crucial for improving diagnostic capabilities with respect to what can be obtained from individual techniques. The experimental setup presented here can improve diagnostic capabilities on a broad range of tissues and has the potential of being used clinically for guiding surgical resection in the near future.

  6. Defect states in microcrystalline silicon probed by photoluminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merdzhanova, T.; Carius, R.; Klein, S.; Finger, F.; Dimova-Malinovska, D.

    2006-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy is used to investigate defects and localized band tail states within the band gap of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The effect of the substrate temperature (T S ), which influences mainly the defect density, and silane concentration (SC), as Key parameter to control the microstructure of the material were varied. In high quality μc-Si:H films (T S = 185-200 deg. C) a PL band ('μc'-Si-band) is observed at ∼ 0.9-1.05 eV which is attributed to radiative recombination via localized band tail states in the microcrystalline phase. In μc-Si:H films prepared at higher T S (> 300 deg. C), an additional PL band at ∼ 0.7 eV with a width of ∼ 0.17 eV is found for both PECVD and HWCVD material. This band maintains its position at ∼ 0.7 eV with increasing SC in contrast to the observed shift of the 'μc'-Si-band to higher energies. Studies of the temperature dependences of the PL peak energy and intensity for the two bands show: (i) the PL band at 0.7 eV remains unaffected upon increasing temperature, while the 'μc'-Si-band shifts to lower energies (ii) a much weaker quenching for the 0.7 eV band compared to the 'μc'-Si-band. It was also found that the PL band at 0.7 eV exhibits a slightly stronger temperature dependence of the PL intensity compared to 'defect' band at 0.9 eV in a-Si:H suggesting similar recombination transition via deeper trap states. Due to a similar PL properties of the emission band previously observed in Czochralski-grown silicon (Cz-Si), the 0.7 eV band in μc-Si:H is assigned tentatively to defect-related transitions in the crystalline phase

  7. Pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mole, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    An electromagnetic pump for circulating liquid -metal coolant through a nuclear reactor wherein opposite walls of a pump duct serve as electrodes to transmit current radially through the liquid-metal in the ducts. A circumferential electric field is supplied to the liquid-metal by a toroidal electromagnet which has core sections interposed between the ducts. The windings of the electromagnet are composed of metal which is superconductive at low temperatures and the electromagnet is maintained at a temperature at which it is superconductive by liquid helium which is fed through the conductors which supply the excitation for the electromagnet. The walls of the ducts joining the electrodes include metal plates insulated from the electrodes backed up by insulators so that they are capable of withstanding the pressure of the liquid-metal. These composite wall structures may also be of thin metal strips of low electrical conductivity backed up by sturdy insulators. (author)

  8. Fluorescence suppression using wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy in fiber-probe-based tissue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Bavishna B; Ashok, Praveen C; Mazilu, Michael; Riches, Andrew; Herrington, Simon; Dholakia, Kishan

    2012-07-01

    In the field of biomedical optics, Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for probing the chemical composition of biological samples. In particular, fiber Raman probes play a crucial role for in vivo and ex vivo tissue analysis. However, the high-fluorescence background typically contributed by the auto fluorescence from both a tissue sample and the fiber-probe interferes strongly with the relatively weak Raman signal. Here we demonstrate the implementation of wavelength-modulated Raman spectroscopy (WMRS) to suppress the fluorescence background while analyzing tissues using fiber Raman probes. We have observed a significant signal-to-noise ratio enhancement in the Raman bands of bone tissue, which have a relatively high fluorescence background. Implementation of WMRS in fiber-probe-based bone tissue study yielded usable Raman spectra in a relatively short acquisition time (∼30  s), notably without any special sample preparation stage. Finally, we have validated its capability to suppress fluorescence on other tissue samples such as adipose tissue derived from four different species.

  9. In situ scanning probe spectroscopy at nanoscale solid/liquid interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, W.; Hugelmann, M.; Hugelmann, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemistry provides unique features for the preparation of low-dimensional structures, but in situ spectroscopy with atomic/molecular resolution at such structures is at present not well established yet. This paper shows that in situ scanning probe spectroscopy at solid/liquid interfaces can be utilized to study electronic properties at nanoscale, if appropriate conditions are applied. Tunneling spectroscopy provides information about tunneling barrier heights and electronic states in the tunneling gap, as shown on Au(1 1 1) substrates, contact spectroscopy allows for transport measurements at single nanostructures, as shown at Au/n-Si(1 1 1) nanodiodes. The influence of the electrolytic environment on spectroscopic investigations is not a principal limitation, but offers additional degrees of freedom, which allow, for example, spectroscopic studies of potential dependent surface phenomena at solid/liquid interfaces

  10. Probing Pharmaceutical Mixtures during Milling: The Potency of Low-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy in Identifying Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Greg; Römann, Philipp; Poller, Bettina; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rooney, Jeremy S; Huff, Gregory S; Smith, Geoffrey P S; Rades, Thomas; Gordon, Keith C; Strachan, Clare J; Fraser-Miller, Sara J

    2017-12-04

    This study uses a multimodal analytical approach to evaluate the rates of (co)amorphization of milled drug and excipient and the effectiveness of different analytical methods in detecting these changes. Indomethacin and tryptophan were the model substances, and the analytical methods included low-frequency Raman spectroscopy (785 nm excitation and capable of measuring both low- (10 to 250 cm -1 ) and midfrequency (450 to 1800 cm -1 ) regimes, and a 830 nm system (5 to 250 cm -1 )), conventional (200-3000 cm -1 ) Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The kinetics of amorphization were found to be faster for the mixture, and indeed, for indomethacin, only partial amorphization occurred (after 360 min of milling). Each technique was capable of identifying the transformations, but some, such as low-frequency Raman spectroscopy and XRPD, provided less ambiguous signatures than the midvibrational frequency techniques (conventional Raman and FTIR). The low-frequency Raman spectra showed intense phonon mode bands for the crystalline and cocrystalline samples that could be used as a sensitive probe of order. Multivariate analysis has been used to further interpret the spectral changes. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which has several practical advantages over XRPD, for probing (dis-)order during pharmaceutical processing, showcasing its potential for future development, and implementation as an in-line process monitoring method.

  11. Temperature-induced transitions in disordered proteins probed by NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are abundant in nature and perform many important physiological functions. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy has been crucial for the understanding of the conformational properties of disordered proteins and is increasingly used to probe their conformational...... ensembles. Compared to folded proteins, disordered proteins are more malleable and more easily perturbed by environmental factors. Accordingly, the experimental conditions and especially the temperature modify the structural and functional properties of disordered proteins. NMR spectroscopy allows analysis...... of temperature-induced structural changes at residue resolution using secondary chemical shift analysis, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, and residual dipolar couplings. This chapter discusses practical aspects of NMR studies of temperature-induced structural changes in disordered proteins....

  12. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.

    be considered. We have therefore developed a simple and versatile method to make single-cell bacterial probes for measuring single cell adhesion with atomic force microscopy (AFM).[1] A single-cell probe was readily made by picking up a bacterial cell from a glass surface using a tipless AFM cantilever coated...... random immobilization is obtained by submerging the cantilever in a bacterial suspension. The reported method provides a general platform for investigating single cell interactions of bacteria with different surfaces and other cells by AFM force spectroscopy, thus improving our understanding....... The strain-dependent susceptibility to bacterial colonization on conventional PLL-g-PEG illustrates how bacterial diversity challenges development of “universal” antifouling coatings, and AFM single-cell force spectroscopy was proven to be a powerful tool to provide insights into the molecular mechanisms...

  13. Raman spectroscopy in investigations of mechanism of binding of human serum albumin to molecular probe fluorescein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasova, I M; Saletsky, A M

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of molecular probe fluorescein to molecules of human serum albumin was studied by the Raman spectroscopy method. The position of binding Center on human serum albumin molecule for fluorescein is determined. The amino acid residues of albumin molecule, participating in binding of fluorescein at different pH values of solution, are established. The conformation rearrangements of globules of human serum albumin, taking place at binding of fluorescein at different pH values of solution, are registered

  14. μ+SR spectroscopy: the positive muon as a magnetic probe in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, J.H.; Fleming, D.G.; Crowe, K.M.; Johnson, R.F.; Patterson, B.D.; Portis, A.M.; Gygax, F.N.; Schenck, A.

    1974-06-01

    Through its asymmetric decay, the positive muon acts as a sensitive detector of the interactions of its spin with the medium in which it comes to rest. Development of the μ + SR spectroscopy technique is described, and recent applications of the μ + as a probe are discussed. Results for hyperfine fields in ferromagnets and impurity states in nonmetals are presented with suggestions for future studies. 6 figures

  15. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs by G. GABRIELSE / Harvard University, USA Experiments with atomic energy scales probe nature and its symmetries with exquisite precision. Particle traps allow the manipulation of single charged particles for months at a time, allow the most accurate comparison of theory and experiment, and promise to allow better measurement of fundamental quantities like the fine structure constant. Ions and atoms can be probed with lasers that are phase locked to microwave frequency standards via optical combs, thus calibrating optical sources in terms of the official cesium second. A series of three lectures will illustrate what can be measured and discuss key techniques.  ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  16. Probing molecular orientations in thin films by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Li, P.; Lu, Z.-H.

    2018-03-01

    A great number of functional organic molecules in active thin-film layers of optoelectronic devices have highly asymmetric structures, such as plate-like, rod-like, etc. This makes molecular orientation an important aspect in thin-films as it can significantly affect both the optical and electrical performance of optoelectronic devices. With a combination of in-situ ultra violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigations for organic molecules having a broad range of structural properties, we discovered a rigid connection of core levels and frontier highest occupied molecular orbital levels at organic interfaces. This finding opens up opportunities of using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy as an alternative tool to UPS for providing an easy and unambiguous data interpretation in probing molecular orientations.

  17. Probing molecular orientations in thin films by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A great number of functional organic molecules in active thin-film layers of optoelectronic devices have highly asymmetric structures, such as plate-like, rod-like, etc. This makes molecular orientation an important aspect in thin-films as it can significantly affect both the optical and electrical performance of optoelectronic devices. With a combination of in-situ ultra violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS investigations for organic molecules having a broad range of structural properties, we discovered a rigid connection of core levels and frontier highest occupied molecular orbital levels at organic interfaces. This finding opens up opportunities of using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy as an alternative tool to UPS for providing an easy and unambiguous data interpretation in probing molecular orientations.

  18. Tunable third-harmonic probe for non-degenerate ultrafast pump ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... In this article, we report a method to achieve a precisely tunable highly stable probe beam generation for performing pump–probe experiment around a given wavelength by tilting a sum frequency generation (SFG) crystal angle. The width of the generated third-harmonic beam is of the order of 2 nm ...

  19. Tissue classification and diagnostics using a fiber probe for combined Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchi, Riccardo; Anand, Suresh; Crisci, Alfonso; Giordano, Flavio; Rossari, Susanna; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Maio, Vincenza; Massi, Daniela; Nesi, Gabriella; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Guerrini, Renzo; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-07-01

    Two different optical fiber probes for combined Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were designed, developed and used for tissue diagnostics. Two visible laser diodes were used for fluorescence spectroscopy, whereas a laser diode emitting in the NIR was used for Raman spectroscopy. The two probes were based on fiber bundles with a central multimode optical fiber, used for delivering light to the tissue, and 24 surrounding optical fibers for signal collection. Both fluorescence and Raman spectra were acquired using the same detection unit, based on a cooled CCD camera, connected to a spectrograph. The two probes were successfully employed for diagnostic purposes on various tissues in a good agreement with common routine histology. This study included skin, brain and bladder tissues and in particular the classification of: malignant melanoma against melanocytic lesions and healthy skin; urothelial carcinoma against healthy bladder mucosa; brain tumor against dysplastic brain tissue. The diagnostic capabilities were determined using a cross-validation method with a leave-one-out approach, finding very high sensitivity and specificity for all the examined tissues. The obtained results demonstrated that the multimodal approach is crucial for improving diagnostic capabilities. The system presented here can improve diagnostic capabilities on a broad range of tissues and has the potential of being used for endoscopic inspections in the near future.

  20. Key electronic states in lithium battery materials probed by soft X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Wanli; Liu, Xiaosong; Qiao, Ruimin; Olalde-Velasco, Paul; Spear, Jonathan D.; Roseguo, Louis; Pepper, John X.; Chuang, Yi-de; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Hussain, Zahid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Key electronic states in battery materials revealed by soft X-ray spectroscopy. •Soft X-ray absorption consistently probes Mn oxidation states in different systems. •Soft X-ray absorption and emission fingerprint battery operations in LiFePO 4 . •Spectroscopic guidelines for selecting/optimizing polymer materials for batteries. •Distinct SEI formation on same electrode material with different crystal orientations. -- Abstract: The formidable challenges for developing a safe, low-cost, high-capacity, and high-power battery necessitate employing advanced tools that are capable of directly probing the key electronic states relevant to battery performance. Synchrotron based soft X-ray spectroscopy directly measures both the occupied and unoccupied states in the vicinity of the Fermi level, including transition-metal-3d and anion-p states. This article presents the basic concepts on how fundamental physics in electronic structure could provide valuable information for lithium-ion battery applications. We then discuss some of our recent studies on transition-metal oxide based cathodes, silicon based anode, and solid-electrolyte-interphase through soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. We argue that spectroscopic results reveal the evolution of electronic states for fingerprinting, understanding, and optimizing lithium-ion battery operations

  1. The Utilization of Spin Polarized Photoelectron Spectroscopy as a Probe of Electron Correlation with an Ultimate Goal of Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, James; Yu, Sung; Chung, Brandon; Morton, Simon; Komesu, Takashi; Waddill, George

    2008-01-01

    We are developing the technique of spin-polarized photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of electron correlation with the ultimate goal of resolving the Pu electronic structure controversy. Over the last several years, we have demonstrated the utility of spin polarized photoelectron spectroscopy for determining the fine details of the electronic structure in complex systems such as those shown in the paper.

  2. Low-temperature FTIR spectroscopy provides evidence for protein-bound water molecules in eubacterial light-driven ion pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yurika; Ito, Shota; Teranishi, Miwako; Ono, Hikaru; Inoue, Keiichi; Kandori, Hideki

    2018-01-31

    Light-driven H + , Na + and Cl - pumps have been found in eubacteria, which convert light energy into a transmembrane electrochemical potential. A recent mutation study revealed asymmetric functional conversion between the two pumps, where successful functional conversions are achieved exclusively when mutagenesis reverses the evolutionary amino acid sequence changes. Although this fact suggests that the essential structural mechanism of an ancestral function is retained even after gaining a new function, questions regarding the essential structural mechanism remain unanswered. Light-induced difference FTIR spectroscopy was used to monitor the presence of strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules for all eubacterial H + , Na + and Cl - pumps, including a functionally converted mutant. This fact suggests that the strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules are maintained for these new functions during evolution, which could be the reason for successful functional conversion from Na + to H + , and from Cl - to H + pumps. This also explains the successful conversion of the Cl - to the H + pump only for eubacteria, but not for archaea. It is concluded that water-containing hydrogen-bonding networks constitute one of the essential structural mechanisms in eubacterial light-driven ion pumps.

  3. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachtel, J A; Haglund, R F; Pantelides, S T; Marvinney, C; Mayo, D; Mouti, A; Lupini, A R; Chisholm, M F; Mu, R; Pennycook, S J

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows us to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. The approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications. (paper)

  4. Probing flexible conformations in molecular junctions by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Mingsen [Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025 (China); Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, 550018 (China); Ye, Gui; Jiang, Jun, E-mail: jiangj1@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Physics, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Cai, Shaohong, E-mail: caish@mail.gufe.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025 (China); Guizhou Key Laboratory of Economic System Simulation, Guizhou University of Finance and Economics, Guiyang, 550004 (China); Sun, Guangyu [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, 550018 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The probe of flexible molecular conformation is crucial for the electric application of molecular systems. We have developed a theoretical procedure to analyze the couplings of molecular local vibrations with the electron transportation process, which enables us to evaluate the structural fingerprints of some vibrational modes in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Based on a model molecule of Bis-(4-mercaptophenyl)-ether with a flexible center angle, we have revealed and validated a simple mathematical relationship between IETS signals and molecular angles. Our results might open a route to quantitatively measure key geometrical parameters of molecular junctions, which helps to achieve precise control of molecular devices.

  5. Probing near-normally propagating bulk acoustic waves using pseudo-reflection geometry Brillouin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, L. C.; Andrews, G. T.

    2012-09-01

    Pseudo-reflection geometry Brillouin spectroscopy can be used to probe acoustic wave dispersion approximately along the surface normal of a material system while avoiding the difficulties associated with specularly reflected light encountered in an ideal reflection configuration. As an example of its application, we show analytically that it can be used to determine both the refractive index and bulk acoustic mode velocities of optically-isotropic non-metallic materials and confirm the utility of the approach via a series of experiments on fused quartz, gallium phosphide, water, and porous silicon films.

  6. A novel probe of intrinsic electronic structure: hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takata, Y.; Tamasaku, K.; Nishino, Y.; Miwa, D.; Yabashi, M.; Ikenaga, E.; Horiba, K.; Arita, M.; Shimada, K.; Namatame, H.; Nohira, H.; Hattori, T.; Soedergren, S.; Wannberg, B.; Taniguchi, M.; Shin, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    2005-01-01

    We have realized hard X-ray (HX) photoemission spectroscopy (PES) with high throughput and high-energy resolution for core level and valence band studies using high-energy and high-brilliance synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. This is a brand new method because large escape depth of high-energy photoelectrons enables us to probe intrinsic bulk states free from surface condition. By use of a newly developed electron energy analyzer and well-focused X-rays, high-energy resolution of 75 meV (E/ΔE 79,000) was realized for 5.95 keV photoelectrons

  7. Case study on the dynamics of ultrafast laser heating and ablation of gold thin films by ultrafast pump-probe reflectometry and ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, T.; Wang, J.; Olbrich, M.; Frank, M.; Horn, A.

    2018-02-01

    To increase the comprehension of ultrafast laser ablation, the ablation process has to be portrayed with sufficient temporal resolution. For example, the temporal modification of the complex refractive index {\\tilde{n}} and the relative reflectance of a sample material after irradiation with ultrafast single-pulsed laser radiation can be measured with a pump-probe setup. This work describes the construction and validation of a pump-probe setup enabling spatially, temporally, and spectroscopically resolved Brewster angle microscopy, reflectometry, ellipsometry, and shadow photography. First pump-probe reflectometry and ellipsometry measurements are performed on gold at λ _{probe}= 440 nm and three fluences of the single-pulsed pump radiation at λ _{pump}= 800 nm generating no, gentle, and strong ablation. The relative reflectance overall increases at no and gentle ablation. At strong ablation, the relative reflectance locally decreases, presumable caused by emitted thermal electrons, ballistic electrons, and ablating material. The refractive index n is slightly decreasing after excitation, while the extinction coefficient k is increasing.

  8. Proposal for probing energy transfer pathway by single-molecule pump-dump experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Ming-Jie; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2016-01-01

    The structure of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex has long been recognized as containing seven bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. Recently, an additional BChl molecule was discovered in the crystal structure of the FMO complex, which may serve as a link between baseplate and the remaining seven molecules. Here, we investigate excitation energy transfer (EET) process by simulating single-molecule pump-dump experiment in the eight-molecules complex. We adopt the coherent m...

  9. Tunable third-harmonic probe for non-degenerate ultrafast pump ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... 413–417. Tunable third-harmonic probe for non-degenerate ultrafast ... A beam splitter was used to split the beam into two with the power ratio of ... Now polarization of the 800-nm beam is made to be parallel with the 400-nm.

  10. Optical pump-and-probe test system for thermal characterization of thin metal and phase-change films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Kazuo; Polynkin, Pavel; Mansuripur, Masud

    2005-01-01

    A single-shot optical pump-and-probe test system is reported. The system is designed for thermal characterization of thin-film samples that can change their phase state under the influence of a short and intense laser pulse on a subnanosecond time scale. In combination with numerical analysis, the system can be used to estimate thermal constants of thin films, such as specific heat and thermal conductivity. In-plane and out-of plane thermal conductivity can be estimated independently. The system is intended for use in research on optical data storage and material processing with pulsed laser light. The system design issues are discussed. As application examples, we report on using the system to study thermal dynamics in two different thin-film samples: a gold film on a glass substrate (a single-phase system) and the quadrilayer phase-change stack typical in optical data-storage applications

  11. Picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe experiments using a gated single-photon-counting area detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejdrup, T.; Lemke, H.T.; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA...... limited time-resolution of 60 ps using the gated PILATUS detector. This is the first demonstration of X-ray pulse duration limited data recorded using an area detector without the use of a mechanical chopper array at the beamline........ The capability of the gated PILATUS detector to selectively detect the signal from a given X-ray pulse in 24 bunch mode at the APS storage ring is demonstrated. A test experiment performed on polycrystalline organic thin films of [alpha]-perylene illustrates the possibility of reaching an X-ray pulse duration...

  12. Bio-analytical applications of mid-infrared spectroscopy using silver halide fiber-optic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, H.M.; Kuepper, L.; Butvina, L.N.

    2002-01-01

    Infrared-spectroscopy has proved to be a powerful method for the study of various biomedical samples, in particular for in-vitro analysis in the clinical laboratory and for non-invasive diagnostics. In general, the analysis of biofluids such as whole blood, urine, microdialysates and bioreactor broth media takes advantage of the fact that a multitude of analytes can be quantified simultaneously and rapidly without the need for reagents. Progress in the quality of infrared silver halide fibers enabled us to construct several flexible fiber-optic probes of different geometries, which are particularly suitable for the measurement of small biosamples. Recent trends show that dry film measurements by mid-infrared spectroscopy could revolutionize analytical tools in the clinical chemistry laboratory, and an example is given. Infrared diagnostic tools show a promising potential for patients, and minimal-invasive blood glucose assays or skin tissue pathology in particular cannot be left out using mid-infrared fiber-based probes. Other applications include the measurement of skin samples including penetration studies of vitamins and constituents of cosmetic cream formulations. A further field is the micro-domain analysis of biopsy samples from bog mummified corpses, and recent results on the chemistry of dermis and hair samples are reported. Another field of application, for which results are reported, is food analysis and bio-reactor monitoring

  13. Optical afterburner for an x-ray free electron laser as a tool for pump-probe experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Saldin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme for two-color operation of an x-ray self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL. The scheme is based on an intrinsic feature of such a device: chaotic modulations of electron beam energy and energy spread on the scale of FEL coherence length are converted into large density modulations on the same scale with the help of a dispersion section, installed behind the x-ray undulator. Powerful radiation is then generated with the help of a dedicated radiator (like an undulator that selects a narrow spectral line, or one can simply use, for instance, broadband edge radiation. A typical radiation wavelength can be as short as a FEL coherence length, and can be redshifted by increasing the dispersion section strength. In practice it means the wavelength ranges from vacuum ultraviolet to infrared. The long-wavelength radiation pulse is naturally synchronized with the x-ray pulse and can be either directly used in pump-probe experiments or cross correlated with a high-power pulse from a conventional laser system. In this way experimenters overcome jitter problems and can perform pump-probe experiments with femtosecond resolution. Additional possibilities like on-line monitoring of x-ray pulse duration (making “optical replica” of an x-ray pulse are also discussed in the paper. The proposed scheme is very simple, cheap, and robust, and therefore can be easily realized in facilities like FLASH, European XFEL, LCLS, and SCSS.

  14. Photonic topological boundary pumping as a probe of 4D quantum Hall physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberberg, Oded; Huang, Sheng; Guglielmon, Jonathan; Wang, Mohan; Chen, Kevin P; Kraus, Yaacov E; Rechtsman, Mikael C

    2018-01-03

    When a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas is placed in a perpendicular magnetic field, its in-plane transverse conductance becomes quantized; this is known as the quantum Hall effect. It arises from the non-trivial topology of the electronic band structure of the system, where an integer topological invariant (the first Chern number) leads to quantized Hall conductance. It has been shown theoretically that the quantum Hall effect can be generalized to four spatial dimensions, but so far this has not been realized experimentally because experimental systems are limited to three spatial dimensions. Here we use tunable 2D arrays of photonic waveguides to realize a dynamically generated four-dimensional (4D) quantum Hall system experimentally. The inter-waveguide separation in the array is constructed in such a way that the propagation of light through the device samples over momenta in two additional synthetic dimensions, thus realizing a 2D topological pump. As a result, the band structure has 4D topological invariants (known as second Chern numbers) that support a quantized bulk Hall response with 4D symmetry. In a finite-sized system, the 4D topological bulk response is carried by localized edge modes that cross the sample when the synthetic momenta are modulated. We observe this crossing directly through photon pumping of our system from edge to edge and corner to corner. These crossings are equivalent to charge pumping across a 4D system from one three-dimensional hypersurface to the spatially opposite one and from one 2D hyperedge to another. Our results provide a platform for the study of higher-dimensional topological physics.

  15. Photonic topological boundary pumping as a probe of 4D quantum Hall physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberberg, Oded; Huang, Sheng; Guglielmon, Jonathan; Wang, Mohan; Chen, Kevin P.; Kraus, Yaacov E.; Rechtsman, Mikael C.

    2018-01-01

    When a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas is placed in a perpendicular magnetic field, its in-plane transverse conductance becomes quantized; this is known as the quantum Hall effect. It arises from the non-trivial topology of the electronic band structure of the system, where an integer topological invariant (the first Chern number) leads to quantized Hall conductance. It has been shown theoretically that the quantum Hall effect can be generalized to four spatial dimensions, but so far this has not been realized experimentally because experimental systems are limited to three spatial dimensions. Here we use tunable 2D arrays of photonic waveguides to realize a dynamically generated four-dimensional (4D) quantum Hall system experimentally. The inter-waveguide separation in the array is constructed in such a way that the propagation of light through the device samples over momenta in two additional synthetic dimensions, thus realizing a 2D topological pump. As a result, the band structure has 4D topological invariants (known as second Chern numbers) that support a quantized bulk Hall response with 4D symmetry. In a finite-sized system, the 4D topological bulk response is carried by localized edge modes that cross the sample when the synthetic momenta are modulated. We observe this crossing directly through photon pumping of our system from edge to edge and corner to corner. These crossings are equivalent to charge pumping across a 4D system from one three-dimensional hypersurface to the spatially opposite one and from one 2D hyperedge to another. Our results provide a platform for the study of higher-dimensional topological physics.

  16. Optical beam transport to a remote location for low jitter pump-probe experiments with a free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cinquegrana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a scheme that allows a strong reduction of the timing jitter between the pulses of a free electron laser (FEL and external laser pulses delivered simultaneously at the FEL experimental stations for pump-probe–type experiments. The technique, applicable to all seeding-based FEL schemes, relies on the free-space optical transport of a portion of the seed laser pulse from its optical table to the experimental stations. The results presented here demonstrate that a carefully designed laser beam transport, incorporating also a transverse beam position stabilization, allows one to keep the timing fluctuations, added by as much as 150 m of free space propagation and a number of beam folding mirrors, to less than 4 femtoseconds rms. By its nature our scheme removes the major common timing jitter sources, so the overall jitter in pump-probe measurements done in this way will be below 10 fs (with a margin to be lowered to below 5 fs, much better than the best results reported previously in the literature amounting to 33 fs rms.

  17. Transverse Electromagnetic Mode Conversion for High-Harmonic Self-Probing Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Camper

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on high-order harmonic (HHG two-source interferometry (TSI in molecular gases. We used a 0-\\(\\pi\\ phase plate to create two bright spots at the focus of a lens by converting a Gaussian laser beam into a TEM please define \\(_{01}\\ Transverse Electromagnetic Mode. The two bright foci produce two synchronized HHG sources. One of them is used to probe on-going dynamics in the generating medium, while the other serves to heterodyne the signal. The interference of the emissions in the far–field gives access to the phase difference between the two sources. In self–probing HHG phase spectroscopy, one of the two sources is used as a reference while the other one probes some on goin dynamics in the generating medium. We first compute overlap integrals to investigate the mode conversion efficiency. We then establish a clear relation between the laser phase-front curvature and the far-field overlap of the two HHG beams. Both Fresnel diffraction calculations and an experimental lens position scan are used to reveal variations of the phase front inclination in each source. We show that this arrangement offers \\(\\frac{\\lambda_{XUV}}{100}\\ precision, enabling extremely sensitive phase measurements. Finally, we use this compact setup for TSI and measure phase variations across the molecular alignment revival of nitrogen and in vibrating sulfur hexafluoride. In both gases, the phase variations change sign around the ionization threshold of the investigated molecule.

  18. Ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide probed by femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Neumark, Daniel M.; Gessner, Oliver; Leone, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Strong-field induced ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide, CH 2 =CHBr, are probed using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy. Strong-field ionization is initiated with an intense femtosecond, near infrared (NIR, 775 nm) laser field. Femtosecond XUV pulses covering the photon energy range of 50-72 eV probe the subsequent dynamics by measuring the time-dependent spectroscopic features associated with transitions of the Br (3d) inner-shell electrons to vacancies in molecular and atomic valence orbitals. Spectral signatures are observed for the depletion of neutral C 2 H 3 Br, the formation of C 2 H 3 Br + ions in their ground (X ~ ) and first excited (A ~ ) states, the production of C 2 H 3 Br ++ ions, and the appearance of neutral Br ( 2 P 3/2 ) atoms by dissociative ionization. The formation of free Br ( 2 P 3/2 ) atoms occurs on a timescale of 330 ± 150 fs. The ionic A ~ state exhibits a time-dependent XUV absorption energy shift of ∼0.4 eV within the time window of the atomic Br formation. The yield of Br atoms correlates with the yield of parent ions in the A ~ state as a function of NIR peak intensity. The observations suggest that a fraction of vibrationally excited C 2 H 3 Br + (A ~ ) ions undergoes intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution followed by the C–Br bond dissociation. The C 2 H 3 Br + (X ~ ) products and the majority of the C 2 H 3 Br ++ ions are relatively stable due to a deeper potential well and a high dissociation barrier, respectively. The results offer powerful new insights about orbital-specific electronic processes in high field ionization, coupled vibrational relaxation and dissociation dynamics, and the correlation of valence hole-state location and dissociation in polyatomic molecules, all probed simultaneously by ultrafast table-top XUV spectroscopy

  19. Femtosecond visible/visible and visible/mid-IR pump-probe study of the photosystem II core antenna complex CP47

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.L.; Breton, J.; van Wilderen, L.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    CP47 is one of the two core antenna proteins of Photosystem II involved in the transfer of solar energy toward the photochemically active reaction center, the D1D2cytb559 complex. We have performed vis/vis and vis/mid-IR pump-probe experiments at room temperature as a first step in linking the

  20. Soft x-ray spectroscopy for probing electronic and chemical states of battery materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wanli; Qiao Ruimin

    2016-01-01

    The formidable challenge of developing high-performance battery system stems from the complication of battery operations, both mechanically and electronically. In the electrodes and at the electrode–electrolyte interfaces, chemical reactions take place with evolving electron states. In addition to the extensive studies of material synthesis, electrochemical, structural, and mechanical properties, soft x-ray spectroscopy provides unique opportunities for revealing the critical electron states in batteries. This review discusses some of the recent soft x-ray spectroscopic results on battery binder, transition-metal based positive electrodes, and the solid-electrolyte-interphase. By virtue of soft x-ray’s sensitivity to electron states, the electronic property, the redox during electrochemical operations, and the chemical species of the interphases could be fingerprinted by soft x-ray spectroscopy. Understanding and innovating battery technologies need a multimodal approach, and soft x-ray spectroscopy is one of the incisive tools to probe the chemical and physical evolutions in batteries. (topical review)

  1. Nanoscale probing of bandgap states on oxide particles using electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianlang; March, Katia; Crozier, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Surface and near-surface electronic states were probed with nanometer spatial resolution in MgO and TiO 2 anatase nanoparticles using ultra-high energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled to a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). This combination allows the surface electronic structure determined with spectroscopy to be correlated with nanoparticle size, morphology, facet etc. By acquiring the spectra in aloof beam mode, radiation damage to the surface can be significantly reduced while maintaining the nanometer spatial resolution. MgO and TiO 2 showed very different bandgap features associated with the surface/sub-surface layer of the nanoparticles. Spectral simulations based on dielectric theory and density of states models showed that a plateau feature found in the pre-bandgap region in the spectra from (100) surfaces of 60nm MgO nanocubes is consistent with a thin hydroxide surface layer. The spectroscopy shows that this hydroxide species gives rise to a broad filled surface state at 1.1eV above the MgO valence band. At the surfaces of TiO 2 nanoparticles, pronounced peaks were observed in the bandgap region, which could not be well fitted to defect states. In this case, the high refractive index and large particle size may make Cherenkov or guided light modes the likely causes of the peaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Incoherent manipulation of the photoactive yellow protein photocycle with dispersed pump-dump-probe spectroscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, D.S.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Vengris, M.; van der Horst, M.A.; de Weerd, F.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    Photoactive yellow protein is the protein responsible for initiating the ``blue-light vision¿¿ of Halorhodospira halophila. The dynamical processes responsible for triggering the photoactive yellow protein photocycle have been disentangled with the use of a novel application of dispersed ultrafast

  3. Incoherent manipulation of the photoactive yellow protein photocycle with dispersed pump-dump-probe spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, D.S.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Vengris, M.; Horst, M.A.; de Weerd, F.L.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    Photoactive yellow protein is the protein responsible for initiating the "blue-light vision" of Halorhodospira halophila. The dynamical processes responsible for triggering the photoactive yellow protein photocycle have been disentangled with the use of a novel application of dispersed ultrafast

  4. Proposal for probing energy transfer pathway by single-molecule pump-dump experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ming-Jie; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2016-06-01

    The structure of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex had long been recognized as containing seven bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. Recently, an additional BChl molecule was discovered in the crystal structure of the FMO complex, which may serve as a link between baseplate and the remaining seven molecules. Here, we investigate excitation energy transfer (EET) process by simulating single-molecule pump-dump experiment in the eight-molecules complex. We adopt the coherent modified Redfield theory and non-Markovian quantum jump method to simulate EET dynamics. This scheme provides a practical approach of detecting the realistic EET pathway in BChl complexes with currently available experimental technology. And it may assist optimizing design of artificial light-harvesting devices.

  5. Femtosecond nonlinear spectroscopy at surfaces: Second-harmonic probing of hole burning at the Si(111)7x7 surface and Fourier-transform sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, John Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The high temporal resolution and broad bandwidth of a femtosecond laser system are exploited in a pair of nonlinear optical studies of surfaces. The dephasing dynamics of resonances associated with the adatom dangling bonds of the Si(111)7 x 7 surface are explored by transient second-harmonic hole burning, a process that can be described as a fourth-order nonlinear optical process. Spectral holes produced by a 100 fs pump pulse at about 800 nm are probed by the second harmonic signal of a 100 fs pulse tunable around 800 nm. The measured spectral holes yield homogeneous dephasing times of a few tens of femtoseconds. Fits with a Lorentzian spectral hole centered at zero probe detuning show a linear dependence of the hole width on pump fluence, which suggests that charge carrier-carrier scattering dominates the dephasing dynamics at the measured excitation densities. Extrapolation of the deduced homogeneous dephasing times to zero excitation density yields an intrinsic dephasing time of ∼ 70 fs. The presence of a secondary spectral hole indicates that scattering of the surface electrons with surface optical phonons at 570 cm -1 occurs within the first 200 fs after excitation. The broad bandwidth of femtosecond IR pulses is used to perform IR-visible sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy. By implementing a Fourier-transform technique, we demonstrate the ability to obtain sub-laser-bandwidth spectral resolution. FT-SFG yields a greater signal when implemented with a stretched visible pulse than with a femtosecond visible pulse. However, when compared with multichannel spectroscopy using a femtosecond IR pulse but a narrowband visible pulse, Fourier-transform SFG is found to have an inferior signal-to-noise ratio. A mathematical analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio illustrates the constraints on the Fourier-transform approach

  6. Femtosecond nonlinear spectroscopy at surfaces: Second-harmonic probing of hole burning at the Si(111)7x7 surface and fourier-transform sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, John Andrew [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-11-24

    The high temporal resolution and broad bandwidth of a femtosecond laser system are exploited in a pair of nonlinear optical studies of surfaces. The dephasing dynamics of resonances associated with the adatom dangling bonds of the Si(111)7 x 7 surface are explored by transient second-harmonic hole burning, a process that can be described as a fourth-order nonlinear optical process. Spectral holes produced by a 100 fs pump pulse at about 800 nm are probed by the second harmonic signal of a 100 fs pulse tunable around 800 nm. The measured spectral holes yield homogeneous dephasing times of a few tens of femtoseconds. Fits with a Lorentzian spectral hole centered at zero probe detuning show a linear dependence of the hole width on pump fluence, which suggests that charge carrier-carrier scattering dominates the dephasing dynamics at the measured excitation densities. Extrapolation of the deduced homogeneous dephasing times to zero excitation density yields an intrinsic dephasing time of {approx} 70 fs. The presence of a secondary spectral hole indicates that scattering of the surface electrons with surface optical phonons at 570 cm-1 occurs within the first 200 fs after excitation. The broad bandwidth of femtosecond IR pulses is used to perform IR-visible sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy. By implementing a Fourier-transform technique, we demonstrate the ability to obtain sub-laser-bandwidth spectral resolution. FT-SFG yields a greater signal when implemented with a stretched visible pulse than with a femtosecond visible pulse. However, when compared with multichannel spectroscopy using a femtosecond IR pulse but a narrowband visible pulse, Fourier-transform SFG is found to have an inferior signal-to-noise ratio. A mathematical analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio illustrates the constraints on the Fourier-transform approach.

  7. Single-resonance optical pumping spectroscopy and application in dressed-state measurement with atomic vapor cell at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qiangbing; Yang, Baodong; Zhang, Tiancai; Wang, Junmin

    2010-06-21

    By monitoring the transmission of probe laser beam (also served as coupling laser beam) which is locked to a cycling hyperfine transition of cesium D(2) line, while pumping laser is scanned across cesium D(1) or D(2) lines, the single-resonance optical pumping (SROP) spectra are obtained with atomic vapor cell. The SROP spectra indicate the variation of the zero-velocity atoms population of one hyperfine fold of ground state, which is optically pumped into another hyperfine fold of ground state by pumping laser. With the virtue of Doppler-free linewidth, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), flat background and elimination of crossover resonance lines (CRLs), the SROP spectra with atomic vapor cell around room temperature can be employed to measure dressed-state splitting of ground state, which is normally detected with laser-cooled atomic sample only, even if the dressed-state splitting is much smaller than the Doppler-broaden linewidth at room temperature.

  8. Neutrino spectroscopy can probe the dark matter content in the Sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2010-10-22

    After being gravitationally captured, low-mass cold dark-matter particles (mass range from 5 to ~50 × 10(9) electron volts) are thought to drift to the center of the Sun and affect its internal structure. Solar neutrinos provide a way to probe the physical processes occurring in the Sun's core. Solar neutrino spectroscopy, in particular, is expected to measure the neutrino fluxes produced in nuclear reactions in the Sun. Here, we show how the presence of dark-matter particles inside the Sun will produce unique neutrino flux distributions in (7)Be-ν and (8)B-ν, as well as (13)N-ν, (15)O-ν, and (17)F-ν.

  9. Probing the photoluminescence properties of gold nanoclusters by fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C. T.; Lin, T. N.; Shen, J. L.; Lin, C. A.; Chang, W. H.; Cheng, H. W.; Tang, J.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) have attracted much attention for promising applications in biological imaging owing to their tiny sizes and biocompatibility. So far, most efforts have been focused on the strategies for fabricating high-quality Au NCs and then characterized by conventional ensemble measurement. Here, a fusion single-molecule technique combining fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-correlated single-photon counting can be successfully applied to probe the photoluminescence (PL) properties for sparse Au NCs. In this case, the triplet-state dynamics and diffusion process can be observed simultaneously and the relevant time constants can be derived. This work provides a complementary insight into the PL mechanism at the molecular levels for Au NCs in solution

  10. Note: Microelectrode-shielding tip for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Zhean; Xu, Chunkai; Liu, Jian; Xu, Chunye; Chen, Xiangjun

    2018-04-01

    We report a novel microelectrode-shielding tip (ME tip) for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy (SPEES). The shielding effect of this tip is studied through comparing the detection efficiency with the normal tip by both experiment and simulation. The results show that the backscattering count rate detected by the SPEES instrument using the normal tip begins to decrease as the tip approaches to the sample surface within 21 μm, while that using the ME tip only starts to drop off within 1 μm. This indicates that the electron energy spectra can be measured with the ME tip at a much closer tip-sample distance. Furthermore, it is also demonstrated that the ME tip can be used to obtain topography of the sample surface in situ simultaneously.

  11. Surfaces of colloidal PbSe nanocrystals probed by thin-film positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and positron-electron momentum density (PEMD studies on multilayers of PbSe nanocrystals (NCs, supported by transmission electron microscopy, show that positrons are strongly trapped at NC surfaces, where they provide insight into the surface composition and electronic structure of PbSe NCs. Our analysis indicates abundant annihilation of positrons with Se electrons at the NC surfaces and with O electrons of the oleic ligands bound to Pb ad-atoms at the NC surfaces, which demonstrates that positrons can be used as a sensitive probe to investigate the surface physics and chemistry of nanocrystals inside multilayers. Ab initio electronic structure calculations provide detailed insight in the valence and semi-core electron contributions to the positron-electron momentum density of PbSe. Both lifetime and PEMD are found to correlate with changes in the particle morphology characteristic of partial ligand removal.

  12. Probing the exciton density of states in semiconductor nanocrystals using integrated photoluminescence spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Filonovich, S A; Vasilevskiy, M I; Rolo, A G; Gomes, M J M; Artemiev, M V; Talapin, D V; Rogach, A L

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of a comparative analysis of the absorption and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra vs. integrated photoluminescence (IPL) measured as a function of the excitation wavelength for a number of samples containing II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) produced by different techniques. The structure of the absorption and PL spectra due to excitons confined in NCs and difficulties with the correct interpretation of the transmittance and PLE results are discussed. It is shown that, compared to the conventional PLE, the IPL intensity plotted against the excitation wavelength (IPLE spectra) reproduce better the structure of the absorption spectra. Therefore, IPLE spectroscopy can be successfully used for probing the quantized electron-hole (e-h) transitions in semiconductor nanocrystals. (author)

  13. Operational electrochemical stability of thiophene-thiazole copolymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, Jessica; Wood, Sebastian; Kim, Ji-Seon, E-mail: ji-seon.kim@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Beatrup, Daniel; Hurhangee, Michael; McCulloch, Iain; Durrant, James R. [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Bronstein, Hugo [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-28

    We report on the electrochemical stability of hole polarons in three conjugated polymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The materials considered are all isostructural to poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, where thiazole units have been included to systematically deepen the energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). We demonstrate that increasing the thiazole content planarizes the main conjugated backbone of the polymer and improves the electrochemical stability in the ground state. However, these more planar thiazole containing polymers are increasingly susceptible to electrochemical degradation in the polaronic excited state. We identify the degradation mechanism, which targets the C=N bond in the thiazole units and results in disruption of the main polymer backbone conjugation. The introduction of thiazole units to deepen the HOMO energy level and increase the conjugated backbone planarity can be beneficial for the performance of certain optoelectronic devices, but the reduced electrochemical stability of the hole polaron may compromise their operational stability.

  14. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy as a Novel Interfacial Probe for Thin Polymeric Films and Nano-Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Somia; Chen, Hongmin; Maina, Grace; Lee, L. James; Gu, Xiaohong; Jean, Y. C.

    2010-03-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has been developed as a novel probe to characterize the sub-nanometer defect, free volume, profile from the surface, interfaces, and to the bulk in polymeric materials when a variable mono-energy slow positron beam is used. Free-volume hole sizes, fractions, and distributions are measurable as a function of depth at the high precision. PAS has been successfully used to study the interfacial properties of polymeric nanocomposites at different chemical bonding. In nano-scale thin polymeric films, such as in PS/SiO2, and PU/ZnO, significant variations of Tg as a function of depth and of wt% oxide are observed. Variations of Tg are dependent on strong or weak interactions between polymers and nano-scale oxides surfaces.

  15. Probing a molecular electronic transition by two-colour sum-frequency generation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, C.; Dreesen, L.; Nihonyanagi, S.; Masuda, T.; Kondo, T.; Mani, A.A.; Uosaki, K.; Thiry, P.A.; Peremans, A.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that a new emerging technique, two-colour sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, can be used to probe the molecular electronic properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). In the CH spectral range (2800-3200 cm -1 ), we show that the sum-frequency generation signal of a porphyrin alkanethiol derivative adsorbed on Pt(1 1 1) reaches a maximum intensity at ∼435 nm SFG wavelength. This wavelength corresponds to the porphyrin moiety specific π-π* molecular electronic transition which is called the Soret or B band. This resonant behaviour is not observed for 1-dodecanethiol SAMs, which are devoid of molecular electronic transition in the investigated visible spectral range

  16. X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging as Multiscale Probes of Intercalation Phenomena in Cathode Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrocks, Gregory A.; De Jesus, Luis R.; Andrews, Justin L.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2017-09-01

    Intercalation phenomena are at the heart of modern electrochemical energy storage. Nevertheless, as out-of-equilibrium processes involving concomitant mass and charge transport, such phenomena can be difficult to engineer in a predictive manner. The rational design of electrode architectures requires mechanistic understanding of physical phenomena spanning multiple length scales, from atomistic distortions and electron localization at individual transition metal centers to phase inhomogeneities and intercalation gradients in individual particles and concentration variances across ensembles of particles. In this review article, we discuss the importance of the electronic structure in mediating electrochemical storage and mesoscale heterogeneity. In particular, we discuss x-ray spectroscopy and imaging probes of electronic and atomistic structure as well as statistical regression methods that allow for monitoring of the evolution of the electronic structure as a function of intercalation. The layered α-phase of V2O5 is used as a model system to develop fundamental ideas on the origins of mesoscale heterogeneity.

  17. Probing of Hermean Exosphere by ultraviolet spectroscopy: Instrument presentation, calibration philosophy and first lights results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, J. F.; Rouanet, N.; Maria, J. L.; Quémerais, E.; Mine, P. O.; Zuppella, P.; Suman, M.; Nicolosi, P.; Pelizzo, M. G.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.

    2017-11-01

    PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) is a double spectrometer for the Extreme Ultraviolet range (55-155 nm) and the Far Ultraviolet range (145-315 nm) dedicated to the characterization of Mercury's exosphere composition and dynamics, and surface-exosphere connections. PHEBUS is part of the ESA BepiColombo cornerstone mission payload devoted to the study of Mercury. The BepiColombo mission consists of two spacecrafts: the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) and the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) on which PHEBUS will be mounted. PHEBUS is a French-led instrument implemented in a cooperative scheme involving Japan (detectors), Russia (scanner) and Italy (ground calibration). Before launch, PHEBUS team want to perform a full absolute calibration on ground, in addition to calibrations which will be made in-flight, in order to know the instrument's response as precisely as possible. Instrument overview and calibration philosophy are introduced along with the first lights results observed by a first prototype.

  18. Probing Transient Valence Orbital Changes with Picosecond Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    March, Anne Marie; Assefa, Tadesse A.; Boemer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    We probe the dynamics of valence electrons in photoexcited [Fe(terpy)2]2+ in solution to gain deeper insight into the Fe ligand bond changes. We use hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), which combines element specificity and high penetration with sensitivity to orbital structure, making...... valence orbitals to the nascent core-hole. Vtc-XES offers particular insight into the molecular orbitals directly involved in the light-driven dynamics; a change in the metal ligand orbital overlap results in an intensity reduction and a blue energy shift in agreement with our theoretical calculations...... and more subtle features at the highest energies reflect changes in the frontier orbital populations....

  19. Pump–probe microscopy: Visualization and spectroscopy of ultrafast dynamics at the nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumstrup, Erik M., E-mail: erik.grumstrup@montana.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59718 (United States); Gabriel, Michelle M.; Cating, Emma E.M.; Van Goethem, Erika M. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Papanikolas, John M., E-mail: john_papanikolas@unc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2015-09-08

    Highlights: • Diffraction limited pump–probe microscopy methods are described. • Spatial variation in dynamical phenomena across single structures. • Direct observation of carrier motion in individual nanostructures. - Abstract: Excited state dynamics at the nanoscale provide important insight into the influence of structural features such as interfaces, defects, and surfaces on material properties. Pump–probe microscopy combines the spatial resolution of far-field optical microscopy with the temporal resolution of ultrafast spectroscopy, and has emerged as a powerful technique for characterizing spatial variation in dynamical phenomena across nanometer length scales. It has helped correlate dynamical phenomena with specific structural features in a variety of materials, shedding light on how excited state behaviors can dramatically differ from one member of the ensemble to the next, and even at different points within a single structure. It has also enabled direct imaging of transport phenomena such as free carrier diffusion, exciton migration and plasmon propagation in nanostructures. This ability to observe individual objects provides unique insight into complex materials where heterogeneous behavior makes it difficult, if not impossible, to reach clear and quantitative conclusions.

  20. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O–H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm −1 . We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150–250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1–2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O–H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ∼200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions

  1. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy for immunoassay using iron oxide nanoparticles as probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jia; Tian, Sizhu; Wang, Kun; Wang, Yang; Zang, Shuang; Yu, Aimin; Zhang, Ziwei

    2018-02-01

    With the help of iron oxide nanoparticles, electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was applied to immunoassay. Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as the ESR probe in order to achieve an amplification of the signal resulting from the large amount of Fe 3+ ion enclosed in each nanoparticle. Rabbit IgG was used as antigen to test this method. Polyclonal antibody of rabbit IgG was used as antibody to detect the antigen. Iron oxide nanoparticle with a diameter of either 10 or 30 nm was labeled to the antibody, and Fe 3+ in the nanoparticle was probed for ESR signal. The sepharose beads were used as solid phase to which rabbit IgG was conjugated. The nanoparticle-labeled antibody was first added in the sample containing antigen, and the antigen-conjugated sepharose beads were then added into the sample. The nanoparticle-labeled antibody bound to the antigen on sepharose beads was separated from the sample by centrifugation and measured. We found that the detection ranges of the antigen obtained with nanoparticles of different sizes were different because the amount of antibody on nanoparticles of 10 nm was about one order of magnitude higher than that on nanoparticles of 30 nm. When 10 nm nanoparticle was used as probe, the upper limit of detection was 40.00 μg mL -1 , and the analytical sensitivity was 1.81 μg mL -1 . When 30 nm nanoparticle was used, the upper limit of detection was 3.00 μg mL -1 , and the sensitivity was 0.014 and 0.13 μg mL -1 depending on the ratio of nanoparticle to antibody. Graphical abstract Schematic diagram of procedure and ESR spectra.

  2. A proximal retarding field analyzer for scanning probe energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Karl; Murphy, Shane; Palmer, Richard E.

    2017-03-01

    A compact proximal retarding field analyzer for scanning probe energy loss spectroscopy measurements is described. Using the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as a field emission (FE) electron source in conjunction with this analyzer, which is placed at a glancing angle to the surface plane, FE sample current and electron reflectivity imaging may be performed simultaneously. This is demonstrated in measurements of Ag nanostructures prepared on graphite by electron-beam lithography, where a material contrast of 13% is observed, with a lateral resolution of 25 nm, between the silver and graphite in electron reflectivity images. Topological contrast mechanisms such as edge enhancement and shadowing are also observed, giving rise to additional features in the electron reflectivity images. The same instrument configuration has been used to measure electron energy loss spectra on bare graphite, where the zero loss peak, π band plasmon loss peak and secondary electron peaks are observed. Using this simple and compact analyzer an STM, with sufficient open access to the tip-sample junction, may easily be augmented to provide simultaneous elemental and topographic mapping, supplementing STM image measurements with FE sample current and electron reflectivity images, as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements, in the same instrument.

  3. Development of micro-optics for high-resolution IL spectroscopy with a proton microbeam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, Wataru; Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Koka, Masashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2014-01-01

    Confocal optics for ion luminescence (IL) was developed for the precise analysis of the chemical composition of microscopic targets with an external proton microbeam probe. Anti-reflection-coated confocal micro-lens optics with an effective focus area of approximately 800 × 800 μm was installed on the microbeam line of a single-ended accelerator. Chromatic aberrations of the confocal optics were examined at wavelengths of 300–900 nm. An electrically-cooled back-thinned charge coupled device spectrometer with a wavelength resolution of 0.5 nm was used for the microscopic spectroscopy and IL imaging of microscopic mineral targets. Simultaneous microscopic IL and micro-PIXE analysis were performed using an external 3 MeV H + microbeam with a current of less than 100 pA. A spectral resolution of 3 nm was achieved for a single IL peak which corresponded to Cr 3+ impurities in a single-crystal of aluminum oxide. The use of IL spectroscopy and imaging for aerosol targets revealed microscopic distributions of the chemical and elemental composition in the atmosphere

  4. Probing Nitrosyl Ligation of Surface-Confined Metalloporphyrins by Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Complexes obtained by the ligation of nitric oxide (NO) to metalloporphyrins represent important model systems with biological relevance. Herein we report a molecular-level investigation of surface-confined cobalt tetraphenyl porphyrin (Co-TPP) species and their interaction with NO under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. It is demonstrated that individual NO adducts can be desorbed using the atomically sharp tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, whereby a writing process is implemented for fully saturated regular metalloporphyrin arrays. The low-energy vibrational characteristics of individual Co-TPP-nitrosyl complexes probed by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) reveal a prominent signature at an energy of ≃31 meV. Using density functional theory-based IETS simulations—the first to be performed on such an extensive interfacial nanosystem—we succeed to reproduce the low-frequency spectrum for the NO-ligated complex and explain the absence of IETS activity for bare Co-TPP. Moreover, we can conclusively assign the IETS peak of NO-Co-TPP to a unique vibration mode involving the NO complexation site, namely, the in-plane Co–N–O rocking mode. In addition, we verify that the propensity rules previously designed on small aromatic systems and molecular fragments hold true for a metal–organic entity. This work notably permits one to envisage IETS spectroscopy as a sensitive tool to chemically characterize hybrid interfaces formed by complex metal–organic units and gaseous adducts. PMID:23718257

  5. Nanoscale probing of bandgap states on oxide particles using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qianlang [School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85287 AZ (United States); March, Katia [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bâtiment 510, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Crozier, Peter A., E-mail: CROZIER@asu.edu [School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85287 AZ (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Surface and near-surface electronic states were probed with nanometer spatial resolution in MgO and TiO{sub 2} anatase nanoparticles using ultra-high energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled to a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). This combination allows the surface electronic structure determined with spectroscopy to be correlated with nanoparticle size, morphology, facet etc. By acquiring the spectra in aloof beam mode, radiation damage to the surface can be significantly reduced while maintaining the nanometer spatial resolution. MgO and TiO{sub 2} showed very different bandgap features associated with the surface/sub-surface layer of the nanoparticles. Spectral simulations based on dielectric theory and density of states models showed that a plateau feature found in the pre-bandgap region in the spectra from (100) surfaces of 60 nm MgO nanocubes is consistent with a thin hydroxide surface layer. The spectroscopy shows that this hydroxide species gives rise to a broad filled surface state at 1.1 eV above the MgO valence band. At the surfaces of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, pronounced peaks were observed in the bandgap region, which could not be well fitted to defect states. In this case, the high refractive index and large particle size may make Cherenkov or guided light modes the likely causes of the peaks. - Highlights: • Bandgap states detected with aloof beam monochromated EELS on oxide nanoparticle surfaces. • Dielectric theory applied to simulate the spectra and interpret surface structure. • Density of states models also be employed to understand the surface electronic structure. • In MgO, one states associate with water species was found close to the valence band edge. • In anatase, two mid-gap states associated with point defects were found.

  6. Ultra-fast pump-probe determination of electron-phonon coupling in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, Dragan

    2010-03-01

    Fresh femtosecond spectroscopy experiments show the electron-phonon interaction strength λ to be 0.7 and 1.4 for YBCO and LSCO respectively and not around 0.2 as previously reported [1]. The revised estimates arise primarily from improved time-resolution, and also partly from improved modeling. Comparison with classical superconductors and pnictides shows non-monotonic correlation of λ with Tc. Systematic new measurements of the condensate vaporization energy (Uv) in cuprates [2] and pnictides reveals a power-law dependence on Tc with exponent 2. However, Uc is 16-18 times greater than the BCS condensation energy Uc, implying that a significant heat capacity of the ``bosonic glue.'' In contrast, charge-density wave systems with electronically driven ordering transitions have Uv˜Uc. The data suggest BCS and Eliashberg-based models to be inappropriate for describing the physics of high-temperature superconductors, and point towards polaron models which consider strong or intermediate λ.[4pt] [1] C.Gadermeier et al., arXiv:0902.1636[0pt] [2] P.Kusar et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 227001 (2008)

  7. Styrene oligomerization as a molecular probe reaction for zeolite acidity: a UV-Vis spectroscopy and DFT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurmans, I.L.C.; Pidko, E.A.; Groot, de J.M.; Stavitski, E.; Santen, van R.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of H-ZSM-5 crystallites with different framework Si/Al ratios was studied by analyzing the kinetics and reaction mechanism of the oligomerization of 4-fluorostyrene as molecular probe reaction for Brønsted acidity. The formation of carbocationic species was followed by UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  8. Ultrafast Photodissociation Dynamics of the F State of Sulfur Dioxide by Femtosecond Time-Resolved Pump-Probe Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dong-Dong; Ni Qiang; Luo Si-Zuo; Zhang Jing; Liu Hang; Xu Hai-Feng; Jin Ming-Xing; Ding Da-Jun

    2011-01-01

    A femtosecond pump-probe method is employed to study the dissociation dynamics of sulfur dioxide. SO 2 molecules are excited to the F state by absorbing two photons of 267 nm femtosecond laser pulses, and ionized by 400 nm laser pulses at different delay times between the two lasers. Transients of both parent ions (SO + 2 ) and the fragment ions (SO + , S + and O + ) are observed. The SO + 2 transient can be well fitted to a biexponential decay comprising a fast and a slow component of 280 fs and 2.97 ps lifetimes, respectively. The SO + transient consists of two growth components of 270 fs and 2.50 ps. The results clearly show that the F state of SO 2 dissociates along an S-O bond. The transients of S + and O + , however, have different behavior, which consist of a fast growth and a long decay component. A possible mechanism of the fragment formation is discussed to understand the dissociation dynamics of the F state of SO 2 . (atomic and molecular physics)

  9. Electrically continuous graphene from single crystal copper verified by terahertz conductance spectroscopy and micro four-point probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jessen, Bjarke Sørensen

    2014-01-01

    noninvasive conductance characterization methods: ultrabroadband terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and micro four-point probe, which probe the electrical properties of the graphene film on different length scales, 100 nm and 10 μm, respectively. Ultrabroadband terahertz time-domain spectroscopy allows......- and microscale electrical continuity of single layer graphene grown on centimeter-sized single crystal copper with that of previously studied graphene films, grown on commercially available copper foil, after transfer to SiO2 surfaces. The electrical continuity of the graphene films is analyzed using two....... Micro four-point probe resistance values measured on graphene grown on single crystalline copper in two different voltage-current configurations show close agreement with the expected distributions for a continuous 2D conductor, in contrast with previous observations on graphene grown on commercial...

  10. Nonadiabatic Dynamics May Be Probed through Electronic Coherence in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kochise; Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-02-09

    We present a hierarchy of Fermi golden rules (FGRs) that incorporate strongly coupled electronic/nuclear dynamics in time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) signals at different levels of theory. Expansion in the joint electronic and nuclear eigenbasis yields the numerically most challenging exact FGR (eFGR). The quasistatic Fermi Golden Rule (qsFGR) neglects nuclear motion during the photoionization process but takes into account electronic coherences as well as populations initially present in the pumped matter as well as those generated internally by coupling between electronic surfaces. The standard semiclassical Fermi Golden Rule (scFGR) neglects the electronic coherences and the nuclear kinetic energy during the ionizing pulse altogether, yielding the classical Condon approximation. The coherence contributions depend on the phase-profile of the ionizing field, allowing coherent control of TRPES signals. The photoelectron spectrum from model systems is simulated using these three levels of theory. The eFGR and the qsFGR show temporal oscillations originating from the electronic or vibrational coherences generated as the nuclear wave packet traverses a conical intersection. These oscillations, which are missed by the scFGR, directly reveal the time-evolving splitting between electronic states of the neutral molecule in the curve-crossing regime.

  11. Polarization-dependent pump-probe studies in atomic fine-structure levels: towards the production of spin-polarized electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokell, E.; Zamith, S.; Bouchene, M.A.; Girard, B.

    2000-01-01

    The precession of orbital and spin angular momentum vectors has been observed in a pump-probe study of the 4P fine-structure states of atomic potassium. A femtosecond pump pulse prepared a coherent superposition of the two fine-structure components. A time-delayed probe pulse then ionized the system after it had been allowed to evolve freely. Oscillations recorded in the ion signal reflect the evolution of the orientation of the orbital and spin angular momentum due to spin-orbit coupling. This interpretation gives physical insight into the cause of the half-period phase shift observed when the relative polarizations of the laser pulses were changed from parallel to perpendicular. Finally, it is shown that these changes in the orientation of the spin momentum vector of the system can be utilized to produce highly spin-polarized free electrons on the femtosecond scale. (author)

  12. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lourenço-Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London 514, 209 (2014NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London 543, 529 (2017NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS. While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989PMABDJ1364-281210.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015APCHD52330-402210.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  13. Probing Protein Multidimensional Conformational Fluctuations by Single-Molecule Multiparameter Photon Stamping Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Conformational motions of proteins are highly dynamic and intrinsically complex. To capture the temporal and spatial complexity of conformational motions and further to understand their roles in protein functions, an attempt is made to probe multidimensional conformational dynamics of proteins besides the typical one-dimensional FRET coordinate or the projected conformational motions on the one-dimensional FRET coordinate. T4 lysozyme hinge-bending motions between two domains along α-helix have been probed by single-molecule FRET. Nevertheless, the domain motions of T4 lysozyme are rather complex involving multiple coupled nuclear coordinates and most likely contain motions besides hinge-bending. It is highly likely that the multiple dimensional protein conformational motions beyond the typical enzymatic hinged-bending motions have profound impact on overall enzymatic functions. In this report, we have developed a single-molecule multiparameter photon stamping spectroscopy integrating fluorescence anisotropy, FRET, and fluorescence lifetime. This spectroscopic approach enables simultaneous observations of both FRET-related site-to-site conformational dynamics and molecular rotational (or orientational) motions of individual Cy3-Cy5 labeled T4 lysozyme molecules. We have further observed wide-distributed rotational flexibility along orientation coordinates by recording fluorescence anisotropy and simultaneously identified multiple intermediate conformational states along FRET coordinate by monitoring time-dependent donor lifetime, presenting a whole picture of multidimensional conformational dynamics in the process of T4 lysozyme open-close hinge-bending enzymatic turnover motions under enzymatic reaction conditions. By analyzing the autocorrelation functions of both lifetime and anisotropy trajectories, we have also observed the dynamic and static inhomogeneity of T4 lysozyme multidimensional conformational fluctuation dynamics, providing a fundamental

  14. Intraminiband Relaxation In Doped GaAs/AlGaAs Superlattices Studied By Two-Color Infrared Pump-Probe Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Stehr, D.; Schneider, H.; Helm, M.; Andrews, A. M.; Roch, T.; Strasser, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report on two-color pump-probe measurements to investigate the intraminiband dynamics of doped GaAs/AlGaAs superlattices with different miniband widths smaller or larger than the optical phonon energy. For a miniband with a width larger than the optical phonon energy we found a fast relaxation, independent of the excitation intensity. For narrow minibands this relaxation takes longer and shows a strong temperature and intensity dependence.

  15. Localized excitation of magnetostatic surface spin waves in yttrium iron garnet by shorted coaxial probe detected via spin pumping and rectification effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soh, Wee Tee; Ong, C. K.; Peng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the localized excitation and dc electrical detection of magnetostatic surface spin waves (MSSWs) in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) by a shorted coaxial probe. Thin films of NiFe and Pt are patterned at different regions onto a common bulk YIG substrate. A shorted coaxial probe is used to excite spin precession locally near various patterned regions. The dc voltages across the corresponding regions are recorded. For excitation of the Pt regions, the dc voltage spectra are dominated by the spin pumping of MSSWs from YIG, where various modes can be clearly distinguished. For the NiFe region, it is also found that spin pumping from MSSWs generated in YIG dominated the spectra, indicating that the spin pumped currents are dissipated into charge currents via the inverse Spin Hall effect (ISHE) in NiFe. For all regions, dc signals from YIG MSSWs are observed to be much stronger than the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) uniform mode, likely due to the nature of the microwave excitation. The results indicate the potential of this probe for microwave imaging via dc detection of spin dynamics in continuous and patterned films

  16. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS): a probe for molecular organisation in self-assembled biomimetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Celesta; Dong, Aurelia W; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-07-21

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been shown to be highly sensitive to conformational, structural and microenvironmental transformations arising from subtle geometric changes in molecular geometry in self-assembling biomimetic systems. The ortho-positronium (oPs) may be considered an active probe that can provide information on intrinsic packing and mobility within low molecular weight solids, viscous liquids, and soft matter systems. In this perspective we provide a critical overview of the literature in this field, including the evolution of analysis software and experimental protocols with commentary upon the practical utility of PALS. In particular, we discuss how PALS can provide unique insight into the macroscopic transport properties of several porous biomembrane-like nanostructures and suggest how this insight may provide information on the release of drugs from these matrices to aid in developing therapeutic interventions. We discuss the potentially exciting and fruitful application of this technique to membrane dynamics, diffusion and permeability. We propose that PALS can provide novel molecular level information that is complementary to conventional characterisation techniques.

  17. Probing the amphiphile micellar to hexagonal phase transition using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Aurelia W; Fong, Celesta; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2013-07-15

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) has been utilised only sparingly for structural characterisation in self assembled materials. Inconsistencies in approaches to experimental configuration and data analysis between studies has complicated comparisons between studies, meaning that the technique has not provided a cohesive data set across the study of different self assembled systems that advance the technique towards an important tool in soft matter research. In the current work a systematic study was conducted using ionic and non-ionic micellar systems with increasing surfactant concentration to probe positron behaviour on changes between micellar phase structures, and data analysed using contemporary approaches to fit four component spectra. A characteristic orthopositronium lifetime (in the organic regions) of 3.5±0.2 ns was obtained for the hexagonal phase for surfactants with C12 alkyl chains. Chemical quenching of the positron species was also observed for systems with ionic amphiphiles. The application of PALS has also highlighted an inconsistency in the published phase diagram for the octa(ethylene oxide) monododecyl ether (C12EO8) system. These results provide new insight into how the physical properties of micellar systems can be related to PALS parameters and means that the PALS technique can be applied to other more complex self-assembled amphiphile systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy probing the traps in field-effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Im, Seongil; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Solid state field-effect devices such as organic and inorganic-channel thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been expected to promote advances in display and sensor electronics. The operational stabilities of such TFTs are thus important, strongly depending on the nature and density of charge traps present at the channel/dielectric interface or in the thin-film channel itself. This book contains how to characterize these traps, starting from the device physics of field-effect transistor (FET). Unlike conventional analysis techniques which are away from well-resolving spectral results, newly-introduced photo-excited charge-collection spectroscopy (PECCS) utilizes the photo-induced threshold voltage response from any type of working transistor devices with organic-, inorganic-, and even nano-channels, directly probing on the traps. So, our technique PECCS has been discussed through more than ten refereed-journal papers in the fields of device electronics, applied physics, applied chemistry, nano-devices and materia...

  19. Development of a Fiber-Optics Microspatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy Sensor for Probing Layered Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Conti, Claudia; Rousaki, Anastasia; Moens, Luc; Realini, Marco; Matousek, Pavel

    2017-09-05

    Microspatially offset Raman spectroscopy (micro-SORS) has been proposed as a valuable approach to sample molecular information from layers that are covered by a turbid (nontransparent) layer. However, when large magnifications are involved, the approach is not straightforward, as spatial constraints exist to position the laser beam and the objective lens with the external beam delivery or, with internal beam delivery, the maximum spatial offset achievable is restricted. To overcome these limitations, we propose here a prototype of a new micro-SORS sensor, which uses bare glass fibers to transfer the laser radiation to the sample and to collect the Raman signal from a spatially offset zone to the Raman spectrometer. The concept also renders itself amenable to remote delivery and to the miniaturization of the probe head which could be beneficial for special applications, e.g., where access to sample areas is restricted. The basic applicability of this approach was demonstrated by studying several layered structure systems. Apart from proving the feasibility of the technique, also, practical aspects of the use of the prototype sensor are discussed.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy as a Probe of the Surface Chemistry of Nanostructured Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Susan; Konrad, Magdalena P; Lee, Wendy W Y; McCabe, Hannah; McCracken, John N; Rahman, Taifur M D; Stewart, Alan; Xu, Yikai; Bell, Steven E J

    2016-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is now widely used as a rapid and inexpensive tool for chemical/biochemical analysis. The method can give enormous increases in the intensities of the Raman signals of low-concentration molecular targets if they are adsorbed on suitable enhancing substrates, which are typically composed of nanostructured Ag or Au. However, the features of SERS that allow it to be used as a chemical sensor also mean that it can be used as a powerful probe of the surface chemistry of any nanostructured material that can provide SERS enhancement. This is important because it is the surface chemistry that controls how these materials interact with their local environment and, in real applications, this interaction can be more important than more commonly measured properties such as morphology or plasmonic absorption. Here, the opportunity that this approach to SERS provides is illustrated with examples where the surface chemistry is both characterized and controlled in order to create functional nanomaterials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Investigation of LaBr3:Ce probe for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Alzimami, K. S.; Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alsafi, K. G.; Ma, A.; Alfuraih, A. A.; Alghamdi, A. A.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2014-02-01

    The main thrust of this work is the investigation of performance of relatively new commercial LaBr3:Ce probe (Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce crystal) for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry measurements in comparison to LaCl3:Ce and NaI:Tl scintillators. The crystals were irradiated by a wide range of energies (57Co, 22Na, 18F, 137Cs and 60Co). The study involved recording of detected spectra and measurement of energy resolution, photopeak efficiency, internal radioactivity measurements as well as dose rate. The Monte Carlo package, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) was used to validate the experiments. Overall results showed very good agreement between the measurements and the simulations. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has excellent energy resolution, energy resolutions of (3.37±0.05)% and (2.98±0.07)% for a 137Cs 662 keV and a 60Co 1332 keV gamma-ray point sources respectively, were recorded. The disadvantage of the lanthanum halide scintillators is their internal radioactivity. Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce scintillator has shown an accurate and quick dose measurements at Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Units which allows accurate assessment of the radiation dose received by staff members compared to the use of electronic personal dosimeters (EPD).

  2. Utilizing NMR and EPR spectroscopy to probe the role of copper in prion diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2013-02-24

    Copper is an essential nutrient for the normal development of the brain and nervous system, although the hallmark of several neurological diseases is a change in copper concentrations in the brain and central nervous system. Prion protein (PrP) is a copper-binding, cell-surface glycoprotein that exists in two alternatively folded conformations: a normal isoform (PrPC) and a disease-associated isoform (PrPSc). Prion diseases are a group of lethal neurodegenerative disorders that develop as a result of conformational conversion of PrPC into PrPSc. The pathogenic mechanism that triggers this conformational transformation with the subsequent development of prion diseases remains unclear. It has, however, been shown repeatedly that copper plays a significant functional role in the conformational conversion of prion proteins. In this review, we focus on current research that seeks to clarify the conformational changes associated with prion diseases and the role of copper in this mechanism, with emphasis on the latest applications of NMR and EPR spectroscopy to probe the interactions of copper with prion proteins. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Utilizing NMR and EPR spectroscopy to probe the role of copper in prion diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Al-Talla, Zeyad; Guo, Xianrong; Al-Ghamdi, Suliman; Al-Masri, Harbi Tomah

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential nutrient for the normal development of the brain and nervous system, although the hallmark of several neurological diseases is a change in copper concentrations in the brain and central nervous system. Prion protein (PrP) is a copper-binding, cell-surface glycoprotein that exists in two alternatively folded conformations: a normal isoform (PrPC) and a disease-associated isoform (PrPSc). Prion diseases are a group of lethal neurodegenerative disorders that develop as a result of conformational conversion of PrPC into PrPSc. The pathogenic mechanism that triggers this conformational transformation with the subsequent development of prion diseases remains unclear. It has, however, been shown repeatedly that copper plays a significant functional role in the conformational conversion of prion proteins. In this review, we focus on current research that seeks to clarify the conformational changes associated with prion diseases and the role of copper in this mechanism, with emphasis on the latest applications of NMR and EPR spectroscopy to probe the interactions of copper with prion proteins. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Probing GFP-actin diffusion in living cells using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelke, Hanna; Heinrich, Doris; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2010-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells is continuously remodeled by polymerization and depolymerization of actin. Consequently, the relative content of polymerized filamentous actin (F-actin) and monomeric globular actin (G-actin) is subject to temporal and spatial fluctuations. Since fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) can measure the diffusion of fluorescently labeled actin it seems likely that FCS allows us to determine the dynamics and hence indirectly the structural properties of the cytoskeleton components with high spatial resolution. To this end we investigate the FCS signal of GFP-actin in living Dictyostelium discoideum cells and explore the inherent spatial and temporal signatures of the actin cytoskeleton. Using the free green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reference, we find that actin diffusion inside cells is dominated by G-actin and slower than diffusion in diluted cell extract. The FCS signal in the dense cortical F-actin network near the cell membrane is probed using the cytoskeleton protein LIM and is found to be slower than cytosolic G-actin diffusion. Furthermore, we show that polymerization of the cytoskeleton induced by Jasplakinolide leads to a substantial decrease of G-actin diffusion. Pronounced fluctuations in the distribution of the FCS correlation curves can be induced by latrunculin, which is known to induce actin waves. Our work suggests that the FCS signal of GFP-actin in combination with scanning or spatial correlation techniques yield valuable information about the local dynamics and concomitant cytoskeletal properties

  5. Bispectral analysis of harmonic oscillations measured using beam emission spectroscopy and magnetic probes in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Tetsutarou; Yoshinuma, Mikirou; Ida, Katsumi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Minami, Takashi; Nagaoka, Kenichi; Shimizu, Akihiro; Okamura, Shoichi; Kado, Shinichiro

    2008-01-01

    The coherent MHD oscillation, which consists of the fundamental frequency of several kilohertz and its higher harmonics, (harmonic oscillation: HO) has been observed in Compact Helical System. HO consists of two pairs of harmonic series. One is located in the core region near the ι=0.5 rational surface (denoted as 'HO (core)'), the other is located in the edge region near the ι=1.0 rational surface (denoted as 'HO (edge)'). In the present study, bispectral analysis is applied to the fluctuation data, for which HO is measured by beam emission spectroscopy (BES) and using magnetic probes. The analysis has revealed that fundamental mode of HO in both the magnetic and core density fluctuations have phase correlation with the harmonics including fundamental oscillation, while HO in edge density fluctuation does not have such phase correlation. Mode numbers of HOs are identical for harmonic components having different frequencies, i.e., m/n=-2/1 for HO (core) and m/n=-1/1 for HO (edge). It suggests that the generation of harmonics cannot be interpreted simply as mode coupling because the summation rule for the wavenumber is not satisfied, even though the bicoherence value is significant. The bicoherence value and relative amplitude of higher harmonics correlate with each other, which suggests that bicoherence indicates the degree of distortion of the signals. (author)

  6. Investigation of Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Atmospheric Transmission Using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Optics Letters, 28(23):2336–2338, 2003. 48. Lavan, M. “High Energy Laser Systems for Short Range Defense”. Acta Physica Polonica -Series A General Physics...able diode laser spectrometer for the remote sensing of vehicle emissions”. Spec- trochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, 60...P. “A review of recent advances in semiconductor laser based gas mon- itors”. Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, 54

  7. Development and Optical Testing of the Camera, Hand Lens, and Microscope Probe with Scannable Laser Spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gursel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-01-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of approx. 1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  8. Superconducting β-ZrNClx probed by scanning-tunnelling and break-junction spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekino, Toshikazu; Sugimoto, Akira; Gabovich, Alexander M.; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Yamanaka, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •STM/STS combined with break-junction tunnelling spectroscopy (BJTS) on β-ZrNCl. •STM image on the ab plane shows triangular atomic lattice spots with a period of 0.36 nm. •The gap peaks are widely distributed (Δ p–p = 9–28 meV)over the area of 100 nm 2 . •Average gap ratio 2Δ/k B T c ∼ 10 is confirmed by both STS and BJTS. -- Abstract: Superconducting layered compound β-ZrNCl x (x = 0.7) with the critical temperature T c = 13–14 K was investigated by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy. The single-crystal domain facet of ∼100 μm 2 in the c-axis-oriented polycrystal was used as a probing surface. The STM image at 4.9 K shows triangular atomic lattice spots with the period of ∼0.36 nm, which agrees with the X-ray diffraction measurements. The STS measurements of the local conductance, dI/dV, exhibit broadened gap structures with a substantial distribution of the gap-edge values. Most frequently observed peak-to-peak value of ∼20 mV is remarkably similar to the superconducting gap edge of the isostructural β-HfNCl x with T c = 24 K. Temperature, T, dependence of the dI/dV shows that the gap structure disappears above T c ∼ 13 K. Fitting of the dI/dV curve by the broadened BCS density of states leads to the superconducting gap of 2Δ(4.9 K) = 11–13 meV. This is in accordance with our former break-junction data confirming the intrinsic character of the previously obtained extremely large gap to T c ratio 2Δ(0)/k B T c ≈ 10 (k B is the Boltzmann constant), thereby pointing to the unusual superconducting properties of this compound

  9. Probing Intermolecular Electron Delocalization in Dimer Radical Anions by Vibrational Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Grills, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Delocalization of charges is one of the factors controlling charge transport in conjugated molecules. It is considered to play an important role in the performance of a wide range of molecular technologies, including organic solar cells and organic electronics. Dimerization reactions are well-suited as a model to investigate intermolecular spatial delocalization of charges. And while dimerization reactions of radical cations are well investigated, studies on radical anions are still scarce. Upon dimerization of radical anions with neutral counterparts, an electron is considered to delocalize over the two molecules. By using time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection coupled with pulse radiolysis, we show that radical anions of 4-n-hexyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (6CB) undergo such dimerization reactions, with an electron equally delocalized over the two molecules. We have recently demonstrated that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization of nitrile-substituted anions: we can quantify the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles by monitoring the ν(C≡N) IR shifts. In the first part of this article, we show that the sensitivity of the ν(C≡N) IR shifts does not depend on solvent polarity. In the second part, we describe how probing the shifts of the nitrile IR vibrational band unambiguously confirms the formation of dimer radical anions, with K dim = 3 × 10 4 M –1 . IR findings are corroborated by electronic absorption spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations. We find that the presence of a hexyl chain and the formation of π–π interactions are both crucial for dimerization of radical anions of 6CB with neutral 6CB. Our study provides clear evidence of spatial delocalization of electrons over two molecular fragments.

  10. Transient Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of a Light-Driven Sodium-Ion-Pump Rhodopsin from Indibacter alkaliphilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimoto, Kousuke; Kikukawa, Takashi; Nakashima, Hiroki; Yamaryo, Haruki; Saito, Yuta; Fujisawa, Tomotsumi; Demura, Makoto; Unno, Masashi

    2017-05-04

    Sodium-ion-pump rhodopsin (NaR) is a microbial rhodopsin that transports Na + during its photocycle. Here we explore the photocycle mechanism of NaR from Indibacter alkaliphilus with transient absorption and transient resonance Raman spectroscopy. The transient absorption data indicate that the photocycle of NaR is K (545 nm) → L (490 nm)/M (420 nm) → O 1 (590 nm) → O 2 (560 nm) → NaR, where the L and M are formed as equilibrium states. The presence of K, L, M, and O intermediates was confirmed by the resonance Raman spectra with 442 and 532 nm excitation. The main component of the transient resonance Raman spectra was due to L which contains a 13-cis retinal protonated Schiff base. The presence of an enhanced hydrogen out-of-plane band as well as its sensitivity to the H/D exchange indicate that the retinal chromophore is distorted near the Schiff base region in L. Moreover, the retinal Schiff base of the L state forms a hydrogen bond that is stronger than that of the dark state. These observations are consistent with a Na + pumping mechanism that involves a proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to a key aspartate residue (Asp116 in Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2) in the L/M states.

  11. A monolithic microsphere-fiber probe for spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy: Application to head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, S.; Haig, B.; Donovan, M. J.; Sobrero, M.; Miles, B. A.

    2018-03-01

    The ability to identify precise cancer margins in vivo during a surgical excision is critical to the well-being of the patient. Decreased operative time has been linked to shorter patient recovery time, and there are risks associated with removing either too much or too little tissue from the surgical site. The more rapidly and accurately a surgeon can identify and excise diseased tissue, the better the prognosis for the patient. To this end, we investigate both malignant and healthy oral cavity tissue using the Raman spectroscopy, with a monolithic microsphere-fiber probe. Our results indicate that this probe has decreased the size of the analyzed area by more than an order of magnitude, as compared to a conventional fiber reflection probe. Scanning the probe across the tissues reveals variations in the Raman spectra that enable us to differentiate between malignant and healthy tissues. Consequently, we anticipate that the high spatial resolution afforded by the probe will permit us to identify tumor margins in detail, thereby optimizing tissue removal and improving patient outcomes.

  12. Effect of an ultrafast laser induced plasma on a relativistic electron beam to determine temporal overlap in pump-probe experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoby, Cheyne M; Li, R K; Musumeci, P

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we report on a simple and robust method to measure the absolute temporal overlap of the laser and the electron beam at the sample based on the effect of a laser induced plasma on the electron beam transverse distribution, successfully extending a similar method from keV to MeV electron beams. By pumping a standard copper TEM grid to form the plasma, we gain timing information independent of the sample under study. In experiments discussed here the optical delay to achieve temporal overlap between the pump electron beam and probe laser can be determined with ~1 ps precision. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Introducing a standard method for experimental determination of the solvent response in laser pump, x-ray probe time-resolved wide-angle x-ray scattering experiments on systems in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kasper Skov; Brandt van Driel, Tim; Kehres, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In time-resolved laser pump, X-ray probe wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments on systems in solution the structural response of the system is accompanied by a solvent response. The solvent response is caused by reorganization of the bulk solvent following the laser pump event, and in order...... response-the solvent term-experimentally when applying laser pump, X-ray probe time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering. The solvent term describes difference scattering arising from the structural response of the solvent to changes in the hydrodynamic parameters: pressure, temperature and density. We...... is demonstrated to exhibit first order behaviour with respect to the amount of energy deposited in the solution. We introduce a standardized method for recording solvent responses in laser pump, X-ray probe time-resolved X-ray wide-angle scattering experiments by using dye mediated solvent heating. Furthermore...

  14. Raman spectroscopy in comparative investigations of mechanisms of binding of three molecular probes - fluorescein, eosin, and erythrosin - to human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, I. M.; Saletsky, A. M.

    2008-11-01

    The comparative analysis of binding of three molecular fluorescent probes (fluorescein, eosin, and erythrosin), belonging to one homologous family, to human serum albumin (HSA) is made by Raman spectroscopy method. The binding of all three probes to binding Center I of HSA is registered. The character of binding of initial probe of the given homologous family - fluorescein - to protein differs from character of binding of its halogen-derivatives (eosin and erythrosin) to protein. The differences in binding of these three probes to HSA are determined by value of electronegativity of atoms of lateral radicals in structural formulas of probes and, therefore, by value of pK of their ionized groups.

  15. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  16. Laser-pump/X-ray-probe experiments with electrons ejected from a Cu(111) target: space-charge acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiwietz, G; Kühn, D; Föhlisch, A; Holldack, K; Kachel, T; Pontius, N

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the emission characteristics for electrons induced by X-rays of a few hundred eV at grazing-incidence angles on an atomically clean Cu(111) sample during laser excitation is presented. Electron energy spectra due to intense infrared laser irradiation are investigated at the BESSY II slicing facility. Furthermore, the influence of the corresponding high degree of target excitation (high peak current of photoemission) on the properties of Auger and photoelectrons liberated by a probe X-ray beam is investigated in time-resolved pump and probe measurements. Strong electron energy shifts have been found and assigned to space-charge acceleration. The variation of the shift with laser power and electron energy is investigated and discussed on the basis of experimental as well as new theoretical results.

  17. Emission Spectroscopy as a Probe into Photoinduced Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Polyazine Bridged Ru(II,Rh(III Supramolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Brewer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy are valuable tools to probe photochemical processes of metal-ligand, coordination complexes. Ru(II polyazine light absorbers are efficient light harvesters absorbing in the UV and visible with emissive 3MLCT excited states known to undergo excited state energy and electron transfer. Changes in emission intensity, energy or band-shape, as well as excited state lifetime, provide insight into excited state dynamics. Photophysical processes such as intramolecular electron transfer between electron donor and electron acceptor sub-units may be investigated using these methods. This review investigates the use of steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy to measure excited state intramolecular electron transfer in polyazine bridged Ru(II,Rh(III supramolecular complexes. Intramolecular electron transfer in these systems provides for conversion of the emissive 3MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state to a non-emissive, but potentially photoreactive, 3MMCT (metal-to-metal charge transfer excited state. The details of the photophysics of Ru(II,Rh(III and Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II systems as probed by steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy will be highlighted.

  18. A no-tune no-match wideband probe for nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy in the VHF range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfetter, Hermann; Petrovic, Andreas; Eggenhofer, Heidi; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy is a method for the characterization of chemical compounds containing so-called quadrupolar nuclei. Similar to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the sample under investigation is irradiated with strong radiofrequency (RF) pulses, which stimulate the emission of weak RF signals from the quadrupolar nuclei. The signals are then amplified and Fourier transformed so as to obtain a spectrum. In principle, narrowband NQR spectra can be measured with NMR spectrometers. However, pure NQR signals require the absence of a static magnetic field and several special applications require the characterization of a substance over a large bandwidth, e.g. 50-100% of the central frequency, which is hardly possible with standard NMR equipment. Dedicated zero-field NQR equipment is not widespread and current concepts employ resonating probes which are tuned and matched over a wide range by using mechanical capacitors driven by stepper motors. While providing the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR) such probes are slow in operation and can only be operated from dedicated NMR consoles. We developed a low-cost NQR wideband probe without tuning and matching for applications in the very high frequency (VHF) range below 300 MHz. The probe coil was realized as part of a reactive network which approximates an exponential transmission line. The input reflection coefficient of the two developed prototype probe coils is ≤ 20 dB between 90-145 MHz and 74.5-99.5 MHz, respectively. Two wideband NQR spectra of published test substances were acquired with an SNR of better than 20 dB after sufficient averaging. The measured signals and the SNR correspond very well to the theoretically expected values and demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Because there is no need for tuning and matching, our probes can be operated easily from any available NMR console.

  19. Diode-pumped efficient laser operation and spectroscopy of Tm,Ho:YVO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Yao, B. Q.; Meng, P. B.; Duan, X. M.; Ju, Y. L.; Wang, Y. Z.

    2011-04-01

    Spectroscopic characterization of co-doped Tm,Ho:YVO 4 crystal grown by the Czochralski method has been performed including absorption spectrum, emitting spectrum and luminescence decay lifetime. The polarization emitting spectrum around 2 μm is accomplished by exciting a singly Ho 3+ doped YVO 4 crystal to exclude the influence of Tm 3+3F 4- 3H 6 transition and the emission cross section is deduced from both Fuchtbauer-Ladenburg (F-L) equation and reciprocity method (RM). In addition, we report up to 10.4 W continuous wave (CW) output with a conversion efficiency of 40% and 10.3 W Q-Switch output with 12.5 kHz pulse repetition rate of diode-pumped cryogenic Tm,Ho:YVO 4 laser. For Q-Switch operation, the minimum pulse width of 28.2 ns is obtained, all of which demonstrate that the Tm,Ho:YVO 4 is excellent laser material for 2 μm radiation.

  20. Monitoring hemodynamics and oxygenation of the kidney in rats by a combined near-infrared spectroscopy and invasive probe approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Cantow, Kathleen; Arakelyan, Karen; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Flemming, Bert; Skalweit, Angela; Ladwig, Mechthild; Macdonald, Rainer; Niendorf, Thoralf; Seeliger, Erdmann

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a hybrid approach to investigate the dynamics of perfusion and oxygenation in the kidney of rats under pathophysiologically relevant conditions. Our approach combines near-infrared spectroscopy to quantify hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in the renal cortex, and an invasive probe method for measuring total renal blood flow by an ultrasonic probe, perfusion by laser-Doppler fluxmetry, and tissue oxygen tension via fluorescence quenching. Hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation were determined from experimental data by a Monte Carlo model. The hybrid approach was applied to investigate and compare temporal changes during several types of interventions such as arterial and venous occlusions, as well as hyperoxia, hypoxia and hypercapnia induced by different mixtures of the inspired gas. The approach was also applied to study the effects of the x-ray contrast medium iodixanol on the kidney.

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the probe fluorescence in the study of human blood protein dynamic structure on SR beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobretsov, G.E.; Kurek, N.K.; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Yakimenko, M.N.; Clarke, D.T.; Jones, G.R.; Munro, I.H.

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy on the SRS of the Daresbury Laboratory was used for the study of the human serum lipoproteins and human blood albumins with fluorescent probes K-37 and K-35, developed in Russia. The probe K-37 was found sensitive to the difference in dynamic properties of the lipid objects. Two sets of the parameters were used for the description of lipid dynamic structure: (1) time-resolved fluorescence spectra and (2) time-resolved fluorescence depolarization as a function of rotational mobility of lipid molecules. Each measured dynamic parameter reflected the monotonous changes of dynamic properties in the range: lipid spheres-very low density lipoproteins-low density lipoproteins-high density lipoproteins-phospholipid liposomes. The range is characterized by the increase of the ratio polar/ nonpolar lipids. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence could be used to detect some structural modifications in lipoproteins related to atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases development

  2. [The influence of probe geometry on the sensitivity of tissue oximeter using near infra-red spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Ding, H; Lin, F

    2000-08-01

    Based on the modified Lambert-Beer law under scattering media, near infra-red spectroscopy tissue oximeter measures the changes of absorber concentrations (such as oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, cytochrome aa3). This is made possible by recording the optical density change under different physiological status. This paper describes the average penetration depth, average photon path-length and spatial sensitive profile in multi-layered tissue model using Monte-Carlo method. The result shows the probe geometry of the sensor, which is the separation between the light source and the detector, has a great influence on the sensitivity of measurement. Increasing this separation properly allows the improvement of the sensitivity of measurement and the increase of the probability of looking at oxygenation deep under the surface tissue. But this improvement is limited by the decrease of signal-noise ratio. Optimum probe spacing should be estimated for special tissue structure.

  3. Investigation of optical pump on dielectric tunability in PZT/PT thin film by THz spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jie; Luo, Chunya; Rao, Yunkun; Ling, Furi; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-07-11

    The dielectric spectra of single-layer PbTiO3 (PT), single-layer PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT) and multilayer PZT/PT thin films under an external optical field were investigated at room temperature by time-domain terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. Results showed that the real part of permittivity increased upon application of an external optical field, which could be interpreted as hardening of the soft mode and increasing of the damping coefficient and oscillator strength. Furthermore, the central mode was observed in the three films. Among the dielectric property of the three thin films studied, the tunability of the PZT/PT superlattice was the largest.

  4. Scheme for femtosecond-resolution pump-probe experiments at XFELs with two-color ten GW-level X-ray pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a scheme for pump-probe experiments that can be performed at LCLS and at the European XFEL and determines what additional hardware development will be required to bring these experiments to fruition. It is proposed to derive both pump and probe pulses from the same electron bunch, but from different parts of the tunable-gap baseline undulator. This eliminates the need for synchronization and cancels jitter problems. The method has the further advantage to make a wide frequency range accessible at high peak-power and high repetition-rate. An important feature of the proposed scheme is that the hardware requirement is minimal. Our technique is based in essence on the ''fresh'' bunch technique. For its implementation it is sufficient to substitute a single undulator module with short magnetic delay line, i.e. a weak magnetic chicane, which delays the electron bunch with respect to the SASE pulse of half of the bunch length in the linear stage of amplification. This installation does not perturb the baseline mode of operation. We present a feasibility study and we make exemplifications with the parameters of the SASE2 line of the European XFEL. (orig.)

  5. High-repetition-rate setup for pump-probe time-resolved XUV-IR experiments employing ion and electron momentum imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Shashank; Robatjazi, Seyyed Javad; Wright Lee, Pearson; Raju Pandiri, Kanaka; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem

    2017-04-01

    J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan KS, USA We report on the development of a versatile experimental setup for XUV-IR pump-probe experiments using a 10 kHz high-harmonic generation (HHG) source and two different charged-particle momentum imaging spectrometers. The HHG source, based on a commercial KM Labs eXtreme Ultraviolet Ultrafast Source, is capable of delivering XUV radiation of less than 30 fs pulse duration in the photon energy range of 17 eV to 100 eV. It can be coupled either to a conventional velocity map imaging (VMI) setup with an atomic, molecular, or nanoparticle target; or to a novel double-sided VMI spectrometer equipped with two delay-line detectors for coincidence studies. An overview of the setup and results of first pump-probe experiments including studies of two-color double ionization of Xe and time-resolved dynamics of photoionized CO2 molecule will be presented. This project is supported in part by National Science Foundation (NSF-EPSCOR) Award No. IIA-1430493 and in part by the Chemical science, Geosciences, and Bio-Science division, Office of Basic Energy Science, Office of science, U.S. Department of Energy. K.

  6. The glass transition in nanoscaled confinement probed by dynamic mechanical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppensteiner, J.

    2009-01-01

    , able to join the row of successfully used experimental methods as NMR, light scattering, dielectric and calorimetric spectroscopy. A main point of investigation was inhomogeneous relaxation within a nm-sized pore geometry. An increase of τ when approaching the rough (untreated) pore surface as recently proposed by computer simulations nicely reproduces the data at hand, yielding a downshift of ΔT g ∝ 1/d in perfect agreement with literature data. Interaction with the pore walls to a large extend was removed by silanation. Homogeneous relaxation is found within silanated pores following a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation. This lubrication effect leads to a stronger downshift of T g with decreasing pore size. Further, high resolution thermal expansion measurements of silanated and untreated porous silica samples, both unfilled and filled, revealed the intensely discussed contribution of negative pressure. These findings allow to separate competing side effects from the pure confinement induced acceleration of molecular dynamics. Thereon, the dynamic elastic susceptibility data for the rst time were analyzed in terms of a recently proposed procedure [C. Dalle-Ferrier et al., Phys. Rev. E 76, 041510 (2007)], relating the number N corr,T of molecules, whose dynamics is correlated to a local enthalpy fluctuation, to the three-point dynamic susceptibility χ T . The observed increase of N corr,T with decreasing temperature strongly indicates that the size ξ of dynamic heterogeneities increases when approaching T g to ξ∼3 nm. The calculation of N corr,T and estimation of ξ(T g ), both of nanoscopic nature, from a macroscopic probe experiment are major results of this thesis. (author) [de

  7. Combined fluorescence-Raman spectroscopy measurements with an optical fiber probe for the diagnosis of melanocytic lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosci, Alessandro; Cicchi, Riccardo; Rossari, Susanna; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Massi, Daniela; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2012-02-01

    We have designed and developed an optical fiber-probe for spectroscopic measurements on human tissues. The experimental setup combines fluorescence spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy in a multidimensional approach. Concerning fluorescence spectroscopy, the excitation is provided by two laser diodes, one emitting in the UV (378 nm) and the other emitting in the visible (445 nm). These two lasers are used to selectively excite fluorescence from NADH and FAD, which are among the brightest endogenous fluorophores in human tissues. For Raman and NIR spectroscopy, the excitation is provided by a third laser diode with 785 nm excitation wavelength. Laser light is delivered to the tissue through the central optical fiber of a fiber bundle. The surrounding 48 fibers of the bundle are used for collecting fluorescence and Raman and for delivering light to the spectrograph. Fluorescence and Raman spectra are acquired on a cooled CCD camera. The instrument has been tested on fresh human skin biopsies clinically diagnosed as malignant melanoma, melanocytic nevus, or healthy skin, finding an optimal correlation with the subsequent histological exam. In some cases our examination was not in agreement with the clinical observation, but it was with the histological exam, demonstrating that the system can potentially contribute to improve clinical diagnostic capabilities and hence reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies.

  8. Probing Conditions at Ionized/Molecular Gas Interfaces With High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kyle Franklin

    2017-08-01

    Regions of star formation and star death in our Galaxy trace the cycle of gas and dust in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas in dense molecular clouds collapses to form stars, and stars at the end of their lives return the gas that made up their outer layers back out into the Galaxy. Hot stars generate copious amounts of ultraviolet photons which interact with the surrounding medium and dominate the energetics, ionization state, and chemistry of the gas. The interface where molecular gas is being dissociated into neutral atomic gas by far-UV photons from a nearby hot source is called a photodissociation or photon-dominated region (PDR). PDRs are found primarily in star forming regions where O and B stars serve as the source of UV photons, and in planetary nebulae where the hot core of the dying star acts as the UV source. The main target of this dissertation is molecular hydrogen (H2), the most abundant molecule in the Universe, made from hydrogen formed during the Big Bang. H2 makes up the overwhelming majority of molecules found in the ISM and in PDRs. Far-UV radiation absorbed by H2 will excite an electron in the molecule. The molecule then either dissociates ( 10% of the time; Field et al. 1966) or decays into excited rotational and vibrational ("rovibrational") levels of the electronic ground state. These excited rovibrational levels then decay via a radiative cascade to the ground rovibrational state (v = 0, J = 0), giving rise to a large number of transitions observable in emission from the mid-IR to the optical (Black & van Dishoeck, 1987). These transitions provide an excellent probe of the excitation and conditions within the gas. These transitions are also observed in warm H2, such as in shocks, where collisions excite H2 to higher rovibrational levels. High resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, with its ability to see through dust, and avoid telluric absorption and emission, serves as an effective tool to detect emission from ions, atoms, and molecules

  9. Probing the Interaction of Ionic Liquids with CO2: A Raman Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eucker, IV, William

    2008-01-01

    ...) with selected ionic liquids (ILs). Raman spectroscopy and first principle quantum mechanical calculations were performed on selected IL solvents in contact with CO2 in the effort to discover how the solvents interact with the gas. ILs are salts...

  10. Dark excited states of carotenoid in light harvesting complex probing with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational dynamics of dark excited states in carotenoids have been investigated using tunable Raman pump pulses. The S1 state has same vibrational dynamics in light-harvesting complex (LH1 and solution. The S* state in LH1 has similar vibrational modes with the triplet state of carotenoid. However, the so-called S* state in solution does not have the modes and is concluded to be different from the S* state in LH1.

  11. Physiological and pathophysiological reactive oxygen species as probed by EPR spectroscopy: the underutilized research window on muscle ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Abdel-Rahman, Engy; Mahmoud, Ali M; Khalifa, Abdulrahman M; Ali, Sameh S

    2016-08-15

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) play crucial roles in triggering, mediating and regulating physiological and pathophysiological signal transduction pathways within the cell. Within the cell, ROS efflux is firmly controlled both spatially and temporally, making the study of ROS dynamics a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed for ROS assessment; however, many of these assays are not capable of direct identification or determination of subcellular localization of different ROS. Here we highlight electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy as a powerful technique that is uniquely capable of addressing questions on ROS dynamics in different biological specimens and cellular compartments. Due to their critical importance in muscle functions and dysfunction, we discuss in some detail spin trapping of various ROS and focus on EPR detection of nitric oxide before highlighting how EPR can be utilized to probe biophysical characteristics of the environment surrounding a given stable radical. Despite the demonstrated ability of EPR spectroscopy to provide unique information on the identity, quantity, dynamics and environment of radical species, its applications in the field of muscle physiology, fatiguing and ageing are disproportionately infrequent. While reviewing the limited examples of successful EPR applications in muscle biology we conclude that the field would greatly benefit from more studies exploring ROS sources and kinetics by spin trapping, protein dynamics by site-directed spin labelling, and membrane dynamics and global redox changes by spin probing EPR approaches. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  12. IMPURITY SEGREGATION OF STAINLESS STEEL STUDIED BY ATOM-PROBE AND AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Koguchi , Y.; Takahashi , K.; Ishikawa , Y.

    1987-01-01

    The surface compositions of type 304 stainless steel heated in vacuum at 600-900°C were determined by an atom-probe and Auger electron spectroscopic analysis. In addition to enrichment and depletion of alloying elements in the surface of the stainless steel, segregation of impurity elements such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur is known to occur. In this paper the atom-probe was used to measure the impurity segregation in the grains as well as in the grain boundary while the AES was...

  13. Real-Time Probing of Structural Dynamics by Interaction between Chromophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation of structural dynamics in excited-state cations probed in real-time by femtosecond timeresolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy. From photoelectron spectroscopy data on 1,3-dibromopropane we conclude that the pump pulse ionizes the molecule, populating an excited...

  14. Sodium pumping: pump problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guer, M.; Guiton, P.

    Information on sodium pumps for LMFBR type reactors is presented concerning ring pump design, pool reactor pump design, secondary pumps, sodium bearings, swivel joints of the oscillating annulus, and thermal shock loads

  15. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  16. Selective interaction between Xanthophylls and Chlorophylls in LHCII probed by femtosecond transient absoprtion spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradinaru, C.C.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed femtosecond transient absorption measurements on trimeric light-harvesting complex II from spinach. Either chlorophyll (Chl) a (675 nm) or Chl b (650 nm) was excited, and the spectral response was probed for wavelengths longer than 470 nm. Excitation of Chl b led to instantaneous

  17. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-10-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  18. Differentiation of bacterial versus viral otitis media using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry probe (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youbo; Shelton, Ryan L.; Tu, Haohua; Nolan, Ryan M.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a highly prevalent disease that can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection. Because antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections, blind use of antibiotics without definitive knowledge of the infectious agent, though commonly practiced, can lead to the problems of potential harmful side effects, wasteful misuse of medical resources, and the development of antimicrobial resistance. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry (LCI) device to differentiate OM infections caused by viruses and bacteria and improve our diagnostic ability of OM. Raman spectroscopy, an established tool for molecular analysis of biological tissue, has been shown capable of identifying different bacterial species, although mostly based on fixed or dried sample cultures. LCI has been demonstrated recently as a promising tool for determining tympanic membrane (TM) thickness and the presence and thickness of middle-ear biofilm located behind the TM. We have developed a fiber-based ear insert that incorporates spatially-aligned Raman and LCI probes for point-of-care diagnosis of OM. As shown in human studies, the Raman probe provides molecular signatures of bacterial- and viral-infected OM and normal middle-ear cavities, and LCI helps to identify depth-resolved structural information as well as guide and monitor positioning of the Raman spectroscopy beam for relatively longer signal acquisition time. Differentiation of OM infections is determined by correlating in vivo Raman data collected from human subjects with the Raman features of different bacterial and viral species obtained from cultured samples.

  19. Probing Gas Adsorption in Zeolites by Variable-Temperature IR Spectroscopy: An Overview of Current Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrone, Edoardo; Delgado, Montserrat R; Bonelli, Barbara; Arean, Carlos O

    2017-09-15

    The current state of the art in the application of variable-temperature IR (VTIR) spectroscopy to the study of (i) adsorption sites in zeolites, including dual cation sites; (ii) the structure of adsorption complexes and (iii) gas-solid interaction energy is reviewed. The main focus is placed on the potential use of zeolites for gas separation, purification and transport, but possible extension to the field of heterogeneous catalysis is also envisaged. A critical comparison with classical IR spectroscopy and adsorption calorimetry shows that the main merits of VTIR spectroscopy are (i) its ability to provide simultaneously the spectroscopic signature of the adsorption complex and the standard enthalpy change involved in the adsorption process; and (ii) the enhanced potential of VTIR to be site specific in favorable cases.

  20. Innovation and optimization of a method of pump-probe polarimetry with pulsed laser beams in view of a precise measurement of parity violation in atomic cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvat, D.

    1997-10-01

    While Parity Violation (PV) experiments on highly forbidden transitions have been using detection of fluorescence signals; our experiment uses a pump-probe scheme to detect the PV signal directly on a transmitted probe beam. A pulsed laser beam of linear polarisation ε 1 excites the atoms on the 6S-7S cesium transition in a colinear electric field E || k(ex). The probe beam (k(pr) || k(ex)) of linear polarisation ε 2 tuned to the transition 7S-6P(3/2) is amplified. The small asymmetry (∼ 10 -6 ) in the gain that depends on the handedness of the tri-hedron (E, ε 1 , ε 2 ) is the manifestation of the PV effect. This is measured as an E-odd apparent rotation of the plane of polarization of the probe beam; using balanced mode polarimetry. New criteria of selection have been devised, that allow us to distinguish the true PV-signal against fake rotations due to electromagnetic interferences, geometrical effects, polarization imperfections, or stray transverse electric and magnetic fields. These selection criteria exploit the symmetry of the PV-rotation - linear dichroism - and the revolution symmetry of the experiment. Using these criteria it is not only possible to reject fake signals, but also to elucidate the underlying physical mechanisms and to measure the relevant defects of the apparatus. The present signal-to-noise ratio allows embarking in PV measurements to reach the 10% statistical accuracy. A 1% measurement still requires improvements. Two methods have been demonstrated. The first one exploits the amplification of the asymmetry at high gain - one major advantage provided by our detection method based on stimulated emission. The second method uses both a much higher incident intensity and a special dichroic component which magnifies tiny polarization rotations. (author)

  1. In vivo imaging of a stable paramagnetic probe by pulsed-radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murugesan; Cook; Devasahayam

    1997-01-01

    , Recent advances in radiofrequency (RF) electronics have enabled the generation of pulses of the order of 10-50 ns. Such short pulses provide adequate spectral coverage for EPR studies at 300 MHz resonant frequency. Acquisition of free induction decays (FID) of paramagnetic species possessing...... inhomogeneously broadened narrow lines after pulsed excitation is feasible with an appropriate digitizer/averager. This report describes the use of time-domain RF EPR spectrometry and imaging for in vivo applications. FID responses were collected from a water-soluble, narrow line width spin probe within phantom...... samples in solution and also when infused intravenously in an anesthetized mouse. Using static magnetic field gradients and back-projection methods of image reconstruction, two-dimensional images of the spin-probe distribution were obtained in phantom samples as well as in a mouse. The resolution...

  2. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  3. Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy (FSCS) for probes with highly overlapping emission spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, A.; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin; Gaus, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2014), s. 2973-2988 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400904; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * fluorescence and luminiscence * confocal microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  4. Probing of the interfacial Heisenberg and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange interaction by magnon spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Khalil

    2017-01-11

    This Topical Review presents an overview of the recent experimental results on the quantitative determination of the magnetic exchange parameters in ultrathin magnetic films and multilayers grown on different substrates. The experimental approaches for probing both the symmetric Heisenberg and the antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange interaction in ultrathin magnetic films and at interfaces are discussed in detail. It is explained how the experimental spectrum of magnetic excitations can be used to quantify the strength of these interactions.

  5. Quantitative generalized ratiometric fluorescence spectroscopy for turbid media based on probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xiu-Fang; Chen, Zeng-Ping; Cui, Yin-Yin; Hu, Yuan-Liang; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-01-01

    PEBBLE (probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding) nanosensor encapsulating an intensity-based fluorescence indicator and an inert reference fluorescence dye inside the pores of stable matrix can be used as a generalized wavelength-ratiometric probe. However, the lack of an efficient quantitative model render the choices of inert reference dyes and intensity-based fluorescence indicators used in PEBBLEs based generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes rather limited. In this contribution, an extended quantitative fluorescence model was derived specifically for generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes based on PEBBLE technique (QFM GRP ) with a view to simplify the design of PEBBLEs and hence further extend their application potentials. The effectiveness of QFM GRP has been tested on the quantitative determination of free Ca 2+ in both simulated and real turbid media using a Ca 2+ sensitive PEBBLE nanosensor encapsulating Rhod-2 and eosin B inside the micropores of stable polyacrylamide matrix. Experimental results demonstrated that QFM GRP could realize precise and accurate quantification of free Ca 2+ in turbid samples, even though there is serious overlapping between the fluorescence excitation peaks of eosin B and Ca 2+ bound Rhod-2. The average relative predictive error value of QFM GRP for the test simulated turbid samples was 5.9%, about 2–4 times lower than the corresponding values of partial least squares calibration model and the empirical ratiometric model based on the ratio of fluorescence intensities at the excitation peaks of Ca 2+ bound Rhod-2 and eosin B. The recovery rates of QFM GRP for the real and spiked turbid samples varied from 93.1% to 101%, comparable to the corresponding results of atomic absorption spectrometry. - Highlights: • An advanced model was derived for generalized wavelength-ratiometric PEBBLEs. • The model can simplify the design of generalized wavelength-ratiometric PEBBLEs. • The model realized accurate

  6. Temperature dependant thermal and mechanical properties of a metal-phase change layer interface using the time resolved pump probe technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schick, V; Battaglia, J-L; Kusiak, A; Rossignol, C; Wiemer, C

    2011-01-01

    Time Resolved Pump Probe (TRPP) technique has been implemented to study the thermal and mechanical properties of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 (GST) film deposited on a silicon substrate. According to the knowledge of the thermal properties of the GST layer, the temperature dependant Thermal Boundary Resistance (TBR) at the metal-GST interface is evaluated. Measuring the acoustic oscillation and more particularly its damping leads to characterize the adhesion at the metal - GST interface. This quantity can be efficiently related to the temperature dependent TBR in the 25 deg. C - 400 deg. C range. The TBR increases with temperature and follows the changes of the crystalline structure of materials. A linear relation between the acoustic reflection coefficient and the logarithm of the thermal boundary resistance is found.

  7. Probing Ultrafast Electron Dynamics at Surfaces Using Soft X-Ray Transient Reflectivity Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. Robert; Husek, Jakub; Biswas, Somnath; Cirri, Anthony

    The ability to probe electron dynamics with surface sensitivity on the ultrafast time scale is critical for understanding processes such as charge separation, injection, and surface trapping that mediate efficiency in catalytic and energy conversion materials. Toward this goal, we have developed a high harmonic generation (HHG) light source for femtosecond soft x-ray reflectivity. Using this light source we investigated the ultrafast carrier dynamics at the surface of single crystalline α-Fe2O3, polycrystalline α-Fe2O3, and the mixed metal oxide, CuFeO2. We have recently demonstrated that CuFeO2 in particular is a selective catalyst for photo-electrochemical CO2 reduction to acetate; however, the role of electronic structure and charge carrier dynamics in mediating catalytic selectivity has not been well understood. Soft x-ray reflectivity measurements probe the M2,3, edges of the 3d transition metals, which provide oxidation and spin state resolution with element specificity. In addition to chemical state specificity, these measurements are also surface sensitive, and by independently simulating the contributions of the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index, we can differentiate between surface and sub-surface contributions to the excited state spectrum. Accordingly, this work demonstrates the ability to probe ultrafast carrier dynamics in catalytic materials with element and chemical state specificity and with surface sensitivity.

  8. Photocurrent Spectroscopy of Perovskite Layers and Solar Cells: A Sensitive Probe of Material Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Holovský , Jakub; De Wolf, Stefaan; Werner, Jé ré mie; Remeš, Zdeněk; Mü ller, Martin; Neykova, Neda; Ledinský , Martin; Černá , Ladislava; Hrzina, Pavel; Lö per, Philipp; Niesen, Bjoern; Ballif, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Optical absorptance spectroscopy of polycrystalline CHNHPbI films usually indicates the presence of a PbI phase, either as a preparation residue or due to film degradation, but gives no insight on how this may affect electrical properties. Here, we apply photocurrent spectroscopy to both perovskite solar cells and coplanar-contacted layers at various stages of degradation. In both cases, we find that the presence of a PbI phase restricts charge-carrier transport, suggesting that PbI encapsulates CHNHPbI grains. We also find that PbI injects holes into the CHNHPbI grains, increasing the apparent photosensitivity of PbI. This phenomenon, known as modulation doping, is absent in the photocurrent spectra of solar cells, where holes and electrons have to be collected in pairs. This interpretation provides insights into the photogeneration and carrier transport in dual-phase perovskites.

  9. Photocurrent Spectroscopy of Perovskite Layers and Solar Cells: A Sensitive Probe of Material Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Holovský, Jakub

    2017-01-25

    Optical absorptance spectroscopy of polycrystalline CHNHPbI films usually indicates the presence of a PbI phase, either as a preparation residue or due to film degradation, but gives no insight on how this may affect electrical properties. Here, we apply photocurrent spectroscopy to both perovskite solar cells and coplanar-contacted layers at various stages of degradation. In both cases, we find that the presence of a PbI phase restricts charge-carrier transport, suggesting that PbI encapsulates CHNHPbI grains. We also find that PbI injects holes into the CHNHPbI grains, increasing the apparent photosensitivity of PbI. This phenomenon, known as modulation doping, is absent in the photocurrent spectra of solar cells, where holes and electrons have to be collected in pairs. This interpretation provides insights into the photogeneration and carrier transport in dual-phase perovskites.

  10. New transport phenomena probed by dielectric spectroscopy of oxidized and non-oxidized porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, B.; Axelrod, E.; Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2007-05-15

    Dielectric spectroscopy accompanied by infrared (IR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy have been utilized to reveal the correlation between transport, optical and structural properties of oxidized porous silicon (PS). Three relaxation processes at low-, mid- and high-temperatures were observed, including dc-conductivity at high-temperatures. Both the low-T relaxation and the dc conductivity were found to be thermally activated processes that involve tunneling and hopping in between the nanocrystals in oxidized PS. We have found that the dc-conductivity is limited by geometrical constrictions along the transport channels, which are not effected by the oxidation process and are characterized by activation energies of about {proportional_to}0.85 eV. The low-T relaxation process involves thermal activation followed by tunneling in between neighbor nanocrystals, with somewhat lower activation energies. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Acoustic properties of nanoscale oxide heterostructures probed by UV Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruchhausen, A; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N D; Fainstein, A; Soukiassian, A; Tenne, D A; Schlom, D; Xi, X X; Cantarero, A

    2007-01-01

    We study high quality molecular-beam epitaxy grown BaTiO 3 /SrTiO 3 superlat-tices using ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy. In the low energy spectral region, acoustic phonon doublets are observed. These are due to the artificial superlattice periodicity and consequent folding of the acoustic phonon dispersion. From the study of samples with different BaTiO 3 /SrTiO 3 layer thicknesses the effective sound velocities within each of the layers are obtained

  12. Acoustic properties of nanoscale oxide heterostructures probed by UV Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchhausen, A.; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Fainstein, A.; Soukiassian, A.; Tenne, D. A.; Schlom, D.; Xi, X. X.; Cantarero, A.

    2007-12-01

    We study high quality molecular-beam epitaxy grown BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlat-tices using ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy. In the low energy spectral region, acoustic phonon doublets are observed. These are due to the artificial superlattice periodicity and consequent folding of the acoustic phonon dispersion. From the study of samples with different BaTiO3/SrTiO3 layer thicknesses the effective sound velocities within each of the layers are obtained.

  13. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-03-15

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplexes. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γ(MP)PNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that the γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ≈ 0.030 ± 0.01 s⁻¹ for γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs 0.375 ± 0.18 s⁻¹ for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γ(MP)PNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γ(MP)PNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes.

  14. Interaction of nanodiamond with in situ generated sp-carbon chains probed by Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Zukalová, Markéta; Kalbáč, Martin; Osawa, E.; Dunsch, L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 14 (2006), s. 3113-3116 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040306; GA MŠk LC510 Grant - others:NEDO International Grant(XE) 20041T081 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : carbyne * diamond * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.884, year: 2006

  15. Probing focal cortical dysplasia in formalin fixed samples using tissue optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Conti, Valerio; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2016-03-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of most common causes of intractable epilepsy in pediatric population and these are often insensitive to anti-epileptic drugs. FCD is characterized by a disarray in localized regions of the cerebral cortex and abnormal neurons which results them to misfire with incorrect signals. Resective neurosurgery to remove or disconnect the affected parts from the rest of the brain seems to be a viable option to treat FCD. Before neurosurgery the subject could undergo imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scans. On the downside FCD could be elusive in MRI images and may be practically invisible in CT scans. Furthermore, unnecessary removal of normal tissues is to be taken into consideration as this could lead to neurological defects. In this context, optical spectroscopy have been widely investigated as an alternative technique for the detection of abnormal tissues in different organ sites. Disease progression is accompanied by a number of architectural, biochemical and morphological changes. These variations are reflected in the spectral intensity and line shape. Here, in this proof of concept study we propose to investigate the application of tissue optical spectroscopy based on fluorescence excitation at two wavelength 378 and 445 nm coupled along with Raman spectroscopy for the detection of FCD on formalin fixed tissue specimens from pediatric subjects. For fluorescence at both the excitation wavelengths FCD showed a decreased intensity at longer wavelength when compared to normal tissues. Also, differences exist in the Raman spectral profiles of normal and FCD.

  16. Structure and orbital ordering of ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} probed by atomic resolution electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela; Engelmayer, Johannes; Loosdrecht, Paul H.M. van [II. Physikalisches Institut, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Jin, Lei; Jia, Chun-Lin [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-5) and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Himcinschi, Cameliu [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Hensling, Felix; Waser, Rainer; Dittmann, Regina [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-7), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Orbital ordering has been less investigated in epitaxial thin films, due to the difficulty to evidence directly the occurrence of this phenomenon in thin film samples. Atomic resolution electron microscopy enabled us to observe the structural details of the ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} films. The transition to orbital ordering of epitaxial layers as thin as ∼4 nm was probed by temperature-dependent Raman scattering spectroscopy of multilayer samples. From the occurrence and temperature dependence of the 700 cm{sup -1} Raman active mode it can be inferred that the structural phase transition associated with orbital ordering takes place in ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} films at about 130 K. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Total internal reflection sum-frequency generation spectroscopy and dense gold nanoparticles monolayer: a route for probing adsorbed molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourillon, Gerard; Dreesen, Laurent; Volcke, Cedric; Sartenaer, Yannick; Thiry, Paul A; Peremans, Andre

    2007-01-01

    We show that sum-frequency generation spectroscopy performed in the total internal reflection configuration (TIR-SFG) combined with a dense gold nanoparticles monolayer allows us to study, with an excellent signal to noise ratio and high signal to background ratio, the conformation of adsorbed molecules. Dodecanethiol (DDT) was used as probe molecules in order to assess the potentialities of the approach. An enhancement of more than one order of magnitude of the SFG signals arising from the adsorbed species is observed with the TIR geometry compared to the external reflection one while the SFG non-resonant contribution remains the same for both configurations. Although further work is required to fully understand the origin of the SFG process on nanoparticles, our work opens new possibilities for studying nanostructures

  18. Probing the formation of silicon nano-crystals (Si-ncs) using variable energy positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knights, A. P.; Bradley, J. D. B.; Hulko, O.; Stevanovic, D. V.; Edwards, C. J.; Kallis, A.; Coleman, P. G.; Crowe, I. F.; Halsall, M. P.; Gwilliam, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe preliminary results from studies of the formation of silicon nano-crystals (Si-ncs) embedded in stoichiometric, thermally grown SiO2 using Variable Energy Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (VEPAS). We show that the VEPAS technique is able to monitor the introduction of structural damage. In SiO2 through the high dose Si+ ion implantation required to introduce excess silicon as a precursor to Si-nc formation. VEPAS is also able to characterize the rate of the removal of this damage with high temperature annealing, showing strong correlation with photoluminescence. Finally, VEPAS is shown to be able to selectively probe the interface between Si-ncs and the host oxide. Introduction of hydrogen at these interfaces suppresses the trapping of positrons at the interfaces.

  19. Electrochemical preparation of uranium and plutonium measuring probes for alpha spectroscopy from organic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, W.; Beutmann, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method for preparation of uranium and plutonium measuring probes for α-spectrometry is described. The method is based on electrodeposition from isopropanol and especially from ethanol and methanol solution. It was shown that a definite additions of a little amount of water lead to an increase of the deposition rate. It is possible to reach a 100% deposition in ethanol after an electrolysis time of 3 minutes for uranium and 30 minutes for plutonium with voltages of 150-200 V. (author)

  20. Two-Copy Wavelength Conversion of an 80 Gbit/s Serial Data Signal Using Cross-Phase Modulation in a Silicon Nanowire and Detailed Pump-Probe Characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua; Cleary, C. S.; Dailey, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate 80 Gbit/s wavelength conversion to two copies by simultaneously extracting the blue- and red-shifted sidebands from XPM in a silicon nanowire. Bit error rates of 10-9 with only ~2 dB power penalty is achieved for both sidebands. Detailed pump-probe characterisation r...

  1. Biomedical Probes Based on Inorganic Nanoparticles for Electrochemical and Optical Spectroscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoh, Abdulhadee; Pinyorospathum, Chanika; Siangproh, Weena; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles usually provide novel and unique physical properties as their size approaches nanometer scale dimensions. The unique physical and optical properties of nanoparticles may lead to applications in a variety of areas, including biomedical detection. Therefore, current research is now increasingly focused on the use of the high surface-to-volume ratios of nanoparticles to fabricate superb chemical- or biosensors for various detection applications. This article highlights various kinds of inorganic nanoparticles, including metal nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, nanocomposites, and semiconductor nanoparticles that can be perceived as useful materials for biomedical probes and points to the outstanding results arising from their use in such probes. The progress in the use of inorganic nanoparticle-based electrochemical, colorimetric and spectrophotometric detection in recent applications, especially bioanalysis, and the main functions of inorganic nanoparticles in detection are reviewed. The article begins with a conceptual discussion of nanoparticles according to types, followed by numerous applications to analytes including biomolecules, disease markers, and pharmaceutical substances. Most of the references cited herein, dating from 2010 to 2015, generally mention one or more of the following characteristics: a low detection limit, good signal amplification and simultaneous detection capabilities. PMID:26343676

  2. Pump--probe measurements of state-to-state rotational energy transfer rates in N2 (v=1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitz, G.O.; Farrow, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    We report direct measurements of the state-to-state rotational energy transfer rates for N 2 (υ=1) at 298 K. Stimulated Raman pumping of Q-branch (υ=1 left-arrow 0) transitions is used to prepare a selected rotational state of N 2 in the υ=1 state. After allowing an appropriate time interval for collisions to occur, 2+2 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization is used (through the a 1 Π g left-arrow X 1 Σ + g transition) to detect the relative population of the pumped level and other levels to which rotational energy transfer has occurred. We have performed a series of measurements in which a single even rotational level (J i =0--14) is excited and the time-dependent level populations are recorded at three or more delay times. This data set is then globally fit to determine the best set of state-to-state rate constants. The fitting procedure does not place any constraints (such as an exponential gap law) on the J or energy dependence of the rates. We compare our measurements and best-fit rates with results predicted from phenomenological rate models and from a semiclassical scattering calculation of Koszykowski et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 91, 41 (1987)]. Excellent agreement is obtained with two of the models and with the scattering calculation. We also test the validity of the energy-corrected sudden (ECS) scaling theory for N 2 by using our experimental transfer rates as basis rates (J=L→0), finding that the ECS scaling expressions accurately predict the remaining rates

  3. Excitation transfer and trapping kinetics in plant photosystem I probed by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Parveen; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Zhengtang; Tan, Howe-Siang; Lambrev, Petar H

    2018-03-01

    Photosystem I is a robust and highly efficient biological solar engine. Its capacity to utilize virtually every absorbed photon's energy in a photochemical reaction generates great interest in the kinetics and mechanisms of excitation energy transfer and charge separation. In this work, we have employed room-temperature coherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to follow exciton equilibration and excitation trapping in intact Photosystem I complexes as well as core complexes isolated from Pisum sativum. We performed two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements with low excitation pulse energies to record excited-state kinetics free from singlet-singlet annihilation. Global lifetime analysis resolved energy transfer and trapping lifetimes closely matches the time-correlated single-photon counting data. Exciton energy equilibration in the core antenna occurred on a timescale of 0.5 ps. We further observed spectral equilibration component in the core complex with a 3-4 ps lifetime between the bulk Chl states and a state absorbing at 700 nm. Trapping in the core complex occurred with a 20 ps lifetime, which in the supercomplex split into two lifetimes, 16 ps and 67-75 ps. The experimental data could be modelled with two alternative models resulting in equally good fits-a transfer-to-trap-limited model and a trap-limited model. However, the former model is only possible if the 3-4 ps component is ascribed to equilibration with a "red" core antenna pool absorbing at 700 nm. Conversely, if these low-energy states are identified with the P 700 reaction centre, the transfer-to-trap-model is ruled out in favour of a trap-limited model.

  4. Acoustic properties of nanoscale oxide heterostructures probed by UV Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruchhausen, A [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atomico Bariloche, Av. E. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Lanzillotti-Kimura, N D [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atomico Bariloche, Av. E. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Fainstein, A [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atomico Bariloche, Av. E. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Soukiassian, A [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Tenne, D A [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Schlom, D [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Xi, X X [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Cantarero, A [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, PO Box 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-12-15

    We study high quality molecular-beam epitaxy grown BaTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} superlat-tices using ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy. In the low energy spectral region, acoustic phonon doublets are observed. These are due to the artificial superlattice periodicity and consequent folding of the acoustic phonon dispersion. From the study of samples with different BaTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} layer thicknesses the effective sound velocities within each of the layers are obtained.

  5. Dispersive electron transport in tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) probed by impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berleb, Stefan; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2002-12-31

    Electron transport in tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) is investigated by impedance spectroscopy under conditions of space-charge limited conduction (SCLC). Existing SCLC models are extended to include the field dependence of the charge carrier mobility and energetically distributed trap states. The dispersive nature of electron transport is revealed by a frequency-dependent mobility with a dispersion parameter alpha in the range 0.4-0.5, independent of temperature. This indicates that positional rather than energetic disorder is the dominant mechanism for the dispersive transport of electrons in Alq3.

  6. Photocurrent spectroscopy of perovskite layers and solar cells: a sensitive probe of material degradation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holovský, Jakub; De Wolf, S.; Werner, J.; Remeš, Zdeněk; Müller, Martin; Neykova, Neda; Ledinský, Martin; Černá, L.; Hrzina, P.; Löper, P.; Niesen, B.; Ballif, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2017), s. 838-843 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ17-26041Y; GA MŠk LM2015087 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) KONNECT-007 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photocurrent spectroscopy * perovskite layers * solar cells Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 9.353, year: 2016

  7. Vibrational Properties of h-BN and h-BN-Graphene Heterostructures Probed by Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Suyong; Park, Minkyu; Park, Jaesung; Jeong, Tae-Young; Kim, Ho-Jong; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ha, Dong Han; Hwang, Chanyong; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-11-13

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a powerful technique for investigating lattice dynamics of nanoscale systems including graphene and small molecules, but establishing a stable tunnel junction is considered as a major hurdle in expanding the scope of tunneling experiments. Hexagonal boron nitride is a pivotal component in two-dimensional Van der Waals heterostructures as a high-quality insulating material due to its large energy gap and chemical-mechanical stability. Here we present planar graphene/h-BN-heterostructure tunneling devices utilizing thin h-BN as a tunneling insulator. With much improved h-BN-tunneling-junction stability, we are able to probe all possible phonon modes of h-BN and graphite/graphene at Γ and K high symmetry points by inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. Additionally, we observe that low-frequency out-of-plane vibrations of h-BN and graphene lattices are significantly modified at heterostructure interfaces. Equipped with an external back gate, we can also detect high-order coupling phenomena between phonons and plasmons, demonstrating that h-BN-based tunneling device is a wonderful playground for investigating electron-phonon couplings in low-dimensional systems.

  8. Ligand-field symmetry effects in Fe(ii) polypyridyl compounds probed by transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; Gullikson, Eric M.; Kim, Tae Kyu; de Groot, Frank M. F.; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Huse, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast excited-state evolution in polypyridyl FeII complexes are of fundamental interest for understanding the origins of the sub-ps spin-state changes that occur upon photoexcitation of this class of compounds as well as for the potential impact such ultrafast dynamics have on incorporation of these compounds in solar energy conversion schemes or switchable optical storage technologies. We have demonstrated that ground-state and, more importantly, ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption methods can offer unique insights into the interplay between electronic and geometric structure that underpin the photo-induced dynamics of this class of compounds. The present contribution examines in greater detail how the symmetry of the ligand field surrounding the metal ion can be probed using these x-ray techniques. In particular, we show that steady-state K-edge spectroscopy of the nearest-neighbour nitrogen atoms reveals the characteristic chemical environment of the respective ligands and suggests an interesting target for future charge-transfer femtosecond and attosecond spectroscopy in the x-ray water window.

  9. Performance of electrical spectroscopy using a RESPER probe to measure salinity and water content of concrete and terrestrial soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Settimi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    This paper discusses the performance of electrical spectroscopy using a RESPER probe to measure the salinity s and volumetric content θW of the water in concrete or terrestrial soil. The RESPER probe is an induction device for spectroscopy which performs simultaneous and non invasive measurements of the electrical RESistivity 1/σ and relative dielectric PERmittivity εr of a subjacent medium. Numerical simulations establish that the RESPER can measure σ and ε with inaccuracies below a predefined limit (10% up to the high frequency band (HF. Conductivity is related to salinity and dielectric permittivity to volumetric water content using suitably refined theoretical models which are consistent with the predictions of Archie’s and Topp’s empirical laws. The better the agreement, the lower the hygroscopic water content and the higher s; so closer agreement is found with concrete containing almost no bonded water molecules provided these are characterized by a high σ. A novelty of the present paper is the application of a mathematical–physical model to the propagation of errors in the measurements, based on a sensitivity functions tool. The inaccuracy of salinity (water content is the ratio (product between the conductivity (permittivity inaccuracy, specified by the probe, and the sensitivity function of salinity (water content relative to conductivity (permittivity, derived from the constitutive equations of the medium. The main result is the model’s prediction that the lower the inaccuracy for the measurements of s and θW (decreasing by as much as an order of magnitude from 10% to 1%, the higher σ; so the inaccuracy for soil is lower. The proposed physical explanation is that water molecules are mostly dispersed as H+ and OH- ions

  10. Gold Nanoparticles as Probes for Nano-Raman Spectroscopy: Preliminary Experimental Results and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Le Nader

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an effective Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectrometer (TERS in backscattering reflection configuration. It combines a tip-probe nanopositioning system with Raman spectroscope. Specific tips were processed by anchoring gold nanoparticles on the apex of tapered optical fibers, prepared by an improved chemical etching method. Hence, it is possible to expose a very small area of the sample (~20 nm2 to the very strong local electromagnetic field generated by the lightning rod effect. This experimental configuration was modelled and optimised using the finite element method, which takes into account electromagnetic effects as well as the plasmon resonance. Finally, TERS measurements on single-wall carbon nanotubes were successfully performed. These results confirm the high Raman scattering enhancement predicted by the modelling, induced by our new nano-Raman device.

  11. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  12. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  13. Probing the CZTS/CdS heterojunction utilizing photoelectrochemistry and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Matthew J.; Vaccarello, Daniel; Wong, Jonathan; Yiu, Yun Mui; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Ding, Zhifeng

    2018-04-01

    The importance of renewable resources is becoming more and more influential on research due to the depletion of fossil fuels. Cost-effective ways of harvesting solar energy should also be at the forefront of these investigations. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cells are well within the frame of these goals, and a thorough understanding of how they are made and processed synthetically is crucial. The CZTS/CdS heterojunction was examined using photoelectrochemistry and synchrotron radiation (SR) spectroscopy. These tools provided physical insights into this interface that was formed by the electrophoretic deposition of CZTS nanocrystals and chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS for the respective films. It was discovered that CBD induced a change in the local and long range environment of the Zn in the CZTS lattice, which was detrimental to the photoresponse. X-ray absorption near-edge structures and extended X-ray absorption fine structures (EXAFSs) of the junction showed that this change was at an atomic level and was associated with the coordination of oxygen to zinc. This was confirmed through FEFF fitting of the EXAFS and through IR spectroscopy. It was found that this change in both photoresponse and the Zn coordination can be reversed with the use of low temperature annealing. Investigating CZTS through SR techniques provides detailed structural information of minor changes from the zinc perspective.

  14. Aureochrome 1 illuminated: structural changes of a transcription factor probed by molecular spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Kerruth

    Full Text Available Aureochrome 1 from Vaucheria frigida is a recently identified blue-light receptor that acts as a transcription factor. The protein comprises a photosensitive light-, oxygen- and voltage-sensitive (LOV domain and a basic zipper (bZIP domain that binds DNA rendering aureochrome 1 a prospective optogenetic tool. Here, we studied the photoreaction of full-length aureochrome 1 by molecular spectroscopy. The kinetics of the decay of the red-shifted triplet state and the blue-shifted signaling state were determined by time-resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy. It is shown that the presence of the bZIP domain further prolongs the lifetime of the LOV390 signaling state in comparison to the isolated LOV domain whereas bound DNA does not influence the photocycle kinetics. The light-dark Fourier transform infrared (FTIR difference spectrum shows the characteristic features of the flavin mononucleotide chromophore except that the S-H stretching vibration of cysteine 254, which is involved in the formation of the thio-adduct state, is significantly shifted to lower frequencies compared to other LOV domains. The presence of the target DNA influences the light-induced FTIR difference spectrum of aureochrome 1. Vibrational bands that can be assigned to arginine and lysine side chains as well to the phosphate backbone, indicate crucial changes in interactions between transcription factor and DNA.

  15. Fourier transform infrared imaging and infrared fiber optic probe spectroscopy identify collagen type in connective tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Hanifi

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in

  16. Femtosecond pump probe spectroscopy for the study of energy transfer of light-harvesting complexes from extractions of spinach leaves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available been implemented at the CSIR National Laser Centre and has been applied to investigate energy transfer processes in different parts of photosynthetic systems. In this paper, researchers report on the first results obtained with Malachite green as a...

  17. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuo; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Chen, Kevin, E-mail: pec9@pitt.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Liu, Lei; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications.

  18. Femtosecond Broadband Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Y; Yoon, Sagwoon; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique where a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a red-shifted broadband femtosecond Stokes probe pulse (with or without time delay between the pulses) act on a sample to produce a high resolution Raman gain spectrum with high efficiency and speed, free from fluorescence background interference. It can reveal vibrational structural information and dynamics of stationary or transient states. Here, the quantum picture for femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to develop the semiclassical coupled wave theory of the phenomenon and to derive an expression for the measurable Raman gain in FSRS. The semiclassical theory is applied to study the dependence of lineshapes in FSRS on the pump-probe time delay and to deduce vibrational dephasing times in cyclohexane in the ground state

  19. Dimensional Crossover in a Charge Density Wave Material Probed by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, C. W.; Berthod, C.; Puppin, M.; Berger, H.; Wolf, M.; Hoesch, M.; Monney, C.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data reveal evidence of a crossover from one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D) behavior in the prototypical charge density wave (CDW) material NbSe3 . In the low-temperature 3D regime, gaps in the electronic structure are observed due to two incommensurate CDWs, in agreement with x-ray diffraction and electronic-structure calculations. At higher temperatures we observe a spectral weight depletion that approaches the power-law behavior expected in one dimension. From the warping of the quasi-1D Fermi surface at low temperatures, we extract the energy scale of the dimensional crossover. This is corroborated by a detailed analysis of the density of states, which reveals a change in dimensional behavior dependent on binding energy. Our results offer an important insight into the dimensionality of excitations in quasi-1D materials.

  20. Hybridized electronic states in potassium-doped picene probed by soft x-ray spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Yamane

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The electronic structure of the unoccupied and occupied states of potassium (K-doped and undoped picene crystalline films has been investigated by using the element-selective and bulk-sensitive photon-detection methods of X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies. We observed the formation of the doping-induced unoccupied and occupied electronic states in K-doped picene. By applying the inner-shell resonant-excitation experiments, we observed the evidence for the orbital hybridization between K and picene near the Fermi energy. Furthermore, the resonant X-ray emission experiment suggests the presence of the Raman-active vibronic interaction in K-doped picene. These experimental evidences play a crucial role in the superconductivity of K-doped picene.

  1. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  2. Vacancy-induced ferromagnetism in ZnO probed by spin-polarized positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Masaki; Abe, Hiroshi; Miyashita, Atsumi; Sakai, Seiji; Yamamoto, Shunya; Kawasuso, Atsuo

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the ferromagnetism of ZnO induced by oxygen implantation by using spin-polarized positron annihilation spectroscopy together with magnetization measurements. The magnetization measurements showed the appearance of ferromagnetism after oxygen implantation and its disappearance during post-implantation annealing at temperatures above 573 K. The Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) spectrum showed asymmetry upon field reversal after oxygen implantation. The obtained differential DBAR spectrum between positive and negative magnetic fields was well-explained with a theoretical calculation considering zinc vacancies. The disappearance of the field-reversal asymmetry of the DBAR spectrum as a result of annealing agreed with the observations of ferromagnetism by magnetization measurements. These results suggest the radiation-induced zinc vacancies to be the source of the observed ferromagnetism of ZnO.

  3. Evolution of native point defects in ZnO bulk probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng-Xiao; Wang, Ke-Fan; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Feng-Li; Weng, Hui-Min; Ye, Bang-Jiao

    2009-05-01

    This paper studies the evolution of native point defects with temperature in ZnO single crystals by positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) spectroscopy, combined with the calculated results of positron lifetime and electron momentum distribution. The calculated and experimental results of the positron lifetime in ZnO bulk ensure the presence of zinc monovacancy, and zinc monovacancy concentration begins to decrease above 600 °C annealing treatment. CDB is an effective method to distinguish the elemental species, here we combine this technique with calculated electron momentum distribution to determine the oxygen vacancies, which do not trap positrons due to their positive charge. The CDB spectra show that oxygen vacancies do not appear until 600 °C annealing treatment, and increase with the increase of annealing temperature. This study supports the idea that green luminescence has a close relation with oxygen vacancies.

  4. Probing cytochrome c in living mitochondria with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda A.; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.; Goodilin, Eugene A.

    2015-01-01

    Selective study of the electron transport chain components in living mitochondria is essential for fundamental biophysical research and for the development of new medical diagnostic methods. However, many important details of inter- and intramembrane mitochondrial processes have remained in shadow...... due to the lack of non-invasive techniques. Here we suggest a novel label-free approach based on the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to monitor the redox state and conformation of cytochrome c in the electron transport chain in living mitochondria. We demonstrate that SERS spectra of living...... mitochondria placed on hierarchically structured silver-ring substrates provide exclusive information about cytochrome c behavior under modulation of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, proton gradient and the activity of ATP-synthetase. Mathematical simulation explains the observed enhancement of Raman...

  5. Confined detection volume of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy by bare fiber probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guowei; Lei, Franck H; Angiboust, Jean-François; Manfait, Michel

    2010-04-01

    A fiber-tip-based near-field fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been developed for confining the detection volume to sub-diffraction-limited dimensions. This near-field FCS is based on near-field illumination by coupling a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) to a conventional confocal FCS. Single-molecule FCS analysis at 100 nM Rhodamine 6G has been achieved by using bare chemically etched, tapered fiber tips. The detection volume under control of the SNOM system has been reduced over one order of magnitude compared to that of the conventional confocal FCS. Related factors influencing the near-field FCS performance are investigated and discussed in detail. In this proof-of-principle study, the preliminary experimental results suggest that the fiber-tip-based near-field FCS might be a good alternative to realize localized analysis at the single-molecule level.

  6. Quantum nature of protons in water probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Lü, Jing-Tao; Feng, Yexin; Chen, Ji; Peng, Jinbo; Lin, Zeren; Meng, Xiangzhi; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xin-Zheng; Wang, En-Ge; Jiang, Ying; Jing-Tao Lü Team; Xin-Zheng Li Team

    The complexity of hydrogen-bonding interaction largely arises from the quantum nature of light hydrogen nuclei, which has remained elusive for decades. Here we report the direct assessment of nuclear quantum effects on the strength of a single hydrogen bond formed at a water-salt interface, using tip-enhanced inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) based on a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The IETS signals are resonantly enhanced by gating the frontier orbitals of water via a chlorine-terminated STM tip, such that the hydrogen-bonding strength can be determined with unprecedentedly high accuracy from the redshift in the O-H stretching frequency of water. Isotopic substitution experiments combined with quantum simulations reveal that the anharmonic quantum fluctuations of hydrogen nuclei weaken the weak hydrogen bonds and strengthen the relatively strong ones. However, this trend can be completely reversed when the hydrogen bond is strongly coupled to the polar atomic sites of the surface.

  7. Probing the extreme wind confinement of the most magnetic O star with COS spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Veronique

    2014-10-01

    We propose to obtain phase-resolved UV spectroscopy of the recently discovered magnetic O star NGC 1624-2, which has the strongest magnetic field ever detected in a O-star, by an order of magnitude. We will use the strength and variability of the UV resonance line profiles to diagnose the density, velocity, and ionization structure of NGC 1624-2's enormous magnetosphere that results from entrapment of its stellar wind by its strong, nearly dipolar magnetic field. With this gigantic magnetosphere, NGC 1624-2 represents a new regime of extreme wind confinement that will constrain models of magnetized winds and their surface mass flux properties. A detailed understanding of such winds is necessary to study the rotational braking history of magnetic O-stars, which can shed new light on the fundamental origin of magnetism in massive, hot stars.

  8. Evolution of native point defects in ZnO bulk probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng-Xiao, Peng; Ke-Fan, Wang; Yang, Zhang; Feng-Li, Guo; Hui-Min, Weng; Bang-Jiao, Ye

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the evolution of native point defects with temperature in ZnO single crystals by positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) spectroscopy, combined with the calculated results of positron lifetime and electron momentum distribution. The calculated and experimental results of the positron lifetime in ZnO bulk ensure the presence of zinc monovacancy, and zinc monovacancy concentration begins to decrease above 600 °C annealing treatment. CDB is an effective method to distinguish the elemental species, here we combine this technique with calculated electron momentum distribution to determine the oxygen vacancies, which do not trap positrons due to their positive charge. The CDB spectra show that oxygen vacancies do not appear until 600 °C annealing treatment, and increase with the increase of annealing temperature. This study supports the idea that green luminescence has a close relation with oxygen vacancies

  9. Probing Temperature-Dependent Recombination Kinetics in Polymer:Fullerene Solar Cells by Electric Noise Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Landi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of solvent additives on the temperature behavior of both charge carrier transport and recombination kinetics in bulk heterojunction solar cells has been investigated by electric noise spectroscopy. The observed differences in charge carrier lifetime and mobility are attributed to a different film ordering and donor-acceptor phase segregation in the blend. The measured temperature dependence indicates that bimolecular recombination is the dominant loss mechanism in the active layer, affecting the device performance. Blend devices prepared with a high-boiling-point solvent additive show a decreased recombination rate at the donor-acceptor interface as compared to the ones prepared with the reference solvent. A clear correlation between the device performance and the morphological properties is discussed in terms of the temperature dependence of the mobility-lifetime product.

  10. Probing the dielectric response of the interfacial buffer layer in epitaxial graphene via optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Heather M.; Rigosi, Albert F.; Chowdhury, Sugata; Yang, Yanfei; Nguyen, Nhan V.; Tavazza, Francesca; Elmquist, Randolph E.; Newell, David B.; Hight Walker, Angela R.

    2017-11-01

    Monolayer epitaxial graphene (EG) is a suitable candidate for a variety of electronic applications. One advantage of EG growth on the Si face of SiC is that it develops as a single crystal, as does the layer below, referred to as the interfacial buffer layer (IBL), whose properties include an electronic band gap. Although much research has been conducted to learn about the electrical properties of the IBL, not nearly as much work has been reported on the optical properties of the IBL. In this work, we combine measurements from Mueller matrix ellipsometry, differential reflectance contrast, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, as well as calculations from Kramers-Kronig analyses and density-functional theory, to determine the dielectric function of the IBL within the energy range of 1 eV to 8.5 eV.

  11. The hydrogen bond in ice probed by soft x-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, A.; Ogasawara, H.; Cavalleri, M.; Nordlund, D.; Nyberg, M.; Wernet, Ph.; Pettersson, L.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    We combine photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory to derive a molecular orbital picture of the hydrogen bond in ice. We find that the hydrogen bond involves donation and back-donation of charge between the oxygen lone pair and the O-H antibonding orbitals on neighboring molecules. Together with internal s-p rehybridization this minimizes the repulsive charge overlap of the connecting oxygen and hydrogen atoms, which is essential for a strong attractive electrostatic interaction. Our joint experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that an electrostatic model based on only charge induction from the surrounding medium fails to properly describe the internal charge redistributions upon hydrogen bonding

  12. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy to probe single membrane proteins in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, K Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened vast avenues hitherto inaccessible to the biological scientist. The high temporal (millisecond) and spatial (nanometer) resolutions of the AFM are suited for studying many biological processes in their native conditions. The AFM cantilever stylus is aptly termed as a "lab on a tip" owing to its versatility as an imaging tool as well as a handle to manipulate single bonds and proteins. Recent examples assert that the AFM can be used to study the mechanical properties and monitor processes of single proteins and single cells, thus affording insight into important mechanistic details. This chapter specifically focuses on practical and analytical protocols of single-molecule AFM methodologies related to high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. Both these techniques are operator oriented, and require specialized working knowledge of the instrument, theoretical, and practical skills.

  13. Improved Carrier Transport in Perovskite Solar Cells Probed by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpetzoglou, Efthymis; Konidakis, Ioannis; Kakavelakis, George; Maksudov, Temur; Kymakis, Emmanuel; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2017-12-20

    CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 perovskite thin films have been deposited on glass/indium tin oxide/hole transport layer (HTL) substrates, utilizing two different materials as the HTLs. In the first configuration, the super hydrophilic polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate), known as PEDOT:PSS, was employed as the HTL material, whereas in the second case, the nonwetting poly(triarylamine) semiconductor polymer, known as PTAA, was used. It was found that when PTAA is used as the HTL material, the averaged power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the perovskite solar cells (PSCs) remarkably increases from 12.60 to 15.67%. To explore the mechanism behind this enhancement, the aforementioned perovskite/HTL arrangements were investigated by time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) performed under inert conditions. By means of TAS, the charge transfer, carrier trapping, and hole injection dynamics from the photoexcited perovskite layers to the HTL can be directly monitored via the characteristic bleaching profile of the perovskite at ∼750 nm. TAS studies revealed faster relaxation times and decay dynamics when the PTAA polymer is employed, which potentially account for the enhanced PCE observed. The TAS results are correlated with the structure and crystalline quality of the corresponding perovskite films, investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, micro-photoluminescence, and transmittance spectroscopy. It is concluded that TAS is a benchmark technique for the understanding of the carrier transport mechanisms in PSCs and constitutes a figure-of-merit tool toward their efficiency improvement.

  14. TIME-RESOLVED INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY IN THE U121R BEAMLINE AT THE NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARR, G.L.; LAVEIGNE, J.D.; LOBO, R.P.S.M.; REITZE, D.H.; TANNER, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    A facility for performing time-resolved infrared spectroscopy has been developed at the NSLS, primarily at beamline U12IR. The pulsed IR light from the synchrotron is used to perform pump-probe spectroscopy. The authors present here a description of the facility and results for the relaxation of photoexcitations in both a semiconductor and superconductor

  15. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  16. Excitonic Coupling in Linear and Trefoil Trimer Perylenediimide Molecules Probed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Yoo, Hyejin

    2012-10-25

    Perylenediimide (PDI) molecules are promising building blocks for photophysical studies of electronic interactions within multichromophore arrays. Such PDI arrays are important materials for fabrication of molecular nanodevices such as organic light-emitting diodes, organic semiconductors, and biosensors because of their high photostability, chemical and physical inertness, electron affinity, and high tinctorial strength over the entire visible spectrum. In this work, PDIs have been organized into linear (L3) and trefoil (T3) trimer molecules and investigated by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to probe the relationship between molecular structures and interchromophoric electronic interactions. We found a broad distribution of coupling strengths in both L3 and T3 and hence strong/weak coupling between PDI units by monitoring spectral peak shifts in single-molecule fluorescence spectra upon sequential photobleaching of each constituent chromophore. In addition, we used a wide-field defocused imaging technique to resolve heterogeneities in molecular structures of L3 and T3 embedded in a PMMA polymer matrix. A systematic comparison between the two sets of experimental results allowed us to infer the correlation between intermolecular interactions and molecular structures. Our results show control of the PDI intermolecular interactions using suitable multichromophoric structures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  17. Low temperature excitonic spectroscopy and dynamics as a probe of quality in hybrid perovskite thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarang, Som; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Chen, Yen-Chang; Lin, Oliver; Gopinathan, Ajay; Tung, Vincent C; Ghosh, Sayantani

    2016-10-19

    We have developed a framework for using temperature dependent static and dynamic photoluminescence (PL) of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (PVSKs) to characterize lattice defects in thin films, based on the presence of nanodomains at low temperature. Our high-stability PVSK films are fabricated using a novel continuous liquid interface propagation technique, and in the tetragonal phase (T > 120 K), they exhibit bi-exponential recombination from free charge carriers with an average PL lifetime of ∼200 ns. Below 120 K, the emergence of the orthorhombic phase is accompanied by a reduction in lifetimes by an order of magnitude, which we establish to be the result of a crossover from free carrier to exciton-dominated radiative recombination. Analysis of the PL as a function of excitation power at different temperatures provides direct evidence that the exciton binding energy is different in the two phases, and using these results, we present a theoretical approach to estimate this variable binding energy. Our findings explain this anomalous low temperature behavior for the first time, attributing it to an inherent fundamental property of the hybrid PVSKs that can be used as an effective probe of thin film quality.

  18. Excitonic Coupling in Linear and Trefoil Trimer Perylenediimide Molecules Probed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Yoo, Hyejin; Furumaki, Shu; Yang, Jaesung; Lee, Ji-Eun; Chung, Heejae; Oba, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Rybtchinski, Boris; Wilson, Thea M.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Vacha, Martin; Kim, Dongho

    2012-01-01

    Perylenediimide (PDI) molecules are promising building blocks for photophysical studies of electronic interactions within multichromophore arrays. Such PDI arrays are important materials for fabrication of molecular nanodevices such as organic light-emitting diodes, organic semiconductors, and biosensors because of their high photostability, chemical and physical inertness, electron affinity, and high tinctorial strength over the entire visible spectrum. In this work, PDIs have been organized into linear (L3) and trefoil (T3) trimer molecules and investigated by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to probe the relationship between molecular structures and interchromophoric electronic interactions. We found a broad distribution of coupling strengths in both L3 and T3 and hence strong/weak coupling between PDI units by monitoring spectral peak shifts in single-molecule fluorescence spectra upon sequential photobleaching of each constituent chromophore. In addition, we used a wide-field defocused imaging technique to resolve heterogeneities in molecular structures of L3 and T3 embedded in a PMMA polymer matrix. A systematic comparison between the two sets of experimental results allowed us to infer the correlation between intermolecular interactions and molecular structures. Our results show control of the PDI intermolecular interactions using suitable multichromophoric structures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  19. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  20. Probing defects in chemically synthesized ZnO nanostrucures by positron annihilation and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, S. K.; Das, D.; Ghosh, Manoranjan; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    The present article describes the size induced changes in the structural arrangement of intrinsic defects present in chemically synthesized ZnO nanoparticles of various sizes. Routine x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy have been performed to determine the shapes and sizes of the nanocrystalline ZnO samples. Detailed studies using positron annihilation spectroscopy reveals the presence of zinc vacancy. Whereas analysis of photoluminescence results predict the signature of charged oxygen vacancies. The size induced changes in positron parameters as well as the photoluminescence properties, has shown contrasting or nonmonotonous trends as size varies from 4 to 85 nm. Small spherical particles below a critical size (∼23 nm) receive more positive surface charge due to the higher occupancy of the doubly charge oxygen vacancy as compared to the bigger nanostructures where singly charged oxygen vacancy predominates. This electronic alteration has been seen to trigger yet another interesting phenomenon, described as positron confinement inside nanoparticles. Finally, based on all the results, a model of the structural arrangement of the intrinsic defects in the present samples has been reconciled.

  1. Probing hot-electron effects in wide area plasmonic surfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayas, Sencer; Cupallari, Andi; Dana, Aykutlu, E-mail: aykutlu@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [UNAM Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-12-01

    Plasmon enhanced hot carrier formation in metallic nanostructures increasingly attracts attention due to potential applications in photodetection, photocatalysis, and solar energy conversion. Here, hot-electron effects in nanoscale metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures are investigated using a non-contact X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy based technique using continuous wave X-ray and laser excitations. The effects are observed through shifts of the binding energy of the top metal layer upon excitation with lasers of 445, 532, and 650 nm wavelength. The shifts are polarization dependent for plasmonic MIM grating structures fabricated by electron beam lithography. Wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces fabricated using a lithography free route by the dewetting of evaporated Ag on HfO{sub 2} exhibit polarization independent optical absorption and surface photovoltage. Using a simple model and making several assumptions about the magnitude of the photoemission current, the responsivity and external quantum efficiency of wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces are estimated as 500 nA/W and 11 × 10{sup −6} for 445 nm illumination.

  2. Probing odd-triplet contributions to the long-ranged proximity effect by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diesch, Simon; Machon, Peter; Belzig, Wolfgang; Scheer, Elke [Universitaet Konstanz, Konstanz (Germany); Suergers, Christoph; Beckmann, Detlef [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In conventional superconductors, electrons are bound in singlet Cooper pairs, i.e. with opposite spin. More recently, experiments on superconductor-ferromagnet-systems have shown Cooper pairs tunneling through ferromagnetic layers, indicating Cooper pairs of equal spin, thus corresponding to a long-range triplet proximity effect. Most experimental evidence for triplet superconductivity comes from observations of the thickness dependence of the Josephson current through a ferromagnetic barrier, but there is an increasing interest in obtaining direct spectroscopic evidence. This project aims at analyzing the electronic density of states of a thin diffusive normal metal layer (Ag) coupled to a superconductor (Al) across a ferromagnetic insulator (EuS) using a scanning tunneling microscope in spectroscopy mode at 280 mK. For this purpose, we fabricated EuS films of different thicknesses and acquired spectroscopic data at different magnetic fields. We observe significant broadening of the superconductive energy gap and a variety of sub-gap structures including zero-bias conductance peaks induced by the presence of the ferromagnet.

  3. Use of interfacial layers to prolong hole lifetimes in hematite probed by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradzah, Alexander T.; Diale, Mmantsae; Maabong, Kelebogile; Krüger, Tjaart P. J.

    2018-04-01

    Hematite is a widely investigated material for applications in solar water oxidation due primarily to its small bandgap. However, full realization of the material continues to be hampered by fast electron-hole recombination rates among other weaknesses such as low hole mobility, short hole diffusion length and low conductivity. To address the problem of fast electron-hole recombination, researchers have resorted to growth of nano-structured hematite, doping and use of under-layers. Under-layer materials enhance the photo-current by minimising electron-hole recombination through suppressing of back electron flow from the substrate, such as fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO), to hematite. We have carried out ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy on hematite in which Nb2O5 and SnO2 materials were used as interfacial layers to enhance hole lifetimes. The transient absorption data was fit with four different lifetimes ranging from a few hundred femtoseconds to a few nanoseconds. We show that the electron-hole recombination is slower in samples where interfacial layers are used than in pristine hematite. We also develop a model through target analysis to illustrate the effect of under-layers on electron-hole recombination rates in hematite thin films.

  4. Structural properties of glucose-dimethylsulfoxide solutions probed by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolantoni, Marco; Gallina, Maria Elena; Sassi, Paola; Morresi, Assunta

    2009-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy was employed to achieve a molecular level description of solvation properties in glucose-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solutions. The analysis of Raman spectra confirms the importance of the dipole-dipole interaction in determining structural properties of pure DMSO; the overall intermolecular structure is maintained in the whole 20-75 °C temperature range investigated. The blueshift of the CH stretching modes observed at higher temperatures points out that CH3⋯O contacts contribute to the cohesive energy of the DMSO liquid system. The addition of glucose perturbs the intermolecular ordering of DMSO owing to the formation of stable solute-solvent hydrogen bonds. The average number of OH⋯OS contacts (3.2±0.3) and their corresponding energy (˜20 kJ/mol) were estimated. Besides, the concentration dependence of the CH stretching bands and the behavior of the noncoincidence effect on the SO band, suggest that the dipole-dipole and CH3⋯O interactions among DMSO molecules are disfavored within the glucose solvation layer. These findings contribute to improve our understanding about the microscopic origin of solvent properties of DMSO toward more complex biomolecular systems.

  5. Probing the interaction of noble gases with pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene through Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Renato; Perea-López, Néstor; Elías, Ana Laura; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Carozo, Victor; Feng, Simin; Lv, Ruitao; dos Santos, Maria Cristina; Terrones, Mauricio; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2018-05-01

    The interactions of adsorbates with graphene have received increasing attention due to its importance in the development of applications involving graphene-based coatings. Here, we present a study of the adsorption of noble gases on pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene. Single-layer graphene samples were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Several noble gases were allowed to adsorb on the suspended graphene substrate at very low temperatures. Raman spectra show distinct frequency blue shifts in both the 2D and G bands, which are induced by gas adsorption onto high quality single layer graphene (1LG). These shifts, which we associate with compressive biaxial strain in the graphene layers induced by the noble gases, are negligible for nitrogen-doped graphene. Additionally, a thermal depinning transition, which is related to the desorption of a noble gas layer from the graphene surface at low temperatures (ranging from 20 to 35 K), was also observed at different transition temperatures for different noble gases. These transition temperatures were found to be 25 K for argon and 35 K for xenon. Moreover, we were able to obtain values for the compressive biaxial strain in graphene induced by the adsorbed layer of noble gases, using Raman spectroscopy. Ab initio calculations confirmed the correlation between the noble gas-induced strain and the changes in the Raman features observed.

  6. Probing molecular interactions in bone biomaterials: Through molecular dynamics and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmik, Rahul; Katti, Kalpana S.; Verma, Devendra; Katti, Dinesh R.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer-hydroxyapatite (HAP) composites are widely investigated for their potential use as bone replacement materials. The molecular interactions at mineral polymer interface are known to have significant role of mechanical response of the composite system. Modeling interactions between such dissimilar molecules using molecular dynamics (MD) is an area of current interest. Molecular dynamics studies require potential function or force field parameters. Some force fields are described in literature that represents the structure of hydroxyapatite reasonably well. Yet, the applicability of these force fields for studying the interaction between dissimilar materials (such as mineral and polymer) is limited, as there is no accurate representation of polymer in these force fields. We have obtained the parameters of consistent valence force field (CVFF) for monoclinic hydroxyapatite. Validation of parameters was done by comparing the computationally obtained unit cell parameters, vibrational spectra and atomic distances with XRD and FTIR experiments. Using the obtained parameters of HAP, and available parameters of polymer (polyacrylic acid), interaction study was performed with MD simulations. The MD simulations showed that several hydrogen bonds may form between HAP and polyacrylic acid depending upon the exposed surface of HAP. Also there are some favourable planes of HAP where polyacrylic acid is most likely to attach. We have also simulated the mineralization of HAP using a 'synthetic biomineralization'. These modeling studies are supported by photoacoustic spectroscopy experiments on both porous and non porous composite samples for potential joint replacement and bone tissue engineering applications

  7. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Li [Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, Goettingen (Germany); Ueta, Hirokazu; Beck, Rainer D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moleculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bisson, Regis [Aix-Marseille Universite, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France)

    2013-05-15

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S({theta}). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  8. Variation in LOV Photoreceptor Activation Dynamics Probed by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Iuliano, James N.

    2017-12-14

    The light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) domain proteins are blue light photoreceptors that utilize a non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor as the chromophore. The modular nature of these proteins has led to their wide adoption in the emerging fields of optogenetics and optobiology, where the LOV domain has been fused to a variety of output domains leading to novel light-controlled applications. In the present work, we extend our studies of the sub-picosecond to several hundred microsecond transient infrared spectroscopy of the isolated LOV domain AsLOV2 to three full-length photoreceptors in which the LOV domain is fused to an output domain: the LOV-STAS protein, YtvA, the LOV-HTH transcription factor, EL222, and the LOV-histidine kinase, LovK. Despite differences in tertiary structure, the overall pathway leading to cysteine adduct formation from the FMN triplet state is highly conserved, although there are slight variations in rate. However significant differences are observed in the vibrational spectra and kinetics after adduct formation, which are directly linked to the specific output function of the LOV domain. While the rate of adduct formation varies by only 3.6-fold amongst the proteins, the subsequent large-scale structural changes in the full-length LOV photoreceptors occur over the micro- to sub-millisecond timescales and vary by orders of magnitude depending on the different output function of each LOV domain.

  9. Confinement effects on strongly polar alkylcyanobiphenyl liquid crystals probed by dielectric spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leys, Jan; Glorieux, Christ; Thoen, Jan [Laboratorium voor Akoestiek en Thermische Fysica, Departement Natuurkunde en Sterrenkunde, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D-bus 2416, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.leys@fys.kuleuven.be, E-mail: jan.thoen@fys.kuleuven.be

    2008-06-18

    Dielectric spectroscopy has often been used to study confinement effects in alkylcyanobiphenyl liquid crystals. In this paper, we highlight some of the effects that have been discovered previously and add new data and interpretation. Aerosil nanoparticles form a hydrogen bonded random porous network. In dispersions of alkylcyanobiphenyls with aerosils, an additional slow process arises, that we ascribe to the relaxation of liquid crystal molecules in close interaction with these nanoparticles. Their relaxation is retarded by a hydrogen bond interaction between the cyano group of the liquid crystals and an aerosil surface hydroxyl group. A similar surface process is also observed in Vycor porous glass, a random rigid structure with small pores. A comparison of the temperature dependence of the relaxation times of the surface processes in decylcyanobiphenyl and isopentylcyanobiphenyl is made, both for Vycor and aerosil confinement. In decylcyanobiphenyl, the temperature dependence for the bulk and surface processes is Arrhenius (in a limited temperature range above the melting point), except in Vycor, where it is a Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman dependence (over a much broader temperature range). In bulk and confined isopentylcyanobiphenyl, the molecular processes have a Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman dependence, whereas the surface processes have an Arrhenius one. Another effect is the acceleration of the rotation around the short molecular axis in confinement, and particularly in aerosil dispersions. This is a consequence of the disorder introduced in the liquid crystalline phase. The disorder drives the relaxation time towards a more isotropic value, resulting in an acceleration for the short axis rotation.

  10. Electron phonon couplings in 2D perovskite probed by ultrafast photoinduced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Uyen; Ni, Limeng; Rao, Akshay

    We use the time-resolved photoinduced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy with 20fs time resolution to investigate the electron phonon coupling in the self-assembled hybrid organic layered perovskite, the hexyl ammonium lead iodide compound (C6H13NH3)2 (PbI4) . The coupling results in the broadening and asymmetry of its temperature-dependence photoluminescence spectra. The exact time scale of this coupling, however, wasn't reported experimentally. Here we show that using an ultrashort excitation pulse allows us to resolve from PIA kinetics the oscillation of coherent longitudinal optical phonons that relaxes and self-traps electrons to lower energy states within 200 fs. The 200fs relaxation time is equivalent to a coupling strength of 40meV. Two coupled phonon modes are also identified as about 100 cm-1 and 300 cm-1 from the FFT spectrum of the PIA kinetics. The lower energy mode is consistent with previous reports and Raman spectrum but the higher energy one hasn't been observed before.

  11. Probing defects in chemically synthesized ZnO nanostrucures by positron annihilation and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, S. K.; Ghosh, Manoranjan; Das, D.; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2010-09-01

    The present article describes the size induced changes in the structural arrangement of intrinsic defects present in chemically synthesized ZnO nanoparticles of various sizes. Routine x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy have been performed to determine the shapes and sizes of the nanocrystalline ZnO samples. Detailed studies using positron annihilation spectroscopy reveals the presence of zinc vacancy. Whereas analysis of photoluminescence results predict the signature of charged oxygen vacancies. The size induced changes in positron parameters as well as the photoluminescence properties, has shown contrasting or nonmonotonous trends as size varies from 4 to 85 nm. Small spherical particles below a critical size (˜23 nm) receive more positive surface charge due to the higher occupancy of the doubly charge oxygen vacancy as compared to the bigger nanostructures where singly charged oxygen vacancy predominates. This electronic alteration has been seen to trigger yet another interesting phenomenon, described as positron confinement inside nanoparticles. Finally, based on all the results, a model of the structural arrangement of the intrinsic defects in the present samples has been reconciled.

  12. Electrohydrodynamic properties of succinoglycan as probed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, potentiometric titration and capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Slaveykova, Vera I; Hosse, Monika; Buffle, Jacques; Wilkinson, Kevin J

    2006-10-01

    The electrostatic, hydrodynamic and conformational properties of aqueous solutions of succinoglycan have been analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), proton titration, and capillary electrophoresis (CE) over a large range of pH values and electrolyte (NaCl) concentrations. Using the theoretical formalism developed previously for the electrokinetic properties of soft, permeable particles, a quantitative analysis for the electro-hydrodynamics of succinoglycan is performed by taking into account, in a self-consistent manner, the measured values of the diffusion coefficients, electric charge densities, and electrophoretic mobilities. For that purpose, two limiting conformations for the polysaccharide in solution are tested, i.e. succinoglycan behaves as (i) a spherical, random coil polymer or (ii) a rodlike particle with charged lateral chains. The results show that satisfactory modeling of the titration data for ionic strengths larger than 50 mM can be accomplished using both geometries over the entire range of pH values. Electrophoretic mobilities measured for sufficiently large pH values (pH > 5-6) are in line with predictions based on either model. The best manner to discriminate between these two conceptual models is briefly discussed. For low pH values (pH < 5), both models indicate aggregation, resulting in an increase of the hydrodynamic permeability and a decrease of the diffusion coefficient.

  13. Variation in LOV Photoreceptor Activation Dynamics Probed by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Iuliano, James N.; Gil, Agnieszka A.; Laptenok, Sergey P.; Hall, Christopher R.; Tolentino Collado, Jinnette; Lukacs, Andras; Hag Ahmed, Safaa A; Abyad, Jenna; Daryaee, Taraneh; Greetham, Gregory M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Illarionov, Boris; Bacher, Adelbert; Fischer, Markus; Towrie, Michael; French, Jarrod B.; Meech, Stephen R.; Tonge, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    The light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) domain proteins are blue light photoreceptors that utilize a non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor as the chromophore. The modular nature of these proteins has led to their wide adoption in the emerging fields of optogenetics and optobiology, where the LOV domain has been fused to a variety of output domains leading to novel light-controlled applications. In the present work, we extend our studies of the sub-picosecond to several hundred microsecond transient infrared spectroscopy of the isolated LOV domain AsLOV2 to three full-length photoreceptors in which the LOV domain is fused to an output domain: the LOV-STAS protein, YtvA, the LOV-HTH transcription factor, EL222, and the LOV-histidine kinase, LovK. Despite differences in tertiary structure, the overall pathway leading to cysteine adduct formation from the FMN triplet state is highly conserved, although there are slight variations in rate. However significant differences are observed in the vibrational spectra and kinetics after adduct formation, which are directly linked to the specific output function of the LOV domain. While the rate of adduct formation varies by only 3.6-fold amongst the proteins, the subsequent large-scale structural changes in the full-length LOV photoreceptors occur over the micro- to sub-millisecond timescales and vary by orders of magnitude depending on the different output function of each LOV domain.

  14. Light adaptation of the unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    Photosynthetic organisms change the quantity and/or quality of their pigment-protein complexes and the interactions among these complexes in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed light adaptation of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, whose pigment composition is similar to that of cyanobacteria because its phycobilisomes (PBS) lack phycoerythrin. C. merolae were grown under different light qualities, and their responses were measured by steady-state absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. Cells were cultivated under four monochromatic light-emitting diodes (blue, green, yellow, and red), and changes in pigment composition and energy transfer were observed. Cells grown under blue and green light increased their relative phycocyanin levels compared with cells cultured under white light. Energy-transfer processes to photosystem I (PSI) were sensitive to yellow and red light. The contribution of direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI increased only under yellow light, while red light induced a reduction in energy transfer from photosystem II to PSI and an increase in energy transfer from light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex I to PSI. Differences in pigment composition, growth, and energy transfer under different light qualities are discussed.

  15. Structures of cycloserine and 2-oxazolidinone probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng; Acres, Robert G; Prince, Kevin C

    2014-05-22

    The electronic structures and properties of 2-oxazolidinone and the related compound cycloserine (CS) have been investigated using theoretical calculations and core and valence photoelectron spectroscopy. Isomerization of the central oxazolidine heterocycle and the addition of an amino group yield cycloserine. Theory correctly predicts the C, N, and O 1s core spectra, and additionally, we report theoretical natural bond orbital (NBO) charges. The valence ionization energies are also in agreement with theory and previous measurements. Although the lowest binding energy part of the spectra of the two compounds shows superficial similarities, further analysis of the charge densities of the frontier orbitals indicates substantial reorganization of the wave functions as a result of isomerization. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of CS shows leading carbonyl π character with contributions from other heavy (non-H) atoms in the molecule, while the HOMO of 2-oxazolidinone (OX2) has leading nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen pπ characters. The present study further theoretically predicts bond resonance effects of the compounds, evidence for which is provided by our experimental measurements and published crystallographic data.

  16. Probing static disorder in Arrhenius kinetics by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Li, Jingyuan; Barel, Itay; Lu, Hui; Berne, Bruce J; Urbakh, Michael; Klafter, Joseph; Fernández, Julio M

    2010-06-22

    The widely used Arrhenius equation describes the kinetics of simple two-state reactions, with the implicit assumption of a single transition state with a well-defined activation energy barrier DeltaE, as the rate-limiting step. However, it has become increasingly clear that the saddle point of the free-energy surface in most reactions is populated by ensembles of conformations, leading to nonexponential kinetics. Here we present a theory that generalizes the Arrhenius equation to include static disorder of conformational degrees of freedom as a function of an external perturbation to fully account for a diverse set of transition states. The effect of a perturbation on static disorder is best examined at the single-molecule level. Here we use force-clamp spectroscopy to study the nonexponential kinetics of single ubiquitin proteins unfolding under force. We find that the measured variance in DeltaE shows both force-dependent and independent components, where the force-dependent component scales with F(2), in excellent agreement with our theory. Our study illustrates a novel adaptation of the classical Arrhenius equation that accounts for the microscopic origins of nonexponential kinetics, which are essential in understanding the rapidly growing body of single-molecule data.

  17. Enzyme stability, thermodynamics and secondary structures of α-amylase as probed by the CD spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikani, B A; Singh, S P

    2015-11-01

    An amylase of a thermophilic bacterium, Bacillus sp. TSSC-3 (GenBank Number, EU710557) isolated from the Tulsi Shyam hot spring reservoir (Gujarat, India) was purified to the homogeneity in a single step on phenyl sepharose 6FF. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 25kD, while the temperature and pH optima for the enzyme catalysis were 80°C and 7, respectively. The purified enzyme was highly thermostable with broad pH stability and displayed remarkable resistance against surfactants, chelators, urea, guanidine HCl and various solvents as well. The stability and changes in the secondary structure of the enzyme under various extreme conditions were determined by the circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The stability trends and the changes in the α-helices and β-sheets were analyzed by Mean Residual Ellipticity (MRE) and K2D3. The CD data confirmed the structural stability of the enzyme under various harsh conditions, yet it indicated reduced α-helix content and increased β-sheets upon denaturation. The thermodynamic parameters; deactivation rate constant, half-life, changes in entropy, enthalpy, activation energy and Gibb's free energy indicated that the enzyme-substrate reactions were highly stable. The overall profile of the enzyme: high thermostability, alkalitolerance, calcium independent nature, dextrose equivalent values and resistance against chemical denaturants, solvents and surfactants suggest its commercial applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Probing Properties of Glassy Water and Other Liquids with Site Selective Spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Nhan Chuong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The standard non-photochemical hole burning (NPHB) mechanism, which involves phonon-assisted tunneling in the electronically excited state, was originally proposed to explain the light-induced frequency change of chemically stable molecules in glassy solids at liquid helium temperatures by this research group more than two decades ago. The NPHB mechanism was then further elucidated and the concept of intrinsic to glass configurational relaxation processes as pre-mediating step to the hole burning process was introduced. The latter provided the theoretical basis for NPHB to evolve into a powerful tool probing the dynamics and nature of amorphous media, which aside from ''simple'' inorganic glasses may include also ''complex'' biological systems such as living cells and cancerous/normal tissues. Presented in this dissertation are the experimental and theoretical results of hole burning properties of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulphonate (APT) in several different matrices: (1) hyperquenched glassy water (HGW); (2) cubic ice (Ic); and (3) water confined into poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (poly-HEMA). In addition, results of photochemical hole burning (PHB) studies obtained for phthalocyanine tetrasulphonate (PcT) in HGW and free base phthalocyanine (Pc) in ortho-dichlorobenzene (DCB) glass are reported. The goal of this dissertation was to provide further evidence supporting the NPHB mechanism and to provide more insight that leads to a better understanding of the kinetic events (dynamics) in glasses, and various dynamical processes of different fluorescent chromorphores in various amorphous solids and the liquid that exist above the glass transition temperature (Tg). The following issues are addressed in detail: (1) time evolution of hole being burned under different conditions and in different hole burning systems; (2) temperature dependent hole profile; and (3) the structure

  19. Sub-nanosecond laser-induced structural changes in the phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5 measured by an optical pump/x-ray probe technique: Structural snapshots with a 500 ps shutter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fons, P.; Brewe, D.; Stern, E.; Kolobov, A.V.; Fukaya, T.; Suzuki, M.; Uruga, T.; Kawamura, N.; Takagaki, M.; Ohsawa, H.; Tanida, H.; Tominaga, J.

    2007-01-01

    Phase-change alloys are characterized by reversible switching between amorphous and crystalline phases either by laser irradiation or by an electric programming current; the resulting changes in material properties can be used for non-volatile data storage. Switching typically occurs on nanosecond or less time scales. Considering the conflicting requirements for high-speed switching, yet long term data storage integrity, a deeper understanding of the switching processes in these materials is essential for insightful application development. Although, high-speed optical pump/probe observations have been made of reflectivity changes during the Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 switching process, due to the nanosecond order time scales involved little is known about the corresponding changes in structure. In addition as the amorphous phase does not diffract, its structural analysis is not amenable to analysis by high-speed diffraction techniques. We have used synchrotron-based time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), a technique equally suitable for amorphous and crystalline phases to elaborate details in structural changes in the phase-change process. We report on two experiments using high-speed pulsed lasers that serve as optical pumps to induced material changes followed by synchrotron produced x-ray burst that serve as a time resolved structural probe. The first experiment carried out at the Advanced Photon source focuses on changes due to heating in the amorphous phase. Our experimental results indicate that the maximum temperature reached during the re-amorphization process are less than the melting point indicated in the bulk phase diagram of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 reaching a maximum temperature of 620 C and in addition, do not share the same bond length distribution of a true melt. These findings strongly suggest the possibility of non-thermal melting. In the second experiment, we have obtained near-edge x-ray absorption data for a Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 film in the

  20. Assessment of photon migration for subsurface probing in selected types of bone using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Churchwell, John H.; Buckley, Kevin; Kerns, Jemma G.; Goodship, Allen E.; Parker, Anthony W.; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Bone diseases and disorders are a growing challenge in aging populations; so effective diagnostic and therapeutic solutions are now essential to manage the demands of healthcare sectors effectively. Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) allows for chemically specific sub-surface probing and has a great potential to become an in vivo tool for early non-invasive detection of bone conditions. Bone is a complex hierarchical material and the volume probed by SORS is dependent on its optical properties. Understanding and taking into account the variations in diffuse scattering properties of light in various bone types is essential for the effective development and optimization of SORS as a diagnostic in vivo tool for characterizing bone disease. This study presents SORS investigations at 830 nm excitation on two specific types of bone with differing mineralization levels. Thin slices of bone from horse metacarpal cortex (0.6 mm thick) and whale bulla (1.0 mm thick) were cut and stacked on top of each other (4-7 layers with a total thickness of 4.1 mm). To investigate the depth origin of the detected Raman signal inside the bone a 0.38 mm thin Teflon slice was used as test sample and inserted in between the layers of stacked bone slices. For both types of bone it could be demonstrated that chemically specific Raman signatures different from those of normal bone can be retrieved through 3.8-4.0 mm of overlying bone material with a spatial offset of 7-8 mm. The determined penetration depths can be correlated with the mechanical and optical properties of the specimens. The findings of this study increase our understanding of SORS analysis of bone and thus have impact for medical diagnostic applications e.g. enabling the non-invasive detection of spectral changes caused by degeneration, infection or cancer deep inside the bone matrix.

  1. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy to probe sensorimotor region activation during electrical stimulation-evoked movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalib, Makii; Ferrari, Marco; Quaresima, Valentina; Kerr, Graham; Perrey, Stephane

    2017-11-07

    This study used non-invasive functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) neuroimaging to monitor bilateral sensorimotor region activation during unilateral voluntary (VOL) and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked movements. In eight healthy male volunteers, fNIRS was used to measure relative changes in oxyhaemoglobin (O 2 Hb) and deoxyhaemoglobin (HHb) concentrations from a cortical sensorimotor region of interest in the left (LH) and right (RH) hemispheres during NMES-evoked and VOL wrist extension movements of the right arm. NMES-evoked movements induced significantly greater activation (increase in O 2 Hb and concomitant decrease in HHb) in the contralateral LH than in the ipsilateral RH (O 2 Hb: 0·44 ± 0·16 μM and 0·25 ± 0·22 μM, P = 0·017; HHb: -0·19 ± 0·10 μM and -0·12 ± 0·09 μM, P = 0·036, respectively) as did VOL movements (0·51 ± 0·24 μΜ and 0·34 ± 0·21 μM, P = 0·031; HHb: -0·18 ± 0·07 μΜ and -0·12 ± 0·04 μΜ, P = 0·05, respectively). There was no significant difference between conditions for O 2 Hb (P = 0·144) and HHb (P = 0·958). fNIRS neuroimaging enables quantification of bilateral sensorimotor regional activation profiles during voluntary and NMES-evoked wrist extension movements. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Spin-spin cross relaxation and spin-Hamiltonian spectroscopy by optical pumping of Pr/sup 3+/:LaF3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukac, M.; Otto, F.W.; Hahn, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    We report the observation of an anticrossing in solid-state laser spectroscopy produced by cross relaxation. Spin-spin cross relaxation between the /sup 141/Pr- and /sup 19/F-spin reservoirs in Pr/sup 3+/:LaF 3 and its influence on the /sup 141/Pr NMR spectrum is detected by means of optical pumping. The technique employed combines optical pumping and hole burning with either external magnetic field sweep or rf resonance saturation in order to produce slow transient changes in resonant laser transmission. At a certain value of the external Zeeman field, where the energy-level splittings of Pr and F spins match, a level repulsion and discontinuity of the Pr/sup 3+/ NMR lines is observed. This effect is interpreted as the ''anticrossing'' of the combined Pr-F spin-spin reservoir energy states. The Zeeman-quadrupole-Hamiltonian spectrum of the hyperfine optical ground states of Pr/sup 3+/:LaF 3 is mapped out over a wide range of Zeeman magnetic fields. A new scheme is proposed for dynamic polarization of nuclei by means of optical pumping, based on resonant cross relaxation between rare spins and spin reservoirs

  3. Relaxation dynamics of the LH2 complex from a photosynthetic purple bacterium Thiorhodospira sibirica studied by the near-IR femtosecond pump-probe method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razjivin, A P; Pishchal'nikov, R Yu; Kozlovskii, V S; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, Sergei V; Moskalenko, A A; Makhneva, Z K

    2005-01-01

    Photoinduced changes in the absorption spectrum of the LH2 (B800-830-850) complex from a Thiorhodospira sibirica (Trs. sibirica) bacterium are studied by the pump-probe method. The complex has the anomalous absorption spectrum exhibiting three bands in the near-IR region at 793, 826.5, and 846.5 nm. At room temperature, the excitation energy transfer from the B800, B830, and B859 bands was detected with the time constants τ 1 ∼0.5 ps, τ 2 ∼2.5 ps, and τ 3 of the order of a few hundreds of picoseconds, respectively. A rapid energy transfer from the B830 band compared to energy transfer from the B850 band (τ 2 ||τ 3 ) suggests that all the three bands belong to the same complex (i.e., that the LH2 complex from Trs. sibirica is homogeneous). A slower energy transfer (by three - five times) from the B830 band of the LH2 complex from Trs. sibirica compared to energy transfer from the B800 band of the LH2 complexes (B800-850 and especially B800-820) from other purple bacteria suggests that the electronic structures of ensembles of bacteriochlorophyll molecules in these complexes are substantially different. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Probing specific molecular processes and intermediates by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: application to the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; Kandori, Hideki; Padrós, Esteve

    2011-06-23

    We present a general approach for probing the kinetics of specific molecular processes in proteins by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Using bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a model we demonstrate that by appropriately monitoring some selected IR bands it is possible obtaining the kinetics of the most important events occurring in the photocycle, namely changes in the chromophore and the protein backbone conformation, and changes in the protonation state of the key residues implicated in the proton transfers. Besides confirming widely accepted views of the bR photocycle, our analysis also sheds light into some disputed issues: the degree of retinal torsion in the L intermediate to respect the ground state; the possibility of a proton transfer from Asp85 to Asp212; the relationship between the protonation/deprotonation of Asp85 and the proton release complex; and the timing of the protein backbone dynamics. By providing a direct way to estimate the kinetics of photocycle intermediates the present approach opens new prospects for a robust quantitative kinetic analysis of the bR photocycle, which could also benefit the study of other proteins involved in photosynthesis, in phototaxis, or in respiratory chains.

  5. Water adsorption on TiO2 surfaces probed by soft X-ray spectroscopies: bulk materials vs. isolated nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkoula, Safia; Sublemontier, Olivier; Patanen, Minna; Nicolas, Christophe; Sirotti, Fausto; Naitabdi, Ahmed; Gaie-Levrel, François; Antonsson, Egill; Aureau, Damien; Ouf, François-Xavier; Wada, Shin-Ichi; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    We describe an experimental method to probe the adsorption of water at the surface of isolated, substrate-free TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) based on soft X-ray spectroscopy in the gas phase using synchrotron radiation. To understand the interfacial properties between water and TiO2 surface, a water shell was adsorbed at the surface of TiO2 NPs. We used two different ways to control the hydration level of the NPs: in the first scheme, initially solvated NPs were dried and in the second one, dry NPs generated thanks to a commercial aerosol generator were exposed to water vapor. XPS was used to identify the signature of the water layer shell on the surface of the free TiO2 NPs and made it possible to follow the evolution of their hydration state. The results obtained allow the establishment of a qualitative determination of isolated NPs’ surface states, as well as to unravel water adsorption mechanisms. This method appears to be a unique approach to investigate the interface between an isolated nano-object and a solvent over-layer, paving the way towards new investigation methods in heterogeneous catalysis on nanomaterials. PMID:26462615

  6. Probing Temperature- and pH-Dependent Binding between Quantum Dots and Bovine Serum Albumin by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonghua Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent quantum dots (QDs with unique optical properties have potential applications in bio-imaging. The interaction between QDs and bio-molecules is important to the biological effect of QDs in vivo. In this paper, we have employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS to probe the temperature- and pH-dependent interactions between CdSe QDs with carboxyl (QDs-COOH and bovine serum albumin (BSA in buffer solutions. The results have shown that microscopic dissociation constant K′D is in the range of (1.5 ± 0.2 × 10−5 to (8.6 ± 0.1 × 10−7 M, the Hill coefficient n is from 0.4 to 2.3, and the protein corona thickness is from 3.0 to 9.4 nm. Variable-temperature measurements have shown both negative values of ∆H and ∆S for BSA adsorption on QDs-COOH, while pH has a profound effect on the adsorption. Additional, FCS measurement QDs-COOH and proteins in whole mice serum and plasma samples has also been conducted. Finally, simulation results have shown four favored QD binding sites in BSA.

  7. Optical properties of single semiconductor nanowires and nanowire ensembles. Probing surface physics by photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfueller, Carsten

    2011-06-27

    This thesis presents a detailed investigation of the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) in general and single GaN NWs and GaN NW ensembles in particular by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. NWs are often considered as potential building blocks for future nanometer-scaled devices. This vision is based on several attractive features that are generally ascribed to NWs. For instance, they are expected to grow virtually free of strain and defects even on substrates with a large structural mismatch. In the first part of the thesis, some of these expectations are examined using semiconductor NWs of different materials. On the basis of the temperature-dependent PL of Au- and selfassisted GaAs/(Al,Ga)As core-shell NWs, the influence of foreign catalyst particles on the optical properties of NWs is investigated. For the Au-assisted NWs, we find a thermally activated, nonradiative recombination channel, possibly related to Auatoms incorporated from the catalyst. These results indicate the limited suitability of catalyst-assisted NWs for optoelectronic applications. The effect of the substrate choice is studied by comparing the PL of ZnO NWs grown on Si, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZnO substrates. Their virtually identical optical characteristics indicate that the synthesis of NWs may indeed overcome the constraints that limit the heteroepitaxial deposition of thin films. The major part of this thesis discusses the optical properties of GaN NWs grown on Si substrates. The investigation of the PL of single GaN NWs and GaN NW ensembles reveals the significance of their large surface-to-volume ratio. Differences in the recombination behavior of GaNNW ensembles and GaN layers are observed. First, the large surface-to-volume ratio is discussed to be responsible for the different recombination mechanisms apparent in NWs. Second, certain optical features are only found in the PL of GaN NWs, but not in that of GaN layers. An unexpected broadening of the donor

  8. Development of a microwave dielectric spectroscopy system for materials characterization using the open-ended coaxial probe technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Ruiz, I.; Aviles-Castro, D. [Centro Nacional de Metrologia, Queretaro (Mexico); Jardon-Aguilar, H. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2001-02-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy is a measurement technique to characterize the interaction between electromagnetic energy and macroscopic samples as a function of frequency. It is based on the measurement of complex permittivity plus conductivity and it has shown to be very useful to provide information about internal structure of matter. It has some advantages over others like optical or chemical analysis: it is very fast, easy to implement, requires little or no preparation of the sample, it can be non-destructive and/or minimally intrusive. In this paper the development of a dielectric spectroscopy system for the microwave frequency range (50 MHz-20 GHz), using an open-ended coaxial probe as sensor, is described. The complete system includes a vector network analyzer, a microwave coaxial cable, the probe, a sample holder and a computer to automate measurements and further data processing. This system has been used to measure some liquid and solid materials such as alcohol, water and Teflon. The real and imaginary parts of permittivity as function of frequency, for several sugarcane alcohol and deionised water mixtures, tequilas and Teflon samples are given. Measurement repeatability and accuracy considerations were taken and it was identified that uncertainty of reference standards and system repeatability are the most important error sources. Also, it was found that open-ended coaxial probe technique is appropriate for measuring not only liquids but also solid materials. Some of the obtained results were compared to those reported in literature and good convergence was observed. [Spanish] La espectroscopia dielectrica es una tecnica moderna de medicion para caracterizar la interaccion entre la energia electromagnetica y muestras macroscopicas como funcion de la frecuencia. Esta tecnica se basa en la medicion de la permitividad compleja y conductividad de los materiales y ha mostrado ser muy util para proporcionar informacion sobre la estructura interna de estos. Tiene

  9. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129 Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131 Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen

  10. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, T; Kiessling, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

    2013-12-01

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast "white light" supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  11. Temperature dependence of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. I. Simulation predictions of resonance Raman and pump-probe transient absorption spectra of cavity and non-cavity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zho, Chen-Chen; Farr, Erik P.; Glover, William J.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2017-08-01

    We use one-electron non-adiabatic mixed quantum/classical simulations to explore the temperature dependence of both the ground-state structure and the excited-state relaxation dynamics of the hydrated electron. We compare the results for both the traditional cavity picture and a more recent non-cavity model of the hydrated electron and make definite predictions for distinguishing between the different possible structural models in future experiments. We find that the traditional cavity model shows no temperature-dependent change in structure at constant density, leading to a predicted resonance Raman spectrum that is essentially temperature-independent. In contrast, the non-cavity model predicts a blue-shift in the hydrated electron's resonance Raman O-H stretch with increasing temperature. The lack of a temperature-dependent ground-state structural change of the cavity model also leads to a prediction of little change with temperature of both the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time of the hydrated electron following photoexcitation. This is in sharp contrast to the predictions of the non-cavity model, where both the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time are expected to decrease significantly with increasing temperature. These simulation-based predictions should be directly testable by the results of future time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. Finally, the temperature-dependent differences in predicted excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time of the two models also lead to different predicted pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy of the hydrated electron as a function of temperature. We perform such experiments and describe them in Paper II [E. P. Farr et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074504 (2017)], and find changes in the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time with temperature that match well with the predictions of the non-cavity model. In particular, the experiments

  12. Ultrafast multi-pulse transient absorption spectroscopy of fucoxanthin chlorophyll a protein from Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert G; Bína, David; Fuciman, Marcel; Kuznetsova, Valentyna; Litvín, Radek; Polívka, Tomáš

    2018-05-01

    We have applied femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in pump-probe and pump-dump-probe regimes to study energy transfer between fucoxanthin and Chl a in fucoxanthin-Chl a complex from the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Experiments were carried out at room temperature and 77 K to reveal temperature dependence of energy transfer. At both temperatures, the ultrafast (pump-dump-probe regime, with the dump pulse centered in the spectral region of ICT stimulated emission at 950 nm and applied at 2 ps after excitation, proved that the S 1 and ICT states of fucoxanthin in FCP are individual, yet coupled entities. Analysis of the pump-dump-probe data suggested that the main energy donor in the slow S 1 /ICT-Chl a route is the S 1 part of the S 1 /ICT potential surface. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  14. Quantitative probe of the transition metal redox in battery electrodes through soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qinghao; Chen, Jun; Chen, Yanxue; Yan, Shishen; Qiao, Ruimin; Zhuo, Zengqing; Hussain, Zahid; Yang, Wanli; Wray, L Andrew; Pan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Most battery positive electrodes operate with a 3 d transition-metal (TM) reaction centre. A direct and quantitative probe of the TM states upon electrochemical cycling is valuable for understanding the detailed cycling mechanism and charge diffusion in the electrodes, which is related with many practical parameters of a battery. This review includes a comprehensive summary of our recent demonstrations of five different types of quantitative analysis of the TM states in battery electrodes based on soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and multiplet calculations. In LiFePO 4 , a system of a well-known two-phase transformation type, the TM redox could be strictly determined through a simple linear combination of the two end-members. In Mn-based compounds, the Mn states could also be quantitatively evaluated, but a set of reference spectra with all the three possible Mn valences needs to be deliberately selected and considered in the fitting. Although the fluorescence signals suffer the self-absorption distortion, the multiplet calculations could consider the distortion effect, which allows a quantitative determination of the overall Ni oxidation state in the bulk. With the aid of multiplet calculations, one could also achieve a quasi-quantitative analysis of the Co redox evolution in LiCoO 2 based on the energy position of the spectroscopic peak. The benefit of multiplet calculations is more important for studying electrode materials with TMs of mixed spin states, as exemplified by the quantitative analysis of the mixed spin Na 2−x Fe 2 (CN) 6 system. At the end, we showcase that such quantitative analysis could provide valuable information for optimizing the electrochemical performance of Na 0.44 MnO 2 electrodes for Na-ion batteries. The methodology summarized in this review could be extended to other energy application systems with TM redox centre for detailed analysis, for example, fuel cell and catalytic materials. (topical review)

  15. Quantitative probe of the transition metal redox in battery electrodes through soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghao; Qiao, Ruimin; Wray, L. Andrew; Chen, Jun; Zhuo, Zengqing; Chen, Yanxue; Yan, Shishen; Pan, Feng; Hussain, Zahid; Yang, Wanli

    2016-10-01

    Most battery positive electrodes operate with a 3d transition-metal (TM) reaction centre. A direct and quantitative probe of the TM states upon electrochemical cycling is valuable for understanding the detailed cycling mechanism and charge diffusion in the electrodes, which is related with many practical parameters of a battery. This review includes a comprehensive summary of our recent demonstrations of five different types of quantitative analysis of the TM states in battery electrodes based on soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and multiplet calculations. In LiFePO4, a system of a well-known two-phase transformation type, the TM redox could be strictly determined through a simple linear combination of the two end-members. In Mn-based compounds, the Mn states could also be quantitatively evaluated, but a set of reference spectra with all the three possible Mn valences needs to be deliberately selected and considered in the fitting. Although the fluorescence signals suffer the self-absorption distortion, the multiplet calculations could consider the distortion effect, which allows a quantitative determination of the overall Ni oxidation state in the bulk. With the aid of multiplet calculations, one could also achieve a quasi-quantitative analysis of the Co redox evolution in LiCoO2 based on the energy position of the spectroscopic peak. The benefit of multiplet calculations is more important for studying electrode materials with TMs of mixed spin states, as exemplified by the quantitative analysis of the mixed spin Na2-x Fe2(CN)6 system. At the end, we showcase that such quantitative analysis could provide valuable information for optimizing the electrochemical performance of Na0.44MnO2 electrodes for Na-ion batteries. The methodology summarized in this review could be extended to other energy application systems with TM redox centre for detailed analysis, for example, fuel cell and catalytic materials.

  16. New frontiers of high-resolution spectroscopy: Probing the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and reflected light from exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkby, Jayne; Alonso, Roi; Brogi, Matteo; Charbonneau, David; Fortney, Jonathan; Hoyer, Sergio; Johnson, John Asher; de Kok, Remco; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Montet, Ben; Snellen, Ignas

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy (R>25,000) is a robust and powerful tool in the near-infrared characterization of exoplanet atmospheres. It has unambiguously revealed the presence of carbon monoxide and water in several hot Jupiters, measured the rotation rate of beta Pic b, and suggested the presence of fast day-to-night winds in one atmosphere. The method is applicable to transiting, non-transiting, and directly-imaged planets. It works by resolving broad molecular bands in the planetary spectrum into a dense, unique forest of individual lines and tracing them directly by their Doppler shift, while the star and tellurics remain essentially stationary. I will focus on two ongoing efforts to expand this technique. First, I will present new results on 51 Peg b revealing its infrared atmospheric compositional properties, then I will discuss an ongoing optical HARPS-N/TNG campaign (due mid October 2015) to obtain a detailed albedo spectrum of 51 Peg b at 387-691 nm in bins of 50nm. This spectrum would provide strong constraints on the previously claimed high albedo and potentially cloudy nature of this planet. Second, I will discuss preliminary results from Keck/NIRSPAO observations (due late September 2015) of LHS 6343 C, a 1000 K transiting brown dwarf with an M-dwarf host star. The high-resolution method converts this system into an eclipsing, double-lined spectroscopic binary, thus allowing dynamical mass and radius estimates of the components, free from astrophysical assumptions. Alongside probing the atmospheric composition of the brown dwarf, these data would provide the first model-independent study of the bulk properties of an old brown dwarf, with masses accurate to <5%, placing a crucial constraint on brown dwarf evolution models.

  17. spectroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... characterized by using phenotypic, API and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods. One hundred and fifty-seven (157) strains were isolated from 13 cheese samples, and identification test was performed for 83 strains. At the end of the study, a total of 22 Lactococcus sp., 36 Enterecoccus ...

  18. Theory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Vibrational Polaritons

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, RF; Dunkelberger, AD; Xiang, B; Xiong, W; Simpkins, BS; Owrutsky, JC; Yuen-Zhou, J

    2017-01-01

    Molecular polaritons have gained considerable attention due to their potential to control nanoscale molecular processes by harnessing electromagnetic coherence. Although recent experiments with liquid-phase vibrational polaritons have shown great promise for exploiting these effects, significant challenges remain in interpreting their spectroscopic signatures. In this letter, we develop a quantum-mechanical theory of pump-probe spectroscopy for this class of polaritons based on the quantum La...

  19. Field ion microscopy and imaging atom-probe mass spectroscopy of superconducting YBa2Cu3O7/sub -//sub x/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, G.L.; Brenner, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and composition of the superconducting oxide YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-//sub x/ have been examined in atomic detail by field ion microscopy and imaging atom-probe mass spectroscopy. The field ion samples were prepared from hot-pressed disks of the oxide powders. Atomic resolution images were obtained with either argon or hydrogen as the imaging gas. Individual layers of atoms were observed which could be field evaporated in a uniform, layer-by-layer manner. Imaging atom-probe analysis of the field ion tips indicated a metal composition which varied noticeably from sample to sample and an oxygen concentration which was consistently much too low

  20. Self-probing spectroscopy of XUV photo-ionization dynamics in atoms subjected to a strong-field environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoury, Doron; Krüger, Michael; Orenstein, Gal; Larsson, Henrik R; Bauch, Sebastian; Bruner, Barry D; Dudovich, Nirit

    2017-11-13

    Single-photon ionization is one of the most fundamental light matter interactions in nature, serving as a universal probe of the quantum state of matter. By probing the emitted electron, one can decode the full dynamics of the interaction. When photo-ionization is evolving in the presence of a strong laser field, the fundamental properties of the mechanism can be signicantly altered. Here we demonstrate how the liberated electron can perform a self-probing measurement of such interaction with attosecond precision. Extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulses initiate an electron wavepacket by photo-ionization, a strong infrared field controls its motion, and finally electron-ion collision maps it into re-emission of attosecond radiation bursts. Our measurements resolve the internal clock provided by the self-probing mechanism, obtaining a direct insight into the build-up of photo-ionization in the presence of the strong laser field.

  1. Invited Review Article: Tip modification methods for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and colloidal probe technique: A 10 year update (2006-2016) review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C. C.; Zhang, D.; Gan, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Engineering atomic force microscopy tips for reliable tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and colloidal probe technique are becoming routine practices in many labs. In this 10 year update review, various new tip modification methods developed over the past decade are briefly reviewed to help researchers select the appropriate method. The perspective is put in a large context to discuss the opportunities and challenges in this area, including novel combinations of seemingly different methods, potential applications of some methods which were not originally intended for TERS tip fabrication, and the problems of high cost and poor reproducibility of tip fabrication.

  2. β-Isocyanoalanine as an IR probe: comparison of vibrational dynamics between isonitrile and nitrile-derivatized IR probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Michał; Ahn, Changwoo; Kossowska, Dorota; Park, Kwanghee; Kwak, Kyungwon; Han, Hogyu; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-07

    An infrared (IR) probe based on isonitrile (NC)-derivatized alanine 1 was synthesized and the vibrational properties of its NC stretching mode were investigated using FTIR and femtosecond IR pump-probe spectroscopy. It is found that the NC stretching mode is very sensitive to the hydrogen-bonding ability of solvent molecules. Moreover, its transition dipole strength is larger than that of nitrile (CN) in nitrile-derivatized IR probe 2. The vibrational lifetime of the NC stretching mode is found to be 5.5 ± 0.2 ps in both D2O and DMF solvents, which is several times longer than that of the azido (N3) stretching mode in azido-derivatized IR probe 3. Altogether these properties suggest that the NC group can be a very promising sensing moiety of IR probes for studying the solvation structure and dynamics of biomolecules.

  3. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; de Oliveira, E. M.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Lima, M. A. P.; Jones, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  4. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range

  5. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, Université de Liège, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  6. Development of Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy: Stimulated Raman Gain via Elimination of Cross Phase Modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Young Jong; Yu, Jong Wan; Kim, Seong Keun

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new femtosecond probe technique by using stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The cross phase modulation in femtosecond time scale associated with off-resonant interaction was shown to be eliminated by integrating the transient gain/loss signal over the time delay between the Raman pump pulse and the continuum pulse. The stimulated Raman gain of neat cyclohexane was obtained to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Spectral and temporal widths of stimulated Raman spectra were controlled by using a narrow band pass filter. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy was proposed as a highly useful probe in time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

  7. Complementary Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ Thin-Film Photovoltaic Cells Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, Auger Electron Spectroscopy, and Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yun Jung; Lee, Jihye; Jeong, Jeung-Hyun; Lee, Kang-Bong; Kim, Donghwan; Lee, Yeonhee

    2018-05-01

    To enhance the conversion performance of solar cells, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is required. In this study, we determined the average concentration of the major elements (Cu, In, Ga, and Se) in fabricated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films, using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and wavelengthdispersive electron probe microanalysis. Depth profiling results for CIGS thin films with different cell efficiencies were obtained using secondary ion mass spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy to compare the atomic concentrations. Atom probe tomography, a characterization technique with sub-nanometer resolution, was used to obtain three-dimensional elemental mapping and the compositional distribution at the grain boundaries (GBs). GBs are identified by Na increment accompanied by Cu depletion and In enrichment. Segregation of Na atoms along the GB had a beneficial effect on cell performance. Comparative analyses of different CIGS absorber layers using various analytical techniques provide us with understanding of the compositional distributions and structures of high efficiency CIGS thin films in solar cells.

  8. Photodissociation of 1,2-dibromoethylene at 248 nm: Br2 molecular elimination probed by cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Ping-Chen; Lin, King-Chuen; Huang, C H; Sun, B J; Chang, A H H

    2008-06-02

    The Br2 elimination channel is probed for 1,2-C2H2Br2 in the B(3)Pi(+)ou-X(1)Sigma(+)g transition upon irradiation at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS). The nascent vibrational population ratio of Br2(v=1)/Br2(v=0) is obtained to be 0.7+/-0.2, thus indicating that the Br2 fragment is produced in hot vibrational states. The obtained Br2 products are anticipated to result primarily from photodissociation of the ground-state cis isomer via four-center elimination or from cis/trans isomers via three-center elimination, each mechanism involving a transition state that has a Br-Br distance much larger than that of ground state Br2. According to ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathways that lead to Br2 elimination may proceed either through the electronic ground state by internal conversion or through the triplet state by intersystem crossing. Temperature-dependence measurements are examined, thereby supporting the pathway that involves internal conversion--which was excluded previously by using product translational spectroscopy (PTS). The quantum yield for the Br2 elimination reaction is determined to be 0.120.1, being substantially contributed by the ground-state Br2 product. The discrepancy of this value from that (of 0.2) obtained by PTS may rise from the lack of measurements in probing the triplet-state Br2 product.

  9. A comparative study of the enhancement of molecular emission in a spatially confined plume through optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Dayu; Liang, Peipei; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian, E-mail: jsun@fudan.edu.cn

    2013-01-01

    The spatial confinement effects of shock wave on the expansion of a carbon plume induced by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in air and the enhancement of the plume emission were studied by optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements. A metal disk was set in the way of the ablation-generated shock wave to block and reflect the supersonically propagating shock wave. The reflected shock wave propagated backwards and confined the expanding plume. The optical emission of CN molecules was enhanced in contrast to the case without the block disk and the emission enhancement was dependent on the position of the disk. Based on the results of time-integrated and -resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and the time- and space-resolved probe beam deflection measurements, the processes occurring in the plume were discussed and the mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of molecular emission in the spatially confined plume were investigated. - Highlights: ► Spatial confinement and optical emission enhancement of carbon plume were studied. ► Ablation-generated shockwave propagating in air was reflected by a block disk. ► The effects of reflected shockwave on the emission enhancement were confirmed. ► The reflect shockwave confined the carbon plume and enhanced the plume emission.

  10. A comparative study of the enhancement of molecular emission in a spatially confined plume through optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Dayu; Liang, Peipei; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The spatial confinement effects of shock wave on the expansion of a carbon plume induced by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in air and the enhancement of the plume emission were studied by optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements. A metal disk was set in the way of the ablation-generated shock wave to block and reflect the supersonically propagating shock wave. The reflected shock wave propagated backwards and confined the expanding plume. The optical emission of CN molecules was enhanced in contrast to the case without the block disk and the emission enhancement was dependent on the position of the disk. Based on the results of time-integrated and -resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and the time- and space-resolved probe beam deflection measurements, the processes occurring in the plume were discussed and the mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of molecular emission in the spatially confined plume were investigated. - Highlights: ► Spatial confinement and optical emission enhancement of carbon plume were studied. ► Ablation-generated shockwave propagating in air was reflected by a block disk. ► The effects of reflected shockwave on the emission enhancement were confirmed. ► The reflect shockwave confined the carbon plume and enhanced the plume emission

  11. Functional Single-Cell Approach to Probing Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria in Soil Communities by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy with 15N2 Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li; Yang, Kai; Li, Hong-Zhe; Zhang, Han; Su, Jian-Qiang; Paraskevaidi, Maria; Martin, Francis L; Ren, Bin; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2018-04-17

    Nitrogen (N) fixation is the conversion of inert nitrogen gas (N 2 ) to bioavailable N essential for all forms of life. N 2 -fixing microorganisms (diazotrophs), which play a key role in global N cycling, remain largely obscure because a large majority are uncultured. Direct probing of active diazotrophs in the environment is still a major challenge. Herein, a novel culture-independent single-cell approach combining resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy with 15 N 2 stable isotope probing (SIP) was developed to discern N 2 -fixing bacteria in a complex soil community. Strong RR signals of cytochrome c (Cyt c, frequently present in diverse N 2 -fixing bacteria), along with a marked 15 N 2 -induced Cyt c band shift, generated a highly distinguishable biomarker for N 2 fixation. 15 N 2 -induced shift was consistent well with 15 N abundance in cell determined by isotope ratio mass spectroscopy. By applying this biomarker and Raman imaging, N 2 -fixing bacteria in both artificial and complex soil communities were discerned and imaged at the single-cell level. The linear band shift of Cyt c versus 15 N 2 percentage allowed quantification of N 2 fixation extent of diverse soil bacteria. This single-cell approach will advance the exploration of hitherto uncultured diazotrophs in diverse ecosystems.

  12. Application of a compact diode pumped solid-state laser source for quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortschanoff, Andreas; Baumgart, Marcus; Kroupa, Gerhard

    2017-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology holds the potential for onsite real-time measurements of steel products. However, for a mobile and robust LIBS measurement system, an adequate small and ruggedized laser source is a key requirement. In this contribution, we present tests with our compact high-power laser source, which, initially, was developed for ignition applications. The CTR HiPoLas® laser is a robust diode pumped solid-state laser with a passive Q-switch with dimensions of less than 10 cm3. The laser generates 2.5-ns pulses with 30 mJ at a maximum continuous repetition rate of about 30 Hz. Feasibility of LIBS experiments with the laser source was experimentally verified with steel samples. The results show that the laser with its current optical output parameters is very well-suited for LIBS measurements. We believe that the miniaturized laser presented here will enable very compact and robust portable high-performance LIBS systems.

  13. Development of a pump-probe facility with sub-picosecond time resolution combining a high-power ultraviolet regenerative FEL amplifier and a soft X-ray SASE FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faatz, B.; Fateev, A.A.; Feldhaus, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Pflueger, J.; Rossbach, J.; Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of a high power radiation source with laser-like characteristics in the ultraviolet spectral range at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF). The concept is based on the generation of radiation in a regenerative FEL amplifier (RAFEL). The RAFEL described in this paper covers a wavelength range of 200-400 nm and provides 200 fs pulses with 2 mJ of optical energy per pulse. The linac operates at 1% duty factor and the average output radiation power exceeds 100 W. The RAFEL will be driven by the spent electron beam leaving the soft X-ray FEL, thus providing minimal interference between these two devices. The RAFEL output radiation has the same time structure as the X-ray FEL and the UV pulses are naturally synchronized with the soft X-ray pulses from the TTF FEL. Therefore, it should be possible to achieve synchronization close to the duration of the radiation pulses (200 fs) for pump-probe techniques using either an UV pulse as a pump and soft X-ray pulse as a probe, or vice versa

  14. Exciton lifetime and spin dynamics in type-I In1−xAlxAs/Ga0.67Al0.33As quantum dots: Photoluminescence and pump-probe experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Daly, A.; Bernardot, F.; Barisien, T.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Maaref, M.A.; Testelin, C.

    2015-01-01

    The exciton lifetime and spin relaxation have been studied in self-assembled In 1−x Al x As/Ga 0.67 Al 0.33 As quantum dots (QDs). Time-resolved photoluminescence and resonant pump-probe measurements were performed, at variable temperature and for different QD aluminium compositions. At low temperature, a long exciton-spin relaxation time has been measured, in agreement with the QD zero-dimensional confinement and the quenching of the relaxation mechanisms. The existence of a quasi-2D regime, in sample with a high QD density, has been observed. The importance of thermally-activated processes toward excited states is also evidenced, for QDs with different compositions and sizes. - Highlights: • The exciton lifetime and spin relaxation have been studied in In 1−x Al x As/Ga 0.67 Al 0.33 As quantum dot (QD). • Time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) and pump-probe measurements were performed, at variable temperature and for different QD aluminium compositions. • From the PL decay time, several thermal activation processes, related to 0D or 2D regime, or dependending on collective mechanisms. • The importance of thermal activated processes toward excited states is also evidenced, for QD with different compositions and sizes

  15. Penis Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your appointment might be less involved. Choosing a penis pump Some penis pumps are available without a ... it doesn't get caught in the ring. Penis pumps for penis enlargement Many advertisements in magazines ...

  16. Reflectance-difference spectroscopy as an optical probe for in situ determination of doping levels in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martinez, A.; Lara-Velazquez, I.; Balderas-Navarro, R.E.; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guel-Sandoval, S.; Lastras-Martinez, L.F. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi, SLP 78000 (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    We report on in situ Reflectance Difference Spectroscopy measurements carried out on GaAs(001). Measurements were performed at temperatures of 580 C and 430 C, in both n and p-type doped films and for both (2 x 4) and c(4 x 4) reconstructions. Samples employed were grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy with doping levels in the range from 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. We demonstrate the potential of Reflectance Difference Spectroscopy for impurity level determinations under growth conditions. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Probing defect states in polycrystalline GaN grown on Si(111) by sub-bandgap laser-excited scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, F.-M.; Schnedler, M.; Portz, V.; Huang, Y.-C.; Huang, B.-C.; Shih, M.-C.; Chang, C.-W.; Tu, L.-W.; Eisele, H.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.; Chiu, Y.-P.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the potential of sub-bandgap laser-excited cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate the presence of defect states in semiconductors. The characterization method is illustrated on GaN layers grown on Si(111) substrates without intentional buffer layers. According to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, the GaN layers consist of nanoscale wurtzite and zincblende crystallites with varying crystal orientations and hence contain high defect state densities. In order to discriminate between band-to-band excitation and defect state excitations, we use sub-bandgap laser excitation. We probe a clear increase in the tunnel current at positive sample voltages during sub-bandgap laser illumination for the GaN layer with high defect density, but no effect is found for high quality GaN epitaxial layers. This demonstrates the excitation of free charge carriers at defect states. Thus, sub-bandgap laser-excited scanning tunneling spectroscopy is a powerful complimentary characterization tool for defect states.

  18. Probing the KII 3p54p fine structure by photoelectron spectroscopy of laser-excited potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M; Cubaynes, D; Wuilleumier, F J; Heinecke, E; Richter, T; Zimmermann, P; Strakhova, S I; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N

    2006-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra of atomic potassium excited by laser optical pumping into the 3p 6 4p 2 P 1/2 and 2 P 3/2 states are measured with high-energy resolution. The relative intensities of the 3p 5 4p fine-structure lines depend strongly on the initial excitation to one of the 4p spin-orbit components. Similar to the case of sodium, dynamically and quasiforbidden transitions are observed in the photoelectron spectra of potassium. The theoretical predictions of the generalized geometrical model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. (letter to the editor)

  19. Role of spontaneous emission through operating transition in probe-field spectroscopy of two-level systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saprykin, E. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Chernenko, A. A., E-mail: chernen@isp.nsc.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Shalagin, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Analytical and numerical investigations are carried out of the effect of spontaneous decay through operating transition on the shape of a resonance in the work of a probe field under a strong field applied to the transition. A narrow nonlinear resonance arising on transitions with long-living lower level in the work of a probe field can manifest itself in the form of a traditional minimum and a peak as a function of the first Einstein coefficient for the operating transition. The transformation of the resonance from a minimum to a peak is attributed to the specific character of relaxation of lower-level population beatings on a closed or almost closed transition (the decay of the upper level occurs completely or almost completely through the operating transition).

  20. An expanded genetic code for probing the role of electrostatics in enzyme catalysis by vibrational Stark spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völler, Jan-Stefan; Biava, Hernan; Hildebrandt, Peter; Budisa, Nediljko

    2017-11-01

    To find experimental validation for electrostatic interactions essential for catalytic reactions represents a challenge due to practical limitations in assessing electric fields within protein structures. This review examines the applications of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) as genetically encoded probes for studying the role of electrostatic interactions in enzyme catalysis. ncAAs constitute sensitive spectroscopic probes to detect local electric fields by exploiting the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and thus have the potential to map the protein electrostatics. Mapping the electrostatics in proteins will improve our understanding of natural catalytic processes and, in beyond, will be helpful for biocatalyst engineering. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biochemistry of Synthetic Biology - Recent Developments" Guest Editor: Dr. Ilka Heinemann and Dr. Patrick O'Donoghue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preferential adsorption of NH3 gas molecules on MWCNT defect sites probed using in situ Raman spectroscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chimowa, George

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The preferential adsorption of NH(sub3) gas molecules on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was studied using in situ Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that the full widths at half maximum of the G band and the intensity ratio I(sub2D...

  2. Quality management. Avoidance of mistakes for heating systems with heat pumps and geothermal probes. 2. ed.; Qualitaetsmanagement. Fehlervermeidung bei Waermepumpen- und Erdsonden-Heizsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    The design and construction of geothermal probes require an extensive knowledge and a wealth of experience. The brochure under consideration formulates qualitative requirements for the construction of geothermal probes. Only a transparent assessment and implementation leads to an overall system with an enhanced quality and efficiency. The brochure describes the current state of knowledge for the construction of boreholes in Baden-Wuerttemberg. Mainly those trades and scopes are considered which directly or indirectly affect the quality of groundwater. It addressed all those scopes which are affected in the construction of a geothermal probe. In order to minimize errors in the planning as far as the implementation and acceptance of borehole heat exchangers, advices and recommendations to the drilling, backfill materials and heat sources are given.

  3. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and cavity ring-down (CRD) absorption spectroscopy of oil-contaminated jet fuel using fiber-optic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Hengameh; Barnes, Jack A; Dudelzak, Alexander E; Loock, Hans-Peter; Waechter, Helen

    2012-06-21

    Excitation emission matrix (EEM) and cavity ring-down (CRD) spectral signatures have been used to detect and quantitatively assess contamination of jet fuels with aero-turbine lubricating oil. The EEM spectrometer has been fiber-coupled to permit in situ measurements of jet turbine oil contamination of jet fuel. Parallel Factor (PARAFAC) analysis as well as Principal Component Analysis and Regression (PCA/PCR) were used to quantify oil contamination in a range from the limit of detection (10 ppm) to 1000 ppm. Fiber-loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy using a pulsed 355 nm laser was used to quantify the oil contamination in the range of 400 ppm to 100,000 ppm. Both methods in combination therefore permit the detection of oil contamination with a linear dynamic range of about 10,000.

  4. Photoluminescence spectroscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy probe of alloying and annealing effects in nonpolar m-plane ZnMgO thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, A. L.; Song, H. P.; Liang, D. C.; Wei, H. Y.; Liu, X. L.; Jin, P.; Qin, X. B.; Yang, S. Y.; Zhu, Q. S.; Wang, Z. G.

    2010-04-01

    Temperature-dependent photoluminescence characteristics of non-polar m-plane ZnO and ZnMgO alloy films grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been studied. The enhancement in emission intensity caused by localized excitons in m-plane ZnMgO alloy films was directly observed and it can be further improved after annealing in nitrogen. The concentration of Zn vacancies in the films was increased by alloying with Mg, which was detected by positron annihilation spectroscopy. This result is very important to directly explain why undoped Zn1-xMgxO thin films can show p-type conduction by controlling Mg content, as discussed by Li et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 232115 (2007)].

  5. Band structure of TiO sub 2 -doped yttria-stabilized zirconia probed by soft-x-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Higuchi, T; Kobayashi, K; Yamaguchi, S; Fukushima, A; Shin, S

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of TiO sub 2 -doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been studied by soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The valence band is mainly composed of the O 2p state. The O 1s XAS spectrum exhibits the existence of the Ti 3d unoccupied state under the Zr 4d conduction band. The intensity of the Ti 3d unoccupied state increases with increasing TiO sub 2 concentration. The energy separation between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the Ti 3d unoccupied state is in accord with the energy gap, as expected from dc-polarization and total conductivity measurements. (author)

  6. Electronic structure of ferromagnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs probed by sub-gap magneto-optical spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Acbas, G.; Kim, M. -H.; Cukr, M.; Novak, V.; Scarpulla, M. A.; Dubon, O. D.; Jungwirth, T.; Sinova, Jairo; Cerne, J.

    2009-01-01

    We employ Faraday and Kerr effect spectroscopy in the infrared range to investigate the electronic structure of Ga1-xMnxAs near the Fermi energy. The band structure of this archetypical dilute-moment ferromagnetic semiconductor has been a matter of controversy, fueled partly by previous measurements of the unpolarized infrared absorption and their phenomenological impurity-band interpretation. The infrared magneto-optical effects we study arise directly from the spin-splitting of the carrier ...

  7. Ultrafast optical responses of {beta}-carotene and lycopene probed by sub-20-fs time-resolved coherent spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M.; Sugisaki, M. [CREST-JST and Department of Physics, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Gall, A.; Robert, B. [CEA, Institut de Biologie et Technologies de Saclay, and CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Cogdell, R.J. [IBLS, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hashimoto, H., E-mail: hassy@sci.osaka-cu.ac.j [CREST-JST and Department of Physics, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    We investigate how structural distortions in carotenoid cause decoherences of its high-frequency vibrational modes by applying the sub-20-fs time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy to {beta}-carotene and lycopene. The results indicate that the C=C central stretching mode shows significant loss of coherence under the effects of the steric hindrance between {beta}-ionone ring and polyene backbone, whereas the other high-frequency modes do not show such dependency on the structural distortions.

  8. Ultrafast optical responses of β-carotene and lycopene probed by sub-20-fs time-resolved coherent spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, M.; Sugisaki, M.; Gall, A.; Robert, B.; Cogdell, R.J.; Hashimoto, H.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate how structural distortions in carotenoid cause decoherences of its high-frequency vibrational modes by applying the sub-20-fs time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy to β-carotene and lycopene. The results indicate that the C=C central stretching mode shows significant loss of coherence under the effects of the steric hindrance between β-ionone ring and polyene backbone, whereas the other high-frequency modes do not show such dependency on the structural distortions.

  9. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS Tracking of Chelerythrine, a Na+/K+ Pump Inhibitor, into Cytosol and Plasma Membrane Fractions of Human Lens Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Dorney

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The quaternary benzo-phenanthridine alkaloid (QBA chelerythrine (CET is a pro-apoptotic drug and Na+/K+ pump (NKP inhibitor in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs. In order to obtain further insight into the mechanism of NKP inhibition by CET, its sub-cellular distribution was quantified in cytosolic and membrane fractions of HLEC cultures by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS. Methods: Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs prepared by the Creighton method were concentrated, and size-selected using a one-step tangential flow filtration approach. HLECs cultures were exposed to 50 μM CET in 300 mOsM phosphate-buffered NaCl for 30 min. A variety of cytosolic extracts, crude and purified membranes, prepared in lysing solutions in the presence and absence of a non-ionic detergent, were incubated with AgNPs and subjected to SERS analysis. Determinations of CET were based on a linear calibration plot of the integrated CET SERS intensity at its 659 cm-1 marker band as a function of CET concentration. Results: SERS detected chemically unaltered CET in both cytosol and plasma membrane fractions. Normalized for protein, the CET content was some 100 fold higher in the crude and purified plasma membrane fraction than in the soluble cytosolic extract. The total free CET concentration in the cytosol, free of membranes or containing detergent-solubilized membrane material, approached that of the incubation medium of HLECs. Conclusion: Given a negative membrane potential of HLECs the data suggest, but do not prove, that CET may traverse the plasma membrane as a positively charged monomer (CET+ accumulating near or above passive equilibrium distribution. These findings may contribute to a recently proposed hypothesis that CET binds to and inhibits the NKP through its cytosolic aspect.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tracking of chelerythrine, a Na(+)/K(+) pump inhibitor, into cytosol and plasma membrane fractions of human lens epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Kevin M; Sizemore, Ioana E P; Alqahtani, Tariq; Adragna, Norma C; Lauf, Peter K

    2013-01-01

    The quaternary benzo-phenanthridine alkaloid (QBA) chelerythrine (CET) is a pro-apoptotic drug and Na(+)/K(+) pump (NKP) inhibitor in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs). In order to obtain further insight into the mechanism of NKP inhibition by CET, its sub-cellular distribution was quantified in cytosolic and membrane fractions of HLEC cultures by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) prepared by the Creighton method were concentrated, and size-selected using a one-step tangential flow filtration approach. HLECs cultures were exposed to 50 μM CET in 300 mOsM phosphate-buffered NaCl for 30 min. A variety of cytosolic extracts, crude and purified membranes, prepared in lysing solutions in the presence and absence of a non-ionic detergent, were incubated with AgNPs and subjected to SERS analysis. Determinations of CET were based on a linear calibration plot of the integrated CET SERS intensity at its 659 cm(-1) marker band as a function of CET concentration. SERS detected chemically unaltered CET in both cytosol and plasma membrane fractions. Normalized for protein, the CET content was some 100 fold higher in the crude and purified plasma membrane fraction than in the soluble cytosolic extract. The total free CET concentration in the cytosol, free of membranes or containing detergent-solubilized membrane material, approached that of the incubation medium of HLECs. Given a negative membrane potential of HLECs the data suggest, but do not prove, that CET may traverse the plasma membrane as a positively charged monomer (CET(+)) accumulating near or above passive equilibrium distribution. These findings may contribute to a recently proposed hypothesis that CET binds to and inhibits the NKP through its cytosolic aspect. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Probing interfacial characteristics of rubrene/pentacene and pentacene/rubrene bilayers with soft X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, J H; Pedersen, T M; Chang, G S; Moewes, A; Yoo, K-H; Cho, S J; Whang, C N

    2007-08-16

    The electronic structure of rubrene/pentacene and pentacene/rubrene bilayers has been investigated using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy, and density-functional theory calculations. X-ray absorption and emission measurements reveal that it has been possible to alter the lowest unoccupied and the highest occupied molecular orbital states of rubrene in rubrene/pentacene bilayer. In the reverse case, one gets p* molecular orbital states originating from the pentacene layer. Resonant X-ray emission spectra suggest a reduction in the hole-transition probabilities for the pentacene/rubrene bilayer in comparison to reference pentacene layer. For the rubrenepentacene structure, the hole-transition probability shows an increase in comparison to the rubrene reference. We also determined the energy level alignment of the pentacene-rubrene interface by using X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. From these comparisons, it is found that the electronic structure of the pentacene-rubrene interface has a strong dependence on interface characteristics which depends on the order of the layers used.

  12. Edge harmonic oscillations at the density pedestal in the H-mode discharges in CHS Heliotron measured using beam emission spectroscopy and magnetic probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kado, S. [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)]. E-mail: kado@q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Oishi, T. [School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Yoshinuma, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ida, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Takeuchi, M. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Akiyama, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Minami, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nagaoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Shimizu, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Okamura, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Tanaka, S. [School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Edge harmonic oscillations (EHO) offer the potential to relax the H-mode pedestal in a tokamak, thus avoiding edge localised modes (ELM). The mode structure of the EHO in CHS was investigated using a poloidal array of beam emission spectroscopy (BES) and a magnetic probe array. The EHO exhibited a peculiar characteristic in which the first, second and third harmonics show the same wavenumber, suggesting that the propagation velocities are different. Change in the phase of higher harmonics at the time when that of the first harmonic is zero can be described as a variation along the (m, n) = (-2, 1) mode structure, though the EHO lies on the {iota} = 1 surface. This behavior leads to an oscillation that exhibits periodic dependence of shape on spatial position.

  13. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Golberg, D., E-mail: xuzhi@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3058577 (Japan); Xu, Z., E-mail: xuzhi@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Kvashnin, D. G. [National University of Science and Technology, MISIS, Leninskiy Prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y. [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Sorokin, P. B. [National University of Science and Technology, MISIS, Leninskiy Prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutsky Lane 9, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-31

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  14. Growth and structure of water on SiO2 films on Si investigated byKelvin probe microscopy and in situ X-ray Spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdaguer, A.; Weis, C.; Oncins, G.; Ketteler, G.; Bluhm, H.; Salmeron, M.

    2007-06-14

    The growth of water on thin SiO{sub 2} films on Si wafers at vapor pressures between 1.5 and 4 torr and temperatures between -10 and 21 C has been studied in situ using Kelvin Probe Microscopy and X-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopies. From 0 to 75% relative humidity (RH) water adsorbs forming a uniform film 4-5 layers thick. The surface potential increases in that RH range by about 400 mV and remains constant upon further increase of the RH. Above 75% RH the water film grows rapidly, reaching 6-7 monolayers at around 90% RH and forming a macroscopic drop near 100%. The O K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption spectrum around 75% RH is similar to that of liquid water (imperfect H-bonding coordination) at temperatures above 0 C and ice-like below 0 C.

  15. Probing electronic and vibrational properties at the electrochemical interface using SFG spectroscopy: Methanol electro-oxidation on Pt(1 1 0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, F.; Busson, B.; Tadjeddine, A.

    2005-02-01

    We report the study of methanol electro-oxidation on Pt(1 1 0) using infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The use of this technique enables to probe the vibrational and electronic properties of the interface simultaneously in situ. We have investigated the vibrational properties of the interface in the CO ads internal stretch spectral region (1700-2150 cm -1) over a wide range of potentials. The analysis of the evolution of the C-O stretch line shape, which is related to the interference between the vibrational and electronic parts of the non-linear response, with the potential allows us to show that the onset of bulk methanol oxidation corresponds to the transition from a negatively to a positively charged surface.

  16. Electronic structure of Pt-Co cathode catalysts in membrane electrolyte assembly observed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy with different probing depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Hidai, S.; Niwa, H.; Harada, Y.; Oshima, M.; Ofuchi, H.; Nakamori, Y.; Aoki, T.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic structures of Pt-Co cathode and Pt-Ru anode catalysts in membrane electrolyte assemblies (MEAs) for polymer electrolyte fuel cell have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and the changes of electronic structures accompanied with degradation have been observed by comparison between spectra obtained by fluorescence-yield (FY) and conversion-electron-yield (CEY) methods, probing depths of which are several hundreds μm and ∼100 nm, respectively. The Co K XANES spectra of the as-fabricated MEA show that the Co atoms in the cathode are metallic and oxidized Co ions exist at the interface between the cathode and electrolyte. The spectra of the long-time operated MEA suggest that the oxidation of Co makes progress with degradation of the cathode catalysts. In contrast to the Co K XANES spectra, the line shape of the Ru K XANES spectra is unchanged even after the long-time operation.

  17. Centrifugal pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, HH

    1981-01-01

    Centrifugal Pumps describes the whole range of the centrifugal pump (mixed flow and axial flow pumps are dealt with more briefly), with emphasis on the development of the boiler feed pump. Organized into 46 chapters, this book discusses the general hydrodynamic principles, performance, dimensions, type number, flow, and efficiency of centrifugal pumps. This text also explains the pumps performance; entry conditions and cavitation; speed and dimensions for a given duty; and losses. Some chapters further describe centrifugal pump mechanical design, installation, monitoring, and maintenance. The

  18. Determination of Schottky barrier heights and Fermi-level unpinning at the graphene/n-type Si interfaces by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Kelvin probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yow-Jon; Zeng, Jian-Jhou

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The interface characteristics of graphene/n-type Si devices are measured. • The actual work function of graphene is examined with the Kelvin probe. • An analysis is conducted according to the Schottky–Mott limit. • The Fermi energy level at the graphene/n-type Si interfaces is unpinned. • The Schottky barrier value is dependent on the work function of graphene. - Abstract: The interface characteristics of graphene/n-type Si samples using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are investigated. XPS makes it possible to extract a reliable Schottky barrier value. For graphene/n-type Si samples with (without) sulfide treatment, the Schottky barrier height is 0.86 (0.78) eV. The Schottky barrier height was increased from 0.78 to 0.86 eV, indicating that sulfide treatment is effective in passivating the surface of Si (owing to the formation of Si–S bonds). To determine the Fermi-level pinning/unpinning at the graphene/n-type Si interfaces with sulfide treatment, an analysis is conducted according to the Schottky–Mott limit and the actual work function of graphene is examined with the Kelvin probe. It is shown that the Fermi energy level is unpinned and the Schottky barrier value is dependent on the work function of graphene. Investigation of graphene/n-type Si interfaces is important, and providing the other technique for surface potential control is possible

  19. Monitoring uranium, hydrogen, and lithium and their isotopes using a compact laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) probe and high-resolution spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, David A; Beddingfield, Alan; Smithwick, Robert; Chinni, Rosemarie C; Jones, C Randy; Beardsley, Burt; Karch, Larry

    2012-03-01

    The development of field-deployable instruments to monitor radiological, nuclear, and explosive (RNE) threats is of current interest for a number of assessment needs such as the on-site screening of suspect facilities and nuclear forensics. The presence of uranium and plutonium and radiological materials can be determined through monitoring the elemental emission spectrum using relatively low-resolution spectrometers. In addition, uranium compounds, explosives, and chemicals used in nuclear fuel processing (e.g., tributyl-phosphate) can be identified by applying chemometric analysis to the laser-induced breakdown (LIBS) spectrum recorded by these spectrometers. For nuclear forensic applications, however, isotopes of U and Pu and other elements (e.g., H and Li) must also be determined, requiring higher resolution spectrometers given the small magnitude of the isotope shifts for some of these elements (e.g., 25 pm for U and 13 pm for Pu). High-resolution spectrometers will be preferred for several reasons but these must fit into realistic field-based analysis scenarios. To address the need for field instrumentation, we evaluated a previously developed field-deployable hand-held LIBS interrogation probe combined with two relatively new high-resolution spectrometers (λ/Δλ ~75,000 and ~44,000) that have the potential to meet field-based analysis needs. These spectrometers are significantly smaller and lighter in weight than those previously used for isotopic analysis and one unit can provide simultaneous wide spectral coverage and high resolution in a relatively small package. The LIBS interrogation probe was developed initially for use with low resolution compact spectrometers in a person-portable backpack LIBS instrument. Here we present the results of an evaluation of the LIBS probe combined with a high-resolution spectrometer and demonstrate rapid detection of isotopes of uranium and hydrogen and highly enriched samples of (6)Li and (7)Li. © 2012 Society for

  20. Probing the Vibrational Spectroscopy of the Deprotonated Thymine Radical by Photodetachment and State-Selective Autodetachment Photoelectron Spectroscopy via Dipole-Bound States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dao-Ling; Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonated thymine can exist in two different forms, depending on which of its two N sites is deprotonated: N1[T-H]^- or N3[T-H]^-. Here we report a photodetachment study of the N1[T-H]^- isomer cooled in a cryogenic ion trap and the observation of an excited dipole-bound state. Eighteen vibrational levels of the dipole-bound state are observed, and its vibrational ground state is found to be 238 ± 5 wn below the detachment threshold of N1[T-H]^-. The electron affinity of the deprotonated thymine radical (N1[T-H]^.) is measured accruately to be 26 322 ± 5 wn (3.2635 ± 0.0006 eV). By tuning the detachment laser to the sixteen vibrational levels of the dipole-bound state that are above the detachment threshold, highly non-Franck-Condon resonant-enhanced photoelectron spectra are obtained due to state- and mode-selective vibrational autodetachment. Much richer vibrational information is obtained for the deprotonated thymine radical from the photodetachment and resonant-enhanced photoelectron spectroscopy. Eleven fundamental vibrational frequencies in the low-frequency regime are obtained for the N1[T-H]^. radical, including the two lowest-frequency internal rotational modes of the methyl group at 70 ± 8 wn and 92 ± 5 wn. D. L. Huang, H. T. Liu, C. G. Ning, G. Z. Zhu and L. S. Wang, Chem. Sci., 6, 3129-3138 (2015)

  1. Conformational study of sarcosine as probed by matrix-isolation FT-IR spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea; Fausto, R.

    2003-01-01

    Sarcosine (N-methylglycine) has been studied by matrix-isolation FT-IR spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations undertaken at the DFT/B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory with the 6-311++G(d, p) and 6-31++G(d, p) basis set, respectively. Eleven different conformers were located in the potential energy surface (PES) of sarcosine, with the ASC conformer being the ground conformational state. This form is analogous to the glycine most stable conformer and is characterized by a NH...O= intramole...

  2. Combination of high-performance refractometry and infrared spectroscopy as a probe for chemically induced gelation and vitrification of epoxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U; Philipp, M; Gervais, P-C; Sanctuary, R; Krueger, J K; Possart, W; Wehlack, C; Kieffer, J

    2010-01-01

    A combination of infrared spectroscopy and high-performance refractometry was used to investigate the chemically induced sol-gel and glass transition during the polymerization of epoxies. Representations of the refractive index versus chemical conversion reveal an interesting insight into the optical properties accompanying gelation and vitrification. Whereas the electronic polarizability of the liquid state of small average molecular mass and the glassy state is dominated by the mass density, an unexpected excess polarizability observed during the gelation is attributed to cooperative dipole-dipole interactions.

  3. Combination of high-performance refractometry and infrared spectroscopy as a probe for chemically induced gelation and vitrification of epoxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, U; Philipp, M; Gervais, P-C; Sanctuary, R; Krueger, J K [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Universite du Luxembourg, 162A avenue de la faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Possart, W; Wehlack, C [Fachbereich Werkstoffwissenschaften, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Kieffer, J, E-mail: ulrich.mueller@uni.l [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-08-15

    A combination of infrared spectroscopy and high-performance refractometry was used to investigate the chemically induced sol-gel and glass transition during the polymerization of epoxies. Representations of the refractive index versus chemical conversion reveal an interesting insight into the optical properties accompanying gelation and vitrification. Whereas the electronic polarizability of the liquid state of small average molecular mass and the glassy state is dominated by the mass density, an unexpected excess polarizability observed during the gelation is attributed to cooperative dipole-dipole interactions.

  4. Deciphering excited state evolution in halorhodopsin with stimulated emission pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bismuth, Oshrat; Komm, Pavel; Friedman, Noga; Eliash, Tamar; Sheves, Mordechai; Ruhman, Sanford

    2010-03-04

    The primary photochemical dynamics of Hb. pharaonis Halorhodopsin (pHR) are investigated by femtosecond visible pump-near IR dump-hyperspectral probe spectroscopy. The efficiency of excited state depletion is deduced from transient changes in absorption, recorded with and without stimulated emission pumping (SEP), as a function of the dump delay. The concomitant reduction of photocycle population is assessed by probing the "K" intermediate difference spectrum. Results show that the cross section for stimulating emission is nearly constant throughout the fluorescent state lifetime. Probing "K" demonstrates that dumping produces a proportionate reduction in photocycle yields. We conclude that, despite its nonexponential internal conversion (IC) kinetics, the fluorescent state in pHR constitutes a single intermediate in the photocycle. This contrasts with conclusions drawn from the study of primary events in the related chloride pump from Hb. salinarum (sHR), believed to produce the "K" intermediate from a distinct short-lived subpopulation in the excited state. Our discoveries concerning internal conversion dynamics in pHR are discussed in light of recent expectations for similar excited state dynamics in both proteins.

  5. Growth of block copolymer stabilized metal nanoparticles probed simultaneously by in situ XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, D; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-01-01

    The growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles from their respective chloride precursors using block copolymer-based reducers has been studied by simultaneous in situ measurement of XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy at the energy-dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS at RRCAT, Indore, India. While the XANES spectra of the precursor give real-time information on the reduction process, the EXAFS spectra reveal the structure of the clusters formed at the intermediate stages of growth. The growth kinetics of both types of nanoparticles are found to be almost similar and are found to follow three stages, though the first stage of nucleation takes place earlier in the case of Au than in the case of Pt nanoparticles due to the difference in the reduction potential of the respective precursors. The first two stages of the growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles as obtained by in situ XAS measurements could be corroborated by simultaneous in situ measurement of UV-Vis spectroscopy also.

  6. Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Oberg, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Beye, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Dell' Angela, M. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Turner, J. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gladh, J. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ng, M. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sellberg, J. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Kaya, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mercurio, G. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Hieke, F. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Nordlund, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Schlotter, W. F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dakovski, G. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Minitti, M. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fohlisch, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Univ. Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Wolf, M. [Fritz-Haber Institute of the Max-Planck-Society, Berlin (Germany); Wurth, W. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY Photon Science, Hamburg (Germany); Ogasawara, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Norskov, J. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Ostrom, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, L. G. M. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ablid-Pedersen, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-04-16

    We show that coadsorbed oxygen atoms have a dramatic influence on the CO desorption dynamics from Ru(0001). In contrast to the precursor-mediated desorption mechanism on Ru(0001), the presence of surface oxygen modifies the electronic structure of Ru atoms such that CO desorption occurs predominantly via the direct pathway. This phenomenon is directly observed in an ultrafast pump-probe experiment using a soft x-ray free-electron laser to monitor the dynamic evolution of the valence electronic structure of the surface species. This is supported with the potential of mean force along the CO desorption path obtained from density-functional theory calculations. Charge density distribution and frozen-orbital analysis suggest that the oxygen-induced reduction of the Pauli repulsion, and consequent increase of the dative interaction between the CO 5σ and the charged Ru atom, is the electronic origin of the distinct desorption dynamics. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of CO desorption from Ru(0001) and oxygen-coadsorbed Ru(0001) provide further insights into the surface bond-breaking process.

  7. Band Transport and Trapping in Didodecyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene Probed by Terahertz Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Thomas R; Wimmer, Andreas; Schweicher, Guillaume; Chattopadhyay, Basab; Geerts, Yves H; Kersting, Roland

    2017-11-02

    Terahertz electromodulation spectroscopy provides insight into the material-inherent transport properties of charge carriers in organic semiconductors. Experiments on didodecyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C 12 -BTBT-C 12 ) devices yield for holes an intraband mobility of 9 cm 2 V -1 s -1 . The short duration of the THz pulses advances the understanding of the hole transport on the molecular scale. The efficient screening of Coulomb potentials leads to a collective response of the hole gas to external fields, which can be well described by the Drude model. Bias stress of the devices generates deep traps that capture mobile holes. Although the resulting polarization across the device hinders the injection of mobile holes, the hole mobilities are not affected.

  8. Band Alignment in MoS2/WS2 Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Heterostructures Probed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Heather M; Rigosi, Albert F; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Flynn, George W; Heinz, Tony F

    2016-08-10

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we examine the electronic structure of transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures (TMDCHs) composed of monolayers of MoS2 and WS2. STS data are obtained for heterostructures of varying stacking configuration as well as the individual monolayers. Analysis of the tunneling spectra includes the influence of finite sample temperature, yield information about the quasi-particle bandgaps, and the band alignment of MoS2 and WS2. We report the band gaps of MoS2 (2.16 ± 0.04 eV) and WS2 (2.38 ± 0.06 eV) in the materials as measured on the heterostructure regions and the general type II band alignment for the heterostructure, which shows an interfacial band gap of 1.45 ± 0.06 eV.

  9. Mechanical Anisotropy and Pressure Induced Structural Changes in Piroxicam Crystals Probed by In Situ Indentation and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimunda, Praveena; Hintsala, Eric; Asif, Syed; Mishra, Manish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The ability to correlate mechanical and chemical characterization techniques in real time is both lacking and powerful tool for gaining insights into material behavior. This is demonstrated through use of a novel nanoindentation device equipped with Raman spectroscopy to explore the deformation-induced structural changes in piroxicam crystals. Mechanical anisotropy was observed in two major faces ( 0bar{1}1 ) and (011), which are correlated to changes in the interlayer interaction from in situ Raman spectra recorded during indentation. The results of this study demonstrate the considerable potential of an in situ Raman nanoindentation instrument for studying a variety of topics, including stress-induced phase transformation mechanisms, mechanochemistry, and solid state reactivity under mechanical forces that occur in molecular and pharmaceutical solids.

  10. Laser spectroscopy of cadmium isotopes: probing the nuclear structure between the neutron 50 and 82 shell closures

    CERN Multimedia

    Blaum, K; Stroke, H H; Krieger, A R

    We propose to study the isotopic chain of cadmium with high-resolution laser spectroscopy for the first time. Our goal is to determine nuclear spins, moments and root-mean-square charge radii of ground and isomeric states between the neutron 50 and 82 shell closures, contributing decisively to a better understanding of the nuclear structure in the vicinity of the doubly-magic $^{100}$Sn and $^{132}$Sn. On the neutron-rich side this is expected to shed light on a shell-quenching hypothesis and consequently on the duration of the r-process along the waiting-point nuclei below $^{130}$Cd. On the neutron-deficient side it may elucidate the role of the cadmium isotopes in the rp-process for rapidly accreting neutron stars.

  11. Phonon spectrum of single-crystalline FeSe probed by high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Khalil; Engelhardt, Tobias; Le Tacon, Matthieu; Wolf, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    Utilizing high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) we measure the phonon frequencies of β-FeSe(001), cleaved under ultra-high vacuum conditions. At the zone center (Γ bar-point) three prominent loss features are observed at loss energies of about ≃ 20.5 and 25.6 and 40 meV. Based on the scattering selection rules we assign the observed loss features to the A1g, B1g, and A2u phonon modes of β-FeSe(001). The experimentally measured phonon frequencies do not agree with the results of density functional based calculations in which a nonmagnetic, a checkerboard or a strip antiferromagnetic order is assumed for β-FeSe(001). Our measurements suggest that, similar to the other Fe-based materials, magnetism has a profound impact on the lattice dynamics of β-FeSe(001).

  12. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy as an experimental probe for S-nitroso proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, Robert K.; Schwab, David E.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the sulfur K-edge (2.4-2.6 keV) provides a sensitive and specific technique to identify S-nitroso compounds, which have significance in nitric oxide-based cell signaling. Unique spectral features clearly distinguish the S-nitroso-form of a cysteine residue from the sulfhydryl-form or from a methionine thioether. Comparison of the sulfur K-edge spectra of thiolate, thiol, thioether, and S-nitroso thiolate compounds indicates high sensitivity of energy positions and intensities of XAS pre-edge features as determined by the electronic environment of the sulfur absorber. A new experimental setup is being developed for reaching the in vivo concentration range of S-nitroso thiol levels in biological samples

  13. Unoccupied electronic state of delafossite-type PdCoO2 single crystal probed using inverse photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Tohru; Tsukamoto, Takeyo; Hasegawa, Masashi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Takei, Humihiko; Shin, Shik

    2004-01-01

    The unoccupied electronic state of delafossite-type PdCoO 2 has been studied using inverse-photoemission spectroscopy (IPES). The Fermi edge and the unoccupied density-of-state (DOS) at the Fermi level (E F ) are not observed in the IPES spectrum measured at the incidence electron energy (E K ) of 100 eV, which corresponds to the Cooper minimum of Pd 4d. The finite DOS at E F is observed in the IPES spectra measured at the lower E K , which the ionization cross section of Pd 4d increases. These findings indicate that the Pd 4d electron is closely related to the low electrical resistivity of PdCoO 2 . (author)

  14. Magneto-structural coupling and harmonic lattice dynamics in CaFe2As2 probed by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhiwei; Ma Xiaoming; Pang Hua; Li Fashen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed Moessbauer spectroscopy study of the structural and magnetic properties of the undoped parent compound CaFe 2 As 2 single crystal. By fitting the temperature dependence of the hyperfine magnetic field we show that the magneto-structural phase transition is clearly first order in nature and we also deduce the compressibility of our sample to be 1.67 x 10 -2 GPa -1 . Within Landau's theory of phase transition, we further argue that the observed phase transition may stem from the strong magneto-structural coupling effect. The temperature dependence of the Lamb-Moessbauer factor shows that the paramagnetic phase and the antiferromagnetic phase exhibit similar lattice dynamics in high-frequency modes with very close Debye temperatures, Θ D ∼ 270 K.

  15. Vacuum pump age effects by the exposure to the corrosive gases on the Cr etch rate as observed using optical emission spectroscopy in an Ar/O{sub 2}/Cl{sub 2} mixed plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seolhye; Roh, Hyun-Joon; Jang, Yunchang; Jeong, Sangmin; Ryu, Sangwon; Choe, Jae-Myung; Kim, Gon-Ho, E-mail: ghkim@snu.ac.kr

    2016-03-31

    Vacuum pumps of different ages were used to prepare Cl{sub 2} based plasmas for use in Cr etching. The effects of the vacuum pump age on the etching results were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy analysis. The composition of gas at the base pressure was mainly nitrogen and oxygen, although the ratio depended on the vacuum pump age and therefore, modulated the etch rate in a manner that was difficult to monitor. The effects of the pump age on the etch rate were clearly observed in the Cl{sub 2} plasma-assisted chromium film etching process, in which oxygen and chlorine radicals were responsible for the etching process. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF), which provided a proxy for the thermal equilibrium properties of the etching plasmas, was monitored. The shape of EEDF was derived from an analysis of the optical emission spectral data using an analysis model described previously. Because molecular nitrogen has a higher threshold energy and a larger cross-section of inelastic collisional processes than oxygen, the tail of the EEDF depends on the mixing ratio between nitrogen and oxygen. The various mechanisms that contribute to the chromium etch rate varied with subtle differences in the vacuum conditions, which were determined by age of the turbo molecular pump. The rates at which oxygen and chlorine radicals were generated were estimated using the measured EEDF, and the estimated oxygen radical and etching product contents were verified by comparing the residual gas analyzer data. The results revealed that the residual nitrogen partial pressures in two etchers equipped with either a new or an aged pump differed by 0.18%, and the EEDF tail areas differed by 10{sup −4}. Importantly, the chromium etch rates in these two instruments differed by 30%. These results suggest that the chamber-to-chamber mismatch should be monitored during plasma-assisted device fabrication processes. - Highlights: • We observed the vacuum pump age effect

  16. Probing the Kinetic Anabolism of Poly-Beta-Hydroxybutyrate in Cupriavidus necator H16 Using Single-Cell Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanhua Tao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB can be formed in large amounts in Cupriavidus necator and is important for the industrial production of biodegradable plastics. In this investigation, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS was used to characterize dynamic changes in PHB content—as well as in the contents of other common biomolecule—in C. necator during batch growth at both the population and single-cell levels. PHB accumulation began in the early stages of bacterial growth, and the maximum PHB production rate occurred in the early and middle exponential phases. The active biosynthesis of DNA, RNA, and proteins occurred in the lag and early exponential phases, whereas the levels of these molecules decreased continuously during the remaining fermentation process until the minimum values were reached. The PHB content inside single cells was relatively homogenous in the middle stage of fermentation; during the late growth stage, the variation in PHB levels between cells increased. In addition, bacterial cells in various growth phases could be clearly discriminated when principle component analysis was performed on the spectral data. These results suggest that LTRS is a valuable single-cell analysis tool that can provide more comprehensive information about the physiological state of a growing microbial population.

  17. Acid-base equilibrium dynamics in methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide probed by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chiho; Son, Hyewon; Park, Sungnam

    2015-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy, which has been proven to be an excellent experimental method for studying thermally-driven chemical processes, was successfully used to investigate the acid dissociation equilibrium of HN3 in methanol (CH3OH) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for the first time. Our 2DIR experimental results indicate that the acid-base equilibrium occurs on picosecond timescales in CH3OH but that it occurs on much longer timescales in DMSO. Our results imply that the different timescales of the acid-base equilibrium originate from different proton transfer mechanisms between the acidic (HN3) and basic (N3(-)) species in CH3OH and DMSO. In CH3OH, the acid-base equilibrium is assisted by the surrounding CH3OH molecules which can directly donate H(+) to N3(-) and accept H(+) from HN3 and the proton migrates through the hydrogen-bonded chain of CH3OH. On the other hand, the acid-base equilibrium in DMSO occurs through the mutual diffusion of HN3 and N3(-) or direct proton transfer. Our 2DIR experimental results corroborate different proton transfer mechanisms in the acid-base equilibrium in protic (CH3OH) and aprotic (DMSO) solvents.

  18. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  19. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S. [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  20. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex

  1. Magnetic properties of some selected, soil-related iron oxides and oxyhydroxides as probed by 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrave, E.; Vandenberghe, R.E.; Bowen, L.H.

    1990-01-01

    In the last decade, Mossbauer spectroscopy has become an increasingly important and applied analytical tool for the characterization of environmental Fe-containing material. One of the most fastly growing application area of this technique is undoubtedly that of soils and sediments. Since such systems are commonly complex mixtures of various and mostly poorly crystalline compounds, much emphasis has been displayed towards the Mossbauer spectra of the pure constituents which, in the case of oxides and oxyhydroxides, usually concern well characterized synthetic samples. Many excellent and fairly complete review papers in that respect have been published in the recent literature and it is not the aim of the present authors to come up with still another one covering the same period. Only those results reported since 1985 and which have provided basically new insight concerning structural and/or magnetic properties have been selected. In addition, it has been attempted to collect some of the less-frequently dealt-with magnetic characteristics which more often have a fundamental importance rather than an analytical one, and which are therefore at the moment less-directly related and restricted to soil studies. A particular aspect that has received considerable attention in this paper is the effect on the Mossbauer spectra of the application of strong magnetic fields

  2. Probing the Behaviors of Gold Nanorods in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Based on UV-vis-NIR Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqi; Ji, Yinglu; Meng, Jie; Wu, Xiaochun; Xu, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    In this work, behaviors of positively-charged AuNRs in a highly metastatic tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 are examined based on UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dark-field microscopic observation. It is found that characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks of AuNRs can be detected using spectroscopic method within living cells that have taken up AuNRs. The peak area of transverse SPR band is shown to be proportionally related to the amount of AuNRs in the cells determined with ICP-MS, which suggests a facile and real time quantification method for AuNRs in living cells. The shape of longitudinal SPR band in UV-vis-NIR spectrum reflects the aggregation state of AuNRs in the cells during the incubation period, which is proved by TEM and microscopic observations. Experimental results reveal that AuNRs are internalized by the cells rapidly; the accumulation, distribution and aggregation of AuNRs in the cells compartments are time and dose dependent. The established spectroscopic analysis method can not only monitor the behaviors of AuNRs in living cells but may also be helpful in choosing the optimum laser stimulation wavelength for anti-tumor thermotherapy. PMID:22384113

  3. Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) as a probe of macromolecule adsorption kinetics at functionalized interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Michael A; de Cuendias, Anne; Gayet, Florence; Shirley, Ian M; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Haddleton, David M; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-05-01

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) has been employed to study the interfacial adsorption kinetics of coumarin-tagged macromolecules onto a range of functionalized planar surfaces. Such studies are valuable in designing polymers for complex systems where the degree of interaction between the polymer and surface needs to be tailored. Three tagged synthetic polymers with different functionalities are examined: poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) (PSPMA), and a mannose-modified glycopolymer. Adsorption transients at the silica/water interface are found to be characteristic for each polymer, and kinetics are deduced from the initial rates. The chemistry of the adsorption interfaces has been varied by, first, manipulation of silica surface chemistry via the bulk pH, followed by surfaces modified by poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA) and cellulose, giving five chemically different surfaces. Complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has been used for additional surface characterization of adsorbed layers and functionalized interfaces to allow adsorption rates to be interpreted more fully. Adsorption rates for PSPMA and the glycopolymer are seen to be highly surface sensitive, with significantly higher rates on cellulose-modified surfaces, whereas PAA shows a much smaller rate dependence on the nature of the adsorption surface.

  4. Probing the electrochemical properties of TiO{sub 2}/graphene composite by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Pankaj [Department of Physics, Marwadi Education Foundation, Rajkot 360003 (India); Pandey, Kavita; Bhatt, Parth [School of Solar Energy, Pandit Deendayal Petroleum University, Gandhinagar 382007 (India); Tripathi, Brijesh, E-mail: brijesh.tripathi@sse.pdpu.ac.in [School of Technology, Pandit Deendayal Petroleum University, Gandhinagar 382007 (India); Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Kumar, Manoj [School of Technology, Pandit Deendayal Petroleum University, Gandhinagar 382007 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Role of TiO{sub 2}/graphene composite in charge transport within supercapacitors. • DC and AC characterization to investigate voltage dependence of charge transport. • Physical insight into the electrochemistry of electrode–electrolyte interface. - Abstract: This work describes the role of graphene in charge transport and diffusion mechanism at TiO{sub 2}/graphene electrode–electrolyte interface. To explore the mechanism, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used. The CV results depict that TiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}/graphene electrodes behave differently in terms of charge transport and ion adsorption under the steady state conditions. The performance of TiO{sub 2} electrode–electrolyte interface is mainly limited by the charge transport and pseudo-capacitive effects while the response of TiO{sub 2}/graphene electrode–electrolyte interface is mainly dominated by the double layer capacitive effects. The EIS measurement leads to the direct determination of broad range of parameters, i.e. series resistance, charge transport, rate capability and ion diffusion. The experimental results and their analysis will have a significant impact on understanding the role of graphene in the electrochemical response of an electrode–electrolyte interface.

  5. Probing Surface-Adlayer Conjugation on Organic-Modified Si(111) Surfaces with Microscopy, Scattering, Spectroscopy, and Density Functional Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellar, Joshua A.; Lin, Jui-Ching; Kim, Jun-Hyun; Yoder, Nathan L.; Bevan, Kirk H.; Stokes, Grace Y.; Geiger, Franz M.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Highly conjugated molecules bound to silicon are promising candidates for organosilicon electronic devices and sensors. In this study, 1-bromo-4-ethynylbenzene was synthesized and reacted with a hydrogen-passivated Si(111) surface via ultraviolet irradiation. Through an array of characterization and modeling tools, the binding configuration and morphology of the reacted molecule were thoroughly analyzed. Atomic force microscopy confirmed an atomically flat surface morphology following reaction, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy verified reaction to the surface via the terminal alkyne moiety. In addition, synchrotron X-ray characterization, including X-ray reflectivity, X-ray fluorescence, and X-ray standing wave measurements, enabled sub-angstrom determination of the position of the bromine atom with respect to the silicon lattice. This structural characterization was quantitatively compared with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, thus enabling the π-conjugation of the terminal carbon atoms to be deduced. The X-ray and DFT results were additionally corroborated with the vibrational spectrum of the organic adlayer, which was measured with sum frequency generation. Overall, these results illustrate that the terminal carbon atoms in 1-bromo-4-ethynylbenzene adlayers on Si(111) retain π-conjugation, thus revealing alkyne molecules as promising candidates for organosilicon electronics and sensing.

  6. Probing the cellular damage in bacteria induced by GaN nanoparticles using confocal laser Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, Prasana, E-mail: prasanasahoo@gmail.com [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India); Murthy, P. Sriyutha [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Section, Water and Steam Chemistry Division (India); Dhara, S., E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India); Venugopalan, V. P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Section, Water and Steam Chemistry Division (India); Das, A.; Tyagi, A. K. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India)

    2013-08-15

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle (NP) induced toxicity in microbes is of potential importance to a variety of disciplines including disease diagnostics, biomedical implants, and environmental analysis. In this context, toxicity to bacterial cells and inhibition of biofilm formation by GaN NPs and their functional derivatives have been investigated against gram positive and gram negative bacterial species down to single cellular level. High levels of inhibition of biofilm formation (>80 %) was observed on treatments with GaN NPs at sub-micro molar concentrations. These results were substantiated with morphological features investigated with field emission scanning electron microscope, and the observed changes in vibrational modes of microbial cells using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra provided molecular interpretation of cell damage by registering signatures of molecular vibrations of individual living microbial cells and mapping the interplay of proteins at the cell membrane. As compared to the untreated cells, Raman spectra of NP-treated cells showed an increase in the intensities of characteristic protein bands, which confirmed membrane damage and subsequent release of cellular contents outside the cells. Raman spectral mapping at single cellular level can facilitate understanding of the mechanistic aspect of toxicity of GaN NPs. The effect may be correlated to passive diffusion causing mechanical damage to the membrane or ingress of Ga{sup 3+} (ionic radius {approx}0.076 nm) which can potentially interfere with bacterial metabolism, as it resembles Fe{sup 2+} (ionic radius {approx}0.077 nm), which is essential for energy metabolism.

  7. Pressure-induced amorphization and reactivity of solid dimethyl acetylene probed by in situ FTIR and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jiwen; Daljeet, Roshan; Kieran, Arielle; Song, Yang

    2018-06-01

    Conjugated polymers are prominent semiconductors that have unique electric conductivity and photoluminescence. Synthesis of conjugated polymers under high pressure is extremely appealing because it does not require a catalyst or solvent used in conventional chemical methods. Transformation of acetylene and many of its derivatives to conjugated polymers using high pressure has been successfully achieved, but not with dimethyl acetylene (DMA). In this work, we present a high-pressure study on solid DMA using a diamond anvil cell up to 24.4 GPa at room temperature characterized by in situ Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that solid DMA exists in a phase II crystal structure and is stable up to 12 GPa. Above this pressure, amorphization was initiated and the process was completed at 24.4 GPa. The expected polymeric transformation was not evident upon compression, but only observed upon decompression from a threshold compression pressure (e.g. 14.4 GPa). In situ florescence measurements suggest excimer formation via crystal defects, which induces the chemical reactions. The vibrational spectral analysis suggests the products contain the amorphous poly(DMA) and possibly additional amorphous hydrogenated carbon material.

  8. Electronic Structure of the Kitaev Material α-RuCl3 Probed by Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Soobin; Kim, Choong Hyun; Kim, Beom Hyun; Lee, Kyung Dong; Won, Choong Jae; Oh, Ji Seop; Han, Moonsup; Chang, Young Jun; Hur, Namjung; Sato, Hitoshi; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Kim, Changyoung; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Noh, Tae Won

    2016-12-01

    Recently, α-RuCl3 has attracted much attention as a possible material to realize the honeycomb Kitaev model of a quantum-spin-liquid state. Although the magnetic properties of α-RuCl3 have been extensively studied, its electronic structure, which is strongly related to its Kitaev physics, is poorly understood. Here, the electronic structure of α-RuCl3 was investigated by photoemission (PE) and inverse-photoemission (IPE) spectroscopies. The band gap was directly measured from the PE and IPE spectra and was found to be 1.9 eV, much larger than previously estimated values. Local density approximation (LDA) calculations showed that the on-site Coulomb interaction U could open the band gap without spin-orbit coupling (SOC). However, the SOC should also be incorporated to reproduce the proper gap size, indicating that the interplay between U and SOC plays an essential role. Several features of the PE and IPE spectra could not be explained by the results of LDA calculations. To explain such discrepancies, we performed configuration-interaction calculations for a RuCl63- cluster. The experimental data and calculations demonstrated that the 4d compound α-RuCl3 is a Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulator rather than a quasimolecular-orbital insulator. Our study also provides important physical parameters required for verifying the proposed Kitaev physics in α-RuCl3.

  9. Probing the cellular damage in bacteria induced by GaN nanoparticles using confocal laser Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Prasana; Murthy, P. Sriyutha; Dhara, S.; Venugopalan, V. P.; Das, A.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle (NP) induced toxicity in microbes is of potential importance to a variety of disciplines including disease diagnostics, biomedical implants, and environmental analysis. In this context, toxicity to bacterial cells and inhibition of biofilm formation by GaN NPs and their functional derivatives have been investigated against gram positive and gram negative bacterial species down to single cellular level. High levels of inhibition of biofilm formation (>80 %) was observed on treatments with GaN NPs at sub-micro molar concentrations. These results were substantiated with morphological features investigated with field emission scanning electron microscope, and the observed changes in vibrational modes of microbial cells using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra provided molecular interpretation of cell damage by registering signatures of molecular vibrations of individual living microbial cells and mapping the interplay of proteins at the cell membrane. As compared to the untreated cells, Raman spectra of NP-treated cells showed an increase in the intensities of characteristic protein bands, which confirmed membrane damage and subsequent release of cellular contents outside the cells. Raman spectral mapping at single cellular level can facilitate understanding of the mechanistic aspect of toxicity of GaN NPs. The effect may be correlated to passive diffusion causing mechanical damage to the membrane or ingress of Ga 3+ (ionic radius ∼0.076 nm) which can potentially interfere with bacterial metabolism, as it resembles Fe 2+ (ionic radius ∼0.077 nm), which is essential for energy metabolism

  10. Facet-specific interaction between methanol and TiO2 probed by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deheng; Li, Yadong; Liu, Xinyi; Cao, Yue; Gao, Yi; Shen, Y Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2018-04-24

    The facet-specific interaction between molecules and crystalline catalysts, such as titanium dioxides (TiO 2 ), has attracted much attention due to possible facet-dependent reactivity. Using surface-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, we have studied how methanol interacts with different common facets of crystalline TiO 2 , including rutile(110), (001), (100), and anatase(101), under ambient temperature and pressure. We found that methanol adsorbs predominantly in the molecular form on all of the four surfaces, while spontaneous dissociation into methoxy occurs preferentially when these surfaces become defective. Extraction of Fermi resonance coupling between stretch and bending modes of the methyl group in analyzing adsorbed methanol spectra allows determination of the methanol adsorption isotherm. The isotherms obtained for the four surfaces are nearly the same, yielding two adsorbed Gibbs free energies associated with two different adsorption configurations singled out by ab initio calculations. They are ( i ) ∼-20 kJ/mol for methanol with its oxygen attached to a low-coordinated surface titanium, and ( ii ) ∼-5 kJ/mol for methanol hydrogen-bonded to a surface oxygen and a neighboring methanol molecule. Despite similar adsorption energetics, the Fermi resonance coupling strength for adsorbed methanol appears to depend sensitively on the surface facet and coverage.

  11. Sugar-influenced water diffusion, interaction, and retention in clay interlayer nanopores probed by theoretical simulations and experimental spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristilde, Ludmilla; Galdi, Stephen M.; Kelch, Sabrina E.; Aoki, Thalia G.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamics in clay nanopores is important for gaining insights into the trapping of water, nutrients, and contaminants in natural and engineered soils. Previous investigations have focused on the interlayer organization and molecular diffusion coefficients (D) of cations and water molecules in cation-saturated interlayer nanopores of smectite clays. Little is known, however, about how these interlayer dynamic properties are influenced by the ubiquitous presence of small organic compounds such as sugars in the soil environment. Here we probed the effects of glucose molecules on montmorillonite interlayer properties. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed re-structuring of the interlayer organization of the adsorptive species. Water-water interactions were disrupted by glucose-water H-bonding interactions. ;Dehydration; of the glucose-populated nanopore led to depletion in the Na solvation shell, which resulted in the accumulation of both Na ions (as inner-sphere complexes) and remaining hydrated water molecules at the mineral surface. This accumulation led to a decrease in both DNa and Dwater. In addition, the reduction in Dglucose as a function of increasing glucose content can be explained by the aggregation of glucose molecules into organic clusters H-bonded to the mineral surface on both walls of the nanopore. Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction data were consistent with the theoretical predictions. Compared to clay interlayers devoid of glucose, increased intensities and new peaks in the 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectra confirmed increasing immobilization of Na as a function of increasing glucose content. And, the X-ray diffraction data indicated a reduced collapse of glucose-populated interlayers exposed to decreasing moisture conditions, which led to the maintenance of hydrated clay nanopores. The coupling of theoretical and experimental findings sheds light on the molecular to nanoscale mechanisms that

  12. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Macmichael, DBA

    1988-01-01

    A fully revised and extended account of the design, manufacture and use of heat pumps in both industrial and domestic applications. Topics covered include a detailed description of the various heat pump cycles, the components of a heat pump system - drive, compressor, heat exchangers etc., and the more practical considerations to be taken into account in their selection.

  13. Lanthanide paramagnetic probes for NMR spectroscopic studies of fast molecular conformational dynamics and temperature control. Effective six-site proton exchange in 18-crown-6 by exchange spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babailov, Sergey P

    2012-02-06

    (1)H and (13)C NMR measurements are reported for the CDCl(3) and CD(2)Cl(2) solutions of [La(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (I), [Pr(18-crown-6) (NO(3))(3)] (II), [Ce(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (III), and [Nd(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (IV) complexes. Temperature dependencies of the (1)H NMR spectra of paramagnetic II-IV have been analyzed using the dynamic NMR (DNMR) methods for six-site exchange. Two types of conformational dynamic processes were identified (the first one is conditioned by interconversion of complex enantiomeric forms and pseudorotation of a macrocycle molecule upon the C(2) symmetry axis; the second one is conditioned by macrocycle molecule inversion). Application of exchange spectroscopy (2D-EXSY) of DNMR for investigation of this dynamic system (II-IV) simplifies the assignment of the NMR signals and represents the first experimental study of multisite exchange. In the present work, the methodology of paramagnetic 4f (Ce, Pr, and Nd) probe applications for the study of free-energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes in chemical exchange processes, as well as the advantages of this method in a comparison with DNMR studies of diamagnetic substances, is discussed. In particular, as a result of paramagnetic chemical shifts in 4f complexes, the range of measurable rate constants expands considerably compared to the analogous range in diamagnetic compounds. Coordination compounds investigated in the paper represent new types of thermometric NMR sensors and lanthanide paramagnetic probes for in situ temperature control in solution.

  14. Probing adenine rings and backbone linkages using base specific isotope-edited Raman spectroscopy: application to group II intron ribozyme domain V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Eldho, Nadukkudy V; Dayie, T Kwaku; Carey, Paul R

    2010-04-27

    Raman difference spectroscopy is used to probe the properties of a 36-nt RNA molecule, "D5", which lies at the heart of the catalytic apparatus in group II introns. For D5 that has all of its adenine residues labeled with (13)C and (15)N and utilizing Raman difference spectroscopy, we identify the conformationally sensitive -C-O-P-O-C- stretching modes of the unlabeled bonds adjacent to adenine bases, as well as the adenine ring modes themselves. The phosphodiester modes can be assigned to individual adenine residues based on earlier NMR data. The effect of Mg(2+) binding was explored by analyzing the Raman difference spectra for [D5 + Mg(2+)] minus [D5 no Mg(2+)], for D5 unlabeled, or D5 labeled with (13)C/(15)N-enriched adenine. In both sets of data we assign differential features to G ring modes perturbed by Mg(2+) binding at the N7 position. In the A-labeled spectra we attribute a Raman differential near 1450 cm(-1) and changes of intensity at 1296 cm(-1) to Mg binding at the N7 position of adenine bases. The A and G bases involved in Mg(2+) binding again can be identified using earlier NMR results. For the unlabeled D5, a change in the C-O-P-O-C stretch profile at 811 cm(-1) upon magnesium binding is due to a "tightening up" (in the sense of a more rigid molecule with less dynamic interchange among competing ribose conformers) of the D5 structure. For adenine-labeled D5, small changes in the adenine backbone bond signatures in the 810-830 cm(-1) region suggest that small conformational changes occur in the tetraloop and bulge regions upon binding of Mg(2+). The PO(2)(-) stretching vibration, near 1100 cm(-1), from the nonbridging phosphate groups, probes the effect of Mg(2+)-hydrate inner-sphere interactions that cause an upshift. In turn, the upshift is modulated by the presence of monovalent cations since in the presence of Na(+) and Li(+) the upshift is 23 +/- 2 cm(-1) while in the presence of K(+) and Cs(+) it is 13 +/- 3 cm(-1), a finding that correlates

  15. Trace gas detection by laser intracavity photothermal spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, K.H.; Lin, H.h.

    1986-01-01

    A novel laser intracavity photothermal detector is described. In this scheme, sample absorption of the pump laser power takes place within the cavity of a probe He-Ne laser causing modulation in the gain and in turn the output power. Comparison of this intracavity detector with two other photothermal techniques, namely, phase fluctuation optical heterodyne spectroscopy and thermal beam deflection, is made in terms of practicality and sensitivity. For in situ measurements, sensitivity of 0.5 x 10 -7 cm -1 for a probe length of 3 cm has been achieved

  16. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang, E-mail: howesiang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H., E-mail: lambrev@brc.hu [Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 521, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  17. Functional near infrared spectroscopy as a probe of brain function in people with prolonged disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka M. Kempny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive technique which measures changes in brain tissue oxygenation. NIRS has been used for continuous monitoring of brain oxygenation during medical procedures carrying high risk of iatrogenic brain ischemia and also has been adopted by cognitive neuroscience for studies on executive and cognitive functions. Until now, NIRS has not been used to detect residual cognitive functions in patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness (pDOC. In this study we aimed to evaluate the brain function of patients with pDOC by using a motor imagery task while recording NIRS. We also collected data from a group of age and gender matched healthy controls while they carried out both real and imagined motor movements to command. We studied 16 pDOC patients in total, split into two groups: five had a diagnosis of Vegetative state/Unresponsive Wakefulness State, and eleven had a diagnosis of Minimally Conscious State. In the control subjects we found a greater oxy-haemoglobin (oxyHb response during real movement compared with imagined movement. For the between group comparison, we found a main effect of hemisphere, with greater depression of oxyHb signal in the right > left hemisphere compared with rest period for all three groups. A post-hoc analysis including only the two pDOC patient groups was also significant suggesting that this effect was not just being driven by the control subjects. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of using NIRS for the assessment of brain function in pDOC patients using a motor imagery task.

  18. Functional near infrared spectroscopy as a probe of brain function in people with prolonged disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempny, Agnieszka M; James, Leon; Yelden, Kudret; Duport, Sophie; Farmer, Simon; Playford, E Diane; Leff, Alexander P

    2016-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive technique which measures changes in brain tissue oxygenation. NIRS has been used for continuous monitoring of brain oxygenation during medical procedures carrying high risk of iatrogenic brain ischemia and also has been adopted by cognitive neuroscience for studies on executive and cognitive functions. Until now, NIRS has not been used to detect residual cognitive functions in patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness (pDOC). In this study we aimed to evaluate the brain function of patients with pDOC by using a motor imagery task while recording NIRS. We also collected data from a group of age and gender matched healthy controls while they carried out both real and imagined motor movements to command. We studied 16 pDOC patients in total, split into two groups: five had a diagnosis of Vegetative state/Unresponsive Wakefulness State, and eleven had a diagnosis of Minimally Conscious State. In the control subjects we found a greater oxy-haemoglobin (oxyHb) response during real movement compared with imagined movement. For the between group comparison, we found a main effect of hemisphere, with greater depression of oxyHb signal in the right > left hemisphere compared with rest period for all three groups. A post-hoc analysis including only the two pDOC patient groups was also significant suggesting that this effect was not just being driven by the control subjects. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of using NIRS for the assessment of brain function in pDOC patients using a motor imagery task.

  19. Mapping Rotational Wavepacket Dynamics with Chirped Probe Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Dmitri; Odhner, Johanan; Levis, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We develop an analytical model description of the strong-field pump-probe polarization spectroscopy of rotational transients in molecular gases in a situation when the probe pulse is considerably chirped: the frequency modulation over the pulse duration is comparable with the carrier frequency. In this scenario, a femtosecond pump laser pulse prepares a rotational wavepacket in a gas-phase sample at room temperature. The rotational revivals of the wavepacket are then mapped onto a chirped broadband probe pulse derived from a laser filament. The slow-varying envelope approximation being inapplicable, an alternative approach is proposed which is capable of incorporating the substantial chirp and the related temporal dispersion of refractive indices. Analytical expressions are obtained for the probe signal modulation over the interaction region and for the resulting heterodyned transient birefringence spectra. Dependencies of the outputs on the probe pulse parameters reveal the trade-offs and the ways to optimize the temporal-spectral imaging. The results are in good agreement with the experiments on snapshot imaging of rotational revival patterns in nitrogen gas. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through AFOSR MURI Grant No. FA9550-10-1-0561.

  20. Nano-confined water in the interlayers of hydrocalumite: Reorientational dynamics probed by neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichev, A. G.; Faraone, A.; Udovic, T.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; de Souza, N. R.; Reinholdt, M. X.; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2008-12-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs, anionic clays) represent excellent model systems for detailed molecular- level studies of the structure, dynamics, and energetics of nano-confined water in mineral interlayers and nano-pores, because LDH interlayers can have a well-defined structures and contain H2O molecules and a wide variety of anions in structurally well-defined positions and coordinations. [Ca2Al(OH)6]Cl·2H2O, also known as hydrocalumite or Friedel's salt, has a well- ordered Ca,Al distribution in the hydroxide layer and a very high degree of H2O,Cl ordering in the interlayer. It is also one of the only LDH phase for which a single crystal structure refinement is available. Thus, it is currently the best model compound for understanding the structure and dynamical behavior of interlayer and surface species in other, less-ordered, LDHs. We investigated the structural and dynamic behavior of water in the interlayers of hydrocalumite using inelastic (INS) and quasielastic (QENS) neutron scattering and molecular dynamics computer simulations. The comperehensive neutron scattering studies were performed for one fully hydrated and one dehydrated sample of hydrocalumite using several complementary instruments (HFBS, DCS and FANS at NCNR; HRMECS and QENS at IPNS) at temperatures above and below the previously discovered order-disorder interlayer phase transition. Together the experimental and molecular modeling results capture the important details of the dynamics of nano-confined water and the effects of the orientational ordering of H2O molecules above and below the phase transition. They provide otherwise unobtainable experimental information about the transformation of H2O librational and diffusional modes across the order-disorder phase transition and significantly add to our current understanding of the structure and dynamics of water in LDH phases based on the earlier NMR, IR, X-ray, and calorimetric measurements. The approach can now be extended to probe the

  1. Photo-Induced Spin-State Conversion in Solvated Transition Metal Complexes Probed via Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huse, Nils; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2010-04-30

    Solution-phase photoinduced low-spin to high-spin conversion in the FeII polypyridyl complex [Fe(tren(py)3)]2+ (where tren(py)3 is tris(2-pyridylmethyliminoethyl)amine) has been studied via picosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy. Following 1A1 --> 1MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) excitation at 560 nm, changes in the iron L2- and L3-edges were observed concomitant with formation of the transient high-spin 5T2 state. Charge-transfer multiplet calculations coupled with data acquired on low-spin and high-spin model complexes revealed a reduction in ligand field splitting of 1 eV in the high-spin state relative to the singlet ground state. A significant reduction in orbital overlap between the central Fe-3d and the ligand N-2p orbitals was directly observed, consistent with the expected ca. 0.2 Angstrom increase in Fe-N bond length upon formation of the high-spin state. The overall occupancy of the Fe-3d orbitals remains constant upon spin crossover, suggesting that the reduction in sigma-donation is compensated by significant attenuation of pi-back-bonding in the metal-ligand interactions. These results demonstrate the feasibility and unique potential of time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study ultrafast reactions in the liquid phase by directly probing the valence orbitals of first-row metals as well as lighter elements during the course of photochemical transformations.

  2. Concentration-modulated absorption spectroscopy and the triplet state: Photoinduced absorption/bleaching in erythrosin B, rose bengal and eosin y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. Jeremy; Grofcsik, Andras; Kubinyi, Miklos; Thomas, Daniel

    2006-07-01

    The pump and probe method concentration-modulated absorption spectroscopy has been applied for studying the triplet characteristics of dyes erythrosin B, rose bengal and eosin y in ethanol solutions. Using the 514.5 and 488 nm lines of an argon ion laser for pump and probe beams, respectively, photoinduced bleaching for erythrosin B and eosin y and photoinduced absorption for rose bengal have been observed. The theory developed for describing the interactions of dye molecules of strong triplet forming ability with continuous wave pump and probe beams of Gaussian beam profiles has been tested by analysing the probe power gain or loss at different positions along the optical path of the focused collinear beams. From the gain-modulation frequency curves triplet absorption cross sections and the lifetimes of the triplet states have been determined.

  3. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Brodowicz, Kazimierz; Wyszynski, M L; Wyszynski

    2013-01-01

    Heat pumps and related technology are in widespread use in industrial processes and installations. This book presents a unified, comprehensive and systematic treatment of the design and operation of both compression and sorption heat pumps. Heat pump thermodynamics, the choice of working fluid and the characteristics of low temperature heat sources and their application to heat pumps are covered in detail.Economic aspects are discussed and the extensive use of the exergy concept in evaluating performance of heat pumps is a unique feature of the book. The thermodynamic and chemical properties o

  4. Excited-State Dynamics of a DNA Duplex in a Deep Eutectic Solvent Probed by Femtosecond Time-Resolved IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Harpe, Kimberly; Kohl, Forrest R; Zhang, Yuyuan; Kohler, Bern

    2018-03-08

    To better understand how the solvent influences excited-state deactivation in DNA strands, femtosecond time-resolved IR (fs-TRIR) pump-probe measurements were performed on a d(AT) 9 ·d(AT) 9 duplex dissolved in a deep eutectic solvent (DES) made from choline chloride and ethylene glycol in a 1:2 mol ratio. This solvent, known as ethaline, is a member of a class of ionic liquids capable of solubilizing DNA with minimal disruption to its secondary structure. UV melting analysis reveals that the duplex studied here melts at 18 °C in ethaline compared to 50 °C in aqueous solution. Ethaline has an excellent transparency window that facilitates TRIR measurements in the double-bond stretching region. Transient spectra recorded in deuterated ethaline at room temperature indicate that photoinduced intrastrand charge transfer occurs from A to T, yielding the same exciplex state previously detected in aqueous solution. This state decays via charge recombination with a lifetime of 380 ± 10 ps compared to the 300 ± 10 ps lifetime measured earlier in D 2 O solution. The TRIR data strongly suggest that the long-lived exciplex forms exclusively in the solvated duplex, and not in the denatured single strands, which appear to have little, if any, base stacking. The longer lifetime of the exciplex state in the DES compared to aqueous solution is suggested to arise from reduced stabilization of the charge transfer state, resulting in slower charge recombination on account of Marcus inverted behavior.

  5. Theory of NMR probe design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnall, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The NMR probe is the intrinsic part of the NMR system which allows transmission of a stimulus to a sample and the reception of a resulting signal from a sample. NMR probes are used in both imaging and spectroscopy. Optimal probe design is important to the production of adequate signal/moise. It is important for anyone using NMR techniques to understand how NMR probes work and how to optimize probe design

  6. Study of Carrier Dynamics in Self-Assembled InAs QDs and InAs/InGaSb Superlattices Using Pump Probe Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krishna, Sanjay

    2006-01-01

    .... The proposed duration of the project is three years. In this period (1 Jan 2003-31 Dec 2003), metamorphic InGaSb structures were grown and their optical and structural properties were characterized...

  7. Probing the ignored elimination channel of Br2 in the 248 nm photodissociation of 1,1-dibromoethylene by cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping-Chen; Tsai, Po-Yu; Hsiao, Ming-Kai; Lin, King-Chuen; Huang, C H; Chang, A H H

    2009-03-09

    In the photodissociation of 1,1-C(2)H(2)Br(2) at 248 nm, the Br(2) elimination channel is probed by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS). In terms of spectral simulation, the vibrational population ratio of Br(2)(v = 1)/Br(2)(v = 0) is found to be 0.55+/-0.05, which indicates that the Br(2) fragment is vibrationally hot. The rotational population is thermally equilibrated with a Boltzmann temperature of 349+/-38 K. According to ab initio potential energy calculations, the obtained fragments are anticipated to result primarily from photodissociation of the ground electronic state that undergoes 1) H migration followed by three-center elimination, and 2) isomerization forming either trans- or cis-1,2-C(2)H(2)Br(2) from which Br(2) is eliminated. RRKM calculations predict that the Br(2) dissociation rates through the ground singlet state prevail over those through the triplet state. Measurements of temperature and Ar pressure dependence are examined to support the proposed pathway via internal conversion. The quantum yield for the Br(2) elimination reaction is determined to be 0.07+/-0.04. This result is smaller than that obtained in 1,2-C(2)H(2)Br(2), probably because the dissociation rates are slowed in the isomerization stage.

  8. High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy of TiO3H2-: Probing the TiO2- + H2O dissociative adduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVine, Jessalyn A.; Abou Taka, Ali; Babin, Mark C.; Weichman, Marissa L.; Hratchian, Hrant P.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2018-06-01

    Slow electron velocity-map imaging spectroscopy of cryogenically cooled TiO3H2- anions is used to probe the simplest titania/water reaction, TiO20/- + H2O. The resultant spectra show vibrationally resolved structure assigned to detachment from the cis-dihydroxide TiO(OH)2- geometry based on density functional theory calculations, demonstrating that for the reaction of the anionic TiO2- monomer with a single water molecule, the dissociative adduct (where the water is split) is energetically preferred over a molecularly adsorbed geometry. This work represents a significant improvement in resolution over previous measurements, yielding an electron affinity of 1.2529(4) eV as well as several vibrational frequencies for neutral TiO(OH)2. The energy resolution of the current results combined with photoelectron angular distributions reveals Herzberg-Teller coupling-induced transitions to Franck-Condon forbidden vibrational levels of the neutral ground state. A comparison to the previously measured spectrum of bare TiO2- indicates that reaction with water stabilizes neutral TiO2 more than the anion, providing insight into the fundamental chemical interactions between titania and water.

  9. Oxygen vacancies at the spinel/perovskite γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface probed by resonant photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, Philipp; Pfaff, Florian; Zapf, Michael; Gabel, Judith; Dudy, Lenart; Berner, Goetz; Sing, Michael; Claessen, Ralph [Physikalisches Institut and Roentgen Center for Complex Material Systems (RCCM), Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Chen, Yunzhong; Pryds, Nini [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Risoe (Denmark); Schlueter, Christoph; Lee, Tien-Lin [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    The spinel/perovskite heterointerface between the band insulators γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} hosts a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) with exceptionally high electron mobility. Soft x-ray resonant photoelectron spectroscopy at the Ti L absorption edge is used to probe the Ti 3d derived interface states. Marked differences in the resonance behavior are found for the SrTiO{sub 3} valence band and the different interface states, which are observed in the band gap of SrTiO{sub 3}. A comparison to X-ray absorption spectra of Ti 3d{sup 0} and Ti 3d{sup 1} systems reveals the presence of different types of electronic states with Ti 3d character, i.e., oxygen vacancy induced, trapped in-gap states and itinerant states contributing to the 2DES. Exposure to low doses of oxygen during irradiation allows for the reversible manipulation of the oxygen stoichiometry, thus revealing the presence of an oxygen vacancy-induced state, which is characteristic for this spinel/perovskite interface.

  10. Probing the application of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for assessment of deposited flux of Radon and Thoron progeny in high exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, R., E-mail: rosaline@barc.gov.in; Sapra, B.K.; Rout, R.P.; Prajith, R.

    2016-12-01

    Direct measurement of Radon and Thoron progeny in the atmosphere and occupational environments such as Uranium mines, Uranium and Thorium handling facilities has gained importance because of its radiological significance in inhalation dose assessment. In this regard, Radon and Thoron Progeny sensors (DTPS and DRPS) are the only passive solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD, LR115) based devices which are being extensively used for time integrated direct progeny measurements. An essential component of the analysis is the chemical etching of the detectors, followed by spark counting of tracks and then estimation of the inhalation dose using appropriate calibration factors. Alternatively, the tracks may be counted using image analysis techniques. However, under high exposure conditions, both these methods have inherent limitations and errors arising due to increased frequency of tracks. In the present work, we probe the use of Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy to analyse the deposited fluence of the progeny particulates based on change in transmittance of the nitric group vibrational bands of the LR115. A linear relationship between the transmittance and the deposited fluence was observed, which can be used to estimate the deposited fluence rate and the inhalation dose. This alternative method of analysis will provide a faster and non-destructive technique for inhalation dose assessment, specially for routine large scale measurements. - Highlights: • An alternative method of inhalation dose assessment. • Linearity between the transmittance of nitric goup bands and the deposited fluence. • Faster and non-destructive technique for high exposure scenarios.

  11. An overview on the research of Sr2IrO4-based system probed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Zhu, Chaomin; Ma, Jingyuan; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shengli

    2018-03-01

    Investigations of materials with 5d transition metal ions have opened up new paradigms in condensed-matter physics because of their large spin-orbit coupling (SOC) interactions. The typical compound is Sr2IrO4, which attracted much attention due to its similarities to the parent compound of high-Tc cuprate superconductor La2CuO4. Theoretical calculations predicted that the unconventional superconductivity can occur in carrier doped-Sr2IrO4 system. Until now, hundreds of experimental methods were devoted to investigate the carrier doping effect on Sr2IrO4. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) made great contributions to the local lattice and electronic structure, and also the intimate relationship between the local structure and physical properties induced by carrier doping. The aim of this review is a short introduction to the progress of research on Sr2IrO4-based system probed by the unique technique — XAS, including the strength of the SOC, valence changes upon doping and even local lattice structure with atomic level for this Sr2IrO4-based family.

  12. Comparative and complementary characterization of precipitate microstructures in Al-Mg-Si(-Li) alloys by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshino, Yuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Kozuka, Masaya [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan); Hirosawa, Shoichi, E-mail: hirosawa@ynu.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Aruga, Yasuhiro [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Microalloying addition of Li enhances the age-hardening response of Al-Mg-Si alloys. • Size and number density of nanoclusters or precipitates are increased by Li addition. • Mg and Si contents within the aggregates are inversely decreased by Li addition. • Microalloying Li accelerates heterogeneous nucleation of such Mg-Si aggregates. - Abstract: In this study, comparative and complementary characterization of precipitate microstructures by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atom probe tomography (APT) has been performed for Al-0.55 wt%Mg-0.89 wt%Si(-0.043 wt%Li) alloys aged at 433 K for 1.2 ks (under aging) and 36 ks (peak aging). Quantitative estimation of nanometer-scale clusters (nanoclusters) and β″ precipitates by TEM and APT revealed that microalloying addition of Li increases the size and number density of these Mg-Si aggregates, resulting in the enhanced age-hardening response. Positive evidence by APT for the segregation of Li suggests that heterogeneous nucleation of such Mg-Si aggregates with the aid of Li is attributed to the modified precipitate microstructures and thus improved mechanical strength of this alloy system.

  13. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy to Probe State- and Trait-Like Conditions in Chronic Tinnitus: A Proof-of-Principle Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schecklmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Several neuroscience tools showed the involvement of auditory cortex in chronic tinnitus. In this proof-of-principle study we probed the capability of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS for the measurement of brain oxygenation in auditory cortex in dependence from chronic tinnitus and from intervention with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Methods. Twenty-three patients received continuous theta burst stimulation over the left primary auditory cortex in a randomized sham-controlled neuronavigated trial (verum = 12; placebo = 11. Before and after treatment, sound-evoked brain oxygenation in temporal areas was measured with fNIRS. Brain oxygenation was measured once in healthy controls (n=12. Results. Sound-evoked activity in right temporal areas was increased in the patients in contrast to healthy controls. Left-sided temporal activity under the stimulated area changed over the course of the trial; high baseline oxygenation was reduced and vice versa. Conclusions. By demonstrating that rTMS interacts with auditory evoked brain activity, our results confirm earlier electrophysiological findings and indicate the sensitivity of fNIRS for detecting rTMS induced changes in brain activity. Moreover, our findings of trait- and state-related oxygenation changes indicate the potential of fNIRS for the investigation of tinnitus pathophysiology and treatment response.

  14. Probing vacancy-type free-volume defects in Li2B4O7 single crystal by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Adamiv, V.; Teslyuk, I.; Ingram, A.; Demchenko, P.

    2018-01-01

    Vacancy-type free-volume defects in lithium tetraborate Li2B4O7 single crystal, grown by the Czochralski technique, are probed with positron annihilation spectroscopy in the lifetime measuring mode. The experimental positron lifetime spectrum is reconstructed within the three-component fitting, involving channels of positron and positronium Ps trapping, as well as within the two-component fitting with a positronium-compensating source input. Structural configurations of the most efficient positron traps are considered using the crystallographic specificity of lithium tetraborate with the main accent on cation-type vacancies. Possible channels of positron trapping are visualized using the electronic structure calculations with density functional theory at the basis of structural parameters proper to Li2B4O7. Spatially-extended positron-trapping complexes involving singly-ionized lithium vacancies, with character lifetime close to 0.32 ns, are responsible for positron trapping in the nominally undoped lithium tetraborate Li2B4O7 crystal.

  15. Electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen/helium plasma characterization and simulation of pumping in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outten, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasmas have been employed to simulate the plasma conditions at the edge of a tokamak in order to investigate hydrogen/helium uptake in thin metal films. The process of microwave power absorption, important to characterizing the ECR plasma source, was investigated by measuring the electron density and temperature with a Langmuir probe and optical spectroscopy as a function of the magnetic field gradient and incident microwave power. A novel diagnostic, carbon resistance probe, provided a direct measure of the ion energy and fluence while measurements from a Langmuir probe were used for comparison. The Langmuir probe gave a plasma potential minus floating potential of 30 ± 5 eV, in good agreement with the carbon resistance probe result of ion energy ≤ 40 eV. The measured ion energy was consistent with the ion energy predicted from a model based upon divergent magnetic field extraction. Also, based upon physical sputtering of the carbon, the hydrogen fluence rate was determined to be 1 x 10 16 /cm 2 -sec for 50 Watts of incident microwave power. ECR hydrogen/helium plasmas were used to study preferential pumping of helium in candidate materials for tokamak pump-limiters: nickel, vanadium, aluminum, and nickel/aluminum multi-layers. Nickel and vanadium exhibited similar pumping capacities whereas aluminum showed a reduced capacity due to increased sputtering. A helium retention model based upon ion implantation ranges and sputtering rates agreed with the experimental data. A new multilayer/bilayer pumping concept showed improved pumping above that for single element films

  16. Probing the nanoscale interaction forces and elastic properties of organic and inorganic materials using force-distance (F-D) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Abhilash

    Due to their therapeutic applications such as radical scavenging, MRI contrast imaging, Photoluminescence imaging, drug delivery, etc., nanoparticles (NPs) have a significant importance in bio-nanotechnology. The reason that prevents the utilizing NPs for drug delivery in medical field is mostly due to their biocompatibility issues (incompatibility can lead to toxicity and cell death). Changes in the surface conditions of NPs often lead to NP cytotoxicity. Investigating the role of NP surface properties (surface charges and surface chemistry) on their interactions with biomolecules (Cells, protein and DNA) could enhance the current understanding of NP cytotoxicity. Hence, it is highly beneficial to the nanotechnology community to bring more attention towards the enhancement of surface properties of NPs to make them more biocompatible and less toxic to biological systems. Surface functionalization of NPs using specific ligand biomolecules have shown to enhance the protein adsorption and cellular uptake through more favorable interaction pathways. Cerium oxide NPs (CNPs also known as nanoceria) are potential antioxidants in cell culture models and understanding the nature of interaction between cerium oxide NPs and biological proteins and cells are important due to their therapeutic application (especially in site specific drug delivery systems). The surface charges and surface chemistry of CNPs play a major role in protein adsorption and cellular uptake. Hence, by tuning the surface charges and by selecting proper functional molecules on the surface, CNPs exhibiting strong adhesion to biological materials can be prepared. By probing the nanoscale interaction forces acting between CNPs and protein molecules using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based force-distance (F-D) spectroscopy, the mechanism of CNP-protein adsorption and CNP cellular uptake can be understood more quantitatively. The work presented in this dissertation is based on the application of AFM in

  17. Practical guide to surface science and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Yip-Wah

    2001-01-01

    Practical Guide to Surface Science and Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to surface science as well as describes the basic analytical techniques that researchers use to understand what occurs at the surfaces of materials and at their interfaces. These techniques include auger electron spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, inelastic scattering of electrons and ions, low energy electron diffraction, scanning probe microscopy, and interfacial segregation. Understanding the behavior of materials at their surfaces is essential for materials scientists and engineers as they design and fabricate microelectronics and semiconductor devices. The book gives over 100 examples, discussion questions and problems with varying levels of difficulty. Included with this book is a CD-ROM, which not only contains the same information, but also provides many elements of animation and interaction that are not easily emulated on paper. In diverse subject matters ranging from the operation of ion pumps, computer-...

  18. Centrifugal pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Gülich, Johann Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    This book gives an unparalleled, up-to-date, in-depth treatment of all kinds of flow phenomena encountered in centrifugal pumps including the complex interactions of fluid flow with vibrations and wear of materials. The scope includes all aspects of hydraulic design, 3D-flow phenomena and partload operation, cavitation, numerical flow calculations, hydraulic forces, pressure pulsations, noise, pump vibrations (notably bearing housing vibration diagnostics and remedies), pipe vibrations, pump characteristics and pump operation, design of intake structures, the effects of highly viscous flows, pumping of gas-liquid mixtures, hydraulic transport of solids, fatigue damage to impellers or diffusers, material selection under the aspects of fatigue, corrosion, erosion-corrosion or hydro-abrasive wear, pump selection, and hydraulic quality criteria. As a novelty, the 3rd ed. brings a fully analytical design method for radial impellers, which eliminates the arbitrary choices inherent to former design procedures. The d...

  19. Pumping life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitsel, Oleg; Dach, Ingrid; Hoffmann, Robert Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The name PUMPKIN may suggest a research centre focused on American Halloween traditions or the investigation of the growth of vegetables – however this would be misleading. Researchers at PUMPKIN, short for Centre for Membrane Pumps in Cells and Disease, are in fact interested in a large family o......’. Here we illustrate that the pumping of ions means nothing less than the pumping of life....

  20. Probing topology and dynamics of the second transmembrane domain (M2δ) of the acetyl choline receptor using magnetically aligned lipid bilayers (bicelles) and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Indra D; Mayo, Daniel J; Subbaraman, Nidhi; Inbaraj, Johnson J; McCarrick, Robert M; Lorigan, Gary A

    2017-08-01

    Characterizing membrane protein structure and dynamics in the lipid bilayer membrane is very important but experimentally challenging. EPR spectroscopy offers a unique set of techniques to investigate a membrane protein structure, dynamics, topology, and distance constraints in lipid bilayers. Previously our lab demonstrated the use of magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) for probing topology and dynamics of the membrane peptide M2δ of the acetyl choline receptor (AchR) as a proof of concept. In this study, magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers and rigid spin labels were further utilized to provide improved dynamic information and topology of M2δ peptide. Seven TOAC-labeled AchR M2δ peptides were synthesized to demonstrate the utility of a multi-labeling amino acid substitution alignment strategy. Our data revealed the helical tilts to be 11°, 17°, 9°, 17°, 16°, 11°, 9°±4° for residues I7TOAC, Q13TOAC, A14TOAC, V15TOAC, C16TOAC, L17TOAC, and L18TOAC, respectively. The average helical tilt of the M2δ peptide was determined to be ∼13°. This study also revealed that the TOAC labels were attached to the M2δ peptide with different dynamics suggesting that the sites towards the C-terminal end are more rigid when compared to the sites towards the N-terminus. The dynamics of the TOAC labeled sites were more resolved in the aligned samples when compared to the randomly disordered samples. This study highlights the use of magnetically aligned lipid bilayer EPR technique to determine a more accurate helical tilt and more resolved local dynamics of AchR M2δ peptide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Micropolarity and Hydrogen-Bond Donor Ability of Environmentally Friendly Anionic Reverse Micelles Explored by UV/Vis Absorption of a Molecular Probe and FTIR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Valeria R; Silber, Juana J; Falcone, Ruben Darío; Correa, N Mariano

    2018-03-19

    In the present work we show how two biocompatible solvents, methyl laurate (ML) and isopropyl myristate (IPM), can be used as a less toxic alternative to replace the nonpolar component in a sodium 1,4-bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles (RMs) formulation. In this sense, the micropolarity and the hydrogen-bond ability of the interface were monitored through the use of the solvatochromism of a molecular probe (1-methyl-8-oxyquinolinium betaine, QB) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Our results demonstrate that the micropolarity sensed by QB in ML RMs is lower than in IPM RMs. Additionally, the water molecules form stronger H-bond interactions with the polar head of AOT in ML than in IPM. By FTIR was revealed that more water molecules interact with the interface in ML/AOT RMs. On the other hand, for AOT RMs generated in IPM, the weaker water-surfactant interaction allows the water molecules to establish hydrogen bonds with each other trending to bulk water more easily than in ML RMs, a consequence of the dissimilar penetration of nonpolar solvents into the interfacial region. The penetration process is strongly controlled by the polarity and viscosity of the external solvents. All of these results allow us to characterize these biocompatible systems, providing information about interfacial properties and how they can be altered by changing the external solvent. The ability of the nontoxic solvent to penetrate or not into the AOT interface produces a new interface with attractive properties. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Laser frequency stabilization and shifting by using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Wu, Bin; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The stabilizing and shifting of laser frequency are very important for the interaction between the laser and atoms. The modulation transfer spectroscopy for the 87Rb atom with D2 line transition F = 2 → F' = 3 is used for stabilizing and shifting the frequency of the external cavity grating feedback diode laser. The resonant phase modulator with electro—optical effect is used to generate frequency sideband to lock the laser frequency. In the locking scheme, circularly polarized pump- and probe-beams are used. By optimizing the temperature of the vapor, the pump- and probe-beam intensity, the laser linewidth of 280 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the magnetic field generated by a solenoid is added into the system. Therefore the system can achieve the frequency locking at any point in a range of hundreds of megahertz frequency shifting with very low power loss.

  3. Coherent spectroscopy of a {Lambda} atomic system and its prospective application to tunable frequency offset locking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, Y B [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ray, Ayan [Radioactive Ion Beam Group, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India); Lawande, Q V [Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Jagatap, B N, E-mail: yogeshwar84@rediffmail.com, E-mail: ayan_ray_in@rediffmail.com, E-mail: bnj@barc.gov.in [Atomic and Molecular Physics Division and Homi Bhabha National Institute, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the coherent pump-probe spectroscopy of a three-level {Lambda} system, 6s{sub 1/2}F = 3,4{yields}6p{sub 3/2}F{sup '}= 4, in the hyperfine manifold of D{sub 2} transition (852 nm) of cesium with particular reference to the sub-Doppler linewidth resonance arising from Aulter-Townes (AT) splitting and the possibility of using it for realizing a scheme for tunable atomic frequency offset locking (AFOL). We discuss here the theoretical framework for a {Lambda} system interacting with a coherent pump and probe and use it to describe the process of modulation transfer in the AT and electromagnetically induced transparency regimes. We further employ an experimental scheme consisting of a strong pump and a pair of weak probes to resolve the sub-Doppler linewidth ({approx}8 MHz) AT resonance and study its dependence on pump intensity and detuning. In order to explore the possibility of using such a sub-Doppler linewidth resonance for AFOL, we use its first derivative signal as a frequency discriminator to stabilize the probe laser. The frequency stability of the probe is characterized by means of error signal analysis. This study reveals that while the frequency stability of the AT locked laser is limited by the pump laser, the tuning range of the offset frequency lock can cover the entire Doppler profile and its immediate neighbourhood, thereby providing a simple and cost effective alternative to the external modulator. The study described in this paper contributes to the discussion on the subtle link between dressed state spectroscopy and AFOL, which is relevant for developing a master-slave-type laser system in the domain of coherent photon-atom interaction.

  4. Femtosecond spectroscopy on alkali-doped helium nanodroplets; Femtosekundenspektroskopie an alkalidotierten Helium-Nanotroepfchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claas, P.

    2006-01-15

    In the present thesis first studies on the short-time dynamics in alkali dimers and microclusters, which were bound on the surface of superfluid helium droplets, were presented. The experiments comprehended pump-probe measurements on the fs scale on the vibration dynamics on the dimers and on the fragmentation dynamics on the clusters. Generally by the studies it was shown that such extremely short slopes can also be observed on helium droplets by means of the femtosecond spectroscopy.

  5. Liquid metals pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Frere, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Pumps used to pump liquid metals depend on the liquid metal and on the type of application concerned. One deals more particularly with electromagnetic pumps, the main pumps used with mechanical pumps. To pump sodium in the nuclear field, these two types of pumps are used; the pumps of different circuits of Super Phenix are presented and described [fr

  6. Electromagnetic pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koji; Suetake, Norio; Aizawa, Toshie; Nakasaki, Masayoshi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides an electromagnetic pump suitable to a recycling pump for liquid sodium as coolants of an FBR type reactor. Namely, a stator module of the electromagnetic pump of the present invention comprises a plurality of outer laminate iron core units and outer stator modules stacked alternately in the axial direction. With such a constitution, even a long electromagnetic pump having a large number of outer stator coils can be manufactured without damaging electric insulation of the outer stator coils. In addition, the inner circumferential surface of the outer laminate iron cores is urged and brought into contact with the outer circumferential surface of the outer duct by an elastic material. With such a constitution, Joule loss heat generated in the outer stator coils and internal heat generated in the outer laminate iron cores can be released to an electroconductive fluid flowing the inner circumference of the outer duct by way of the outer duct. (I.S.)

  7. Electrokinetic pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2007-11-20

    A method for altering the surface properties of a particle bed. In application, the method pertains particularly to an electrokinetic pump configuration where nanoparticles are bonded to the surface of the stationary phase to alter the surface properties of the stationary phase including the surface area and/or the zeta potential and thus improve the efficiency and operating range of these pumps. By functionalizing the nanoparticles to change the zeta potential the electrokinetic pump is rendered capable of operating with working fluids having pH values that can range from 2-10 generally and acidic working fluids in particular. For applications in which the pump is intended to handle highly acidic solutions latex nanoparticles that are quaternary amine functionalized can be used.

  8. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... information about chemical equilibria, kinetics and molecular motion by monitoring changes in optical properties of the system. The five presented research projects are largely unrelated to each other both in aim and in what property is probed, however they are all connected in that they are fluorophore...... reactions by optical spectroscopy. In project 1 simple steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometries and equilibrium constants in the inclusion complex formation between cyclodextrins and derivatives of the water-insoluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) in aqueous...

  9. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  10. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  11. Br2 elimination in 248-nm photolysis of CF2Br2 probed by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Yi; Huang, Hong-Yi; Lin, King-Chuen

    2005-10-01

    By using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy technique, we have observed the channel of Br2 molecular elimination following photodissociation of CF2Br2 at 248 nm. A tunable laser beam, which is crossed perpendicular to the photolyzing laser beam in a ring-down cell, is used to probe the Br2 fragment in the B 3Piou+-X1Sigmag+ transition. The vibrational population is obtained in a nascent state, despite ring-down time as long as 500-1000 ns. The population ratio of Br2(v=1)/Br2(v=0) is determined to be 0.4+/-0.2, slightly larger than the value of 0.22 evaluated by Boltzmann distribution at room temperature. The quantum yield of the Br2 elimination reaction is also measured to be 0.04+/-0.01. This work provides direct evidence to support molecular elimination occurring in the CF2Br2 photodissociation and proposes a plausible pathway with the aid of ab initio potential-energy calculations. CF2Br2 is excited probably to the 1B1 and 3B2 states at 248 nm. As the C-Br bond is elongated upon excitation, the coupling of the 1A'(1B1) state to the high vibrational levels of the ground state X 1A'(1A1) may be enhanced to facilitate the process of internal conversion. After transition, the highly vibrationally excited CF2Br2 feasibly surpasses a transition barrier prior to decomposition. According to the ab initio calculations, the transition state structure tends to correlate with the intermediate state CF2Br+Br(CF2Br...Br) and the products CF2+Br2. A sequential photodissociation pathway is thus favored. That is, a single C-Br bond breaks, and then the free-Br atom moves to form a Br-Br bond, followed by the Br2 elimination. The formed Br-Br bond distance in the transition state tends to approach equilibrium such that the Br2 fragment may be populated in cold vibrational distribution. Observation of a small vibrational population ratio of Br2(v=1)Br2(v=0) agrees with the proposed mechanism.

  12. Frequency stabilization of a 1083 nm fiber laser to {sup 4}He transition lines with optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, W.; Peng, X., E-mail: xiangpeng@pku.edu.cn; Li, W.; Guo, H., E-mail: hongguo@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Center for Quantum Information Technology, and Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE), Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Two kinds of optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies, namely, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS), are demonstrated for locking a fiber laser to the transition lines of metastable {sup 4}He atoms around 1083 nm. The servo-loop error signals of FMS and MTS for stabilizing laser frequency are optimized by studying the dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude and slope on the optical power of pump and probe beams. A comparison of the stabilization performances of FMS/MTS and polarization spectroscopy (PS) is presented, which shows that MTS exhibits relatively superior performance with the least laser frequency fluctuation due to its flat-background dispersive signal, originated from the four-wave mixing process. The Allan deviation of the stabilized laser frequency is 5.4 × 10{sup −12}@100 s with MTS for data acquired in 1000 s, which is sufficiently applicable for fields like laser cooling, optical pumping, and optical magnetometry.

  13. Pumps and pump facilities. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, W.; Bauerfeind, H.; Gutmann, G.; Leuschner, G.; Matthias, H.B.; Mengele, R.; Neumaier, R.; Vetter, G.; Wagner, W.

    1981-01-01

    This book deals with the common fundamental aspects of liquid pumps and gives an exemplary choice of the most important kinds of pumps. The scientific matter is dealt with by means of practical mathematical examples among other ways of presenting the matter. Survey of contents: Division on main operational data of pumps - pipe characteristics - pump characteristics - suction behaviour of the pumps - projecting and operation of rotary pumps - boiler feed pumps - reactor feed pumps - oscillating positive-displacement pumps - eccentric spiral pumps. (orig./GL) [de

  14. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik

    This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse and by me......This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse...... and by measuring the transmission of a terahertz probe pulse, the photoconductivity of the excited sample can be obtained. By changing the relative arrival time at the sample between the pump and the probe pulse, the photoconductivity dynamics can be studied on a picosecond timescale. The rst studied semiconductor...

  15. Pump limiter studies in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, M.; Bonnel, P.; Bruneau, J.L.; Gil, C.; Grisolia, C.; Loarer, T.; Martin, G.; Pegourie, B.; Rodriguez, L.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the Tore Supra pump limiter program is to study particle exhaust with a pump limiter system in long-pulse discharges with continuous pellet fueling and strong auxiliary heating. The pump limiter system consists of six vertical modules, located at the bottom of the machine, and one horizontal module at the outer midplane. The instrumentation of the limiter included pressure gauges, a residual gas analyser Langmuir probes, a spectrometer and water calorimeters. Initial results in low-density discharges, with the outboard limiter only, showed a modest effect on the plasma density, while large exhaust fluxes were measured in the pump limiter, without any external fueling

  16. Modulation above Pump Beam Energy in Photoreflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fuertes Marrón

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoreflectance is used for the characterisation of semiconductor samples, usually by sweeping the monochromatized probe beam within the energy range comprised between the highest value set up by the pump beam and the lowest absorption threshold of the sample. There is, however, no fundamental upper limit for the probe beam other than the limited spectral content of the source and the responsivity of the detector. As long as the modulation mechanism behind photoreflectance does affect the complete electronic structure of the material under study, sweeping the probe beam towards higher energies from that of the pump source is equally effective in order to probe high-energy critical points. This fact, up to now largely overseen, is shown experimentally in this work. E1 and E0 + Δ0 critical points of bulk GaAs are unambiguously resolved using pump light of lower energy. This type of upstream modulation may widen further applications of the technique.

  17. Time dependence of the natural passivation process on AISI 304 in an alkaline medium: Atomic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy as additional tools to electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaioun, N. E.; Maafa, I.; Florentin, A.; Denys, E.; Hakiki, N. E.; Moulayat, N.; Bubendorff, J. L.

    2018-04-01

    Thin surface films formed on AISI 304 samples in an alkaline solution of pH = 13 are studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a function of immersion time. The results reveal that changes on EIS diagrams correspond to topographical modifications on the sample surface as shown by AFM. Both techniques are therefore complementary. The oxide layer is chemically homogenous as shown by SKPFM imaging and our ultra-thin passive layer is an efficient barrier against corrosion.

  18. Fluidic pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priestman, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    A fluidic pump has primary and secondary vessels connected by a pipe, a displacement vessel having liquid to be delivered through a pipe via a rectifier provided with a feed tank. A drive unit delivers pressure fluid to a line to raise liquid and compress trapped gas or liquid in the space, including the pipe between the liquids in the two vessels and thus drive liquid out of the displacement vessel. The driving gas is therefore separated by the barrier liquid and the trapped gas or liquid from the liquid to be pumped which liquid could be e.g. radioactive. (author)

  19. Pumped storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, P.L.

    1991-01-01

    The privately financed 1,000 MW Rocky Point Pumped Storage Project located in central Colorado, USA, will be one of the world's highest head, 2,350 feet reversible pump/turbine projects. The project will offer an economical supply of peaking power and spinning reserve power to Colorado and other southwestern states. This paper describes how the project will be made compatible with the environmental conditions in the project area and the type of terrestrial mitigation measures that are being proposed for those situations where the project impacts the environment, either temporarily or permanently

  20. Fine structure and optical pumping of spins in individual semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracker, Allan S.; Gammon, Daniel; Korenev, Vladimir L.

    2008-11-01

    We review spin properties of semiconductor quantum dots and their effect on optical spectra. Photoluminescence and other types of spectroscopy are used to probe neutral and charged excitons in individual quantum dots with high spectral and spatial resolution. Spectral fine structure and polarization reveal how quantum dot spins interact with each other and with their environment. By taking advantage of the selectivity of optical selection rules and spin relaxation, optical spin pumping of the ground state electron and nuclear spins is achieved. Through such mechanisms, light can be used to process spins for use as a carrier of information.