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Sample records for pulse pressure variation

  1. Vasodilation increases pulse pressure variation, mimicking hypovolemic status in rabbits

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    Glauco A Westphal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that pulse pressure respiratory variation (PPV amplification, observed in hypovolemia, can also be observed during sodium nitroprusside (SNP-induced vasodilation. INTRODUCTION: PPV is largely used for early identification of cardiac responsiveness, especially when hypovolemia is suspected. PPV results from respiratory variation in transpulmonary blood flow and reflects the left ventricular preload variations during respiratory cycles. Any factor that decreases left ventricular preload can be associated with PPV amplification, as seen in hypovolemia. METHODS: Ten anesthetized and mechanically ventilated rabbits underwent progressive hypotension by either controlled hemorrhage (Group 1 or intravenous SNP infusion (Group 2. Animals in Group 1 (n = 5 had graded hemorrhage induced at 10% steps until 50% of the total volume was bled. Mean arterial pressure (MAP steps were registered and assumed as pressure targets to be reached in Group 2. Group 2 (n = 5 was subjected to a progressive SNP infusion to reach similar pressure targets as those defined in Group 1. Heart rate (HR, systolic pressure variation (SPV and PPV were measured at each MAP step, and the values were compared between the groups. RESULTS: SPV and PPV were similar between the experimental models in all steps (p > 0.16. SPV increased earlier in Group 2. CONCLUSION: Both pharmacologic vasodilation and graded hemorrhage induced PPV amplification similar to that observed in hypovolemia, reinforcing the idea that amplified arterial pressure variation does not necessarily represent hypovolemic status but rather potential cardiovascular responsiveness to fluid infusion.

  2. Respiratory Variations in Pulse Pressure Reflect Central Hypovolemia during Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation

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    Ingrid Elise Hoff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Correct volume management is essential in patients with respiratory failure. We investigated the ability of respiratory variations in noninvasive pulse pressure (ΔPP, photoplethysmographic waveform amplitude (ΔPOP, and pleth variability index (PVI to reflect hypovolemia during noninvasive positive pressure ventilation by inducing hypovolemia with progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP. Methods. Fourteen volunteers underwent LBNP of 0, −20, −40, −60, and −80 mmHg for 4.5 min at each level or until presyncope. The procedure was repeated with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. We measured stroke volume (suprasternal Doppler, ΔPP (Finapres, ΔPOP, and PVI and assessed their association with LBNP-level using linear mixed model regression analyses. Results. Stroke volume decreased with each pressure level (−11.2 mL, 95% CI −11.8, −9.6, P<0.001, with an additional effect of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (−3.0 mL, 95% CI −8.5, −1.3, P=0.009. ΔPP increased for each LBNP-level (1.2%, 95% CI 0.5, 1.8, P<0.001 and almost doubled during noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (additional increase 1.0%, 95% CI 0.1, 1.9, P=0.003. Neither ΔPOP nor PVI was significantly associated with LBNP-level. Conclusions. During noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, preload changes were reflected by ΔPP but not by ΔPOP or PVI. This implies that ΔPP may be used to assess volume status during noninvasive positive pressure ventilation.

  3. Automatic algorithm for monitoring systolic pressure variation and difference in pulse pressure.

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    Pestel, Gunther; Fukui, Kimiko; Hartwich, Volker; Schumacher, Peter M; Vogt, Andreas; Hiltebrand, Luzius B; Kurz, Andrea; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Leibundgut, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Difference in pulse pressure (dPP) reliably predicts fluid responsiveness in patients. We have developed a respiratory variation (RV) monitoring device (RV monitor), which continuously records both airway pressure and arterial blood pressure (ABP). We compared the RV monitor measurements with manual dPP measurements. ABP and airway pressure (PAW) from 24 patients were recorded. Data were fed to the RV monitor to calculate dPP and systolic pressure variation in two different ways: (a) considering both ABP and PAW (RV algorithm) and (b) ABP only (RV(slim) algorithm). Additionally, ABP and PAW were recorded intraoperatively in 10-min intervals for later calculation of dPP by manual assessment. Interobserver variability was determined. Manual dPP assessments were used for comparison with automated measurements. To estimate the importance of the PAW signal, RV(slim) measurements were compared with RV measurements. For the 24 patients, 174 measurements (6-10 per patient) were recorded. Six observers assessed dPP manually in the first 8 patients (10-min interval, 53 measurements); no interobserver variability occurred using a computer-assisted method. Bland-Altman analysis showed acceptable bias and limits of agreement of the 2 automated methods compared with the manual method (RV: -0.33% +/- 8.72% and RV(slim): -1.74% +/- 7.97%). The difference between RV measurements and RV(slim) measurements is small (bias -1.05%, limits of agreement 5.67%). Measurements of the automated device are comparable with measurements obtained by human observers, who use a computer-assisted method. The importance of the PAW signal is questionable.

  4. Pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients: tidal vs. forced inspiratory breathing.

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    Hong, D M; Lee, J M; Seo, J H; Min, J J; Jeon, Y; Bahk, J H

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated whether pulse pressure variation can predict fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients. Fifty-nine elective thoracic surgical patients were studied before induction of general anaesthesia. After volume expansion with hydroxyethyl starch 6 ml.kg(-1) , patients were defined as responders by a ≥ 15% increase in the cardiac index. Haemodynamic variables were measured before and after volume expansion and pulse pressure variations were calculated during tidal breathing and during forced inspiratory breathing. Median (IQR [range]) pulse pressure variation during forced inspiratory breathing was significantly higher in responders (n = 29) than in non-responders (n = 30) before volume expansion (18.2 (IQR 14.7-18.2 [9.3-31.3])% vs. 10.1 (IQR 8.3-12.6 [4.8-21.1])%, respectively, p breathing could predict fluid responsiveness (area under the curve 0.910, p breathing can be used to guide fluid management in spontaneously breathing patients.

  5. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation under different inhaled concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane in pigs undergoing hemorrhage

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    Alexandre Hideaki Oshiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Inhalant anesthesia induces dose-dependent cardiovascular depression, but whether fluid responsiveness is differentially influenced by the inhalant agent and plasma volemia remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation in pigs undergoing hemorrhage. METHODS: Twenty-five pigs were randomly anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data were registered sequentially at minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M1, 1.25 (M2, and 1.00 (M3. Then, following withdrawal of 30% of the estimated blood volume, these data were registered at a minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M4 and 1.25 (M5. RESULTS: The minimum alveolar concentration increase from 1.00 to 1.25 (M2 decreased the cardiac index and increased the central venous pressure, but only modest changes in mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were observed in all groups from M1 to M2. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure was only observed with desflurane. Following blood loss (M4, pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation and central venous pressure increased (p <0.001 and mean arterial pressure decreased in all groups. Under hypovolemia, the cardiac index decreased with the increase of anesthesia depth in a similar manner in all groups. CONCLUSION: The effects of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were not different during normovolemia or hypovolemia.

  6. Stroke volume variation compared with pulse pressure variation and cardiac index changes for prediction of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients

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    Randa Aly Soliman

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Baseline stroke volume variation ⩾8.15% predicted fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with acute circulatory failure. The study also confirmed the ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness.

  7. Pulse-pressure variation predicts fluid responsiveness during heart displacement for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

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    Lee, Jong-Hwan; Jeon, Yunseok; Bahk, Jae-Hyon; Gil, Nam-Su; Kim, Ki-Bong; Hong, Deok Man; Kim, Hyun Joo

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of pulse-pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness during heart displacement for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery using receiver operating characteristic analysis. A prospective study. A clinical study in a single cardiac anesthesia institution. Thirty-five patients undergoing elective off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. Central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial occlusion pressure, pulse-pressure variation, and cardiac index were measured 5 minutes after revascularization of the left anterior descending coronary artery and before heart displacement. Immediately after heart displacement for revascularization of the left circumflex artery, and 10 minutes after fluid loading with hydroxyethyl starch 6% (10 mL/kg) during heart displacement, the measurements were repeated. Patients whose cardiac indices increased by ≥15% from fluid loading were defined as responders. After heart displacement, only pulse-pressure variation showed significant difference between the responders and nonresponders (13.48 ± 6.42 v 7.33 ± 3.81, respectively; p fluid responsiveness (area under the curve = 0.839, p = 0.0001). Pulse-pressure variation >7.69% identified the responders, with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 83%. Pulse-pressure variation successfully predicted fluid responsiveness and would be useful in guiding fluid management during heart displacement for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulse pressure variation and prediction of fluid responsiveness in patients ventilated with low tidal volumes

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    Clarice Daniele Alves de Oliveira-Costa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the utility of pulse pressure variation (ΔRESP PP in predicting fluid responsiveness in patients ventilated with low tidal volumes (V T and to investigate whether a lower ΔRESP PP cut-off value should be used when patients are ventilated with low tidal volumes. METHOD: This cross-sectional observational study included 37 critically ill patients with acute circulatory failure who required fluid challenge. The patients were sedated and mechanically ventilated with a V T of 6-7 ml/kg ideal body weight, which was monitored with a pulmonary artery catheter and an arterial line. The mechanical ventilation and hemodynamic parameters, including ΔRESP PP, were measured before and after fluid challenge with 1,000 ml crystalloids or 500 ml colloids. Fluid responsiveness was defined as an increase in the cardiac index of at least 15%. ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01569308. RESULTS: A total of 17 patients were classified as responders. Analysis of the area under the ROC curve (AUC showed that the optimal cut-off point for ΔRESP PP to predict fluid responsiveness was 10% (AUC = 0.74. Adjustment of the ΔRESP PP to account for driving pressure did not improve the accuracy (AUC = 0.76. A ΔRESP PP>10% was a better predictor of fluid responsiveness than central venous pressure (AUC = 0.57 or pulmonary wedge pressure (AUC = 051. Of the 37 patients, 25 were in septic shock. The AUC for ΔRESP PP>10% to predict responsiveness in patients with septic shock was 0.484 (sensitivity, 78%; specificity, 93%. CONCLUSION: The parameter D RESP PP has limited value in predicting fluid responsiveness in patients who are ventilated with low tidal volumes, but a ΔRESP PP>10% is a significant improvement over static parameters. A ΔRESP PP > 10% may be particularly useful for identifying responders in patients with septic shock.

  9. Influence of Surface Resistivity and Temperature on Variation with Time of Current Pulses in Air at Optimum Pressure

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    S.G. Pimpale

    1977-04-01

    Full Text Available The variation of discharge current pulses with the surface nature of electrodes has been investigated by producing discharge in the intense ionizing zone of two ozonizers (A&B containing pure, dry air at a pressure of 4 & 10mm of mercury respectively. The course of reaction in the tube A showed that the periodic rise and fall of discharge counts through a series of recurrences whose amplitude varied randomly. During this reaction, steady potential, temperature of the electrolytic bath, counting time and pulse height were kept fixed. The phenomenon obtained for both the tubes is produced within a critical range of conditions. The results have been interpreted on the basis of activated adsorption at a temperature of 90 degree and 100 degree Centigrade and discussed on the theoretical grounds of change of surface resistivity upon the glass walls. Use of different coatings on annular surface in the same system with appropriate levels of electrolytic solution for a definite value of height-pulses and temperature, etc. shows significant variations in the discharge counts.

  10. Using an expiratory resistor, arterial pulse pressure variations predict fluid responsiveness during spontaneous breathing: an experimental porcine study.

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    Dahl, Michael K; Vistisen, Simon T; Koefoed-Nielsen, Jacob; Larsson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Fluid responsiveness prediction is difficult in spontaneously breathing patients. Because the swings in intrathoracic pressure are minor during spontaneous breathing, dynamic parameters like pulse pressure variation (PPV) and systolic pressure variation (SPV) are usually small. We hypothesized that during spontaneous breathing, inspiratory and/or expiratory resistors could induce high arterial pressure variations at hypovolemia and low variations at normovolemia and hypervolemia. Furthermore, we hypothesized that SPV and PPV could predict fluid responsiveness under these conditions. Eight prone, anesthetized and spontaneously breathing pigs (20 to 25 kg) were subjected to a sequence of 30% hypovolemia, normovolemia, and 20% and 40% hypervolemia. At each volemic level, the pigs breathed in a randomized order either through an inspiratory and/or an expiratory threshold resistor (7.5 cmH2O) or only through the tracheal tube without any resistor. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were measured during the breathing modes. Fluid responsiveness was defined as a 15% increase in stroke volume (DeltaSV) following fluid loading. Stroke volume was significantly lower at hypovolemia compared with normovolemia, but no differences were found between normovolemia and 20% or 40% hypervolemia. Compared with breathing through no resistor, SPV was magnified by all resistors at hypovolemia whereas there were no changes at normovolemia and hypervolemia. PPV was magnified by the inspiratory resistor and the combined inspiratory and expiratory resistor. Regression analysis of SPV or PPV versus DeltaSV showed the highest R2 (0.83 for SPV and 0.52 for PPV) when the expiratory resistor was applied. The corresponding sensitivity and specificity for prediction of fluid responsiveness were 100% and 100%, respectively, for SPV and 100% and 81%, respectively, for PPV. Inspiratory and/or expiratory threshold resistors magnified SPV and PPV in spontaneously breathing pigs during hypovolemia

  11. Passive leg-raising and end-expiratory occlusion tests perform better than pulse pressure variation in patients with low respiratory system compliance.

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    Monnet, Xavier; Bleibtreu, Alexandre; Ferré, Alexis; Dres, Martin; Gharbi, Rim; Richard, Christian; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    We tested whether the poor ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness in cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome was related to low lung compliance. We also tested whether the changes in cardiac index induced by passive leg-raising and by an end-expiratory occlusion test were better than pulse pressure variation at predicting fluid responsiveness in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients. Prospective study. Medical intensive care unit. We included 54 patients with circulatory shock (63 ± 13 yrs; Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, 63 ± 24). Twenty-seven patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (compliance of the respiratory system, 22 ± 3 mL/cm H2O). In nonacute respiratory distress syndrome patients, the compliance of the respiratory system was 45 ± 9 mL/cm H2O. We measured the response of cardiac index (transpulmonary thermodilution) to fluid administration (500 mL saline). Before fluid administration, we recorded pulse pressure variation and the changes in pulse contour analysis-derived cardiac index induced by passive leg-raising and end-expiratory occlusion. Fluid increased cardiac index ≥ 15% (44% ± 39%) in 30 "responders." Pulse pressure variation was significantly correlated with compliance of the respiratory system (r = .58), but not with tidal volume. The higher the compliance of the respiratory system, the better the prediction of fluid responsiveness by pulse pressure variation. A compliance of the respiratory system of 30 mL/cm H2O was the best cut-off for discriminating patients regarding the ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness. If compliance of the respiratory system was >30 mL/cm H2O, then the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve for predicting fluid responsiveness was not different for pulse pressure variation and the passive leg-raising and end-expiratory occlusion tests (0.98 ± 0.03, 0.91 ± 0.06, and 0.97 ± 0.03, respectively). By contrast

  12. Applicability of Pulse Pressure Variation during Unstable Hemodynamic Events in the Intensive Care Unit: A Five-Day Prospective Multicenter Study

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    Bertrand Delannoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse pressure variation can predict fluid responsiveness in strict applicability conditions. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical applicability of pulse pressure variation during episodes of patient hemodynamic instability in the intensive care unit. We conducted a five-day, seven-center prospective study that included patients presenting with an unstable hemodynamic event. The six predefined inclusion criteria for pulse pressure variation applicability were as follows: mechanical ventilation, tidal volume >7 mL/kg, sinus rhythm, no spontaneous breath, heart rate/respiratory rate ratio >3.6, absence of right ventricular dysfunction, or severe valvulopathy. Seventy-three patients presented at least one unstable hemodynamic event, with a total of 163 unstable hemodynamic events. The six predefined criteria for the applicability of pulse pressure variation were completely present in only 7% of these. This data indicates that PPV should only be used alongside a strong understanding of the relevant physiology and applicability criteria. Although these exclusion criteria appear to be profound, they likely represent an absolute contraindication of use for only a minority of critical care patients.

  13. Theoretical investigation of the variation of the radiation frequency of atmospheric-pressure CO/sub 2/ lasers in the course of a lasing pulse

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    Kuntsevich, B.F.; Maliuta, D.D.; Mezhevov, V.S.; Napartovich, A.P.; Strel' tsov, A.P.

    1987-02-01

    The variation of the radiation frequency during the emission pulse of atmospheric-pressure CO/sub 2/ lasers is studied for the case where the underlying mechanisms responsible for the frequency sweeping are the variation of the density of free electrons in the discharge and anomalous dispersion. The frequency variation can take on both a monotonic and nonmonotonic character. If the initial position of the resonator's longitudinal mode is fixed, then the frequency range within which the main fraction of the lasing energy luminesces changes with variations of the photon lifetime in the resonator and of the energy stored by the discharge. 17 references.

  14. Run-to-run variations, asymmetric pulses, and long time-scale transient phenomena in dielectric-barrier atmospheric pressure glow discharges

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    Shin, Jichul; Raja, Laxminarayan L [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2007-05-21

    The dielectric-barrier (DB) discharge is an important approach to generate uniform non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure glow discharges. We report run-to-run variations, asymmetric pulse formation and long time-scale transient phenomena in these discharges. For similar DB discharge geometric and operating conditions, we observe significant run-to-run variations as manifested in the different voltage-current waveforms at the start of each new run. These run-to-run variations are also accompanied by asymmetric pulses at the start of each run. The variations are observed to drift to a repeatable true steady-state condition on time scales of order tens of minutes to hours. Asymmetric pulse waveforms drift to a symmetric pulse waveform at the true steady state. We explore reasons for these phenomena and rule out thermal drift during a discharge run and gas-phase impurity buildup as potential causes. The most plausible explanation appears to be variations in the surface characteristics of the DBs between two consecutive runs owing to varying inter-run environmental exposure and the conditioning of the dielectric surface during a run owing to plasma-surface interactions. We speculate that the dielectric surface state affects the secondary electron emission coefficient of the surface which in turn is manifested in the discharge properties. A zero-dimensional model of the discharge is used to explore the effect of secondary electron emission.

  15. The added value of cardiac index and pulse pressure variation monitoring to mean arterial pressure-guided volume therapy in moderate-risk abdominal surgery (COGUIDE): a pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial.

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    Stens, J; Hering, J-P; van der Hoeven, C W P; Boom, A; Traast, H S; Garmers, L E; Loer, S A; Boer, C

    2017-09-01

    There is disagreement regarding the benefits of goal-directed therapy in moderate-risk abdominal surgery. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the addition of non-invasive cardiac index and pulse pressure variation monitoring to mean arterial pressure-based goal-directed therapy would reduce the incidence of postoperative complications in patients having moderate-risk abdominal surgery. In this pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial, we randomly allocated 244 patients by envelope drawing in a 1:1 fashion, stratified per centre. All patients had mean arterial pressure, cardiac index and pulse pressure variation measured continuously. In one group, healthcare professionals were blinded to cardiac index and pulse pressure variation values and were asked to guide haemodynamic therapy only based on mean arterial pressure (control group). In the second group, cardiac index and pulse pressure variation values were displayed and kept within target ranges following a pre-defined algorithm (CI-PPV group). The primary endpoint was the incidence of postoperative complications within 30 days. One hundred and seventy-five patients were eligible for final analysis. Overall complication rates were similar (42/94 (44.7%) vs. 38/81 (46.9%) in the control and CI-PPV groups, respectively; p = 0.95). The CI-PPV group had lower mean (SD) pulse pressure variation values (9.5 (2.0)% vs. 11.9 (4.6)%; p = 0.003) and higher mean (SD) cardiac indices (2.76 (0.62) l min(-1) .m(-2) vs. 2.53 (0.66) l min(-1) .m(-2) ; p = 0.004) than the control group. In moderate-risk abdominal surgery, we observed no additional value of cardiac index and pulse pressure variation-guided haemodynamic therapy to mean arterial pressure-guided volume therapy with regard to postoperative complications. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Evaluation of augmented pulse pressure variation using the Valsalva manoeuvre as a predictor of fluid responsiveness under open-chest conditions: A prospective observational study.

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    Min, Jeong Jin; Kim, Tae Kyong; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Park, Jiyeon; Cho, Hyun Sung; Kim, Wook Sung; Lee, Young Tak

    2017-05-01

    Pulse pressure variation (PPV) is a well known dynamic preload indicator of fluid responsiveness. However, its usefulness in open-chest conditions remains controversial. We evaluated whether augmented PPV during a Valsalva manoeuvre can predict fluid responsiveness after sternotomy. A prospective, observational study. Single-centre trial, study period from October 2014 to June 2015. Forty-nine adult patients who underwent off-pump coronary arterial bypass grafting. After midline sternotomy, haemodynamic parameters were measured before and after volume expansion (6 ml kg of crystalloids). PPV was calculated both automatically (PPVauto) and manually (PPVmanual). For PPV augmentation, we performed Valsalva manoeuvres with manual holding of the rebreathing bag and constant airway pressure of 30 cmH2O for 10 s before fluid loading and calculated PPV during the Valsalva manoeuvre (PPVVM). The predictive ability of PPVVM for fluid responsiveness using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis. Responders were identified when an increase in cardiac index of at least 12% occurred after fluid loading. Twenty-one patients were responders and 28 were nonresponders. PPVVM successfully predicted fluid responsiveness with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.88 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.75 to 0.95; sensitivity 91%, specificity 79%, P responsiveness [AUC 0.75 (0.62 to 0.88); sensitivity 79%, specificity 75%; and 0.76 (0.61 to 0.87]; sensitivity 71%, specificity 71%, respectively). However, only PPVVM showed a significant AUC-difference from that of central venous pressure (P = 0.008) and correlated with the change of cardiac index induced by volume expansion (r = 0.6, P responsiveness under open-chest condition. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02457572.

  17. Comparison between respiratory changes in the inferior vena cava diameter and pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness in postoperative patients.

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    de Oliveira, Olivia Haun; Freitas, Flávio Geraldo Rezende de; Ladeira, Renata Teixeira; Fischer, Claudio Henrique; Bafi, Antônio Tonete; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2016-08-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the reliability of the distensibility index of the inferior vena cava (dIVC) as a predictor of fluid responsiveness in postoperative, mechanically ventilated patients and compare its accuracy with that of the pulse pressure variation (PPV) measurement. We included postoperative mechanically ventilated and sedated patients who underwent volume expansion with 500mL of crystalloids over 15minutes. A response to fluid infusion was defined as a 15% increase in the left ventricular outflow tract velocity time integral according to transthoracic echocardiography. The inferior vena cava diameters were recorded by a subcostal view using the M-mode and the PPV by automatic calculation. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for the baseline dIVC and PPV. Twenty patients were included. The area under the ROC curve for dIVC was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.0), and the best cutoff value was 16% (sensitivity, 67%; specificity, 100%). The area under the ROC curve for PPV was 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-1.0), and the best cutoff was 12.4% (sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 100%). A noninferiority test showed that dIVC cannot replace PPV to predict fluid responsiveness (P=.28). The individual PPV discriminative properties for predicting fluid responsiveness in postoperative patients seemed superior to those of dIVC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Field mapping of ballistic pressure pulse sources

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    Rad Abtin Jamshidi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic pressure pulse sources are used since late 1990s for the extracorporeal treatment of chronic Enthesitis. Newly indications are found in trigger-point-therapy for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In both applications excellent results without relevant side effects were found in clinical trials. The technical principle of pressure pulse source is based on the same techniques used in air guns. A projectile is accelerated by pressurized air and hits the applicator with high kinetic energy. By this a compression wave travels through the material and induces a fast (4..5μs, almost singular pressure pulse of 2..10 MPa, which is followed by an equally short rarefaction phase of about the same amplitude. It is assumed that the pressure pulse accounts for the biomedical effects of the device. The slower inertial motion of the waveguide is damped by elastic stoppers, but still can be measured several micro seconds after the initial pressure pulse. In order to characterize the pressure pulse devices, field mapping is performed on several radial pressure pulse sources using the fiber optic hydrophone and a polyvinylidenfluorid (PVDF piezoelectric hydrophone. It could be shown that the current standard (IEC 61846 is not appropriate for characterization of ballistic pressure pulse sources.

  19. TRANSMISSION BEHAVIOR OF MUD-PRESSURE PULSE ALONG WELL BORE

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    LIU Xiu-shan; LI Bo; YUE Yu-quan

    2007-01-01

    In oil and gas industry, mud-pulse telemetry has been widely used to obtain directional data, drilling parameters, formation evaluation data and safety data, etc. Generally, the drilling mud in most current models was considered to be a single-phase fluid through which the mud pulses travel, despite the fact that the drilling mud is composed of two or more phases. In this article, a multiphase flow formula was proposed to calculate the mud-pulse velocity as mud solids and free-gas content change, and a mathematical model was put forward to simulate the dynamic-transmission behavior of the mud-pressure pulse or waves. Compared to conventional methods, the present model provides more accurate mud-pulse attenuation, and the dynamic-transmission behavior of drilling-mud pulses along well bores can also be easily examined. The model is valuable in improving the existing mud-pulse systems and developing new drilling-mud pulse systems.

  20. Respiratory variations in the photoplethysmographic waveform amplitude depend on type of pulse oximetry device.

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    Høiseth, Lars Øivind; Hoff, Ingrid Elise; Hagen, Ove Andreas; Kirkebøen, Knut Arvid; Landsverk, Svein Aslak

    2016-06-01

    Respiratory variations in the photoplethysmographic waveform amplitude predict fluid responsiveness under certain conditions. Processing of the photoplethysmographic signal may vary between different devices, and may affect respiratory amplitude variations calculated by the standard formula. The aim of the present analysis was to explore agreement between respiratory amplitude variations calculated using photoplethysmographic waveforms available from two different pulse oximeters. Analysis of registrations before and after fluid loads performed before and after open-heart surgery (aortic valve replacement and/or coronary artery bypass grafting) with patients on controlled mechanical ventilation. Photoplethysmographic (Nellcor and Masimo pulse oximeters) and arterial pressure waveforms were recorded. Amplitude variations induced by ventilation were calculated and averaged over ten respiratory cycles. Agreements for absolute values are presented in scatterplots (with least median square regression through the origin, LMSO) and Bland-Altman plots. Agreement for trending presented in a four-quadrant plot. Agreement between respiratory photoplethysmographic amplitude variations from the two pulse oximeters was poor with LMSO ΔPOPNellc = 1.5 × ΔPOPMas and bias ± limits of agreement 7.4 ± 23 %. Concordance rate with a fluid load was 91 %. Agreement between respiratory variations in the photoplethysmographic waveform amplitude calculated from the available signals output by two different pulse oximeters was poor, both evaluated by LMSO and Bland-Altman plot. Respiratory amplitude variations from the available signals output by these two pulse oximeters are not interchangeable.

  1. Intradiscal pressure variation under spontaneous ventilation

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    Roriz, Paulo; Ferreira, J.; Potes, J. C.; Oliveira, M. T.; Santos, J. L.; Simões, J. A.; Frazão, O.

    2014-05-01

    The pressure measured in the intervertebral discs is a response to the loads acting on the spine. External loads, such as the reaction forces resulting from locomotion, manual handling and collisions are probably the most relevant in studying spine trauma. However, the physiological functions such as breathing and hearth rate also participate in subtle variations of intradiscal pressure that can be observed only in vivo at resting. Present work is an effort to measure the effect of breathing on intradiscal pressure of an anesthetized sheep.

  2. Neighborhood Disadvantage and Variations in Blood Pressure

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    Cathorall, Michelle L.; Xin, Huaibo; Peachey, Andrew; Bibeau, Daniel L.; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which neighborhood disadvantage accounts for variation in blood pressure. Methods: Demographic, biometric, and self-reported data from 19,261 health screenings were used. Addresses of participants were geocoded and located within census block groups (n = 14,510, 75.3%). Three hierarchical linear models were…

  3. [Cardiovascular risk stratification. Systolic, diastolic or pulse pressure?].

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    Pede, S; Lombardo, M

    2001-04-01

    It is well known that hypertension is a highly prevalent condition in the population, carries a significant risk of adverse cardiovascular events and is therapeutically difficult to control. These factors render it "a major unsolved - but soluble - mass public health problem". One of the present-day aspects of the complexity of managing patients with high blood pressure (BP) derives from clinical and epidemiological data that have emerged over the past 10 years: the growing importance of the clinical significance of systolic and pulse BP. The pathophysiological basis of these data is based, on the one hand, on a better articulated definition of the components of BP, and on the other, on precise information concerning age-related modifications. The common definition of BP does not take into account pressure fluctuations occurring during the cardiac cycle; in fact, systolic and diastolic BP denote the extreme values of continuous variations in differential pressure. Diastolic BP reflects, to a greater extent, the trend of arterial resistances and mean BP (usually calculated as diastolic BP plus one third of the differential BP, and considered the "stable component" of the arterial sphygmogram) and has long been used as a diagnostic and therapeutic target. Systolic BP is more closely linked to variations in pulse BP (given from the difference between systolic and diastolic BP and considered the "dynamic component" of the arterial sphygmogram) and is produced by a group of factors including left ventricular ejection and the reflection of the sphygmic wave. As age increases, the walls of the aorta and the large elastic arteries progressively harden due to senile degenerative phenomena and the loss of elasticity as well as the progressive diffusion of atherosdclerotic lesions. This leads to the reduced capacity of the arterial wall to distend during the systole with a consequent increase in both systolic and pulse BP. These pathophysiological data have important clinical

  4. 33 CFR 159.111 - Pressure and vacuum pulse test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pressure and vacuum pulse test. 159.111 Section 159.111 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... vacuum pulse test. Liquid retention components of the device with manufacturer specified...

  5. Pulse variation of the optical emission of Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, S; Biryukov, A; Plokhotnichenko, V; Debur, V; Shearer, A

    2007-01-01

    The stability of the optical pulse of the Crab pulsar is analyzed based on the 1 $\\mu$s resolution observations with the Russian 6-meter and William Hershel telescopes equipped with different photon-counting detectors. The search for the variations of the pulse shape along with its arrival time stability is performed. Upper limits on the possible short time scale free precession of the pulsar are placed. The evidence of pulse time of arrival (TOA) variations on 1.5-2 hours time scale is presented, along with evidence of small light curve (shape and separation of main and secondary peaks) changes between data sets, on time scale of years. Also, the fine structure of the main pulse is studied.

  6. Influential factors for pressure pulse waveform in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yi; Wang, Ling; Li, Shuyu; Zhi, Guang; Li, Deyu; Zhang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    The effects of gender and other contributory factors on pulse waveform are still under arguments. In view of different results caused by few considerations of possible influential factors and general agreement of gender relating to pulse waveform, this study aims to address the confounding factors interfering with the association between gender and pulse waveform characteristics. A novel method was proposed to noninvasively detect pressure pulse wave and assess the morphology of pulse wave. Forty healthy young subjects were included in the present research. Height, weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured manually and body mass index (BMI), pulse blood pressure (PP) and heart rate (HR) were calculated automatically. Student's t test was used to analyze the gender difference and analysis of variance (ANOVA) to examine the effects of intrinsic factors. Univariate regression analysis was performed to assess the main factors on the waveform characteristics. Waveform features were found significantly different between genders. However this study indicates that the main factors for time-related and amplitude-related parameters are HR and SBP respectively. In conclusion, the impact of HR and SBP on pulse waveform features should not be underestimated, especially when analyzing the gender difference.

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O’Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian’an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hotteng, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco US; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, M Fabiola; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco JC; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; ’t Hoen, Peter AC; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; DeStefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth JF; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci influence systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans 1-3. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N=74,064) and follow-up studies (N=48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P= 2.7×10-8 to P=2.3×10-13) four novel PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2/PDGFRAI, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV, 11q24.3 near ADAMTS-8), two novel MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4, 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) which has recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the novel PP signals, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite to that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings indicate novel genetic mechanisms underlying blood pressure variation, including pathways that may differentially influence SBP and DBP. PMID:21909110

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wain, Louise V.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D.; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M.; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V.; Ehret, Georg B.; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G.; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Doerr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C.; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tonu; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U.; Webster, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F.; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I.; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Chambers, John C.; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kuehnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M.; Polasek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Voelker, Uwe; Voelzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L.; Taylor, Kent D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Ines; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sober, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F.; Melander, Olle; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Salomaa, Veikko; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, Fabiola M.; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S.; Bergman, Richard N.; Beilby, John P.; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A. William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S.; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N.; Rose, Lynda M.; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L.; Kahonen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Doering, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; Koenig, Inke R.; Felix, Janine F.; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stephanie; DeStefano, Anita L.; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J.; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T.; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wright, Alan F.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Tobin, Martin D.; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans(1-3). We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.V. Wain (Louise); G.C. Verwoert (Germaine); P.F. O'Reilly (Paul); G. Shi (Gang); T. Johnson (Toby); M. Bochud (Murielle); K. Rice (Kenneth); P. Henneman (Peter); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); G.B. Ehret (Georg); N. Amin (Najaf); M.G. Larson (Martin); V. Mooser (Vincent); D. Hadley (David); M. Dörr (Marcus); J.C. Bis (Joshua); T. Aspelund (Thor); T. Esko (Tõnu); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); J.H. Zhao; S.C. Heath (Simon); M. Laan (Maris); J. Fu (Jingyuan); G. Pistis (Giorgio); J. Luan; G. Lucas (Gavin); N. Pirastu (Nicola); I. Pichler (Irene); A.U. Jackson (Anne); R.J. Webster (Rebecca J.); F.F. Zhang; J. Peden (John); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); H. Campbell (Harry); W. Igl (Wilmar); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); V. Vitart (Veronique); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); S. Trompet (Stella); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); J.C. Chambers (John); X. Guo (Xiuqing); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); B. Kuhnel (Brigitte); L.M. Lopez; O. Polasek (Ozren); M. Boban (Mladen); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); V. Pihur (Vasyl); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); A. Hofman (Albert); S. Kundu (Suman); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.J. Hwang; R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); Y.A. Wang (Ying); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); J. Laitinen (Jaana); A. Pouta (Anneli); P. Zitting (Paavo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); K.D. Taylor (Kent); T.B. Harris (Tamara); H. Alavere (Helene); T. Haller (Toomas); A. Keis (Aime); M.L. Tammesoo; Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); P. Galan (Pilar); S. Hercberg (Serge); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); S. Eyheramendy (Susana); E. Org (Elin); S. Sõber (Siim); X. Lu (Xiaowen); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); T. Corre (Tanguy); C. Masciullo (Corrado); C. Sala (Cinzia); L. Groop (Leif); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); O. Melander (Olle); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); V. Salomaa (Veikko); P. d' Adamo (Pio); A. Fabretto (Antonella); F. Faletra (Flavio); S. Ulivi (Shelia); F. Del Greco M (Fabiola); M.F. Facheris (Maurizio); F.S. Collins (Francis); R.N. Bergman (Richard); J.P. Beilby (John); J. Hung (Judy); A.W. Musk (Arthur); M. Mangino (Massimo); S.Y. Shin (So Youn); N. Soranzo (Nicole); H. Watkins (Hugh); A. Goel (Anuj); A. Hamsten (Anders); P. Gider (Pierre); M. Loitfelder (Marisa); M. Zeginigg (Marion); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); S.S. Najjar (Samer); P. Navarro (Pau); S.H. Wild (Sarah); A.M. Corsi (Anna Maria); A. Singleton (Andrew); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); A.N. Parker (Alex); L.M. Rose (Lynda); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); D.J. Stott (David. J.); M. Orrù (Marco); M. Uda (Manuela); M.M. van der Klauw (Melanie); X. Li (Xiaohui); J. Scott (James); Y.D.I. Chen (Yii-Der Ida); G.L. Burke (Greg); M. Kähönen (Mika); J. Viikari (Jorma); A. Döring (Angela); T. Meitinger (Thomas); G.S. Davis; J.M. Starr (John); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); J.H. Lindeman (Jan H.); P.A.C. 't Hoen (Peter); I.R. König (Inke); J.F. Felix (Janine); R. Clarke; J. Hopewell; H. Ongen (Halit); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); S. Debette (Stéphanie); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); M. Fornage (Myriam); G.F. Mitchell (Gary); H. Holm (Hilma); K. Stefansson (Kari); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); M. Preuss (Michael); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Hayward (Caroline); I.J. Deary (Ian); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); O. Raitakari (Olli); W. Palmas (Walter); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); A.F. Wright (Alan); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); M. Farrall (Martin); T.D. Spector (Timothy); L.J. Palmer; J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A. Pfeufer (Arne); P. Gasparini (Paolo); D.S. Siscovick (David); D. Altshuler (David); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D. Toniolo (Daniela); H. Snieder (Harold); C. Gieger (Christian); P. Meneton (Pierre); N.J. Wareham (Nick); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Metspalu (Andres); L.J. Launer (Lenore); R. Rettig (Rainer); D.P. Strachan (David); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J.A.P. Willems van Dijk (Ko); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); M. Boehnke (Michael); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M.R. Järvelin; A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); D. Levy (Daniel); P. Arora (Pankaj)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNumerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N =

  10. Noninvasive Measurement of Central Vascular Pressures With Arterial Tonometry: Clinical Revival of the Pulse Pressure Waveform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew R.; Stepanek, Jan; Cevette, Michael; Covalciuc, Michael; Hurst, R. Todd; Tajik, A. Jamil

    2010-01-01

    The arterial pulse has historically been an essential source of information in the clinical assessment of health. With current sphygmomanometric and oscillometric devices, only the peak and trough of the peripheral arterial pulse waveform are clinically used. Several limitations exist with peripheral blood pressure. First, central aortic pressure is a better predictor of cardiovascular outcome than peripheral pressure. Second, peripherally obtained blood pressure does not accurately reflect central pressure because of pressure amplification. Lastly, antihypertensive medications have differing effects on central pressures despite similar reductions in brachial blood pressure. Applanation tonometry can overcome the limitations of peripheral pressure by determining the shape of the aortic waveform from the radial artery. Waveform analysis not only indicates central systolic and diastolic pressure but also determines the influence of pulse wave reflection on the central pressure waveform. It can serve as a useful adjunct to brachial blood pressure measurements in initiating and monitoring hypertensive treatment, in observing the hemodynamic effects of atherosclerotic risk factors, and in predicting cardiovascular outcomes and events. Radial artery applanation tonometry is a noninvasive, reproducible, and affordable technology that can be used in conjunction with peripherally obtained blood pressure to guide patient management. Keywords for the PubMed search were applanation tonometry, radial artery, central pressure, cardiovascular risk, blood pressure, and arterial pulse. Articles published from January 1, 1995, to July 1, 2009, were included in the review if they measured central pressure using radial artery applanation tonometry. PMID:20435839

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O'Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, Fabiola M; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco J C; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; Hoen, Peter A C 't; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; Destefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C; Tobin, Martin D; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2011-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we ident

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wain, Louise V.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D.; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M.; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V.; Ehret, Georg B.; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G.; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Doerr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C.; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tonu; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U.; Webster, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F.; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I.; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Chambers, John C.; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kuehnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M.; Polasek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Voelker, Uwe; Voelzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L.; Taylor, Kent D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Ines; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sober, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F.; Melander, Olle; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Salomaa, Veikko; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, Fabiola M.; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S.; Bergman, Richard N.; Beilby, John P.; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A. William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S.; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N.; Rose, Lynda M.; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L.; Kahonen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Doering, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; Koenig, Inke R.; Felix, Janine F.; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stephanie; DeStefano, Anita L.; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J.; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T.; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wright, Alan F.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Tobin, Martin D.; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans(1-3). We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.V. Wain (Louise); G.C. Verwoert (Germaine); P.F. O'Reilly (Paul); G. Shi (Gang); T. Johnson (Toby); M. Bochud (Murielle); K. Rice (Kenneth); P. Henneman (Peter); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); G.B. Ehret (Georg); N. Amin (Najaf); M.G. Larson (Martin); V. Mooser (Vincent); D. Hadley (David); M. Dörr (Marcus); J.C. Bis (Joshua); T. Aspelund (Thor); T. Esko (Tõnu); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); J.H. Zhao; S.C. Heath (Simon); M. Laan (Maris); J. Fu (Jingyuan); G. Pistis (Giorgio); J. Luan; G. Lucas (Gavin); N. Pirastu (Nicola); I. Pichler (Irene); A.U. Jackson (Anne); R.J. Webster (Rebecca J.); F.F. Zhang; J. Peden (John); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); H. Campbell (Harry); W. Igl (Wilmar); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); V. Vitart (Veronique); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); S. Trompet (Stella); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); J.C. Chambers (John); X. Guo (Xiuqing); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); B. Kuhnel (Brigitte); L.M. Lopez; O. Polasek (Ozren); M. Boban (Mladen); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); V. Pihur (Vasyl); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); A. Hofman (Albert); S. Kundu (Suman); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.J. Hwang; R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); Y.A. Wang (Ying); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); J. Laitinen (Jaana); A. Pouta (Anneli); P. Zitting (Paavo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); K.D. Taylor (Kent); T.B. Harris (Tamara); H. Alavere (Helene); T. Haller (Toomas); A. Keis (Aime); M.L. Tammesoo; Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); P. Galan (Pilar); S. Hercberg (Serge); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); S. Eyheramendy (Susana); E. Org (Elin); S. Sõber (Siim); X. Lu (Xiaowen); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); T. Corre (Tanguy); C. Masciullo (Corrado); C. Sala (Cinzia); L. Groop (Leif); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); O. Melander (Olle); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); V. Salomaa (Veikko); P. d' Adamo (Pio); A. Fabretto (Antonella); F. Faletra (Flavio); S. Ulivi (Shelia); F. Del Greco M (Fabiola); M.F. Facheris (Maurizio); F.S. Collins (Francis); R.N. Bergman (Richard); J.P. Beilby (John); J. Hung (Judy); A.W. Musk (Arthur); M. Mangino (Massimo); S.Y. Shin (So Youn); N. Soranzo (Nicole); H. Watkins (Hugh); A. Goel (Anuj); A. Hamsten (Anders); P. Gider (Pierre); M. Loitfelder (Marisa); M. Zeginigg (Marion); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); S.S. Najjar (Samer); P. Navarro (Pau); S.H. Wild (Sarah); A.M. Corsi (Anna Maria); A. Singleton (Andrew); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); A.N. Parker (Alex); L.M. Rose (Lynda); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); D.J. Stott (David. J.); M. Orrù (Marco); M. Uda (Manuela); M.M. van der Klauw (Melanie); X. Li (Xiaohui); J. Scott (James); Y.D.I. Chen (Yii-Der Ida); G.L. Burke (Greg); M. Kähönen (Mika); J. Viikari (Jorma); A. Döring (Angela); T. Meitinger (Thomas); G.S. Davis; J.M. Starr (John); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); J.H. Lindeman (Jan H.); P.A.C. 't Hoen (Peter); I.R. König (Inke); J.F. Felix (Janine); R. Clarke; J. Hopewell; H. Ongen (Halit); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); S. Debette (Stéphanie); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); M. Fornage (Myriam); G.F. Mitchell (Gary); H. Holm (Hilma); K. Stefansson (Kari); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); M. Preuss (Michael); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Hayward (Caroline); I.J. Deary (Ian); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); O. Raitakari (Olli); W. Palmas (Walter); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); A.F. Wright (Alan); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); M. Farrall (Martin); T.D. Spector (Timothy); L.J. Palmer; J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A. Pfeufer (Arne); P. Gasparini (Paolo); D.S. Siscovick (David); D. Altshuler (David); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D. Toniolo (Daniela); H. Snieder (Harold); C. Gieger (Christian); P. Meneton (Pierre); N.J. Wareham (Nick); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Metspalu (Andres); L.J. Launer (Lenore); R. Rettig (Rainer); D.P. Strachan (David); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J.A.P. Willems van Dijk (Ko); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); M. Boehnke (Michael); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M.R. Järvelin; A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); D. Levy (Daniel); P. Arora (Pankaj); P. Munroe (Patricia); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); M. Caulfield (Mark); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); P. Elliott (Paul); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); I. Barroso (Inês)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNumerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,60

  14. Tensile Strength of Water Exposed to Pressure Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that pressurization for an extended period of time increases the tensile strength of water, but little information is available on the effect of pressure pulses of short duration. This is addressed in the present paper where we first measure the tensile strength of water...

  15. Tree shoot bending generates hydraulic pressure pulses: a new long-distance signal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Rosana; Badel, Eric; Peraudeau, Sebastien; Leblanc-Fournier, Nathalie; Beaujard, François; Julien, Jean-Louis; Cochard, Hervé; Moulia, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    When tree stems are mechanically stimulated, a rapid long-distance signal is induced that slows down primary growth. An investigation was carried out to determine whether the signal might be borne by a mechanically induced pressure pulse in the xylem. Coupling xylem flow meters and pressure sensors with a mechanical testing device, the hydraulic effects of mechanical deformation of tree stem and branches were measured. Organs of several tree species were studied, including gymnosperms and angiosperms with different wood densities and anatomies. Bending had a negligible effect on xylem conductivity, even when deformations were sustained or were larger than would be encountered in nature. It was found that bending caused transient variation in the hydraulic pressure within the xylem of branch segments. This local transient increase in pressure in the xylem was rapidly propagated along the vascular system in planta to the upper and lower regions of the stem. It was shown that this hydraulic pulse originates from the apoplast. Water that was mobilized in the hydraulic pulses came from the saturated porous material of the conduits and their walls, suggesting that the poroelastic behaviour of xylem might be a key factor. Although likely to be a generic mechanical response, quantitative differences in the hydraulic pulse were found in different species, possibly related to differences in xylem anatomy. Importantly the hydraulic pulse was proportional to the strained volume, similar to known thigmomorphogenetic responses. It is hypothesized that the hydraulic pulse may be the signal that rapidly transmits mechanobiological information to leaves, roots, and apices.

  16. Ozone formation in pulsed SDBD in a wide pressure range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Nudnova, Maryia; mipt Team

    2011-10-01

    Ozone concentration in surface anode-directed DBD for wide pressure range (150 - 1300 torr) was experimentally measured. Voltage and pressure effect were investigated. Reduced electric field was measured for anode-directed and cathode-directed SDBD. E/n values in cathode-directed SDBD is higher than in cathode-directed on 50 percent at atmospheric pressure. E/n value increase leads to decrease the rate of oxygen dissociation and Ozone formation at lower pressures. Radiating region thickness of sliding discharge was measured. Typical thickness of radiating zone is 0.4-1.0 mm within pressure range 220-740 torr. It was shown that high-voltage pulsed nanosecond discharge due to high E/n value produces less Ozone with compare to other discharges. Kinetic model was proposed to describe Ozone formation in the pulsed nanosecond SDBD.

  17. Pulsed pressure treatment for inactivation of escherichia coli and listeria innocua in whole milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzrul, S; Largeteau, A; Demazeau, G [ICMCB, CNRS, Universite Bordeaux 1, site de l' ENSCPB, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, 33608 PESSAC cedex (France); Alpas, H [Food Engineering Department, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: sbuzrul@metu.edu.tr

    2008-07-15

    E. coli and L. innocua in whole milk were subjected to continuous pressure treatments (300, 350, 400, 450, 500, 550 and 600 MPa) at ambient temperature for 5, 10, 15 and 20 min. These treatments underlined that at moderate pressure values (300, 350 and 400 MPa), increasing the pressurization time from 5 to 20 min did not improve cell death to a great extent. Therefore, pulsed pressure treatments (at 300, 350 and 400 MPa) for 5 min (2.5 min x 2 pulses, 1 min x 5 pulses and 0.5 min x 10 pulses), 10 min (5 min x 2 pulses, 2 min x 5 pulses and 1 min x 10 pulses), 15 min (5 min x 3 pulses, 3 min x 5 pulses and 1.5 min x 10 pulses) and 20 min (10 min x 2 pulses, 5 min x 4 pulses, 4 min x 5 pulses and 2 min x 10 pulses) were applied. As already observed in continuous pressure experiments, in pulsed pressure treatments the inactivation level is improved with increasing pressure level and in addition with the number of applied pulses; however, the effect of pulse number is not additive. Results obtained in this study indicated that pulsed pressure treatments could be used to pasteurize the whole milk at lower pressure values than the continuous pressure treatments. Nevertheless, an optimization appears definetely necessary between the number of pulses and pressure levels to reach the desirable number of log-reduction of microorganisms.

  18. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepa, M. W.; Ridley, C. J.; Kamenev, K. V.; Huxley, A. D.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2.

  19. Tissue tearing caused by pulsed laser-induced ablation pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, J P; Walsh, J T

    1993-02-01

    Pressure induced by ablative pulses of laser radiation is shown to correlate with the mechanical disruption of tissue. The ablation pressure induced during Er:YSGG laser irradiation of skin, liver, and aorta was calculated from a ballistic pendulum-based measurement of recoil momentum. The ejected material and ablation crater were examined grossly and microscopically after ablation. A gas-dynamic model of laser-induced vaporization was used to understand the measured pressures. The results show that mechanical disruption of tissue occurs when the ablation pressure exceeds the strength of the irradiated tissue at sites of intrinsic weakness.

  20. Patient Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Monitoring With an Alert ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-01

    Dec 1, 2012 ... Blood pressure and pulse rate are two of the vital signs of humans and it is ... even from their homes and transfer the readings into the computer ... benefits from Omron's 'IntelliSense' .... (the port number assigned to the smart.

  1. Pulse Radiolysis at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, Knud

    1981-01-01

    A set-up enabling pulse radiolysis measurements at high temperatures (up to 320°C) and high pressures (up to 140 bar) has been constructed in collaboration between Risö National Laboratory and Studsvik Energiteknik. The cell has been used for experiments with aqueous solutions with the purpose...

  2. Correlation between diurnal variation of intraocular pressure, ocular pulse amplitude and corneal structural properties Correlação entre a variação diurna da pressão intraocular, amplitude de pulso e propriedades estruturais corneanas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Silva Villas-Bôas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fluctuation of intraocular pressure measurements obtained by Goldmann applanation tonometry, dynamic contour tonometry, and corneal compensated non-contact tonometry during office hours in glaucoma and healthy participants. This study also aims at correlating the intraocular pressure fluctuations with fluctuations of corneal hysteresis, central corneal thickness, mean central corneal curvature and ocular pulse amplitude. METHODS: A total of 12 controls (24 eyes and 21 patients (38 eyes with open-angle glaucoma were recruited. Intraocular pressure measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry, dynamic contour tonometry and corneal compensated non-contact tonometry, ocular pulse amplitude, central corneal curvature and thickness, corneal hysteresis, and resistance factor were obtained at intervals of 2 hours, between 9 AM and 5 PM. RESULTS: Intraocular pressure fluctuated significantly throughout the day in controls and glaucoma individuals with all tonometers (POBJETIVO: Avaliar a flutuação das medidas da pressão intraocular obtidas pela tonometria de aplanação de Goldmann, tonometria de contorno dinâmico e pela tonometria de não-contato com compensação corneana durante o período ambulatorial, em participantes com glaucoma e saudáveis. Esse estudo também correlacionou as flutuações da pressão intraocular com as flutuações da histerese corneana, espessura corneana central, média da curvatura corneana central e amplitude de pulso ocular. MÉTODOS: Um total de 12 controles (24 olhos e 21 pacientes com glaucoma de ângulo aberto (38 olhos foram selecionados. A pressão intraocular medida pela tonometria de aplanação de Goldmann, tonometria de contorno dinâmico e tonometria de não-contato com compensação corneana, amplitude de pulso ocular, a curvatura central e espessura corneanas, a histerese corneana e o fator de resistência foram medidos em intervalos de 2 horas, entre 9

  3. RELATIONS BETWEEN DAIRY FOOD INTAKE AND ARTERIAL STIFFNESS: PULSE WAVE VELOCITY AND PULSE PRESSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Georgina E.; Elias, Merrrill F.; Dore, Gregory A.; Abhayaratna, Walter P.; Robbins, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Modifiable risk factors, such as diet, are becomingly increasingly important in the management of cardiovascular disease, one of the greatest major causes of death and disease burden. Few studies have examined the role of diet as a possible means of reducing arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity, an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dairy food intake is associated with measures of arterial stiffness including carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. A cross-sectional analysis of a subset of the Maine Syracuse Longitudinal Study sample was performed. A linear decrease in pulse wave velocity was observed across increasing intakes of dairy food consumption (ranging from never/rarely to daily dairy food intake). The negative linear relationship between pulse wave velocity and intake of dairy food was independent of demographic variables, other cardiovascular disease risk factors and nutrition variables. The pattern of results was very similar for pulse pressure, while no association between dairy food intake and lipid levels was found. Further intervention studies are needed to ascertain whether dairy food intake may be an appropriate dietary intervention for the attenuation of age-related arterial stiffening and reduction of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:22431583

  4. Multi-Pulsed High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment of Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Sencer Buzrul

    2015-01-01

    Multi-pulsed high hydrostatic pressure (mpHHP) treatment of foods has been investigated for more than two decades. It was reported that the mpHHP treatment, with few exceptions, is more effective than the classical or single-pulsed HHP (spHHP) treatment for inactivation of microorganisms in fruit juice, dairy products, liquid whole egg, meat products, and sea foods. Moreover, the mpHHP treatment could be also used to inactivate enzymes in foods and to increase the shelf-life of foods. The eff...

  5. Variations in physician interpretation of overnight pulse oximetry monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Rory; Mehra, Reena; Strohl, Kingman P

    2007-09-01

    Overnight pulse oximetry is commonly used for hypoxemia evaluation in patients with COPD and sleep-disordered breathing. There is little information regarding its impact on physician decision making, and therefore an important measure of its clinical utility is untested and unknown. The aim of this study was to describe physician interpretation, use, and opinions regarding overnight pulse oximetry. Forty-one pulmonary physicians and fellows participated in structured interviews consisting of three oximetry record interpretations, oral responses to a standard question set, and a questionnaire. Qualitative data were analyzed using an open coding process. Quantitative data were assessed for distributions. Four measures were consistently used by the majority of physicians in record interpretation: background information, arterial oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry (Spo(2)) waveform and pattern, and time spent with Spo(2) 60% consensus. There was a wide range of opinions on important matters related to this test, including test utility, indications, variables considered most important for interpretation, and criteria for nocturnal oxygen prescription. Forty-one physicians provided 35 different opinions on when nocturnal supplemental oxygen should be initiated. The variation in physician interpretation, use, and opinions regarding overnight pulse oximetry calls into question its clinical utility and underscores a need for standardization of presentation, training, and interpretation.

  6. 49 CFR 195.104 - Variations in pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Variations in pressure. 195.104 Section 195.104... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.104 Variations in pressure. If, within a pipeline system, two or more components are to be connected at a place where one will operate at a higher pressure than another, the...

  7. Digital pressure ulcer after pulse oximetry [Digitales Druckulkus nach Pulsoxymetrie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeplin, Philip H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available [english] In emergency medical service, in intensive care unit and anaesthesia oxygenation is monitored with pulse oximetry apparatus. Pulse oximetry probe is usually attached to the finger, toe or earlobe. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report describing the occurrence of a pressure ulcer after finger pulse oximetry measurement.[german] Sowohl in der Notfall- und Intensivmedizin als auch in der Anästhesie wird die Sauerstoffsättigung des Blutes mit Pulsoxymetern ermittelt. Diese Pulsoxymeter werden üblicherweise an den Fingern, den Zehen oder dem Ohrläppchen angebracht. Wir beschreiben einen Fall, bei dem es nach Anlage eines Fingerclip-Pulsoxymeters zur Ausbildung eines operationsbedürftigen Druckulkus kam.

  8. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURE PULSING PIPELINE UNPLUGGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servin, M. A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Garfield, J. S. [AEM Consulting, LLC (United States); Golcar, G. R. [AEM Consulting, LLC (United States)

    2012-12-20

    The ability to unplug key waste transfer routes is generally essential for successful tank farms operations. All transfer lines run the risk of plugging but the cross site transfer line poses increased risk due to its longer length. The loss of a transfer route needed to support the waste feed delivery mission impacts the cost and schedule of the Hanford clean up mission. This report addresses the engineering feasibility for two pressure pulse technologies, which are similar in concept, for pipeline unplugging.

  9. Pulse Radiolysis at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, Knud

    1980-01-01

    A cell for pulse radiolytic measurements up to temperatures of 320°C and pressures of 14 MPa is constructed. The activation energy of the reaction OH + Cu2+ is determined to 13.3 kJ × mol−1 (3.2 kcal × mol−1). A preliminary study of the reaction e−aq + e−aq yields an activation energy of 22 kJ × ...

  10. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W.; Rihani, Ryan J.; Laine, Glen A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (Ctot) and increases in total peripheral resistance (Rtot) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (cph) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in cph do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in cph cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), Rtot, Ctot, and cph to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, cph was theoretically maintained constant, while Ctot, Rtot, and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, Ctot, Rtot, and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and cph was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in cph have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in Ctot. PMID:22561301

  11. Treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis with pressure-pulsed corticosteroid inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goektas, Oender; Lau, Larissa; Olze, Heidi

    2013-08-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis may cause olfactory dysfunction and affects quality of life in patients. In a prospective study we investigated the effect of topical application of corticosteroids through pressure-pulsed inhalation as treatment option of chronic rhinosinusitis with olfactory disorder. Patients with sinonasal olfactory disorder according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EP3OS) were allocated to the new nasal inhalation therapy or a systemic corticosteroid therapy, each receiving a corticosteroid course of 12 days. 18 patients received topical corticosteroid pressure-pulsed inhalation (AMSA, Schumacher, Dausenau) and 15 systemic corticosteroid. Olfactory function was measured before and after treatment using the Threshold Discrimination Identification score (TDI score) and visual analogue scales. Lund Mackay score (LMS) was measured before starting treatment. Olfactory function (OF) increased from 17.5 ± 6.4 to 21 ± 7.9 TDI points (p treatment after 2 months. In the follow-up period of 6 months, the mean TDI score dropped to 20.0 ± 9.2 points (p = 0.01). There was no correlation between LMS and TDI. Treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis with pressure-pulsed inhalation was demonstrated to be effective. Multicenter investigations with large participant numbers are needed.

  12. Simulations of piezoelectric pressure sensor for radial artery pulse measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Abhay B. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Kalange, Ashok E. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Tuljaram Chaturchand College, Baramati 413 102 (India); Bodas, Dhananjay, E-mail: dhananjay.bodas@gmail.co [Center for Nanobio Sciences, Agharkar Research Institute, Pune 411 004 (India); Gangal, S.A. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-04-15

    A radial artery pulse is used to diagnose human body constitution (Prakruti) in Ayurveda. A system consisting of piezoelectric sensor (22 mm x 12 mm), data acquisition card and LabView software was used to record the pulse data. The pulse obtained from the sensor was noisy, even though signal processing was done. Moreover due to large sized senor accurate measurements were not possible. Hence, a need was felt to develop a sensor of the size of the order of finger tip with a resonant frequency of the order of 1 Hz. A micromachined pressure sensor based on piezoelectric sensing mechanism was designed and simulated using CoventorWare. Simulations were carried out by varying dimensions of the sensor to optimize the resonant frequency, stresses and voltage generated as a function of applied pressure. All simulations were done with pressure ranging of 1-30 kPa, which is the range used by Ayurvedic practitioners for diagnosis. Preliminary work on fabrication of such a sensor was carried out successfully.

  13. Responses of azeotropes and relative volatilities to pressure variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2015-01-01

    of two columns. Because operating costs are highly sensitive to the pressure dependence of azeotropic compositions, reliable and accurate phase equilibrium thermodynamic property information is needed to computationally explore pressure variation for such processes. An analysis of property modeling has...

  14. Compaction-induced elevated pore pressure and creep pulsing in California faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshmanesh, M.; Shirzaei, M.

    2016-12-01

    The creeping segment of San Andreas Fault (CSAF) is recognized as a weak fault, namely, cannot sustain large earthquake stress drops. Moreover, variable creep rate constrained using kinematic models of geodetic and seismic data implies that the fault frictional strength is both spatially and temporally variable. Intrinsic low friction of fault zone material and locally elevated pore pressure due to ascend of mantle-derived fluid are proposed as possible justifications for CSAF weakness. However, lack of plausible explanation for creep pulsing observed at seismogenic zone in both hypotheses, calls for rethinking of the underlying mechanisms and processes governing the CSAF behavior. Here we provide evidence for the role of pore pressure variation in changing the fault frictional strength, not primarily due to mantle fluids. Using a rate- and state-dependent friction model, we estimate fault frictional properties between 2003 and 2011, and link their apparent temporal variations to undulation of effective normal stress. Since there is no evidence that tectonic stressing rate varies during this study period, we conclude that the variation of effective normal stress is a result of pore pressure change in the fault zone. We show that temporally variable pore pressure and its inferred spatial heterogeneity correlate perfectly with the variation of surface creep rate obtained using InSAR observations. Furthermore, our analysis of microseismicity suggests that the temporal variation of Gutenberg-Richter b-value and released seismic moment has respectively positive and negative correlation with the pore pressure variations. Our results highlight the role of 3D seal-bounded compartments formed through the compaction of intergranular pore spaces, leading to spatially heterogeneous elevated pore pressure and initiation of accelerated creep events. Frictional dilation due to creep acceleration, on the other hand, causes redistribution and reduction of the pore pressure

  15. Waveform descriptor for pulse onset detection of intracranial pressure signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Zhao, Mingxi; Peng, Chenglin; Hu, Xiao; Feng, Hua; Ji, Zhong

    2012-03-01

    We present an algorithm to identify the onset of intracranial pressure (ICP) pulses. The algorithm creates a waveform descriptor to extract the feature of each local minimum of the waveform and then identifies the onset by comparing the feature with a customized template. The waveform descriptor is derived by transforming the vectors connecting a given point and the local waveform samples around it into log-polar coordinates and ranking them into uniform bins. Using an ICP dataset consisting of 40933 normal beats and 306 segments of artifacts and noise, we investigated the performance of our algorithm (waveform descriptor, WD), global minimum within a sliding window (GM) and two other algorithms originally proposed for arterial blood pressure (ABP) signal (slope sum function, SSF and pulse waveform delineator, PUD). As a result, all the four algorithms showed good performance and WD showed overall better one. At a tolerance level of 30 ms (i.e., the predicted onset and ground truth were considered as correctly matched if the distance between the two was equal or less than 30 ms), WD achieved a sensitivity of 0.9723 and PPV of 0.9475, GM achieved a sensitivity of 0.9226 and PPV of 0.8968, PUD achieved a sensitivity of 0.9599 and PPV of 0.9327 and SSF, a sensitivity of 0.9720 and PPV of 0.9136. The evaluation indicates that the algorithms are effective for identifying the onset of ICP pulses.

  16. Multi-Pulsed High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment of Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sencer Buzrul

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-pulsed high hydrostatic pressure (mpHHP treatment of foods has been investigated for more than two decades. It was reported that the mpHHP treatment, with few exceptions, is more effective than the classical or single-pulsed HHP (spHHP treatment for inactivation of microorganisms in fruit juice, dairy products, liquid whole egg, meat products, and sea foods. Moreover, the mpHHP treatment could be also used to inactivate enzymes in foods and to increase the shelf-life of foods. The effects of the mpHHP treatment of foods are summarized and the differences between the mpHHP and spHHP are also emphasized.

  17. Association of adiposity with Pulse pressure amongst Gujarati Indian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Wasim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The current study was conducted to determine the effect of adiposity on vascular distensibility in Gujarati Indian adolescents as research indicating the pathogenesis of hypertension among overweight and/or obese Indian adolescents is scant and ethnic differences exist in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 488 Gujarati Indian adolescents of 16-19 years age group. Adiposity was assessed in terms of BMI, Body Fat %, Fat Mass, Fat Mass Index and Waist Circumference. Arterial blood pressure was recorded and pulse pressure (PP was calculated using the standard equation based on the difference between systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP. Pearson′s correlation coefficient was determined to find the association between the markers of adiposity and SBP, DBP and PP. Result: A significant positive correlationship was found between adiposity and PP in boys. However, no significant correlationship was found between adiposity and PP in girls. Conclusion: An increase in total as well as visceral adiposity is probably associated with a decrease in vascular distensibility in the Gujarati Indian adolescent boys but not in girls, thus indicating a protective role of female sex hormone estrogen which has been shown earlier to protect the vasculature from atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction which occurs with increase in adiposity.

  18. Association of adiposity with pulse pressure amongst gujarati Indian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Wasim A; Patel, Minal; Singh, Sk

    2010-07-01

    The current study was conducted to determine the effect of adiposity on vascular distensibility in Gujarati Indian adolescents as research indicating the pathogenesis of hypertension among overweight and/or obese Indian adolescents is scant and ethnic differences exist in the pathogenesis of hypertension A cross-sectional study was conducted on 488 Gujarati Indian adolescents of 16-19 years age group. Adiposity was assessed in terms of BMI, Body Fat %, Fat Mass, Fat Mass Index and Waist Circumference. Arterial blood pressure was recorded and pulse pressure (PP) was calculated using the standard equation based on the difference between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Pearson's correlation coefficient was determined to find the association between the markers of adiposity and SBP, DBP and PP. A significant positive correlationship was found between adiposity and PP in boys. However, no significant correlationship was found between adiposity and PP in girls. An increase in total as well as visceral adiposity is probably associated with a decrease in vascular distensibility in the Gujarati Indian adolescent boys but not in girls, thus indicating a protective role of female sex hormone estrogen which has been shown earlier to protect the vasculature from atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction which occurs with increase in adiposity.

  19. Understanding Cavitation Intensity through Pitting and Pressure Pulse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, A.; Singh, S.; Choi, J.-K.; Chahine, G.

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation erosion is of interest to the designers of ship propulsion devices because of its detrimental effects. One of the difficulties of predicting cavitation erosion is that the intensity of cavitation is not well predicted or defined. In this work we attempt to define the intensity of a cavitation erosion field through analysis of cavitation induced erosion pits and pressure pulses. In the pitting tests, material samples were subjected to cavitation field for a short duration of time selected within the test sample's incubation period, so that the test sample undergoes plastic deformation only. The sample material reacts to these cavitation events by undergoing localized permanent deformation, called pits. The resulting pitted sample surfaces were then optically scanned and analyzed. The pressure signals under cavitating jets and ultrasonic horns, for different conditions, were experimentally recorded using high frequency response pressure transducers. From the analysis of the pitting data and recorded pressure signals, we propose a model that describes the statistics, which in the future can be used to define the cavitation field intensity. Support for this work was provided by Office of Naval Research (ONR) under contract number N00014-08-C-0450, monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim.

  20. Relationship between stroke volume and pulse pressure during blood volume perturbation: a mathematical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bighamian, Ramin; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Arterial pulse pressure has been widely used as surrogate of stroke volume, for example, in the guidance of fluid therapy. However, recent experimental investigations suggest that arterial pulse pressure is not linearly proportional to stroke volume. However, mechanisms underlying the relation between the two have not been clearly understood. The goal of this study was to elucidate how arterial pulse pressure and stroke volume respond to a perturbation in the left ventricular blood volume based on a systematic mathematical analysis. Both our mathematical analysis and experimental data showed that the relative change in arterial pulse pressure due to a left ventricular blood volume perturbation was consistently smaller than the corresponding relative change in stroke volume, due to the nonlinear left ventricular pressure-volume relation during diastole that reduces the sensitivity of arterial pulse pressure to perturbations in the left ventricular blood volume. Therefore, arterial pulse pressure must be used with care when used as surrogate of stroke volume in guiding fluid therapy.

  1. Change of guinea pig inner ear pressure by square wave middle ear cavity pressure variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen, RA; Segenhout, JM; Albers, FWJ; Wit, HP

    The inner ear fluid pressure of guinea pigs was measured during square wave middle ear cavity pressure variation. Time constants were derived for the slopes of the inner ear pressure recovery curves after middle ear pressure change. A "single exponential" function did not fit well and therefore more

  2. Change of guinea pig inner ear pressure by square wave middle ear cavity pressure variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen, RA; Segenhout, JM; Albers, FWJ; Wit, HP

    2002-01-01

    The inner ear fluid pressure of guinea pigs was measured during square wave middle ear cavity pressure variation. Time constants were derived for the slopes of the inner ear pressure recovery curves after middle ear pressure change. A "single exponential" function did not fit well and therefore more

  3. Theoretical Studies of the Output Pulse with Variation of the Pumping Pulse for RF Excited CO2 Pulsed Waveguide Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Rauf; ZHOU Wei; XIN Jian-guo

    2006-01-01

    The behavior of a RF-excited waveguide CO2 laser in the pulse regime is studied theoretically. The output pulse evolution is studied by applying three types of pulses namely the square, sine and the triangular ones as the excitation pulses. The frequency dependence behavior of the output pulse is also presented.

  4. Ethnic Variations in Blood Pressure and Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.O. Agyemang (Charles)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of the study was to review published evidence on whether blood pressure levels and the prevalence of hypertension are higher or lower in South Asian adults living in the UK as compared to white populations. A systematic literature review was carried out using MEDLINE 196

  5. Ethnic Variations in Blood Pressure and Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.O. Agyemang (Charles)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of the study was to review published evidence on whether blood pressure levels and the prevalence of hypertension are higher or lower in South Asian adults living in the UK as compared to white populations. A systematic literature review was carried out using MEDLINE

  6. Central Pulse Pressure in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew A.; Sozio, Stephen M.; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Go, Alan S.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Rafey, Mohammed; Wright, Jackson T.; Duckworth, Mark J.; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Joffe, Marshall P.

    2010-01-01

    Central pulse pressure can be non-invasively derived using the radial artery tonometric methods. Knowledge of central pressure profiles has predicted cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, particularly those with known coronary artery disease and those receiving dialysis. Few data exist characterizing central pressure profiles in patients with mild-moderate chronic kidney disease who are not on dialysis. We measured central pulse pressure cross-sectionally in 2531 participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study to determine correlates of the magnitude of central pulse pressure in the setting of chronic kidney disease. Tertiles of central pulse pressure (CPP) were 51 mmHg with an overall mean (± S.D.) of 46 ± 19 mmHg. Multivariable regression identified the following independent correlates of central pulse pressure: age, gender, diabetes mellitus, heart rate (negatively correlated), glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin, glucose and PTH concentrations. Additional adjustment for brachial mean arterial pressure and brachial pulse pressure showed associations for age, gender, diabetes, weight and heart rate. Discrete intervals of brachial pulse pressure stratification showed substantial overlap within the associated central pulse pressure values. The large size of this unique chronic kidney disease cohort provides an ideal situation to study the role of brachial and central pressure measurements in kidney disease progression and cardiovascular disease incidence. PMID:20660819

  7. Effect of frequency variation on electromagnetic pulse interaction with charges and plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Goor, van F.A.; Verschuur, J.W.J.; Boller, K.-J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of frequency variation (chirp) in an electromagnetic (EM) pulse on the pulse interaction with a charged particle and plasma is studied. Various types of chirp and pulse envelopes are considered. In vacuum, a charged particle receives a kick in the polarization direction after interaction

  8. Multivariate Modeling of Body Mass Index, Pulse Pressure, Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure in Chinese Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng; Pang, Zengchang;

    2015-01-01

    Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure (PP), and body mass index (BMI) are heritable traits in human metabolic health but their common genetic and environmental backgrounds are not well investigated. The aim of this article was to explore the phenotypic and genetic associations among...... PP, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and BMI. The studied sample contained 615 twin pairs (17-84 years) collected in the Qingdao municipality. Univariate and multivariate structural equation models were fitted for assessing the genetic and environmental contributions...... model estimated (1) high genetic correlations for DBP with SBP (0.87), PP with SBP (0.75); (2) low-moderate genetic correlations between PP and DBP (0.32), each BP component and BMI (0.24-0.37); (3) moderate unique environmental correlation for PP with SBP (0.68) and SBP with DBP (0.63); (4...

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure (letter)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wain, L.V.; Verwoert, G.C.; O'Reilly, P.F.; Shi, G.; Johnson, T.; Johnson, A.D.; Bochud, M.; Rice, K.M.; Henneman, P.; Smith, A.V.; Ehret, G.B.; Amin, N.; Larson, M.G.; Mooser, V.; Hadley, D.; Dorr, M.; Bis, J.C.; Aspelund, T.; Esko, T.; Janssens, A.C.J.W.; Zhao, J.H.; Heath, S.; Laan, M.; Fu, J.Y.; Pistis, G.; Luan, J.A.; Arora, P.; Lucas, G.; Pirastu, N.; Pichler, I.; Jackson, A.U.; Webster, R.J.; Zhang, F.; Peden, J.F.; Schmidt, H.; Tanaka, T.; Campbell, H.; Igl, W.; Milaneschi, Y.; Hottenga, J.J.; Vitart, V.; Chasman, D.I.; Trompet, S.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Alizadeh, B.Z.; Chambers, J.C.; Guo, X.Q.; Lehtimaki, T.; Kuhnel, B.; Lopez, L.M.; Polasek, O.; Boban, M.; Nelson, C.P.; Morrison, A.C.; Pihur, V.; Ganesh, S.K.; Hofman, A.; Kundu, S.; Mattace-Raso, F.U.S.; Rivadeneira, F.; Sijbrands, E.J.G.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Hwang, S.J.; Vasan, R.S.; Wang, T.J.; Bergmann, S.; Vollenweider, P.; Waeber, G.; Laitinen, J.; Pouta, A.; Zitting, P.; McArdle, W.L.; Kroemer, H.K.; Volker, U.; Volzke, H.; Glazer, N.L.; Taylor, K.D.; Harris, T.B.; Alavere, H.; Haller, T.; Keis, A.; Tammesoo, M.L.; Aulchenko, Y.; Barroso, I.; Khaw, K.T.; Galan, P.; Hercberg, S.; Lathrop, M.; Eyheramendy, S.; Org, E.; Sober, S.; Lu, X.W.; Nolte, I.M.; Penninx, B.W.; Corre, T.; Masciullo, C.; Sala, C.; Groop, L.; Voight, B.F.; Melander, O.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Salomaa, V.; d'Adamo, A.P.; Fabretto, A.; Faletra, F.; Ulivi, S.; Del Greco, M.F.; Facheris, M.; Collins, F.S.; Bergman, R.N.; Beilby, J.P.; Hung, J.; Musk, A.W.; Mangino, M.; Shin, S.Y.; Soranzo, N.; Watkins, H.; Goel, A.; Hamsten, A.; Gider, P.; Loitfelder, M.; Zeginigg, M.; Hernandez, D.; Najjar, S.S.; Navarro, P.; Wild, S.H.; Corsi, A.M.; Singleton, A.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Willemsen, G.; Parker, A.N.; Rose, L.M.; Buckley, B.; Stott, D.; Orru, M.; Uda, M.; van der Klauw, M.M.; Zhang, W.H.; Li, X.Z.; Scott, J.; Chen, Y.D.I.; Burke, G.L.; Kahonen, M.; Viikari, J.; Doring, A.; Meitinger, T.; Davies, G.; Starr, J.M.; Emilsson, V.; Plump, A.; Lindeman, J.H.; 'T Hoen, P.A.C.; Konig, I.R.; Felix, J.F.; Clarke, R.; Hopewell, J.C.; Ongen, H.; Breteler, M.; Debette, S.; DeStefano, A.L.; Fornage, M.; Mitchell, G.F.; Smith, N.L.; Holm, H.; Stefansson, K.; Thorleifsson, G.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Samani, N.J.; Preuss, M.; Rudan, I.; Hayward, C.; Deary, I.J.; Wichmann, H.E.; Raitakari, O.T.; Palmas, W.; Kooner, J.S.; Stolk, R.P.; Jukema, J.W.; Wright, A.F.; Boomsma, D.I.; Bandinelli, S.; Gyllensten, U.B.; Wilson, J.F.; Ferrucci, L.; Schmidt, R.; Farrall, M.; Spector, T.D.; Palmer, L.J.; Tuomilehto, J.; Pfeufer, A.; Gasparini, P.; Siscovick, D.; Altshuler, D.; Loos, R.J.F.; Toniolo, D.; Snieder, H.; Gieger, C.; Meneton, P.; Wareham, N.J.; Oostra, B.A.; Metspalu, A.; Launer, L.; Rettig, R.; Strachan, D.P.; Beckmann, J.S.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Erdmann, J.; van Dijk, K.W.; Boerwinkle, E.; Boehnke, M.; Ridker, P.M.; Jarvelin, M.R.; Chakravarti, A.; Abecasis, G.R.; Gudnason, V.; Newton-Cheh, C.; Levy, D.; Munroe, P.B.; Psaty, B.M.; Caulfield, M.J.; Rao, D.C.; Tobin, M.D.; Elliott, P.; van Duijn, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans(1-3). We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we

  10. Processing of X-ray Microcalorimeter Data with Pulse Shape Variation using Principal Component Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Daikang; Gades, Lisa; Jacobsen, Chris; Madden, Timothy; Miceli, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    We present a method using principal component analysis (PCA) to process x-ray pulses with severe shape variation where traditional optimal filter methods fail. We demonstrate that PCA is able to noise-filter and extract energy information from x-ray pulses despite their different shapes. We apply this method to a dataset from an x-ray thermal kinetic inductance detector which has severe pulse shape variation arising from position-dependent absorption.

  11. Atmospheric pressure variations and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) presents with increased frequency in the winter and spring months. Seasonal changes in atmospheric pressure mirrors this pattern. AIM: To establish if there was a seasonal variation in the occurrence of RAAA and to determine if there was any association with atmospheric pressure changes. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed. Daily atmospheric pressure readings for the region were obtained. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant monthly variation in RAAA presentation with 107 cases (52.5%) occurring from November to March. The monthly number of RAAA and the mean atmospheric pressure in the previous month were inversely related (r = -0.752, r (2) = 0.566, P = 0.03), and there was significantly greater daily atmospheric pressure variability on days when patients with RAAA were admitted. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a relationship between atmospheric pressure and RAAA.

  12. The Relation Between Aortic Pulse Pressure and Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Metin Esen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pulse pressure (PP is a significant marker of cardiovascular morbidity.We investigated the relation between aortic PP and the presence and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography (CAG.Patients and Method: The study group consisted of 550 patients (363 men, 187 women.We evaluated patients in two different groups, PP < 60 mmHg and ≥ 60 mmHg.Results: In univariate analysis gender and presence of hyperlipidemia showed no statistically significant differences between both groups. However, the ratio of patients having diabetes mellitus, hypertension or smoking were significantly higher in ≥ 60 mmHg PP group. The mean age was 55.2 ±11.9 in < 60 mmHg PP group and 61.3±9.3 in the other group (p<0.01. Although systolic blood pressure level was higher in ≥ 60 mmHg PP group (160.4±21.1 vs. 126.4±13.5, p< 0.001, diastolic blood pressure level showed no significant differences between both groups (78.3±13.5 vs. 80.3±10.2, p= 0.32. In the <60 mmHg PP group, the ratio of normal CAG was significantly higher, and also, the critically CAD rate was lower than the other group. In multivariate analysis, smoking [odds ratios (OR 2.344, 95% confidence intervals (CI, 1.416-3.879], male gender (OR 5.858, 95% CI, 3.425-10.019 and PP ≥60 mmHg (OR 25.788, 95% CI, 14.001-47.498 were evaluated as an independent indicators of CAD.Conclusions: In our study, we demonstrate that, aortic PP ≥60 mmHg is related to the risk of critically CAD as an independent factor.

  13. On the Responses of Azeotropes to Pressure Variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2014-01-01

    . Because of the sensitivity of column size to accurate estimates of the relative volatility, it is important to use reliable phase equilibrium thermodynamics when exploring the possibility of varying pressure to avoid an azeotrope. Based on an analysis of the pressure sensitivity of azeotropic compositions......Systems with azeotropes cannot be separated by simple distillation since the vapor and liquid compositions are the same. Variation of the applied pressure can shift the azeotropic composition out of the range of purification of a single column or may allow pressure swing operation of two columns...

  14. Investigation of Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge and Its Audio Characteristics in Atmospheric-pressure Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Chengyan; RAN Huijuan; WANG Jue; WANG Tao; YAN Ping

    2013-01-01

    There was no well-resolved mechanism of audible noise caused by corona discharge on UHV transmission lines.Hence we measured the sound pressure of pulsed discharges between needle-plane electrodes under different discharge conditions in air,for revealing the intrinsic relationship between discharge and its audible noise(AN).The relationship between discharge parameters and audio characteristics was drawn from the analysis of the electric and sound signals obtained in experiments.Experiment results showed that nanosecond pulsed discharges produce the sound pressure with a microsecond pulse lagging behind the discharge pulse in their waveforms.The peak value of the sound pulse decreases and its high frequency component gradually attenuates,when the measuring distance from discharges increases.The sound pulses correlate with the discharge current and voltage significantly,especially the current.The audible noise produced by repetitive pulsed discharge increases with the strength,duration,and pulse repetition rate of discharge.

  15. Stroke volume variation does not predict fluid responsiveness in patients with septic shock on pressure support ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Faber, T

    2006-01-01

    Stroke volume variation (SVV)--as measured by the pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO) system--predicts the cardiac output response to a fluid challenge in patients on controlled ventilation. Whether this applies to patients on pressure support ventilation is unknown....

  16. Characteristics of wind pressure pulse on large-span flat roofs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ying; CAO Zheng-gang; WU Yue

    2009-01-01

    The wind pressure pulse events, among the most important characteristics of wind pressure fluctuations on large-span fiat roofs, were investigated by wind tunnel tests in this paper. Incorporating the formation mechanism of wind pressure pulse events, the peak over threshold method was employed to study properties of this kind of events. The event duration time, the energy contribution, the number of the pulse events, and the distribution of average peak pressure were calculated. Probability density functions of some typical samples in separation region were also given. Results show that the non-Gaussian roof pressure is strong in the flow separa tion region owing to the wind pressure pulse events. Evaluations of the extreme peak pressures, which can be determined by the peak over threshold method effectively, are important to the design of building cladding.

  17. Genome-wide association analyses using electronic health records identify new loci influencing blood pressure variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas J; Ehret, Georg B; Nandakumar, Priyanka; Ranatunga, Dilrini; Schaefer, Catherine; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Iribarren, Carlos; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Risch, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Longitudinal electronic health records on 99,785 Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort individuals provided 1,342,814 systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements for a genome-wide association study on long-term average systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure. We identified 39 new loci among 75 genome-wide significant loci (P ≤ 5 × 10(-8)), with most replicating in the combined International Consortium for Blood Pressure (ICBP; n = 69,396) and UK Biobank (UKB; n = 152,081) studies. Combining GERA with ICBP yielded 36 additional new loci, with most replicating in UKB. Combining all three studies (n = 321,262) yielded 241 additional genome-wide significant loci, although no replication sample was available for these. All associated loci explained 2.9%, 2.5%, and 3.1% of variation in systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure, respectively, in GERA non-Hispanic whites. Using multiple blood pressure measurements in GERA doubled the variance explained. A normalized risk score was associated with time to onset of hypertension (hazards ratio = 1.18, P = 8.2 × 10(-45)). Expression quantitative trait locus analysis of blood pressure loci showed enrichment in aorta and tibial artery.

  18. Sarcopenia Is Associated with High Pulse Pressure in Older Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio José Coelho Júnior

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome associated with impairment of muscle function, metabolism, and cognition in older women. Recent studies have shown a relationship between changes in muscle mass and the cardiovascular system. However, this relationship has not been fully elucidated. Methods. One hundred and thirty community-dwelling Brazilian older women (65.4 ± 6.3 years were recruited to participate in this study. Data on body composition (via bioelectrical impedance measurements, cardiovascular parameters (using an automatic and noninvasive monitor, and muscle function (using a 3-meter gait speed test were measured. Results. Sarcopenic older women (n=43 presented higher levels of pulse pressure (PP (60.3 ± 2.6 mmHg and lower muscle function (0.5 ± 0.0 m/s compared with nonsarcopenic subjects (n=87 (53.7 ± 1.5 mmHg; 0.9 ± 0.0 m/s (P<0.05. Linear regression analysis demonstrated a significantly negative association between skeletal muscle index (SMI and PP levels (β=−226, P<0.05. Furthermore, sarcopenic older women showed a 3.1-fold increased risk of having higher PP levels compared with nonsarcopenic women (IC = 1.323–7.506 (P<0.05. Conclusion. Sarcopenic older women showed lower muscle function and higher cardiovascular risk due to increased PP levels compared with nonsarcopenic subjects.

  19. Evaluation of tracheal cuff pressure variation in spontaneously breathing patients

    OpenAIRE

    Plotnikow, Gustavo A; Roux, Nicolas; Feld, Viviana; Gogniat, Emiliano; Villalba, Dario; Ribero, Noelia Vairo; Sartore, Marisa; Bosso, Mauro; Quiroga, Corina; Leiva, Valeria; Scrigna, Mariana; Puchulu, Facundo; Distéfano, Eduardo; Scapellato, Jose Luis; Intile, Dante

    2013-01-01

    Background: Most of the studies referring cuff tubes’ issues were conducted on intubated patients. Not much is known about the cuff pressure performance in chronically tracheostomized patients disconnected from mechanical ventilation. Objective: To evaluate cuff pressure (CP) variation in tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing patients in a weaning rehabilitation center. Materials and Methods: Experimental setup to test instruments in vitro, in which the gauge (TRACOE) performance at differ...

  20. Variation of the pulse profile of Hercules X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, T.; Inoue, H.; Kawai, N.; Koyama, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Mitani, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Nagase, F.; Nakagawa, M.; Kondo, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray pulsar Her X-1 was observed in an on-state during its 35th cycle of activity in May, 1983 using the gas scintillation proportional counter (GSPC) array of the Tenma X-ray astronomy satellite. The outstanding features observed during the declining phase of the on-state included: a sharp decrease in the main X-ray pulse amplitude; and a steady increase in the column density of cool matter. On the basis of the spectral shape of the pulses, it is suggested that the main phase was attenuated due to electron scattering of the X-ray beam in a highly ionized medium located 3 x 10 to the 8th cm from the neutron star. Near the end of the on-state, the main pulse totally disappeared and a plain sinusoidal profile was observed. The observed pulse profiles are reproduced in graphic form.

  1. Characteristics of SF6 Switch with a Small Gap under High Pressure and Nanosecond Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Junping; QIU Aici; BO Haiwang; DONG Qinxiao; HE Xiaoping

    2009-01-01

    Structural design and tests on the characteristics of the SFs gas switch with a small gap are presented. This kind of switch often works under high pressure and nanosecond pulse for getting pulse with faster risetime. The breakdown voltage and breakdown delay of a number of switches with different geometries, gas pressures and pulse waveforms were investigated.Experimental results suggested that the breakdown voltage increases linearly with the gas pressure,and the breakdown delay decreases with an increase in the gas pressure and a reduction in the gap distance of the switch under the same applied pulse. By using this kind of switch with a gap of 3 mm as a peaking switch, a pulse generator can provide an output voltage with a peak voltage of 300 kV and a risetime of 3 ns on a resistance load of 150 Ω.

  2. Relationship between Resting Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Pulse Pressure in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Casonatto, Juliano; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; Dias, Raphael Mendes Ritti

    2017-05-01

    High resting heart rate is considered an important factor for increasing mortality chance in adults. However, it remains unclear whether the observed associations would remain after adjustment for confounders in adolescents. To analyze the relationship between resting heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure in adolescents of both sexes. A cross-sectional study with 1231 adolescents (716 girls and 515 boys) aged 14-17 years. Heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure were evaluated using an oscillometric blood pressure device, validated for this population. Weight and height were measured with an electronic scale and a stadiometer, respectively, and waist circumference with a non-elastic tape. Multivariate analysis using linear regression investigated the relationship between resting heart rate and blood pressure and pulse pressure in boys and girls, controlling for general and abdominal obesity. Higher resting heart rate values were observed in girls (80.1 ± 11.0 beats/min) compared to boys (75.9 ± 12.7 beats/min) (p ≤ 0.001). Resting heart rate was associated with systolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.15 [0.04; 0.26]) and girls (Beta = 0.24 [0.16; 0.33]), with diastolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.50 [0.37; 0.64]) and girls (Beta = 0.41 [0.30; 0.53]), and with pulse pressure in boys (Beta = -0.16 [-0.27; -0.04]). This study demonstrated a relationship between elevated resting heart rate and increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure in both sexes and pulse pressure in boys even after controlling for potential confounders, such as general and abdominal obesity. A frequência cardíaca de repouso é considerada um importante fator de aumento de mortalidade em adultos. Entretanto, ainda é incerto se as associações observadas permanecem após ajuste para fatores de confusão em adolescentes. Analisar a relação entre frequência cardíaca de repouso, pressão arterial e pressão de pulso em adolescentes dos dois sexos. Estudo transversal

  3. Dynamic effects of high-pressure pulsed water jet in low-permeability coal seams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-hong; ZHOU Dong-ping; LU Yi-yu; KANG Yong; ZHAO Yu; WANG Xiao-chuan

    2009-01-01

    Mine gas extraction in China is difficult due to the characteristics such as mi-cro-porosity, low-permeability and high adsorption of coal seams. The pulsed mechanism of a high-pressure pulsed water jet was studied through theoretical analysis, experiment and field measurement. The results show that high-pressure pulsed water jet has three dynamic properties. What's more, the three dynamic effects can be found in low-perme-ability coal seams. A new pulsed water jet with 200-1 000 Hz oscillation frequency and peak pressure 2.5 times than average pressure was introduced. During bubble collapsing, sound vibration and instantaneous high pressures over 100 MPa enhanced the cutting ability of the high-pressure jet. Through high-pressure pulsed water jet drilling and slotting, the exposure area of coal bodies was greatly enlarged and pressure of the coal seams rapidly decreased. Therefore, the permeability of coal seams was improved and gas ab-sorption rate also decreased. Application results show that gas adsorption rate decreased by 30%-40% and the penetrability coefficient increased 100 times. This proves that high-pressure pulsed water is more efficient than other conventional methods.

  4. Significant practice pattern variations associated with intracranial pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, DaiWai M; Lewis, Lisa S; Bader, Mary Kay; Bautista, Cynthia; Malloy, Rachel; Riemen, Kristina E; McNett, Molly M

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nursing practice in the care of patients with intracranial pressure monitoring. Although standards for care of such patients have been established, there continue to be variations in the nursing practice. This was an observational study in which data were collected from 28 nurse-patient dyads at 16 different hospitals across the United States. Each dyad was observed for 2 hours; nursing actions and patient responses including intracranial pressure readings were documented. Differences in the care of patients with intracranial pressure monitoring were prevalent. Variations in practice were prompted by healthcare provider prescriptions as well as nursing decisions. Prescriptions and interventions were often not supported by the available scientific evidence. For more insights from the authors, see Supplemental Digital Content 1, at http://links.lww.com/JNN/A7.

  5. Validation of the pulse decomposition analysis algorithm using central arterial blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Martin C; Kalantari, Kambiz; Gerdt, David W; Adkins, Charles M

    2014-07-08

    There is a significant need for continuous noninvasive blood pressure (cNIBP) monitoring, especially for anesthetized surgery and ICU recovery. cNIBP systems could lower costs and expand the use of continuous blood pressure monitoring, lowering risk and improving outcomes.The test system examined here is the CareTaker® and a pulse contour analysis algorithm, Pulse Decomposition Analysis (PDA). PDA's premise is that the peripheral arterial pressure pulse is a superposition of five individual component pressure pulses that are due to the left ventricular ejection and reflections and re-reflections from only two reflection sites within the central arteries.The hypothesis examined here is that the model's principal parameters P2P1 and T13 can be correlated with, respectively, systolic and pulse pressures. Central arterial blood pressures of patients (38 m/25 f, mean age: 62.7 y, SD: 11.5 y, mean height: 172.3 cm, SD: 9.7 cm, mean weight: 86.8 kg, SD: 20.1 kg) undergoing cardiac catheterization were monitored using central line catheters while the PDA parameters were extracted from the arterial pulse signal obtained non-invasively using CareTaker system. Qualitative validation of the model was achieved with the direct observation of the five component pressure pulses in the central arteries using central line catheters. Statistically significant correlations between P2P1 and systole and T13 and pulse pressure were established (systole: R square: 0.92 (p pressures obtained through the conversion of PDA parameters to blood pressures of non-invasively obtained pulse signatures with catheter-obtained blood pressures fell within the trend guidelines of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation SP-10 standard (standard deviation: 8 mmHg(systole: 5.87 mmHg, diastole: 5.69 mmHg)). The results indicate that arterial blood pressure can be accurately measured and tracked noninvasively and continuously using the CareTaker system and the PDA algorithm. The

  6. Modeling of patient's blood pressure variation during ambulance transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatani, Kenji; Ono, Takahiko; Kobayasi, Yasuhide; Hikita, Shinichi; Saito, Mitsuyuki

    2007-12-01

    In an emergency transportation by ambulance, a patient is transported in a supine position. In this position, a patient's blood pressure (BP) variation depending on an inertial force which occurs when an ambulance accelerates or decelerates. This BP variation causes a critical damage for a patent with brain disorder. In order to keep a patient stable during transportation, it is required to maintain small BP variation. To analyze the BP variation during transportation, a model of the BP variation has so far been made. But, it can estimate the BP variation only in braking. The purpose of this paper is to make a dynamical model of the BP variation which can simulate it in both braking and accelerating. First, to obtain the data to construct the model, we used a tilting bed to measure a head-to-foot acceleration and BP of fingertip. Based on this data, we build a mathematical model whose input is the head-to-foot acceleration and output is the Mean BP variation. It is a switched model which switches two models depending on the jerk. We add baroreceptor reflex to the model as a offset value.

  7. Estimation of fracture flow parameters through numerical analysis of hydromechanical pressure pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappa, F.; Guglielmi, Y.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C.-F.; Thoraval, A.

    2008-03-16

    The flow parameters of a natural fracture were estimated by modeling in situ pressure pulses. The pulses were generated in two horizontal boreholes spaced 1 m apart vertically and intersecting a near-vertical highly permeable fracture located within a shallow fractured carbonate reservoir. Fracture hydromechanical response was monitored using specialized fiber-optic borehole equipment that could simultaneously measure fluid pressure and fracture displacements. Measurements indicated a significant time lag between the pressure peak at the injection point and the one at the second measuring point, located 1 m away. The pressure pulse dilated and contracted the fracture. Field data were analyzed through hydraulic and coupled hydromechanical simulations using different governing flow laws. In matching the time lag between the pressure peaks at the two measuring points, our hydraulic models indicated that (1) flow was channeled in the fracture, (2) the hydraulic conductivity tensor was highly anisotropic, and (3) the radius of pulse influence was asymmetric, in that the pulse travelled faster vertically than horizontally. Moreover, our parametric study demonstrated that the fluid pressure diffusion through the fracture was quite sensitive to the spacing and orientation of channels, hydraulic aperture, storativity and hydraulic conductivity. Comparison between hydraulic and hydromechanical models showed that the deformation significantly affected fracture permeability and storativity, and consequently, the fluid pressure propagation, suggesting that the simultaneous measurements of pressure and mechanical displacement signals could substantially improve the interpretation of pulse tests during reservoir characterization.

  8. Prediction of systolic blood pressure using peripheral pulse palpation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Erica L; Rees, Colleen; Drobatz, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of peripheral pulse palpation to predict systolic blood pressure (SBP) in cats presenting as emergencies. Prospective observational study performed over an 8-month period. University veterinary teaching hospital. One hundred two cats presenting to the emergency service. Eligibility for inclusion in the study included a physical examination and a SBP via Doppler technique performed prior to treatment. None. Femoral and metatarsal pulses were digitally palpated and the quality of the pulses was assessed as either strong, moderate, poor, or absent. A concurrent SBP was also recorded. The median SBP for all cats was 92.5 mm Hg (range, 30-240 mm Hg). Femoral pulse quality was found to strongly correlate with the admission SBP (P cats with either absent or strong pulses was significantly different (P Cats with absent metatarsal and femoral pulses had a median SBP of 30 mm Hg (range, 30-105 mm Hg), whereas cats with strong metatarsal pulses had a median SBP of 135 mm Hg (range, 58-210 mm Hg). Absent metatarsal pulses correctly identified cats with a blood pressure of 75 mm Hg or less 84% the time (area under the curve: 0.89, confidence interval 0.81, 0.97). In cats, peripheral pulse quality assessment by emergency room veterinarians correlates with SBP. With progressive decreases in blood pressure, metatarsal pulses will disappear and it is only with severe hypotension that femoral pulses are absent. An assessment of both dorsal metatarsal pulse and femoral pulse quality during triage may be useful in identifying abnormalities in blood pressure. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  9. Differing prognostic value of pulse pressure in patients with heart failure with reduced or preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Colette E.; Castagno, Davide; Maggioni, Aldo P.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Low pulse pressure is a marker of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) but the prognostic value of pulse pressure in patients with HF and preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF) is unknown. We examined the prognostic value of pulse pressure...

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid pulse pressure amplitude during lumbar infusion in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus can predict response to shunting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brean Are

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously seen that idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH patients having elevated intracranial pressure (ICP pulse amplitude consistently respond to shunt surgery. In this study we explored how the cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP pulse amplitude determined during lumbar infusion testing, correlates with ICP pulse amplitude determined during over-night ICP monitoring and with response to shunt surgery. Our goal was to establish a more reliable screening procedure for selecting iNPH patients for shunt surgery using lumbar intrathecal infusion. Methods The study population consisted of all iNPH patients undergoing both diagnostic lumbar infusion testing and continuous over-night ICP monitoring during the period 2002-2007. The severity of iNPH was assessed using our NPH grading scale before surgery and 12 months after shunting. The CSFP pulse was characterized from the amplitude of single pressure waves. Results Totally 62 iNPH patients were included, 45 of them underwent shunt surgery, in whom 78% were shunt responders. Among the 45 shunted patients, resistance to CSF outflow (Rout was elevated (≥ 12 mmHg/ml/min in 44. The ICP pulse amplitude recorded over-night was elevated (i.e. mean ICP wave amplitude ≥ 4 mmHg in 68% of patients; 92% of these were shunt responders. In those with elevated overnight ICP pulse amplitude, we found also elevated CSFP pulse amplitude recorded during lumbar infusion testing, both during the opening phase following lumbar puncture and during a standardized period of lumbar infusion (15 ml Ringer over 10 min. The clinical response to shunting after 1 year strongly associated with the over-night ICP pulse amplitude, and also with the pulsatile CSFP during the period of lumbar infusion. Elevated CSFP pulse amplitude during lumbar infusion thus predicted shunt response with sensitivity of 88 and specificity of 60 (positive and negative predictive values of 89 and 60

  11. Parametric Study of Pulse-Combustor-Driven Ejectors at High-Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungster, Shaye; Paxson, Daniel E.; Perkins, Hugh D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse-combustor configurations developed in recent studies have demonstrated performance levels at high-pressure operating conditions comparable to those observed at atmospheric conditions. However, problems related to the way fuel was being distributed within the pulse combustor were still limiting performance. In the first part of this study, new configurations are investigated computationally aimed at improving the fuel distribution and performance of the pulse-combustor. Subsequent sections investigate the performance of various pulse-combustor driven ejector configurations operating at highpressure conditions, focusing on the effects of fuel equivalence ratio and ejector throat area. The goal is to design pulse-combustor-ejector configurations that maximize pressure gain while achieving a thermal environment acceptable to a turbine, and at the same time maintain acceptable levels of NOx emissions and flow non-uniformities. The computations presented here have demonstrated pressure gains of up to 2.8%.

  12. Reflectance pulse oximetry at the forehead of newborns : The influence of varying pressure on the probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dassel, ACM; Graaff, R; Zijlstra, WG; Aarnoudse, JG

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Transmission pulse oximetry (TPO) is not a practical method of intrapartum fetal monitoring of arterial oxygen saturation. Reflectance pulse oximetry (RPO) requires a sensor applied to the skin of the fetal head and may be a useful technique. During labor, various degrees of pressure will

  13. Determination of instantaneous pressure in a transonic base flow using four-pulse tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blinde, P.L.; Lynch, K.P.; Schrijer, F.F.J.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2015-01-01

    A tomographic four-pulse PIV system is used in a transonic axisymmetric base flow experiment at a nominal free stream Mach number of 0.7, with the objective to obtain flow acceleration and pressure data. The PIV system, consisting of two double-pulse lasers and twelve cameras, allows acquiring two v

  14. Reflectance pulse oximetry at the forehead of newborns : The influence of varying pressure on the probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dassel, ACM; Graaff, R; Zijlstra, WG; Aarnoudse, JG

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Transmission pulse oximetry (TPO) is not a practical method of intrapartum fetal monitoring of arterial oxygen saturation. Reflectance pulse oximetry (RPO) requires a sensor applied to the skin of the fetal head and may be a useful technique. During labor, various degrees of pressure will

  15. Modelingflywheel-Speed Variations Based on Cylinder Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Magnus

    2004-01-01

    Combustion supervision by evaluating flywheel speed variations is a common approach in the automotive industry. This often involves preliminary measurements. An adequate model for simulating flywheel speed can assist to avoid some of these preliminary measurements. A physical nonlinear model for simulating flywheel speed based on cylinder pressure information is investigated in this work. Measurements were conducted at Scania in a test bed and on a chassis dynamometer. The model was implemen...

  16. Global Remote Sensing of Precipitating Electron Energies: A Comparison of Substorms and Pressure Pulse Related Intensifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) observes aurora responses to incident solar wind pressure pulses and interplanetary shocks such its those associated with coronal mass ejections. Previous observations have demonstrated that the arrival of it pressure pulse at the front of the magnetosphere results in highly disturbed geomagnetic conditions and a substantial increase in both dayside and nightside aurora precipitations. Our observations show it simultaneous brightening over bread areas of the dayside and nightside auroral in response to a pressure pulse, indicating that more magnetospheric regions participate as sources for auroral precipitation than during isolate substorm. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated event to those during isolated substorms. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated events to those during isolated auroral substorms. Electron precipitation during substorms has characteristic energies greater than 10 KeV and is structured both in local time and in magnetic latitude. For auroral intensifications following the arrival of'a pressure pulse or interplanetary shock. Electron precipitation is less spatially structured and has greater flux of lower characteristic energy electrons (Echar less than 7 KeV) than during isolated substorm onsets. These observations quantify the differences between global and local auroral precipitation processes and will provide a valuable experimental check for models of sudden storm commencements and magnetospheric response to perturbations in the solar wind.

  17. Elevated pulse pressure is associated with hemolysis, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease in sickle cell disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico M Novelli

    Full Text Available A seeming paradox of sickle cell disease is that patients do not suffer from a high prevalence of systemic hypertension in spite of endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation and vasculopathy. However, some patients do develop systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure, an increasingly recognized major cardiovascular risk factor in other populations. Hence, we hypothesized that pulse pressure, unlike other blood pressure parameters, is independently associated with markers of hemolytic anemia and cardiovascular risk in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the correlates of pulse pressure in patients (n  =  661 enrolled in a multicenter international sickle cell trial. Markers of hemolysis were analyzed as independent variables and as a previously validated hemolytic index that includes multiple variables. We found that pulse pressure, not systolic, diastolic or mean arterial pressure, independently correlated with high reticulocyte count (beta  =  2.37, p  =  0.02 and high hemolytic index (beta  =  1.53, p = 0.002 in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease in two multiple linear regression models which include the markers of hemolysis as independent variables or the hemolytic index, respectively. Pulse pressure was also independently associated with elevated serum creatinine (beta  =  3.21, p  =  0.02, and with proteinuria (beta  =  2.52, p  =  0.04. These results from the largest sickle cell disease cohort to date since the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease show that pulse pressure is independently associated with hemolysis, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease. We propose that high pulse pressure may be a risk factor for clinical complications of vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease. Longitudinal and mechanistic studies should be conducted to confirm these hypotheses.

  18. Indexes of aortic pressure augmentation markedly underestimate the contribution of reflected waves toward variations in aortic pressure and left ventricular mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booysen, Hendrik L; Woodiwiss, Angela J; Sibiya, Moekanyi J; Hodson, Bryan; Raymond, Andrew; Libhaber, Elena; Sareli, Pinhas; Norton, Gavin R

    2015-03-01

    Although indexes of wave reflection enhance risk prediction, the extent to which measures of aortic systolic pressure augmentation (augmented pressures [Pa] or augmentation index) underestimate the effects of reflected waves on cardiovascular risk is uncertain. In participants from a community sample (age >16), we compared the relative contribution of reflected (backward wave pressures and the reflected wave index [RI]) versus augmented (Pa and augmentation index) pressure wave indexes to variations in central aortic pulse pressure (PPc; n=1185), and left ventricular mass index (LVMI; n=793). Aortic hemodynamics and LVMI were determined using radial applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor) and echocardiography. Independent of confounders, RI and backward wave pressures contributed more than forward wave pressures, whereas Pa and augmentation index contributed less than incident wave pressure to variations in PPc (Ppressures (partial r=0.28, Ppressures (partial r=0.15, Ppressure (partial r=0.22, Ppressures (partial r=0.21, Ppressures (P=0.98), while incident wave pressure (partial r=0.23, Prelations between indexes of aortic pressure augmentation and PPc or LVMI, strikingly better relations are noted between aortic wave reflection and PPc or LVMI. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. A relative local variational principle for topological pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We define the relative local topological pressure for any given factor map and open cover,and prove the relative local variational principle of this pressure.More precisely,for a given factor map π:(X,T)→(Y,S) between two topological dynamical systems,an open cover U of X,a continuous,real-valued function f on X and an S-invariant measure ν on Y,we show that the corresponding relative local pressure P(T,f,U,y) satisfies sup μ∈M(X,T){ hμ(T,U|Y)+∫X f(x)dμ(x) :πμ=ν}=∫Y P(T,f,U,y)dν(y),where M(X,T) denotes the family of all T-invariant measures on X.Moreover,the supremum can be attained by a T-invariant measure.

  20. Integrated experimental test program on waterhammer pressure pulses and associated structural responses within a feedwater sparger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the methods and systems as utilized in an integrated experimental thermohydraulic/mechanics analysis test program on waterhammer pressure pulses within a revised feedwater sparger of a Loviisa generation VVER-440-type reactor. This program was carried out in two stages: (1) measurements with a strictly limited set of operating parameters at Loviisa NPP, and (2) measurements with the full set of operating parameters on a test article simulating the revised feedwater sparger. The experiments at Loviisa NPS served as an invaluable source of information on the nature of waterhammer pressure pulses and structural responses. These tests thus helped to set the objectives and formulate the concept for series of tests on a test article to study the water hammer phenomena. The heavily instrumented full size test article of a steam generator feedwater sparger was placed within a pressure vessel simulating the steam generator. The feedwater sparger was subjected to the full range of operating parameters which were to result in waterhammer pressure pulse trains of various magnitudes and duration. Two different designs of revised feedwater sparger were investigated (i.e. `grounded` and `with goose neck`). The following objects were to be met within this program: (1) establish the thermohydraulic parameters that facilitate the occurrence of water hammer pressure pulses, (2) provide a database for further analysis of the pressure pulse phenomena, (3) establish location and severity of these water hammer pressure pulses, (4) establish the structural response due to these pressure pulses, (5) provide input data for structural integrity analysis. (orig.). 3 refs.

  1. Pressure tunable cascaded third order nonlinearity and temporal pulse switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilenberger, Falk; Bache, Morten; Minardi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Effects based on the χ(3)-nonlinearity are arguably the most commonly discussed nonlinear interactions in photonics. In the description of pulse propagation, however, the generation of the third harmonic (TH) is commonly neglected, because it is strongly phase mismatched in most materials and wav...

  2. Evaluation of paint coating thickness variations based on pulsed Infrared thermography laser technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezghani, S.; Perrin, E.; Vrabie, V.; Bodnar, J. L.; Marthe, J.; Cauwe, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a pulsed Infrared thermography technique using a homogeneous heat provided by a laser source is used for the non-destructive evaluation of paint coating thickness variations. Firstly, numerical simulations of the thermal response of a paint coated sample are performed. By analyzing the thermal responses as a function of thermal properties and thickness of both coating and substrate layers, optimal excitation parameters of the heating source are determined. Two characteristic parameters were studied with respect to the paint coating layer thickness variations. Results obtained using an experimental test bench based on the pulsed Infrared thermography laser technique are compared with those given by a classical Eddy current technique for paint coating variations from 5 to 130 μm. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this approach and suggest that the pulsed Infrared thermography technique presents good perspectives to characterize the heterogeneity of paint coating on large scale samples with other heating sources.

  3. Flow Reactor Studies with Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure and Higher

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Image of Discharge Reactor with Viewport Inlet Cap • Modular plasma discharge reactor can be interchanged with redesigned pressure shell to perform...Flow Reactor Studies with Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure and Higher Nicholas Tsolas, Kuni Togai and Richard Yetter...Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering The Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA, 16801 Fourth Annual Review Meeting of the

  4. Central venous pulse pressure analysis using an R-synchronized pressure measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Shinya; Yoshioka, Naoki; Yasukawa, Takeshi; Pestel, Gunther

    2006-12-01

    The information derived from central venous catheters is underused. We developed an EKG-R synchronization and averaging system to obtained distinct CVP waveforms and analyzed components of these. Twenty-five paralyzed surgical patients undergoing CVP monitoring under mechanical ventilation were studied. CVP and EKG signals were analyzed employing our system, the mean CVP and CVP at end-diastole during expiration were compared, and CVP waveform components were measured using this system. CVP waveforms were clearly visualized in all patients. They showed the a peak to be 1.8+/- 0.7 mmHg, which was the highest of three peaks, and the x trough to be lower than the y trough (-1.6+/- 0.7 mmHg and -0.9+/- 0.5 mmHg, respectively), with a mean pulse pressure of 3.4 mmHg. The difference between the mean CVP and CVP at end-diastole during expiration was 0.58+/- 0.81 mmHg. The mean CVP can be used as an index of right ventricular preload in patients under mechanical ventilation with regular sinus rhythm. Our newly developed system is useful for clinical monitoring and for education in circulatory physiology.

  5. Model calibration for pressure drop in a pulse-jet cleaned fabric filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, John L.; David, Leith

    A model based on Darcy's law allows prediction of pressure drop in a pulse-jet cleaned fabric filter. The model considers the effects of filtration velocity, dust areal density added during one filtration cycle, and pulse pressure. Data used to calibrate the model were collected in experiments with three fabric surface treatments and three dusts conducted at three filtration velocities, for a total of 27 different experimental conditions. The fabric used was polyester felt with untreated, singed, or PTFE-laminated surface. The dusts used were granite, limestone and fly ash. Filtration velocities were 50,75 and 100 mm s -1. Dust areal density added during one filtration cycle was constant, as was pulse pressure. Under these conditions, fabric surface treatment alone largely determined the values for two of the three constants in the model; the third constant depends on pressure drop characteristics of the venturi at the top of each filter bag.

  6. A viscoelastic spring-block model for investigating subglacial water pressure pulse generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    A viscoelastic spring-block model of glacier motion has been developed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for generating brief pulses in subglacial water pressure recorded at Trapridge Glacier, Yukon. In this model, the glacier is treated as an array of ice blocks, each of which is connected to its nearest neighbors by spring-and-dashpot linkages. The model glacier is gravitationally driven, and down-slope flow is resisted by a basal shear stress determined by the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. This model is forced with realistic basal water pressure conditions. With prescribed summer-mode, diurnally-varying pressures, the model produces elevated slip activity at times of rising (rather than peak) water pressures; with steady, elevated winter-mode pressures, slip events occur at non-uniform intervals due to the effects of elastic loading and the (nonlinear) viscous relaxation of stresses. Magnitude and interevent time statistics for model slip events and basal water pressure pulses are compared.

  7. Acute changes in pulse pressure in relation to constituents of particulate air pollution in elderly persons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Lotte [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Buczynska, Anna [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Walgraeve, Christophe [Research group EnVOC, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, UGent, Gent (Belgium); Delcloo, Andy [Royal Meteorological Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Molecular Science Institute, School of Chemistry, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester (United Kingdom); Van Grieken, Rene [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Demeestere, Kristof; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman [Research group EnVOC, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, UGent, Gent (Belgium); De Backer, Hugo [Royal Meteorological Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Nemery, Benoit, E-mail: ben.nemery@med.kuleuven.be [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Nawrot, Tim S. [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2012-08-15

    An increased pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure) suggests aortic stiffening. The objective of this study was to examine the acute effects of both particulate matter (PM) mass and composition on blood pressure, among elderly persons. We carried out a panel study in persons living in elderly homes in Antwerp, Belgium. We recruited 88 non-smoking persons, 70% women with a mean age of 83 years (standard deviation: 5.2). Blood pressure was measured and a blood sample was collected on two time points, which were chosen so that there was an exposure contrast in ambient PM exposure. The elemental content of the collected indoor and outdoor PM{sub 2.5} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 {mu}m) mass concentration was measured. Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) on outdoor PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 {mu}m) were measured. Each interquartile range increase of 20.8 {mu}g/m Superscript-Three in 24-h mean outdoor PM{sub 2.5} was associated with an increase in pulse pressure of 4.0 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 1.8-6.2), in persons taking antihypertensive medication (n=57), but not in persons not using antihypertensive medication (n=31) (p for interaction: 0.02). Vanadium, iron and nickel contents of PM{sub 2.5} were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, among persons on antihypertensive medication. Similar results were found for indoor concentrations. Of the oxy-PAHs, chrysene-5,6-dione and benzo[a]pyrene-3,6-dione were significantly associated with increases in systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. In elderly, pulse pressure was positively associated with acute increases in outdoor and indoor air pollution, among persons taking antihypertensive medication. These results might form a mechanistic pathway linking air pollution as a trigger of cardiovascular events.

  8. Using Advanced Tensiometers to Monitor Temporal Variations in Pore Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, R. L.; Young, M. H.; Dixon, K. L.; Rossabi, J.; Hyde, W. K.; Holmes-Burns, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Savannah River Site has installed a comprehensive vadose zone monitoring system (VZMS) at it's low level radioactive waste disposal facility to collect the necessary information to calculate contaminant flux. The VZMS includes water content reflectometers, suction lysimeters, advanced tensiometers (ATs), water flux meters, access ports for neutron probes, and a tipping bucket rain gauge. Forty one ATs were installed from 1999 to 2001 at depths ranging from 2 to 60 feet and have been operated continuously. The installation depths were based on a hydrostatigraphic model developed from core logs, cone penetrometer logs, moisture content profiles, water retention curves model that were obtained during the phased installation of the VZMS. An AT consists of a porous cup installed at a prescribed depth with casing back to the surface and a pressure transducer that is lowered into the casing and connects with the porous cup. The pressure transducer transmits it's signal to a datalogger where the data is stored for future retrieval using a cellular phone communications package. Results from the 2 year operating period show that the AT calibrations are stable and t ATs are capable of extended monitoring of pore pressures in the 0 to 300 cm H2 O range. The ATs had sufficient resolution to detect the naturally occurring fluctuations in pore pressure (1 to 100 cm H2 O over 1 to 72 hours) that resulted from infiltration events at the site. The stable performance of the ATs combined with their ability to detect naturally occurring fluctuations in pore pressure make the ATs a useful tool in measuring temporal pore pressure variations for use in calibrating numerical models of fluid flow in variably saturated porous media.

  9. High-pressure dielectric barrier discharge Xenon lamps generating short pulses of high-peak-power VUV radiation (172nm) with high pulse-to-pulse reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Robert; Ward, Barry; Mildren, Richard; Kane, Deborah

    2003-10-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are used to efficiently generate radiation in the ultraviolet and vacuum-ultraviolet spectral regions (88nm-350nm) by forming rare-gas and rare-gas halide excimers in a transient plasma. Usually, DBD lamps generate the light output quasi-continuously or in bursts with a high degree of stochastic or random variability in the instantaneous UV/VUV intensity. However, regular pulses of high-peak-power UV/VUV, with high pulse-to-pulse reproducibility, are of interest for applications in biology, surface treatment and cleaning, and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Such pulses can be generated from spatially homogeneous plasmas in a Xe DBD when the discharge is driven by uni-polar voltage pulses of short duration ( 100ns)^1. In the present study, we will report Xe DBD lamp performance and VUV output pulse characteristics for gas pressures up to 2.5bar and excitation conditions tailored for high-peak-power output. The experimental results will be compared to theoretical results from a detailed 1-D computer model of the spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma kinetics and Xe species population densities. ^1R.P.Mildren and R.J.Carman, J.Phys.D, 34, L1-L6, (2001)

  10. Smartphone-based Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement Using Pulse Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Meintjes, Andries; Baig, Mirza; Linden, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of low cost and easy to use personalized medical monitoring devices has opened the door for new and innovative methods of health monitoring to emerge. Cuff-less and continuous methods of measuring blood pressure are particularly attractive as blood pressure is one of the most important measurements of long term cardiovascular health. Current methods of noninvasive blood pressure measurement are based on inflation and deflation of a cuff with some effects on arteries where blood pressure is being measured. This inflation can also cause patient discomfort and alter the measurement results. In this work, a mobile application was developed to collate the PhotoPlethysmoGramm (PPG) waveform provided by a pulse oximeter and the electrocardiogram (ECG) for calculating the pulse transit time. This information is then indirectly related to the user's systolic blood pressure. The developed application successfully connects to the PPG and ECG monitoring devices using Bluetooth wireless connection and stores the data onto an online server. The pulse transit time is estimated in real time and the user's systolic blood pressure can be estimated after the system has been calibrated. The synchronization between the two devices was found to pose a challenge to this method of continuous blood pressure monitoring. However, the implemented continuous blood pressure monitoring system effectively serves as a proof of concept. This combined with the massive benefits that an accurate and robust continuous blood pressure monitoring system would provide indicates that it is certainly worthwhile to further develop this system.

  11. Exploring glacier dynamics with subglacial water pressure pulses: Evidence for self-organized criticality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, J. L.

    2009-03-01

    In order to determine whether brief excursions, or "pulses," in subglacial water pressure inferred by Kavanaugh and Clarke (2000, 2001) occur, water pressures at the bed of Trapridge Glacier, Yukon, Canada, were recorded using an interface board that continuously monitored a pressure transducer. During the 231 day period between 16 July 2005 and 4 March 2006, more than 7000 pressure pulses were recorded, with magnitudes reaching nearly 3 times the flotation value. Comparison of the pressure pulse record with those from a number of other instruments installed in this soft-bedded glacier indicates that these pulses are generated by stress transients that compress the water within the borehole; calculations suggest that these transients are as large as 75 times the nominal driving stress. Both the magnitudes and interevent times for these pulses are well fitted by power law distributions that are remarkably similar to those exhibited by earthquakes. These similarities suggest that the ice-bed interface of a soft-bedded glacier behaves much like an earthquake fault and raises the possibility that such glaciers self-organize to a critical state. Further evidence for self-organized criticality (SOC) of soft-bedded glaciers is suggested by an examination of well-known ice dynamical properties and the rheological properties of subglacial sediments, which suggests that SOC might be a natural consequence of the rate-independent behavior of subglacial sediments.

  12. Study of relationship between pulse pressure and mortality from all the causes, CVD and CVA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between pulse pressure and mortality from all the causes: CVD and CVA. Methods: The cohort consisted of the beneficiaries from Korea Medical Insurance Corporation (KMIC) aged 40 and older who had taken health examination and completed the questionnaire inquiring of health habits and past medical history in 1992 or 1993. The number of cohort members was 698,796, and they were followed up from 1st January, 1994 until 31st December, 2000. The primary sources of the data used in this study were the death benefit record and health examination file of KMIC. In the case that the information about the cause of death was unknown in the death benefit record, it was checked from the death registry of National statistical Office and the inpatient data of KMIC. There were 37439 deaths during the follow-up period. Results: A linear relationship between pulse pressure and mortality from all the causes, cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular disease, was determined in both genders, the whole population and age groups, in the hypertensive and normotensive ( P< 0. 01). Pulse pressure and mortality from all the causes, CVD and CVA increased ( P <0.01). Pulse pressure was significantly associated with a relatively high risk of mortality from all the causes, CVD and CVA in the whole population, both genders, all age groups, the hypertensive and normotensive after adjusted to age, gender, body mass index, blood sugar, serum total cholesterol, AST, ALT, urine protein, urine glucose, alcohol drinking and cigarette smoking ( P< 0.01). Conclusion: Pulse pressure shows linear relationship with the mortality from all the causes,CVD and CVA. Pulse pressure appears to be a single measure of blood pressure in predicting mortality from all the causes,CVD and CVA, even in the hypertensive and normotensive.

  13. Variation associated with measurement of retinal vessel diameters at different points in the pulse cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudtson, M D; Klein, B E K; Klein, R; Wong, T Y; Hubbard, L D; Lee, K E; Meuer, S M; Bulla, C P

    2004-01-01

    Background/aims: To assess the variability in retinal vessel measurements at different points in the pulse cycle. Methods: A healthy white male aged 19 years had 30 digitised images taken at three distinct points in the pulse cycle over a one hour period. A pulse synchronised ear clip trigger device was used to capture images at the desired point in the pulse cycle. Two trained graders measured the retinal vessel diameter of one large arteriole, one large venule, one small arteriole, and one small venule 10 times in each of these 30 images. Results: Within an image, variability was similar between graders, pulse point, and vessel type. Across images taken at the same point in the pulse period, the change from the minimum to maximum measurement was between 6% and 17% for arterioles and between 2% and 11% for venules. In addition, measurements of small vessels had greater changes than large vessels and no point in the pulse period was more variable than another. Ignoring pulse cycle increased variability across images in the large venule, but not in the other vessel types. Mixed effect models were fit for each of the vessel types to determine the greatest source of variability. Controlling for pulse point and grader, the largest source of variability for all four vessels measured was across images, accounting for more than 50% of the total variability. Conclusion: Measurements of large retinal venules is generally less variable than measurements of other retinal vessels. After controlling for pulse point and grader, the largest source of variation is across images. Understanding the components of variability in measuring retinal vessels is important as these techniques are applied in epidemiological studies. PMID:14693774

  14. Phylloquinone (vitamin K₁) intake and pulse pressure as a measure of arterial stiffness in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Joan A; Huffman, Fatma G

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among ethnicity/race, lifestyle factors, phylloquinone (vitamin K₁) intake, and arterial pulse pressure in a nationally representative sample of older adults from four ethnic/racial groups: non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, Mexican Americans, and other Hispanics. This was a cross-sectional study of U.S. representative sample with data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2007-2008 and 2009-2010 of adults aged 50 years and older (N = 5296). Vitamin K intake was determined by 24-hour recall. Pulse pressure was calculated as the difference between the averages of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Compared to White non-Hispanics, the other ethnic/racial groups were more likely to have inadequate vitamin K₁ intake. Inadequate vitamin K₁ intake was an independent predictor of high arterial pulse pressure. This was the first study that compared vitamin K₁ inadequacy with arterial pulse pressure across ethnicities/races in U.S. older adults. These findings suggest that vitamin K screening may be a beneficial marker for the health of older adults.

  15. Basis of monitoring central blood pressure and hemodynamic parameters by peripheral arterial pulse waveform analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Hiroshi; Katsuda, Shin-ichiro

    2013-01-01

    In hypertension clinics, central blood pressure (CBP) should be estimated, instead of directly measured, by the "signal processing" of a noninvasive peripheral pressure waveform. This paper deals with the data obtained in our three separate studies focusing on a major estimation method, i.e., radial artery late systolic shoulder pressure (rSBP2)-based CBP estimation. Study 1: Using a wave separation analysis of precise animal data of pressure wave transmission along the upper-limb arteries, we first demonstrate that pulse pressure amplification is largely attributable to local wave reflection alone. Study 2: A frequency component analysis of simultaneously recorded human central and radial artery pressure waveforms showed a predominance of lower (1st+2nd) harmonic components in determining the central augmentation peak amplitude. The features of a central pressure waveform, including its phase property, may contribute to the less-altered transmission of augmentation peak pressure to rSBP2. Study 3: Comparisons of noninvasive rSBP2 with direct or estimated central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) revealed broad agreement but also augmentation-dependent biases. Based on the features of the biases as well as the counterbalanced relationship between pulse pressure amplification and the transmission-induced alterations of augmentation peak amplitude observed in Study 2, we propose an improved cSBP estimate, SBPm, the simple arithmetic mean of rSBP2 and peripheral systolic blood pressure.

  16. Pulse wave velocity and digital volume pulse as indirect estimators of blood pressure: pilot study on healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Juan M; Berjano, Enrique J; Sáiz, Javier; Rodriguez, Rafael; Fácila, Lorenzo

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to asses the potential use of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and digital volume pulse (DVP) as estimators of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DPB) blood pressure. Single and multiple correlation studies were conducted, including biometric parameters and risk factors. Brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) and DVP signals were obtained from a Pulse Trace PWV and Pulse Trace PCA (pulse contour analysis), respectively. The DVP (obtained by photoplethysmography), allowed stiffness (SI) and reflection indexes (RI) to be derived. The first study on 47 healthy volunteers showed that both SBP and DPB correlated significantly both with baPWV and SI. Multiple regression models of the baPWV and the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) allowed SBP and DBP to be modeled with r = 0.838 and r = 0.673, respectively. SI results also employed WHR and modeled SBP and DBP with r = 0.852 and r = 0.663, respectively. RI did not correlate either with SBP or DBP. In order to avoid the use of ultrasound techniques to measure PWV, we then developed a custom-built system to measure PWV by photoplethysmography and validated it against the Pulse Trace. With the same equipment we conducted a second pilot study with ten healthy volunteers. The best SBP multiple regression model for SBP achieved r = 0.997 by considering the heart-finger PWV (hfPWV measured between R-wave and index finger), WHR and heart rate. Only WHR was significant in the DBP model. Our findings suggest that the hfPWV photoplethysmography signal could be a reliable estimator of approximate SBP and could be used, for example, to monitor cardiac patients during physical exercise sessions in cardiac rehabilitation.

  17. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Troyer, G L

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse r...

  18. Experimental verification of the ablation pressure dependence upon the laser intensity at pulsed irradiation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasyuk, I. K.; Semenov, A. Yu; Stuchebryukhov, I. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments for verification of a functional dependence of the ablation pressure on the irradiated surface of a target upon the laser intensity in a range from 1.2 to 350 TW/cm2 have been carried out. For that, at some intensities of the laser irradiation, time intervals between the laser pulse maximum and the moment of the shock-wave front arrival to the rear surface of the target were measured, which are dependent on the ablation pressure. Two schemes of the measurements were used. At the first scheme, at higher laser intensities, the front arrival moment is determined via an electron-optical camera when the rear surface begins glowing. At the second scheme, the front arrival moment is recorded when a probe laser pulse changes the character of the reflection by the rear surface of the irradiated target. Results of measurements are in agreement with the ablation pressure dependence upon the laser pulse intensity within 20%.

  19. Influence of Pulse Pressure on Seed Quality and Yield of Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nefed'eva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A method of pre-sowing treatment of seeds by pulse pressure which is characterized by high intensity and accuracy of dosage has been proposed. Pulse pressures in the range of 11-29 MPa did not lead to acute lethality determined by phosphorescence at room temperature. So there was no elimination of unproductive individuals but pulse pressure stimulated physiological processes in seeds and plants, leading to increased yield. Changes of germination, growth, and distribution of substances as well as plant productivity were observed. Generalization and analysis of experimental results demonstrated zones in dose-dependent area, such as the zone of hormesis (11-17 MPa, transitional zone (20-26 MPa and stress zone (29 MPa and more.

  20. Applications of tunable high energy/pressure pulsed lasers to atmospheric transmission and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. V.; Seals, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy C12 O2(16) lasers were improved by pulsed high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening of laser lines, permits tuning the laser 'off' atmospheric C12 O2(16) absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers, and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. The atmospheric transmission of tuned C12 O2(16) lasers compares favorably with C12 O2(18) isotope lasers and CO lasers. The advantages of tunable, high energy, high pressure pulsed lasers over tunable diode lasers and waveguide lasers, in combining high energies with a large tuning range, are evaluated for certain applications to remote sensing of atmospheric constituents and pollutants. Pulsed operation considerably increases the signal to noise ratio without seriously affecting the high spectral resolution of signal detection obtained with laser heterodyning.

  1. Ionospheric Response to Solar Wind Pressure Pulses Under Northward IMF Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Liou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancements of aurora and auroral electrojets in response to sudden compression of the magnetosphere by shocks/pressure pulses are well known and have been attributed by some to compression-enhanced magnetic field reconnection. To examine such a view, we analyze a fortuitous event that is comprised of a series of pressure pulses (< 20 min on November 8, 2000. These pressure pulses were preceded by a large, northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF that lasted more than 15 hours such that effects from reconnection can be minimized. Auroral images acquired by ultraviolet imager on board the Polar satellite clearly show intensifications of the aurora that occurred first near local noon and progressively extended from dayside to nightside. The area-integrated global auroral power reached ~30 gigawatts (GW. It is also found that the global auroral power is well correlated with the solar wind dynamic pressure (correlation coefficient r ~0.90, rather than the change in the solar wind dynamic pressure. In-situ measurements of particle data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite indicate that the magnetospheric source for the pressure-enhanced auroras is most likely the central plasma sheet. Other ionospheric parameters such as the auroral electrojet (AE index, magnetic storm index (Sym-H, and the cross polarcap potential drop also show a one-to-one correspondence to the pressure pulses. In one instance the auroral electrojets AE index reached more than 200 nT, the cross polar-cap potential drop (ÎŚpc inferred from the SuperDARN radar network ionospheric plasma convection increased to ~60 kV. The observed increases in the auroral emissions, AE, and polar cap potential were not associated with substorms. Our result strongly suggests that solar wind pressure pulses are an important source of geomagnetic activity during northward IMF periods.

  2. Needling Neiguan (P 6) for Treatment of Low Pulse Pressure Syndrome-- A Report of 31 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the impact of needling Neiguan (P 6) on the cardiovascular functional status in low pulse pressure syndrome. Method: 49 eligible patients were randomly assigned to a acupuncture group with bilateral Neiguan (P 6) needled for successive 3 days, and a medication group given a daily 20 mL of Shenmai Injectio intravenously dripped for successive 6 days. The blood pressure, pulse pressure, stroke volume (SV), cardiac output(CO)/min, left ventricle work index (LVWI), mean arterial pressure (MAP), total peripheral resistance (TPR), coronary perfusion pressure (CPP), pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (PAWP), effective blood volume (BV), blood viscosity (N), microcirculation half renewal rate (MHR), and cardiac muscle blood volume (CMBV) were determined before and after the treatment, which were compared with the parameters obtained in 23 healthy subjects. Results: The decreased pulse pressure of all patients before treatment (P<0.01) increased significantly after treatment (P<0.001). The levels of SV, CO, LVWI, PAWP, BV, MHR and CMBV were lowed when compared with the healthy subjects before treatment (P<0.01), but all of them significantly increased after treatment (P<0.01). The increased CPP, TPR and N before treatment (P<0.01) were decreased after treatment (P<0.01). Conclusion: The therapeutic effect of acupuncture at point Neiguan (P 6) was better than medication though some of the indexes showed no significant difference (P<0.05).

  3. Ice-Shelf Tidal Flexure and Subglacial Pressure Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ryan T.; Parizek, Byron R.; Alley, Richard B.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Riverman, Kiya L.; Christianson, Knut

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model of an ice shelf-ice stream system as a viscoelastic beam partially supported by an elastic foundation. When bed rock near the grounding line acts as a fulcrum, leverage from the ice shelf dropping at low tide can cause significant (approx 1 cm) uplift in the first few kilometers of grounded ice.This uplift and the corresponding depression at high tide lead to basal pressure variations of sufficient magnitude to influence subglacial hydrology.Tidal flexure may thus affect basal lubrication, sediment flow, and till strength, all of which are significant factors in ice-stream dynamics and grounding-line stability. Under certain circumstances, our results suggest the possibility of seawater being drawn into the subglacial water system. The presence of sea water beneath grounded ice would significantly change the radar reflectivity of the grounding zone and complicate the interpretation of grounded versus floating ice based on ice-penetrating radar observations.

  4. Arterial pulse pressure amplification described by means of a nonlinear wave model: characterization of human aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, M.; Cymberknop, L.; Armentano, R.; Pessana, F.; Wray, S.; Legnani, W.

    2016-04-01

    The representation of blood pressure pulse as a combination of solitons captures many of the phenomena observed during its propagation along the systemic circulation. The aim of this work is to analyze the applicability of a compartmental model for propagation regarding the pressure pulse amplification associated with arterial aging. The model was applied to blood pressure waveforms that were synthesized using solitons, and then validated by waveforms obtained from individuals from differentiated age groups. Morphological changes were verified in the blood pressure waveform as a consequence of the aging process (i.e. due to the increase in arterial stiffness). These changes are the result of both a nonlinear interaction and the phenomena present in the propagation of nonlinear mechanic waves.

  5. Arterial Pulse Pressure and Its Association With Reduced Stroke Volume During Progressive Central Hypovolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Measurement of Stroke Volume Stroke volume (SV) was measured noninvasively using thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB). TEB was measured using four...tients who did not die. For the current study, we measured mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), pulse pressure (PP), SV, and muscle sympathetic nerve...hemorrhagic shock. The vital sign monitors placed in emergency transport vehicles provide the medic with routine measures of arterial systolic, diastolic and

  6. Probing of Fast Chemical Dynamics at High Pressures and Temperatures using Pulsed Laser Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-17

    Goncharov. Hydrogen (deuterium) vibron frequency as a pressure comparison gauge at multi-Mbar pressures, Journal of Applied Physics, (08 2013): 73505...V. Struzhkin, Innokenty Kantor, Mark L. Rivers , D. Allen Dalton. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell, Review of...few-layered two-dimensional MoS2 in collaboration with Avinash Nayak and Professor Jung-Fu Lin at the University of Texas at Austin

  7. Role of Pulse Pressure and Geometry of Primary Entry Tear in Acute Type B Dissection Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelukhana, Srikara V; Wang, Yanmin; Berwick, Zachary; Kratzberg, Jarin; Krieger, Joshua; Roeder, Blayne; Cloughs, Rachel E; Hsiao, Albert; Chambers, Sean; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-08-10

    The hemodynamic and geometric factors leading to propagation of acute Type B dissections are poorly understood. The objective is to elucidate whether geometric and hemodynamic parameters increase the predilection for aortic dissection propagation. A pulse duplicator set-up was used on porcine aorta with a single entry tear. Mean pressures of 100 and 180 mmHg were used, with pulse pressures ranging from 40 to 200 mmHg. The propagation for varying geometric conditions (%circumference of the entry tear: 15-65%, axial length: 0.5-3.2 cm) were tested for two flap thicknesses (1/3rd and 2/3rd of the thickness of vessel wall, respectively). To assess the effect of pulse and mean pressure on flap dynamics, the %true lumen (TL) cross-sectional area of the entry tear were compared. The % circumference for propagation of thin flap (47 ± 1%) was not significantly different (p = 0.14) from thick flap (44 ± 2%). On the contrary, the axial length of propagation for thin flap (2.57 ± 0.15 cm) was significantly different (p propagation was calculated as 75 ± 9 J/m(2) and was fairly uniform across different specimens. Pulse pressure had a significant effect on the flap movement in contrast to mean pressure. Hence, mitigation of pulse pressure and restriction of flap movement may be beneficial in patients with type B acute dissections.

  8. Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis for Loci Affecting Pulse Pressure: The Family Blood Pressure Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bielinski, Suzette J; Lynch, Amy I; Miller, Michael B; Weder, Alan; Cooper, Richard; Oberman, Albert; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Turner, Stephen T; Fornage, Myriam; Province, Michael; Arnett, Donna K

    2005-01-01

    ... in sequential oligogenic linkage analysis routines. The analysis sample included 10 798 participants in 3320 families who were recruited as part of the Family Blood Pressure Program and were phenotyped with an oscillometric blood pressure measurement...

  9. Simultaneously Propagating Voltage and Pressure Pulses in Lipid Monolayers of pork brain and synthetic lipids

    CERN Document Server

    Griesbauer, J; Wixforth, A; Schneider, M F

    2012-01-01

    Hydrated interfaces are ubiquitous in biology and appear on all length scales from ions, individual molecules to membranes and cellular networks. In vivo, they comprise a high degree of self-organization and complex entanglement, which limits their experimental accessibility by smearing out the individual phenomenology. The Langmuir technique, however, allows the examination of defined interfaces, whose controllable thermodynamic state enables one to explore the proper state diagrams. Here we demonstrate that voltage and pressure pulses simultaneously propagate along monolayers comprised of either native pork brain or synthetic lipids. The excitation of pulses is conducted by the application of small droplets of acetic acid and monitored subsequently employing timeresolved Wilhelmy plate and Kelvin probe measurements. The isothermal state diagrams of the monolayers for both lateral pressure and surface potential are experimentally recorded, enabling us to predict dynamic voltage pulse amplitudes of 0,1 to 3mV...

  10. Evidence for the propagation of 2D pressure pulses in lipid monolayers near the phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Griesbauer, J; Wixforth, A; Schneider, M F

    2012-01-01

    The existence and propagation of acoustic pressure pulses on lipid monolayers at the air/water-interfaces are directly observed by simple mechanical detection. The pulses are excited by small amounts of solvents added to the monolayer from the air phase. Employing a deliberate control of the lipid interface compressibility k, we can show that the pulses propagate at velocities, which are precisely reflecting the nonlinear behavior of the interface. This is manifested by a pronounced minimum of the sound velocity in the monolayer phase transition regime, while ranging up to 1.5 m/s at high lateral pressures. Motivated by the ubiquitous presence of lipid interfaces in biology, we propose the demonstrated sound propagation as an efficient and fast way of communication and protein modulation along nerves, between cells and biological units being controlled by the physical state of the interfaces.

  11. Influence of aerobic exercise training on post-exercise responses of aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiko eAkazawa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Central arterial blood pressure (BP is more predictive of future cardiovascular events than is brachial BP because it reflects the BP load imposed on the left ventricle with greater accuracy. However, little is known about the effects of exercise training on central hemodynamic response to acute exercise. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of an aerobic exercise regimen on the response of aortic BP after a single aerobic exercise in postmenopausal women. Nine healthy postmenopausal women (age: 61 ± 2 years participated in a 12-week aerobic exercise training regimen. Before and after the training, each subjects performed a single bout of cycling at ventilatory thresholds for 30 min. We evaluated the post-exercise aortic BP response, which was estimated via the general transfer function from applanation tonometry. After the initial pre-training aerobic exercise session, aortic BP did not change significantly: however, aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure were significantly attenuated after the single aerobic exercise session following the 12-week training regimen. The present study demonstrated that a regular aerobic exercise training regimen induced the post-exercise reduction of aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure. Regular aerobic exercise training may enhance post-exercise reduction in aortic BP.

  12. Enhancement of proton acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulse in radiation pressure mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosoughian, H.; Riazi, Z.; Afarideh, H.; Yazdani, E.

    2015-07-01

    The transition from hole-boring to light-sail regime of radiation pressure acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulses is studied using particle-in-cell simulation. The penetration depth of laser into the plasma with ramped density profile increases when a negatively chirped laser pulse is applied. Because of this induced transparency, the laser reflection layer moves deeper into the target and the hole-boring stage would smoothly transit into the light-sail stage. An optimum chirp parameter which satisfies the laser transparency condition, a 0 ≈ π n e l / n c λ , is obtained for each ramp scale length. Moreover, the efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the kinetic energy of particles is maximized at the obtained optimum condition. A relatively narrow proton energy spectrum with peak enhancement by a factor of 2 is achieved using a negatively chirped pulse compared with the un-chirped pulse.

  13. REFLECTANCE PULSE OXIMETRY AT THE FOREHEAD IMPROVES BY PRESSURE ON THE PROBE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DASSEL, ACM; GRAAFF, R; SIKKEMA, M; ZIJLSTRA, WG; AARNOUDSE, JG

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the possibility of improving reflectance (back-scatter) pulse oximetry measurements by pressure applied to the probe. Optimal signal detection, with the probe applied to an easily accessible location, is important to prevent erroneous oxygen saturation readouts. At the

  14. Consumer acceptance of high-pressure processing and pulsed-electric-field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nina Veflen; Grunert, Klaus G.; Sonne, Anne-Mette

    2010-01-01

    has to offer, do not necessarily guarantee the success of a product in the market place. Consumer acceptance depends on whether consumers perceive that there are specific benefits associated with the product. This review focuses specifically on how high-pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed...

  15. Resonant Pulse Combustors: A Reliable Route to Practical Pressure Gain Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A particular type of pressure gain combustion (PGC) device is described, which is under investigation at GRC. The Resonant Pulse Combustor (RPC) has been largely overlooked due to its theoretically low performance. However, its practical performance is quite competitive with other PGC systems, and its physical simplicity is unmatched.

  16. Pressure variations in the Monte Rosa nappe, Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Cindy; Vaughan-Hammon, Joshua; Baumgartner, Lukas; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    internally consistent thermodynamic database on whiteschists result in a minimum P of 2.2 GPa at T of 550 to 570˚C and a water activity close to 1, unlike previous water activities proposed (Le Bayon et al., 2006). Peak alpine pressures and temperatures calculated for the metagranite and associated whiteschists hence result in significant different pressure estimates, corroborating previous results from the literature. The possible explanations for such pressure variations are i) slight underestimation of the metagranite peak pressure, due to water-undersaturation conditions, however a pressure as high as 2 GPa is unlikely, or ii) heterogeneous stress conditions, due to rheologically contrasting lithologies, consisting of weak whiteschist inclusions within strong, undeformed metagranites. References Le Bayon et al., 2006: Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 151, 395-412 Luisier et al., 2015: GSA conference abstract Massonne and Schreyer, 1987: Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 96, 212-224 Pawlig, S. 2001: PhD thesis, University of Mainz (Germany) Pawlig and Baumgartner, 2001: SMPM 81,329-346

  17. Effect of ambient gas pressure on pulsed laser ablation plume dynamics and ZnTe film growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouleau, C.M.; Lowndes, D.H.; Geohegan, D.B.; Allard, L.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Strauss, M.A.; Cao, S.; Pedraza, A.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Puretzky, A.A. [Inst. of Spectroscopy, Troitsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    Epitaxial thin films of nitrogen-doped p-ZnTe were grown on single-crystal, semi-insulating Ga-As substrates via pulsed laser ablation of a stoichiometric ZnTe target. Both low pressure nitrogen ambients and high vacuum were used. Results of in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and time-resolved ion probe measurements have been compared with ex situ Hall effect and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. A strong correlation was observed between the nature of the film`s surface during growth (2-D vs. 3-D, assessed via RHEED) and the ambient gas pressures employed during deposition. The extended defect content (assessed via cross-sectional TEM) in the region >150 mn from the film/substrate interface was found to increase with the ambient gas pressure during deposition, which could not be explained by lattice mismatch alone. At sufficiently high pressures, misoriented, columnar grains developed which were not only consistent with the RHEED observations but also were correlated with a marked decrease in Hall mobility and a slight decrease in hole concentration. Ion probe measurements, which monitored the attenuation and slowing of the ion current arriving at the substrate surface, indicated that for increasing nitrogen pressure the fast (vacuum) velocity distribution splits into a distinct fast and two collisionally-slowed components or modes. Gas controlled variations in these components mirrored trends in electrical properties and microstructural measurements.

  18. Acetylcysteine reduces plasma homocysteine concentration and improves pulse pressure and endothelial function in patients with end-stage renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Rinder, Christiane; Beige, Joachim;

    2004-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress, elevated plasma homocysteine concentration, increased pulse pressure, and impaired endothelial function constitute risk factors for increased mortality in patients with end-stage renal failure.......Increased oxidative stress, elevated plasma homocysteine concentration, increased pulse pressure, and impaired endothelial function constitute risk factors for increased mortality in patients with end-stage renal failure....

  19. The association of 25(OH)D with blood pressure, pulse pressure and carotid–radial pulse wave velocity in African women

    OpenAIRE

    Iolanthé M Kruger; Schutte, Aletta E.; Huisman, Hugo W.; Van Rooyen, Johannes M.; Schutte, Rudolph; Malan, Leoné; Malan, Nicolaas T.; Carla M T Fourie; Kruger, Annamarie

    2013-01-01

    High susceptibility of the African population to develop cardiovascular disease obliges us to investigate possible contributing risk factors. Our aim was to determine whether low 25(OH)D status is associated with increased blood pressure and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in black South African women. We studied 291 urban women (mean age: 57.5669.00 yrs.). 25(OH)D status was determined by serum 25(OH)D levels. Women were stratified into sufficient (.30 ng/ ml), and insufficien...

  20. High-pressure (>1-bar) dielectric barrier discharge lamps generating short pulses of high-peak power vacuum ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carman, R J; Mildren, R P; Ward, B K; Kane, D M [Short Wavelength Interactions with Materials (SWIM), Physics Department, Macquarie University, North Ryde, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2004-09-07

    We have investigated the scaling of peak vacuum ultraviolet output power from homogeneous Xe dielectric barrier discharges excited by short voltage pulses. Increasing the Xe fill pressure above 1-bar provides an increased output pulse energy, a shortened pulse duration and increases in the peak output power of two to three orders of magnitude. High peak power pulses of up to 6 W cm{sup -2} are generated with a high efficiency for pulse rates up to 50 kHz. We show that the temporal pulse characteristics are in good agreement with results from detailed computer modelling of the discharge kinetics.

  1. Simultaneously propagating voltage and pressure pulses in lipid monolayers of pork brain and synthetic lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbauer, J.; Bössinger, S.; Wixforth, A.; Schneider, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrated interfaces are ubiquitous in biology and appear on all length scales from ions and individual molecules to membranes and cellular networks. In vivo, they comprise a high degree of self-organization and complex entanglement, which limits their experimental accessibility by smearing out the individual phenomenology. The Langmuir technique, however, allows the examination of defined interfaces, the controllable thermodynamic state of which enables one to explore the proper state diagrams. Here we demonstrate that voltage and pressure pulses simultaneously propagate along monolayers comprised of either native pork brain or synthetic lipids. The excitation of pulses is conducted by the application of small droplets of acetic acid and monitored subsequently employing time-resolved Wilhelmy plate and Kelvin probe measurements. The isothermal state diagrams of the monolayers for both lateral pressure and surface potential are experimentally recorded, enabling us to predict dynamic voltage pulse amplitudes of 0.1-3 mV based on the assumption of static mechanoelectrical coupling. We show that the underlying physics for such propagating pulses is the same for synthetic and natural extracted (pork brain) lipids and that the measured propagation velocities and pulse amplitudes depend on the compressibility of the interface. Given the ubiquitous presence of hydrated interfaces in biology, our experimental findings seem to support a fundamentally new mechanism for the propagation of signals and communication pathways in biology (signaling), which is based neither on protein-protein or receptor-ligand interaction nor diffusion.

  2. Experimental and numerical analysis of pressure pulses characteristics in a Francis turbine with partial load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yexiang, X; Zhengwei, W; Zongguo, Y; Jin, Z, E-mail: xiaoyex@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering and Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2010-08-15

    This study experimentally and numerically investigates the pressure pulses characteristics and unsteady flow behavior in a Francis turbine with partial load. Unsteady wall pressure measurements with partial load condition are performs to investigate thoroughly pressure fields in the spiral case, runner head cover and straight draft tube dynamically. The unsteady Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k-{omega}based SST turbulence model were used to model the unsteady flow within the entire flow passage of the Francis turbine. The dominate frequency of the predicted pressure pulses at runner inlet agree with the experimental results in the head cover. The influence of the blade passing frequency causes the simulated peak-to-peak amplitudes in the runner inlet to be larger than in the head cover. The measured and predicted pressure pulses at different positions along the runner are comparable. The predicted pressure fluctuations in the draft tube agree well with the experimental results. However the peak-to-peak amplitudes in the spiral case are not as well predicted so the calculation domain and the inlet boundary conditions need to be improved. At the most unstable operating condition, the pulse in the flow passage are due to the rotor-stator interference (RSI) between the runner and the guide vanes, the blade channel vortex in the runner blade passage and the vortex rope in the draft tube. The unsteady flow patterns in the turbine, including the blade channel vortex in the runner and the helical vortex rope in the draft tube, are classified numerically.

  3. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  4. Unconstrained pulse pressure monitoring for health management using hetero-core fiber optic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Michiko; Sonobe, Masako; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a pulse pressure waveform sensor that does not constrain a wearer's daily activity; the sensor uses hetero-core fiber optics. Hetero-core fiber sensors have been found to be sensitive to moderate bending. To detect minute pulse pressure changes from the radial artery at the wrist, we devised a fiber sensor arrangement using three-point bending supports. We analyzed and evaluated the measurement validity using wavelet transformation, which is well-suited for biological signal processing. It was confirmed that the detected pulse waveform had a fundamental mode frequency of around 1.25 Hz over the time-varying waveform. A band-pass filter with a range of frequencies from 0.85 to 1.7 Hz was used to pick up the fundamental mode. In addition, a high-pass filter with 0.85 Hz frequency eliminated arm motion artifacts; consequently, we achieved high signal-to-noise ratio. For unrestricted daily health management, it is desirable that pulse pressure monitoring can be achieved by simply placing a device on the hand without the sensor being noticed. Two types of arrangements were developed and demonstrated in which the pulse sensors were either embedded in a base, such as an armrest, or in a wearable device. A wearable device without cuff pressure using a sensitivity-enhanced fiber sensor was successfully achieved with a sensitivity of 0.07-0.3 dB with a noise floor lower than 0.01 dB for multiple subjects.

  5. Plasma electron source for the generation of wide-aperture pulsed beam at forevacuum pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oks, E.; Burdovitsin, V.; Medovnik, A.; Yushkov, Yu. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    This article reports on design and application of wide-aperture pulsed beam source, based on hollow cathode discharge. The source is intended for electron beam generation in pressure range 2-15 Pa. Multi-aperture extraction system, used in a source, provided beam cross-section uniformity of 10% on diameter 40 mm. The limiting values of the current density, pulse duration, and accelerating voltage are 350 mA/cm{sup 2}, 250 {mu}s, and 10 kV, respectively. These parameters are sufficient for surface modification of various materials, including non-conducting matters.

  6. Pulsed Discharge Effects on Bacteria Inactivation in Low-Pressure Radio-Frequency Oxygen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicoveanu, Dragos; Ohtsu, Yasunori; Fujita, Hiroharu

    2008-02-01

    The sporicidal effects of low-pressure radio frequency (RF) discharges in oxygen, produced by the application of continuous and pulsed RF power, were evaluated. For all cases, the survival curves showed a biphasic evolution. The maximum efficiency for bacteria sterilization was obtained when the RF power was injected in the continuous wave mode, while in the pulsed mode the lowest treatment temperature was ensured. The inactivation rates were calculated from the microorganism survival curves and their dependencies on the pulse characteristics (i.e., pulse frequency and duty cycle) were compared with those of the plasma parameters. The results indicated that the inactivation rate corresponding to the first phase of the survival curves is related to the time-averaged intensity of the light emission by the excited neutral atoms in the pulsed plasma, whereas the inactivation rate calculated from the second slope of the survival curves and the time-averaged plasma density have similar behaviors, when the pulse parameters were modified.

  7. Aluminum oxide films deposited in low pressure conditions by reactive pulsed dc magnetron sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Seino, T

    2002-01-01

    The reactive pulsed dc sputtering technique is widely used for the deposition of oxide films. The operating pressure for sputtering is commonly above 0.13 Pa. In this study, however, aluminum oxide (alumina) films were deposited at operating pressures from 0.06 to 0.4 Pa using a sputtering system equipped with a scanning magnetron cathode and a pulsed dc power supply. The pulsed dc power was found to be useful not only to reduce arcing, but also to sustain the discharge at low pressure. The electrical breakdown field, intrinsic stress, O/Al ratio, refractive index, and surface roughness were investigated. Both a low intrinsic stress and an O/Al ratio around the stoichiometry were required to get the film having a high breakdown field. A low operating pressure of 0.1 Pa was found to provide the necessary stress and O/Al ratio targets. A 50-nm-thick alumina film having a maximum breakdown field of 7.4 MV/cm was obtained.

  8. Numerical predictions of pressure pulses in a Francis pump turbine with misali-gned guide vanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖业祥; 王正伟; 张瑾; 罗永要

    2014-01-01

    Previous experimental and numerical analyses of the pressure pulse characteristics in a Francis turbine are extended here by using the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model to model the unsteady flow within the entire flow passage of a large Francis pump turbine with misaligned guide vanes at the rated rotational speed. The S-curve characteristics are analyzed by a combined use of the model test and the steady state simulation with the aligned guide vane firstly. Four misaligned guide vanes with two different openings are chosen to analyze the influence of pressure pulses in the turbine. The characteristics of the dominant unsteady flow frequencies in different parts of the pump turbine for various misaligned guide vane openings are investigated in detail. The predicted hydraulic performance and the pressure fluctuations show that the misaligned guide vanes reduce the relative pressure fluctuation amplitudes in the stationary part of the flow passage, but not the runner blades. The misaligned guide vanes have changed the low frequencies in the entire flow passage with the change of the pulse amplitudes mainly due to changes in the rotor-stator interaction and the low frequency vortex rope flow behavior.

  9. Dual-modality arterial pulse monitoring system for continuous blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Xuan Dai; Yuan-Ting Zhang; Jing Liu; Xiao-Rong Ding; Ni Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and ambulatory measurement of blood pressure (BP) is essential for efficient diagnosis, management and prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, traditional cuff-based BP measurement methods provide only intermittent BP readings and can cause discomfort with the occlusive cuff. Although pulse transit time (PTT) method is promising for cuffless and continuous BP measurement, its pervasive use is restricted by its limited accuracy and requirement of placing sensors on multiple body sites. To tackle these issues, we propose a novel dual-modality arterial pulse monitoring system for continuous blood pressure measurement, which simultaneously records the pressure and photoplethysmography (PPG) signals of radial artery. The obtained signals can be used to generate a pressure-volume curve, from which the elasticity index (EI) and viscosity index (VI) can be extracted. Experiments were carried out among 7 healthy subjects with their PPG, ECG, arterial pressure wave and reference BP collected to examine the effectiveness of the proposed indexes. The results of this study demonstrate that a linear regression model combining EI and VI has significantly higher BP tracking correlation coefficient as compared to the PTT method. This suggests that the proposed system and method can potentially be used for convenient and continuous blood pressure estimation with higher accuracy.

  10. Continuous cuff-less blood pressure monitoring based on the pulse arrival time approach: the impact of posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlsteff, J; Aubert, X A; Morren, G

    2008-01-01

    There is an unmet need for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring especially, in personal healthcare applications. The pulse arrival time (PAT) approach might offer a suitable solution to enable comfortable BP monitoring even at beat-level. However, the methodology is based on hemodynamic surrogate measures, which are sensitive to patient activities such as posture changes, not necessarily related to blood pressure variations. In this paper, we analyze the impact of posture on the PAT measure and related hemodynamic parameters such as the pre-ejection period in well-defined procedures. Additionally, the PAT of a monitored subject is investigated in an unsupervised scenario illustrating the complexity of such a measurement. Our results show the failure of blood pressure inference based on simple calibration strategies using the PAT measure only. We discuss opportunities to compensate for the observed effects towards the realization of wearable cuff-less blood pressure monitoring. These findings emphasize the importance of accessing context information in personal healthcare applications, where vital sign monitoring is typically unsupervised.

  11. Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the person's heart is pumping. Pulse ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  12. Pulse, dc and ac breakdown in high pressure gas discharge lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, J.; Manders, F.; Aben, P. C. H.; Stoffels, W. W.; Haverlag, M.

    2008-07-01

    An optical study of pulse, dc, and ac (50-400 kHz) ignition of metal halide lamps has been performed by investigating intensified CCD camera images of the discharges. The ceramic lamp burners were filled with xenon gas at pressures of 300 and 700 mbar. In comparison with dc and pulse ignition, igniting with an ac voltage decreases the ignition voltage by up to 56% and the breakdown time scales get much longer (~10-3 s compared with ~10-7 s for pulse ignition). Increasing the ac frequency decreases the ignition voltages and changes the ionization channel shapes. External irradiation of UV light can have either an increasing or a decreasing effect on ignition voltages.

  13. Dehydration stress associated variations in rectal temperature, pulse and respiration rate of Marwari sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini, B. S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was carried out in adult female Marwari sheep to evaluate the dehydration stress associated variations in rectal temperature, pulse and respiration rate. The whole experiment was divided into control, thirst and drinking periods. The thirst period was of 5 days to find out the dehydration stress. The control mean values of rectal temperature (oF, pulse rate (min -1 and respiration rate (min -1 were 101.1 ± 0.198, 65.667 ± 2.028 and 25.167 ± 1.515 in the morning and 101.567 ± 0.174, 71.333 ± 1.229 and 27.833 ± 1.83 in the evening, respectively. With the advancement of thirst period the mean values of rectal temperature and pulse rate gradually increased while that of respiration rate increased first and then decreased. After drinking the mean values gradually decreased and on hour 72 of drinking, they differed non significantly (P>0.05 from their respective control values. Changes in rectal temperature, pulse rate and respiration rate indicated the adaptability of the animals to increased thirst periods.Dehydration due to thirst period provoked physiological mechanisms in the body in a manner that helped the animals to survive. Although dehydration was a stress to the animals, but the changes brought about by five days of dehydration were reversible.

  14. Nonmonotonous variation of DNA angular separation during asymmetric pulsed field electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemifard, Neda; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Masliyah, Jacob H; Harrison, D Jed

    2013-09-01

    Asymmetric pulsed field electrophoresis within crystalline arrays is used to generate angular separation of DNA molecules. Four regimes of the frequency response are observed, a low frequency rise in angular separation, a plateau, a subsequent decline, and a second plateau at higher frequencies. It is shown that the frequency response for different sized DNA is governed by the relation between pulse time and the reorientation time of DNA molecules. The decline in angular separation at higher frequencies has not previously been analyzed. Real-time videos of single DNA molecules migrating under high frequency-pulsed electric field show the molecules no longer follow the head to tail switching, ratchet mechanism seen at lower frequencies. Once the pulse period is shorter than the reorientation time, the migration mechanism changes significantly. The molecule reptates along the average direction of the two electric fields, which reduces the angular separation. A freely jointed chain model of DNA is developed where the porous structure is represented with a hexagonal array of obstacles. The model qualitatively predicts the variation of DNA angular separation with respect to frequency.

  15. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure, ultrasound and pulsed electric fields on milk composition and characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jeličić

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available High hydrostatic pressure, ultrasonication and pulsed eletrcic fields (PEF belong to novel food processing methods which are mostly implemented in combination with moderate temperatures and/ or in combination with each other in order to provide adequate microbiological quality with minimal losses of nutritional value. All of three mentioned methods have been intensively investigated for the purpose of inactivation and reduction of foodborne microorganisms present in milk and dairy products. However, a large number of scientific researches have been dedicated to investigation of impact of these methods on changes in constituents like milk fat, milk proteins and lactose as well as changes in mechanisms like renneting properties and coagulation of milk. The aim of this research was to give an overview of changes in milk constituents induced by high hydrostatic pressure, ultrasonification and pulsed electric field treatments as well as to suggest how these changes could improve conventional processes in the dairy industry.

  16. Numerical simulation of pressure waves in the cochlea induced by a microwave pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitzhak, Nir M; Ruppin, Raphael; Hareuveny, Ronen

    2014-10-01

    The pressure waves developing at the cochlea by the irradiation of the body with a plane wave microwave pulse are obtained by numerical simulation, employing a two-step finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm. First, the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution is obtained by solving the Maxwell equations on a FDTD grid. Second, the temperature rise due to this SAR distribution is used to formulate the thermoelastic equations of motion, which are discretized and solved by the FDTD method. The calculations are performed for anatomically based full body human models, as well as for a head model. The dependence of the pressure amplitude at the cochlea on the frequency, the direction of propagation, and the polarization of the incident electromagnetic radiation, as well as on the pulse width, was investigated.

  17. Studies on an improved indigenous pressure wave generator and its testing with a pulse tube cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S.; Karunanithi, R.; Narsimham, G. S. V. L.; Kranthi, J. Kumar; Damu, C.; Praveen, T.; Samir, M.; Mallappa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Earlier version of an indigenously developed Pressure Wave Generator (PWG) could not develop the necessary pressure ratio to satisfactorily operate a pulse tube cooler, largely due to high blow by losses in the piston cylinder seal gap and due to a few design deficiencies. Effect of different parameters like seal gap, piston diameter, piston stroke, moving mass and the piston back volume on the performance is studied analytically. Modifications were done to the PWG based on analysis and the performance is experimentally measured. A significant improvement in PWG performance is seen as a result of the modifications. The improved PWG is tested with the same pulse tube cooler but with different inertance tube configurations. A no load temperature of 130 K is achieved with an inertance tube configuration designed using Sage software. The delivered PV power is estimated to be 28.4 W which can produce a refrigeration of about 1 W at 80 K.

  18. Modeling of asymmetric pulsed phenomena in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha Yan [College of Mathematics and Computer Science, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Wang Huijuan [School of Mathematics and Physics, North China Electric Power University, Baoding 071003 (China); Wang Xiaofei [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Asymmetric current pulses in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges are investigated by a self-consistent, one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the glow mode and Townsend mode can coexist in the asymmetric discharge even though the gas gap is rather large. The reason for this phenomenon is that the residual space charge plays the role of anode and reduces the gap width, resulting in the formation of a Townsend discharge.

  19. Arterial compliance in patients with cirrhosis: stroke volume-pulse pressure ratio as simplified index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Fuglsang, Stefan; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2001-01-01

    Arterial function may be altered in patients with cirrhosis. We determined compliance of the arterial tree (C(1)) in relation to systemic and splanchnic hemodynamic derangement and clinical variables. C(1) and the stroke volume-pulse pressure index (SV/PP) were significantly higher (+62% and +40...... predictors of SV/PP (P index seems to reflect abnormalities in the arterial compliance of these patients....

  20. Arterial compliance in patients with cirrhosis: stroke volume-pulse pressure ratio as simplified index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, S; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, E

    2001-01-01

    Arterial function may be altered in patients with cirrhosis. We determined compliance of the arterial tree (C(1)) in relation to systemic and splanchnic hemodynamic derangement and clinical variables. C(1) and the stroke volume-pulse pressure index (SV/PP) were significantly higher (+62% and +40...... predictors of SV/PP (P compliance is elevated in cirrhosis. A simplified SV/PP index seems to reflect abnormalities in the arterial compliance of these patients....

  1. Damage of cellular material under simultaneous application of pressure and pulsed electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Bazhal, M I; Vorobev, E I

    2000-01-01

    Influence of pulsed electric field (PEF) simultaneous to pressure treatment on moisture expression from fine-cut cellular raw material has been investigated. Dependencies of specific conductivity $\\sigma$, liquid yield $Y$, instantaneous flow rate $v$ and qualitative juice characteristics at different modes of PEF treatment are discussed. Three main consolidation phases were observed in a case of mechanical expression. A unified approach is proposed for liquid yield data analysis allowing to reduce the data scattering caused by differences in the quality of samples. Simultaneous application of pressure and PEF treatment allows to reveal a passive form of electrical damage. Pressure provokes the damage of defected cells, enhances diffusion migration of moisture in porous cellular material and depresses the cell resealing processes. PEF application at a moment when a sample specific electrical conductivity reaches minimum and pressure achieves its constant value seemed to be the most optimal.

  2. Central blood pressure assessment using 24-hour brachial pulse wave analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muiesan ML

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Lorenza Muiesan, Massimo Salvetti, Fabio Bertacchini, Claudia Agabiti-Rosei, Giulia Maruelli, Efrem Colonetti, Anna Paini Clinica Medica, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy Abstract: This review describes the use of central blood pressure (BP measurements during ambulatory monitoring, using noninvasive devices. The principles of measuring central BP by applanation tonometry and by oscillometry are reported, and information on device validation studies is described. The pathophysiological basis for the differences between brachial and aortic pressure is discussed. The currently available methods for central aortic pressure measurement are relatively accurate, and their use has important clinical implications, such as improving diagnostic and prognostic stratification of hypertension and providing a more accurate assessment of the effect of treatment on BP. Keywords: aortic blood pressure measurements, ambulatory monitoring, pulse wave analysis

  3. Impacts of air pressure on the evolution of nanosecond pulse discharge products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jin-Lu; He Li-Ming; Ding Wei; Wang Yu-Qian; Du Chun

    2013-01-01

    Based on the nonequilibrium plasma dynamics of air discharge,a dynamic model of zero-dimensional plasma is established by combining the component density equation,the Boltzmann equation,and the energy transfer equation.The evolution properties of nanosecond pulse discharge (NPD) plasma under different air pressures are calculated.The results show that the air pressure has significant impacts on the NPD products and the peak values of particle number density for particles such as O atoms,O3 molecules,N2(A3) molecules in excited states,and NO molecules.It increases at first and then decreases with the increase of air pressure.On the other hand,the peak values of particle number density for N2(B3)and N2(C3) molecules in excited states are only slightly affected by the air pressure.

  4. Outcome-driven thresholds for ambulatory pulse pressure in 9938 participants recruited from 11 populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Yu-Mei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based thresholds for risk stratification based on pulse pressure (PP) are currently unavailable. To derive outcome-driven thresholds for the 24-hour ambulatory PP, we analyzed 9938 participants randomly recruited from 11 populations (47.3% women). After age stratification (... years) and using average risk as reference, we computed multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) to assess risk by tenths of the PP distribution or risk associated with stepwise increasing (+1 mm Hg) PP levels. All adjustments included mean arterial pressure. Among 6028 younger participants (68 853...

  5. Effect of fluid/structure-interaction on pressure pulse loads on pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellner, A.; Schoenfelder, C.

    1982-08-01

    In the analysis of pressure pulse loads on piping systems the fluid-structure-interaction is usually neglected. The resulting violation of energy conservation can lead to drastic overestimations of the loads. At first simple formulas are derived which can be used for a rough assessment of the magnitude of this effect for both possible forms of loads due to pressure waves: pipe wall stress and excitation of global pipe vibration. Secondly numerical methods which explicitly include the fluid-structure-interaction are described and some computational results presented.

  6. Volumetric observations during paroxysmal eruptions at Mount Etna: pressurized drainage of a shallow chamber or pulsed supply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Andrew J. L.; Neri, Marco

    2002-07-01

    The October 17 to November 5, 1999, eruption of Mount Etna's Bocca Nuova crater emplaced a ˜15×10 6 m 3 flow field. The eruption was characterized by 11 paroxysmal events during which intense Strombolian and lava fountain activity fed vigorous channelized 'a'a flows at eruption rates of up to 120 m 3 s -1. Each paroxysm lasted between 75 and 450 min, and was separated by periods of less intense Strombolian activity and less vigorous (foam collapse at the reservoir roof powers fountaining. In the pulsing case, variations in magma flux account for pressurization-depressurization and supply the excess volume. Increases in rise rate and volatile flux, coupled with rapid exsolution during ascent, trigger fountaining. Limiting equations that define critical foam layer volumes and magma rise rates necessary for Hawaiian-style fountaining favor the latter model.

  7. Ocular rigidity, ocular pulse amplitude, and pulsatile ocular blood flow: the effect of intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastiridou, Anna I; Ginis, Harilaos S; De Brouwere, Dirk; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the pressure-volume relation in the living human eye, measure the ocular pulse amplitude (OPA), and calculate the corresponding pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) in a range of clinically relevant IOP levels. Fifty patients with cataract (50 eyes) were enrolled in the study. After cannulation of the anterior chamber, a computer-controlled device for the intraoperative measurement and control of IOP was used to artificially increase the IOP in a stepping procedure from 15 to 40 mm Hg. The IOP was continuously recorded for 2 seconds after each infusion step. The pressure-volume relation was approximated with an exponential fit, and the ocular rigidity coefficient was computed. OPA, pulse volume (PV), and POBF were measured from the continuous IOP recordings. The average rigidity coefficient was 0.0224 microL(-1) (SD 0.0049). OPA increased by 91% and PV and POBF decreased by 29% and 30%, respectively, when increasing the IOP from 15 to 40 mm Hg. The OPA is positively correlated with the coefficient of ocular rigidity (r = 0.65, P < 0.01). The present results suggest a nonlinear pressure-volume relation in the living human eye characterized by an increase in rigidity at higher IOP levels. The increased OPA and decreased pulse volume relate to the decreased POBF and the increased mechanical resistance of the ocular wall at high IOP levels.

  8. A Neural Network for Estimation of Aortic Pressure from the Radial Artery Pressure Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    from periphery to artery: a model based study, American Journal of Physiology, 1998,274:43, pp H1386-92 [9] C. Chen, E. Nevo , B Fetics, P Pak, F, Yin, L...36. [10] B Fetics, E Nevo , C. Chen, D Kass, Parametric model derivation of transfer function for noninvasive estimation of aortic pressure by radial

  9. Antihypertensive treatments obscure familial contributions to blood pressure variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jisheng S; Hopper, John L; Harrap, Stephen B

    2003-02-01

    The linkage and association between inherent blood pressure and underlying genotype is potentially confounded by antihypertensive treatment. We estimated blood pressure variance components (genetic, shared environmental, individual-specific) in 767 adult volunteer families by using a variety of approaches to adjusting blood pressure of the 244 subjects (8.2%) receiving antihypertensive medications. The additive genetic component of variance for systolic pressure was 73.9 mm Hg(2) (SE, 8.8) when measured pressures (adjusted for age by gender within each generation) were used but fell to 61.4 mm Hg(2) (SE, 8.0) when treated subjects were excluded. When the relevant 95th percentile values were substituted for treated systolic pressures, the additive genetic component was 81.9 mm Hg(2) (SE, 9.5), but individual adjustments in systolic pressure ranged from -53.5 mm Hg to +64.5 mm Hg (mean, +17.2 mm Hg). Instead, when 10 mm Hg was added to treated systolic pressure, the additive genetic component rose to 86.6 mm Hg(2) (SE, 10.1). Similar changes were seen in the shared environment component of variance for systolic pressure and for the combined genetic and shared environmental (ie, familial) components of diastolic pressure. There was little change in the individual-specific variance component across any of the methods. Therefore, treated subjects contribute important information to the familial components of blood pressure variance. This information is lost if treated subjects are excluded and obscured by treatment effects if unadjusted measured pressures are used. Adding back an appropriate increment of pressure restores familial components, more closely reflects the pretreatment values, and should increase the power of genomic linkage and linkage disequilibrium analyses.

  10. Country variations in family members' informal pressure to drink less.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmila, Marja; Raitasalo, Kirsimarja; Knibbe, Ronald; Selin, Klara

    2009-04-01

    The paper examines how family members in 18 countries attempt to influence each other to drink less. Data come from the GENACIS (Gender, Alcohol and Culture: an International Study) dataset. Countries included were Argentina, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, India, Japan, Nigeria, Norway, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Uganda, UK and Uruguay (overall sample 44,115). In each country, the percentage of people who had experienced family member pressure to drink less were compared to country abstinence rate, mean drinking volume per drinker and other societal-level factors. While countries differed greatly on proportion of drinkers having experienced family members' pressure to drink less, in all countries drinking women reported less pressure than drinking men in their own society. In all studied countries, informal pressure was exerted most often by the spouse or sexual partner. However, other family members were also involved. Informal pressure was found to be highly correlated with the country's socioeconomic conditions. Informal pressure to drink less by family members is on one hand an expression of social and family problems, caused by heavy drinking, especially in the economically less developed countries, suggesting alcohol-related deprivation. On the other hand, similar gender differences were seen in all the societies, men reporting receiving more informal pressure than women. Thus, informal pressure to drink less tended to reflect the gender conflict caused by heavy use of alcohol by men.

  11. Application of Pressure Pulse Test Analysis in CO2 Leakage Detection and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, M.; Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, numerous research and industrial projects have been devoted to investigate the feasibility and efficiency of carbon dioxide capture, storage, and utilization. Besides the studies over the characteristics of candidate formations for CO2 injection, much attention has been paid to answer the environmental concerns regarding the CO2 leak to overlying formations. To first detect and then track a possible CO2 leak, different techniques have been proposed in the literature; however, most of them examine only a small portion of the formation and have a low resolution for early leak detection. To further increase the extent of the investigation zone and to monitor a large section of the formation in more detail, multi-well testing techniques have received a significant attention. Pressure pulse testing is a multi-well test technique in which a pressure signal generated by periods of injection and shut-in from a pulser well is propagated inside the formation, and the corresponding response is recorded at the observer wells. The recorded pressure response is then analyzed to measure the rock and fluid properties and to monitor the possible changes over the time. In this research study, we have applied frequency methods as well as superposition principle to interpret the pressure pulse test data and monitor the changes in transmissibility and storativity of the formation between the well pairs. We have used synthetic reservoir models and numerical reservoir simulations to produce the pressure pulse test data. The analysis of the simulation results indicated that even a small amount of CO2 leak in the investigation zone can have a measurable effect on the calculated storativity and transmissibility factors. This can be of a great importance when an early leak detection is of interest. Moreover, when multiple wells are available in the formation, the distribution of the calculated parameters can visualize the extent of CO2 leak, which has a great

  12. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-12-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms – and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries – in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of ‑0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of ‑0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP.

  13. Pressure effects during pulsed-laser deposition of barium titanate thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalo, J.; Afonso, C.N. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Optica; Gomez San Roman, R.; Perez Casero, R. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Perriere, J. [Groupe de Physique des Solides, Universites Paris VII et VI, URA 17 du CNRS, Tour 23, 2 Place Jussieu, 75251 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    1998-05-01

    The composition and homogeneity of barium titanate films grown by pulsed-laser deposition at different substrate temperatures (room temperature, 700 C) and gas environments (O{sub 2},Ar) in a broad pressure range (10{sup -7}-1 mbar) are correlated to the plasma expansion dynamics. It is found that the deposited films present an excess of Ba in the intermediate pressure range (10{sup -2}pressure and the existence of scattering processes for distances (d) from the target lower than L{sub P} and the diffusion of the ejected species for L{sub P}

  14. Using Short Pulse Lasers to Address Frontiers in High Pressure Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildmann, K.; Springer, P.T.; Cauble, R.; Foord, M.E.; Guethlein, G.; Ng, A.; Patel, P.K.; Price, D.F.; Rogers, F.J; Wicks, S.C.

    1999-08-10

    Having laser intensities of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} yield electrical field strengths of 10{sup 12} V/cm which is comparable to the field strength at the K-shell of neon. Instant field ionization becomes part of the laser-matter interaction allowing to transfer most of the photons momenta directly onto the ions by driving an electrostatic shock through the target equivalent to pressures of several 100 Gbar. Utilization of these high-pressure conditions in form of equation of state measurements, however, strongly depends on the contrast of the femtosecond laser pulse. Currently, the Livermore USP and JanUSP lasers reach contrast values up to 10{sup 8}. This is sufficient to explore near-isochorically heated materials at moderate intensities (10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) attaining pressures around 100 Mbar.

  15. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, B M; O' Flynn, B; Mathewson, A, E-mail: brian.mccarthy@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, UCC, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  16. Mapping Activity Variations for Ru2O3 in Lunar Volcanic Green Glass Analogs Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malum, K. M.; Colson, R. O.; Sawarynski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Using differential pulse voltammetry, we are mapping variations in activities for NiO and Ru2O3 as a function of compositional variation for compositions centered around an Apollo 15 green glass analog. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Improved Performance of an Indigenous Stirling Type Pulse Tube Cooler and Pressure Wave Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J. Kranthi; Jacob, S.; Karunanithi, R.; Narasimham, G. S. V. L.; Damu, C.; Praveen, T.; Samir, M.

    Sustained efforts have been made in our laboratory to improve the performance of an indigenously developed pressure wave gen- erator by reducing the mechanical losses and the required input power. An acoustically matching pulse tube cooler, with a design target of 0.5 W at 80 K, was designed using Sage and experience gained from previous studies. The pulse tube cooler was fabri- cated and tested. The effect of regenerator stacking pattern on the cooler performance was studied by filling the regenerator with mesh of the same size #400 and with multi meshes #250, 325, 400. In present experiments, regenerator with #400 mesh at 30 bar filling pressure performed better with more energy efficiency. A no load temperature of 74 K was achieved with input power of 59 W corresponding to a cooling power of 0.22 W at 80 K. Parasitic heat load to the cooler was measured be 0.68 W. This heat load is primarily by heat conduction through the regenerator and pulse tube wall. By reducing the wall thickness from 0.30 mm to 0.15 mm, the parasitic loads can be reduced by 50%.

  18. Blood pulse wave velocity and pressure sensing via fiber based and free space based optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkis, Talia; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Agdarov, Sergey; Beiderman, Yafim; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-02-01

    Continuous noninvasive measurement of vital bio-signs, such as cardiopulmonary parameters, is an important tool in evaluation of the patient's physiological condition and health monitoring. On the demand of new enabling technologies, some works have been done in continuous monitoring of blood pressure and pulse wave velocity. In this paper, we introduce two techniques for non-contact sensing of vital bio signs. In the first approach the optical sensor is based on single mode in-fibers Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to detect heartbeat, respiration and pulse wave velocity (PWV). The introduced interferometer is based on a new implanted scheme. It replaces the conventional MZI realized by inserting of discontinuities in the fiber to break the total internal reflection and scatter/collect light. The proposed fiber sensor was successfully incorporated into shirt to produce smart clothing. The measurements obtained from the smart clothing could be obtained in comfortable manner and there is no need to have an initial calibration or a direct contact between the sensor and the skin of the tested individual. In the second concept we show a remote noncontact blood pulse wave velocity and pressure measurement based on tracking the temporal changes of reflected secondary speckle patterns produced in human skin when illuminated by a laser beams. In both concept experimental validation of the proposed schemes is shown and analyzed.

  19. High-voltage nanosecond pulses in a low-pressure radiofrequency discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Pustylnik, Mikhail; Ivlev, Alexei; Vasilyak, Leonid; Couëdel, Lenaic; Thomas, Hubertus; Morfill, Gregor; Fortov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    An influence of a high-voltage (3-17 kV) 20 ns pulse on a weakly-ionized low-pressure (0.1-10 Pa) capacitively-coupled radiofrequency (RF) argon plasma is studied experimentally. The plasma evolution after pulse exhibits two characteristic regimes: a bright flash, occurring within 100 ns after the pulse (when the discharge emission increases by 2-3 orders of magnitude over the steady-state level), and a dark phase, lasting a few hundreds \\mu s (when the intensity of the discharge emission drops significantly below the steady-state level). The electron density increases during the flash and remains very large at the dark phase. 1D3V particle-in-cell simulations qualitatively reproduce both regimes and allow for detailed analysis of the underlying mechanisms. It is found that the high-voltage nanosecond pulse is capable of removing a significant fraction of plasma electrons out of the discharge gap, and that the flash is the result of the excitation of gas atoms, triggered by residual electrons accelerated in t...

  20. Pulse Combustor Driven Pressure Gain Combustion for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2017-02-01

    The gas turbine engine is an essential component of the global energy infrastructure which accounts for a significant portion of the total fossil fuel consumption in transportation and electric power generation sectors. For this reason there is significant interest in further increasing the efficiency and reducing the pollutant emissions of these devices. Conventional approaches to this goal, which include increasing the compression ratio, turbine inlet temperature, and turbine/compressor efficiency, have brought modern gas turbine engines near the limits of what may be achieved with the conventionally applied Brayton cycle. If a significant future step increase in gas turbine efficiency is to be realized some deviation from this convention is necessary. The pressure gain gas turbine concept is a well established new combustion technology that promises to provide a dramatic increase in gas turbine efficiency by replacing the isobaric heat addition process found in conventional technology with an isochoric process. The thermodynamic benefit of even a small increase in stagnation pressure across a gas turbine combustor translates to a significant increase in cycle efficiency. To date there have been a variety of methods proposed for achieving stagnation pressure gains across a gas turbine combustor and these concepts have seen a broad spectrum of levels of success. The following chapter provides an introduction to one of the proposed pressure gain methods that may be most easily realized in a practical application. This approach, known as pulse combustor driven pressure gain combustion, utilizes an acoustically resonant pulse combustor to approximate isochoric heat release and thus produce a rise in stagnation pressure.

  1. Numerical Study of Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure Under the Needle-Plate Electrode Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yanhui; YE Huanhuan; ZHANG Jiao; WANG Qi; ZHANG Jie; WANG Dezhen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper,we study the characteristics of atmospheric-pressure pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) under the needle-plate electrode configuration using a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model.The results show that,the DBDs driven by positive pulse,negative pulse and bipolar pulse possess different behaviors.Moreover,the two discharges appearing at the rising and the falling phases of per voltage pulse also have different discharge regimes.For the case of the positive pulse,the breakdown field is much lower than that of the negative pulse,and its propagation characteristic is different from the negative pulse DBD.When the DBD is driven by a bipolar pulse voltage,there exists the interaction between the positive and negative pulses,resulting in the decrease of the breakdown field of the negative pulse DBD and causing the change of the discharge behaviors.In addition,the effects of the discharge parameters on the behaviors of pulsed DBD in the needle-plate electrode configuration are also studied.

  2. An atmospheric pressure plasma source driven by a train of monopolar high voltage pulses superimposed to a dc voltage

    OpenAIRE

    Stoican, O.S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An atmospheric pressure plasma source supplied by an electrical circuit consisting of two voltage sources in parallel connection is reported. One of them is a low-power self-oscillating flyback converter which produces negative voltage pulses with an amplitude of several kilovolts. The high voltage pulses are necessary to ignite an electrical discharge between the electrodes at atmospheric pressure. An additional dc source delivering several hundreds of volts at a few hund...

  3. The effects of pulse pressure from seismic water gun technology on Northern Pike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jackson A.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Wilmoth, Siri K.; Wagner, Tristany L.; Shields, Patrick A; Fox, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of sound pressure pulses generated from a water gun for controlling invasive Northern Pike Esox lucius. Pulse pressures from two sizes of water guns were evaluated for their effects on individual fish placed at a predetermined random distance. Fish mortality from a 5,620.8-cm3 water gun (peak pressure source level = 252 dB referenced to 1 μP at 1 m) was assessed every 24 h for 168 h, and damage (intact, hematoma, or rupture) to the gas bladder, kidney, and liver was recorded. The experiment was replicated with a 1,966.4-cm3 water gun (peak pressure source level = 244 dB referenced to 1 μP at 1 m), but fish were euthanized immediately. The peak sound pressure level (SPLpeak), peak-to-peak sound pressure level (SPLp-p), and frequency spectrums were recorded, and the cumulative sound exposure level (SELcum) was subsequently calculated. The SPLpeak, SPLp-p, and SELcum were correlated, and values varied significantly by treatment group for both guns. Mortality increased and organ damage was greater with decreasing distance to the water gun. Mortality (31%) by 168 h was only observed for Northern Pike exhibiting the highest degree of organ damage. Mortality at 72 h and 168 h postexposure was associated with increasing SELcum above 195 dB. The minimum SELcum calculated for gas bladder rupture was 199 dB recorded at 9 m from the 5,620.8-cm3 water gun and 194 dB recorded at 6 m from the 1,966.4-cm3water gun. Among Northern Pike that were exposed to the large water gun, 100% of fish exposed at 3 and 6 m had ruptured gas bladders, and 86% exposed at 9 m had ruptured gas bladders. Among fish that were exposed to pulse pressures from the smaller water gun, 78% exhibited gas bladder rupture. Results from these initial controlled experiments underscore the potential of water guns as a tool for controlling Northern Pike.

  4. Favorable effect of aerobic exercise on arterial pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity during stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milatz, Florian; Ketelhut, Sascha; Ketelhut, Sascha; Ketelhut, Reinhard G

    2015-07-01

    Increased central pulse wave velocity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The favorable influence of exercise on arterial stiffness (AS) and blood pressure (BP) has been reported exclusively at rest. The present study investigated the influence of a single bout of acute cycling on AS and BP during recovery and, moreover, during cold pressor stress testing. 32 healthy men (33.7 ± 8 years, BMI 24 ± 2.5 kg/m²) performed a 60 minute endurance exercise on a bicycle ergometer (45 % VO2max). Before and after exercise aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) as well as central and peripheral BP were measured non-invasively at rest and at the end of a 2 minute cold pressor test (CPT). Even after 60 minutes of recovery aPWV (- 0.22 ± 0.3 m / sec) was significantly reduced (p testing.

  5. Plasma sterilization of polyethylene terephthalate bottles by pulsed corona discharge at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaoka, Satoshi

    2007-06-01

    A pulsed power supply was used to generate a corona discharge on a polyethylene terephthalate bottle, to conduct plasma sterilization at atmospheric pressure. Before generating such a discharge, minute quantities of water were attached to the inner surface of the bottle and to the surface of a high voltage (HV) electrode inserted into the bottle. Next, high-voltage pulses of electricity were discharged between electrodes for 6.0s, while rotating the bottle. The resulting spore log reduction values of Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger on the inner surface of the bottle were 5.5 and 6 or higher, respectively, and those on the HV electrode surface were each 6 or higher for both strains. The presence of the by-products gaseous ozone, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric ions resulting from the electrical discharge was confirmed.

  6. Plantar Pressure Variation during Jogging with Different Heel Height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the key testing and analysis results of an investigation on the effect of heel height on the plantar pressure over different foot areas in jogging. It is important in improving the understanding of jogging with high heels and damage/injury prevention. It can also potentially guide the development of suitable/adaptive exercise schemes in between daily activities with high heels. In this work, plantar pressure data were collected from 10 habituated healthy female subjects (aged 21–25 years at their natural jogging speed with three different conditions: flat heeled shoes (0.8 cm, low heeled shoes (4.0 cm, and high heeled shoes (6.6 cm. Data analysis showed significantly differences in plantar pressure distribution associated with the heel heights with increased pressure in the first metatarsal region and decreased pressure in the lateral metatarsal and midfoot sections. However, there is no significant alteration of plantar pressure in the central area of the forefoot with jogging gait.

  7. Issues in deep ocean collinear double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy: Dependence of emission intensity and inter-pulse delay on solution pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence-Snyder, Marion; Scaffidi, Jonathan P.; Pearman, William F.; Gordon, Christopher M.; Angel, S. Michael

    2014-09-01

    Double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) with a collinear laser beam orientation is shown for high-pressure bulk aqueous solutions (up to 50 bar) along with bubble and plasma images. These investigations reveal that the emission plasma is quenched much more rapidly in solution requiring much shorter detector gate delays than for typical LIBS measurements in air. Also, the emission is inversely proportional to solution pressure, and the most intense emission at all pressures occurs when the laser-induced vapor bubble is at a maximum diameter. It is also shown that the laser-induced bubble grows initially at the same rate for all solution pressures, collapsing more quickly as the pressure is increased. Intense emission is best obtained for conditions where the laser-induced bubble formed by the first laser pulse is small and spherically shaped. - Highlights: • Collinear double-pulse LIBS is shown for 50 bar bulk aqueous solutions. • LIBS plasma in solution is much more rapidly quenched than a LIBS plasma in air. • For DP LIBS, the emission is inversely proportional to solution pressure. • Laser-induced bubble growth rate is the same at all solution pressures. • Large spherical laser-induced bubbles produce the strongest DP LIBS emission.

  8. Nanosecond-timescale high-pressure gas discharge in a microwave pulse compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Krasik, Yakov

    2016-09-01

    The results of experimental and numerical studies of the microwave plasma discharge initiated by a nanosecond laser pulse are presented. The discharge is ignited in the pressurized gas filling the switch, which opens the charged resonant cavity, so that the accumulated microwave energy is rapidly released into a load. Fast-framing optical imaging showed that the plasma in the switch appears as filaments expanding along the RF electric field. The temporal evolution of the plasma density was derived from time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. With increasing microwave energy in the cavity, the plasma appears earlier in time after the laser beam enters the switch and its density rises more steeply reaching values which exceed 1016 cm-3 at a gas pressure of 2 .105 Pa. Numerical simulations were conducted using the gas conductivity model of plasma and representation of discharge origin by setting initial population of seed electrons treated by PIC algorithm. The results showed good agreement with the experiments and explained how the self-consistent dynamics of the plasma and RF fields determines the quality of microwave output pulses. In addition, the dynamics of the microwave energy absorption in the discharge plasma was studied. It was shown that at a high pressure, even with an unlimited rate of ionization, a significant portion of the stored energy, 20%, is lost. This work was partially supported by the BSF Grant No. 2012038.

  9. Inactivation differences of microorganisms by low pressure UV and pulsed xenon lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, M; Okuda, A; Tajima, K; Iwasaki, T; Kinoshita, S; Ohgaki, S

    2003-01-01

    UV disinfection has been applied to water treatment in recent years with low-pressure and medium-pressure UV lamps mainly used as the light source. In general, UV disinfection is considered to be inefficient with water of high turbidity because of inhibition of light penetration. Additionally, photoreactivation may be a problem that should be considered in case a disinfected water is discharged to the environment where sunlight causes reactivation. Recently, other types of lamps have been proposed including a flush-type lamp (such as a pulsed-xenon lamp) that emits high energy and wide wavelength intermittently. In this study, the difference between inactivation efficiencies by low-pressure UV (LPUV) and pulsed-xenon (PXe) lamps was investigated using two coliphage types and three strains of Escherichia coli. PXe had a suppressive effect on photoreactivation rate of the E. coli strains even though there was no significant effect on inactivation rate and maximum survival ratio after photoreactivation. PXe also had a benefit when applied to high turbidity waters as no tailing phenomena were observed in the low survival ratio area although it was observed in LPUV inactivation. This efficiency difference was considered to be due to the difference in irradiated wavelength of both lamps.

  10. Evaluating the BD-100R as a neutron spectrometer through pressure variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, B.H.; Ebert, D.D.; Munno, F.J. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Investigators have evaluated the dose response of neutron bubble dosimeters for possible use as a personnel monitor. In addition, two types of neutron spectrometer devices using bubble dosimetry have been developed. One uses the variation of vapor pressure of mixtures of detection material to extract the neutron energy spectrum, while the other employs variation of applied pressure on a different material. Dosimeter response changes due to variation of applied pressure have been demonstrated by Ing and Birnboim at absolute pressures of 0.432 MPa and atmospheric pressure. This investigation is intended to demonstrate the determination of an unknown spectrum utilizing the dosimeter response (number of bubbles formed) as a function of the applied pressure.

  11. Particle Densities of the Atmospheric-Pressure Argon Plasmas Generated by the Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Li, Li; Wang, Yunuan; Xiu, Xianwu; Wang, Chao; Song, Yuzhi

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric-pressure argon plasmas have received increasing attention due to their high potential in many industrial and biomedical applications. In this paper, a 1-D fluid model is used for studying the particle density characteristics of the argon plasmas generated by the pulsed dielectric barrier discharges. The temporal evolutions of the axial particle density distributions are illustrated, and the influences of changing the main discharge conditions on the averaged particle densities are researched by independently varying the various discharge conditions. The calculation results show that the electron density and the ion density reach two peaks near the momentary cathodes during the rising and the falling edges of the pulsed voltage. Compared with the charged particle densities, the densities of the resonance state atom Arr and the metastable state atom Arm have more uniform axial distributions, reach higher maximums and decay more slowly. During the platform of the pulsed voltage and the time interval between the pulses, the densities of the excited state atom Ar* are far lower than those of the Arr or the Arm. The averaged particle densities of the different considered particles increase with the increases of the amplitude and the frequency of the pulsed voltage. Narrowing the discharge gap and increasing the relative dielectric constant of the dielectric also contribute to the increase of the averaged particle densities. The effects of reducing the discharge gap distance on the neutral particle densities are more significant than the influences on the charged particle densities. supported by Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (No. ZR2015AQ008), and Project of Shandong Province Higher Educational Science and Technology Program of China (No. J15LJ04)

  12. Inter-pulse delay optimization in dual-pulse laser induced breakdown vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy of a steel sample in ambient gases at low pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, X., E-mail: xi.jiang2@mail.dcu.ie [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland); National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland); Hayden, P. [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland); National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland); Laasch, R. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitat Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Costello, J.T.; Kennedy, E.T. [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland); National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland)

    2013-08-01

    Time-integrated spatially-resolved Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to investigate spectral emissions from laser-induced plasmas generated on steel targets. Instead of detecting spectral lines in the visible/near ultraviolet (UV), as investigated in conventional LIBS, this work explored the use of spectral lines emitted by ions in the shorter wavelength vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region. Single-pulse (SP) and dual-pulse LIBS (DP-LIBS) experiments were performed on standardized steel samples. In the case of the double-pulse scheme, two synchronized lasers were used, an ablation laser (200 mJ/15 ns), and a reheating laser (665 mJ/6 ns) in a collinear beam geometry. Spatially resolved and temporally integrated laser induced plasma VUV emission in the DP scheme and its dependence on inter-pulse delay time were studied. The VUV spectral line intensities were found to be enhanced in the DP mode and were significantly affected by the inter-pulse delay time. Additionally, the influence of ambient conditions was investigated by employing low pressure nitrogen, argon or helium as buffer gases in the ablation chamber. The results clearly demonstrate the existence of a sharp ubiquitous emission intensity peak at 100 ns and a wider peak, in the multi-microsecond range of inter-pulse time delay, dependent on the ambient gas conditions. - Highlights: • First dual-pulse and ambient gas deep VUV LIBS plasma emission study • Optimization of inter-pulse delay time for vacuum and ambient gas environments • A sharp intensity peak implies optimal inter-pulse delay of 100 ns for all conditions. • A broad peak appears in the microsecond delay range, but only in ambient gases. • Pressure dependence implies a different enhancement process.

  13. Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time From Bioimpedance and Continuous Wave Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxi, Dilpreet; Redout, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-04-01

    We have developed and tested a new architecture for pulse transit time (PTT) estimation at the central arteries using electrical bioimpedance, electrocardiogram, and continuous wave radar to estimate cuffless blood pressure. A transmitter and receiver antenna are placed at the sternum to acquire the arterial pulsation at the aortic arch. A four-electrode arrangement across the shoulders acquires arterial pulse across the carotid and subclavian arteries from bioimpedance as well as a bipolar lead I electrocardiogram. The PTT and pulse arrival times (PATs) are measured on six healthy male subjects during exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Using linear regression, the estimated PAT and PTT values are calibrated to the systolic and mean as well as diastolic blood pressure from an oscillometric device. For all subjects, the Pearson correlation coefficients for PAT-SBP and PTT-SBP are -0.66 (p = 0.001) and -0.48 (p = 0.0029), respectively. Correlation coefficients for individual subjects ranged from -0.54 to -0.9 and -0.37 to -0.95, respectively. The proposed system architecture is promising in estimating cuffless arterial blood pressure at the central, proximal arteries, which obey the Moens-Korteweg equation more closely when compared to peripheral arteries. An important advantage of PTT from the carotid and subclavian arteries is that the PTT over the central elastic arteries is measured instead of the peripheral arteries, which potentially reduces the changes in PTT due to vasomotion. Furthermore, the sensors can be completely hidden under a patients clothes, making them more acceptable by the patient for ambulatory monitoring.

  14. High pulse pressure and metabolic syndrome are associated with proteinuria in young adult women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity and metabolic syndrome play causative roles in the increasing prevalence of proteinuria in the general population. However, in young adult women the clinical significance of incidentally discovered proteinuria and its association with metabolic syndrome are unclear. We investigated the prevalence and risk factors for proteinuria in this population. Methods A total of 10,385 women aged 20 to 39 years who underwent health screenings were surveyed. Each patient was tested for proteinuria with a dipstick (−, ±, 1+, 2+, or 3+), and proteinuria was defined as 1+ or greater. Persistent proteinuria was established by confirming proteinuria in a subsequent test. Metabolic syndrome was defined in accordance with the updated National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for Asia. Results The mean age was 28.9 ± 5.5 years, and the prevalence of persistent proteinuria was 1.0%. Among these subjects with persistent proteinuria, obesity and metabolic syndrome were found in 10.4% and 5.2%, respectively. Metabolic syndrome, as well as its components of hypertension, hyperglycemia, central obesity, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and high triglyceride levels, was closely related to the presence of proteinuria. In addition, a wide pulse pressure of ≥40 mmHg was another independent risk factor for proteinuria [odds ratio (OR) 3.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–11.91)]. This had an additive effect on metabolic syndrome in terms of predicting proteinuria. Even in subjects without metabolic syndrome, the influence of an increased pulse pressure was consistent (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.03–8.61). Conclusions Specific attention to proteinuria may be necessary in asymptomatic young women aged 20 to 39 years if they have metabolic syndrome or a wide pulse pressure. PMID:23433013

  15. Spectroscopic diagnostics of a pulsed discharge in high-pressure argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treshchalov, A. B.; Lissovskii, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    Results of investigation of high-pressure argon plasma excited by a high-current pulsed volume discharge are presented. The plasma diagnostics employs spatiotemporal dependences of the emission intensity in the VUV — visible range. A homogenous discharge is observed at pressures up to 10 atm. It is found that the spectrum of the UV — visible photorecombination continuum is sensitive to the discharge constriction. Change in the shape of the spectrum is caused bythe change of the type of positive charge carriers upon passing of the discharge from the uniform phase (molecular Ar2+ ions) to the arc phase (atomic Ar+ ions). Experimental data and model calculations show that the electron heating after the main excitation pulse is a highly undesirable process. It slows down the recombination flow in the plasma, which results in stretching of all the kinetic processes for all excited components in time, and hence in a decrease in the peak values of their concentrations. Electron collision-induced mixing effi-ciently converts the reservoir of long-lived Ar2* molecules in the triplet state into rapidly emitting singlet excimers. It is this mechanism that dominates the production of singlet Ar2* excimer molecules. The threshold concentration needed to obtain lasing at a wavelength of 127 nm on Ar2* excimers (1Σ+u(v=0)) was, according to calculations, about 5×1015 cm-3 for the gain 0.05 cm-1. This concentration can be achieved in the case of homogeneous pulsed discharge pumping with the peak electron concentration 2.×1016 cm-3 at the argon pressure 10 atm.

  16. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duten, X.; Redolfi, M.; Aggadi, N.; Vega, A.; Hassouni, K.

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  17. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duten, X; Redolfi, M; Aggadi, N; Vega, A; Hassouni, K, E-mail: duten@lspm.cnrs.fr [LSPM-CNRS UPR 3407, Universite Paris Nord, 90 Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2011-10-19

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  18. Synthesis of Crystalline Carbon Nitride Thin Films by Pulsed Arc Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Changyong; MA Zhibin

    2007-01-01

    The preparation of crystalline C3N4 films was investigated using pulsed arc discharge from mixed methanol and ammonia water at atmospheric pressure.The X-ray diffraction(XRD)patterns of the films prepared at a substrate temperature of 450℃ suggested that the film was composed of α-C3N4 and β-C3N4 crystallites.Raman spectra exhibited distinct peaks which are in good agreement with those predicted theoretically for C3N4 crystallites.

  19. Full-density, net-shape powder consolidation using dynamic magnetic pulse pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelluri, Bhanu; Barber, John P.

    1999-07-01

    The full-density consolidation of powders into net-shape parts yields high green strength, low shrinkage, short sinter times, superior mechanical properties, and low manufacturing costs. The conventional lowcost, single-press, single-sinter process typically densifies powders at less than 65 percent green density. This article describes the Magnepress™ process, a powder-processing technique wherein pulsed magnetic pressures consolidate powders into full-density parts without admixed lubricants or binders. The Magnepress technique is especially suitable for producing net-shape products with radial symmetry (e.g., rods, cylindrical parts with internal features, tubular shapes, and high aspect-ratio specimens).

  20. Effects of transmural pressure and muscular activity on pulse waves in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachev, A I

    1980-05-01

    Propagation of small amplitude harmonic waves through a viscous incompressible fluid contained in an initially stressed elastic cylindrical tube is considered as a model of the pulse wave propagation in arteries. The nonlinearity and orthotropy of the vascular material is taken into account. Muscular activity is introduced by means of an "active" tension in circumferential direction of the vessel. The frequency equation is obtained and it is solved numerically for the parameters of a human abdominal aorta. Conclusions concerning pressure-dependence, age-dependence, and muscular activation-dependence of the wave characteristics are drawn which are in accord with available experimental data.

  1. Stable radiation pressure acceleration of ions by suppressing transverse Rayleigh-Taylor instability with multiple Gaussian pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M. L.; Liu, B.; Hu, R. H.; Shou, Y. R.; Lin, C.; Lu, H. Y.; Lu, Y. R.; Gu, Y. Q.; Ma, W. J.; Yan, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    In the case of a thin plasma slab accelerated by the radiation pressure of an ultra-intense laser pulse, the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) will destroy the acceleration structure and terminate the acceleration process much sooner than theoretical limit. In this paper, a new scheme using multiple Gaussian pulses for ion acceleration in a radiation pressure acceleration regime is investigated with particle-in-cell simulation. We found that with multiple Gaussian pulses, the instability could be efficiently suppressed and the divergence of the ion bunch is greatly reduced, resulting in a longer acceleration time and much more collimated ion bunch with higher energy than using a single Gaussian pulse. An analytical model is developed to describe the suppression of RTI at the laser-plasma interface. The model shows that the suppression of RTI is due to the introduction of the long wavelength mode RTI by the multiple Gaussian pulses.

  2. Harmonic components of cylinder pressure variation and their characteristics for combustion noise in internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.R.; Miyamoto, Noboru; Murayama, Tadashi

    1987-10-31

    Combustion noise is a serious problem in internal combustion engines, especially diesel engines. Although the cylinder pressure variation is easily visible tool to evaluate the combustion noise and thermal efficiency, the exciting force in engine combustion noise has not been completely determined. Cylinder pressure variation for different combustion behaviors and their harmonic components were calculated and an attempt was made to correlate the various components. It was found that the logarithmic harmonic components of cylinder pressure variations, the cylinder pressure level (CPL) can be described by a function with four variables, the values of cylinder pressure variation. The results of this paper is summarized as follows: 1) A relationship was established between CPL and four characteristic values describing the cylinder pressure and variation diagram. 2) Harmonic components of cylinder pressure variations are described by a linear function with four variables and four characteristic values. 3) In this case, the coefficients of the four variables depend solely on the order of engine revolutions and are independent of combustion behavior and engine operating conditions. (13 figs, 7 refs)

  3. An experimental study on discharge characteristics in a pulsed-dc atmospheric pressure CH3OH/Ar plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Muyang; Liu, Sanqiu; Yang, Congying; Pei, Xuekai; Lu, Xinpei; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-10-01

    Recently, C/H/Ar plasma discharges found enormous potential and possibility in carbonaceous compounds conversion and production. In this work, a pulsed-dc CH3OH/Ar plasma jet generated at atmospheric pressure is investigated by means of optical and electrical diagnosis concerning the variation of its basic parameters, absolute concentration of OH radicals, and plasma temperature with different CH3OH/Ar volume ratios, in the core region of discharge with needle-to-ring electrode configuration. The voltage-current characteristics are also measured at different CH3OH/Ar ratios. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) results here show that only small amounts of added methanol vapor to argon plasma (about 0.05% CH3OH/Ar volume ratio) is favorable for the production of OH radicals. The optical emission lines of CH, CN, and C2 radicals have been detected in the CH3OH/Ar plasma. And, the plasma temperatures increase with successive amount of added methanol vapor to the growth plasma. Moreover, qualitative discussions are presented regarding the mechanisms for methanol dissociation and effect of the CH3OH component on the Ar plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure.

  4. High-pressure pulsed avalanche discharges: Formulas for required preionization density and rate for homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenning, N.; Axnaes, I.; Nilsson, J.O.; Eninger, J.E. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    The requirements on preionization for the formation of spatially homogeneous pulsed avalanche discharges are examined. The authors derive two formulas which apply in the case of a slowly rising electric field, one which gives the required preionization density at breakdown, and one which gives the required preionization rate. These quantities are expressed as functions of the electrochemical properties of the gas, the neutral density, and the electric field rise time. They also treat the statistical effect that the electrons tend to form groups, in contrast to being randomly distributed in space, during the prebreakdown phase. This process is found to increase the required preionization rate significantly, typically by a factor of five for a discharge at atmospheric pressure. Homogeneous high-pressure discharges have been used for laser excitation, and have also been proposed for chemical plasma processing (ozone production) because of their good scaling properties and high efficiency.

  5. Plasma polymerization of ethylene in an atmospheric pressure-pulsed discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, K.; Wydeven, T.

    1979-01-01

    The polymerization of ethylene in an atmospheric pressure-pulsed discharge has been studied. Partial pressures of ethylene up to 4 kN/sq m were used with helium as a diluent. Deposition rates (on glass slides) were the same throughout the discharge volume over a wide range of operating conditions. These rates were in the 1-2 A/sec range. The films were clear, soft, and showed good adhesion to the glass substrates. Oligomers large enough to visibly scatter 637.8-nm light were observed in the gas phase under all conditions in which film deposition occurred. The experimental results suggest that Brownian diffusion of these oligomers was the rate-limiting step in the film deposition process.

  6. Cuff-less blood pressure measurement using pulse arrival time and a Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Xianxiang; Fang, Zhen; Xue, Yongjiao; Zhan, Qingyuan; Yang, Ting; Xia, Shanhong

    2017-02-01

    The present study designs an algorithm to increase the accuracy of continuous blood pressure (BP) estimation. Pulse arrival time (PAT) has been widely used for continuous BP estimation. However, because of motion artifact and physiological activities, PAT-based methods are often troubled with low BP estimation accuracy. This paper used a signal quality modified Kalman filter to track blood pressure changes. A Kalman filter guarantees that BP estimation value is optimal in the sense of minimizing the mean square error. We propose a joint signal quality indice to adjust the measurement noise covariance, pushing the Kalman filter to weigh more heavily on measurements from cleaner data. Twenty 2 h physiological data segments selected from the MIMIC II database were used to evaluate the performance. Compared with straightforward use of the PAT-based linear regression model, the proposed model achieved higher measurement accuracy. Due to low computation complexity, the proposed algorithm can be easily transplanted into wearable sensor devices.

  7. Vapor film collapse triggered by external pressure pulse and the fragmentation of melt droplet in FCIs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qian; TONG Lili; CAO Xuewu; KRIVENTSEV Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The fragmentation process of high-temperature molten drop is a key factor to determine the ratio heat transferred to power in FCIs,which estimates the possible damage degree during the hypothetical severe accident in the nuclear reactors.In this paper,the fragmentation process of melt droplet in FCIs is investigated by theoretic analysis.The fragmentation mechanism is studied when an external pressure pulse applied to a melt droplet,which is surrounded by vapor film.The vapor film collapse which induces fragmentation of melt droplet is analyzed and modeled.And then the generated pressure is calculated.The vapor film collapse model is introduced to fragmentation correlation,and the predicted fragment size is calculated and compared with experimental data.The result shows that the developed model can predict the diameter of fragments and can be used to calculate the fragmentation process appreciatively.

  8. Ion motion effects on the generation of short-cycle relativistic laser pulses during radiation pressure acceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.P.Wang; X.M.Zhang; X.F.Wang; X.Y.Zhao; J.C.Xu; Y.H.Yu; L.Q.Yi; Y.Shi; L.G.Zhang; T.J.Xu; C.Liu; Z.K.Pei; B.F.Shen

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ion motion on the generation of short-cycle relativistic laser pulses during radiation pressure acceleration are investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. Studies show that the rear part of the transmitted pulse modulated by ion motion is sharper compared with the case of the electron shutter only. In this study, the ions further modulate the short-cycle pulses transmitted. A 3.9 fs laser pulse with an intensity of 1.33×1021W cm-2is generated by properly controlling the motions of the electron and ion in the simulations. The short-cycle laser pulse source proposed can be applied in the generation of single attosecond pulses and electron acceleration in a small bubble regime.

  9. Plasma density enhancement in atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier discharges by high-voltage nanosecond pulse in the pulse-on period: a PIC simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Jizhong; Wang, Dezhen

    2010-02-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) plus Monte Carlo collision simulation is employed to investigate how a sustainable atmospheric pressure single dielectric-barrier discharge responds to a high-voltage nanosecond pulse (HVNP) further applied to the metal electrode. The results show that the HVNP can significantly increase the plasma density in the pulse-on period. The ion-induced secondary electrons can give rise to avalanche ionization in the positive sheath, which widens the discharge region and enhances the plasma density drastically. However, the plasma density stops increasing as the applied pulse lasts over certain time; therefore, lengthening the pulse duration alone cannot improve the discharge efficiency further. Physical reasons for these phenomena are then discussed.

  10. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sizhe; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6mm gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using synthetic air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the DBD mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBDs. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave, due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and DBD develops in streamer instead, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initiatory electron density by pre-ionization methods may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also find that the dependence of uniformity upon PRF is non-monotonic.

  11. A volume pulsed corona formed during nanosecond pulsed periodic discharge of negative polarity in narrow gaps with airflow at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepekhin, N. M.; Priseko, Yu. S.; Puresev, N. I.; Filippov, V. G.

    2014-06-01

    A volume mode of spatially homogeneous nanosecond pulsed-periodic corona discharge of negative polarity has been obtained using an edge-to-edge electrode geometry in narrow gaps with airflow at atmospheric pressure and natural humidity. The parameters of discharge are estimated, and a factor limiting the power deposited in discharge is determined.

  12. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S.; Pei, X.; Hasnain, Q.; Nie, L.; Lu, X.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6 mm discharge gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using dry air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-Streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBD. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and discharge develops in streamer, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initial electron density by pre-ionization may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also found that the dependence of homogeneity upon PRF is a non-monotonic one.

  13. Day-night variations in malate concentration, osmotic pressure, and hydrostatic pressure in Cereus validus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luettge, U.; Nobel, P.S.

    1984-07-01

    Malate concentration and stem osmotic pressure concomitantly increase during nighttime CO/sub 2/ fixation and then decrease during the daytime in the obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant, Cereus validus (Cactaceae). Changes in malate osmotic pressure calculated using the Van't Hoff relation match the changes in stem osmotic pressure, indicating that changes in malate level affected the water relations of the succulent stems. In contrast to stem osmotic pressure, stem water potential showed little day-night changes, suggesting that changes in cellular hydrostatic pressure occurred. This was corroborated by direct measurements of hydrostatic pressure using the Juelich pressure probe where a small oil-filled micropipette is inserted directly into chlorenchyma cells, which indicated a 4-fold increase in hydrostatic pressure from dusk to dawn. A transient increase of hydrostatic pressure at the beginning of the dark period was correlated with a short period of stomatal closing between afternoon and nighttime CO/sub 2/ fixation, suggesting that the rather complex hydrostatic pressure patterns could be explained by an interplay between the effects of transpiration and malate levels. A second CAM plant, Agave deserti, showed similar day-night changes in hydrostatic pressure in its succulent leaves. It is concluded that, in addition to the inverted stomatal rhythm, the oscillations of malate markedly affect osmotic pressures and hence water relations of CAM plants. 13 references, 4 figures.

  14. Effect of atomization gas pressure variation on gas flow field in supersonic gas atomization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a computational fluid flow model was adopted to investigate the effect of varying atomization gas pressure (P0) on the gas flow field in supersonic gas atomization. The influence of P0 on static pressure and velocity magnitude of the central axis of the flow field was also examined. The numerical results indicate that the maximum gas velocity within the gas field increases with increasing P0. The aspiration pressure (ΔP) is found to decrease as P0 increases at a lower atomization gas pressure. However, at a higher atomization gas pressure increasing P0 causes the opposite: the higher atomization gas pressure, the higher aspiration pressure. The alternation of ΔP is caused by the variations of stagnation point pressure and location of Mach disk, while hardly by the location of stagnation point. A radical pressure gradient is formed along the tip of the delivery tube and increases as P0 increases.

  15. Oxygen partial pressure induced effects on the microstructure and the luminescence properties of pulsed laser deposited TiO2 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Kunti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the influence of oxygen partial pressure on structural, morphological, and optical properties of TiO2 thin films grown on fused quartz substrate at different oxygen partial pressure by pulsed laser deposition were examined. X-Ray diffraction (XRD patterns show the formation of TiO2 anatase phase deposited at high oxygen pressure. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM reveals that surface roughness of the films increases with oxygen pressure. Variation of surface morphology of films with increasing oxygen partial pressure was studied by AFM. It is observed that energy band gap of the films increases from 3.27 eV to 3.52 eV with the increase of oxygen pressure and is attributed to the decrease of oxygen defects. TiO2 thin films exhibited blue emission under the excitation of 320 nm wavelength. De-convoluted photoluminescence (PL peaks showed that defect states are responsible for visible emission in TiO2 thin films. The intensity of PL emission associated with oxygen vacancies decreases with increasing oxygen pressure. Photometric characteristic analysis shows that the films deposited 1x10-4 mbar oxygen pressure exhibited intense blue emission with high luminescence efficacy of radiation.

  16. Country variations in family members' informal pressure to drink less

    OpenAIRE

    Holmila, Marja; Raitasalo, Kirsimarja; Knibbe, Ronald; Selin, Klara

    2009-01-01

    The paper examines how family members in 18 countries attempt to influence each other to drink less. Data come from the GENACIS (Gender, Alcohol and Culture: an International Study) dataset. Countries included were Argentina, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, India, Japan, Nigeria, Norway, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Uganda, UK and Uruguay (overall sample 44,115). In each country, the percentage of people who had experienced family member pressure to drink...

  17. Ion kinetics and self pulsing in DC microplasma discharges at atmospheric and higher pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamud, Rajib; Farouk, Tanvir I.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure microplasma devices have been the subject of considerable interest and research during the last decade. Most of the operation regime of the plasma discharges studied fall in the ‘abnormal’, ‘normal’ and ‘corona’ modes—increasing and a ‘flat’ voltage current characteristics. However, the negative differential resistance regime at atmospheric and high pressures has been less studied and possesses unique characteristics that can be employed for novel applications. In this work, the role of ion kinetics especially associated with trace impurities; on the self pulsing behavior has been investigated. Detailed numerical simulations have been conducted with a validated model for a helium-nitrogen feed gas mixture. Different oscillatory modes were observed where the discharge was found to undergo complete or partial relaxation. Trace amount of nitrogen was found to significantly alter the pulsing characteristics. External parameters influencing these self oscillations are also studied and aspects of the ion kinetics on the oscillatory behavior are discussed.

  18. VUV-VIS spectroscopic diagnostics of a pulsed high-pressure discharge in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treshchalov, A. B.; Lissovski, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    High-pressure argon plasma, excited by a high-current pulsed volume discharge, has been investigated. Spatial-time VUV-VIS emission kinetics were used for the plasma diagnostics. A homogeneous discharge was obtained at a pressure of up to 10 bar. It was revealed that the spectral shape of the UV-VIS photorecombination continuum is a sensitive diagnostic tool for the constriction of the discharge. This shape changes because of the difference of the positive charge carriers in the arc (atomic Ar+ ions) and homogeneous (molecular Ar_{2}^{+} ions) phases of the discharge. The intensity of this continuum is proportional to the square of the electron density. The experimental data and modelling show that the heating of electrons after the main excitation pulse is a very undesirable process. It suppresses the recombination flow in plasma, thus the kinetics of all excited species are spread in time with a decrease in the Ar_{2}^{\\ast } excimers densities. The electron collision-induced mixing effectively converts the reservoir of long-lived triplet Ar_{2}^{\\ast } molecules to fast-emitted singlet excimers. This mechanism is dominant in the production of singlet excimers. A realistic threshold density for the lasing of Ar_2^{\\ast}({{}^{1}\\Sigma_u})_{(v=0)} excimers of about 5 × 1015 cm-3 was estimated (the gain coefficient is 0.05 cm-1). This criterion could be realized in 10 bar of Ar by a homogeneous single pulse discharge pumping with a peak electron density of 2.4 × 1016 cm-3.

  19. Intracranial pressure pulse waveform correlates with aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid stroke volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Robert; Baldwin, Kevin; Fuller, Jennifer; Vespa, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Bergsneider, Marvin

    2012-11-01

    This study identifies a novel relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume through the cerebral aqueduct and the characteristic peaks of the intracranial pulse (ICP) waveform. ICP waveform analysis has become much more advanced in recent years; however, clinical practice remains restricted to mean ICP, mainly due to the lack of physiological understanding of the ICP waveform. Therefore, the present study set out to shed some light on the physiological meaning of ICP morphological metrics derived by the morphological clustering and analysis of continuous intracranial pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm by investigating their relationships with a well defined physiological variable, i.e., the stroke volume of CSF through the cerebral aqueduct. Seven patients received both overnight ICP monitoring along with a phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) of the cerebral aqueduct to quantify aqueductal stroke volume (ASV). Waveform morphological analysis of the ICP signal was performed by the MOCAIP algorithm. Following extraction of morphological metrics from the ICP signal, nine temporal ICP metrics and two amplitude-based metrics were compared with the ASV via Spearman's rank correlation. Of the nine temporal metrics correlated with the ASV, only the width of the P2 region (ICP-Wi2) reached significance. Furthermore, both ICP pulse pressure amplitude and mean ICP did not reach significance. In this study, we showed the width of the second peak (ICP-Wi2) of an ICP pulse wave is positively related to the volume of CSF movement through the cerebral aqueduct. This finding is an initial step in bridging the gap between ICP waveform morphology research and clinical practice.

  20. Pulse transit time differential measurement by fiber Bragg grating pulse recorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, Sharath; Padma, Srivani; Ambastha, Shikha; Kalegowda, Anand; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2015-05-01

    The present study reports a noninvasive technique for the measurement of the pulse transit time differential (PTTD) from the pulse pressure waveforms obtained at the carotid artery and radial artery using fiber Bragg grating pulse recorders (FBGPR). PTTD is defined as the time difference between the arrivals of a pulse pressure waveform at the carotid and radial arterial sites. The PTTD is investigated as an indicator of variation in the systolic blood pressure. The results are validated against blood pressure variation obtained from a Mindray Patient Monitor. Furthermore, the pulse wave velocity computed from the obtained PTTD is compared with the pulse wave velocity obtained from the color Doppler ultrasound system and is found to be in good agreement. The major advantage of the PTTD measurement via FBGPRs is that the data acquisition system employed can simultaneously acquire pulse pressure waveforms from both FBGPRs placed at carotid and radial arterial sites with a single time scale, which eliminates time synchronization complexity.

  1. A method for determining transverse permeability of tight reservoir cores by radial pressure pulse decay measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zehao; Dong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Shaojie; Gong, Houjian; Li, Yajun; Long, Feifei

    2016-10-01

    A transverse pressure pulse decay (TPPD) method is presented to measure transverse permeability of tight reservoir cores in a cell with finite volume. Given appropriate assumptions, a mathematical model based on the specially designed experiment is formulated, and its general solution is proposed. Early-time and late-time techniques are further presented for convenient postprocessing applications of experimental data. Meanwhile, sensitivity analysis of TPPD method is given. It is found that a good TPPD experimental principle can be obtained by adjusting test gas, experimental pressure, dimension of core sample, and volume ratio (λ). The volume ratio error (λerror) analysis reveals the following: (1) a larger λerror results in increased transverse permeability error (kerror); (2) the volume ratio (λ) is better not very close to 0.754; (3) when λ is equal to or greater than 1, the kerror resulting from λerror is monotonic decreasing as the volume ratio increases. In practice, λ is usually equal to or greater than 1 due to the very small pore volume of a tight core. But this does not mean that the volume ratio should be as large as possible. The reason for this is that a pressure transducer with higher resolution is needed to record pressure change. That means experimental apparatus is much more costly. And such a TPPD experiment requires a much longer time to attain the late-time straight line behavior. The best choice is to find an optimal balance point among experimental cost, time, and accuracy.

  2. A comparison of the failure times of pulse oximeters during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion in volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagishi, Toshiya; Kanaya, Noriaki; Nakayama, Masayasu; Kurosawa, Saori; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2004-09-01

    Important information may not be obtained if the pulse oximetry signal is lost during inflation of a cuff for blood pressure measurement, particularly in patients with hemodynamic instability. In the present study, we compared the failure times of pulse oximeters during cuff-induced hypoperfusion in volunteers. A pulse oximeter sensor was attached to the index finger, and a blood pressure cuff was attached to the same arm of each volunteer. MasimoSET Radical (Masimo), Nellcor N-395 (N-395), Nellcor N-20PA, and Nellcor D-25 were tested. To evaluate the failure time of each pulse oximeter, time to peak of cuff pressure, time to loss of signal, time to recovery of signal, and failure interval were measured. All measurements were performed three times for each pulse oximeter and were averaged. There were no differences in hemodynamic measurements among the groups. Time to loss of signal was longer in Masimo than the other pulse oximeters. Masimo and N-395 showed significantly shorter times to recovery of signal than those of the other two pulse oximeters. Failure interval was in the order of Masimo Masimo did not lose a signal as rapidly as the other oximeters studied. Masimo was similar in performance to the N-395 at providing useful data sooner than conventional technology after a loss of the signal. These observations suggest that data will be more available with fewer false-positive alarms when using the Masimo oximeter followed by the N-395 when compared with conventional oximeters.

  3. Blood pressure circadian rhythm and obesity: Blood pressure variations and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despotović Nebojša

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The association between obesity and arterial hypertension has been established in a great number of studies. Our objective was to investigate whether circadian rhythm of blood pressure is disturbed among obese people. Material and methods In this cross-sectional, randomized study, Schiller BR-102 device was used for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. One hundred and twenty outpatients were divided into three randomized groups: obese body mass index 30 kg/m2 (52 patients, overweight (28 patients, with body mass index 25,0-29,9 kg/m2 and normal weight (control group (48 patients, with body mass index 18,5-24,9 kg/m2. In all patients we investigated the following blood pressure parameters: average blood pressure (total, day-time and night-time, maximal blood pressure and dipping or non-dipping blood pressure pattern during night (for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Results In body mass index beyond 30 kg/m2 only systolic blood pressure parameters were significantly higher - average blood pressure - during daytime (P=0.034 and during night (P=0.014; maximal blood pressure (P=0.001. In body mass index beyond 30 kg/m2, absence of normal blood pressure during night was significantly more often registered (P=0.007. Discussion and Conclusion The non-dipping blood pressure pattern and increase of systolic blood pressure only reveal hyper activation of sympathetic nervous system as a leading pathophysiological mechanism causing arterial hypertension in obese patients.

  4. Efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in healing of pressure ulcers: A randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Anupam

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background : Pressure ulcers are one of the most common complications in health care settings. Still there are no optimal protocols to manage the pressure ulcers. Aim : To assess the effectiveness of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF in healing of pressure ulcers in patients with neurological disorders. Design : Randomized double blind control trial. Setting : Neurological rehabilitation department in a university research hospital. Participants : Twelve patients (M:F, 9:3 having neurological disorders, with age between 12-50 years (mean 30.16611.32 yrs and 24 pressure ulcers. Intervention : Six patients with 13 ulcers received PEMF therapy and the remaining 6 patients with 11 ulcers received sham treatment, for 30 sessions (45 minutes each using the equipment ′Pulsatron′. The frequency of PEMF was set at 1 Hz with sine waves and current intensity of 30 mili ampere. Whole body exposure was given in both the groups. Outcome Measures : Bates-Jensen wound assessment tool (BJWAT score was used as main outcome measure and scores at the end of session were compared with initial scores and analyzed. Similarly National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP scores were compared and analyzed as secondary outcome measure. Results : Thirteen ulcers were in stage IV and 11 were in stage III at the start of the study. Significant healing of ulcers was noted, BJWAT scores, in both the treatment and sham groups (P < 0.001 and 0.003 respectively at the completion of the study. However, when comparing between the groups, healing was not significant (P = 0.361. Similarly trend was noted with NPUAP scores with no significant difference between the treatment and sham groups (P = 0.649 at the completion of study. Conclusions : No significant difference in pressure ulcer healing was observed between PEMF treatment and sham group in this study.

  5. Complementary Effects of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy and Pulsed Radiofrequency Energy on Cutaneous Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Kao, Huang-Kai; Dong, Ziqing; Jiang, Zhaohua; Guo, Lifei

    2017-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy and pulsed radiofrequency energy are two clinical modalities used to treat soft-tissue wounds. They are purported to affect healing differently. The aim of this experimental study was to contrast the two modalities at a mechanistic level and to investigate whether their combined therapy could achieve additive and complementary effects on wound healing. Full-thickness dorsal cutaneous wounds of diabetic, db/db, mice were treated with either negative-pressure wound therapy, pulsed radiofrequency energy, or combined therapies. Macroscopic healing kinetics were examined. Epidermal regeneration (proliferation rate and length of reepithelialization) and neovascularization (blood vessel density) were investigated. Messenger RNA levels indicative of angiogenic (basic fibroblast growth factor), profibrotic (transforming growth factor-β), epidermal proliferative (keratinocyte growth factor), and extracellular matrix remodeling (collagen 1) processes were measured in wound tissues. All three treatment groups displayed faster wound healing. The negative-pressure wound therapy/pulsed radiofrequency energy combined therapy led to significantly faster healing than either the negative-pressure wound therapy or pulsed radiofrequency energy therapy alone. Epidermal regeneration and neovascularization were enhanced in all three groups. The two negative-pressure wound therapy groups (alone and combined with pulsed radiofrequency energy) demonstrated more significant increases in expression of all assayed growth factors than the pulsed radiofrequency energy group. Furthermore, the combined therapy exhibited a more profound elevation in collagen 1 expression than either of the two therapies alone. Combining the negative-pressure wound therapy and pulsed radiofrequency energy modalities can achieve additive benefits in cutaneous healing, and the two therapies can be easily used together to complement each other in clinical wound treatments.

  6. Using pressure pulse seismology to examine basal criticality and the influence of sticky spots on glacial flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, J. L.; Moore, P. L.; Dow, C. F.; Sanders, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Here we report results of water pressure pulse studies conducted at Storglaciären (Sweden) and West Washmawapta Glacier (British Columbia, Canada). Comparison of pressure pulse records with meteorological conditions at Storglaciären indicates that several periods of increased basal slip activity observed during a 10 day interval of summer 2008 were due to precipitation loading of the glacier surface, rather than to infiltration of surface water to the glacier bed; this indicates that the glacier bed was close to the failure strength for much of this interval. Pressure pulse magnitudes for the two glaciers were well-fit by power law distributions similar to those earlier observed at Trapridge Glacier (and similar in form to the Gutenberg-Richter relationship commonly used in seismology), suggesting that the mechanical processes that give rise to these distributions are robust features of soft-bedded glaciers. In contrast, interevent time distributions for both glaciers diverge from those observed at Trapridge Glacier for short recurrence intervals, suggesting that the factors that govern the rate at which these processes occur differ between glaciers. An examination of pressure pulse characteristics at West Washmawapta Glacier indicates that the establishment of a basal drainage system in summer 2008 resulted in increased stability and reduced sensitivity to meltwater input, suggesting that common assumptions about the relationship between meltwater production and ice flow are oversimplified. These results demonstrate that water pressure pulse observations can provide valuable insight into the dynamics of soft-bedded glaciers.

  7. Inter-pulse delay optimization in dual-pulse laser induced breakdown vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy of a steel sample in ambient gases at low pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X.; Hayden, P.; Laasch, R.; Costello, J. T.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2013-08-01

    Time-integrated spatially-resolved Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to investigate spectral emissions from laser-induced plasmas generated on steel targets. Instead of detecting spectral lines in the visible/near ultraviolet (UV), as investigated in conventional LIBS, this work explored the use of spectral lines emitted by ions in the shorter wavelength vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region. Single-pulse (SP) and dual-pulse LIBS (DP-LIBS) experiments were performed on standardized steel samples. In the case of the double-pulse scheme, two synchronized lasers were used, an ablation laser (200 mJ/15 ns), and a reheating laser (665 mJ/6 ns) in a collinear beam geometry. Spatially resolved and temporally integrated laser induced plasma VUV emission in the DP scheme and its dependence on inter-pulse delay time were studied. The VUV spectral line intensities were found to be enhanced in the DP mode and were significantly affected by the inter-pulse delay time. Additionally, the influence of ambient conditions was investigated by employing low pressure nitrogen, argon or helium as buffer gases in the ablation chamber. The results clearly demonstrate the existence of a sharp ubiquitous emission intensity peak at 100 ns and a wider peak, in the multi-microsecond range of inter-pulse time delay, dependent on the ambient gas conditions.

  8. Exact solution of the CPMG pulse sequence with phase variation down the echo train: application to R₂ measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Alex D; Kumar Anand, Christopher; Nie, Zhenghua

    2011-04-01

    An implicit exact algebraic solution of CPMG experiments is presented and applied to fit experiments. Approximate solutions are also employed to explore oscillations and effective decay rates of CPMG experiments. The simplest algebraic approximate solution has illustrated that measured intensities will oscillate in the conventional CPMG experiments and that using even echoes can suppress errors of measurements of R₂ due to the imperfection of high-power pulses. To deal with low-power pulses with finite width, we adapt the effective field to calculate oscillations. An optimization model with the effective field approximation and dimensionless variables is proposed to quantify oscillations of measured intensities of CPMG experiments of different phases of the π pulses. We show, as was known using other methods, that repeating one group of four pulses with different phases in CPMG experiments, which we call phase variation, but others call phase alternation or phase cycling, can significantly smooth the dependence of measured intensities on frequency offset in the range of ±½γB₁. In this paper, a second-order expression with respect to the ratio of frequency offset to π-pulse amplitude is developed to describe the effective R₂ of CPMG experiments when using a group phase variation scheme. Experiments demonstrate that (1) the exact calculation of CPMG experiments can remarkably eliminate systematic errors in measured R₂s due to the effects of frequency offset, even in the absence of phase variation; (2) CPMG experiments with group phase variation can substantially remove oscillations and effects of the field inhomogeneity; (3) the second-order expression of the effective decay rate with phase variation is able to provide reliable estimates of R₂ when offsets are roughly within ±½γB₁; and, most significantly, (4) the more sophisticated optimization model using an exact solution of the discretized CPMG experiment extends, to ±γB₁, the range of

  9. Kinetic studies of NO formation in pulsed air-like low-pressure dc plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, M.; Gortschakow, S.; Guaitella, O.; Marinov, D.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.; Loffhagen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the formation of NO in pulsed air-like dc plasmas at a pressure of 1.33 mbar and mean currents between 50 and 150 mA of discharge pulses with 5 ms duration has been investigated both experimentally and by self-consistent numerical modelling. Using time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, the densities of NO, NO2 and N2O have been measured in synthetic air as well as in air with 0.8% of NO2 and N2O, respectively. The temporal evolution of the NO density shows four distinct phases during the plasma pulse and the early afterglow in the three gas mixtures that were used. In particular, a steep density increase during the ignition phase and after termination of the discharge current pulse has been detected. The NO concentration has been found to reach a constant value of 0.57× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , 1.05× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , and 1.3× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} for mean plasma currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA, respectively, in the afterglow. The measured densities of NO2 and N2O in the respective mixture decrease exponentially during the plasma pulse and remain almost constant in the afterglow, especially where the admixture of NO2 has a remarkable impact on the NO production during the ignition. The numerical results of the coupled solution of a set of rate equations for the various heavy particles and the time-dependent Boltzmann equation of the electrons agree quite well with the experimental findings for the different air-like plasmas. The main reaction processes have been analysed on the basis of the model calculations and the remaining differences between the experiment and modelling especially during the afterglow are discussed.

  10. Analysis of Pressure Variations in a Low-Pressure Nickel-Hydrogen Battery– Part 2: Cells with Metal Hydride Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, B. K.; Wainright, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    A sub-atmospheric pressure nickel hydrogen (Ni-H2) battery with metal hydride for hydrogen storage is developed for implantable neuroprosthetic devices. Pressure variations during charge and discharge of the cell are analyzed at different states of charge and are found to follow the desorption curve of the pressure composition isotherm (PCI) of the metal hydride. The measured pressure agreed well with the calculated theoretical pressure based on the PCI and is used to predict the state of charge of the battery. Hydrogen equilibration with the metal hydride during charge/discharge cycling is fast when the pressure is in the range from 8 to 13 psia and slower in the range from 6 to 8 psia. The time constant for the slower hydrogen equilibration, 1.37h, is similar to the time constant for oxygen recombination and therefore pressure changes due to different mechanisms are difficult to estimate. The self-discharge rate of the cell with metal hydride is two times lower in comparison to the cell with gaseous hydrogen storage alone and is a result of the lower pressure in the cell when the metal hydride is used. PMID:22711974

  11. Analysis of Pressure Variations in a Low-Pressure Nickel-Hydrogen Battery- Part 2: Cells with Metal Hydride Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, B K; Wainright, J S

    2012-05-15

    A sub-atmospheric pressure nickel hydrogen (Ni-H(2)) battery with metal hydride for hydrogen storage is developed for implantable neuroprosthetic devices. Pressure variations during charge and discharge of the cell are analyzed at different states of charge and are found to follow the desorption curve of the pressure composition isotherm (PCI) of the metal hydride. The measured pressure agreed well with the calculated theoretical pressure based on the PCI and is used to predict the state of charge of the battery. Hydrogen equilibration with the metal hydride during charge/discharge cycling is fast when the pressure is in the range from 8 to 13 psia and slower in the range from 6 to 8 psia. The time constant for the slower hydrogen equilibration, 1.37h, is similar to the time constant for oxygen recombination and therefore pressure changes due to different mechanisms are difficult to estimate. The self-discharge rate of the cell with metal hydride is two times lower in comparison to the cell with gaseous hydrogen storage alone and is a result of the lower pressure in the cell when the metal hydride is used.

  12. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    OpenAIRE

    R.P. Kelley; Murer, D.; Ray, H.; K.A. Jordan

    2015-01-01

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a 252Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactiv...

  13. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, David,; Lacoste, Deanna,; Laux, C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determine...

  14. Spatial Variation of Pressure in the Lyophilization Product Chamber Part 1: Computational Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Arnab; Varma, Nikhil; Sane, Pooja; Bogner, Robin; Pikal, Michael; Alexeenko, Alina

    2017-04-01

    The flow physics in the product chamber of a freeze dryer involves coupled heat and mass transfer at different length and time scales. The low-pressure environment and the relatively small flow velocities make it difficult to quantify the flow structure experimentally. The current work presents the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling for vapor flow in a laboratory scale freeze dryer validated with experimental data and theory. The model accounts for the presence of a non-condensable gas such as nitrogen or air using a continuum multi-species model. The flow structure at different sublimation rates, chamber pressures, and shelf-gaps are systematically investigated. Emphasis has been placed on accurately predicting the pressure variation across the subliming front. At a chamber set pressure of 115 mtorr and a sublimation rate of 1.3 kg/h/m(2), the pressure variation reaches about 9 mtorr. The pressure variation increased linearly with sublimation rate in the range of 0.5 to 1.3 kg/h/m(2). The dependence of pressure variation on the shelf-gap was also studied both computationally and experimentally. The CFD modeling results are found to agree within 10% with the experimental measurements. The computational model was also compared to analytical solution valid for small shelf-gaps. Thus, the current work presents validation study motivating broader use of CFD in optimizing freeze-drying process and equipment design.

  15. Optical Properties Dependence with Gas Pressure in AlN Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J A; Riascos, H [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, Grupo plasma Laser y Aplicaciones A.A 097 (Colombia); Caicedo, J C [Grupo pelIculas delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G; Yate, L, E-mail: jcaicedoangulo@gmail.com [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    AlN films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using an Nd: YAG laser ({lambda} = 1064 nm). The films were deposited in a nitrogen atmosphere as working gas; the target was an aluminum high purity (99.99%). The films were deposited with a laser fluence of 7 J/cm2 for 10 minutes on silicon (100) substrates. The substrate temperature was 300 deg. C and the working pressure was varied from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr. The thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm for all films. The crystallinity was observed via XRD pattern, the morphology and composition of the films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), respectively. The optical reflectance spectra and color coordinates of the films were obtained by optical spectral reflectometry technique in the range of 400 cm-1- 900 cm-1 by an Ocean Optics 2000 spectrophotometer. In this work, a clear dependence of the reflectance, dominant wavelength and color purity was found in terms of the applied pressure to the AlN films. A reduction in reflectance of about 55% when the pressure was increased from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr was observed. This paper deals with the formation of AlN thin films as promising materials for the integration of SAW devices on Si substrates due to their good piezoelectric properties and the possibility of deposition at low temperature compatible with the manufacturing of Si integrated circuits.

  16. Radiative heat transfer in plasma of pulsed high pressure caesium discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, V. F.

    2016-01-01

    Two-temperature many component gas dynamic model is used for the analysis of features of radiative heat transfer in pulsed high pressure caesium discharge plasma. It is shown that at a sufficiently high pressure the radial optical thickness of arc column is close to unit (τR (λ) ∼ 1) in most part of spectrum. In this case radiative heat transfer has not local character. In these conditions the photons which are emitted in any point of plasma volume are absorbed in other point remote from an emission point on considerable distance. As a result, the most part of the electric energy put in the discharge mainly near its axis is almost instantly redistributed on all volume of discharge column. In such discharge radial profiles of temperature are smooth. In case of low pressure, when discharge plasma is optically transparent for own radiation in the most part of a spectrum (τR(λ) << 1), the emission of radiation without reabsorption takes place. Radiative heat transfer in plasma has local character and profiles of temperature have considerable gradient.

  17. Impact of mental and physical stress on blood pressure and pulse pressure under normobaric versus hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Michael; Trapp, Eva-Maria; Egger, Josef W; Domej, Wolfgang; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Avian, Alexander; Rohrer, Peter M; Hörlesberger, Nina; Magometschnigg, Dieter; Cervar-Zivkovic, Mila; Komericki, Peter; Velik, Rosemarie; Baulmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia, physical and psychosocial stress may influence key cardiovascular parameters including blood pressure (BP) and pulse pressure (PP). We investigated the effects of mild hypobaric hypoxia exposure on BP and PP reactivity to mental and physical stress and to passive elevation by cable car. 36 healthy volunteers participated in a defined test procedure consisting of a period of rest 1, mental stress task (KLT-R), period of rest 2, combined mental (KLT-R) and physical task (bicycle ergometry) and a last period of rest both at Graz, Austria (353 m asl) and at the top station Dachstein (2700 m asl). Beat-to-beat heart rate and BP were analysed both during the test procedures at Graz and at Dachstein and during passive 1000 m elevation by cable car (from 1702 m to 2700 m). A significant interaction of kind of stress (mental vs. combined mental and physical) and study location (Graz vs. Dachstein) was found in the systolic BP (p = .007) and PP (p = .002) changes indicating that during the combined mental and physical stress task sBP was significantly higher under hypoxic conditions whereas sBP and PP were similar during mental stress both under normobaric normoxia (Graz) and under hypobaric hypoxia (Dachstein). During the passive ascent in cable car less trivialization (psychological coping strategy) was associated with an increase in PP (p = .004). Our data show that combined mental and physical stress causes a significant higher raise in sBP and PP under hypoxic conditions whereas isolated mental stress did not affect sBP and PP under hypoxic conditions. PP-reaction to ascent in healthy subjects is not uniform. BP reactions to ascent that represents an accumulation of physical (mild hypobaric hypoxia) and psychological stressors depend on predetermined psychological traits (stress coping strategies). Thus divergent cardiovascular reactions can be explained by applying the multidimensional aspects of the biopsychosocial concept.

  18. Intra-Operative Fluid Management in Adult Neurosurgical Patients Undergoing Intracranial Tumour Surgery: Randomised Control Trial Comparing Pulse Pressure Variance (PPV) and Central Venous Pressure (CVP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Serina Ruth; Kumar, Amar Nandha; Korula, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluid management in neurosurgery presents specific challenges to the anaesthesiologist. Dynamic para-meters like Pulse Pressure Variation (PPV) have been used successfully to guide fluid management. Aim To compare PPV against Central Venous Pressure (CVP) in neurosurgical patients to assess hemodynamic stability and perfusion status. Materials and Methods This was a single centre prospective randomised control trial at a tertiary care centre. A total of 60 patients undergoing intracranial tumour excision in supine and lateral positions were randomised to two groups (Group 1, CVP n=30), (Group 2, PPV n=30). Intra-operative fluid management was titrated to maintain baseline CVP in Group 1(5-10cm of water) and in Group 2 fluids were given to maintain PPV less than 13%. Acid base status, vital signs and blood loss were monitored. Results Although intra-operative hypotension and acid base changes were comparable between the groups, the patients in the CVP group had more episodes of hypotension requiring fluid boluses in the first 24 hours post surgery. {CVP group median (25, 75) 2400ml (1850, 3110) versus PPV group 2100ml (1350, 2200) p=0.03} The patients in the PPV group received more fluids than the CVP group which was clinically significant. {2250 ml (1500, 3000) versus 1500ml (1200, 2000) median (25, 75) (p=0.002)}. The blood loss was not significantly different between the groups The median blood loss in the CVP group was 600ml and in the PPV group was 850 ml; p value 0.09. Conclusion PPV can be used as a reliable index to guide fluid management in neurosurgical patients undergoing tumour excision surgery in supine and lateral positions and can effectively augment CVP as a guide to fluid management. Patients in PPV group had better hemodynamic stability and less post operative fluid requirement. PMID:27437329

  19. Enhanced radiation pressure-assisted acceleration by temporally tuned counter-propagating pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurand, B., E-mail: bastian.aurand@fysik.lth.se [Department of Physics, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kuschel, S.; Jäckel, O.; Rödel, C. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Zhao, H.Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, 73000 Lanzhou (China); Herzer, S. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, 07743 Jena (Germany); Paz, A.E.; Bierbach, J. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Polz, J. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, 07743 Jena (Germany); Elkin, B. [Fraunhofer Institut für Grenzflächen-und Bioverfahrenstechnik, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Karmakar, A. [Leibniz-Supercomputing Center, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gibbon, P. [ExtreMe Matter Institut, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Kaluza, M.C. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kuehl, T. [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-03-11

    Within the last decade, laser-ion acceleration has become a field of broad interest. The possibility to generate short proton- or heavy ion bunches with an energy of a few tens of MeV by table-top laser systems could open new opportunities for medical or technical applications. Nevertheless, today's laser-acceleration schemes lead mainly to a temperature-like energy distribution of the accelerated ions, a big disadvantage compared to mono-energetic beams from conventional accelerators. Recent results [1] of laser-ion acceleration using radiation-pressure appear promising to overcome this drawback. In this paper, we demonstrate the influence of a second counter-propagating laser pulse interacting with a nm-thick target, creating a well defined pre-plasma.

  20. Toward Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Inan, Omer T; Mestha, Lalit K; Kim, Chang-Sei; Töreyin, Hakan; Kyal, Survi

    2015-08-01

    Ubiquitous blood pressure (BP) monitoring is needed to improve hypertension detection and control and is becoming feasible due to recent technological advances such as in wearable sensing. Pulse transit time (PTT) represents a well-known potential approach for ubiquitous BP monitoring. The goal of this review is to facilitate the achievement of reliable ubiquitous BP monitoring via PTT. We explain the conventional BP measurement methods and their limitations; present models to summarize the theory of the PTT-BP relationship; outline the approach while pinpointing the key challenges; overview the previous work toward putting the theory to practice; make suggestions for best practice and future research; and discuss realistic expectations for the approach.

  1. Single-pulse CARS spectra in solid propellant combustion at atmosphere pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyun Hu(胡志云); Jingru Liu(刘晶儒); Zhenrong Zhang(张振荣); Xiaowei Guan(关小伟); Meisheng Huang(黄梅生); Xisheng Ye(叶锡生)

    2003-01-01

    The unstable-resonator spatially enhanced detection (USED) coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements of temperature and N2 concentration in the combustion of solid propellant at atmosphere pressure are reported. The USED CARS measurement system has a high spatial solution of ~ 0.1 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length, and permits instantaneous measurement at 10-Hz rate. The single-pulse N2 Q-branch CARS spectra have been obtained from the propellant combustion. The temperatures and N2 concentrations of the propellant flame at different height have been achieved by fitting the experimental data to theoretical spectra. The results indicate that the temperature is up to~2500 K with N2 concentration in a range from 10% to 26%.

  2. Aging Characteristics on Epoxy Resin Surface Under Repetitive Microsecond Pulses in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing; Liu, Xiong; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ruixue; Rao, Zhangquan; Shao, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Research on aging characteristics of epoxy resin (EP) under repetitive microsecond pulses is important for the design of insulating materials in high power apparatus. It is because that very fast transient overvoltage always occurs in a power system, which causes flashover and is one of the main factors causing aging effects of EP materials. Therefore, it is essential to obtain a better understanding of the aging effect on an EP surface resulting from flashover. In this work, aging effects on an EP surface were investigated by surface flashover discharge under repetitive microsecond pulses in atmospheric pressure. The investigations of parameters such as the surface micro-morphology and chemical composition of the insulation material under different degrees of aging were conducted with the aid of measurement methods such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that with the accumulation of aging energy on the material surface, the particles formed on the material surface increased both in number and size, leading to the growth of surface roughness and a reduction in the water contact angle; the surface also became more absorbent. Furthermore, in the aging process, the molecular chains of EP on the surface were broken, resulting in oxidation and carbonisation. supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province (No. E2015502081), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51222701, 51307060), and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB239505-3)

  3. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  4. Towards radiation pressure acceleration of protons using linearly polarized ultrashort petawatt laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, I Jong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yu, Tae Jun; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Nam, Kee Hwan; Nickles, Peter V; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-01-01

    Particle acceleration using ultraintense, ultrashort laser pulses is one of the most attractive topics in relativistic laser-plasma research. We report proton/ion acceleration in the intensity range of 5x1019 W/cm2 to 3.3x1020 W/cm2 by irradiating linearly polarized, 30-fs, 1-PW laser pulses on 10- to 100-nm-thick polymer targets. The proton energy scaling with respect to the intensity and target thickness was examined. The experiments demonstrated, for the first time with linearly polarized light, a transition from the target normal sheath acceleration to radiation pressure acceleration and showed a maximum proton energy of 45 MeV when a 10-nm-thick target was irradiated by a laser intensity of 3.3x1020 W/cm2. The experimental results were further supported by two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Based on the deduced proton energy scaling, proton beams having an energy of ~ 200 MeV should be feasible at a laser intensity of 1.5x1021 W/cm2.

  5. Effects of the pulse width on the reactive species production and DNA damage in cancer cells exposed to atmospheric pressure microsecond-pulsed helium plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Kang, Tae Hong; Chung, T. H.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma-liquid and plasma-cell interactions were investigated using an atmospheric pressure dc microsecond-pulsed helium plasma jet. We investigated the effects of the electrical parameters such as applied voltage and pulse width (determined by the pulse frequency and duty ratio) on the production of reactive species in the gas/liquid phases and on the DNA damage responses in the cancer cells. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were estimated inside the plasma-treated liquids using a chemical probe method, and the nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. Importantly, the more concentration of OH resulted in the more DNA base oxidation and breaks in human lung cancer A549 cells. The data are very suggestive that there is strong correlation between the production of OH in the plasmas/liquids and the DNA damage.

  6. Circadian variation of blood pressure in patients with chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Ladefoged, Jens

    1995-01-01

    The circadian pattern of blood pressure variation was investigated in 10 patients with advanced chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and in an age-matched group of controls without renal disease with similar office blood pressure level. Monitoring was done using....... In patients with chronic renal failure undergoing CAPD, an otherwise unnoticed 24-h hypertension and nocturnal blood pressure elevation can be discovered by use of 24-h blood pressure monitoring and this may indicate a need of earlier start of antihypertensive treatment in CAPD patients with borderline...

  7. Pulse wave myelopathy: An update of an hypothesis highlighting the similarities between syringomyelia and normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Grant A

    2015-12-01

    Most hypotheses trying to explain the pathophysiology of idiopathic syringomyelia involve mechanisms whereby CSF is pumped against a pressure gradient, from the subarachnoid space into the cord parenchyma. On review, these theories have universally failed to explain the disease process. A few papers have suggested that the syrinx fluid may originate from the cord capillary bed itself. However, in these papers, the fluid is said to accumulate due to impaired fluid drainage out of the cord. Again, there is little evidence to substantiate this. This proffered hypothesis looks at the problem from the perspective that syringomyelia and normal pressure hydrocephalus are almost identical in their manifestations but only differ in their site of effect within the neuraxis. It is suggested that the primary trigger for syringomyelia is a reduction in the compliance of the veins draining the spinal cord. This reduces the efficiency of the pulse wave dampening, occurring within the cord parenchyma, increasing arteriolar and capillary pulse pressure. The increased capillary pulse pressure opens the blood-spinal cord barrier due to a direct effect upon the wall integrity and interstitial fluid accumulates due to an increased secretion rate. An increase in arteriolar pulse pressure increases the kinetic energy within the cord parenchyma and this disrupts the cytoarchitecture allowing the fluid to accumulate into small cystic regions in the cord. With time the cystic regions coalesce to form one large cavity which continues to increase in size due to the ongoing interstitial fluid secretion and the hyperdynamic cord vasculature.

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of helium boil-off experiments with pressure variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Y. S.; Niemann, R. C.; Hull, J. R.

    A thermodynamic analysis by calorimetric experiments in a system with changing pressure is presented. A general equation is derived for use in calculating the rate of heat loss from measured mass flow rate. The results show that the largest contribution from pressure variation is the sensible heat of liquid helium in a Dewar. A dimensionless parameter that was identified provides an indication of the importance of pressure variation relative to the latent heat of vaporization during an experiment. This dimensionless parameter is a function of system pressure land the thermodynamic properties of helium), rate of change of system pressure, liquid helium inventory in the Dewar and measured mass flow rate. In the special case when the effect of pressure variation is small compared to the latent heat of vaporization, the heat loss rate is the product of the measured mass flow rate and the latent heat of vaporization, multiplied by a correction factor that is a function of the ratio of vapour density to liquid density. This correction factor is significant for helium at pressures near or above 1 atm and should always be included in the calculation.

  9. CYLINDER PRESSURE VARIATIONS OF THE FUMIGATED HYDROGEN-DIESEL DUAL FUEL COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonthum Wongchai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylinder pressure is one of the main parameters of diesel engine combustion affecting several changes in exhaust gas emission composition and amount as well as engine useful power, specifically when alternative fuels are used. One among other alternative fuels for diesel engine is hydrogen that can be used as fumigated reagent with air prior to intake to engine in order to substitute the main fossil diesel. In this study, experimental investigation was accomplished using a single cylinder diesel engine for agriculture running on different ratios of hydrogen-to-diesel. Cylinder pressure traces corresponding to the crank angle positions were indicated and analyzed for maximum cylinder pressure and their coefficient of variation. The regression analysis is used to find the correlations between hydrogen percentage and the maximum cylinder pressure as well as its coefficient of variation. When higher hydrogen percentages were added, the combustion shifted toward later crank angles with the maximum cylinder pressure decreased and eminent effects at higher load and speed. The plots of hydrogen percentage against the coefficient of variation of the maximum cylinder pressure (COVPmax show the increase in variation of maximum cylinder pressure when the hydrogen percentage increased for all conditions tested. Gaseous hydrogen fumigated prior to intake to the engine reduced maximum cylinder pressure from the combustion while increasing the values of COVPmax. The maximum pressure-hydrogen percentage correlations and the COVPmax-hydrogen percentage correlations show better curve fittings by second order (n = 2 correlation compared to the first order (n = 1 correlation for all the test conditions.

  10. Can the use of pulsed direct current induce oscillation in the applied pressure during spark plasma sintering?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Salamon, Mirva Eriksson, Mats Nygren and Zhijian Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The spark plasma sintering (SPS process is known for its rapid densification of metals and ceramics. The mechanism behind this rapid densification has been discussed during the last few decades and is yet uncertain. During our SPS experiments we noticed oscillations in the applied pressure, related to a change in electric current. In this study, we investigated the effect of pulsed electrical current on the applied mechanical pressure and related changes in temperature. We eliminated the effect of sample shrinkage in the SPS setup and used a transparent quartz die allowing direct observation of the sample. We found that the use of pulsed direct electric current in our apparatus induces pressure oscillations with the amplitude depending on the current density. While sintering Ti samples we observed temperature oscillations resulting from pressure oscillations, which we attribute to magnetic forces generated within the SPS apparatus. The described current–pressure–temperature relations might increase understanding of the SPS process.

  11. Diagnostics of atmospheric-pressure pulsed-dc discharge with metal and liquid anodes by multiple laser-aided methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Shirai, Naoki; Tomita, Kentaro; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    The density and temperature of electrons and key heavy particles were measured in an atmospheric-pressure pulsed-dc helium discharge plasma with a nitrogen molecular impurity generated using system with a liquid or metal anode and a metal cathode. To obtain these parameters, we conducted experiments using several laser-aided methods: Thomson scattering spectroscopy to obtain the spatial profiles of electron density and temperature, Raman scattering spectroscopy to obtain the neutral molecular nitrogen rotational temperature, phase-modulated dispersion interferometry to determine the temporal variation of the electron density, and time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy to analyze the temporal variation of the helium metastable atom density. The electron density and temperature measured by Thomson scattering varied from 2.4  ×  1014 cm-3 and 1.8 eV at the center of the discharge to 0.8  ×  1014 cm-3 and 1.5 eV near the outer edge of the plasma in the case of the metal anode, respectively. The electron density obtained with the liquid anode was approximately 20% smaller than that obtained with the metal anode, while the electron temperature was not significantly affected by the anode material. The molecular nitrogen rotational temperatures were 1200 K with the metal anode and 1650 K with the liquid anode at the outer edge of the plasma column. The density of helium metastable atoms decreased by a factor of two when using the liquid anode.

  12. An in vitro quantification of pressures exerted by earlobe pulse oximeter probes following reports of device-related pressure ulcers in ICU patients .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, Teresa T

    2012-11-01

    The earlobe often is used to monitor perfusion when pulse oximeter signal quality is impaired in the fingers and toes. Prompted by intermittent occurrences of roughly circular earlobe pressure ulcers among patients in intensive care units, a convenience sample of seven calibrated pulse oximeter probes was used to quantify earlobe pressure exerted by these devices in vitro. All were tested twice with an electronic load cell, a strain gauge with a transducer that transforms the measured force into a readable numerical signal. The probe was clipped to the load cell just as it is clipped to the earlobe in the clinical setting. The probes exerted an average of 0.24 lb (SD 0.6) of force over an area of 0.3 square inches, equal to an average of 20.7 mm Hg (SD 0.6) pressure on tissue. This value exceeds some empirically derived values of capillary perfusion pressure. The occurrence of device-related pressure ulcers, as well pressure ulcers on the ears, has been documented, but little is known about device-related earlobe pressure ulcers or the actual pressure exerted by these devices. Additional in vitro studies are needed to quantify the pressures exerted by these and other probes, and future prevalence and incidence studies should include more detailed pressure ulcer location and device use documentation. Until more is known about the possible role of these devices in the development of pressure ulcers, clinicians should be cognizant of their potential for causing pressure ulcers, particularly in patients whose conditions can compromise skin integrity.

  13. Association of Pulse Pressure with Serum TNF-α and Neutrophil Count in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko Yamada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Elevated pulse pressure (PP has been reported to be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in elderly patients with hypertension. Methods. Cross-sectional relationships of PP with known risk factors for type 2 diabetes and inflammatory markers were examined in 150 elderly community-dwelling women, 79 women (52.7% of whom had hypertension. Results. Systolic blood pressure (standardized β, 0.775, log tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, standardized β, 0.110, age (standardized β, 0.140, and neutrophil count (standardized β, 0.114 emerged as determinants of PP independent of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, monocyte count, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, HDL-cholesterol, and adiponectin (R2 = 0.772. Conclusions. The present studies have demonstrated an independent association of higher PP with higher TNF-α, a marker of insulin resistance, and neutrophil count in community-living elderly women and suggest that insulin resistance and chronic low-grade inflammation may in part be responsible for the association between high PP and incident type 2 diabetes found in elderly patients with hypertension.

  14. Role of laser pulse duration and gas pressure in deposition of AlN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyorgy, Eniko; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, I. N.; Klini, Argyro; Vainos, N.; Fotakis, C.; Ghica, C.; Schmerber, G.; Faerber, J.

    2001-07-01

    We investigated the relative merits and limits of pulsed laser deposition from AlN targets in vacuum and low-pressure nitrogen in obtaining stoichiometric and crystalline aluminum nitride thin films. We used two UV excimer laser sources ({lambda}=248 nm): a nanosecond system ({tau}{sub FWHM}=30 ns) and, a subpicosecond ({tau}{sub FWHM}=450 fs) system. The obtained structures were characterized by x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy in cross section, selected area electron diffraction, and profilometry. We demonstrated that the best results are obtained with the sub-ps laser source in vacuum and in low pressure nitrogen when the AlN thin films are very pure, crystalline, clearly exhibiting a tendency to epitaxy. Metallic Al is present in the films deposited with the ns laser source. We believe this is an effect of the gradual decomposition of AlN inside the crater on the target surface under multipulse laser irradiation. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  15. STRONG SOLAR WIND DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES: INTERPLANETARY SOURCES AND THEIR IMPACTS ON GEOSYNCHRONOUS MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Xie, Yanqiong [College of Meteorology and Oceanography, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Xu, Xiaojun, E-mail: pbzuo@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn [Space Science Institute, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao (China)

    2015-10-20

    In this investigation, we first present a statistical result of the interplanetary sources of very strong solar wind dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) detected by WIND during solar cycle 23. It is found that the vast majority of strong DPPs reside within solar wind disturbances. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears to be no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here, we study both the decompression effects of very strong negative DPPs and the compression from strong positive DPPs on GMFs at different magnetic local time sectors. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on the dayside near dawn and near dusk on the nightside, are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of the events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, the GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that under certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here, we find that a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at the midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, which are stronger at the noon sector.

  16. A biometrical genome search in rats reveals the multigenic basis of blood pressure variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schork, N J; Krieger, J E; Trolliet, M R; Franchini, K G; Koike, G; Krieger, E M; Lander, E S; Dzau, V J; Jacob, H J

    1995-09-01

    A genome-wide search for multiple loci influencing salt-loaded systolic blood pressure (NaSBP) variation among 188 F2 progeny from a cross between the Brown-Norway and spontaneously hypertensive rat strains was pursued in an effort to gain insight into the polygenic basis of blood pressure regulation. The results suggest that loci within five to six genomic regions collectively explain approximately 43% of the total NaSBP variation exhibited among the 188 F2 progeny. Many of these loci are in regions that previous studies have not implicated in blood pressure regulation. Ultimately, however, this study not only sheds light on the multigenic basis of blood pressure but provides further evidence that the identification of the genetic determinants of polygenic traits in mammals is possible with modern biometrical and molecular genetic tools in controlled settings (i.e., breeding paradigm and model organism).

  17. The impact of arm position and pulse pressure on the validation of a wrist-cuff blood pressure measurement device in a high risk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Khoshdel

    2010-03-01

    Hg for SBP and DBP (DESK position resulted in improvement with 75% and 77% of the readings being within 10 mmHg (grade B, respectively. AAMI criteria were not fulfilled due to heterogeneity. The findings also showed that the mismatch between the mercury and wrist-cuff systolic BP readings was directly associated with pulse pressure. In conclusion the DESK position produces the most accurate readings when compared to the mercury device. Although wrist BP measurement may underestimate BP measured compared to a mercury device, an adjustment by 5 and 10 mmHg for SBP and DBP, respectively, creates a valid result with the DESK position. Nevertheless, considering the observed variations and the possible impact of arterial stiffness, individual clinical validation is recommended.Keywords: blood pressure, device validation, position

  18. Assessing intravascular volume by difference in pulse pressure in pigs submitted to graded hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, Gunther J; Hiltebrand, Luzius B; Fukui, Kimiko; Cohen, Delphine; Hager, Helmut; Kurz, Andrea M

    2006-10-01

    We assessed changes in intravascular volume monitored by difference in pulse pressure (dPP%) after stepwise hemorrhage in an experimental pig model. Six pigs (23-25 kg) were anesthetized (isoflurane 1.5 vol%) and mechanically ventilated to keep end-tidal CO2 (etCO2) at 35 mmHg. A PA-catheter and an arterial catheter were placed via femoral access. During and after surgery, animals received lactated Ringer's solution as long as they were considered volume responders (dPP>13%). Then animals were allowed to stabilize from the induction of anesthesia and insertion of catheters for 30 min. After stabilization, baseline measurements were taken. Five percent of blood volume was withdrawn, followed by another 5%, and then in 10%-increments until death from exsanguination occurred. After withdrawal of 5% of blood volume, all pigs were considered volume responders (dPP>13%); dPP rose significantly from 6.1+/-3.3% to 19.4+/-4.2%. The regression analysis of stepwise hemorrhage revealed a linear relation between blood loss (hemorrhage in %) and dPP (y=0.99*x+14; R2=0.7764; P<.0001). In addition, dPP was the only parameter that changed significantly between baseline and a blood loss of 5% (P<0.01), whereas cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate, MAP, central venous pressure, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, and systemic vascular resistance, respectively, remained unchanged. We conclude that in an experimental hypovolemic pig model, dPP correlates well with blood loss.

  19. Effect of Inflammation on the Relationship of Pulse Pressure and Mortality in Haemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Banerjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The effect of hypertension on mortality in haemodialysis patients is controversial and can be confounded by non-traditional risk factors like systemic inflammation. This study examined the effect of systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and pulse pressure (PP on mortality in haemodialysis patients, separately with and without markers of systemic inflammation. Methods:Data from the United States Renal Data System were analysed for 9,862 patients receiving haemodialysis on December 31, 1993, followed through May 2005. Results: In Cox regression analysis, increased age, diabetes, low albumin, high white blood count, low cholesterol, low haemoglobin, high phosphate, low DBP, and cardiovascular comorbidity were associated with high mortality, but SBP was not. Elevated PP adjusted for SBP, age, diabetes, haemoglobin, albumin, cholesterol, calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and white blood count was associated with higher mortality [adjusted hazard ratio, PP 1.006 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.002–1.010; SBP 0.993 (95% CI 0.990–0.996]. In dual models, PP adjusted for SBP then DBP was associated with higher mortality [PP 1.029 (95% CI 1.027–1.032; SBP 0.981 (95% CI 0.979–0.983; PP 1.010 (95% CI 1.008–1.011; DBP 0.981 (95% CI 0.979–0.983]. Increasing PP deciles >70 mm Hg were associated with increasing mortality in the absence of markers of systemic inflammation (white blood count >10 × 109/l, albumin Conclusion: PP was a better indicator of adverse outcome than DBP or SBP. Inflammation-associated injury may mask the effect of PP on mortality in haemodialysis patients.

  20. Pulsed electron beam propagation in gases under pressure of 6.6 kPa in drift tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Poloskov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of pulsed electron beam transport propagated in a drift tube filled with different gases (He, H2, N2, Ar, SF6, and CO2). The total pressure in the drift tube was 6.6 kPa. The experiments were carried out using a TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The electron beam was propagated in the drift tube composed of two sections equipped with reverse current shunts. Under a pressure of 6.6 kPa, the maximum value of the electron beam charge closed on the walls of the drift tube was recorded when the beam was propagated in hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The minimum value of the electron beam charge closed on the walls of the drift tube was recorded for sulfur hexafluoride. The visualization of the pulsed electron beam energy losses onto the walls of the drift chamber was carried out using radiation-sensitive film.

  1. Transition between trickle flow and pulse flow in a cocurrent gas-liquid trickle-bed reactor at elevated pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, W.J.A.; Mechielsen, S.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of reactor pressure in the range of 0.2–2.0 MPa on the transition between the trickle-flow and the pulse-flow regime has been investigated for the non-foaming water—nitrogen and aqueous 40% ethyleneglycol—nitrogen systems. Most models and flow charts which are all based on atmospheric

  2. Plasma-chemical reactor based on a low-pressure pulsed arc discharge for synthesis of nanopowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, I. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Lepeshev, A. A.; Fedorov, L. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    A reactor for producing nanopowders in the plasma of a low-pressure arc discharge has been developed. As a plasma source, a pulsed cold-cathode arc evaporator has been applied. The design and operating principle of the reactor have been described. Experimental data on how the movement of a gaseous mixture in the reactor influences the properties of nanopowders have been presented.

  3. Numerical model for surge and swab pressures on wells with cross-section variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedevjcyk, Joao Victor; Junqueira, Silvio Luiz de Mello; Negrao, Cezar Otaviano Ribeiro [UTFPR - Federal University of Technology - Parana - Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mails: silvio@utfpr.edu.br, negrao@utfpr.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    Drilling is one of the most complex steps in petroleum exploration. The process is accomplished by rotating a drill bit to compress the rock formation. During drilling, a fluid is pumped into the well to lubricate and cool down the drill bit, to clean up the well, to avoid the formation fluid influx to the well and also to stabilize the borehole walls. Fluid circulation, however, can be interrupted for maintenance reasons and the drill pipe can be moved to remove the drill bit. The downward or upward movement of the drill pipe displaces the fluid within the well causing either under pressure (swab) or over pressure (surge), respectively. If the pressure at the well bore overcomes the formation fracture pressure, a loss of circulation can take place. On the other way round, the upward movement may reduce the pressure below the pore pressure and an inflow of fluid to the well (kick) can occur. An uncontrolled kick may cause a blowout with serious damages. The transient flow induced by the axial movement of the drill pipe is responsible for the pressure changes at the well bore. Nevertheless, the well bore cross section variation may modify the pressure change within the pipe. In this paper, the effects of diameter variation of the drilling well on the surge and swab pressures are investigated. The equations that represent the phenomenon (mass and momentum conservation) are discretized by the finite volume method. Despite its non-Newtonian properties, the fluid is considered Newtonian in this first work. The drill pipe is considered closed and the flow is assumed as single-phased, one-dimensional, isothermal, laminar, compressible and transient. A sensitivity analysis of the flow parameters is carried out. The cross-section changes cause the reflection of the pressure wave, and consequently pressure oscillations. (author)

  4. High pressure phase transition and variation of elastic constants of diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, Dinesh; Sharma, P.; Kaurav, N. [School of Physics, Vigyan Bhawan, Devi Ahilya University, Takshila Campus, Indore 452017 (India); Shah, S. [Department of Physics, P. M. B. Gujarati Science College, Indore-452001 (India); Singh, R.K. [M. P. Bhoj (Open) University, Shivaji Nagar, Bhopal-462016 (India)

    2004-11-01

    A theoretical study of the high-pressure phase transition and elastic behavior in diluted magnetic semiconductors Zn{sub 0.83}Mn{sub 0.17}Se, using a three-body interaction (TBI) potential caused by the electron-shell deformation of the overlapping ions is carried out. The estimated values of phase transition pressure and the vast volume discontinuity in pressure-volume (PV) phase diagram indicate the structural phase transition from zincblende (B3) to rock salt (B1). The variation of second-order elastic constants with pressure resembles that observed in some binary semiconductors. The inconsistency in the deduced value of pressure derivative of second order elastic constant with the available data is attributed to the fact that we derive expressions neglecting thermal effects and assuming the overlap repulsion significant only up to nearest neighbors. The vdW interaction is effective in obtaining the thermodynamical parameters such as Debye temperature, Gruneisen parameter, thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility as well phase stability in diluted magnetic semiconductors. It is revealed that TBI model has a promise to predict the phase transition pressure and the pressure variation of elastic constants of other semiconductors as well. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Monounsaturated fatty acid, carbohydrate intake, and diabetes status are associated with arterial pulse pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaccaro Joan A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a global epidemic. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is one of the most prevalent consequences of diabetes. Nutrition is considered a modifiable risk factor for CVD, particularly for individuals with diabetes; albeit, there is little consensus on the role of carbohydrates, proteins and fats for arterial health for persons with or without diabetes. In this study, we examined the association of macronutrients with arterial pulse pressure (APP, a surrogate measure of arterial health by diabetes status and race. Methods Participants were 892 Mexican Americans (MA, 1059 Black, non-Hispanics (BNH and 2473 White, non-Hispanics (WNH with and without diabetes of a weighted sample from the National Nutrition and Health Examination Survey (NHANES 2007-2008. The cross-sectional analysis was performed with IBM-SPSS version 18 with the complex sample analysis module. The two-year sample weight for the sub-sample with laboratory values was applied to reduce bias and approximate a nationally, representative sample. Arterial stiffness was assessed by arterial pulse pressure (APP. Results APP was higher for MA [B = 0.063 (95% CI 0.015 to 0.111, p = 0.013] and BNH [B = 0.044 (95% CI 0.006 to 0.082, p = 0.018] than WNH, controlling for diabetes, age, gender, body mass index (BMI, fiber intake, energy intake (Kcal and smoking. A two-way interaction of diabetes by carbohydrate intake (grams was inversely associated with APP [B = -1.18 (95% CI -0.178 to -0.058, p = 0.001], controlling for race, age, gender, BMI, Kcal and smoking. BNH with diabetes who consumed more mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA than WNH with diabetes had lower APP [B = -0.112 (95%CI-0.179 to -0.045, p = 0.003] adjusting for saturated fatty acids, Kcal, age, gender, BMI and smoking. Conclusion Higher MUFA and carbohydrate intake for persons with diabetes reflecting lower APP may be due to replacement of saturated fats with CHO and MUFA. The associations of APP with

  6. Dependence of the absorption of pulsed CO2-laser radiation by silane on wavenumber, fluence, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of absorbing and nonabsorbing gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bl/aŻejowski, Jerzy; Gruzdiewa, Ludwika; Rulewski, Jacek; Lampe, Frederick W.

    1995-05-01

    The absorption of three lines [P(20), 944.2 cm-1; P(14), 949.2 cm-1; and R(24), 978.5 cm-1] of the pulsed CO2 laser (0001-1000 transition) by SiH4 was measured at various pulse energy, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of the compound and nonabsorbing foreign gases. In addition, low intensity infrared absorption spectrum of silane was compared with high intensity absorption characteristics for all lines of the pulsed CO2 laser. The experimental dependencies show deviations from the phenomenological Beer-Lambert law which can be considered as arising from the high intensity of an incident radiation and collisions of absorbing molecules with surroundings. These effects were included into the expression, being an extended form of the Beer-Lambert law, which reasonably approximates all experimental data. The results, except for extending knowledge on the interaction of a high power laser radiation with matter, can help understanding and planning processes leading to preparation of silicon-containing technologically important materials.

  7. A comparative study on continuous and pulsed RF argon capacitive glow discharges at low pressure by fluid modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiqiang; Liu, Yue; Jia, Wenzhu; Zhou, Yanwen

    2017-01-01

    Based on the plasma fluid theory and using the drift-diffusion approximation, a mathematical model for continuous and pulsed radial frequency (RF) argon capacitive glow discharges at low pressure is established. The model is solved by a finite difference method and the numerical results are reported. Based on the systematic analysis of the results, plasma characteristics of the continuous and pulsed RF discharges are comparatively investigated. It is shown that, under the same condition for the peak value of the driving potential, the cycle-averaged electron density, the current density, and other essential physical quantities in the continuous RF discharge are higher than those from the pulsed RF discharge. On the other hand, similar plasma characteristics are obtained with two types of discharges, by assuming the same deposited power. Consequently, higher driving potential is needed in pulsed discharges in order to maintain the same effective plasma current. Furthermore, it is shown that, in the bulk plasma region, the peak value of the bipolar electric field from the continuous RF discharge is greater than that from the pulsed RF discharge. In the sheath region, the ionization rate has the shape of double-peaking and the explanation is given. Because the plasma input power depends on the driving potential and the plasma current phase, the phase differences between the driving potential and the plasma current are compared between the continuous and the pulsed RF discharges. It is found that this phase difference is smaller in the pulsed RF discharge compared to that of the continuous RF discharge. This means that the input energy coupling in the pulsed RF discharge is less efficient than the continuous counterpart. This comparative study, carried out also under other conditions, thus can provide instructive ideas in applications using the continuous and pulsed RF capacitive glow discharges.

  8. Creep and stick-slip in subglacial granular beds forced by variations in water pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Beem, Lucas H.

    of grain and fluid dynamics to show that rapid rearrangements of load-bearing force chains within the granular sediments drive mechanical transitions between stability and failure. Cyclic variations in driving stresses or pore-water pressure give rise to strain-rate dependent creeping motion at stress...

  9. Pulse Wave Variation during the Menstrual Cycle in Women with Menstrual Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Hyung Jeon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study is performed to obtain objective diagnostic indicators associated with menstrual pain using pulse wave analysis. Methods. Using a pulse diagnostic device, we measured the pulse waves of 541 women aged between 19 and 30 years, placed in either an experimental group with menstrual pain (n=329 or a control group with little or no menstrual pain (n=212. Measurements were taken during both the menstrual and nonmenstrual periods, and comparative analysis was performed. Results. During the nonmenstrual period, the experimental group showed a significantly higher value in the left radial artery for the radial augmentation index (RAI (p=0.050 but significantly lower values for pulse wave energy (p=0.021 and time to first peak from baseline (T1 (p=0.035 in the right radial artery. During the menstrual period, the experimental group showed significantly lower values in the left radial artery for cardiac diastole and pulse wave area during diastole and significantly higher values for pulse wave area during systole, ratio of systolic phase to the full heartbeat, and systolic-diastolic ratio. Conclusion. We obtained indicators of menstrual pain in women during the menstrual period, including prolonged systolic and shortened diastolic phases, increases in pulse wave energy and area of representative pulse wave, and increased blood vessel resistance.

  10. Laser-Ionization TOF Mass Spectrometer Characterization of Benzene Destruction in Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiahong; XIAO Qingmei; WANG Liping; YAO Zhi; DING Hongbin

    2009-01-01

    Benzene is.a major industrial air pollutant and can cause serious human health disorders. In this paper an investigation on benzene destruction, in an atmospheric-pressure fast-flow pulsed DC-discharge by means of laser ionization combined with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, is reported. Most by-products including transient reactive species from the benzene discharge were characterized by molecular beam sampling combined with TOF mass spectrometry.It is showed that, with a gas mixture of 0.5% C6H6 in Ar, benzene can be effectively destroyed by discharge plasma. The intermediate species consisted of small fragments of CNHm (n=3~5,m =1~11), cycle-chain species of CNHm (n=6~9, m = 7~10) and polycyclic species CNHm (n ≥9,m = 8~12). The alternation of mass peaks (intensity) with even/odd electrons was observed in the measured mass spectra. The results indicated that the alternation is mainly due to the different ionization potentials of the open shell and close shell species. Based on the examination of the features of the species' composition, the primary reaction pathways are proposed and discussed.

  11. Plastic Deformation and Rupture of Ring-Stiffened Cylinders under Localized Pressure Pulse Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S. Hoo Fatt

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical solution for the dynamic plastic deformation of a ring-stiffened cylindrical shell subject to high intensity pressure pulse loading is presented. By using an analogy between a cylindrical shell that undergoes large plastic deformation and a rigid-plastic string resting on a rigid-plastic foundation, one derives closed-form solutions for the transient and final deflection profiles and fracture initiation of the shell. Discrete masses' and springs are used to describe the ring stiffeners in the stiffened shell. The problem of finding the transient deflection profile of the central bay is reduced to solving an inhomogeneous wave equation with inhomogeneous boundary conditions using the method of eigenfunction expansion. The overall deflection profile consists of both global (stiffener and local (bay components. This division of the shell deflection profile reveals a complex interplay between the motions of the stiffener and the bay. Furthermore, a parametric study on a ring-stiffened shell damaged by a succession of underwater explosions shows that the string-on-foundation model with ring stiffeners described by lumped masses and springs is a promising method of analyzing the structure.

  12. Effect of Pulse Pressure Treatment on Content of Protein and Some Sugars in Wheat Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Pavlova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of hard wheat (Triticum durum were treated by pulse pressure (PP, generated by shock wave. Protein content was determined by spectroscopy in the nearest infrared point of the spectrum (NIR. HPLC was used for determining glucose level in samples. Moisture of control seeds was 14.2%. It was not changed in PP 11 MPa samples and was decreased by PP 29 MPa (12.8%; that indicated the damage of seeds. Protein content in control sample was 16.5%. The index was not changed by PP 11 MPa (16.9%, but it increased under PP 29 MPa (17.2% due to the degradation of starch and relative elevation of protein level. Glucose content in PP 11 MPa samples was less than the control level, probably, due to the acceleration of amino-carbonyl reaction. PP 29 MPa promoted the increase of glucose content due to non-enzymatic starch hydrolysis activation. Thus PP 11 MPa made minor damages without the accumulation of glucose, but PP 29 MPa promoted the ageing due to the accumulation of glucose.

  13. Relations between diabetes, blood pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity in haemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Kjærgaard, Krista Dybtved; Dzeko, Mirela;

    Diabetes (DM) is common in haemodialysis (HD) patients and affects both blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness. Carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects the stiffness of the aorta and is regarded as a strong risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) mortality in HD patients. However, PWV...... is highly influenced by the BP-level. Higher PWV-values among HD patients with DM could reflect a higher BP-level rather than increased arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of DM on BP and PWV in a group of HD patients. BP and PWV were measured in 66 HD patients without DM...... (HD) and 32 HD patients with DM (HD+DM). The SphygmoCor system was used for estimation of PWV. HD-duration, age, gender and BP medication were similar in the two groups. Mean DM-duration was 23±11 years and 25(78%) had type 2 DM. HD+DM had higher BMI (26±5 vs. 29±5 kg/m2, p=0.02), systolic BP (142...

  14. Implications of Dynamic Pressure Transducer Mounting Variations on Measurements in Pyrotechnic Test Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibbern, Andreas; Crisafulli, Jeffrey; Hagopia, Michael; McDougle, Stephen H.; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate dynamic pressure measurements are often difficult to make within small pyrotechnic devices, and transducer mounting difficulties can cause data anomalies that lead to erroneous conclusions. Delayed initial pressure response followed by data ringing has been observed when using miniaturized pressure transducer mounting adapters required to interface transducers to small test chambers. This delayed pressure response and ringing, combined with a high data acquisition rate, has complicated data analysis. This paper compares the output signal characteristics from different pressure transducer mounting options, where the passage distance from the transducer face to the pyrotechnic chamber is varied in length and diameter. By analyzing the data and understating the associated system dynamics, a more realistic understanding of the actual dynamic pressure variations is achieved. Three pressure transducer mounting configurations (elongated, standard, and face/flush mount) were simultaneously tested using NASA standard initiators in closed volume pressure bombs. This paper also presents results of these pressure transducer mounting configurations as a result of a larger NASA Engineering and Safety Center pyrovalve test project. Results from these tests indicate the improved performance of using face/flush mounted pressure transducers in this application. This type of mounting improved initial pressure measurement response time by approximately 19 s over standard adapter mounting, eliminating most of the lag time; provided a near step-function type initial pressure increase; and greatly reduced data ringing in high data acquisition rate systems. The paper goes on to discuss other issues associated with the firing and instrumentation that are important for the tester to understand.

  15. Pressure and stress waves in a spallation neutron source mercury target generated by high-power proton pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Futakawa, M; Conrad, H; Stechemesser, H

    2000-01-01

    The international ASTE collaboration has performed a first series of measurements on a spallation neutron source target at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) in Brookhaven. The dynamic response of a liquid mercury target hit by high-power proton pulses of about 40 ns duration has been measured by a laser Doppler technique and compared with finite elements calculations using the ABAQUS code. It is shown that the calculation can describe the experimental results for at least the time interval up to 100 mu s after the pulse injection. Furthermore, it has been observed that piezoelectric pressure transducers cannot be applied in the high gamma-radiation field of a spallation target.

  16. Signal-Pressure Curves of Cascaded Four-Wave Mixing in Gas-Filled Capillary by fs Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bao-Zhen; HUANG Zu-Qia

    2005-01-01

    The theoretical framework for the cascaded four waves mixing (CFWM) in gas-filled capillary by fs pulses is constructed. Based on the theoretical framework, the signal-pressure curves (SPC) of the CFWM in gas-filled capillary by fs pulses are calculated. With a comparison between the theoretical and experimental SPC we have discussed the influence of the walk-off and Phase modulation on the SPC. At the same time, we have discussed the possible origin of the first three peaks of the SPC.

  17. Pulsed positive discharges in air at moderate pressures near a dielectric rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinova, A.; Trienekens, D.; Ebert, U.; Nijdam, S.; Christen, T.

    2016-10-01

    We study pulsed positive discharges in air in a cylindrically symmetric setup with an electrode needle close (about 1 mm) above the top of a dielectric cylindrical rod of 4 mm in diameter mounted at its bottom on a grounded plate electrode. We present ICCD (intensified charge-coupled device) pictures and evaluations of experiments as well as simulations with a fluid discharge model; the simulations use cylindrical symmetry. In the experiments, there is an initial inception cloud phase, where the cylindrical symmetry is maintained, and later a streamer phase, where it is broken spontaneously. At 75-150 mbar, discharges with cylindrical symmetry are not attracted to the dielectric rod, but move away from it. The dielectric rod plays the sole role of an obstacle that shades (in the context of photoionization) a cone-shaped part of the inception cloud; the cone size is determined by the geometry of the setup. The material properties of the dielectric rod, such as its dielectric permittivity and the efficiency of the photon induced secondary electron emission do not have a noticeable effect. This is due to the abundance of photoionization in air, which supplies a positive discharge with free electrons and allows it to propagate along the electric field lines. Using some simple field calculations, we show that field enhancement due to dielectric polarization does not play a significant role in our geometry as long as the discharge maintains its cylindrical symmetry. The field component towards the rod is insufficiently enhanced to cause the discharge to move towards the rod. Any additional electrons produced by the dielectric surface do not influence this discharge morphology. This interpretation is supported by both experiments and simulations. At higher pressures (400-600 mbar) or for larger gaps between the needle and the dielectric rod, the inception cloud reaches its maximal radius within the gap between needle and rod and destabilizes there. In those cases

  18. Change in pulse pressure/stroke index in response to sustained blood pressure reduction and its impact on left ventricular mass and geometry changes: the life study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmieri, V.; Bella, J.N.; Gerdts, E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In cross-sectional data in hypertensive subjects, brachial pulse pressure (PP)/Doppler stroke index (SVi), (PP/SVi) correlates weakly but significantly with left ventricular (LV) mass and relative wall thickness (RWT). METHODS: In the Losartan Intervention For End-point reduction...... and not statistically significant at year 2 follow-up. Losartan- or atenolol-based treatments were associated with comparable reduction of PP/SVi. At year 2 follow-up, reduced PP/SVi was associated with greater reductions in mean blood pressure (BP) and heart rate and greater increase in SVi, but not with lower LV mass...

  19. Chronic antihypertensive treatment improves pulse pressure but not large artery mechanics in a mouse model of congenital vascular stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Carmen M.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Knutsen, Russell H.; Ye, Li; Mecham, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is a common characteristic of humans with Williams-Beuren syndrome and mouse models of elastin insufficiency. Arterial stiffness is associated with multiple negative cardiovascular outcomes, including myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death. Therefore, identifying therapeutic interventions that improve arterial stiffness in response to changes in elastin levels is of vital importance. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of chronic pharmacologic therapy with different classes of antihypertensive medications on arterial stiffness in elastin insufficiency. Elastin-insufficient mice 4–6 wk of age and wild-type littermates were subcutaneously implanted with osmotic micropumps delivering a continuous dose of one of the following: vehicle, losartan, nicardipine, or propranolol for 8 wk. At the end of treatment period, arterial blood pressure and large artery compliance and remodeling were assessed. Our results show that losartan and nicardipine treatment lowered blood pressure and pulse pressure in elastin-insufficient mice. Elastin and collagen content of abdominal aortas as well as ascending aorta and carotid artery biomechanics were not affected by any of the drug treatments in either genotype. By reducing pulse pressure and shifting the working pressure range of an artery to a more compliant region of the pressure-diameter curve, antihypertensive medications may mitigate the consequences of arterial stiffness, an effect that is drug class independent. These data emphasize the importance of early recognition and long-term management of hypertension in Williams-Beuren syndrome and elastin insufficiency. PMID:26232234

  20. Numerical analysis of transient pressure variation in the condenser of a nuclear power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinjun; Zhou, Zijie; Song, Zhao [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Lu, Qiankui; Li, Jiafu [Dong Fang Turbine Co., Ltd, Deyang (China)

    2016-02-15

    To research the characteristics of the transient variation of pressure in a nuclear power station condenser under accident condition, a mathematical model was established which simulated the cycling cooling water, heat transfer and pressure in the condenser. The calculation program of transient variation characteristics was established in Fortran language. The pump's parameter, cooling line's organization, check valve's feature and the parameter of siphonic water-collecting well are involved in the cooling water flow's mathematical model. The initial conditions of control volume are determined by the steady state of the condenser. The transient characteristics of a 1000 MW nuclear power station's condenser and cooling water system were examined. The results show that at the condition of plant-power suspension of pump, the cooling water flow rate decreases rapidly and refluxes, then fluctuates to 0. The variation of heat transfer coefficient in the condenser has three stages: at start it decreases sharply, then increases and decreases, and keeps constant in the end. Under three conditions (design, water and summer), the condenser pressure goes up in fluctuation. The time intervals between condenser's pressure signals under three conditions are about 26.4 s, which can fulfill the requirement for safe operation of nuclear power station.

  1. Atmospheric pressure variations at extratropical latitudes associated with Forbush decreases of galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonova, I.; Veretenenko, S.

    2014-12-01

    Changes of troposphere pressure associated with short-time variations of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) taking place in the Northern hemisphere's cold months (October-March) were analyzed for the period 1980-2006, NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data being used. Noticeable pressure variations during Forbush decreases of GCRs were revealed at extratropical latitudes of both hemispheres. The maxima of pressure increase were observed on the 3rd-4th days after the event onsets over Northern Europe and the European part of Russia in the Northern hemisphere, as well as on the 4th-5th days over the eastern part of the South Atlantic opposite Queen Maud Land and over the d'Urville Sea in the Southern Ocean. According to the weather chart analysis, the observed pressure growth, as a rule, results from the weakening of cyclones and intensification of anticyclone development in these areas. The presented results suggest that cosmic ray variations may influence the evolution of extratropical baric systems and play an important role in solar-terrestrial relationships.

  2. Influence of gas pressure on electron beam emission current of pulsed cathodic-arc-based forevacuum plasma electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdovitsin, Victor A.; Kazakov, Andrey V.; Medovnik, Alexander V.; Oks, Efim M.

    2017-09-01

    We describe our experimental investigation of the effect of background gas pressure on the emission parameters of a pulsed cathodic-arc-based forevacuum-pressure plasma-cathode electron source. We find that increased gas pressure over the range 4-16 Pa significantly reduces the beam current rise-time and significantly increases the emission current amplitude. For example, at a discharge current of 20 A, increasing the working gas pressure from 4 Pa to 16 Pa increases the emission current from 8 A to 18 A and shortens the beam rise-time from 50 μs to 20 μs. This influence of gas pressure on the electron beam parameters can be explained by the effect of arc discharge current switching from the anode to emission. In our case, the current switching effect is caused by increased working gas pressure. In the forevacuum pressure range, the increase of the electron emission current with the growth of gas pressure is due to a rise in the emission plasma potential which is caused by ion back-streaming from the plasma formed in the electron beam transport region. A model describing the influence of gas pressure on the electron emission from the plasma is presented.

  3. Lack of family-based association between common variations in WNK1 and blood pressure level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuqiang; Lian, Qiufang; Ren, Jie; Ren, Keyu; Wang, Yang; Wang, Dan; Chu, Chao; Wang, Lan; Guo, Tongshuai; Liu, Enqi; Mu, Jianjun; Yuan, Zuyi

    2014-10-16

    WNK1 (With No-lysine Kinase 1) modulates numerous sodium transport-related ion channels involved in regulation of blood pressure. Several studies have indicated associations between the common variants of the WNK1 gene and hypertension or blood pressure levels. However, little data exists on Asian populations and normotensive or pre-hypertensive subjects. Our aim was to detect whether the common variations in the WNK1 gene are potential contributors to individual variations in blood pressure in a family-based sample. 525 individuals from 116 families were selected from a rural community of Northern China. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms were selected from the WNK1 gene. Single-marker and haplotype analyses were conducted using the Family-Based Association Test program. Regretful, no associations for the 5 WNK1 SNPs and the constructed haplotype blocks of WNK1 with blood pressure level reached nominal statistical significance. We conclude that although multiple candidate genes are involved in development of hypertension, the genetic polymorphism in WNK1 is not a major contributor to the observed variability in blood pressure and familial clustering risk of hypertension.

  4. Simulation Research of Vaporization and Pressure Variation in a Cryogenic Propellant Tank at the Launch Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Liang, Guo-zhu

    2013-12-01

    In order to improve depiction of pressure variation and investigate the interrelation among the physical processes in propellant tanks, a 2D axial symmetry Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) CFD model is established to simulate a large-sized liquid propellant tank when the rocket is preparing for launch with propellant loaded at the launch site. The numerical model is considered with propellant free convection, heat transfer between the tank and the external environment, thermal exchange between propellant and inner tank wall surfaces, gas compressibility, and phase change modeled under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. Vaporization rate of the vented LH2 tank and prediction of pressure change in the tank pressurized with GHe are obtained through simulation. We analysis the distributions of phase, temperature, and velocity vectors to reveal interactions among the propellant's own convection motion, heat transfer and phase change. The results show that the vaporization rate is mainly affected by heat leaks though the tank wall when the tank is vented, but it does not completely accord with the trend of the leakage because of convection motion and temperature nonuniformity of the liquid propellant in the tank. We also find that the main factors on pressure variation in the pressurized tank are the heat transfer on the tank wall surface bonding the ullage and propellant vaporization which has comparatively less influence.

  5. On the variational principle for the topological pressure for certain non-compact sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Let (X,d,T) be a dynamical system,where (X,d) is a compact metric space and T:X → X is a continuous map.We assume that the dynamical system satisfies g-almost product property and the uniform separation property.We compute the topological pressure of saturated sets under these two conditions.If the uniform separation property does not hold,we compute the topological pressure of the set of generic points.We give an application of these results to multifractal analysis and finally get a conditional variational principle.

  6. Review of critical flow rate, propagation of pressure pulse, and sonic velocity in two-phase media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Y.

    1972-01-01

    For single-phase media, the critical discharge velocity, the sonic velocity, and the pressure pulse propagation velocity can be expressed in the same form by assuming isentropic, equilibria processes. In two-phase mixtures, the same concept is not valid due to the existence of interfacial transports of momentum, heat, and mass. Thus, the three velocities should be treated differently and separately for each particular condition, taking into account the various transport processes involved under that condition. Various attempts are reviewed to predict the critical discharge rate or the propagation velocities by considering slip ratio (momentum change), evaporation (mass and heat transport), flow pattern, etc. Experimental data were compared with predictions based on various theorems. The importance is stressed of the time required to achieve equilibrium as compared with the time available during the process, for example, of passing a pressure pulse.

  7. Amine-containing film deposited in pulsed dielectric barrier discharge at a high pressure and its cell adsorption behaviours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Wen-Juan; Xie Fen-Yan; Chen Qiang; Weng Jing

    2009-01-01

    With monomer allylamine, amine-containing functional films were prepared in alternative current pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at a high pressure. This paper analyses in detail the film properties and structures, such as hydrophilicity, compounds and microstructures as well as amine density by the water contact angle, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and ultraviolet-visible measurement. The influence of discharge param-eters, in particular applied power, on amine density was investigated. As an application the cell adsorption behaviours on plasma polymerization films was performed in-vitro. The results show that at a high pressure pulsed DBD plasma can polymerize films with sufficient amine group on surface, through which the very efficient cell adsorption behaviours was demonstrated, and the high rate of cell proliferation was visualized.

  8. Statistical Investigations on Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Pulses:Basic features and Their Impacts on Geosynchronous Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang

    2016-07-01

    Solar wind dynamic pressure pulse (DPP) structures, across which the dynamic pressure abruptly changes over timescales from a few seconds to several minutes, are often observed in the near-Earth space environment. Recently we have developed a novel procedure that is able to rapidly identify the DPPs from the plasma data stream, and simultaneously define the transition region and smartly select the upstream and downstream region for analysis. The plasma data with high time-resolution from 3DP instrument on board the WIND spacecraft are inspected with this automatic DPP-searching code, and a complete list of solar wind DPPs of historic WIND observations are built up. We perform a statistical survey on the properties of DPPs near 1 AU based on this event list. It is found that overwhelming majority of DPPs are associated with the solar wind disturbances including the CME-related flows, the corotating interaction regions, as well as the complex ejecta. The annual variations of the averaged occurrence rate of DPPs are roughly in phase with the solar activities. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here we also study the decompression/compression effects of very strong negative/positive DPPs on GMFs under northward IMFs. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on dayside, near the dawn and dusk on nightside are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that on certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Statistically, both the decompression effect of

  9. Pulse pressure is not an independent predictor of outcome in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic kidney disease and anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, S; Claggett, B; Hansen, T W

    2015-01-01

    Pulse pressure (PP) remains an elusive cardiovascular risk factor with inconsistent findings. We clarified the prognostic value in patients with type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and anemia in the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp (darbepoetin alfa) Therapy. In 4038......, CKD and anemia, PP did not independently predict cardiovascular events or ESRD. This may reflect confounding by aggressive antihypertensive treatment, or PP may be too rough a risk marker in these high-risk patients....

  10. Use of isopycnic plots to understand the role of density in SFC - I. Effect of pressure variation on retention factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Hill, Jason F; Iraneta, Pamela C; Fountain, Kenneth J

    2015-08-07

    This paper aims to demonstrate the effect of pressure variations in modifying analyte retention behavior in SFC. There is a general understanding that in SFC increasing pressure decreases the retention factor (k'), and vice versa. What is not clearly discussed or explained in any recent literature is that these variations can be very different at different operating pressures, temperatures and modifier concentrations. It is important to have a clearer understanding on these variabilities during method development and results analysis. In this paper the nature of k' variation with pressure, at different temperatures and modifier concentrations, will be explained with the help of isopycnic plots of CO2 and CO2+methanol mixtures.

  11. Pulse Pressure, Instead of Brachium-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity, is Associated with Reduced Kidney Function in a Chinese Han Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linpei Jia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In this study, we aim to investigate the association between renal function and arterial stiffness in a Chinese Han population, and further to discuss the effects of smoking on renal function. Methods: We collected the data of the brachium-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, blood pressure, blood chemistry and smoking status. Then, the multiple linear regression was done to explore the relationship between estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR and baPWV. Further, the parameters were compared among the four groups divided according to the quartiles of baPWV. Finally, the baPWV, eGFR and albuminuria values were compared between smokers and non-smokers. Results: baPWV is associated with eGFR in the correlation analysis and univariate linear regression model. After adjustment, the pulse pressure (PP instead of baPWV showed a significant association with eGFR. Nevertheless, the eGFR values differed among the four baPWV groups; the baPWV values were significantly higher in the subjects at the CKD (eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and the early CKD stage (eGFR60–80 mL/min/1.73 m2. The baPWV values and the ratio of proteinuria were significantly increased in smokers. Conclusion: PP but not baPWV is a predictor of declined renal function. Smokers have worse arterial stiffness and worse renal function.

  12. Improved operation of a microwave pulse compressor with a laser-triggered high-pressure gas plasma switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Gorev, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of laser beam parameters on the output pulses of a resonant microwave compressor with a laser-triggered plasma switch was investigated. The S-band compressor, consisting of a rectangular waveguide-based cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm, was filled with pressurized dry air and pumped by 1.8-μs-long microwave pulses of up to 450 kW power. A Nd:YAG laser was used to ignite the gas discharge in the tee side arm for output pulse extraction. The laser beam (at 213 nm or 532 nm) was directed along the RF electric field lines. It was found that the compressor operated most effectively when the laser beam was focused at the center of the switch waveguide cross-section. In this case, the power extraction efficiency reached ˜47% at an output power of ˜14 MW, while when the laser beam was not focused the maximal extraction efficiency was only ˜20% at ˜6 MW output power. Focusing the laser beam resulted also in a dramatic decrease (down to switch, and the jitter of the output pulses' appearance was minimized. In addition, the quality of the output pulses' waveform was significantly improved.

  13. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma on the adhesion and durability of resin composite to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Son, Ho-Hyun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) treatments, in pulsed and conventional modes, on the adhesion of resin composite to dentin and on the durability of the bond between resin composite and dentin. A pencil-type NT-APP jet was applied in pulsed and conventional modes to acid-etched dentin. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of resin composite to dentin was evaluated at 24 h and after thermocycling in one control group (no plasma) and in two experimental groups (pulsed plasma and conventional plasma groups) using the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive System. Data were analyzed using two-factor repeated-measures anova and Weibull statistics. Fractured surfaces and the bonded interfaces were evaluated using a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Although there were no significant differences between the plasma treatment groups, the plasma treatment improved the MTBS compared with the control group. After thermocycling, the MTBS did not decrease in the control or conventional plasma group but increased in the pulsed plasma group. Thermocycling increased the Weibull moduli of plasma-treated groups. In conclusion, plasma treatment using NT-APP improved the adhesion of resin composite to dentin. Using a pulsed energy source, the energy delivered to the dentin was effectively reduced without any reduction in bond strength or durability.

  14. A model for random cyclic pressure variations in spark-ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrashekar, T.K. [Sri Siddhartha Inst. of Technology, Karnataka (India); Antony, A.J. [Sahyadri Inst. of Technology, Mangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2009-07-01

    Cycle-by-cycle (CBC) variation of mean effective pressure in spark ignition engines is always greater than in compression ignition engines and needs to be reduced for better drivability, reduced emissions and increased power output. This study examined the parameters affecting CBC fluctuation and how to reduce the fluctuations. The paper presented two newly developed models designed to simulate the engine combustion process and CBC fluctuation. The mathematical model was outlined in detail with particular reference to model development; the statistical model for CBC fluctuation; and experimental setup. The model was found to be physically realistic and correctly predicted the cyclic variation of pressure to provide fundamental insight into the processes. The combustion model also took the effects of heat transfer and friction into consideration. 7 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs., 1 appendix.

  15. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on the magnetic properties of La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 films grown on SrTiO3 (1 1 1) substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapat, C. L.; Kalita, Parswajit; Sastry, P. U.; Singh, M. R.; Gupta, S. K.; Ravikumar, G.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of oxygen partial pressure on phase formation and magnetic properties of LSMO (La2/3Sr1/3MnO3) thin films deposited on STO (1 1 1) substrates by pulsed laser deposition was investigated. Phase formation and epitaxial growth were confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Good crystalline mosaic is observed for oxygen partial pressures ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 mbar. For each of the pressures, the lattice parameters were estimated assuming the lattice distortion is volume conserving. The Curie temperatures TC vs lattice strain relation thus obtained is comparable to the available data in literature. Variation in coercive field of the films can be accounted for by the variation in TC.

  16. Study on the Seismic Active Earth Pressure by Variational Limit Equilibrium Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangong Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of limit equilibrium theory, the isoperimetric model of functional extremum regarding the seismic active earth pressure is deduced according to the variational method. On this basis, Lagrange multipliers are introduced to convert the problem of seismic active earth pressure into the problem on the functional extremum of two undetermined function arguments. Based on the necessary conditions required for the existence of functional extremum, the function of the slip surface and the normal stress distribution on the slip surface is obtained, and the functional extremum problem is further converted into a function optimization problem with two undetermined Lagrange multipliers. The calculated results show that the slip surface is a plane and the seismic active earth pressure is minimal when the action point is at the lower limit position. As the action point moves upward, the slip surface becomes a logarithmic spiral and the corresponding value of seismic active earth pressure increases in a nonlinear manner. And the seismic active earth pressure is maximal at the upper limit position. The interval estimation constructed by the minimum and maximum values of seismic active earth pressure can provide a reference for the aseismic design of gravity retaining walls.

  17. Sources of measurement variation in blood pressure in large-scale epidemiological surveys with follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulla Overgaard; Henriksen, Jens H; Jensen, Gorm

    2002-01-01

    The Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS) is a longitudinal epidemiological study of 19698 subjects followed up since 1976. Variation in blood pressure (BP) measurement in the first three CCHS surveys is evaluated by assessing two components, systematic variation and random variation [daytime...

  18. A Study on the Pressure Relief Scope and the Stress Variation of Hydraulic Flushing Borehole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F.Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the variation of the pressure relief scope and the stress around hydraulic flushing borehole, the theory of coalrock damage was utilized to distinguish the interaction area of water-jet and coal-rock into the coal-rock crushing area, the water-jet pressure stagnation area, the transition area and the original stress recovery area of coal-rock. Based on the actual occurrence conditions of the coal seam, the pressure variation and relief scope around the hydraulic flushing borehole were analyzed and simulated by RFPA2D-Flow software. The results showed that a relief area with the radius of 5.0 ~ 6.0 m around the borehole formed due to the hydraulic flushing with the pressure relief of 0.038 ~ 6.545 MPa, and the maximum principal stress is 15.85 MPa with a distance of 6.8 m from the inspected hole where stress concentration appeared. After hydraulic flushing test, the diameter (441.8 ~ 1171.6 mm of the hole which can be an expression of coal crushing area size, was calculated based on the examination of the coal amount through the trial process, and it can be drawn that the pressure relief area must be larger than that of the coal-rock crushing area. Meanwhile, the measured pressures relief range(5.96 ~ 6.62 m is basically consistent with the numerical simulation result (5.0 ~ 6.0 m which verified the accuracy of the simulation analysis, according to the distance from the inspection drilling to the hydraulic flushing borehole and the decreased degree of the gas content in the inspection hole by the way of Gas Content.

  19. The Study on the Variation of the Cavity Length's Influence on the Output Pulse Train of the Actively Mode-Locked Fiber Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Hong-e; TIAN Xiao-jian; GAO Bo

    2005-01-01

    The influence of actively mode-locked Erbium-Doped Fiber Laser(EDFL) cavity length variation on the noises of an optical pulse train is investigated, in theory and in MATLAB simulation. Using a simple model, the noise characteristics of the output pulse train are studied. The results show that the noises of the output pulse train increase with the increasing of the variation of the cavity length. The theory analysis and the simulation results agree well. This result is very significant for us to improve the reliability and the stability of the actively mode-locked fiber laser.

  20. Correlation of pulse wave velocity with left ventricular mass in patients with hypertension once blood pressure has been normalized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu H. Chan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vascular stiffness has been proposed as a simple method to assess arterial loading conditions of the heart which induce left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH. There is some controversy as to whether the relationship of vascular stiffness to LVH is independent of blood pressure, and which measurement of arterial stiffness, augmentation index (AI or pulse wave velocity (PWV is best. Carotid pulse wave contor and pulse wave velocity of patients (n=20 with hypertension whose blood pressure (BP was under control (<140/90 mmHg with antihypertensive drug treatment medications, and without valvular heart disease, were measured. Left ventricular mass, calculated from 2D echocardiogram, was adjusted for body size using two different methods: body surface area and height. There was a significant (P<0.05 linear correlation between LV mass index and pulse wave velocity. This was not explained by BP level or lower LV mass in women, as there was no significant difference in PWV according to gender (1140.1+67.8 vs 1110.6+57.7 cm/s. In contrast to PWV, there was no significant correlation between LV mass and AI. In summary, these data suggest that aortic vascular stiffness is an indicator of LV mass even when blood pressure is controlled to less than 140/90 mmHg in hypertensive patients. The data further suggest that PWV is a better proxy or surrogate marker for LV mass than AI and the measurement of PWV may be useful as a rapid and less expensive assessment of the presence of LVH in this patient population.

  1. Intraocular pressure and ocular pulse amplitude using dynamic contour tonometry and contact lens tonometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grus Franz-H

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The new Ocular Dynamic Contour Tonometer (DCT, investigational device supplied by SMT (Swiss Microtechnology AG, Switzerland allows simultaneous recording of intraocular pressure (IOP and ocular pulse amplitude (OPA. It was the aim of this study to compare the IOP results of this new device with Goldmann tonometry. Furthermore, IOP and OPA measured with the new slitlamp-mounted DCT were compared to the IOP and OPA measured with the hand-held SmartLens®, a gonioscopic contact lens tonometer (ODC Ophthalmic Development Company AG, Switzerland. Methods Nineteen healthy subjects were included in this study. IOP was determined by three consecutive measurements with each of the DCT, SmartLens®, and Goldmann tonometer. Furthermore, OPA was measured three times consecutively by DCT and SmartLens®. Results No difference (P = 0.09 was found between the IOP values by means of DCT (mean: 16.6 mm Hg, median: 15.33 mm Hg, SD: +/- 4.04 mm Hg and Goldmann tonometry (mean: 16.17 mm Hg, median: 15.33 mm Hg, SD: +/- 4.03 mm Hg. The IOP values of SmartLens® (mean: 20.25 mm Hg, median: 19.00 mm Hg, SD: +/- 4.96 mm Hg were significantly higher (P = 0.0008 both from Goldmann tonometry and DCT. The OPA values of the DCT (mean: 3.08 mm Hg, SD: +/- 0.92 mm Hg were significantly lower (P = 0.0003 than those obtained by SmartLens® (mean: 3.92 mm Hg, SD: +/- 0.83 mm Hg. Conclusions DCT was equivalent to Goldmann applanation tonometry in measurement of IOP in a small group of normal subjects. In contrast, SmartLens® (contact lens tonometry gave IOP readings that were significantly higher compared with Goldmann applanation tonometer readings. Both devices, DCT and SmartLens® provide the measurement of OPA which could be helpful e.g. for the management of glaucoma.

  2. Effects of injection pressure variation on mixing in a cold supersonic combustor with kerosene fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Lai; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Yin-Yin; Ge, Jia-Ru; Luo, Feng; Zou, Hao-Ran; Wei, Min; Jen, Tien-Chien

    2017-10-01

    Spray jet in cold kerosene-fueled supersonic flow has been characterized under different injection pressures to assess the effects of the pressure variation on the mixing between incident shock wave and transverse cavity injection. Based on the real scramjet combustor, a detailed computational fluid dynamics model is developed. The injection pressures are specified as 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 MPa, respectively, with the other constant operation parameters (such as the injection diameter, angle and velocity). A three dimensional Couple Level Set & Volume of Fluids approach incorporating an improved Kelvin-Helmholtz & Rayleigh-Taylor model is used to investigate the interaction between kerosene and supersonic air. The numerical simulations primarily concentrate on penetration depth, span expansion area, angle of shock wave and sauter mean diameter distribution of the kerosene droplets with/without evaporation. Validation has been implemented by comparing the calculated against the measured in literature with good qualitative agreement. Results show that the penetration depth, span-wise angle and expansion area of the transverse cavity jet are all increased with the injection pressure. However, when the injection pressure is further increased, the value in either penetration depth or expansion area increases appreciably. This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of the combination of Couple Level Set & Volume of Fluids approach and an improved Kelvin-Helmholtz & Rayleigh-Taylor model, in turn providing insights into scramjet design improvement.

  3. Preparation of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation: Ambient pressure dependence of crystallization

    CERN Document Server

    Matsubara, M; Yamaki, T; Itoh, H; Abe, H

    2003-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) with a KrF excimer laser was used to prepare fine particles of titanium dioxide (TiO sub 2). The ablation in an atmosphere of Ar and O sub 2 (5:5) at total pressures of >= 1 Torr led to the formation of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles composed of anatase and rutile structures without any suboxides. The weight fraction of the rutile/anatase crystalline phases was dependent on the pressure of the Ar/O sub 2 gas. The TiO sub 2 nanoparticles had a spherical shape and their size, ranging from 10 and 14 nm, also appeared to be dependent on the ambient pressure. (author)

  4. Impact of low-pressure glow-discharge-pulsed plasma polymerization on properties of polyaniline thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatratkar, Aviraj A.; Yadav, Jyotiprakash B.; Deshmukh, R. R.; Barshilia, Harish C.; Puri, Vijaya; Puri, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    This study reports on polyaniline thin films deposited on a glass substrate using a low-pressure glow-discharge-pulsed plasma polymerization method. The polyaniline thin film obtained by pulsed plasma polymerization has been successfully demonstrated as an optical waveguide with a transmission loss of 3.93 dB cm-1, and has the potential to be employed in integrated optics. An attempt has been made to investigate the effect of plasma OFF-time on the structural, optical as well as surface properties of polyaniline thin film. The plasma ON-time has been kept constant and the plasma OFF-time has been varied throughout the work. The plasma OFF-time strongly influenced the properties of the polyaniline thin film, and a nanostructured and compact surface was revealed in the morphological studies. The plasma OFF-time was found to enhance film thickness, roughness, refractive index and optical transmission loss, whereas it reduced the optical band gap of the polyaniline thin films. Retention in the aromatic structure was confirmed by FTIR results. Optical studies revealed a π-π* electronic transition at about 317 nm as well as the formation of a branched structure. As compared with continuous wave plasma, pulsed plasma polymerization shows better properties. Pulsed plasma polymerization reduced the roughness of the film from 1.2 nm to 0.42 nm and the optical transmission loss from 6.56 dB cm-1 to 3.39 dB cm-1.

  5. Arterial pressure variations as parameters of brain perfusion in response to central blood volume depletion and repletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie G.T. Bronzwaer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rationale:A critical reduction in central blood volume (CBV is often characterized by hemodynamic instability. Restoration of a volume deficit may be established by goal-directed fluid therapy guided by respiration-related variation in systolic- and pulse pressure (SPV and PPV. Stroke volume index (SVI serves as a surrogate end-point of a fluid challenge but tissue perfusion itself has not been addressed. Objective: To delineate the relationship between arterial pressure variations, SVI and regional brain perfusion during CBV depletion and repletion in spontaneously breathing volunteers. Methods: This study quantified in 14 healthy subjects (11 male the effects of CBV depletion (by 30 and 70 degrees passive head-up tilt (HUT and a fluid challenge (by tilt back on CBV (thoracic admittance, mean middle cerebral artery (MCA blood flow velocity (Vmean, SVI, cardiac index (CI , PPV and SPV. Results: PPV (103±89%, p< 0.05 and SPV (136±117%, p< 0.05 increased with progression of central hypovolemia manifested by a reduction in thoracic admittance (11±5%, p< 0.001, SVI (28±6%, p< 0.001, CI (6±8%, p< 0.001 and MCAVmean (17±7%, p< 0.05 but not in arterial pressure. The reduction in MCAVmean correlated to the fall in SVI (R2=0.52, p< 0.0001 and inversely to PPV and SPV (R2=0.46 (p< 0.0001 and R2=0.45 (p< 0.0001, respectively. PPV and SPV predicted a ≥15% reduction in MCAVmean and SVI with comparable sensitivity (67%/ 67% vs. 63%/ 68% respectively and specificity (89%/94% vs. 89%/94%, respectively. A rapid fluid challenge by tilt-back restored all parameters to baseline values within one minute. Conclusion: In spontaneously breathing subjects, a reduction in MCAVmean was related to an increase in PPV and SPV during graded CBV depletion and repletion. Specifically, PPV and SPV predicted changes in both SVI and MCAVmean with comparable sensitivity and specificity, however the predictive value is limited in spontaneously breathing subjects.

  6. Temperature variation induced by the pulsed-periodic laser pumping under terahertz wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaeva, G. Kh; Moiseenko, E. V.; Shepelev, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    During nonlinear-optical parametric frequency conversion the heat-related effects occur, considerably influencing the conversion process. We develop versatile methods for analytic and numerical calculations of thermo-optical parameters and the temperature distribution inside a non-linear crystal pumped by periodic laser pulses. As an example, numerical results are presented for a number of laser-based schemes actual for the non-linear optical terahertz wave generation and parametric frequency conversion processes.

  7. The impact of impoundment on the rotifer communities in two tropical floodplain environments: interannual pulse variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CC. Bonecker

    Full Text Available Hydrological pulses are the main factor regulating the structure of biological communities in floodplains. Reservoirs above this ecosystem change the environment's dynamics and the community's biodiversity. This study evaluated the structure and stability of the rotifer community in response to changes in hydrological pulses after the Porto Primavera impoundment in the Upper Paraná River floodplain. The community was studied in a river and in a floodplain lake downstream of the dam over a four-year period before and after the impoundment. A decrease in species richness and abundance was observed soon after the impoundment, followed by an increase in these attributes and in specific diversity when the hydrometric level of the Paraná River rose and, consequently, increased the connectivity between the floodplain environments. Conochilus coenobasis, Filinia longiseta, Keratella cochlearis, Lecane proiecta and Polyarthra dolichoptera persisted throughout the study and contributed to community stability (the maintenance of rank in species abundance over time, which was high in the floodplain lake, mainly after the impoundment. Reductions in the frequency, intensity and amplitude of potamophase pulses after the impoundment led to the decrease in species richness and the increases in abundance, community stability, and species diversity, which determine community resilience.

  8. 24-hour central aortic systolic pressure and 24-hour central pulse pressure are related to diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    ± 13, 121 ± 13, 119 ± 16 and 121 ± 13 mmHg (p arterial pressure and conventional risk factors), 24 h-CASP and 24 h-CPP increased with diabetes, albuminuria degree, previous......BACKGROUND: Non-invasive measurements of 24 hour ambulatory central aortic systolic pressure (24 h-CASP) and central pulse pressure (24 h-CPP) are now feasible. We evaluate the relationship between 24 h central blood pressure and diabetes-related complications in patients with type 1 diabetes...... cardiovascular disease (CVD), retinopathy and autonomic dysfunction (p ≤ 0.031).Odds ratios per 1 standard deviation increase in 24 h-CASP, 24 h-CPP and 24 h systolic blood pressure (24 h-SBP) were for CVD: 3.19 (1.68-6.05), 1.43 (1.01-2.02) and 2.39 (1.32-4.33), retinopathy: 4.41 (2.03-9.57), 1.77 (1...

  9. Cylinder Imbalance Detection of Six Cylinder DI Diesel Engine Using Pressure Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H.Gawande

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research paper a simplified methodology is presented to detect cylinder imbalance in operating sixcylinder DI diesel engine. The detailed torsional vibration analysis helps to find vibratory frequencies, mode shapes, and vibratory stresses to provide constraints on critical speed in operating engine. The crank shaft is considered to be a rigid body so that the variation of the angular speed could be directly correlated to the cylinder pressure. Actuallythe variation of crank shaft speed has a complex function being influence by torsional stiffness of crank shaft, the mass moment of inertia of reciprocating and rotating masses and the average speed and load on the engine. The information carried by the harmonic order permits to established correlation between measurement and average gaspressure of the engine and to detect torque imbalance and identify faulty cylinder. In this work the detail pressure variation study is carried out on operating six cylinder engine of type SL90 Engine-SL8800TA model manufactured by Kirloskar Oil Engine Pune.

  10. Load variation effects on the pressure fluctuations exerted on a Kaplan turbine runner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, K.; Mulu, B.; Raisee, M.; Cervantes, M. J.

    2014-03-01

    Introduction of intermittent electricity production systems like wind power and solar systems to electricity market together with the consumption-based electricity production resulted in numerous start/stops, load variations and off-design operation of water turbines. The hydropower systems suffer from the varying loads exerted on the stationary and rotating parts of the turbines during load variations which they are not designed for. On the other hand, investigations on part load operation of single regulated turbines, i.e., Francis and propeller, proved the formation of rotating vortex rope (RVR) in the draft tube. The RVR induces oscillating flow both in plunging and rotating modes which results in oscillating force with two different frequencies on the runner blades, bearings and other rotating parts of the turbine. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of transient operations on the pressure fluctuations on the runner and mechanism of the RVR formation/mitigation. Draft tube and runner blades of the Porjus U9 model, a Kaplan turbine, were equipped with pressure sensors. The model was run in off-cam mode during different load variation conditions to check the runner performance under unsteady condition. The results showed that the transients between the best efficiency point and the high load happens in a smooth way while transitions to/from the part load, where rotating vortex rope (RVR) forms in the draft tube induces high level of fluctuations with two frequencies on the runner; plunging and rotating mode of the RVR.

  11. The product of resting heart rate times blood pressure is associated with high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anxin; Tao, Jie; Guo, Xiuhua; Liu, Xuemei; Luo, Yanxia; Liu, Xiurong; Huang, Zhe; Chen, Shuohua; Zhao, Xingquan; Jonas, Jost B; Wu, Shouling

    2014-01-01

    To investigate potential associations between resting heart rate, blood pressure and the product of both, and the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) as a maker of arterial stiffness. The community-based "Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities in Community (APAC) Study" examined asymptomatic polyvascular abnormalities in a general Chinese population and included participants with an age of 40+ years without history of stroke and coronary heart disease. Arterial stiffness was defined as baPWV≥1400 cm/s. We measured and calculated the product of resting heart rate and systolic blood pressure (RHR-SBP) and the product of resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure (RHR-MAP). The study included 5153 participants with a mean age of 55.1 ± 11.8 years. Mean baPWV was 1586 ± 400 cm/s. Significant (Pheart rate or higher arterial blood pressure, with the highest baPWV observed in individuals from the highest quartiles of resting heart rate and blood pressure. After adjusting for confounding parameters such as age, sex, educational level, body mass index, fasting blood concentrations of glucose, blood lipids and high-sensitive C-reactive protein, smoking status and alcohol consumption, prevalence of arterial stiffness increased significantly (Pheart rate in combination with higher blood pressure are risk factors for arterial stiffness.

  12. Experimental study of propagation characteristics of a pulse-modulated surface-wave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe; Wu, Yue; Li, Zhen-Ye; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Yong-Xing

    2016-12-01

    An atmospheric-pressure, pulse-modulated surface wave argon plasma is investigated with respect to its propagation of the ionization front. The time-resolved photographs about the advance of the ionization front are taken using a high speed camera. The ionization front velocity and its rise time when propagating along the discharge tube are measured with respect to a series of values of input power, duty ratio, and the pulse repetition frequency. The interpretations are given on the basis of the ionization and diffusion processes. And it is also found that the reduced electric field and memory effect from previous discharge impose the influence on both the ionization front velocity and its rise time strongly.

  13. VUV-VIS imaging of high-pressure pulsed discharge in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treshchalov, Alexey B.; Lissovski, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial-time behavior of transversally excited pulsed volume discharge in argon is investigated by spontaneous emission spectroscopy and different imaging techniques. VUV Ar II* emission, UV-VIS continuum and Ar* red lines are used for direct monitoring of discharge homogeneity in the breakdown and recombination stages. Experimental data indicate that Ar* atoms and Ar II* excimers are created exclusively in the positive column of the discharge, not in near-cathode zones. These zones (cathode sheath and negative glow), however, are the main sources of UV-VIS continuum. The discharge is homogeneous during the first powerful breakdown pulse and fills the whole space between electrodes. Secondary excitation pulses initiate oscillations of plasma emission and longitudinal fragmentation of the discharge into separate zones. Fragmentation is connected with dynamical change of the electron emittance of heated and cold electrodes. Additional electrons, produced during secondary excitation pulses, convert effectively the reservoir of long-lived triplet Ar II* molecules to fast-emitted singlet Ar II* excimers - sharp spikes of VUV (126 nm) emission are observed. Double-pulse discharge pumping regime is suggested for easier achievement of the lasing threshold for rare gas excimer lasers.

  14. Associations between body mass index, ambulatory blood pressure findings, and changes in cardiac structure: relevance of pulse and nighttime pressures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedecostante, M.; Spannella, F.; Giulietti, F.; Espinosa, E.; Dessi-Fulgheri, P.; Sarzani, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is central in the management of hypertension. Factors related to BP, such as body mass index (BMI), may differently affect particular aspects of 24-hour ABPM profiles. However, the relevance of BMI, the most used index of adiposity, has been underappreciat

  15. Pulse pressure and heart rate in patients with metabolic syndrome across Europe: insights from the GOOD survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlini, S; Naditch-Brule, L; Farsang, C; Zidek, W; Kjeldsen, S E

    2013-07-01

    The Global Cardiometabolic Risk Profile in Patients with hypertension disease (GOOD) survey investigated the global cardiometabolic risk profile in 3464 adult outpatients with hypertension across 289 sites in 12 European countries. The pulse pressure and heart rate profile of the survey population was evaluated according to the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus. History and treatment of hypertension were not counted as criteria for metabolic syndrome as they applied to all patients. Out of the 3370 recruited patients, 1033 had metabolic syndrome and 1177 had neither metabolic syndrome nor diabetes. When compared with patients with no metabolic syndrome or diabetes, patients with metabolic syndrome had higher pulse pressure (59±14 vs. 55±14 mm Hg) and heart rate (75.2±11.0 vs. 72.5±10.0 beats per min) (Ppulse pressure, which may at least in part reflect increased arterial stiffness and increased sympathetic tone. This may contribute, to some extent, to explaining the increased cardiovascular risk attributed to the presence of metabolic syndrome.

  16. Can a central blood volume deficit be detected by systolic pressure variation during spontaneous breathing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael; Hayes, Chris; Steen Rasmussen, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    cardiac output (CO). This study tested that hypothesis in healthy volunteers exposed to central hypovolemia by head-up tilt. METHODS: Thirteen healthy volunteers were exposed to central hypovolemia by 45° head-up tilt while breathing through a facemask with 7.5 cmH2O inspiratory and/or expiratory......BACKGROUND: Whether during spontaneous breathing arterial pressure variations (APV) can detect a volume deficit is not established. We hypothesized that amplification of intra-thoracic pressure oscillations by breathing through resistors would enhance APV to allow identification of a reduced...... (from 21 (±15)% to 30 (±13)%). Yet during head-up tilt, a SPV ≥ 37 % predicted a decrease in CO ≥ 10 % with a sensitivity and specificity of 78 % and 100 %, respectively. CONCLUSION: In spontaneously breathing healthy volunteers combined inspiratory and expiratory resistors enhance SPV during head...

  17. Atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and wind variations between 50 and 200 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1972-01-01

    Data on atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and winds between 50 and 200 km were collected from sources including Meteorological Rocket Network data, ROBIN falling sphere data, grenade release and pitot tube data, meteor winds, chemical release winds, satellite data, and others. These data were analyzed by a daily difference method and results on the distribution statistics, magnitude, and spatial structure of the irregular atmospheric variations are presented. Time structures of the irregular variations were determined by the analysis of residuals from harmonic analysis of time series data. The observed height variations of irregular winds and densities are found to be in accord with a theoretical relation between these two quantities. The latitude variations (at 50 - 60 km height) show an increasing trend with latitude. A possible explanation of the unusually large irregular wind magnitudes of the White Sands MRN data is given in terms of mountain wave generation by the Sierra Nevada range about 1000 km west of White Sands. An analytical method is developed which, based on an analogy of the irregular motion field with axisymmetric turbulence, allows measured or model correlation or structure functions to be used to evaluate the effective frequency spectra of scalar and vector quantities of a spacecraft moving at any speed and at any trajectory elevation angle.

  18. Ice flow dynamics forced by rapid water pressure variations in subglacial granular beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Beem, Lucas H.;

    2016-01-01

    mechanical processes driving transitions from stability to slip. We performed computational experiments that show how rearrangements of load-bearing force chains within the granular sediments drive the mechanical transitions. Cyclic variations in pore water pressure give rise to rate-dependent creeping......Glaciers and ice streams can move by deforming underlying water-saturated sediments, and the nonlinear mechanics of these materials are often invoked as the main reason for initiation, persistence, and shutdown of fast-flowing ice streams. Existing models have failed to fully explain the internal...

  19. Lake-level variations and tides in Lago Argentino, Patagonia: insights from pressure tide gauge records

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Based on precise pressure tide gauge observations lake-level records are derived for two sites in Lago Argentino, southern Patagonia, of 2.5 and 1 years of duration. Applying the tools of time series analysis, the principal processes affecting the lake level are identified and quantified. Lake-level changes reflecting variations in lake volume are dominated by a seasonal cycle of 1.2 m in amplitude. Lake-volume changes occur in addition with a daily period in response to melt water influx fro...

  20. Relationships between diurnal blood pressure variation, physical activity, and health-related QOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Yasuko; Hirawa, Nobuhito; Tochikubo, Osamu; Mizushima, Shunsaku; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Kihara, Minoru; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Umemura, Satoshi

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the associations between diurnal blood pressure variation, physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Ninety-seven volunteers, including 52 hypertensive patients and 45 healthy subjects (average age, 48 years) participated in this study. Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate variability were measured using TM2425 (A&D Co). Physical activity was measured using actigraphy, and HRQOL was assessed by a Medical Outcome Study Short-Forum 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36). Awake mean physical activity positively correlated with the nocturnal dip in systolic blood pressure (SBP) (r = 0.242, p physical functioning positively correlated with awake mean physical activity (r = 0.265, p physical activity (r = 0.269, p = 0.01). Using multiple regression analysis, the nocturnal dip in SBP was found to be correlated with awake and sleep mean physical activities (p physical activity is associated with the nocturnal dip in blood pressure. Moreover, physical activity correlates with some of the factors of HRQOL.

  1. Consumer perception of the use of high-pressure processing and pulsed electric field technologies in food production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Boel; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    on consumer attitudes towards high-pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing of food was carried out. In all 97 adults between 20 and 71 years of age participated in 12 focus groups conducted in Slovenia, Hungary, Serbia, Slovakia, Norway and Denmark using a common guideline...... showed that environmental friendliness and the more natural products were seen as the main advantages, while they were concerned about body and health, the higher price of the products, the lack of information about the technologies and a general scepticism. The study also shows that North European...

  2. Estimating Hydraulic Conductivities in a Fractured Shale Formation from Pressure Pulse Testing and 3d Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbet, C.; DICK, P.; Lefevre, M.; Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.; Barnichon, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the framework of its research on the deep disposal of radioactive waste in shale formations, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a large array of in situ programs concerning the confining properties of shales in their underground research laboratory at Tournemire (SW France). One of its aims is to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling radionuclide migration through the host rock, from the disposal system to the biosphere. Past research programs carried out at Tournemire covered mechanical, hydro-mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire shale as well as water chemistry and long-term behaviour of the host rock. Studies show that fluid circulations in the undisturbed matrix are very slow (hydraulic conductivity of 10-14 to 10-15 m.s-1). However, recent work related to the occurrence of small scale fractures and clay-rich fault gouges indicate that fluid circulations may have been significantly modified in the vicinity of such features. To assess the transport properties associated with such faults, IRSN designed a series of in situ and laboratory experiments to evaluate the contribution of both diffusive and advective process on water and solute flux through a clay-rich fault zone (fault core and damaged zone) and in an undisturbed shale formation. As part of these studies, Modular Mini-Packer System (MMPS) hydraulic testing was conducted in multiple boreholes to characterize hydraulic conductivities within the formation. Pressure data collected during the hydraulic tests were analyzed using the nSIGHTS (n-dimensional Statistical Inverse Graphical Hydraulic Test Simulator) code to estimate hydraulic conductivity and formation pressures of the tested intervals. Preliminary results indicate hydraulic conductivities of 5.10-12 m.s-1 in the fault core and damaged zone and 10-14 m.s-1 in the adjacent undisturbed shale. Furthermore, when compared with neutron porosity data from borehole

  3. In-situ monitoring during pulsed laser deposition using RHEED at high pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, David H.A.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Koster, Gertjan; Rogalla, Horst

    1998-01-01

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is, due to its surface sensitivity, often used for the analysis and monitoring of thin film growth in ultra-high vacuum deposition systems. RHEED is usually applied in combination with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) by adjusting the background

  4. On the pressure effect in energetic deposition of Cu thin films by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering: A global plasma model and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, B. C.; Meng, D.; Che, H. L.; Lei, M. K.

    2015-05-01

    The modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) discharge processes are numerically modeled and experimentally investigated, in order to explore the effect of the pressure on MPPMS discharges as well as on the microstructure of the deposited thin films. A global plasma model has been developed based on a volume-averaged global description of the ionization region, considering the loss of electrons by cross-B diffusion. The temporal variations of internal plasma parameters at different pressures from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa are obtained by fitting the model to duplicate the experimental discharge data, and Cu thin films are deposited by MPPMS at the corresponding pressures. The surface morphology, grain size and orientation, and microstructure of the deposited thin films are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. By increasing the pressure from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa, both the ion bombardment energy and substrate temperature which are estimated by the modeled plasma parameters decrease, corresponding to the observed transition of the deposited thin films from a void free structure with a wide distribution of grain size (zone T) into an underdense structure with a fine fiber texture (zone 1) in the extended structure zone diagram (SZD). The microstructure and texture transition of Cu thin films are well-explained by the extended SZD, suggesting that the primary plasma processes are properly incorporated in the model. The results contribute to the understanding of the characteristics of MPPMS discharges, as well as its correlation with the microstructure and texture of deposited Cu thin films.

  5. Passenger comfort on high-speed trains: effect of tunnel noise on the subjective assessment of pressure variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanok, Sandra; Mendolia, Franco; Wittkowski, Martin; Rooney, Daniel; Putzke, Matthias; Aeschbach, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    When passing through a tunnel, aerodynamic effects on high-speed trains may impair passenger comfort. These variations in atmospheric pressure are accompanied by transient increases in sound pressure level. To date, it is unclear whether the latter influences the perceived discomfort associated with the variations in atmospheric pressure. In a pressure chamber of the DLR-Institute of Aerospace Medicine, 71 participants (M = 28.3 years ± 8.1 SD) rated randomised pressure changes during two conditions according to a crossover design. The pressure changes were presented together with tunnel noise such that the sound pressure level was transiently elevated by either +6 dB (low noise condition) or +12 dB (high noise condition) above background noise level (65 dB(A)). Data were combined with those of a recent study, in which identical pressure changes were presented without tunnel noise (Schwanitz et al., 2013, 'Pressure Variations on a Train - Where is the Threshold to Railway Passenger Discomfort?' Applied Ergonomics 44 (2): 200-209). Exposure-response relationships for the combined data set comprising all three noise conditions show that pressure discomfort increases with the magnitude and speed of the pressure changes but decreases with increasing tunnel noise. Practitioner Summary: In a pressure chamber, we systematically examined how pressure discomfort, as it may be experienced by railway passengers, is affected by the presence of tunnel noise during pressure changes. It is shown that across three conditions (no noise, low noise (+6 dB), high noise (+12 dB)) pressure discomfort decreases with increasing tunnel noise.

  6. Effects of unoprostone on diurnal variation of intraocular pressure in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Kenji Inoue1, Kei Noguchi1, Masato Wakakura1, Goji Tomita21Inouye Eye Hospital, Tokyo; 22nd Department of Ophthalmology, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: To prospectively evaluate the diurnal variation of intraocular pressure (IOP during unoprostone treatment in 13 healthy volunteers.Method: IOP was measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry by the same observer every 3 hours from 9 am to 9 am the next morning. Unoprostone was then instilled at 9 am and 9 pm daily for 1 month. After 1 month, IOP was measured again with unoprostone instilled at 9 am and 9 pm during IOP measurement. We then compared the average daily IOP before and after the treatment (paired t-test.Results: After 1 month of treatment, the average IOP decreased at every time point but one (12 pm, 3 pm, 6 pm, 9 pm, 12 am, 3 am, and 9 am, but not at 6 am. There were no adverse reactions and none of the subjects discontinued unoprostone.Conclusion: The hypotensive effects of unoprostone persist throughout the day, but this study suggests that the effects may be weaker at nighttime and early in the morning.Keywords: unoprostone, intraocular pressure, diurnal variation, healthy volunteer

  7. Blood pressure variations real-time reflect the conditioned fear learning and memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chang Hsu

    Full Text Available The conditioned fear learning and memory occurs when a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS is paired with an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US. This process is critically dependent on the amygdala and inevitably involves blood pressure (BP alterations. We hypothesized that BP variations could instantaneously reveal individual steps during conditioned fear learning and memory. An implanted telemetric probe was used to monitor the BP real-time in rats during training and testing sessions of the fear-potentiated startle. Our results showed that (i the conditioned fear learning during the training sessions was reflected by light (CS-induced rapid BP elevations and by electric shock (US-evoked sympathetic tone elevations; (ii these two BP-related parameters were not only negatively correlated with each other but also coupled to each other in the training session trials; (iii both parameters closely predicted the performance of fear-potentiated startle on the next day; and (iv although local blocking of one of the two fear-conditioned pathways in the training session partially inhibited fear learning, the fear memory retrieval still used both pathways. Altogether, real-time blood pressure variations faithfully revealed the critical steps involved in conditioned fear learning and memory, and our results supported a coupling between the cued learning and the post-shock calmness.

  8. Noise in pressure transducer readings produced by variations in solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, S. F.; Davis, G.A.; Loheide, S.P.; Butler, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in solar radiation can produce noise in readings from gauge pressure transducers when the transducer cable is exposed to direct sunlight. This noise is a result of insolation-induced heating and cooling of the air column in the vent tube of the transducer cable. A controlled experiment was performed to assess the impact of variations in solar radiation on transducer readings. This experiment demonstrated that insolation-induced fluctuations in apparent pressure head can be as large as 0.03 m. The magnitude of these fluctuations is dependent on cable color, the diameter of the vent tube, and the length of the transducer cable. The most effective means of minimizing insolation-induced noise is to use integrated transducer-data logger units that fit within a well. Failure to address this source of noise can introduce considerable uncertainty into analyses of hydraulic tests when the head change is relatively small, as is often the case for tests in highly permeable aquifers or for tests using distant observation wells.

  9. Pressure waves in liquid mercury target from pulsed heat loads and the possible way controlling their effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, L.; Skala, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villingen (Switzerland)

    1996-06-01

    In ESS project liquid metals are selected as the main target for the pulsed spallation neutron source. Since the very high instantaneous energy is deposited on the heavy molten target in a very short period time, pressure waves are generated. They travel through the liquid and cause high stress in the container. Also, additional stress should be considered in the wall which is the result of direct heating of the target window. These dynamic processes were simulated with computational codes with the static response being analized first. The total resulting dynamic wall stress has been found to have exceeded the design stress for the selected container material. Adding a small amount of gas bubbles in the liquid could be a possible way to reduce the pressure waves.

  10. Shock Tube Investigation of Pressure and Ion Sensors Used in Pulse Detonation Engine Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    is a gas which follows the equation RTP ρ= and is generally applied to gases at low temperatures and pressures ( Cengel and Boles, 2002:88). A non...ideal or real gas does not follow this equation at sufficiently high temperature or pressure ( Cengel and Boles, 2002:622). This is the case when the

  11. Continuous Monitoring of Cerebrovascular Reactivity Using Pulse Waveform of Intracranial Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, M.J.H.; Czosnyka, Marek; Budohoski, Karol P.; Kolias, Angelos G.; Radolovich, Danila K.; Lavinio, Andrea; Pickard, John D.; Smielewski, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) call for the development of accurate methods for assessment of the relationship between cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and cerebral autoregulation and to determine the influence of quantitative indices of pressure autoregulation on out

  12. Effects of pressure-dependent segmental arterial compliance and postural changes on pulse wave transmission in an arterial model of the human upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto P

    2011-01-01

    With increasing interest in the effect of postural changes on arterial blood pressure and vascular properties, it is important to understand effects of pressure-dependent arterial compliance. This study investigates effects of pressure-dependent compliance on pulse wave velocity (PWVar), pressure wave shape, and transmission characteristics in an arterial model of the human arm from heart to radial artery from supine to standing. Estimated central pressure waveform was used as the input for the model, calculated using a validated transfer function (SphygmoCor, AtCor Medical) from recorded radial pulses in 10 healthy male subjects (53.8 ± 7.9 years) during 0, 30, 60 and 90 degree head-up tilt. A 5-segment linear model was optimized using estimated central and recorded radial arterial pulse; each segment represented by an equivalent inductance, resistance and capacitance (compliance (C)) Pressure-dependent compliance (C(P)=a · e(b · P) was added to develop a nonlinear model, and the radial pulse calculated. Comparison of the radial pulse calculated by the linear and nonlinear models showed no statistical difference in systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressure in any position of tilt. However, waveform shape was increasingly divergent at higher angles of tilt (RMS error 2.3 ± 1.2 mmHg supine, 6.5 ± 3.0 mmHg standing) as was PWVar (0% increase from supine to standing in the linear model, 16.7% increase in nonlinear model). Fourier analysis demonstrated peak amplitude of transmission being at higher frequencies and phase delay being lower in the nonlinear model relative to the linear model. Pressure-dependent arterial compliance, whilst having no effect on peak values of pressure, has significant effects on waveform shape and transmission speed, especially with a more upright position.

  13. Effect of Variation in Voltage on the Synthesis of Ag Nanopowder by Pulsed Wire Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Woo Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanosized Ag particles were obtained in liquid medium, which is composed of deionized water and sodium hexametaphosphate, using pulsed wire evaporation within hundreds of microseconds from pure initial Ag wire (99.98%, with varying voltage. Changes in powder morphology and microstructure due to change in supply voltage was observed by FE-SEM and HR-TEM, and phase structure of powders was analyzed by XRD. The results revealed that average particle size slightly increased with increasing supply voltage without any impurity and oxide phase, which was explained in terms of addition of stabilizer into the coolant liquid. The experimental results also suggest that addition of sodium hexametaphosphate into the coolant liquid is good for enhancing the dispersibility property of silver nanopowders.

  14. Polymorphisms in the WNK1 gene are associated with blood pressure variation and urinary potassium excretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Newhouse

    Full Text Available WNK1--a serine/threonine kinase involved in electrolyte homeostasis and blood pressure (BP control--is an excellent candidate gene for essential hypertension (EH. We and others have previously reported association between WNK1 and BP variation. Using tag SNPs (tSNPs that capture 100% of common WNK1 variation in HapMap, we aimed to replicate our findings with BP and to test for association with phenotypes relating to WNK1 function in the British Genetics of Hypertension (BRIGHT study case-control resource (1700 hypertensive cases and 1700 normotensive controls. We found multiple variants to be associated with systolic blood pressure, SBP (7/28 tSNPs min-p = 0.0005, diastolic blood pressure, DBP (7/28 tSNPs min-p = 0.002 and 24 hour urinary potassium excretion (10/28 tSNPs min-p = 0.0004. Associations with SBP and urine potassium remained significant after correction for multiple testing (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01 respectively. The major allele (A of rs765250, located in intron 1, demonstrated the strongest evidence for association with SBP, effect size 3.14 mmHg (95%CI:1.23-4.9, DBP 1.9 mmHg (95%CI:0.7-3.2 and hypertension, odds ratio (OR: 1.3 [95%CI: 1.0-1.7].We genotyped this variant in six independent populations (n = 14,451 and replicated the association between rs765250 and SBP in a meta-analysis (p = 7 x 10(-3, combined with BRIGHT data-set p = 2 x 10(-4, n = 17,851. The associations of WNK1 with DBP and EH were not confirmed. Haplotype analysis revealed striking associations with hypertension and BP variation (global permutation p10 mmHg reduction and risk for hypertension (OR<0.60. Our data indicates that multiple rare and common WNK1 variants contribute to BP variation and hypertension, and provide compelling evidence to initiate further genetic and functional studies to explore the role of WNK1 in BP regulation and EH.

  15. HISTOLOGICAL STUDY OF MEDIUM SIZED ARTERIES OF NECK IN RELATION WITH THEIR PULSE PRESSURE AND PULSATORY POWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerana

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: There are several studies on the microstructure of main arteries of the body but limited have been dealt with the neck arteries. It has been mentioned that the vascular pathologies like the thrombo-embolism, atherosclerosis and infarction are common in the branches of vertebral and internal carotid artery as compared to the branches of external carotid artery. OBJECTIVE: To study the histological structure of the 3 medium sized arteries of neck namely external carotid, internal carotid and vertebral artery, calculation of their mean pulse pressure and pulsatory power and to find any association between them if present. METHOD: Fresh samples of external carotid, internal carotid and vertebral artery each measuring 10mm in length were taken from five cadavers and prepared for histological examination under microscope using orcein and H&E stain. The mean pressure and pulsatory power of these arteries were calculated by taking the measurements such as wall thickness, lumen circumference, arterial wall area, and smooth muscle fibre density in tunica media in that arterial segment. RESULT: The pulsatory power of external carotid artery, internal carotid artery and vertebral artery is found to be 120, 273.3, 400 Joules /heart beat and the mean pressure is 17.1 mm Hg, 27.3 mm Hg and 33.3 mm Hg respectively. CONCLUSION: The thickness of tunica media of an artery is directly proportional to its pulsatory power. The mean pulse pressure, pulsatory power as well the number of smooth muscles fibres in tunica media are more in internal carotid artery and vertebral artery in comparison to external carotid artery. It may be a very important reason why vascular pathologies are less common in branches of external carotid as compare to internal carotid and vertebral artery.

  16. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-05-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determined, with the notable result that there exists a minimum and maximum gap distance for its existence at a given ambient gas temperature. The minimum gap distance increases with decreasing gas temperature, whereas the maximum does not vary appreciably. To explain the experimental results, an analytical model is developed to explain the corona-to-glow (C-G) and glow-to-spark (G-S) transitions. The C-G transition is analyzed in terms of the avalanche-to-streamer transition and the breakdown field during the conduction phase following the establishment of a conducting channel across the discharge gap. The G-S transition is determined by the thermal ionization instability, and we show analytically that this transition occurs at a certain reduced electric field for the NRP discharges studied here. This model shows that the electrode geometry plays an important role in the existence of the NRP glow regime at a given gas temperature. We derive a criterion for the existence of the NRP glow regime as a function of the ambient gas temperature, pulse repetition frequency, electrode radius of curvature, and interelectrode gap distance.

  17. Effect of yoga on arterial stiffness in elderly subjects with increased pulse pressure: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Satish Gurunathrao; Aithala, Manjunatha R; Das, Kusal Kanti

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to determine the effect of yoga on arterial function in elderly with increased pulse pressure (PP). Randomized controlled study with two parallel groups. Elderly subjects with PP≥60 mmHg (n=60). Yoga group (n=30) was assigned for yoga training and brisk-walking (BW) group (n=30) for brisk-walk with stretching exercise for 1h in the morning for 6 days in a week for 12 weeks. Arterial stiffness measures: Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV), aortic augmentation index (AIx@75), arterial stiffness index at brachial (bASI) and tibial arteries (aASI). Total serum nitric oxide concentration (NOx) as an index of endothelial function. Heart rate variability (HRV) measures: Low frequency and high frequency in normalized units (LFnu, HFnu) and LF/HF ratio. The mean between-group change (with 95% CI) in arterial stiffness: c-f PWV(m/s) [1.25(0.59-1.89); pyoga group in vascular function, BP and autonomic function, while no significant change within-BW group was observed. Our findings suggest that yoga program offered was more effective than brisk-walk in reducing arterial stiffness along with BP in elderly individuals with increased PP. Yoga can also significantly reduce sympathetic activity and improve endothelial function with enhancement in bioavailability of NO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Blood Pressure Variation Throughout Pregnancy According to Early Gestational BMI: A Brazilian Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Rebelo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The maternal cardiovascular system undergoes progressive adaptations throughout pregnancy, causing blood pressure fluctuations. However, no consensus has been established on its normal variation in uncomplicated pregnancies. Objective: To describe the variation in systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP levels during pregnancy according to early pregnancy body mass index (BMI. Methods: SBP and DBP were measured during the first, second and third trimesters and at 30-45 days postpartum in a prospective cohort of 189 women aged 20-40 years. BMI (kg/m2 was measured up to the 13th gestational week and classified as normal-weight (<25.0 or excessive weight (≥25.0. Longitudinal linear mixed-effects models were used for statistical analysis. Results: A decrease in SBP and DBP was observed from the first to the second trimester (βSBP=-0.394; 95%CI: -0.600- -0.188 and βDBP=-0.617; 95%CI: -0.780- -0.454, as was an increase in SBP and DBP up to 30-45 postpartum days (βSBP=0.010; 95%CI: 0.006-0.014 and βDBP=0.015; 95%CI: 0.012-0.018. Women with excessive weight at early pregnancy showed higher mean SBP in all gestational trimesters, and higher mean DBP in the first and third trimesters. Excessive early pregnancy BMI was positively associated with prospective changes in SBP (βSBP=7.055; 95%CI: 4.499-9.610 and in DBP (βDBP=3.201; 95%CI: 1.136-5.266. Conclusion: SBP and DBP decreased from the first to the second trimester and then increased up to the postpartum period. Women with excessive early pregnancy BMI had higher SBP and DBP than their normal-weight counterparts throughout pregnancy, but not in the postpartum period.

  19. Variation of the anal resting pressure induced by postexpiratory apnea effort in patients with constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Helena Benetti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Intestinal constipation - a common symptom among the general population - is more frequent in women. It may be secondary to an improper diet or organic or functional disturbances, such as dyskinesia of the pelvic floor. This is basically characterized by the absence of relaxation or paradoxical contraction of the pelvic floor and anal sphincter during evacuation. OBJECTIVE: To analyze, by manometric data, the anal pressure variation at rest, during evacuation effort by using the Valsalva maneuver and forced post-expiratory apnea in subjects with secondary constipation. METHODS: Twenty-one patients (19 females - 90.4% with a mean age of 47.5 years old (23-72 were studied. The diagnosis was performed using anorectal manometry, with a catheter containing eight channels disposed at the axial axis, measuring the proximal (1 and distal (2 portions of the anal orifice. The elevation of the pressure values in relation to the resting with the evacuation effort was present in all patients. The Agachan score was used for clinical evaluation of constipation. The variables studied were: mean anal pressure of the anal orifice for 20 seconds at rest, the effort of evacuation using Valsalva maneuver and the effort of evacuation during apnea after forced expiration, as well as the area under the curve of the manometric tracing at moments Valsalva and apnea. RESULTS: The analysis of the mean values of the anal pressure variation at rest evidenced difference between proximal and distal channels (P = 0.007, independent of the moment and tendency to differ during moments Valsalva and apnea (P = 0.06. The mean of values of the area under the manometric tracing curve showed differences between moments Valsalva and apnea (P = 0.0008, either at the proximal portion or at the distal portion of the anal orifice. CONCLUSION: The effort of evacuation associated with postexpiratory apnea, when compared with the effort associated with the Valsalva maneuver, provides

  20. Effect of pulse profile variations on measurement of eccentricity in orbits of Cen X-3 and SMC X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Raichur, Harsha

    2009-01-01

    It has long been argued that better timing precision allowed by satelites like Rossi X-ray Timing Experiments (RXTE) will allow us to measure the orbital eccentricity and the angle of periastron of some of the bright persistent high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and hence a possible measurement of apsidal motion in these system. Measuring the rate of apsidal motion allows one to estimate the apsidal motion constant of the mass losing companion star and hence allows for the direct testing of the stellar structure models for these giant stars present in the HMXBs. In the present paper we use the archival RXTE data of two bright persistent sources, namely Cen X-3 and SMC X-1, to measure the very small orbital eccentricity and the angle of periastron. We find that the small variations in the pulse profiles of these sources rather than the intrinsic timing accuracy provided by RXTE, limit the accuracy with which we can measure arrival time of the pulses from these sources. This influences the accuracy with which one...

  1. Nutritional approaches and health-related properties of plant foods processed by high pressure and pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; de Ancos, Begoña; Plaza, Lucía; Elez-Martínez, Pedro; Cano, M Pilar

    2009-06-01

    Consumers are more and more concerned about the nutritional and health-related characteristics of fruits and vegetables, as well as the safety of the food they eat. The processing of foods is becoming more sophisticated and diverse in response to the growing demand for quality foods. Consumers today expect food products to provide fresh-like appearance, convenience, variety, appropriate shelf-life and caloric content, reasonable cost, environmental soundness, high nutritional and functional quality. Nonthermal processing of fruit and vegetable has been revealed as a useful tool to extend their shelf-life and quality as well as to preserve their nutritional and functional characteristics. In the last ten years, there has been an increasing interest in nonthermal technologies as high pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric fields (PEF) to preserve fruit and vegetable products without the quality and nutritional damage caused by heat treatments. This review will contribute to inform many of the studies conducted to obtain a better understanding on the effects of some of these nonthermal processing technologies (high hydrostatic pressure and pulsed electric fields) applied to vegetable foods on their nutritional value and bioactive compounds related to health, including the results on micronutrient bioavailability studies and oxidative stress and inflammation biomarkers. These studies could contribute to select the most appropriate processing parameters to obtain safe, high-quality, nutritional, and functional vegetable food.

  2. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed Detonation Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation tube. The device utilized a mixture of H2 fuel and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at about 600 Hz, for the quarter wave mode of resonance. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to H2 flow based specific impulse of 2970 s. This value is comparable to measurements in H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the device and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 pounds per cubic inch, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume of order 0.01 pound per cubic inch. This much higher volumetric efficiency results in a potentially much more practical device than the typical PDE, for a wide range of potential applications, including high-speed boundary layer separation control, for example in hypersonic engine inlets, and propulsion for small aircraft and missiles.

  3. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Namtran C.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation actuator. The device utilized a fuel mixture of H2 and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at approx.600 Hz, for the lambda/4 mode. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to specific impulse of 2611 s. This value is comparable to other H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) experiments. The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was approx.600 Hz, and was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the model and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 lb/cu in, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume values of approximately 0.01 lb/cu in.

  4. Modeling transducer impulse responses for predicting calibrated pressure pulses with the ultrasound simulation program Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    FIELD II is a simulation software capable of predicting the field pressure in front of transducers having any complicated geometry. A calibrated prediction with this program is, however, dependent on an exact voltage-to-surface acceleration impulse response of the transducer. Such impulse response...... is not calculated by FIELD II. This work investigates the usability of combining a one-dimensional multilayer transducer modeling principle with the FIELD II software. Multilayer here refers to a transducer composed of several material layers. Measurements of pressure and current from Pz27 piezoceramic disks...... as well as pressure and intensity measurements in front of a 128 element commercial convex medical transducer are compared to the simulations. Results show that the models can predict the pressure from the piezoceramic disks with a root mean square (rms) error of 11.2% to 36.2% with a 2 dB amplitude...

  5. Study of plasma pressure evolution driven by strong picosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Wang, J. X.; Xu, Y. X.; Zhu, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Through one dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulation of strong laser interaction with the solid-density plasma, the evolution of the plasma impact pressure behind a thin foil has been investigated in details. An energy-compression mechanism has been proposed to help optimizing the laser and plasma parameters. It has been found that by using a picosecond laser with intensity 1015 W cm-2, an impact pressure as high as several hundreds of GPa order of magnitude can be obtained. The numerical analysis demonstrates that the peak pressure is mainly resulted from the ion contribution. These results are of potential application to the laser loading upon solids in order to study the material properties under extra-high dynamic pressure.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid pulse pressure and craniospinal dynamics : a theoretical, clinical and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.J. Avezaat (Cees); J.H.M. van Eijndhoven (Johannes Hubertus Marcellianus)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractSince the introduction of continuous recording of intracranial pressure (ICP) in neurosurgical practice (Guillaume and Janny, 1951; Lundberg, 1960) this method has greatly contributed to clinical research in the field of intracranial hypertension. Numerous publications have enriched the

  7. Fast Pulse Measurements and Temperature Variation of Enhanced Magnetic Damping of Spin-Transfer Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, E. M.; Garcia, A. G. F.; Braganca, P. M.; Fuchs, G. D.; Emley, N. C.; Read, J. C.; Tan, E.; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.; Katine, J. A.

    2007-03-01

    Recently, light terbium (Tb) doping in thin films of permalloy (Py) has been shown to increase the damping parameter α by several orders of magnitude [1]. To directly study the effect of increased α on spin-transfer systems, we have fabricated 0.004 um^2 Py/Cu/Py nanopillar spin valves with 0 and 2% Tb in the free layer, and measured critical currents across a range of temperatures from 4.2 K to 295 K. We find that the critical currents for reversibly switching the free layer, generally expected to be proportional to α, are several times larger on average in the 2% Tb samples than in pure Py samples, and increase linearly with decreasing temperature. We will also discuss FMR data, and data for switching with fast pulses from 1 to 100 nsec at both 150 K and room temperature, along with matching simulations that allows us to extract α and other spin-torque parameters [2]. These results suggest one approach for controllably reducing the negative impact of spin-torque effects on nanoscale spin valve and read head sensors, and achieving a deeper understanding of these spin-torque devices. [1] W. Bailey, P. Kabos, F. Mancoff, and S. E. Russek, IEEE Trans. Magn. 37, 1749 (2001). [2] P. M. Braganca, et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 112507 (2005).

  8. Prenatal exposure to dexamethasone in the mouse alters cardiac growth patterns and increases pulse pressure in aged male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Lee; Cuffe, James S M; Paravicini, Tamara M; Campbell, Sally; Dickinson, Hayley; Singh, Reetu R; Gezmish, Oksan; Black, M Jane; Moritz, Karen M

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids during development can result in later cardiovascular and renal disease in sheep and rats. Although prenatal glucocorticoid exposure is associated with impaired renal development, less is known about effects on the developing heart. This study aimed to examine the effects of a short-term exposure to dexamethasone (60 hours from embryonic day 12.5) on the developing mouse heart, and cardiovascular function in adult male offspring. Dexamethasone (DEX) exposed fetuses were growth restricted compared to saline treated controls (SAL) at E14.5, but there was no difference between groups at E17.5. Heart weights of the DEX fetuses also tended to be smaller at E14.5, but not different at E17.5. Cardiac AT1aR, Bax, and IGF-1 mRNA expression was significantly increased by DEX compared to SAL at E17.5. In 12-month-old offspring DEX exposure caused an increase in basal blood pressure of ~3 mmHg. In addition, DEX exposed mice had a widened pulse pressure compared to SAL. DEX exposed males at 12 months had an approximate 25% reduction in nephron number compared to SAL, but no difference in cardiomyocyte number. Exposure to DEX in utero appears to adversely impact on nephrogenesis and heart growth but is not associated with a cardiomyocyte deficit in male mice in adulthood, possibly due to compensatory growth of the myocardium following the initial insult. However, the widened pulse pressure may be indicative of altered vascular compliance.

  9. The Effects of Temperature, Pressure, and Humidity Variations on 100 Meter Sprint Performances

    CERN Document Server

    Mureika, J R

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that ``equivalent'' sprint race times run with different accompanying wind speeds or at different altitudes are anything but equivalent races. The drag force acting on a sprinter is a function of air density and the relative wind speed, where the former has traditionally been calculated using the race venue's elevation above sea level. However, air density variation is dependent on more than just altitude. This work will quantify how changes in air temperature, barometric pressure, and humidity levels influence 100 m sprint performances. When these effects are considered in combination, the corrections to performances can be very large. The results suggest that a non-negligible difference in race times can be expected for ``equivalent'' performances run with the same wind speed at the same venue or physical altitude, but under different atmospheric conditions.

  10. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances angiogenesis and ameliorates contractile dysfunction of pressure-overloaded heart in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Kenta; Shindo, Tomohiko; Hatanaka, Kazuaki; Eguchi, Kumiko; Kurosawa, Ryo; Kagaya, Yuta; Monma, Yuto; Ichijo, Sadamitsu; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Chronic left ventricular (LV) pressure overload causes relative ischemia with resultant LV dysfunction. We have recently demonstrated that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) improves myocardial ischemia in a pig model of chronic myocardial ischemia through enhanced myocardial angiogenesis. In the present study, we thus examined whether LIPUS also ameliorates contractile dysfunction in LV pressure-overloaded hearts. Chronic LV pressure overload was induced with transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in mice. LIPUS was applied to the whole heart three times in the first week after TAC and was repeated once a week for 7 weeks thereafter (n = 22). Animals in the control groups received the sham treatment without LIPUS (n = 23). At 8 weeks after TAC, LV fractional shortening was depressed in the TAC-Control group, which was significantly ameliorated in the TAC-LIPUS group (30.4±0.5 vs. 36.2±3.8%, P<0.05). Capillary density was higher and perivascular fibrosis was less in the LV in the TAC-LIPUS group than in the TAC-Control group. Myocardial relative ischemia evaluated with hypoxyprobe was noted in the TAC-Control group, which was significantly attenuated in the TAC-LIPUS group. In the TAC-LIPUS group, as compared with the control group, mRNA expressions of BNP and collagen III were significantly lower (both P<0.05) and protein expressions of VEGF and eNOS were significantly up-regulated associated with Akt activation (all P<0.05). No adverse effect related to the LIPUS therapy was noted. These results indicate that the LIPUS therapy ameliorates contractile dysfunction in chronically pressure-overloaded hearts through enhanced myocardial angiogenesis and attenuated perivascular fibrosis. Thus, the LIPUS therapy may be a promising, non-invasive treatment for cardiac dysfunction due to chronic pressure overload.

  11. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery’s Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jae-Young Shin; Boncho Ku; Tae-Hun Kim; Jang Han Bae; Min-Ho Jun; Jun-Hwan Lee; Kim, Jaeuk U.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery’s pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. Methods and analysis: This study is a prospective, single-arm, exploratory clinical study. A total of 25 healthy participants, without regard to gender, in their twenties will be recruited by physicians. Written inf...

  12. High pulse pressure is not associated with abnormal activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in repaired aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, T A L; Pedersen, E B; Munk, K; Hjortdal, V E; Emmertsen, K; Andersen, N H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between pulse pressure (PP)--a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness-and activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in adult patients with repaired coarctation and normal left ventricular (LV) function. A total of 114 patients (44 (26-74) years, 13 (0.1-40) years at repair) and 20 healthy controls were examined with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography, vasoactive hormone levels and magnetic resonance of the thoracic aorta. Forty-one patients (36%) were taking antihypertensives (28 RAAS inhibitors). Fifty-one had mean 24-h blood pressures >130/80 mm Hg. Hypertension was not associated with age at repair (P=0.257). Patients had higher PP and LV mass compared with controls (52±11 vs. 45±5 mm Hg and 221±71 vs. 154±55 g, respectively; both Pcoarctation have increased PP and LV mass compared with controls. PP increased with increasing recoarctation. Hypertension was present also in the absence of recoarctation. These changes could not be explained by abnormal activation of the RAAS.

  13. Pulse oximetry-derived pleth variability index can predict dexmedetomidine-induced changes in blood pressure in spontaneously breathing patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Makoto; Kunisawa, Takayuki; Kurosawa, Atsushi; Sasakawa, Tomoki

    2016-11-01

    Hypertension or hypotension in patients receiving continuous infusions of dexmedetomidine (DEX) is often due to changes in vascular resistance caused by α2 receptor stimulation. We investigated whether baseline perfusion index (PI) and pleth variability index (PVI), derived from pulse oximetry readings, could predict DEX-induced changes in the hemodynamic status in spontaneously breathing patients. Observational study. Operating room. Patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists performance status 1 or 2) scheduled to undergo lower extremity or abdominal procedures under regional anesthesia were approached. The PI and PVI were set as baseline upon arrival in theater and were then measured at 2.5-minute intervals. Upon attaining stable hemodynamic status under spontaneous breathing, intravenous administration of DEX was initiated at 6 μg kg(-1) h(-1) for 10minutes, followed by continuous infusion at 0.6 μg kg(-1) h(-1). Blood pressure, heart rate, PI, and PVI were measured. Hypertension was defined as an increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) >15% and hypotension as a decrease in SBP PVI correlated with the degree of change in SBP. The maximum percentage increase as well as the maximum percentage of decrease in SBP from baseline correlated with baseline PI (r=0.418 [P=.005] and r=0.507 [PPVI (r=-0.658 [PPVI PVI >16 identified DEX-induced hypotension (sensitivity 83%, specificity 64%). PVI may predict DEX-induced changes in blood pressure in spontaneously breathing patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The physics of pressure variation in microchannels within corotating or static discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Abhijit; Sengupta, Sayantan

    2016-10-01

    We formulate a comprehensive analysis for the radial pressure variation in flow through microchannels within corotating (or static) discs, which is important for its fundamental value and application potential in macrofluidic and microfluidic devices. The uniqueness and utility of the present approach emanate from our ability to describe the physics completely in terms of non-dimensional numbers and to determine quantitatively the separate roles of inertia, centrifugal force, Coriolis force, and viscous effects in the overall radial pressure difference (Δpio). It is established here that the aspect ratio (ratio of inter-disc spacing and disc radius) plays only a secondary role as an independent parameter, its major role being contained within a newly identified dynamic similarity number (Ds). For radial inflow, it is shown that the magnitude of Δpio decreases monotonically as the tangential speed ratio (γ) increases but exhibits a minima when Ds is varied. For radial outflow, it is shown that Δpio increases monotonically as the flow coefficient (ϕ) decreases but evinces a maxima when Ds is varied. It is further shown that for the radial inflow case, the minima in the magnitude of Δpio exist even when the rotational speed of the discs is reduced to zero (static discs). The demonstrated existence of these extrema (i.e., minima for radial inflow and maxima for radial outflow) creates the scope for device optimization.

  15. Impact of extracorporeal blood flow rate on blood pressure, pulse rate and cardiac output during haemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Philip Andreas; Mace, Maria Lerche; Soja, Anne Merete Boas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: If blood pressure (BP) falls during haemodialysis (HD) [intradialytic hypotension (IDH)] a common clinical practice is to reduce the extracorporeal blood flow rate (EBFR). Consequently the efficacy of the HD (Kt/V) is reduced. However, only very limited knowledge on the effect of redu...

  16. Variation in intracranial pressure monitoring and outcomes in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Tellen D; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Keenan, Heather T; Korgenski, E Kent; Bratton, Susan L

    2012-07-01

    To describe between-hospital and patient-level variation in intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and to evaluate ICP monitoring in association with hospital features and outcome in children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Retrospective cohort study. SETTING Children's hospitals participating in the Pediatric Health Information System database (January 2001 to June 2011). Children (aged head Abbreviated Injury Scale scores of at least 3 who were ventilated for at least 96 consecutive hours or who died in the first 4 days after hospital admission. Monitoring of ICP. A total of 4667 children met the study criteria. Hospital mortality was 41% (n = 1919). Overall, 55% of patients (n = 2586) received ICP monitoring. Expected hospital ICP monitoring rates after adjustment for patient age, cardiac arrest, inflicted injury, craniotomy or craniectomy, head Abbreviated Injury Scale score, and Injury Severity Score were 47% to 60%. Observed hospital ICP monitoring rates were 14% to 83%. Hospitals with more observed ICP monitoring, relative to expected, and hospitals with higher patient volumes had lower rates of mortality or severe disability. After adjustment for between-hospital variation and patient severity of injury, ICP monitoring was independently associated with age 1 year and older (odds ratio, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.5-3.8) vs age younger than 1 year. There was significant between-hospital variation in ICP monitoring that cannot be attributed solely to differences in case mix. Hospitals that monitor ICP more frequently and hospitals with higher patient volumes had better patient outcomes. Infants with TBI are less likely to receive ICP monitoring than are older children.

  17. Some aspects of the geomagnetic response to solar wind pressure variations: a case study at low and middle latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Villante

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined geomagnetic field observations at low and middle latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere during a 50-min interval (12 May 1999, characterized by a complex behaviour of the solar wind dynamic pressure. For the entire interval, the aspects of the geomagnetic response can be organized into four groups of events which show common characteristics for the H and D components, respectively. The correspondence between the magnetospheric field and the ground components reveals different aspects of the geomagnetic response in different magnetic local time (MLT sectors. For the H component, the correspondence is highly significant in the dusk and night sectors; in the dawn and prenoon sectors it shows a dramatic change across a separation line that extends approximately between (6 MLT, 35° and (13 MLT, 60°. For the D component, the correspondence has significant values in the dawn and prenoon regions. We propose a new approach to the experimental data analysis which reveals that, at each station, the magnetospheric field has a close correspondence with the geomagnetic field projection along an axis (M1 that progressively rotates from north/south (night events to east/west orientation (dawn events. When projected along M1, the geomagnetic signals can be interpreted in terms of a one-dimensional pattern that mostly reflects the field behaviour observed at geostationary orbit. Several features appear more evident in this perspective, and the global geomagnetic response to the SW pressure variations appears much clearer than in other representations. In particular, the MLT dependence of the geomagnetic response is much smaller than that one estimated by previous investigations. A clear latitudinal dependence emerges in the dusk sector. The occurrence of low frequency waves at ~2.8mHz can be interpreted in terms of global magnetospheric modes driven by the SW pulse. This event occurred in the recovery phase after the day

  18. Blood Pressure Variation Throughout Pregnancy According to Early Gestational BMI: A Brazilian Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Fernanda; Farias, Dayana Rodrigues; Mendes, Roberta Hack; Schlüssel, Michael Maia; Kac, Gilberto

    2015-02-13

    Background: The maternal cardiovascular system undergoes progressive adaptations throughout pregnancy, causing blood pressure fluctuations. However, no consensus has been established on its normal variation in uncomplicated pregnancies. Objective: To describe the variation in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels during pregnancy according to early pregnancy body mass index (BMI). Methods: SBP and DBP were measured during the first, second and third trimesters and at 30-45 days postpartum in a prospective cohort of 189 women aged 20-40 years. BMI (kg/m2) was measured up to the 13th gestational week and classified as normal-weight (parto imediato segundo o índice de massa corporal (IMC) no início da gravidez. Métodos: A PAS e a PAD foram medidas no 1º, 2º e 3º trimestres gestacionais e aos 30-45 dias pós-parto em uma coorte prospectiva de 189 mulheres com idade entre 20 e 40 anos. O IMC (kg/m2) foi aferido até a 13a semana e classificado como normal (parto (βPAS=0,010; IC95%:0,006-0,014 e βPAD=0,015; IC95%:0,012-0,018). As mulheres com IMC excessivo apresentaram média de PAS maior em todos os trimestres, e de PAD maior no primeiro e no terceiro trimestres. O IMC excessivo no início da gestação esteve positivamente associado com mudanças na PAS (βPAS=7,055; IC95%:4,499-9,610) e na PAD (βPAD=3,201; IC95%:1,136-5,266). Conclusão: A PAS e a PAD diminuíram do primeiro para o segundo trimestre e aumentaram do segundo trimestre até o pósparto. Mulheres com IMC excessivo no início da gestação apresentaram valores mais elevados de PAS e PAD ao longo da gravidez, mas não no pós-parto, quando comparadas às de IMC normal.

  19. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-04

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ.

  20. Comparison of noninvasive pulse transit time estimates as markers of blood pressure using invasive pulse transit time measurements as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingwu; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-05-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) measured as the time delay between invasive proximal and distal blood pressure (BP) or flow waveforms (invasive PTT [I-PTT]) tightly correlates with BP PTT estimated as the time delay between noninvasive proximal and distal arterial waveforms could therefore permit cuff-less BP monitoring. A popular noninvasive PTT estimate for this application is the time delay between ECG and photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms (pulse arrival time [PAT]). Another estimate is the time delay between proximal and distal PPG waveforms (PPG-PTT). PAT and PPG-PTT were assessed as markers of BP over a wide physiologic range using I-PTT as a reference. Waveforms for determining I-PTT, PAT, and PPG-PTT through central arteries were measured from swine during baseline conditions and infusions of various hemodynamic drugs. Diastolic, mean, and systolic BP varied widely in each subject (group average (mean ± SE) standard deviation between 25 ± 2 and 36 ± 2 mmHg). I-PTT correlated well with all BP levels (group average R(2) values between 0.86 ± 0.03 and 0.91 ± 0.03). PPG-PTT also correlated well with all BP levels (group average R(2) values between 0.81 ± 0.03 and 0.85 ± 0.02), and its R(2) values were not significantly different from those of I-PTT PAT correlated best with systolic BP (group average R(2) value of 0.70 ± 0.04), but its R(2) values for all BP levels were significantly lower than those of I-PTT (P < 0.005) and PPG-PTT (P < 0.02). The pre-ejection period component of PAT was responsible for its inferior correlation with BP In sum, PPG-PTT was not different from I-PTT and superior to the popular PAT as a marker of BP.

  1. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    CERN Document Server

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma is characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, voltage-current measurement, microphotography and numerical simulation. On the basis of observed plasma parameters, the kinetics of the film deposition process is discussed.

  2. Simulation of subnanosecond streamers in atmospheric-pressure air: Effects of polarity of applied voltage pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, N. Yu.; Naidis, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    Results of simulation of subnanosecond streamer propagation in corona gap configuration, obtained in the framework of 2D fluid model, are presented. Effects related with the polarity of a voltage pulse applied to the stressed electrode are discussed. It is argued that these effects (dependence of the discharge current and propagation velocity on the polarity of applied voltage) observed in experiments can be attributed to the difference in initial (preceding the streamer formation) distributions of charged species inside the gap. This difference can be caused by preionization (at negative polarity) of the gas inside the discharge gap by runaway electrons. Calculated streamers have large widths (up to 1 cm) and move with velocities in the range of 109-1010 cm s-1, similar to experimental data.

  3. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  4. Artificial Neural Network Modeling for Spatial and Temporal Variations of Pore-Water Pressure Responses to Rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of spatial and temporal variations of soil pore-water pressure in a slope is vital in hydrogeological and hillslope related processes (i.e., slope failure, slope stability analysis, etc.. Measurements of soil pore-water pressure data are challenging, expensive, time consuming, and difficult task. This paper evaluates the applicability of artificial neural network (ANN technique for modeling soil pore-water pressure variations at multiple soil depths from the knowledge of rainfall patterns. A multilayer perceptron neural network model was constructed using Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm for prediction of soil pore-water pressure variations. Time series records of rainfall and pore-water pressures at soil depth of 0.5 m were used to develop the ANN model. To investigate applicability of the model for prediction of spatial and temporal variations of pore-water pressure, the model was tested for the time series data of pore-water pressure at multiple soil depths (i.e., 0.5 m, 1.1 m, 1.7 m, 2.3 m, and 2.9 m. The performance of the ANN model was evaluated by root mean square error, mean absolute error, coefficient of correlation, and coefficient of efficiency. The results revealed that the ANN performed satisfactorily implying that the model can be used to examine the spatial and temporal behavior of time series of pore-water pressures with respect to multiple soil depths from knowledge of rainfall patterns and pore-water pressure with some antecedent conditions.

  5. Researches regarding a pressure pulse generator as a segment of model for a weighing in motion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardare, I.; Tiţa, I.; Pelin, R. I.

    2016-08-01

    There are many types of weighing in motion systems: with strain gauges, piezoelectric type, with optical fibre, capacitive etc. Although one of them proved to be reliable, many research teams all over the world are interested in finding new types or improving the existing ones. In this paper is presented a hydraulic Weigh-In-Motion sensor composed of a metal vessel filled with hydraulic oil connected to an accumulator through a pipe. Vehicle tires press on the deformable upper wall and pressure pulses generated in this way provides information about the load. In this paper are presented: a structure for an experimental model, the block diagram for numerical simulation, experimental model and some experimental results.

  6. Condensation of ablation plumes in the irradiation of metals by high-intensity nanosecond laser pulses at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozadaev, K V [A.N. Sevchenko Institute of Applied Physical Problems, Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2016-01-31

    The Anisimov–Luk'yanchuk model is adapted for describing the condensation of vapour-plasma plumes produced in the irradiation of metal targets by high-intensity (10{sup 8} – 10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) nanosecond (10 – 100 ns) pulses at atmospheric pressure. The resultant data suggest that the initial stages of the development of metal ablation plumes correspond with a high degree of accuracy to the Zel'dovich–Raizer theory of dynamic condensation; however, at the stage of the ablation plume decay, the liquid-droplet phase is formed primarily by coalescence of 'nuclei'. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  7. Consumer perception of the use of high-pressure processing and pulsed electric field technologies in food production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Boel; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    . Participants were introduced to the HPP and PEF technologies and then to the effect of the two new technologies on two specific product categories: juice and baby food. The transcribed data was content analysed and the coded data was transformed into diagrams using UCINET 5 and NETDRAW. The results show......The success of new food processing technologies is highly dependent on consumers' acceptance. The purpose of this paper is to study consumers' perceptions of two new processing technologies and food products produced by means of these novel technologies. To accomplish this, a qualitative study...... on consumer attitudes towards high-pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing of food was carried out. In all 97 adults between 20 and 71 years of age participated in 12 focus groups conducted in Slovenia, Hungary, Serbia, Slovakia, Norway and Denmark using a common guideline...

  8. Analysis of arc pressure and its weld quality in hybrid ultra-high frequency pulse VP-GTAW process%HPVP-GTAW电弧力及焊接质量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    从保强; 齐铂金; 杨明轩; 李伟; 王乐笑; 杨舟; 李玉龙

    2013-01-01

    分别以3种不同材质铝合金平板材料为试验对象,研究分析了复合超高频脉冲方波变极性钨极氩弧焊接(HPVP-GTAW)过程中电弧力的变化及其对焊缝成形特征和接头力学性能的影响.结果表明,与常规变极性氩弧焊工艺相比,脉冲方波电流的加入使得HPVP-GTAW电弧力显著增加,同时焊缝熔透率大幅提高,接头力学性能得到明显改善和提高;保持脉冲电流幅值和占空比基本不变,在10~80 kHz范围内,脉冲电流频率对焊接过程产生了重要影响,频率为40 kHz时,HPVP-GTAW电弧力和焊缝熔透率均达到最大,分别约为常规变极性焊接电弧的1.9倍和1.7倍.%The variations of arc pressure and weld characteristics in the welding of 2219, 2A14 and 5A06 aluminum alloys were investigated based on the hybrid ultrahigh frequency pulse current variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding ( HPVP-GTAW) process. The experimental results show that compared with the conventional VP-GTAW ( variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding) process, arc pressure and weld penetration expressed by the ratio of weld depth to width are enhanced predominantly with the effect of high frequency pulse current. Mechanical properties of welded joints are improved obviously. At the given pulse current amplitude and pulse duty cycle, the welding process is influenced significantly by the pulse current frequency in the range of 10 kHz to 80 kHz. At the given pulse frequency of 40 kHz, arc pressure and weld penetration of welded joints increased by about 90% and 70% , respectively, compared with that of welded joints with no effect of pulse current.

  9. Transient radon signals driven by fluid pressure pulse, micro-crack closure, and failure during granite deformation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Frédéric; Schubnel, Alexandre; Pili, Éric

    2017-09-01

    In seismically active fault zones, various crustal fluids including gases are released at the surface. Radon-222, a radioactive gas naturally produced in rocks, is used in volcanic and tectonic contexts to illuminate crustal deformation or earthquake mechanisms. At some locations, intriguing radon signals have been recorded before, during, or after tectonic events, but such observations remain controversial, mainly because physical characterization of potential radon anomalies from the upper crust is lacking. Here we conducted several month-long deformation experiments under controlled dry upper crustal conditions with a triaxial cell to continuously monitor radon emission from crustal rocks affected by three main effects: a fluid pressure pulse, micro-crack closure, and differential stress increase to macroscopic failure. We found that these effects are systematically associated with a variety of radon signals that can be explained using a first-order advective model of radon transport. First, connection to a source of deep fluid pressure (a fluid pressure pulse) is associated with a large transient radon emission increase (factor of 3-7) compared with the background level. We reason that peak amplitude is governed by the accumulation time and the radon source term, and that peak duration is controlled by radioactive decay, permeability, and advective losses of radon. Second, increasing isostatic compression is first accompanied by an increase in radon emission followed by a decrease beyond a critical pressure representing the depth below which crack closure hampers radon emission (150-250 MPa, ca. 5.5-9.5 km depth in our experiments). Third, the increase of differential stress, and associated shear and volumetric deformation, systematically triggers significant radon peaks (ca. 25-350% above background level) before macroscopic failure, by connecting isolated cracks, which dramatically enhances permeability. The detection of transient radon signals before rupture

  10. THE EFFECTS OF PULSE BIAS VOLTAGE AND N2 PARTIAL PRESSURE ON TiAIN FILMS OF ARC ION PLATING (AIP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.S. Li; S.L. Zhu; Fuhui Wang; C. Sun; L.S. Wen

    2001-01-01

    Owing to the characteristics of arc ion plating(AIP) technique, the structure and com-position of TiAlN films can be tailored by controlling of various parameters such ascompositions of target materials, N2 partial pressure, substrate bias and so on. ln thisstudy, several titanium aluminum nitride films were deposited on 1Cr11Ni2 W2Mo Vsteel for compressor blade of areo-engine under different d.c pulse bias voltage and ni-trogen partial pressure. The effects of substrate pulse bias and nitrogen partial pressureon the deposition rate, droplet formation, microstruture and elemental component ofthe films were investigated.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure on cognitive function: the Women's Health and Aging Study II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Yasar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP and pulse pressure (PP in midlife is associated with increased risk for cognitive impairment later in life. There is mixed evidence regarding the effects of late life elevated SBP or PP on cognitive function, and limited information on the role of female gender. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Effects of SBPand PPon cognitive abilities at baseline and over a 9-year period were evaluated in 337 non-demented community-dwelling female participants over age 70 in the Women's Health and Aging Study II using logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Participants aged 76-80 years with SBP≥160 mmHg or PP≥84 mmHg showed increased incidence of impairment on Trail Making Test-Part B (TMT, Part B, a measure of executive function, over time when compared to the control group that included participants with normal and pre-hypertensive SBP (<120 and 120-139 mmHg or participants with low PP (<68 mmHg (HR = 5.05 [95%CI = 1.42, 18.04], [HR = 5.12 [95%CI = 1.11; 23.62], respectively. Participants aged 70-75 years with PP≥71 mmHg had at least a two-fold higher incidence of impairment on HVLT-I, a measure of verbal learning, over time when compared to participants with low PP (<68 mmHg (HR = 2.44 [95%CI = 1.11, 5.39]. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that elevated SBP or PP in older non-demented women increases risk for late-life cognitive impairment and that PP could be used when assessing the risk for impairment in cognitive abilities. These results warrant further, larger studies to evaluate possible effects of elevated blood pressure in normal cognitive aging.

  12. Hydromechanical Rock Mass Fatigue in Deep-Seated Landslides Accompanying Seasonal Variations in Pore Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisig, Giona; Eberhardt, Erik; Smithyman, Megan; Preh, Alexander; Bonzanigo, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The episodic movement of deep-seated landslides is often governed by the presence of high pore pressures and reduced effective stresses along active shear surfaces. Pore pressures are subject to cyclic fluctuation under seasonal variations of groundwater recharge, resulting in an intermittent movement characterized by acceleration-deceleration phases. However, it is not always clear why certain acceleration phases reach alarming levels without a clear trigger (i.e., in the absence of an exceptional pore pressure event). This paper presents a conceptual framework linking hydromechanical cycling, progressive failure and fatigue to investigate and explain the episodic behavior of deep-seated landslides using the Campo Vallemaggia landslide in Switzerland as a case study. A combination of monitoring data and advanced numerical modeling is used. The principal processes forcing the slope into a critical disequilibrium state are analyzed as a function of rock mass damage and fatigue. Modeling results suggest that during periods of slope acceleration, the rock slope experiences localized fatigue and gradual weakening through slip along pre-existing natural fractures and yield of critically stressed intact rock bridges. At certain intervals, pockets of critically weakened rock may produce a period of enhanced slope movement in response to a small pore pressure increase similar to those routinely experienced each year. Accordingly, the distribution and connectivity of pre-existing permeable planes of weakness play a central role. These structures are often related to the rock mass's tectonic history or initiate (and dilate) in response to stress changes that disturb the entire slope, such as glacial unloading or seismic loading via large earthquakes. The latter is discussed in detail in a companion paper to this (Gischig et al., Rock Mech Rock Eng, 2015). The results and framework presented further demonstrate that episodic movement and progressive failure of deep

  13. Spatiotemporal Evolution of Ar(3P2) Metastable Density Generated in a Pulsed DC Atmospheric Pressure micro-Plasma Jet Impinging on a Glass Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeli, K.; Bauville, G.; Es-Sebbar, Et-T.; Fleury, M.; Neveau, O.; Pasquiers, St.; Santos Sousa, J.; Laboratoire de Physique des gaz et des plasmas Team

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric Pressure micro-Plasma Jets (APPJs) are promising tools in various domains such as biomedical and material treatments. In this work, APPJs are produced in pure argon at variable flow rates (i.e., 200, 400 and 600 sccm), by applying high voltage positive pulses (250 ns in FWHM and 6 kV in amplitude) at a repetition frequency of 20 kHz. The generated plasma impacts an ungrounded glass plate placed at a distance of 5 mm from the tube's orifice and perpendicular to the streamers propagation. At these conditions, a diffuse discharge is established resulting in a non-filamentary and reproducible plasma, in contrast with the free-jet case (no target). This allows the quantification of the absolute density of the Ar(1s5) metastable state by using laser absorption spectroscopy to probe the transition 1s5 -> 2p9 at 811.531 nm. The experiments show the dependence on the gas flow rate and on the axial and radial positions of the maximum density (6-9x1013 cm-3) . At 200 sccm, it is obtained close to the tube's orifice, while with increasing flow rate it is displaced towards the plate. Regarding the radial variation, density maxima are obtained in a small area around the streamers propagation axis.

  14. The amplitude of pulse-synchronous oscillations varies with the level of intramuscular pressure in simulated compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andreas; Zhang, Qiuxia; Styf, Jorma

    2015-12-01

    Patients with compartment syndromes have elevated intramuscular pressure (IMP) due to increased volume in the affected muscle. However, the accuracy of IMP as a parameter in diagnosing chronic compartment syndrome has been questioned. It has been observed that arterial pulsations create oscillations in the IMP in patients with abnormally elevated IMP. The amplitude of the IMP oscillations appears to be related to a pathogenic mechanism of elevated IMP. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the relation between the amplitude of pulse-synchronous IMP oscillations and the absolute level of IMP with a high-end fiber-optic system in a human experimental model of abnormally elevated IMP (simulated compartment syndrome) of the leg. The hypothesis that the amplitude of the IMP oscillations is correlated to the absolute level of IMP was tested. IMP was measured at rest in the anterior tibial muscle in 12 legs of 7 healthy subjects (4 females and 3 males) with a mean age of 28 (range 23-38) years. The subject lay supine with his/her heel placed in a footrest. The foot was kept in a neutral position to avoid biased IMP readings. Measurements were performed at baseline and during 10 minutes with a model of abnormally elevated IMP (simulated compartment syndrome) applied. The abnormally elevated IMP was created by venous obstruction induced by a thigh tourniquet (65 mmHg) of a casted leg. Placement of the pressure-recording catheter was verified by sonography. The IMP increased from 4.7 (SD = 1.8) mmHg at baseline to 48.6 (SD = 7.1) mmHg when the model of elevated IMP was applied. The amplitude of the pulse-synchronous oscillations was undetectable at baseline. It increased to 3.9 (SD = 1.4) mmHg with increasing IMP when the model was applied. The amplitude of the oscillations showed a positive correlation (r = 0.59) with the absolute level of IMP. The amplitude of the pulse-synchronous IMP oscillations is correlated with the absolute

  15. New Assessment Model of Pulse Depth Based on Sensor Displacement in Pulse Diagnostic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Han Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate assessment of the pulse depth in pulse diagnosis is vital to determine the floating and sunken pulse qualities (PQs, which are two of the four most basic PQs. In this work, we proposed a novel model of assessing the pulse depth based on sensor displacement (SD normal to the skin surface and compared this model with two previous models which assessed the pulse depth using contact pressure (CP. In contrast to conventional stepwise CP variation tonometry, we applied a continuously evolving tonometric mechanism at a constant velocity and defined the pulse depth index as the optimal SD where the largest pulse amplitude was observed. By calculating the pulse depth index for 18 volunteers, we showed that the pulse was deepest at Cheok (significance level: P<0.01, while no significant difference was found between Chon and Gwan. In contrast, the two CP-based models estimated that the pulse was shallowest at Gwan (P<0.05. For the repeated measures, the new SD-based model showed a smaller coefficient of variation (CV≈7.6% than the two CP-based models (CV≈13.5% and 12.3%, resp.. The SD-based pulse depth assessment is not sensitive to the complex geometry around the palpation locations and temperature variation of contact sensors, which allows cost-effective sensor technology.

  16. Radiation pressure of light pulses and conservation of linear momentum in dispersive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalora, Michael; D'Aguanno, Giuseppe; Mattiucci, Nadia; Bloemer, Mark J; Centini, Marco; Sibilia, Concita; Haus, Joseph W

    2006-05-01

    We derive an expression for the Minkowski momentum under conditions of dispersive susceptibility and permeability, and compare it to the Abraham momentum in order to test the principle of conservation of linear momentum when matter is present. We investigate cases when an incident pulse interacts with a variety of structures, including thick substrates, resonant, free-standing, micron-sized multilayer stacks, and negative index materials. In general, we find that for media only a few wavelengths thick the Minkowski and Abraham momentum densities yield similar results. For more extended media, including substrates and Bragg mirrors embedded inside thick dielectric substrates, our calculations show dramatic differences between the Minkowski and Abraham momenta. Without exception, in all cases investigated the instantaneous Lorentz force exerted on the medium is consistent only with the rate of change of the Abraham momentum. As a practical example, we use our model to predict that electromagnetic momentum and energy buildup inside a multilayer stack can lead to widely tunable accelerations that may easily reach and exceed 10(10) m/s(2) for a mass of 10(-5) g. Our results suggest that the physics of the photonic band edge and other similar finite structures may be used as a testing ground for basic electromagnetic phenomena such as momentum transfer to macroscopic media.

  17. Pulse Pressure magnifies the effect of COMTVal158Met on 15 Year Episodic Memory Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninni ePersson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether a physiological marker of cardiovascular health, pulse pres­sure (PP, and age magnified the effect of the functional COMT Val158Met (rs4680 pol­ymor­phism on 15-year cognitive trajectories (episodic memory [EM], visuospatial ability, and se­man­tic memory using data from 1585 non-demented adults from the Betula study. A mul­tiple-group growth model was specified to gauge individual differences in change. The allelic variants showed negligible differences across the cognitive markers in average trends. The older portion of the sample selectively age-magnified the effects of Val158Met on EM changes, resulting in greater decline in Val compared to homozygote Met carriers. This effect was attenuated by sta­tistical control for PP. Further, PP mod­erated the effects of COMT on 15-year EM trajectories, resulting in greater decline in Val carriers, even after accounting for the confounding effects of sex, education, cardiovascular diseases (dia­betes, stroke, and hypertension, and chronological age, controlled for practice gains. The effect was still present after excluding individuals with a history of cardiovascular diseases. The effects of cognitive change were not moderated by any other covariates. This report underscores the importance of addressing synergistic effects in nor­mal cognitive aging, as the addition thereof may even place healthy individuals at greater risk for memory decline.

  18. CO2 Exsolution from CO2 Saturated Water: Core-Scale Experiments and Focus on Impacts of Pressure Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruina; Li, Rong; Ma, Jin; Jiang, Peixue

    2015-12-15

    For CO2 sequestration and utilization in the shallow reservoirs, reservoir pressure changes are due to the injection rate changing, a leakage event, and brine withdrawal for reservoir pressure balance. The amounts of exsolved CO2 which are influenced by the pressure reduction and the subsequent secondary imbibition process have a significant effect on the stability and capacity of CO2 sequestration and utilization. In this study, exsolution behavior of the CO2 has been studied experimentally using a core flooding system in combination with NMR/MRI equipment. Three series of pressure variation profiles, including depletion followed by imbibitions without or with repressurization and repetitive depletion and repressurization/imbibition cycles, were designed to investigate the exsolution responses for these complex pressure variation profiles. We found that the exsolved CO2 phase preferentially occupies the larger pores and exhibits a uniform spatial distribution. The mobility of CO2 is low during the imbibition process, and the residual trapping ratio is extraordinarily high. During the cyclic pressure variation process, the first cycle has the largest contribution to the amount of exsolved CO2. The low CO2 mobility implies a certain degree of self-sealing during a possible reservoir depletion.

  19. Pressure and temperature variation of octahedral Na and tetrahedral Al in amphiboles in metamafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D. M.; Lei, J.

    2013-12-01

    The sodium content in the M4 site of amphibole (BNa) was calibrated by Brown (1977, J Petrol, 18, 53-72) in a study that continues to be highly cited to this day. This study, based on empirical observations of amphibole compositional changes in the presence of the buffering assemblage plagioclase, chlorite, epidote, iron oxide, and water, demonstrated a systematic variation in the BNa and tetrahedral Al (TAl) content with pressure. Recent experimental work in this lab aimed at defining the extent of miscibility along the tremolite-glaucophane and hornblende-glaucophane joins in the Na2O-CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O system has provided some additional information on the cation mixing along these joins. These joins also serve as the chemically-simplified framework of the BNa versus TAl correlation reported by Brown (1977). There are now sufficient, though still a bare minimum, of experimentally-confirmed mixing data for sodium-rich amphiboles to test this correlation and for quantifying the pressure-temperature (P-T) dependence of amphibole compositions in metamafic rocks relevant to subduction zones. From experimental results obtained over the range of 500-800°C, 1.5-2.0 GPa, and using a variety of amphibole synthesis and re-equilibration methods, the following set of asymmetric formalism (ASF) macroscopic interaction and mixing parameters have been derived that can be used with THERMOCALC dataset 55: Wtrgl = 70 kJ, Wglts = Wtrts =20 kJ, α(tr) = 1.0, α(ts) = 1.2, and α(gl) = 0.52. Using a fixed MORB bulk composition, the composition of amphiboles within the P-T stability field of the buffering assemblage were calculated for the above chemical system with FeO added (i.e., NCFMASH) over the range of 0.2 - 2.0 GPa and 400 - 700°C. The following main observations can be made. First, the empirical amphibole compositions at low TAl and high BNa contents are well modeled by the miscibility gap in the amphibole ternary sub-system tremolite

  20. Analysis of Self-Terminated Pressure-Driven Quantum Point Contacts with Ultrafast Optical Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Fatemeh; Wlasenko, Alex; Steeves, Geoff

    2009-05-01

    A self-terminated electrochemical method was used to fabricate atomic-scale contacts between two Au electrodes in a microfluidic channel. The conductance of the contacts varies in a stepwise fashion. The mechanism works by a pressure-driven flow parallel with a pair of Au electrodes with a 100 μm gap in an electrolyte of HCl. Without applied flow, dendrite growth and dense branching morphology were typically observed at the cathode. The addition of applied pressure-driven flow resulted in a densely packed gold structure that filled the channel. The electrochemical fabrication approach introduces large variance in the formation and location of individual junctions. Understanding and controlling this process will enable the precise positioning of reproducible geometries into nano-electronic devices. To investigate the high speed behaviour of a QPC, it can be integrated with a transmission line structure patterned on a photoconductive GaAs substrate. The nonlinear conductance of the QPC (due to the finite density of states of the conductors) can be examined and compared with recent theoretical studies. Samples are fabricated in situ using an electrochemical procedure to produce QPCs along the transmission line structure. This method may provide insight into Terahertz Optoelectronic devices and ultrafast communication systems.

  1. Acute effects of supramaximal exercise on carotid artery compliance and pulse pressure in young men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Lindy; Fahs, Christopher A; Guerra, Myriam; Jae, Sae Young; Heffernan, Kevin S; Fernhall, Bo

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cumulative effects of repeated cycling sprints (Wingate tests) on carotid compliance and blood pressure (BP). Fourteen young, healthy men and women completed this study. Vascular and hemodynamic measurements were taken at rest, 5 min following a first Wingate test, 25 min following the first Wingate test, 5 min following a second Wingate test, and 25 min following the second Wingate test. At each time point, the measurements taken included brachial and carotid pulse pressure (PP), heart rate, carotid artery maximum and minimum diameters, and carotid compliance. Carotid BP was obtained with applanation tonometry. Carotid diameters were obtained using ultrasonography and compliance was calculated from carotid diameters and BP. Carotid and brachial PP increased significantly (P sprint, carotid arterial compliance decreased significantly more than 5 min following the first sprint (P sprint reduces carotid artery compliance immediately after exercise. Performance of a second identical cycling sprint further compounds this vascular change, reducing carotid artery compliance beyond levels seen following a single cycling sprint.

  2. 轴承保持架低压脉冲真空氮碳共渗工艺%Low Pressure Pulse Vacuum Nitrocarburizing Process for Bearing Cages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斌; 张文朝; 郭长健

    2012-01-01

    The low pressure pulse vacuum nitrocarburizing process principles of bearing cages are analyzed, the orthogonal experiments are carried out about the influence of pulse process parameters on white layer depth and surface hardness , such as pulse amplitude, pressure holding time and total pulse time. The influence tends of pulse process parameters on white layer depth and surface hardness are studied through the methods of range analysis in orthogonal experiment , and the optimum pulse process parameters under the given test conditions are presented.%分析轴承保持架低压脉冲真空氮碳共渗工艺原理,对影响保持架表面白亮层深度和表面硬度的脉冲工艺参数:脉冲幅度、保压时间及总脉冲时间进行了正交试验.应用正交试验极差分析法分析了脉冲工艺参数与白亮层深度和表面硬度的影响趋势,最终确定出给定试验条件下的最佳脉冲工艺参数.

  3. Effects of genetic variation in H3K79 methylation regulatory genes on clinical blood pressure and blood pressure response to hydrochlorothiazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Julio D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nearly one-third of the United States adult population suffers from hypertension. Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, one of the most commonly used medications to treat hypertension, has variable efficacy. The renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC provides a mechanism for fine-tuning sodium excretion, and is a major regulator of blood pressure homeostasis. DOT1L, MLLT3, SIRT1, and SGK1 encode genes in a pathway that controls methylation of the histone H3 globular domain at lysine 79 (H3K79, thereby modulating expression of the ENaCα subunit. This study aimed to determine the role of variation in these regulatory genes on blood pressure response to HCTZ, and secondarily, untreated blood pressure. Methods We investigated associations between genetic variations in this candidate pathway and HCTZ blood pressure response in two separate hypertensive cohorts (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00246519 and NCT00005520. In a secondary, exploratory analysis, we measured associations between these same genetic variations and untreated blood pressure. Associations were measured by linear regression, with only associations with P ≤ 0.01 in one cohort and replication by P ≤ 0.05 in the other cohort considered significant. Results In one cohort, a polymorphism in DOT1L (rs2269879 was strongly associated with greater systolic (P = 0.0002 and diastolic (P = 0.0016 blood pressure response to hydrochlorothiazide in Caucasians. However, this association was not replicated in the other cohort. When untreated blood pressure levels were analyzed, we found directionally similar associations between a polymorphism in MLLT3 (rs12350051 and greater untreated systolic (P P Conclusions Our data suggest polymorphisms in DOT1L, MLLT3, SIRT1, and SGK1 are not likely associated with blood pressure response to HCTZ. However, a possibility exists that rs2269879 in DOT1L could be associated with HCTZ response in Caucasians. Additionally, exploratory analyses suggest rs

  4. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  5. The face of appearance-related social pressure: gender, age and body mass variations in peer and parental pressure during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfert, Susanne; Warschburger, Petra

    2013-05-17

    Appearance-related social pressure plays an important role in the development of a negative body image and self-esteem as well as severe mental disorders during adolescence (e.g. eating disorders, depression). Identifying who is particularly affected by social pressure can improve targeted prevention and intervention, but findings have either been lacking or controversial. Thus the aim of this study is to provide a detailed picture of gender, weight, and age-related variations in the perception of appearance-related social pressure by peers and parents. 1112 German students between grades 7 and 9 (mean age: M = 13.38, SD = .81) filled in the Appearance-Related Social Pressure Questionnaire (German: FASD), which considers different sources (peers, parents) as well as various kinds of social pressure (e.g. teasing, modeling, encouragement). Girls were more affected by peer pressure, while gender differences in parental pressure seemed negligible. Main effects of grade-level suggested a particular increase in indirect peer pressure (e.g. appearance-related school and class norms) from early to middle adolescence. Boys and girls with higher BMI were particularly affected by peer teasing and exclusion as well as by parental encouragement to control weight and shape. The results suggest that preventive efforts targeting body concerns and disordered eating should bring up the topic of appearance pressure in a school-based context and should strengthen those adolescents who are particularly at risk - in our study, girls and adolescents with higher weight status. Early adolescence and school transition appear to be crucial periods for these efforts. Moreover, the comprehensive assessment of appearance-related social pressure appears to be a fruitful way to further explore social risk-factors in the development of a negative body image.

  6. Genetic Variation in the Natriuretic Peptide System, Circulating Natriuretic Peptide Levels, and Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jørgen L; Nielsen, Søren J; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundIn a large collaborative study (n > 50,000), common variants in the natriuretic peptide (NP) genes were found to be associated with circulating NP levels and also with blood pressure (BP) levels based on office BP measurements (OBPMs). It is unknown if determining an individual's BP by ...... evidence that the NP system plays an important role in BP regulation.American Journal of Hypertension 2012; doi:10.1038/ajh.2012.96.......-h ambulatory BP measurements (ABPMs) will influence the effect of NP gene variations on BP levels.MethodsWe used rs632793 at the NPPB (NP precursor B) locus to investigate the relationship between genetically determined serum N-terminal pro-brain NP (NT-proBNP) concentrations and BP levels......). Office BP decreased across the genotypes from A:A to G:G, but the differences did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.12).ConclusionsThis study suggests that 24-h ABPMs is a better method than OBPMs to detect significant differences in BP levels related to genetic variance and provides further...

  7. Flow Mediated Dilatation, Carotid Intima Media Thickness, Ankle Brachial Pressure Index and Pulse Pressure in Young Male Post Myocardial Infarction Patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Giri, Subhash; Rathi, Vinita; Ranga, Gajender Singh

    2016-10-01

    Due to increase in Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) at a younger age, we should try to diagnose atherosclerotic process and population at risk, at the earliest. Flow Mediated Dilatation (FMD), Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (CIMT) and Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index (ABI) are probable markers for early atherosclerosis and may be useful in coronary risk stratification. To compare and correlate the FMD, CIMT, ABI and Pulse Pressure (PP) in young male patients of Myocardial Infarction (MI) with age and sex matched healthy controls. Eighty male patients of MI aged ≤45 years, who presented to the Cardiac Care Unit and Department of Medicine of Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital, Delhi, India, from November 2010 to April 2012 were recruited consecutively for this case control study and same number of age and sex matched healthy controls were also analyzed. Six weeks after MI, FMD of the brachial artery, intima media thickness of carotid artery, ABPI and PP were measured in the cases and compared with healthy controls. The FMD was lower among young patients of MI than controls (p<0.001). CIMT was higher among cases than controls (p=0.001). ABI was lower among cases than controls (p<0.001). Compared to controls, PP was higher among cases (p=0.001). In all subjects, a negative correlation between FMD and CIMT (r=-0.220, p=0.005) and a positive correlation between FMD and ABPI (r=0.304, p<0.001) was found. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between endothelial dependent FMD and PP among cases and control groups (r=-0.209, p=0.007). Biophysical parameters were deranged in young post MI patients. Majority of our young male patients fell in low risk Framingham risk score but still they manifested with CAD. Despite six weeks of treatment among young male patients of MI, various biophysical parameters were still deranged.

  8. Comparing equivalent thermal, high pressure and pulsed electric field processes for mild pasteurization of orange juice. Part I: Impact on overall quality attributes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, R.A.H.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Knol, J.J.; Quataert, M.C.J.; Vervoort, L.; Plancken, van der I.; Hendrickx, M.E.; Matser, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Mild heat pasteurization, high pressure processing (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing of freshly squeezed orange juice were comparatively evaluated examining their impact on microbial load and quality parameters immediately after processing and during two months of storage. Microbial co

  9. Comparing equivalent thermal, high pressure and pulsed electric field processes for mild pasteurization of orange juice: Part II: Impact on specific chemical and biochemical quality parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, L.; Plancken, van der I.; Grauwet, T.; Timmermans, R.A.H.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.E.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of thermal, high pressure (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing for mild pasteurization of orange juice was compared on a fair basis, using processing conditions leading to an equivalent degree of microbial inactivation. Examining the effect on specific chemical and biochemical

  10. On the motion of dayside auroras caused by a solar wind pressure pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kozlovsky

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Global ultraviolet auroral images from the IMAGE satellite were used to investigate the dynamics of the dayside auroral oval responding to a sudden impulse (SI in the solar wind pressure. At the same time, the TV all-sky camera and the EISCAT radar on Svalbard (in the pre-noon sector allowed for detailed investigation of the auroral forms and the ionospheric plasma flow. After the SI, new discrete auroral forms appeared in the poleward part of the auroral oval so that the middle of the dayside oval moved poleward from about 70° to about 73° of the AACGM latitude. This poleward shift first occurred in the 15 MLT sector, then similar shifts were observed in the MLT sectors located more westerly, and eventually the shift was seen in the 6 MLT sector. Thus, the auroral disturbance "propagated" westward (from 15 MLT to 6 MLT at an apparent speed of the order of 7km/s. This motion of the middle of the auroral oval was caused by the redistribution of the luminosity within the oval and was not associated with the corresponding motion of the poleward boundary of the oval. The SI was followed by an increase in the northward plasma convection velocity. Individual auroral forms showed poleward progressions with velocities close to the velocity of the northward plasma convection. The observations indicate firstly a pressure disturbance propagation through the magnetosphere at a velocity of the order of 200km/s which is essentially slower than the velocity of the fast Alfvén (magnetosonic wave, and secondly a potential (curl-free electric field generation behind the front of the propagating disturbance, causing the motion of the auroras. We suggest a physical explanation for the slow propagation of the disturbance through the magnetosphere and a model for the electric field generation. Predictions of the model are supported by the global convection maps produced by the SuperDARN HF radars. Finally, the interchange instability and the eigenmode toroidal

  11. Hydrophobic treatment on polymethylmethacrylate surface by nanosecond-pulse DBDs in CF{sub 4} at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Cheng [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhou, Yang [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shao, Tao, E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xie, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Baoding 071003 (China); Xu, Jiayu [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Wenjin [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Increase in hydrophobicity on PMMA is achieved after the DBD treatment in CF{sub 4}, and the water contact angle can increase from 68° to 100° after treatment. • Nanosecond-pulse DBD is used for the surface treatment and the power density is about 114.8 mW/cm{sup 2}. • The effects of applied voltage, CF{sub 4} flow, and time on plasma treatment are investigated. • Plasma treatment causes morphological change, significantly increases the roughness of the surface, and introduces fluorine-containing groups into the polymethylmethacrylate surface. • Hydrophobic behavior of the treated PMMA surface is slightly affected by the aging effect. - Abstract: Nanosecond-pulse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can provide non-thermal plasmas with extremely high energy and high density, which can result in a series of complicated physical and chemical reactions in the surface treatment of polymers. Therefore, in this paper, hydrophobic treatment of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) surface is conducted by nanosecond-pulse DBD in carbon tetrafluoride (CF{sub 4}) at atmospheric pressure. Investigations on surface morphology and chemical composition before and after the DBD treatment in CF{sub 4} are conducted with the contact angle measurement, atomic force microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer. The effects of the applied voltage, CF{sub 4} flow rate, and treatment time on the hydrophobic modification are studied. Results show that the contact angles of the treated PMMA surface increases with the applied voltage, and it could be greatly affected by the CF{sub 4} flow rate and the treatment time. The water contact angle can increase from 68° to 100° after the treatment. Furthermore, both surface morphology and chemical composition of the PMMA samples are changed. Both the increase of the surface roughness and the occurrence of fluorine-containing functional groups on the PMMA surface treated by DBD in CF

  12. Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    Suggestions for studying the topic of variation of individuals and objects (balls) to help develop elementary school students' measurement, comparison, classification, evaluation, and data collection and recording skills are made. General suggestions of variables that can be investigated are made for the study of human variation. Twelve specific…

  13. Grain-scale pressure variations recorded in orthopyroxene from the diamond grade ultra-high pressure Svartberget peridotite body, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.

    2014-05-01

    The ultra-high pressure (UHP) area in the Western Gneiss Region (WGR) in Norway is recognized as a giant UHP domain that resulted from the collision of Baltica and Laurentia during the Caledonian Orogeny. Recent geochronological data suggest the WGR resided at UHP for several tens of millions of years and slowly exhumed near- isothermally to amphibolite facies conditions. The Svartberget peridotite body is located in the north-westernmost part of the UHP area of the WGR. The rocks record diamond grade peak metamorphism at ~800 ° C in crosscutting pyroxenite veins as evidenced by micro-diamond inclusions in Caledonian metamorphic garnet. The peridotite body preserves primary spinel-garnet-peridotite assemblages stable at much lower pressure (~2.0 GPa at ~800 ° C). Orthopyroxene typically shows bowl-shaped aluminium (Al) zoning and conventional geothermobarometry using core compositions of garnet-opx mineral pairs yields P-T estimates of 5.5 GPa at ~800 ° C. Besides Al increasing toward the rims of orthopyroxene grains, concentrations also increase in cracks and veins crosscutting the mineral. Here, recently developed unconventional geobarometry and Gibbs minimization methods are used to derive the grain-scale pressure variations corresponding to the observed Al-zoning. The methods independently result in pressure variations from core to rim on the order of 2.0 GPa. Interestingly, low-Al cores correspond to low pressures whereas high-Al rims correspond to high pressures, opposite to conventional geothermobarometry results. However, the new estimates are in agreement with the consideration that at high pressure the high density phases become more stable. In a binary orthopyroxene in the MAS-system, the Mg-Tschermak endmember thought to be the dominant Al-species in the mineral has a higher density then the Al-free enstatite endmember. Therefore at higher pressure the Mg-Tschermak endmember in orthopyroxene is favoured over the enstatite endmember. This is similar

  14. A novel pressure variation study on electronic structure, mechanical stability and thermodynamic properties of potassium based fluoroperovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erum, Nazia; Azhar Iqbal, Muhammad

    2017-09-01

    The effect of pressure variation on stability, structural parameters, elastic constants, mechanical, electronic and thermodynamic properties of cubic SrKF3 fluoroperovskite have been investigated by using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method combined with Quasi-harmonic Debye model in which the phonon effects are considered. The calculated lattice parameters show a prominent decrease in lattice constant and bonds length with the increase in pressure. The application of pressure from 0 to 25 GPa reveals a predominant characteristic associated with widening of bandgap with GGA and GGA plus Tran–Blaha modified Becke–Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential. The influence of pressure on elastic constants and their related mechanical parameters have been discussed in detail. Apart of linear dependence of elastic coefficients, transition from brittle to ductile behavior is also observed at elevated pressure ranges. We have successfully computed variation of lattice constant, volume expansion, bulk modulus, Debye temperature and specific heat capacities at pressure and temperature in the range of 0–25 GPa and 0–600 K.

  15. Widespread sequence variations in VAMP1 across vertebrates suggest a potential selective pressure from botulinum neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lisheng; Adler, Michael; Demogines, Ann; Borrell, Andrew; Liu, Huisheng; Tao, Liang; Tepp, William H; Zhang, Su-Chun; Johnson, Eric A; Sawyer, Sara L; Dong, Min

    2014-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A-G), the most potent toxins known, act by cleaving three SNARE proteins required for synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Previous studies on BoNTs have generally utilized the major SNARE homologues expressed in brain (VAMP2, syntaxin 1, and SNAP-25). However, BoNTs target peripheral motor neurons and cause death by paralyzing respiratory muscles such as the diaphragm. Here we report that VAMP1, but not VAMP2, is the SNARE homologue predominantly expressed in adult rodent diaphragm motor nerve terminals and in differentiated human motor neurons. In contrast to the highly conserved VAMP2, BoNT-resistant variations in VAMP1 are widespread across vertebrates. In particular, we identified a polymorphism at position 48 of VAMP1 in rats, which renders VAMP1 either resistant (I48) or sensitive (M48) to BoNT/D. Taking advantage of this finding, we showed that rat diaphragms with I48 in VAMP1 are insensitive to BoNT/D compared to rat diaphragms with M48 in VAMP1. This unique intra-species comparison establishes VAMP1 as a physiological toxin target in diaphragm motor nerve terminals, and demonstrates that the resistance of VAMP1 to BoNTs can underlie the insensitivity of a species to members of BoNTs. Consistently, human VAMP1 contains I48, which may explain why humans are insensitive to BoNT/D. Finally, we report that residue 48 of VAMP1 varies frequently between M and I across seventeen closely related primate species, suggesting a potential selective pressure from members of BoNTs for resistance in vertebrates.

  16. Lake-level variations and tides in Lago Argentino, Patagonia: insights from pressure tide gauge records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Richter

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on precise pressure tide gauge observations lake-level records are derived for two sites in Lago Argentino, southern Patagonia, of 2.5 and 1 years of duration. Applying the tools of time series analysis, the principal processes affecting the lake level are identified and quantified. Lake-level changes reflecting variations in lake volume are dominated by a seasonal cycle of 1.2 m in amplitude. Lake-volume changes occur in addition with a daily period in response to melt water influx from surrounding glaciers. Sporadic lake-volume jumps are caused by bursting of the ice dam of Perito Moreno glacier. Water movements in Lago Argentino are dominated by surface seiches reaching 20 cm in amplitude. Lake tides reach a maximum amplitude of 3 mm. The comparison of the tidal signal extracted from the lake-level observations with a model composed of the contributions of body tide and ocean tidal loading indicates a phase shift of 23° which is most likely explained by an 1 hour phase lag of global ocean tide models in the region of the highly fragmented Pacific coast. The comparison of the obtained results with those of a previous study of Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego, allows to relate differences in the hydrological and hydrodynamic processes between both lakes to morphological properties. This leads to a tentative prediction of the lake-level variability to be expected from other great Patagonian lakes. The presented geodetic results shall serve as a starting point for a detailed limnological investigation of these aquatic ecosystems.

  17. The relationship of pulse pressure and left ventricular funcion in hypertension patients%高血压患者脉压差与左心功能的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文; 王浩; 刘志发

    2003-01-01

    AIM:Discuss the relationship of pulse pressure and left ventricular function in hypertensive patients.METHODS:We observed the relationship of the pulse pressure and the times of again occurred coronary artery diseases, left ventricular fore and after span, left ventricular back wall thickness and left ventricular ejection fraction(EF) by color Doppler ultrasound in hypertensive patients. RESULTS:The times of again occurred coronary artery diseases, the left ventricular fore and after span and left ventricular EF of each pulse pressure group were significantly difference(P< 0.05, P< 0.01). CONCLUSION:The pulse pressure may take part in the further impair of left ventricular function coronary artery diseases.Control the pulse pressure coronary artery diseases have an important meaning in decreasing the further impair of left ventricular function.

  18. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index and 24-hour ambulatory pulse pressure as predictors of mortality in Ohasama, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuya, Masahiro; Staessen, Jan A; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Thijs, Lutgarde; Metoki, Hirohito; Asayama, Kei; Obara, Taku; Inoue, Ryusuke; Li, Yan; Dolan, Eamon; Hoshi, Haruhisa; Hashimoto, Junichiro; Totsune, Kazuhito; Satoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Ji-Guang; O'Brien, Eoin; Imai, Yutaka

    2007-04-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and pulse pressure (PP) are indexes of arterial stiffness and can be computed from 24-hour blood pressure recordings. We investigated the prognostic value of AASI and PP in relation to fatal outcomes. In 1542 Ohasama residents (baseline age, 40 to 93 years; 63.4% women), we applied Cox regression to relate mortality to AASI and PP while adjusting for sex, age, BMI, 24-hour MAP, smoking and drinking habits, diabetes mellitus, and a history of cardiovascular disease. During 13.3 years (median), 126 cardiovascular and 63 stroke deaths occurred. The sex- and age-standardized incidence rates of cardiovascular and stroke mortality across quartiles were U-shaped for AASI and J-shaped for PP. Across quartiles, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for cardiovascular and stroke death significantly deviated from those in the whole population in a U-shaped fashion for AASI, whereas for PP, none of the HRs departed from the overall risk. The hazard ratios for cardiovascular mortality across ascending AASI quartiles were 1.40 (P=0.04), 0.82 (P=0.25), 0.64 (P=0.01), and 1.35 (P=0.03). Additional adjustment of AASI for PP and sensitivity analyses by sex, excluding patients on antihypertensive treatment or with a history of cardiovascular disease, or censoring deaths occurring within 2 years of enrollment, produced confirmatory results. In a Japanese population, AASI predicted cardiovascular and stroke mortality over and beyond PP and other risk factors, whereas in adjusted analyses, PP did not carry any prognostic information.

  19. Dry Electrodes for ECG and Pulse Transit Time for Blood Pressure: A Wearable Sensor and Smartphone Communication Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyamkumar, Prashanth

    -invasive, cuff-less Blood pressure estimation based on Pulse Transit Time with multiple synchronized sensor nodes, is implemented with e-nanoflex and the results are discussed.

  20. Consumer perception of the use of high-pressure processing and pulsed electric field technologies in food production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henriette Boel; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Grunert, Klaus G; Banati, Diana; Pollák-Tóth, Annamária; Lakner, Zoltán; Olsen, Nina Veflen; Zontar, Tanja Pajk; Peterman, Marjana

    2009-02-01

    The success of new food processing technologies is highly dependent on consumers' acceptance. The purpose of this paper is to study consumers' perceptions of two new processing technologies and food products produced by means of these novel technologies. To accomplish this, a qualitative study on consumer attitudes towards high-pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing of food was carried out. In all 97 adults between 20 and 71 years of age participated in 12 focus groups conducted in Slovenia, Hungary, Serbia, Slovakia, Norway and Denmark using a common guideline. Participants were introduced to the HPP and PEF technologies and then to the effect of the two new technologies on two specific product categories: juice and baby food. The transcribed data was content analysed and the coded data was transformed into diagrams using UCINET 5 and NETDRAW. The results show that consumers perceived the main advantages of HPP and PEF products to be the products' naturalness, improved taste and their high nutritional value, whereas the main disadvantage was the lack of information about the PEF and HPP products. The results of the participants' evaluation of the PEF and HPP processes showed that environmental friendliness and the more natural products were seen as the main advantages, while they were concerned about body and health, the higher price of the products, the lack of information about the technologies and a general scepticism. The study also shows that North European participants were a bit more sceptical towards PEF and HPP products than the East European participants.

  1. Influence of Pulse Pressure on the State of Biopolymers and the Probability of Hydrolysis of Starch in Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Pavlova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Damage of seeds which leads to destruction of the crystal lattice and the phase transition of polymers is formed under the pulse pressure (PP treatment. Biopolymers such as starch compressed under specific conditions can be changed from crystalline to a glassy state; this transition is known to extend the life of seeds. The aging of seeds is involved in the enzymatic glycosylation of proteins and nucleic acids. Reducing sugars which have been produced in seeds by non-enzymatic hydrolysis enter into reaction of glycosylation with proteins and amino acids actively. The authors studied the water absorption by seeds of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench., cultivar Saulyk treated by PP. The values of PP which were used to treat had an influence on water absorption during the first hours of imbibition. When water content was 60%, hydrolysis of reserve substances could begin, so water potential was created by osmotically active molecules. Gibbs energy calculation by method of groups’ contribution indicated the reduction in probability of starch hydrolysis in plant seeds during transition from the crystalline to the glassy state.

  2. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  3. Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briestenský Miloš

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The EU-TecNet monitoring network uses customized three-dimensional extensometers to record transient deformations across individual faults. This paper presents the first results from two newly established monitoring points in the Balkan Mountains in Bulgaria. The data from Saeva Dupka, recorded across an EEN-WWS striking fault, show sinistral strike-slip along the fault and subsidence of the southern block. Much of the subsidence occurred around the time of the distal MW = 5.6 Pernik Earthquake. An important transient deformation event, which began in autumn 2012, was reflected by significant compression and following extension, across the monitored fault. The data from Bacho Kiro, recorded across a NE–SW striking fault, show sinistral strike-slip along the fault and subsidence of the north-western block. The same important deformation event was reflected by changes in the strike-slip, dip-slip, and horizontal opening/closing trends. These results have been compared to data from other monitoring points in the Western Carpathians, External Dinarides, and Tian Shan. Many of the sites show evidence of simultaneous displacement anomalies and this observation is interpreted as a reflection of the plate-wide propagation of a tectonic pressure pulse towards the end of 2012.

  4. Influence of pulsed nanosecond volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air on the electrical characteristics of MCT epitaxial films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, Denis V.; Voitsekhovskii, Alexandr V.; Lozovoy, Kirill A.; Nesmelov, Sergey N.; Dzyadukh, Stanislav M.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shulepov, Michail A.; Dvoretskii, Sergei A.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was investigating the effect of volume nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure on the electro-physical properties of the HgCdTe (MCT) epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Hall measurements of electro-physical parameters of MCT samples after irradiation have shown that there is a layer of epitaxial films exhibiting n-type conductivity that is formed in the near-surface area. After more than 600 pulses of influence parameters and thickness of the resulting n-layer is such that the measured field dependence of Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of n-type conductivity. Also it is shown that the impact of the discharge leads to significant changes in electro-physical characteristics of MIS structures. This fact is demonstrated by increase in density of positive fixed charge, change in the hysteresis type of the capacitance-voltage characteristic, an increase in density of surface states. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies of the controlled change in the properties of MCT.

  5. Space and time structure of helium pulsed surface-wave discharges at intermediate pressures (5-50 Torr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ahmad; Valade, Fabrice; Margot, Joëlle; Vidal, François; Matte, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the ignition and development of a plasma created by pulsed surface wave discharges (PSWDs) was experimentally investigated using time-resolved imaging techniques and optical spectroscopy in helium at intermediate gas pressures between 5 and 50 Torr. We found that the ionization front moves at a few km s-1 during the ignition phase and decreases to hundreds of m s-1 after only some tens of µs. Once the plasma has reached a sufficient length, a standing wave pattern is observed in the light emission of the discharge. We attribute its formation to the reflection of the surface wave on the ionization front, which results in a pattern of nodes and antinodes. We have also determined the time and space evolution of the gas temperature. It is shown that the gas temperature increases from the room temperature value to a plateau at several hundreds of degrees over a short time (typically 100 µs). These results supports those obtained by light emission imaging and also show that the standing wave pattern does not affect the gas temperature.

  6. Luminance and efficacy improvement of low-pressure xenon pulsed fluorescent lamps by using an auxiliary external electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi; Okamoto, Masahiro; Takeda, Masashi; Motomura, Hideki

    2007-07-01

    As the environmental awareness of people becomes stronger, the demand for mercury-free light sources also becomes stronger. The authors have been keeping their interest in developing mercury-free discharge lamps, especially in low-pressure xenon as the most promising UV sources to substitute mercury. In this paper the authors report the effect of auxiliary external electrode (AEE) on the pulsed xenon fluorescent lamps. In this research two types of structures are used. One is the standard type, which has one anode and one cathode inside the lamp. The other is the double anode type, which has two anodes and one cathode inside the lamp. By using the AEE the luminance and the efficacy are improved simultaneously. The luminance is improved by about 129% for the standard structure type and 20% for the double anode type. The efficacy is improved by 60% for the standard type and by 63% for the double anode type. We call this effect/method the Jinno Motomura effect/method (JM-effect/method). Regarding the result of the xenon metastable atom distribution, measured by LIF, this effect is attributed to the plasma potential control and enlargement of the positive column by AEE.

  7. Modeling seismic stimulation: Enhanced non-aqueous fluid extraction from saturated porous media under pore-pressure pulsing at low frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Sposito, Garrison; Huang, Yu-Han

    2012-03-01

    Seismic stimulation, the application of low-frequency stress-pulsing to the boundary of a porous medium containing water and a non-aqueous fluid to enhance the removal of the latter, shows great promise for both contaminated groundwater remediation and enhanced oil recovery, but theory to elucidate the underlying mechanisms lag significantly behind the progress achieved in experimental research. We address this conceptual lacuna by formulating a boundary-value problem to describe pore-pressure pulsing at seismic frequencies that is based on the continuum theory of poroelasticity for an elastic porous medium permeated by two immiscible fluids. An exact analytical solution is presented that is applied numerically using elasticity parameters and hydraulic data relevant to recent proof-of-principle laboratory experiments investigating the stimulation-induced mobilization of trichloroethene (TCE) in water flowing through a compressed sand core. The numerical results indicated that significant stimulation-induced increases of the TCE concentration in effluent can be expected from pore-pressure pulsing in the frequency range of 25-100 Hz, which is in good agreement with what was observed in the laboratory experiments. Sensitivity analysis of our numerical results revealed that the TCE concentration in the effluent increases with the porous medium framework compressibility and the pulsing pressure. Increasing compressibility also leads to an optimal stimulation response at lower frequencies, whereas changing the pulsing pressure does not affect the optimal stimulation frequency. Within the context of our model, the dominant physical cause for enhancement of non-aqueous fluid mobility by seismic stimulation is the dilatory motion of the porous medium in which the solid and fluid phases undergo opposite displacements, resulting in stress-induced changes of the pore volume.

  8. Effect of the shape of mouth pressure variation on dynamic oscillation threshold of a clarinet model

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeot, Baptiste; Vergez, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Simple models of clarinet instruments based on iterated maps have been used in the past to successfully estimate the threshold of oscillation of this instrument as a function of a constant blowing pressure. However, when the blowing pressure gradually increases through time, the oscillations appear at a much higher value, called dynamic oscillation threshold, than what is predicted in the static case. This is known as bifurcation delay, a phenomenon studied in [1,2] for a clarinet model. In particular the dynamic oscillation threshold is predicted analytically when the blowing pressure is linearly increased. However, the mouth pressure cannot grow indefinitely. During a note attack, after an increasing phase, the musician stabilizes the mouth pressure. In the present work, the analytical prediction of the dynamic oscillation threshold is extended to a situations in which the mouth pressure approaches a steady state pressure according to an exponential time profile. The predictions still show a good agreement ...

  9. Pressure variation by a magnetohydrodynamic method at the surface of a body placed in a supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapushkina, T. A.; Erofeev, A. V.; Ponyaev, S. A.

    2014-07-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the possibility of pressure variation near the surface of a body placed in a supersonic flow as a model of an aerofoil or the nose of an aircraft by organizing a surface gas discharge in a magnetic field transverse to the flow. The flow parameters and pressure are mainly affected by the ponderomotive Lorentz force acting on the gas in the direction orthogonal to the direction of the organized discharge current and leading to the removal or compression of the gas at the surface of the body and, hence, a variation of pressure. Experimental data on the visualization of the flow and on the pressure at the surface of the body are considered for various configurations of the current and intensities of the gas discharge and magnetic field; it is demonstrated that such configurations of the current and magnetic field near the surface of the body under investigation can be organized in such a way that the pressure at the front part as well as the upper and lower surfaces of the body under investigation can be increased or decreased, thus changing the aerodynamic drag and the aerofoil lift. Such a magnetohydrodynamic control over aerodynamic parameters of the aircraft can be used during takeoff and landing as well as during steady-state flight and also during the entrance into dense atmospheric layers. This will considerably reduce the thermal load on the surface of the body in the flow.

  10. Experimental study on the pressure and pulse wave propagation in viscoelastic vessel tubes-effects of liquid viscosity and tube stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaga, Yuki; Nishi, Shohei; Komagata, Yuka; Saito, Masashi; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Asada, Takaaki; Matsukawa, Mami

    2013-11-01

    A pulse wave is the displacement wave which arises because of ejection of blood from the heart and reflection at vascular bed and distal point. The investigation of pressure waves leads to understanding the propagation characteristics of a pulse wave. To investigate the pulse wave behavior, an experimental study was performed using an artificial polymer tube and viscous liquid. A polyurethane tube and glycerin solution were used to simulate a blood vessel and blood, respectively. In the case of the 40 wt% glycerin solution, which corresponds to the viscosity of ordinary blood, the attenuation coefficient of a pressure wave in the tube decreased from 4.3 to 1.6 dB/m because of the tube stiffness (Young's modulus: 60 to 200 kPa). When the viscosity of liquid increased from approximately 4 to 10 mPa·s (the range of human blood viscosity) in the stiff tube, the attenuation coefficient of the pressure wave changed from 1.6 to 3.2 dB/m. The hardening of the blood vessel caused by aging and the increase of blood viscosity caused by illness possibly have opposite effects on the intravascular pressure wave. The effect of the viscosity of a liquid on the amplitude of a pressure wave was then considered using a phantom simulating human blood vessels. As a result, in the typical range of blood viscosity, the amplitude ratio of the waves obtained by the experiments with water and glycerin solution became 1:0.83. In comparison with clinical data, this value is much smaller than that seen from blood vessel hardening. Thus, it can be concluded that the blood viscosity seldom affects the attenuation of a pulse wave.

  11. Skin perfusion pressure measured by isotope washout in legs with arterial occlusive disease. Evaluation of different tracers, comparison to segmental systolic pressure, angiography and transcutaneous oxygen tension and variations during changes in systemic blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Trap-Jensen, J; Bagger, H

    1983-01-01

    The skin perfusion pressure (SPP) measured as the isotope washout cessation external pressure is valuable in selection of major amputation level. Five methodological investigations important to clinical use were carried out: (1) In five normal legs and 10 legs with arterial occlusive disease (AOD...... in legs with arterial occlusions at two levels or more; (4) In 47 legs with AOD, the SPP on the calf or on the thigh was compared with transcutaneously measured pO2. The two different methods correlated statistically significant, but the scatter was great; (5) During induced variations in systemic blood...... pressure in seven patients (12 legs with AOD), the segmental SPP and the segmental systolic blood pressure were found on average to vary in proportion with intra-arterial mean and systolic pressure respectively; however, this proportional relationship was not valid for the individual leg. It is concluded...

  12. Intraocular pressure variations during zygomatic fracture reduction and fixation: a clinical study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Dylan J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The reduction of midface fractures has been associated with the rare but devastating complication of blindness. An increase in intraocular pressure is important in the mechanism of blindness in this setting. In this study, the authors assessed the intraocular pressure in patients who underwent zygomatic fracture reduction (with or without fixation). METHODS: Using applanation tonometry, 29 patients underwent intraocular pressure measurements before, during, and after fracture fixation. The contralateral pressures were measured and used as the control. RESULTS: There were 29 patients with a mean age of 35 years, and the mean time to surgery was 5 days. Preoperatively, all patients had normal intraocular pressures and normal visual acuity. All patients underwent a Gillies lift and 18 patients required open reduction and fixation of the frontozygomatic suture (n = 4) or the infraorbital margin (n = 2), and the remainder (n = 12) required fixation of both points. There was no statistically significant increase in the intraocular pressures following the reduction of uncomplicated zygomatic fractures. Statistically significant pressure reductions were noted immediately after reduction and fixation. CONCLUSIONS: The surgical reduction of uncomplicated zygomatic fractures has no adverse effect on the intraocular pressure. It is the authors\\' opinion that adjunctive measures to reduce the pressures are unnecessary.

  13. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Dannoura, M.; Bakker, M. R.; Zeller, B.; Bazot, S.; Bosc, A.; Plain, C.; Lata, J. C.; Priault, P.; Barthes, L.; Loustau, D.

    2011-05-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine) was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C) of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6-2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season), and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer) that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the patterns of carbon

  14. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barthes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6–2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season, and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the

  15. Pressure variation of the valence band width in Ge: A self-consistent GW study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modak, Paritosh; Svane, Axel; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2009-01-01

    . In the present work we report results of quasiparticle self-consistent GW  (QSGW) band calculations for diamond- as well as β-tin-type Ge under pressure. For both phases we find that the band width increases with pressure. For β-tin Ge this agrees with experiment and density-functional theory, but for diamond Ge...

  16. Nocturnal variations in peripheral blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Christensen, H

    1991-01-01

    was associated with a 30-40% increase in blood flow rate and a highly significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (P less than 0.001 for all). Approximately 100 min after the subjects went to sleep an additional blood flow rate increment (mean 56%) and a simultaneous significant decrease......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit...... were used for measurement of blood flow rates. An automatic portable blood pressure recorder and processor unit was used for measurement of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate every 15 min. The change from upright to supine position at the beginning of the night period...

  17. STUDY ON VARIATION OF SETTING AND STOPPING PRESSURES OF SAFETY VALVE WITH STRUCTURAL MODIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of pressure control with the structural change of a safety valve is investigated. Safety valve is commonly used as safety devices for numerous applications which include boilers,ships,industrial plants,and piping.Setting and stopping pressures of a safety valve,pset and psto,are traditionally adjusted with a fine tuning of seat ring and valve ring heights, hsr and hvr. However, it is not easy to achieve the proper setting and stopping pressures of a safety valve in practice. The depth of inside and outside grooves in a valve, di and do are modified and their effects on setting and stopping pressures of a safety vlave are tested. The most appropriate values appear 1.0 mm in di and 0.5~1.0 mm in do,respectively. The valve ring height, hvr,shows that the best results can be achieved at 2.3 mm for setting pressures of 0.1~0.4 MPa and 1.0 mm for setting pressures of 0.5~1.0 MPa. The stopping pressures increases with the increase of seat ring height,hsr, upto certain hsr value and then becomes independent to the seat ring height. This implies that there exists the optimum hsr,which provides the largest flow rate and the proper stopping pressure. Stopping pressures of a safety valve are adjusted with the seat ring and valve ring heights. This study,however,demonstrated that the modification of value grooves also changes setting and stopping pressures of a safety valve.Therefore,the proper selection in dimensions of the inside and outside grooves should be considered for the safety valve design.

  18. Amlodipine+benazepril is superior to hydrochlorothiazide+benazepril irrespective of baseline pulse pressure: subanalysis of the ACCOMPLISH trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, Per H; Svensson, Per; Asp, Joline; Dahlöf, Björn; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Jamerson, Kenneth A; Weber, Michael A; Jia, Yan; Zappe, Dion H; Östergren, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Pulse pressure (PP) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease and death but few studies have investigated the effect of antihypertensive treatments in relation to PP levels before treatment. The Avoiding Cardiovascular Events Through Combination Therapy in Patients Living With Systolic Hypertension (ACCOMPLISH) trial showed that the combination of benazepril+amlodipine (B+A) is superior to benazepril+hydrochlorothiazide (B+H) in reducing CV events. We aimed to investigate whether the treatment effects in the ACCOMPLISH trial were dependent on baseline PP. High-risk hypertensive patients (n=11,499) were randomized to double-blinded treatment with single-pill combinations of either B+A or B+H and followed for 36 months. Patients were divided into tertiles according to their baseline PP and events (CV mortality/myocardial infarction or stroke) were compared. Hazard ratios (HRs) for the treatment effect (B+A over B+H) were calculated in a Cox regression model with age, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus as covariates and were compared across the tertiles. The event rate was increased in the high tertile of PP compared with the low tertile (7.2% vs 4.4% P<.01). In the high and medium PP tertiles, HRs were 0.75 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.95; P=.018) and 0.74 (CI, 0.56-0.98, P=.034), respectively, in favor of B+A. There was no significant difference between the treatments in the low tertile and no significant differences in treatment effect when comparing the HRs between tertiles of PP. B+A has superior CV protection over B+H in high-risk hypertensive patients independent of baseline PP although the absolute treatment effect is enhanced in the higher tertiles of PP where event rates are higher.

  19. High pulse pressure is related to risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese middle-aged females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Bingyuan; Wang, Chongjian; Li, Linlin; Ren, Yongcheng; Zhang, Hongyan; Yang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Yang; Han, Chengyi; Zhou, Junmei; Luo, Xinping; Hu, Dongsheng

    2016-10-01

    To examine the association of risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with high pulse pressure (PP) by sex. We performed a prospective cohort study of 12,272 eligible participants (4664 males and 7608 females) without diabetes at baseline. Participants were classified as having normal PP (20-60mmHg) and high PP (>60mmHg) at baseline. The analysis was further stratified by sex, quartiles of age and high PP categories. During 6years of follow-up, T2DM developed in 775 participants and the incidence was 10.57/1000person-years. With PP 70 to 76mmHg, the multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval) for incident T2DM in females was 1.722 (1.093-2.714) after adjustment for baseline age, smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity level and family history of T2DM, and 1.634 (1.037-2.575) after adjustment for the above factors and body mass index, waist circumference, blood lipid levels and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) category. After stratification by quartiles of age, for females aged 52 to 59, the multivariable adjusted HRs (95% CI) for high PP as compared to normal PP were 2.263 (1.517-3.377) and 2.140 (1.426-3.210) in different models. During follow-up, levels of FPG, fasting plasma insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) were higher in females with higher than normal PP group, but β-cell function was impaired in the high PP group (PHigh PP may be related to incident T2DM among female in China, especially women 52 to 59years old. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanoscale multilayered and porous carbide interphases prepared by pressure-pulsed reactive chemical vapor deposition for ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, S., E-mail: jacques@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, University of Bordeaux 1, CNRS, Herakles-Safran, CEA, 3 allee de la Boetie, F-33600 Pessac (France); Jouanny, I.; Ledain, O.; Maillé, L.; Weisbecker, P. [LCTS, University of Bordeaux 1, CNRS, Herakles-Safran, CEA, 3 allee de la Boetie, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2013-06-15

    In Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) reinforced by continuous fibers, a good toughness is achieved by adding a thin film called “interphase” between the fiber and the brittle matrix, which acts as a mechanical fuse by deflecting the matrix cracks. Pyrocarbon (PyC), with or without carbide sub-layers, is typically the material of choice to fulfill this role. The aim of this work was to study PyC-free nanoscale multilayered carbide coatings as interphases for CMCs. Nanoscale multilayered (SiC–TiC){sub n} interphases were deposited by pressure-Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (P-CVD) on single filament Hi-Nicalon fibers and embedded in a SiC matrix sheath. The thicknesses of the carbide interphase sub-layers could be made as low as a few nanometers as evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. By using the P-ReactiveCVD method (P-RCVD), in which the TiC growth involves consumption of SiC, it was not only possible to obtain multilayered (SiC–TiC){sub n} films but also TiC films with a porous multilayered microstructure as a result of the Kirkendall effect. The porosity in the TiC sequences was found to be enhanced when some PyC was added to SiC prior to total RCVD consumption. Because the porosity volume fraction was still not high enough, the role of mechanical fuse of the interphases could not be evidenced from the tensile curves, which remained fully linear even when chemical attack of the fiber surface was avoided.

  1. Pulse Arrival Time Based Cuff-Less and 24-H Wearable Blood Pressure Monitoring and its Diagnostic Value in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yali; Poon, Carmen C Y; Yan, Bryan P; Lau, James Y W

    2016-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Current standard ABPM devices use an oscillometric cuff-based method which can cause physical discomfort to the patients with repeated inflations and deflations, especially during nighttime leading to sleep disturbance. The ability to measure ambulatory BP accurately and comfortably without a cuff would be attractive. This study validated the accuracy of a cuff-less approach for ABPM using pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements on both healthy and hypertensive subjects for potential use in hypertensive management, which is the first of its kind. The wearable cuff-less device was evaluated against a standard cuff-based device on 24 subjects of which 15 have known hypertension. BP measurements were taken from each subject over a 24-h period by the cuff-less and cuff-based devices every 15 to 30 minutes during daily activities. Mean BP of each subject during daytime, nighttime and over 24-h were calculated. Agreement between mean nighttime systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) measured by the two devices evaluated using Bland-Altman plot were -1.4 ± 6.6 and 0.4 ± 6.7 mmHg, respectively. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) statistics was used to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the cuff-less approach in the detection of BP above the hypertension threshold during nighttime (>120/70 mmHg). The area under ROC curves were 0.975/0.79 for nighttime. The results suggest that PAT-based approach is accurate and promising for ABPM without the issue of sleep disturbances associated with cuff-based devices.

  2. The influence of substrate temperature and deposition pressure on pulsed laser deposited thin films of CaS:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyenge, R.L. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein ZA9300 (South Africa); Physics Department, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844-0100, Nairobi (Kenya); Swart, H.C. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein ZA9300 (South Africa); Ntwaeaborwa, O.M., E-mail: ntwaeab@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein ZA9300 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of substrate temperature and argon deposition pressure on the structure, morphology and photoluminescence emission (PL) properties of pulsed laser deposited thin films of CaS:Eu{sup 2+}. The PL intensity improved significantly upon reaching substrate temperature of 650 °C. The (200) peak gradually became the preferred orientation. The increase in PL intensity as well as surface roughness is attributed to improved crystallinity and higher growth rates, respectively. The best PL intensity as a function of deposition pressure was obtained at an argon pressure of 80 mTorr. The initial increase and eventual drop in PL intensity as deposition pressure increases is ascribed to the changes in growth rates.

  3. Method of optical self-mixing for pulse wave transit time in comparison with other methods and correlation with blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigas, Kalju; Lass, Jaanus; Kattai, Rain; Karai, Deniss; Kaik, Juri

    2004-07-01

    This paper is a part of research to develop convenient method for continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure by non-invasive and non-oscillometric way. A simple optical method, using self-mixing in a diode laser, is used for detection of skin surface vibrations near the artery. These vibrations, which can reveal the pulsate propagation of blood pressure waves along the vasculature, are used for pulse wave registration. The registration of the Pulse Wave Transit Time (PWTT) is based on computing the time delay in different regions of the human body using an ECG as a reference signal. In this study, the comparison of method of optical self-mixing with other methods as photoplethysmographic (PPG) and bioimpedance (BI) for PWTT is done. Also correlation of PWTT, obtained with different methods, with arterial blood pressure is calculated. In our study, we used a group of volunteers (34 persons) who made the bicycle exercise test. The test consisted of cycling sessions of increasing workloads during which the HR changed from 60 to 180 beats per minute. In addition, a blood pressure (NIBP) was registered with standard sphygmomanometer once per minute during the test and all NIBP measurement values were synchronized to other signals to find exact time moments where the systolic blood pressure was detected (Korotkoff sounds starting point). Computer later interpolated the blood pressure signal in order to get individual value for every heart cycle. The other signals were measured continuously during all tests. At the end of every session, a recovery period was included until person's NIBP and heart rate (HR) normalized. As a result of our study it turned out that time intervals that were calculated from plethysmographic (PPG) waveforms were in the best correlation with systolic blood pressure. The diastolic pressure does not correlate with any of the parameters representing PWTT. The pulse wave signals measured by laser and piezoelectric transducer are very similar

  4. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  5. Effect of steaming, blanching, and high temperature/high pressure processing on the amino Acid contents of commonly consumed korean vegetables and pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Yeon; Kim, Bo-Min; Kim, Jung-Bong; Shanmugavelan, Poovan; Kim, Heon-Woong; Kim, So-Young; Kim, Se-Na; Cho, Young-Sook; Choi, Han-Seok; Park, Ki-Moon

    2014-09-01

    In the present report, the effects of blanching, steaming, and high temperature/high pressure processing (HTHP) on the amino acid contents of commonly consumed Korean root vegetables, leaf vegetables, and pulses were evaluated using an Automatic Amino Acid Analyzer. The total amino acid content of the samples tested was between 3.38 g/100 g dry weight (DW) and 21.32 g/100 g DW in raw vegetables and between 29.36 g/100 g DW and 30.55 g/100 g DW in raw pulses. With HTHP, we observed significant decreases in the lysine and arginine contents of vegetables and the lysine, arginine, and cysteine contents of pulses. Moreover, the amino acid contents of blanched vegetables and steamed pulses were more similar than the amino acid contents of the HTHP vegetables and HTHP pulses. Interestingly, lysine, arginine, and cysteine were more sensitive to HTHP than the other amino acids. Partial Least Squares-Discriminate Analyses were also performed to discriminate the clusters and patterns of amino acids.

  6. 成都地区中老年居民脉压及脉压指数分析%AN ANALYSIS OF PULSE PRESSURE AND PULSE PRESSURE INDEX AMONG MIDDLE-AGED RESIDENTS IN CHENGDU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴凯; 高音; 陈晓平; 李龙兴; 万里艳; 陈小妮

    2011-01-01

    [目的]调查分析成都地区中老年居民脉压(PP)、脉压指数(PPI)的影响因素,寻找可能改善脉压异常的方法.[方法]利用2007代谢综合征研究调查资料(共1061人),把人群依据PP(PP≤60 mmHg及PP>60mmHg)及PPI(PPI≤0.450及PPI>0.450)分为正常组及增高组,分析两组人群多代谢异常及心血管疾病危险因素分布特征,并采用Logistic回归分析寻找与PP/PPI相关的危险因素.[结果]①两个分组间年龄、收缩压、男性比重、高血压家族史、体重指教、腰围、臀围、空腹血耱、肾功能等指标PP、PPI增高组明显高于PP、PPI正常组,舒张压则是PP、PPI增高组明显低予PP、PPI正常组.②血脂各成分PP组间无统计学差异,总胆固醇、低密度脂蛋白水平PPI增高组高于正常组.③PP及PPI增高组其代谢综合征、高血压、糖尿病、肥胖、腹型肥胖、血脂异常等患病率皆高于PPI正常组,差异有统计学意义.④Logistic回归分析提示PP、PPI与女性性别、年龄、收缩压、BMI、腰围、臀围、空腹血糖、肌酐、尿酸、总胆固醇、低密度脂蛋白水平呈正相关,与男性性别及舒张压呈负相关.[结论]成都地区脉压及脉压指教与代谢性指标关系密切,可能可以通过改善血脂、空腹血糖、腰围、体重指数、肾功能等指标来减少脉压及脉压指数的异常.%[Objective] To evaluate the influencing factors on pulse pressure (PP) and pulse presure index (PPI) among middle-aged residents in Chengdu, and search the possible methods to relieve PP disorder. [Methods] We divided the 1061 middle-aged people who came from the survey for metabolic syndrome study into 2 groups according to PP (PP≤60mmHg and PP > 60mmHg) and PPI (PPI (PPI≤0.450 and PPI > 0.450)). They were normal PP/PPI group and augmented PP/PPI group. The normal PP group mean the PP of the people was less than or equal to 60 mmHg, and normal PPI group was PPI less or equal to 0.450. The

  7. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on the magnetic properties of La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (1 1 1) substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prajapat, C.L. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kalita, Parswajit [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, Delhi 110007 (India); Sastry, P.U. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, M.R., E-mail: mrsingh@barc.gov.in [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, S.K.; Ravikumar, G. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-09-01

    The influence of oxygen partial pressure on phase formation and magnetic properties of LSMO (La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3}) thin films deposited on STO (1 1 1) substrates by pulsed laser deposition was investigated. Phase formation and epitaxial growth were confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Good crystalline mosaic is observed for oxygen partial pressures ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 mbar. For each of the pressures, the lattice parameters were estimated assuming the lattice distortion is volume conserving. The Curie temperatures T{sub C} vs lattice strain relation thus obtained is comparable to the available data in literature. Variation in coercive field of the films can be accounted for by the variation in T{sub C}.

  8. A Conceptual Design Method of Disc Brake Systems for Reducing Brake Squeal Considering Pressure Distribution Variations

    OpenAIRE

    松島, 徹; 泉井, 一浩; 西脇, 眞二

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a design optimization method for disc brake systems that specifically aims to reduce brake squeal, with robustness against changes on contact surface pressure distribution, based on the concept of First Order Analysis. First, a simplified analysis model is constructed in which a pressure distribution parameter is introduced, and the relationships between the occurrence of brake squeal and the characteristics of various components is then clarified, using the simplified mod...

  9. Studies of solid propellant combustion with pulsed radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godai, T.; Tanemura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Shimizu, M.

    1987-01-01

    Pulsed radiography was applied to observe solid propellant surface regression during rocket motor operation. Using a 150 KV flash X-ray system manufactured by the Field Emission Corporation and two kinds of film suppliers, images of the propellant surface of a 5 cm diameter end burning rocket motor were recorded on film. The repetition frame rate of 8 pulses per second and the pulse train length of 10 pulses are limited by the capability of the power supply and the heat build up within the X-ray tube, respectively. The experiment demonstrated the effectiveness of pulsed radiography for observing solid propellant surface regression. Measuring the position of burning surface images on film with a microdensitometer, quasi-instantaneous burning rate as a function of pressure and the variation of characteristic velocity with pressure and gas stay time were obtained. Other research items to which pulsed radiography can be applied are also suggested.

  10. Assembly Variation Identification of High Pressure Spool by Response Surface Based Model Updating Using IV-optimal Designs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ziyang; XIE Shousheng; HU Jinhai; MIAO Zhuoguang; WANG Lei

    2012-01-01

    This article,in order to improve the assembly of the high-pressure spool,presents an assembly variation identification method achieved by response surface method (RSM)-based model updating using IV-optimal designs.The method involves screening out non-relevant assembly parameters using IV-optimal designs and the preload of the joints is chosen as the input features and modal frequency is the only response feature.Emphasis is placed on the construction of response surface models including the interactions between the bolted joints by which the non-linear relationship between the assembly variation caused by the changes of preload and the output frequency variation is established.By achieving an optimal process of selected variables in the model,assembly variation can be identified.With a case study of the laboratory bolted disks as an example,the proposed method is verified and it gives enough accuracy in variation identification.It has been observed that the first-order response surface models considering the interactions between the bolted joints based on the IV-optimal criterion are adequate for assembly purposes.

  11. Time-resolved OES of nanosecond pulsed discharges in N$_{2}$ and N$_{2}$/H$_{2}$O mixtures]{Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy of nanosecond pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure N$_{2}$ and N$_{2}$/H$_{2}$O mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; van Veldhuizen, E M; Bruggeman, P J

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, nanosecond pulsed discharges in N$_{2}$ and N$_{2}$/0.9% H$_{2}$O at atmospheric pressure (at 300 K) are studied with time-resolved imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and Rayleigh scattering. A 170 ns high voltage pulse is applied across two pin-shaped electrodes at a frequency of 1 kHz. The discharge consists of three phases: an ignition phase, a spark phase and a recombination phase. During the ignition phase the emission is mainly caused by molecular nitrogen (N$_{2}$(C-B)). In the spark and recombination phase mainly atomic nitrogen emission is observed. The emission when H$_{2}$O is added is very similar, except the small contribution of H$_{\\alpha}$ and the intensity of the molecular N$_{2}$(C-B) emission is less.

  12. Finishing of AT-cut quartz crystal wafer with nanometric thickness uniformity by pulse-modulated atmospheric pressure plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Kazuya; Ueda, Masaki; Shibahara, Masafumi; Zettsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-04-01

    Quartz resonator is a very important device to generate a clock frequency for information and telecommunication system. Improvement of the productivity of the quartz resonator is always required because a huge amount of the resonator is demanded for installing to various electronic devices. Resonance frequency of the quartz resonator is decided by the thickness of the quartz crystal wafer. Therefore, it is necessary to uniform the thickness distribution of the wafer with nanometric level. We have proposed the improvement technique of the thickness distribution of the quartz crystal wafer by numerically controlled correction using atmospheric pressure plasma which is non-contact and chemical removal technique. Heating effects of the quartz wafer in the removal rate and the correction accuracy were investigated. The heating of the substrate and compensate of the scanning speed of the worktable according to the variation of the surface temperature enabled an increase of 50% in the etching rate and 10-nanometric-level accuracy in the correction of the thickness distribution of the quartz wafer, respectively.

  13. X-ray emission from a nanosecond-pulse discharge in an inhomogeneous electric field at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Cheng; Shao Tao; Ren Chengyan; Zhang Dongdong [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Tarasenko, Victor; Kostyrya, Igor D. [Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Ma Hao [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yan Ping [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2012-12-15

    This paper describes experimental studies of the dependence of the X-ray intensity on the anode material in nanosecond high-voltage discharges. The discharges were generated by two nanosecond-pulse generators in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a tube-plate gap. The output pulse of the first generator (repetitive pulse generator) has a rise time of about 15 ns and a full width at half maximum of 30-40 ns. The output of the second generator (single pulse generator) has a rise time of about 0.3 ns and a full width at half maximum of 1 ns. The electrical characteristics and the X-ray emission of nanosecond-pulse discharge in atmospheric air are studied by the measurement of voltage-current waveforms, discharge images, X-ray count and dose. Our experimental results showed that the anode material rarely affects electrical characteristics, but it can significantly affect the X-ray density. Comparing the density of X-rays, it was shown that the highest x-rays density occurred in the diffuse discharge in repetitive pulse mode, then the spark discharge with a small air gap, and then the corona discharge with a large air gap, in which the X-ray density was the lowest. Therefore, it could be confirmed that the bremsstrahlung at the anode contributes to the X-ray emission from nanosecond-pulse discharges.

  14. Circadian variations of catecholamines and blood pressure in patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickman, A S; Stern, N; Sowers, J R

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between 24-h recumbent blood pressure levels and secretory patterns of catecholamines was investigated in 4 patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism (PsHP) and hypertension and in 9 patients with essential hypertension. A clear circadian rhythm of blood pressure and catecholamines was documented in both groups with lowest levels of blood pressures and catecholamines occurring during sleep. During the 24-h period of recumbency mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was correlated (r = 0.63, p less than or equal to 0.01) with plasma norepinephrine (N) in the patients with essential hypertension, but this correlation was weaker in patients with PsHP (r = 0.38, p less than or equal to 0.05). MAP was more closely related to plasma epinephrine (E) (r = 0.62, p less than or equal to 0.01) than to plasma NE in patients with PsHP. Plasma NE and E levels were considerably lower in patients with PsHP than in patients with essential hypertension throughout the 24-h recumbent period. The sleep-related decline in blood pressure and NE was less than in patients with essential hypertension. These results suggest that while the sympathetic nervous system may have a role in hour-to-hour maintenance of blood pressure in patients with PsHP and hypertension, it does not appear to be responsible for the elevated arterial pressure in these patients. Factors other than those investigated, such as obesity, alterations in sodium homeostasis of refractoriness of the vascular smooth muscle to the vasodilatory effect of PTH may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension in PsHP.

  15. In vitro genotypic variation of Campylobacter coli documented by pulsed-field gel electrophoretic DNA profiling, implications for epidemiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.

    1998-01-01

    Six isolates of Campylobacter coli from different pig herds were subcultured up to 50 times over a 6-month period and DNA samples suitable for pulsed-field gel electrophoretic (PFGE) profiling prepared at regular (1, 20, 40 and 50 passages) intervals. In 5/6 strains, changes in the banding patter...

  16. [Variation in inspiratory gas flow in pressure support ventilation. The effect on respiratory mechanics and respiratory work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydow, M; Thies, K; Engel, J; Golisch, W; Buscher, H; Zinserling, J; Burchardi, H

    1996-11-01

    During pressure support ventilation (PSV), the timing of the breathing cycle is mainly controlled by the patient. Therefore, the delivered flow pattern during PSV might be better synchronised with the patient's demands than during volume-assisted ventilation. In several modern ventilators, inspiration is terminated when the inspiratory flow decreases to 25% of the initial peak value. However, this timing algorithm might cause premature inspiration termination if the initial peak flow is high. This could result not only in an increased risk of dyssynchronization between the patient and the ventilator, but also in reduced ventilatory support. On the other hand, a decreased peak flow might inappropriately increase the patient's inspiratory effort. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of the variation of the initial peak-flow rate during PSV on respiratory pattern and mechanical work of breathing. Six patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and six patients with no or minor nonobstructive lung pathology (control) were studied during PSV with different inspiratory flow rates by variations of the pressurisation time (Evita I, Drägerwerke, Lübeck, Germany). During the study period all patients were in stable circulatory conditions and in the weaning phase. Patients were studied in a 45 degrees semirecumbent position. Using the medium pressurization time (l s) during PSV the inspiratory pressure was individually adjusted to obtain a tidal volume of about 8 ml/kg body weight. Thereafter, measurements were performed during five pressurization times (ethics committee of our medical faculty. Gas flow was measured at the proximal end of the endotracheal tube with a pneumotachometer (Fleisch no. 2, Fleisch, Lausanne, Switzerland) and a differential pressure transducer. Tracheal pressure (Paw) was determined in the same position with a second differential pressure transducer (Dr. Fenyves & Gut, Basel, Switzerland). Esophageal pressure (Pes) was

  17. Experimental and numerical investigations of air plasmas induced by multi-MeV pulsed X-ray from low to atmospheric pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulois, Mélissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Pouzalgues, Romain; Garrigues, Alain; Delbos, Christophe; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    This research work is devoted to the experimental and theoretical analysis of air plasmas induced by multi-MeV pulsed X-ray for a large pressure range of humid air background gas varying from 20 mbar to atmospheric pressure. The time evolution of the electron density of the air plasma is determined by electromagnetic wave absorption measurements. The measurements have uncertainties of about ±30%, taking into account the precision of the dose measurement and also the shot to shot fluctuations of the generator. The experimental electron density is obtained by comparing the measurements of the transmitted microwave signals to the calculated ones. The calculations need the knowledge of the time evolution of the electron mean energy, which is determined by a chemical kinetic model based on a reaction scheme involving 39 species interacting following 265 reactions. During the X-ray pulse, a good agreement is obtained between time evolution of the electron density obtained from absorption measurements and calculations based on the kinetic model. The relative deviation on the maximum electron density and the corresponding plasma frequency is always lower than 10%. The maximum electron density varies from 4 × 1011 to 3.5 × 1013 cm-3 between 30 mbar to atmospheric pressure, while the peak of the electron mean energy decreases from 5.64 eV to 4.27 eV in the same pressure range.

  18. Variation with Mach Number of Static and Total Pressures Through Various Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Alfred A

    1946-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley 24-inch highspeed tunnel to ascertain the static-pressure and total-pressure losses through screens ranging in mesh from 3 to 12 wires per inch and in wire diameter from 0.023 to 0.041 inch. Data were obtained from a Mach number of approximately 0.20 up to the maximum (choking) Mach number obtainable for each screen. The results of this investigation indicate that the pressure losses increase with increasing Mach number until the choking Mach number, which can be computed, is reached. Since choking imposes a restriction on the mass rate of flow and maximum losses are incurred at this condition, great care must be taken in selecting the screen mesh and wire dimmeter for an installation so that the choking Mach number is

  19. Use of the BD-100R as a neutron spectrometer through applied pressure variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, B.; Ebert, D.; Munno, F. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (USA))

    1991-05-01

    A study was undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of using the well-characterized BD-100R neutron bubble dosimeter as a neutron spectrometer in low-level radiation fields. The BD-100R dosimeters used in this work consisted of a test tube containing an elastic polymer with interspersed droplets of two types of Freon: Freon-12 and Freon-114. Each superheated liquid droplet is a potential nucleation site, with the minimum energy needed to form a bubble at the nucleation site being inversely proportional to the square of the difference between the applied and the vapor pressure (i.e., Emin alpha(delta P)-2). For a given dose, the number of bubbles formed continually decreases with increasing applied pressure, until a pressure is reached where no bubbles are formed, since the energy transferred can no longer vaporize the Freon. This investigation is intended to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring an unknown spectrum utilizing the dosimeter response (number of bubbles formed) as a function of the neutron energy (applied pressure). A set of 12 dosimeters was exposed under various applied pressures in a well-characterized neutron energy spectrum at the East Beam Port (EBP) of the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR). The dosimeters were placed inside a pressure chamber that could accommodate up to 18 dosimeters. Energy response coefficients (cross-sections) were obtained by spectral unfolding techniques on the known spectrum. The same set of dosimeters were then irradiated using a paraffin-moderated Pu/Be source. Measured spectral estimates obtained using the response coefficients were compared with numerical computations generated using the ANISN computer code. The results indicate that further research using the BD-100R as a neutron spectrometer in low radiation fields is warranted.

  20. Nonlinear interaction of ultraintense laser pulse with relativistic thin plasma foil in the radiation pressure-dominant regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KRISHNA KUMAR SONI; K P MAHESHWARI

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the effect of laser pulse temporal profile on the energy/momentum acquired by the ions as a result of the ultraintense laser pulse focussed on a thin plasma layer in the radiation pressuredominant(RPD) regime. In the RPD regime, the plasma foil is pushed by ultraintense laser pulse when the radiation cannot propagate through the foil, while the electron and ion layers move together. The nonlinear character of laser–matter interaction is exhibited in the relativistic frequency shift, and also change in the wave amplitude as the EM wave gets reflected by the relativistically moving thin dense plasma layer. Relativistic effects in a highenergy plasma provide matching conditions that make it possible to exchange very effectively ordered kineticenergy and momentum between the EM fields and the plasma. When matter moves at relativistic velocities, the efficiency of the energy transfer from the radiation to thin plasma foil is more than 30% and in ultrarelativisticcase it approaches one. The momentum/energy transfer to the ions is found to depend on the temporal profile of the laser pulse. Our numerical results show that for the same laser and plasma parameters, a Lorentzian pulse canaccelerate ions upto 0.2 GeV within 10 fs which is 1.5 times larger than that a Gaussian pulse can.

  1. Effects of temperature and pressure on the structural and optical properties of ZnO films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    ZnO thin films were deposited on fused silica via pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at substrate temperatures from 300°C to 800°C and ambient oxygen pressures ranging from 10-2 mTorr to 240 mTorr. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectra indicated that wurtzite ZnO was obtained in all cases. The highly c-oriented ZnO films were obtained for oxygen pressures above 11 mTorr. The room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra demonstrated that all the films exhibited strong near-band-edge (NBE) emission, while deep-level (DL) emission was also observed in films deposited at oxygen pressures below 80 mTorr. From analysis of the XRD, Raman and photoluminescence PL data, an optimal condition was identified for the deposition of highly crystallized ZnO films.

  2. Influence of oxygen pressure and aging on LaAlO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO3 substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Jihwey

    2014-02-24

    The crystal structures of LaAlO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO3 substrates at oxygen pressure of 10−3 millibars or 10−5 millibars, where kinetics of ablated species hardly depend on oxygen background pressure, are compared. Our results show that the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 is sharper when the oxygen pressure is lower. Over time, the formation of various crystalline phases is observed while the crystalline thickness of the LaAlO3 layer remains unchanged. X-ray scattering as well as atomic force microscopy measurements indicate three-dimensional growth of such phases, which appear to be fed from an amorphous capping layer present in as-grown samples.

  3. Drip flow variations under a stalactite of the Père Noël cave (Belgium). Evidence of seasonal variations and air pressure constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genty, Dominique; Deflandre, Guy

    1998-11-01

    The study of drip rate and seepage water electrical conductivity (hereafter called conductivity) under one stalactite in the Père Noël cave (Belgium), with data produced from an automatic station since 1991, demonstrates several previously unobserved features: (1) measurement of drop volume shows that, for 94% of the time series, drop volume is constant (=0.14 ml), but when discharge exceeds 48.2 drips min -1, drop volume decreases, probably because of secondary drop formation; (2) the interannual drip rate variation is correlated to the annual water excess and its correlant, rainfall (R 2=0.98; exponential model); this result introduces a new improvement in the understanding of the previously investigated relationships between stalagmite annual laminae thickness and mean annual rainfall; (3) the drip rate shows a well marked seasonality: it increases abruptly in late fall or early winter and decreases slowly during spring, summer and fall. Increased discharge is accompanied by an increase in conductivity, which suggests that the flushed water is more mineralized and was stored in the karst aquifer for several months; (4) superimposed on these seasonal variations, there are two kinds of flow regimes which are driven by the atmospheric pressure: (i) a "wiggles regime", whose duration is 1-7 days in length and which is inversely proportional to the air pressure wiggles; it is explained by either a "shut-off faucet" process due to the rock formation stress, or to a change in the two-phases flow component proportions (air/water); (ii) an "unstable regime" characterized by abrupt switches (<2 h) or oscillations with variable periodicities, from a few minutes to a few hours. These occur when the drip rate reaches a threshold (i.e. 240 drops 10 min -1); the chaotic behaviour of this phenomenon is discussed.

  4. Anxiety coping style and daily blood pressure variation of female nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broege; James; Peters

    1997-08-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine how the style of coping with anxiety influences ambulatory blood pressures measured in work and home environments for 63 women aged 34 +/- 8 years employed as nurses. METHODS: Awake ambulatory blood pressures measured at work (n = 38 readings) and at home (n =7 readings) were compared among nurses who had been classified as belonging to four anxiety-coping-style groups: low anxious repressive (n = 18 work, n = 16 home), high anxious defensive (n = 4 work, n = 4 home) true low anxious (n = 21 work, n = 20 home) and true high anxious (n = 19 work, n = 18 home). The four anxiety-coping-style groups were determined by cross-classifying the women upon the basis of their scores on the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (cutoff at 18) and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (cutoff at 14). RESULTS: Average systolic blood pressures at work and at home among nurses with a low anxious repressive coping style were significantly lower than were those of nurses with a high anxious defensive coping style (P personality constructs such as the style of coping, which are defined by the interaction of psychologic dimensions, may reflect better the complexity of behavioral influences on the blood pressure than do the univariate psychometric measures of which they are composed.

  5. Value of variation in circadian rhythm of blood pressure for early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙红喜

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the change of 24 h ambulatory blood pressure in patients with subclinical diabetic nephropathy.Methods A total of 190 type 2 diabetic patients were divided into 2 groups according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) :glomerular

  6. Positive Selection Pressure Drives Variation on the Surface-Exposed Variable Proteins of the Pathogenic Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic species of Neisseria utilize variable outer membrane proteins to facilitate infection and proliferation within the human host. However, the mechanisms behind the evolution of these variable alleles remain largely unknown due to analysis of previously limited datasets. In this study, we have expanded upon the previous analyses to substantially increase the number of analyzed sequences by including multiple diverse strains, from various geographic locations, to determine whether positive selective pressure is exerted on the evolution of these variable genes. Although Neisseria are naturally competent, this analysis indicates that only intrastrain horizontal gene transfer among the pathogenic Neisseria principally account for these genes exhibiting linkage equilibrium which drives the polymorphisms evidenced within these alleles. As the majority of polymorphisms occur across species, the divergence of these variable genes is dependent upon the species and is independent of geographical location, disease severity, or serogroup. Tests of neutrality were able to detect strong selection pressures acting upon both the opa and pil gene families, and were able to locate the majority of these sites within the exposed variable regions of the encoded proteins. Evidence of positive selection acting upon the hypervariable domains of Opa contradicts previous beliefs and provides evidence for selection of receptor binding. As the pathogenic Neisseria reside exclusively within the human host, the strong selection pressures acting upon both the opa and pil gene families provide support for host immune system pressure driving sequence polymorphisms within these variable genes.

  7. Longitudinal observations on circadian blood pressure variation in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elung-Jensen, Thomas; Strandgaard, Svend; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that status as a 'non-dipper' determined from 24-h blood pressure (BP) recordings is associated with increased risk of end-organ damage but little is known about the consistency of dipper status in renal patients. The present post hoc analysis evaluated dipper...

  8. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of a solid in water: Effect of hydrostatic pressure on laser induced plasma, cavitation bubble and emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Claros, M.; Dell'Aglio, M.; Gaudiuso, R.; Santagata, A.; De Giacomo, A.; Fortes, F. J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the development of sensors use in exploration of the deep ocean. Techniques for the chemical analysis of submerged solids are of special interest, as they show promise for subsea mining applications where a rapid sorting of materials found in the sea bottom would improve efficiency. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has demonstrated potential for this application thanks to its unique capability of providing the atomic composition of submerged solids. Here we present a study on the parameters that affect the spectral response of metallic targets in an oceanic pressure environment. Following laser excitation of the solid, the plasma persistence and the cavitation bubble size are considerably reduced as the hydrostatic pressure increases. These effects are of particular concern in dual pulse excitation as reported here, where a careful choice of the interpulse timing is required. Shadowgraphic images of the plasma demonstrate that cavitation bubbles are formed early after the plasma onset and that the effect of hydrostatic pressure is negligible during the early stage of plasma expansion. Contrarily to what is observed at atmospheric pressure, emission spectra observed at high pressures are characterized by self-absorbed atomic lines on continuum radiation resulting from strong radiative recombination in the electron-rich confined environment. This effect is much less evident with ionic lines due to the much higher energy of the levels involved and ionization energy of ions, as well as to the lower extent of absorption effects occurring in the inner part of the plasma, where ionized species are more abundant. As a result of the smaller shorter-lived cavitation bubble, the LIBS intensity enhancement resulting from dual pulse excitation is reduced when the applied pressure increases.

  9. Spatial variation patterns of subtidal seaweed assemblages along a subtropical oceanic archipelago: Thermal gradient vs herbivore pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangil, Carlos; Sansón, Marta; Afonso-Carrillo, Julio

    2011-10-01

    The structure and composition of subtidal rocky seaweed assemblages were studied at 69 sites on the Canary Islands (northeastern Atlantic). This group of islands are situated at the southern boundary of the warm temperate region and adjacent to the cold waters from the northwest African coastal upwelling, which creates a difference of almost 2 °C in surface seawater temperature from the eastern to the western islands. This thermal variation allows an examination of the transition between the warm temperate and the tropical regions along this longitudinal gradient together with the hypothesised Fucales-dominated assemblages towards the eastern islands in contrast to the Dictyotales-dominated assemblages towards the western ones. Environmental and biological parameters were considered in order to investigate which were the main factors explaining spatial variation along the gradient in a multi-scaled approach. Although seventy-nine macroalgae were identified, 87.63% of the total mean cover was due to six taxa ( Lobophora variegata, nongeniculate corallines, Canistrocarpus cervicornis, Jania adhaerens, Cystoseira abies-marina and Pseudolithoderma adriaticum). At a large scale, sea urchin density explained the highest variation in seaweed assemblages (26.94%), and its pattern of distribution across the islands. The expected pattern of distribution according to the upwelling distance only occurred in restricted areas of the Canarian Archipelago in absence of herbivore pressure and habitat degradation. Spatial variations within islands (medium scale) were mainly related to wave exposure, while at a small scale these were mostly due to the degree of sedimentation.

  10. Experimental investigations of transient pressure variations in a high head model Francis turbine during start-up and shutdown

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TRIVEDI Chirag; CERVANTES Michel J.; GANDHI B. K.; OLE DAHLHAUG G

    2014-01-01

    Penetration of the power generated using wind and solar energy to electrical grid network causing several incidents of the grid tripping, power outage, and frequency drooping. This has increased restart (star-stop) cycles of the hydroelectric turbines significantly since grid connected hydroelectric turbines are widely used to manage critical conditions of the grid. Each cycle induces significant stresses due to unsteady pressure loading on the runner blades. The presented work investigates the pressure loading to a high head ( HP=377m, DP=1.78m) Francis turbine during start-stop. The measurements were carried out on a scaled model turbine ( HM =12.5m, DM =0.349m). Total four operating points were considered. At each operating point, three schemes of guide vanes opening and three schemes of guide vanes closing were investigated. The results show that total head variation is up to 9%during start-stop of the turbine. On the runner blade, the maximum pressure amplitudes are about 14 kPa and 16 kPa from the instantaneous mean value of 121 kPa during rapid start-up and shutdown, respectively, which are about 1.5 times larger than that of the slow start-up and shutdown. Moreover, the maximum pressure fluctuations are given at the blade trailing edge.

  11. Is gold solubility subject to pressure variations in ascending arc magmas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégo, Sébastien; Nakamura, Michihiko; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki; Chang, Qing; Zellmer, Georg F.

    2016-09-01

    Magmas play a key role in the genesis of epithermal and porphyry ore deposits, notably by providing the bulk of ore metals to the hydrothermal fluid phase. It has been long shown that the formation of major deposits requires a multi-stage process, including the concentration of metals in silicate melts at depth and their transfer into the exsolved ore fluid in more superficial environments. Both aspects have been intensively studied for most of noble metals in subsurface conditions, whereas the effect of pressure on the concentration (i.e., solubility) of those metals in magmas ascending from the sublithospheric mantle to the shallow arc crust has been quite neglected. Here, we present new experimental data aiming to constrain the processes of gold (Au) dissolution in subduction-linked magmas along a range of depth. We have conducted hydrous melting experiments on two dacitic/adakitic magmas at 0.9 and 1.4 GPa and ∼1000 °C in an end-loaded piston cylinder apparatus, under fO2 conditions close to NNO as measured by solid Co-Pd-O sensors. Experimental charges were carried out in pure Au containers, the latter serving as the source of gold, in presence of variable amounts of H2O and, for half of the charges, with elemental sulfur (S) so as to reach sulfide saturation. Au concentrations in melt quenched to glass were determined by LA-ICPMS. When compared to previous data obtained at lower pressures and variable redox conditions, our results show that in both S-free and sulfide-saturated systems pressure has no direct, detectable effect on melt Au solubility. Nevertheless, pressure has a strong, negative effect on sulfur solubility. Since gold dissolution is closely related to the behavior of sulfur in reducing and moderately oxidizing conditions, pressure has therefore a significant but indirect effect on Au solubility. The present study confirms that Au dissolution is mainly controlled by fO2 in S-free melts and by a complex interplay of fO2 and melt S2

  12. Seasonal variation of blood pressure and related factors in Chinese adults:a survey of over 50000 people in Suzhou,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张正姬

    2013-01-01

    Objective Seasonal variation in blood pressure had been observed in several studies on Western populations,but uncertainty remains about the strength of the relationship in other populations and the extent to which it

  13. Flood pulsing in the Sudd wetland: analysis of seasonal variations in 2 inundation and evapotranspiration in Southern Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Gabriel B.; Rebelo, L-M.; McCartney, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Located on the Bahr el Jebel in South Sudan, the Sudd is one of the largest floodplain wetlands in the world. Seasonal inundation drives the hydrologic, geomorphological, and ecological processes, and the annual flood pulse is essential to the functioning of the Sudd. Despite the importance of the flood pulse, various hydrological interventions are planned upstream of the Sudd to increase economic benefits and food security. These will not be without consequences, in particular for wetlands where the biological productivity, biodiversity, and human livelihoods are dependent on the flood pulse and both the costs and benefits need to be carefully evaluated. Many African countries still lack regional baseline information on the temporal extent, distribution, and characteristics of wetlands, making it hard to assess the consequences of development interventions. Because of political instability in Sudan and the inaccessible nature of the Sudd, recent measurements of flooding and seasonal dynamics are inadequate. Analyses of multitemporal and multisensor remote sensing datasets are presented in this paper, in order to investigate and characterize flood pulsing within the Sudd wetland over a 12-month period. Wetland area has been mapped along with dominant components of open water and flooded vegetation at five time periods over a single year. The total area of flooding (both rain and river fed) over the 12 months was 41 334 km2, with 9176 km2 of this constituting the permanent wetland. Mean annual total evaporation is shown to be higher and with narrower distribution of values from areas of open water (1718 mm) than from flooded vegetation (1641 mm). Although the exact figures require validation against ground-based measurements, the results highlight the relative differences in inundation patterns and evaporation across the Sudd.

  14. Dependence of macrophage superoxide release on the pulse amplitude of an applied pressure regime: a potential factor at the soft tissue-implant interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hainsworth Y; Frechette, Danielle M; Rohner, Nathan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Puleo, David A; Bjursten, Lars M

    2016-03-01

    Failure of soft tissue implants has been largely attributed to the influence of biomaterial surface properties on the foreign body response, but some implant complications, e.g. macrophage accumulation and necrosis, are still not effectively addressed with surface treatments to minimize deleterious biomaterial effects. We explored an alternative explanation for implant failure, linking biocompatibility with implant micromotion-induced pressure fluctuations at the tissue-biomaterial interface. For this purpose, we used a custom in vitro system to characterize the effects of pressure fluctuations on the activity of macrophages, the predominant cells at a healing implant site. Initially, we quantified superoxide production by HL60-derived macrophage-like cells under several different pressure regimes with means of 5-40 mmHg, amplitudes of 0-15 mmHg and frequencies of 0-1.5 Hz. All pressure regimes tested elicited significantly (p superoxide production by macrophage-like cells relative to parallel controls. Notably, pressure-sensitive reductions in superoxide release correlated (r(2)  = 0.74; p superoxide production and cell viability, we also explored the influence of cyclic pressure on macrophage numbers and death. Compared to controls, adherent macrophage-like cells exposed to 7.5/2.5 mmHg cyclic pressures for 6 h exhibited significantly (p superoxide dismutase. Collectively, our results suggest that pressure pulses are a putative regulator of macrophage adhesion via a superoxide-related effect. Pressure fluctuations, e.g. due to implant micromotion, may, therefore, potentially modulate macrophage-dependent wound healing.

  15. Ballistic Imaging of High-Pressure Fuel Sprays using Incoherent, Ultra- short Pulsed Illumination with an Ultrafast OKE-based Time Gating

    CERN Document Server

    Purwar, Harsh; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We present an optical Kerr effect based time-gate with the collinear incidence of the pump and probe beams at the Kerr medium, liquid carbon disulfide, for ballistic imaging of the high-pressure fuel sprays. The probe pulse used to illuminate the object under study is extracted from the supercontinuum generated by tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses inside water, thereby destroying their coherence. The optical imaging spatial resolution and gate timings are investigated and compared with a similar setup without supercontinuum generation, where the probe is still coherent. And finally, a few ballistic images of the fuel sprays using coherent and incoherent illumination with the proposed time-gate are presented and compared qualitatively.

  16. Inter- versus Intramolecular Structural Manipulation of a Dichromium(II) Pacman Complex through Pressure Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Charlotte J; Prescimone, Alessandro; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J L; Parsons, Simon; Morrison, Carole A; Arnold, Polly L; Love, Jason B

    2016-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the intranuclear M···M separation and intermolecular secondary interactions in the dinuclear chromium Pacman complex [Cr2(L)](C6H6) was evaluated because this compound contains both a short Cr···Cr separation and an exogenously bound molecule of benzene in the solid state. The electronic structure of [Cr2(L)] was determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, SQUID magnetometry, and density functional theory calculations and shows a diamagnetic ground state through antiferromagnetic exchange, with no evidence for a Cr-Cr bond. Analysis of the solid-state structures of [Cr2(L)](C6H6) at pressures varying from ambient to 3.0 GPa shows little deformation in the Cr···Cr separation, i.e., no Cr-Cr bond formation, but instead a significantly increased interaction between the exogenous arene and the chromium iminopyrrolide environment. It is therefore apparent from this analysis that [Cr2(L)] would be best exploited as a rigid chemical synthon, with pressure regulation being used to mediate the approach and secondary interactions of possible substrates.

  17. Variations in atmospheric pressure as a source of errors in polychromatic X-ray experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Matjushin, A M

    2000-01-01

    The influence of the atmospheric pressure on the accuracy of energy diffractometry (ED), X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) using a semiconductor Si(Li) detector, polychromatic diffractometry without the energy dispersion (PDWED) using a coordinate detector has been considered. It is shown that in the interval of pressures 710-810 mm Hg, errors in the determination of interplanar spaces can reach 2% for PDWED, which is caused by the displacement of the maximum of spectral distribution due to changes in absorption by air gaps of the device, and by changes in the quantum efficiency of the coordinate detector. In the ED and XRF methods, changes in the spectrum lead to errors in the determination of relative intensities of diffraction and fluorescence peaks, respectively. The changes in integral intensity are about 1% and can be neglected in the majority of experiments. The curves of the displacement of the spectral distribution maximum and spectral changes were calculated as a function of the atmospheric pressure...

  18. Association of Temporal Variations in Staffing With Hospital-Acquired Pressure Injury in Military Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrician, Patricia A; McCarthy, Mary S; Swiger, Pauline; Raju, Dheeraj; Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara; Su, Xiaogang; Randall, Kelly H; Loan, Lori A

    2017-04-01

    To more precisely evaluate the effects of nurse staffing on hospital-acquired pressure injury (HAPI) development, data on nursing care hours per patient day (NCHPPD), nursing skill mix, patient turnover (i.e., admissions, transfers, and discharges), and patient acuity were merged with patient information from pressure injury prevalence surveys that were collected annually for the Military Nursing Outcomes Database (MilNOD) project. The MilNOD included staffing and adverse events from 56 medical-surgical, stepdown, and critical care units in 13 military hospitals over a 4-year-period. Data on 1,643 patients were analyzed with Cox proportional hazards models and generalized estimating equations. Staffing was not associated with pressure injuries in stepdown or critical care patients. However, among the 1,104 medical-surgical patients, higher licensed practical nurse (LPN) nursing care hours per patient day (NCHPPD) 3 days and 1 week prior to the HAPI discovery date were associated with fewer HAPI (HR 0.27, p hospital units with more RNs and patient care technicians, and fewer LPNs, hospitals should reconsider LPNs as valuable members of the nursing care team. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Exercise-induced albuminuria vs circadian variations in blood pressure in type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadida Meli, Isabelle Hota; Tankeu, Aurel T; Dehayem, Mesmin Y; Chelo, David; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigated the relationship between exercise-induced ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) abnormalities in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) adolescents. METHODS We conducted a case-control at the National Obesity Center of the Yaoundé Central Hospital, Cameroon. We compared 24 h ABPM and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) at rest and after a standardized treadmill exercise between 20 Cameroonian T1DM patients and 20 matched controls. T1DM adolescents were aged 12-18 years, with diabetes for at least one year, without proteinuria, with normal office blood pressure (BP) and renal function according to the general reference population. Non-diabetic controls were adolescents of general population matched for sex, age and BMI. RESULTS Mean duration of diabetes was 4.2 ± 2.8 years. The mean 24 h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were respectively 116 ± 9 mmHg in the diabetic group vs 111 ± 8 mmHg in the non-diabetic (P = 0.06), and 69 ± 7 mm Hg vs 66 ± 5 mm Hg (P = 0.19). There was no difference in the diurnal pattern of BP in diabetes patients and non-diabetic controls (SBP: 118 ± 10 mmHg vs 114 ± 10 mmHg, P = 0.11; DBP: 71 ± 7 mmHg vs 68 ± 6 mmHg, P = 0.22). Nighttime BP was higher in the diabetic group with respect to SBP (112 ± 11 mmHg vs 106 ± 7 mmHg, P = 0.06) and to the mean arterial pressure (MAP) (89 ± 9 mmHg vs 81 ± 6 mmHg, P = 0.06). ACR at rest was similar in both groups (5.5 mg/g vs 5.5 mg/g, P = 0.74), but significantly higher in diabetes patients after exercise (10.5 mg/g vs 5.5 mg/g, P = 0.03). SBP was higher in patients having exercise-induced albuminuria (116 ± 10 mmHg vs 108 ± 10 mmHg, P = 0.09). CONCLUSION Exercise-induced albuminuria could be useful for early diagnosis of kidney damage in adolescents with T1DM.

  20. Numerical simulation of the main characteristics of a high-pressure DF – CO{sub 2} laser for amplification of picosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agroskin, V Ya; Bravy, B G; Vasiliev, G K; Kashtanov, S A; Makarov, E F; Sotnichenko, S A; Chernyshev, Yu A [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-31

    The gain characteristics of the medium of a pulsed DF – CO{sub 2} laser in the ten-micron region at the working gas pressures from 1 to 2.5 atm, which were experimentally determined in [4], are numerically simulated using a scheme that includes the main chemical and relaxation processes. It is shown that the chosen scheme of processes makes it possible (i) to numerically describe the experimental data on the temporal behaviour of gains; (ii) to explain the reason for early degradation of gains (at the degree of D{sub 2} transformation of about 20%); (iii) from comparison of experimental and calculated temporal gain profiles, to determine the degree of photodissociation of F{sub 2} molecules, which is an important parameter determining the operation of pulsed chemical DF – CO{sub 2} lasers; and (iv) to predict the gain characteristics of working mixtures depending on their composition and pressure and on the initiation parameters. The predicted gains in the mixtures of the optimal composition at a pressure of 2.5 atm, a degree of dissociation of F{sub 2} molecules per flash ∼1%, and a flash duration at half-width of ∼3 μs are ∼7 m{sup -1}. (lasers)

  1. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geissdoerfer, Kai; Goernig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations’ vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway. PMID:28098831

  2. Investigation of the effect of a bend in a transfer line that separates a pulse tube cold head and a pressure wave generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, A. A.; Atrey, M. D.; Vanapalli, S.

    2017-02-01

    A transfer line between a pulse tube cold head and a pressure wave generator is usually required to isolate the cold head from the vibrations of the compressor. Although it is a common practice to use a thin and narrow straight tube, a bent tube would allow design flexibility and easy mounting of the cold head, such as in a split Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler. In this paper, we report a preliminary investigation on the effect of the bending of the tube on the flow transfer characteristics. A numerical study using commercial computational fluid dynamics model is performed to gain insight into the flow characteristics in the bent tube. Oscillating flow experiments are performed with a straight and a bent tube at a filling pressure of 15 bar and an operating frequency of 40, 50 and 60 Hz. The data and the corresponding numerical simulations point to the hypothesis that the secondary flow in the bent tube causes a decrease in flow at a fixed pressure amplitude.

  3. An in-ear pulse wave velocity measurement system using heart sounds as time reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusche R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulse wave measurements provide vital information in medical diagnosis. For this reason, a measurement system is developed for determining the transient time of the pulse wave between the heart and the ear. To detect pressure variations in the sealed ear canal, caused by the arriving pulse wave, an in-ear sensor is developed which uses heart sounds as time reference. Furthermore, for extracting the heart sounds from the pressure measurements and calculating the pulse wave transient time, a MATLAB-based algorithm is described. An embedded microcontroller based measurement board is presented, which realizes an interface between the sensor and the computer for signal processing.

  4. Pore water pressure variations in Subpermafrost groundwater : Numerical modeling compared with experimental modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Agnès.; Goncalves, Julio; Jost, Anne; Font, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    Development and degradation of permafrost directly affect numerous hydrogeological processes such as thermal regime, exchange between river and groundwater, groundwater flows patterns and groundwater recharge (Michel, 1994). Groundwater in permafrost area is subdivided into two zones: suprapermafrost and subpermafrost which are separated by permafrost. As a result of the volumetric expansion of water upon freezing and assuming ice lenses and frost heave do not form freezing in a saturated aquifer, the progressive formation of permafrost leads to the pressurization of the subpermafrost groundwater (Wang, 2006). Therefore disappearance or aggradation of permafrost modifies the confined or unconfined state of subpermafrost groundwater. Our study focuses on modifications of pore water pressure of subpermafrost groundwater which could appear during thawing and freezing of soil. Numerical simulation allows elucidation of some of these processes. Our numerical model accounts for phase changes for coupled heat transport and variably saturated flow involving cycles of freezing and thawing. The flow model is a combination of a one-dimensional channel flow model which uses Manning-Strickler equation and a two-dimensional vertically groundwater flow model using Richards equation. Numerical simulation of heat transport consisted in a two dimensional model accounting for the effects of latent heat of phase change of water associated with melting/freezing cycles which incorporated the advection-diffusion equation describing heat-transfer in porous media. The change of hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity are considered by our numerical model. The model was evaluated by comparing predictions with data from laboratory freezing experiments. Experimental design was undertaken at the Laboratory M2C (Univesité de Caen-Basse Normandie, CNRS, France). The device consisted of a Plexiglas box insulated on all sides except on the top. Precipitation and ambient temperature are

  5. Tandem electroabsorption modulators integrated with DFB laser by ultra-low-pressure selective-area-growth MOCVD for 10 GHz optical short pulse generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q.; Pan, J. Q.; Zhang, J.; Zhou, G. T.; Wu, J.; Wang, L. F.; Wang, W.

    2005-08-01

    A novel device of tandem MQW EAMs monolithically integrated with a DFB laser is fabricated by an ultra-low-pressure (22 mbar) selective area growth MOCVD technique. Experimental results exhibit superior device characteristics with low threshold of 19 mA, output light power of 4.5 mW, and over 20 dB extinction ratio when coupled to a single mode fibre. Moreover, over 10 GHz modulation bandwidth is developed with a driving voltage of 2 V. Using this sinusoidal voltage driven integrated device, 10 GHz repetition rate pulse with an actual width of 13.7 ps without any compression elements is obtained.

  6. Tandem electro-absorption modulators integrated with DFB laser by ultra-low-pressure selective-area-growth MOCVD for 10 GHz optical short-pulse generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q.; Pan, J. Q.; Zhang, J.; Zhou, G. T.; Wu, J.; Wang, L. F.; Wang, W.

    2005-11-01

    A novel device of tandem multiple quantum wells (MQWs) electroabsorption modulators (EAMs) monolithically integrated with DFB laser is fabricated by ultra-low-pressure (22 mbar) selective area growth (SAG) MOCVD technique. Experimental results exhibit superior device characteristics with low threshold of 19 mA, output light power of 4.5 mW, and over 20 dB extinction ratio when coupled into a single mode fiber. Moreover, over 10 GHz modulation bandwidth is developed with a driving voltage of 2 V. Using this sinusoidal voltage driven integrated device, 10GHz repetition rate pulse with a width of 13.7 ps without any compression elements is obtained.

  7. Common genetic variation in the type A endothelin-1 receptor is associated with ambulatory blood pressure: a family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, T; Baker, M; Hall, D H; Avery, P J; Keavney, B

    2008-04-01

    The endothelins are among the most potent vasoconstrictors known. Pharmacological inhibition of endothelin receptors lowers blood pressure (BP). It is unknown whether naturally occurring genetic variation in the endothelin receptors influences BP. We have evaluated the type A endothelin receptor (EDNRA) as a candidate gene for hypertension in a large family study. A total of 1425 members of 248 families selected via a proband with hypertension were studied. Ambulatory BP monitoring was conducted using the A&D TM2421 device. Four haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the EDNRA gene were typed. There was evidence of association between genotype at the rs5335 (C+70G) SNP and night systolic blood pressure (+1.24% (s.e. 0.64) per G allele; P=0.05); night diastolic blood pressure (+1.64% (s.e. 0.71) per G allele; P=0.021) and night mean BP (+1.51% (s.e. 0.64) per G allele; P=0.017). Borderline significant trends in the same direction were seen for daytime BPs. Proportions of hypertensives in each of the three genotype groups were C/C 34.7%, C/G 37.9%, G/G 42.4% yielding an odds ratio for hypertension per G allele of 1.19 (95% confidence interval 1.00-1.41; P=0.05). In conclusion, the rs5335 (C+70G) polymorphism of the EDNRA gene has small effects on the risk of hypertension. Natural variation in other genes in the endothelin-signalling pathway should be explored to identify additional influences on BP regulation.

  8. SEASONAL MORTALITY PATTERNS IN NON-HUMAN PRIMATES: IMPLICATIONS FOR VARIATION IN SELECTION PRESSURES ACROSS ENVIRONMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogarten, Jan F.; Brown, Leone M.; Chapman, Colin A.; Cords, Marina; Doran-Sheehy, Diane; Fedigan, Linda M.; Grine, Frederick E.; Perry, Susan; Pusey, Anne E.; Sterck, Elisabeth H. M.; Wich, Serge A.; Wright, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Examining seasonal mortality patterns can yield insights into the drivers of mortality and thus potential selection pressures acting on individuals in different environments. We compiled adult and juvenile mortality data from nine wild non-human primate taxa to investigate the role of seasonality in patterns of mortality and address the following questions: Is mortality highly seasonal across species? Does greater environmental seasonality lead to more seasonal mortality patterns? If mortality is seasonal, is it higher during wet seasons or during periods of food scarcity? and Do folivores show less seasonal mortality than frugivores? We found seasonal mortality patterns in five of nine taxa, and mortality was more often tied to wet seasons than food-scarce periods, a relationship that may be driven by disease. Controlling for phylogeny, we found a positive relationship between the degree of environmental seasonality and mortality, with folivores exhibiting more seasonal mortality than frugivores. These results suggest that mortality patterns are influenced both by diet and degree of environmental seasonality. Applied to a wider array of taxa, analyses of seasonal mortality patterns may aid understanding of life-history evolution and selection pressures acting across a broad spectrum of environments and spatial and temporal scales. PMID:23025613

  9. Effects of mental workload and caffeine on catecholamines and blood pressure compared to performance variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadelis, Christos; Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Vlachogiannis, Emmanouil; Skepastianos, Petros; Bamidis, Panayiotis; Maglaveras, Nikos; Pappas, Kostantinos

    2003-02-01

    Caffeine is characterised as a central nervous system stimulant, also affecting metabolic and cardiovascular functions. A number of studies have demonstrated an effect of caffeine on the excretion of catecholamines and their metabolites. Urinary epinephrine and norepinephrine have been shown to increase after caffeine administration. Similar trends were observed in our study in adrenaline (ADR) and noradrenaline (NORADR) levels and additionally a dose dependent effect of caffeine. The effect of caffeine on cognitive performance, blood pressure, and catecholamines was tested under resting conditions and under mental workload. Each subject performed the test after oral administration of 1 cup and then 3 cups of coffee. Root mean square error (RMSE) for the tracking task was continuously monitored. Blood pressure was also recorded before and after each stage of the experiment. Catecholamines were collected and measured for three different conditions as: at rest, after mental stress alone, after one dose of caffeine under stress, and after triple dose of caffeine under stress. Comparison of the performance of each stage with the resting conditions revealed statistically significant differences between group of smokers/coffee drinkers compared with the other two groups of non-coffee drinkers/non-smokers and non-smokers/coffee drinkers. There was no statistically significant difference between the last two groups. There was an increase of urine adrenaline with 1 cup of coffee and statistically significant increase of urine noradrenaline. Both catecholamines were significantly increased with triple dose of caffeine. Mental workload increased catecholamines. There was a dose dependent effect of caffeine on catecholamines.

  10. Characterization of chemical contaminants and their spectral properties from an atmospheric pressure ns-pulsed microdischarge in neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillerud, Colin H.; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Moorman, Mathew; Yee, B. T.; Anderson, John; Pfeifer, Nathaniel B.; Hedberg, E. L.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2017-03-01

    Portable applications of microdischarges, such as the remediation of gaseous wastes or the destruction of volatile organic compounds, will mandate operation in the presence of contaminant species. This paper examines the temporal evolution of microdischarge optical and ultraviolet emissions during pulsed operation by experimental methods. By varying the pulse length of a microdischarge initiated in a 4-hole silicon microcavity array operating in a 655 Torr ambient primarily composed of Ne, we were able to measure the emission growth rates for different contaminant species native to the discharge environment as a function of pulse length. It was found that emission from hydrogen and oxygen impurities demonstrated similar rates of change, while emissions from molecular and atomic nitrogen, measured at 337.1 and 120 nm, respectively, exhibited the lowest rate of change. We conclude that it is likely that O2 undergoes the same resonant energy transfer process between rare gas excimers that has been shown for H2. Further, efficient resonant processes were found to be favored during ignition and extinction phases of the pulse, while emission at the 337.1 nm line from N2 was favored during the intermediate stage of the plasma. In addition to the experimental results, a zero-dimensional analysis is also presented to further understand the nature of the microdischarge.

  11. Continuous-Flow Inlet Systems for Low Pressure Curie-Point Pyrolysis. Introduction of Pulse-Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Carlsen, Lars

    1984-01-01

    With emphasis on a constant reactant flow, a series of inlet systems for gas-phase Curie-point pyrolysis—mass spectrometry experiments have been studied. Inlet systems for the handling of gaseous, liquid and oligomeric (solid) samples have been designed and their performances evaluated. The princ....... The principle of pulse-pyrolysis is introduced and its applicability to kinetic studies outlined....

  12. Influence of oxygen pressure on the structural, electrical and optical properties of Nb-doped ZnO thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Muying, E-mail: wumy@dgut.edu.cn [School of Electronic Engineering, Dongguan University of Technology, Guangdong Dongguan 523808 (China); Yu, Shihui [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); He, Lin; Zhang, Geng; Ling, Dongxiong [School of Electronic Engineering, Dongguan University of Technology, Guangdong Dongguan 523808 (China); Zhang, Weifeng [Key Laboratory of Photovoltaic Materials of Henan Province and School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Nb-doped zinc oxide (NZO) transparent conductive thin films with highly (0 0 2)-preferred orientation were deposited on glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition method in oxygen ambience under different oxygen pressures. The as-deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), electrical and optical characterization techniques. It was found that a desirable amount of oxygen can reduce the related defect scattering and enhance the carrier mobility. The resistivity and average optical transmittance of the NZO thin films are of 10{sup −4} Ω cm and over 88%, respectively. The lowest electrical resistivity of the film is found to be about 4.37 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm. In addition, the influence of oxygen pressure on optical properties in NZO thin films was systematically studied as well.

  13. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on structural and optical properties of pulsed laser deposited CaBi4Ti4O15 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emani, Sivanagi Reddy; Raju, K. C. James

    2017-03-01

    The influence of oxygen partial pressure (OPP) on the structural and optical properties of CaBi4Ti4O15 (CBTi) thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition have been investigated in the range of 0.1 mbar to 7.8 × 10-3 mbar. The structural properties show all the films are polycystlline in nature with orthorombic structure. The optical transmission of the films is in the range of 60-90%. A slight shift in transmission threshold towards higher wavelength region with an increase in O2 pressure reveals the systematic reduction in the optical band gap energy (3.69 to 3.59 eV) of the films. Raman studies confirm the phase formation and presence of stresses in the films. It is suggested that the OPP played a key role in controlling crystallinity, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties in CBTi thin films.

  14. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Dezhen; Ren, Chunsheng

    2008-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position.

  15. Ar/O{sub 2} gas pressure dependence of atomic concentration of zirconia prepared by zirconium pulse arc PBII and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukimura, Ken [Department of Electrical Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tatara-Miyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)]. E-mail: kyukimur@mail.doshisha.ac.jp; Yoshinaga, Hiroaki [Department of Electrical Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tatara-Miyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Ohtsu, Yasunori [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Honjo-machi1, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Fujita, Hiroharu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Honjo-machi1, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Nakamura, Keiji [Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Ma Xinxin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2006-01-15

    Zirconium oxide films were prepared by plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII and D), where a zirconium pulse arc discharge was generated in O{sub 2}/Ar gas mixture. The plasma was maintained for approximately 3 ms, and the ion current at the substrate was detected in a time range from 1 to 10 ms after the arc initiation. At O{sub 2}/Ar pressures of 2.6-3.0 Pa, a stoichiometric film was obtained, while at a pressure lower than 2.2 Pa, the film also contained ZrO {sub x} (x < 2) phase as well as ZrO{sub 2} phase. In the absence of argon gas, the plasma became unstable, which resulted in shortage of zirconium ions in the plasma, and hence, a stoichiometric condition was not found.

  16. Validation of noninvasive pulse contour cardiac output using finger arterial pressure in cardiac surgery patients requiring fluid therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuizen, C.M.; Lansdorp, B.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Scheffer, G.J.; Lemson, J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nexfin (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) allows for noninvasive continuous monitoring of blood pressure (ABPNI) and cardiac output (CONI) by measuring finger arterial pressure (FAP). To evaluate the accuracy of FAP in measuring ABPNI and CONI as well as the adequacy of detecting

  17. Validation of noninvasive pulse contour cardiac output using finger arterial pressure in cardiac surgery patients requiring fluid therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuizen, Charlotte; Lansdorp, Benno; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; Scheffer, Gert-Jan; Lemson, Joris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nexfin (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) allows for noninvasive continuous monitoring of blood pressure (ABPNI) and cardiac output (CONI) by measuring finger arterial pressure (FAP). To evaluate the accuracy of FAP in measuring ABPNI and CONI as well as the adequacy of detecting

  18. Design and performance of high-pressure PLANET beamline at pulsed neutron source at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, T.; Sano-Furukawa, A. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Arima, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Komatsu, K. [Geochemical Research Center, Graduate School