WorldWideScience

Sample records for public health partnerships

  1. The Partnership of Public Health and Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Jelenc, Marjetka

    2016-01-01

    Public health focuses on health of the population and it is concerned with threats to health based on population health analysis. Anthropology covers most aspects that concern human beings. Both sciences converge on community and this fact represents a foundation for the partnership between public health and anthropology. Biological/medical anthropology is one of the highly developed fields of anthropology and the most important for public health.

  2. Public-Private Partnerships In Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khalid BOUTI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Extract:The current importance of public debt requires governments to increasingly shift towards Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs. They are long-term contracts of private financing method providing or contributing to public service. The payment is made by the public partner and/or users of the service.The World Health Organization (WHO defines this type of partnership as ‘‘a means to bring together a set of actors for the common goal of improving the health of populations based on mutually agreed roles and principles.’’Historically, the principle of PPP was established by the Private Finance Initiative (PFI, launched by the conservative government of John Major in 1992. It was from this moment that this model quickly spread to the rest of the world. In the mid-90s and from Australia, PPP agreement began to become part of the language of governments. In 1997, Labour with Tony Blair leading, strongly developed this management method, first and particularly in hospitals and then, in the entire public sector and spreading to the Royal Navy. Today, 10-15% of British public investments are made using PFI method....

  3. Public health and business: a partnership that makes cents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Paul A; Fielding, Jonathan E

    2006-01-01

    Historically, public health agencies have had relatively few formal partnerships with private business. However, both groups share an interest in ensuring a healthy population. Businesses have a financial interest in supporting organized public health efforts; in turn, business partnerships can increase the reach and effectiveness of public health. This paper makes the case for the business sector's participation in the broad public health system and its support of governmental public health agencies. Examples of past and current partnerships exemplify how public health efforts benefit business and suggest opportunities for future collaboration to improve the public's health.

  4. Improving public health system performance through multiorganizational partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Glen P; Scutchfield, F Douglas

    2010-11-01

    Public health activities in the United States are delivered through multiple public and private organizations that vary widely in their resources, missions, and operations. Without strong coordination mechanisms, these delivery arrangements may perpetuate large gaps, inequities, and inefficiencies in public health activities. We examined evidence and uncertainties concerning the use of partnerships to improve the performance of the public health system, with a special focus on partnerships between public health agencies and health care organizations. We found that the types of partnerships likely to have the largest and most direct effects on population health are among the most difficult, and therefore least prevalent, forms of collaboration. High opportunity costs and weak and diffuse participation incentives hinder partnerships that focus on expanding effective prevention programs and policies. Targeted policy actions and leadership strategies are required to illuminate and enhance partnership incentives.

  5. Barriers to partnership working in public health: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Carlton Taylor-Robinson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Public health provision in England is undergoing dramatic changes. Currently established partnerships are thus likely to be significantly disrupted by the radical reforms outlined in the Public Health White Paper. We therefore explored the process of partnership working in public health, in order to better understand the potential opportunities and threats associated with the proposed changes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 70 participants took part in an in-depth qualitative study involving 40 semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions. Participants were senior and middle grade public health decision makers working in Primary Care Trusts, Local Authorities, Department of Health, academia, General Practice and Hospital Trusts and the third sector in England. Despite mature arrangements for partnership working in many areas, and much support for joint working in principle, many important barriers exist. These include cultural issues such as a lack of shared values and language, the inherent complexity of intersectoral collaboration for public health, and macro issues including political and resource constraints. There is particular uncertainty and anxiety about the future of joint working relating to the availability and distribution of scarce and diminishing financial resources. There is also the concern that existing effective collaborative networks may be completely disrupted as the proposed changes unfold. The extent to which the proposed reforms might mitigate or potentiate these issues remains unclear. However the threats currently remain more salient than opportunities. CONCLUSIONS: The current re-organisation of public health offers real opportunity to address some of the barriers to partnership working identified in this study. However, significant threats exist. These include the breakup of established networks, and the risk of cost cutting on effective public health interventions.

  6. Mapping private-public-partnership in health organizations: India experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayan Chakravarty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The dream of universal health care demands a much larger and wider approach, engaging not just the public but also the private sector. This paper has attempted mapping the present public-private partnership scenario in India using the WHO health system functions framework, giving an insight into the nature and extent of challenge of the present dominant model. A systematic review methodology was adopted to identify published literature on private-public partnership in India. From an initial pool of 785 articles were identified. Finally a total of 29 published articles meeting the inclusion criteria were included. The descriptive framework of Health system functions by WHO (2000, were used to analyze the data. All papers which were considered for the study were segregated based on the 4 prime health system functions: Financing; Management of non-financial inputs; Health service delivery and Oversight. The literature review reveals that more than half of the papers (51.72% selected for the study were focused on health service delivery functions and quite thin literature were available for other 3 functions, which includes financing, management of non-financial inputs and oversight functions as per WHO. This finding raise an important question if the genesis of most of the public-private partnerships is out of the inability of the public sector in reaching out to a particular target group by virtue of its geographical position or difficulty in working with high risk groups. Considering the limitations of the present model of engagement of private and public sectors, it demands for an alternative model of engagement where the mutual strength that exists with each one of the partners, could be harnessed and complemented. An alternate model is to engage in tri-partite partnership (TPP between the government, non-government and the corporates.

  7. Using interorganizational partnerships to strengthen public health laboratory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Kristina; Kimsey, Paul; Buehring, Gertrude

    2013-01-01

    Due to the current economic environment, many local and state health departments are faced with budget reductions. Health department administrators and public health laboratory (PHL) directors need to assess strategies to ensure that their PHLs can provide the same level of service with decreased funds. Exploratory case studies of interorganizational partnerships among local PHLs in California were conducted to determine the impact on local PHL testing services and capacity. Our findings suggest that interorganizational forms of cooperation among local PHLs can help bolster laboratory capacity by capturing economies of scale, leveraging scarce resources, and ensuring access to affordable, timely, and quality laboratory testing services. Interorganizational partnerships will help local and state public health departments continue to maintain a strong and robust laboratory system that supports their role in communicable disease surveillance.

  8. Ethics in public health research: masters of marketing: bringing private sector skills to public health partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Valerie A; Garbrah-Aidoo, Nana; Scott, Beth

    2007-04-01

    Skill in marketing is a scarce resource in public health, especially in developing countries. The Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing with Soap set out to tap the consumer marketing skills of industry for national handwashing programs. Lessons learned from commercial marketers included how to (1) understand consumer motivation, (2) employ 1 single unifying idea, (3) plan for effective reach, and (4) ensure effectiveness before national launch. After the first marketing program, 71% of Ghanaian mothers knew the television ad and the reported rates of handwashing with soap increased. Conditions for the expansion of such partnerships include a wider appreciation of what consumer marketing is, what it can do for public health, and the potential benefits to industry. Although there are practical and philosophical difficulties, there are many opportunities for such partnerships.

  9. Involving local health departments in community health partnerships: evaluation results from the partnership for the public's health initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Allen; Hsu, Clarissa; Schwartz, Pamela M; Pearson, David; Greenwald, Howard P; Beery, William L; Flores, George; Casey, Maria Campbell

    2008-03-01

    Improving community health "from the ground up" entails a comprehensive ecological approach, deep involvement of community-based entities, and addressing social determinants of population health status. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Office of the Surgeon General, and other authorities have called for public health to be an "inter-sector" enterprise, few models have surfaced that feature local health departments as a key part of the collaborative model for effecting community-level change. This paper presents evaluation findings and lessons learned from the Partnership for the Public's Health (PPH), a comprehensive community initiative that featured a central role for local health departments with their community partners. Funded by The California Endowment, PPH provided technical and financial resources to 39 community partnerships in 14 local health department jurisdictions in California to promote community and health department capacity building and community-level policy and systems change designed to produce long-term improvements in population health. The evaluation used multiple data sources to create progress ratings for each partnership in five goal areas related to capacity building, community health improvement programs, and policy and systems change. Overall results were generally positive; in particular, of the 37 partnerships funded continuously throughout the 5 years of the initiative, between 25% and 40% were able to make a high level of progress in each of the Initiative's five goal areas. Factors associated with partnership success were also identified by local evaluators. These results showed that health departments able to work effectively with community groups had strong, committed leaders who used creative financing mechanisms, inclusive planning processes, organizational changes, and open communication to promote collaboration with the communities they served.

  10. An international partnership interdisciplinary training programme on public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrioti, Despena; Charalambous, George; Skitsou, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Targeted training programmes are more efficient towards skills development. Literature on assessing training needs in order to formulate programmes through international partnerships is very limited. This study intended to identify perceived training needs in public health with an aim...... at providing the respective training in cooperation with the World Health Organization, European Office. Method and Material: We distributed a questionnaire to Greek professionals such as doctors, nurses, administrative personnel and social scientists, employed in the public sector all over the country. We...... analysed 197 structured self-administered questionnaires using one way ANOVA to identify associations between individual characteristics of health professionals and perceived training needs. Results: The majority of participants were women (n=143, 73%) and men (n=53, 27%). In terms of motivation...

  11. Partnership work between Public Health and Health Psychology: introduction to a novel training programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Clare

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public health services implement individual, community and population level interventions to change health behaviours, improve healthy life expectancy and reduce health inequalities. Understanding and changing health behaviour is complex. Integrating behaviour change theory and evidence into interventions has the potential to improve services. Methods Health Psychologists apply evidence and theories aimed at understanding and changing health behaviour. A Scottish programme is piloting the training of Health Psychologists within NHS contexts to address prominent public health challenges. Results This article outlines the details of this novel programme. Two projects are examined to illustrate the potential of partnership working between public health and health psychology. Conclusion In order to develop and improve behaviour change interventions and services, public health planners may want to consider developing and using the knowledge and skills of Health Psychologists. Supporting such training within public health contexts is a promising avenue to build critical NHS internal mass to tackle the major public health challenges ahead.

  12. Public health partnerships in medical toxicology education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schier, Joshua G; Rubin, Carol; Schwartz, Michael D; Thomas, Jerry D; Geller, Robert J; Morgan, Brent W; McGeehin, Michael A; Frumkin, Howard

    2010-06-01

    In December 2002, the medical toxicology sub-board, which consists of representatives from emergency medicine, preventive medicine, and pediatrics, released revised core content for medical toxicology, aiming to better meet the academic challenges imposed by the continually expanding knowledge base of medical toxicology. These challenges included the addition of relatively new areas of interest in medical toxicology, including population health, while simultaneously ensuring that a structural framework existed to accommodate future areas of interest. There is no evidence readily available to assess how well the educational curricula of existing fellowship programs are meeting these needs. In an effort to address this, the authors describe a medical toxicology fellowship program that consists of a partnership among the Emory University School of Medicine, the Georgia Poison Control Center, and the CDC, as well as the results of a reorganization of its academic curriculum that occurred in 2006. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first published report describing such a curriculum redesign. Suggestions and potential resources proposed as enhancements for the public health-associated education of medical toxicology fellows are discussed. The authors also seek to initiate a discussion among programs about how to optimally meet the new challenges developed by the medical toxicology sub-board.

  13. Public-private partnerships and responsibility under international law: a global health perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Clarke

    2014-01-01

    Partnerships between the public and private sectors are an increasingly accepted method to deal with pressing global issues, such as those relating to health. Partnerships, comprised of states and international organizations (public sector) and companies, non-governmental organizations, research ins

  14. A multistate examination of partnership activity among local public health systems using the National Public Health Performance Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Priscilla A; Curtis, Amy B; Hall-Downey, Laura; Moonesinghe, Ramal

    2012-01-01

    This study examines whether partnership-related measures in the second version of the National Public Health Performance Standards (NPHPS) are useful in evaluating level of activity as well as identifying latent constructs that exist among local public health systems (LPHSs). In a sample of 110 LPHSs, descriptive analysis was conducted to determine frequency and percentage of 18 partnership-related NPHPS measures. Principal components factor analysis was conducted to identify unobserved characteristics that promote effective partnerships among LPHSs. Results revealed that 13 of the 18 measures were most frequently reported at the minimal-moderate level (conducted 1%-49% of the time). Coordination of personal health and social services to optimize access (74.6%) was the most frequently reported measure at minimal-moderate levels. Optimal levels (conducted >75% of the time) were reported most frequently in 2 activities: participation in emergency preparedness coalitions and local health departments ensuring service provision by working with state health departments (67% and 61% of respondents, respectively) and the least optimally reported activity was review partnership effectiveness (4% of respondents). Factor analysis revealed categories of partnership-related measures in 4 domains: resources and activities contributing to relationship building, evaluating community leadership activities, research, and state and local linkages to support public health activities. System-oriented public health assessments may have questions that serve as proxy measures to examine levels of interorganizational partnerships. Several measures from the NPHPS were useful in establishing a national baseline of minimal and optimal activity levels as well as identifying factors to enhance the delivery of the 10 essential public health services among organizations and individuals in public health systems.

  15. Product development public-private partnerships for public health: a systematic review using qualitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pinho Campos, Katia; Norman, Cameron D; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2011-10-01

    Almost a decade ago, public health initiated a number of innovative ventures to attract investments from multinational drug companies for the development of new drugs and vaccines to tackle neglected diseases (NDs). These ventures - known as product development public-private partnerships (PD PPPs) - represent the participation of the public and private actors toward the discovery and development of essential medicines to reduce the suffering of over one billion people worldwide living with NDs. This systematic review aimed to identify empirical-based descriptive articles to understand critical elements in the partnership process, and propose a framework to shed light on future guidelines to support better planning, design and management of existing and new forms of PPPs for public health. Ten articles met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed and synthesized using qualitative content analysis. The findings show that the development stage of PD PPPs requires a careful initiation and planning process including discussion on values and shared goals, agreement on mutual interests & equality of power relation, exchange of expertise & resources, stakeholder engagement, and assessment of the local health capacity. The management stage of PD PPPs entails transparency, extensive communication and participatory decision-making among partner organizations. This review illustrates the difficulties, challenges and effective responses during the partnering process. This model of collaboration may offer a way to advance population health at present, while creating streams of innovation that can yield future social and financial dividends in enhancing the public's health more widely.

  16. Helping the public 'Discover Health' in their local library. Providing health information in public libraries: a partnership approach in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Elspeth; Marley, Lesley

    2004-06-01

    A partnership between the Specialist Health Promotion Service of NHS Tayside and Dundee City Council developed a project, 'Discover Health', to bring health information to the public. The two main formats used were traditional leaflets and Internet access via the People's Network, both available in public libraries. The steering group for the project was made up of staff from both organisations. The NHS side secured the funding; the Council side provided the accommodation and information and communication technologies. The partnership worked well, and the project is continuing, with expansion in the pipeline for other areas within Tayside. The various aspects of the functioning of the partnership are discussed. A literature review of similar initiatives is included.

  17. The University of Washington's Community-Oriented Public Health Practice program and Public Health-Seattle & King County partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Peter J; Hartfield, Karen; Nicola, Bud; Bogan, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    The Community-Oriented Public Health Practice (COPHP) program, a 2-year in-residence MPH degree program in the University of Washington School of Public Health, has partnered with Public Health-Seattle & King County (PHSKC) since 2002 to create a mutually beneficial set of programs to improve teaching and address community-based public health problems in a practice setting. The COPHP program uses a problem-based learning approach that puts students in small groups to work on public health problems. Both University of Washington-based and PHSKC-based faculty facilitate the classroom work. In the first year for students, COPHP, in concert with PHSKC, places students in practicum assignments at PHSKC; in the second year, students undertake a master's project (capstone) in a community or public health agency. The capstone project entails taking on a problem in a community-based agency to improve either the health of a population or the capacity of the agency to improve population health. Both the practicum and the capstone projects emphasize applying classroom learning in actual public health practice work for community-based organizations. This partnership brings PHSKC and COPHP together in every aspect of teaching. In essence, PHSKC acts as the "academic health department" for COPHP. There are detailed agreements and contracts that guide all aspects of the partnership. Both the practicum and capstone projects require written contracts. The arrangements for getting non-University of Washington faculty paid for teaching and advising also include formal contracts.

  18. Southeastern Regional Pediatric Disaster Surge Network: a public health partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginter, Peter M; Rucks, Andrew C; Duncan, W Jack; Wingate, Martha S; Beeman, S Kenn; Reeves, Jane; West, Maury A

    2010-01-01

    In the event of a natural or man-made disaster involving large numbers of children, resources in the Southeastern U.S. are extremely limited. This article chronicles the efforts of the Alabama Department of Public Health, the Mississippi State Department of Health, and the South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness in conjunction with more than 40 organizations to develop a voluntary network of health-care providers, public health departments, volunteers, and emergency responders from Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. The purpose of the Southeastern Regional Pediatric Disaster Surge Network (the Network) is to improve the pediatric preparedness response strategies of public health, emergency response, and pediatric providers in the event of large-scale emergencies or disasters that overwhelm local or state pediatric resources. The planning and development of the Network is proceeding through three general phases--information sharing, mutual goal setting and collective action, and long-term formal linkages. In Phase 1, critical planning tasks to be undertaken in the development of the Network were identified. In Phase 2, the agencies developed a draft operational handbook that served as the basis for a formal memorandum of understanding. In Phase 3, participants will engage in exercises and evaluations that will further identify and work out logistical and operational details.

  19. An international partnership interdisciplinary training programme on public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrioti, Despena; Charalambous, George; Skitsou, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    at providing the respective training in cooperation with the World Health Organization, European Office. Method and Material: We distributed a questionnaire to Greek professionals such as doctors, nurses, administrative personnel and social scientists, employed in the public sector all over the country. We...... to participate in and expectations of the course, they stressed the need to go deeper into applications, tools and methods on how to implement relevant policies, to better serve the population of their respective district. They rank primary health care (68.5%), health system challenges (66%) and environmental...

  20. A win-win partnership between academia and public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroro, Rita A; Marola, Marianne; Ferreira, Tina; Raboin, Katie; Lewis, Katharine Kranz

    2011-01-01

    Partnerships are fundamental to successful public health practice, and collaborations between academia and public health practice, as recommended by the Institute of Medicine and the Council on Linkages between academia and public health practice, are vital to ensuring a competent public health workforce. During times of economic crisis, graduate public health nursing students with clinical expertise, people and communication skills, and critical thinking capabilities are uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between academia and public health practice. In 2009, 5 registered nurses enrolled in a master of science in nursing program with a focus on public health partnered with public health professionals from the state Department of Public Health to conduct an active surveillance study to understand the increase in vancomycin-resistant enterococci incidences that occurred since 2005. The purpose of this paper is to describe the successes and challenges of the collaboration to provide an insight for those who wish to build similar collaborations. Even in light of the challenges that occurred during this collaboration, faculty should strongly consider developing partnerships with public health practice in order to contribute to important public health surveillance and other functions, and to provide relevant experiences for students. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Analysis of a unique global public-private partnership to promote oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Cynthia M; Dugdill, Lindsey

    2011-08-01

    Partnerships for health promotion are between two or more partners to work co-operatively towards a set of shared health outcomes; few public-private partnerships in oral health promotion have been established. To undertake a detailed analysis of a unique global public-private partnership to promote oral health between a global company, Unilever and the Féderation Dentaire International (FDI), a membership organisation representing more than one million dentists worldwide. Qualitative and quantitative, including: collating and analysing a wide range of partnership documents (n =164); reviewing film and pictorial records; undertaking structured interviews (n=34) with people who had a critical role in establishing and delivering the aims of the partnership, and external experts; and site visits to selected global projects active at the time of the evaluation. Over 1 million people have been reached directly through their engagement with 39 projects in 36 countries; an oral health message about the benefits of twice daily tooth brushing has appeared with the authority of the FDI logo on billions of packs of Unilever Oral Care's toothpastes worldwide; many individual members of National Dental Associations have participated in health promotion activities within their communities for the first time; some organisational challenges during the development and delivery of the partnership were recognised by both partners. The first phase of this unique global partnership has been successful in making major progress towards achieving its goals; lessons learned have ensured that the next phase of the partnership has significant potential to contribute to improving oral health globally. © 2011 FDI World Dental Federation.

  2. [On the issue of development of state-private partnership in public health of Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The article considers possible directions of development of organizational technologies of state-private partnership in public health of Russia. Such directions are emphasized as management of operational activities of medical institutions, development of infrastructure of population medical care system, implementation of innovative technologies, organization of interaction with international clinical institutions, joint development of legal and low decisions in the area of interactions oa state and business relating to public health. The factors interfering with development of effective state-private partnership are demonstrated and possible ways of overcoming are proposed.

  3. Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement and the public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Mike

    2015-05-29

    The Trans-Pacific Trade Agreement (TPPA) negotiations have been conducted in secrecy over the past four years. In New Zealand, the government has not released any official details of these negotiations and all the information we have about TPPA is derived from leaks. This makes any analysis of the risks and benefits of TPPA difficult to carry out. However, the consistency of the leaked material indicates that the TPPA appears to have major implications for the New Zealand health system, potentially adversely affecting public health initiatives, the control of alcohol and obesity problems, and reducing the availability of some drugs. This article describes the basis for these concerns, and aims to show that the TPPA could interfere with our ability to organise our health systems, now and in the future, for the best interests of all the people of New Zealand.

  4. Building sustainable community partnerships into the structure of new academic public health schools and programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughan, Monica; Gillman, Laura B; Boumbulian, Paul; Davis, Marsha; Galen, Robert S

    2011-01-01

    We describe and assess how the College of Public Health at the University of Georgia, established in 2005, has developed formal institutional mechanisms to facilitate community-university partnerships that serve the needs of communities and the university. The College developed these partnerships as part of its founding; therefore, the University of Georgia model may serve as an important model for other new public health programs. One important lesson is the need to develop financial and organizational mechanisms that ensure stability over time. Equally important is attention to how community needs can be addressed by faculty and students in academically appropriate ways. The integration of these 2 lessons ensures that the academic mission is fulfilled at the same time that community needs are addressed. Together, these lessons suggest that multiple formal strategies are warranted in the development of academically appropriate and sustainable university-community partnerships.

  5. Gender blind? An analysis of global public-private partnerships for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Sarah; Buse, Kent; Kapilashrami, Anuj

    2017-05-12

    The Global Public Private Partnerships for Health (GPPPH) constitute an increasingly central part of the global health architecture and carry both financial and normative power. Gender is an important determinant of health status, influencing differences in exposure to health determinants, health behaviours, and the response of the health system. We identified 18 GPPPH - defined as global institutions with a formal governance mechanism which includes both public and private for-profit sector actors - and conducted a gender analysis of each. Gender was poorly mainstreamed through the institutional functioning of the partnerships. Half of these partnerships had no mention of gender in their overall institutional strategy and only three partnerships had a specific gender strategy. Fifteen governing bodies had more men than women - up to a ratio of 5:1. Very few partnerships reported sex-disaggregated data in their annual reports or coverage/impact results. The majority of partnerships focused their work on maternal and child health and infectious and communicable diseases - none addressed non-communicable diseases (NCDs) directly, despite the strong role that gender plays in determining risk for the major NCD burdens. We propose two areas of action in response to these findings. First, GPPPH need to become serious in how they "do" gender; it needs to be mainstreamed through the regular activities, deliverables and systems of accountability. Second, the entire global health community needs to pay greater attention to tackling the major burden of NCDs, including addressing the gendered nature of risk. Given the inherent conflicts of interest in tackling the determinants of many NCDs, it is debatable whether the emergent GPPPH model will be an appropriate one for addressing NCDs.

  6. Leading change through collaborative partnerships: a profile of leadership and capacity among local public health leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Branda; Harrison, Lisa Macon

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative partnerships have grown in prominence as vehicles for systems change and organizational development among a network of organizations, particularly in the complex field of public health. Likewise, supporting the functioning and effectiveness of collaborative partnerships has become a key interest among organizational development scholars and community psychologists alike. In the question of capacity-building, no aspect of collaborative capacity has received greater attention than that of leadership. Research on collaborative partnerships has highlighted the importance of shared leadership while at the same time acknowledging that specific individuals do and often must emerge and assume more prominent roles in the partnership in order for the work of the partnership to move forward. However, we have limited knowledge of these key individuals and the roles that they play in non-hierarchical, voluntary partnerships. The present study is a comparative case study of prominent leaders in three regional public health partnerships. The aim of this investigation is to explore the questions: (1) What does it mean to be a leader in a context where no one is "in charge?" (2) What roles do those individuals identified as leaders play?, and (3) What are the specific capacities that enable the enactment of these roles? We find that those viewed as leaders by their partnerships shared a similar profile both in the range and types of roles they play and the capacities that enable them to carry out these roles. Further, we find that while individual attributes such as passion, knowledge, and leadership skills are important, some of the most prominent capacities are rooted in the organizational and institutional contexts within which the leader is nested.

  7. Using a partnership barometer to evaluate environmental public health tracking activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkedal, Marni Y V; Malecki, Kristen M; Werner, Mark A; Anderson, Henry A

    2008-01-01

    High-quality environmental health surveillance is challenged by a system in which environmental and health agencies often function with insufficient coordination to routinely address critical issues. The Environmental Public Health Tracking program is working to build a more cohesive system with the capacity for integrated data and information. This work requires a significant amount of effort dedicated to establishing strong partnerships between agencies. Such a task requires skills and activities that differ significantly from the more technical skills needed to physically link data and information from environmental and health resources. Although the work to link people is different from linking data, it is of primary importance because the development of strong partnerships almost invariably provides the necessary foundation for the future integration of data and expertise. As such, the development of partnerships between environmental and health agencies needs to be recognized as a priority product. One approach for moving partnerships into the fore is the creation of assessment tools, or "partnership barometers," that objectively quantify the collaborative process for monitoring progress between and within partners over time. Such measurement would provide a realistic indicator of progress toward tangible products but more importantly emphasizes the importance of building sustainable relationships.

  8. Enhancing an International Perspective in Public Health Teaching through Formalized University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzoska, Patrick; Akgün, Seval; Antia, Bassey E.; Thankappan, K. R.; Nayar, Kesavan Rajasekharan; Razum, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Teaching in the field of public health needs to employ a global perspective to account for the fact that public health problems and solutions have global determinants and implications as well. International university partnerships can promote such a perspective through the strengthening of cooperation, exchange, and communication between academic institutions across national boundaries. As an example for such an academic network in the field of public health, we introduce the International Public Health Partnership—a collaboration between a university in Germany and universities in India, Turkey, and Nigeria. Formed in 2005, it facilitated the exchange of information, fostered discussion about the transferability of public health concepts, contributed to the structural development of the universities involved, and promoted an intercultural dialog through a combination of local and distance learning activities. Although well accepted by students and staff, different obstacles were encountered; these included limited external funding, scarce own financial, time and personnel resources, and diverging regulations and structures of degree programs at the partnership sites. In the present article, we share several lessons that we learned during our joint collaboration and provide recommendations for other universities that are involved in partnerships with institutions of higher education or are interested to initiate such collaborations. PMID:28337431

  9. Public trust and initiatives for new health care partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanic, D

    1998-01-01

    Effective communication between doctor and patient is a critical component of high-quality care. The physician's credibility has a significant effect on treatment outcomes. Because changes in medicine and larger cultural trends challenge the ability of clinicians to engage their patients' trust, new kinds of partnerships must be created. To do this effectively, physicians have to sharpen their communication skills and devise strategies for assuring that their patients become informed allies in their own treatment. A number of innovations are helping to build these alliances: training in communication skills; creative uses of the Internet and videotape technologies; improved "customer service" programs; critical pathways for patients; and special educational aids. All these tools promise to be useful, but they require careful development and evaluation.

  10. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility. Des

  11. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility.

  12. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility. Des

  13. Public-private partnership role in increasing the quality of the health insurance services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan CONSTANTINESCU

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In a context in which the social politics tend to become an optimization instrument for adapting the social security system to the market’s forces, and the talk of some analysts about reinventing the European social model, the partnership between the public sector and the private one in the social domain presumes, besides a tight collaboration, a combination of advantages specific to the private sector, more competitive and efficient, with the ones from the public sector, more responsible toward the society regarding the public money spending. The existence of the private health insurances cannot be tied, causally, to a social politics failure, reason for which they don’t intend, usually, to replace the public insurances, but rather, to offer a complementary alternative for them. In such a context, the public-private partnership’s goal regards both increasing the insurant’s satisfaction and increasing his/her access degree to services, and increasing the investments profitability made by the insurant and insurer. We are facing thus a mixed competitive system that combines the peculiarities of the public and private sectors. Interesting is the fact that, although the different meanings for the quality term may generate some problems regarding implementing quality management in the two health insurance sectors, the experts in the area reckon that establishing a good relationship between public buyers and private providers of healthcare can reduce the costs of public health programs. An essential condition for operating efficiently the partnership model is defining correctly the basic medical services packet financed by the public budget. Which doesn’t exclude the possibility of administrating by the private insurers, the sums of money gathered from the employees and employers contributions to the health fund, as a recently initiated project of law intends to do in Romania.

  14. Public-private partnerships with large corporations: setting the ground rules for better health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Gauden; McKee, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Public-private partnerships with large corporations offer potential benefits to the health sector but many concerns have been raised, highlighting the need for appropriate safeguards. In this paper we propose five tests that public policy makers may wish to apply when considering engaging in such a public-private partnership. First, are the core products and services provided by the corporation health enhancing or health damaging? In some cases, such as tobacco, the answer is obvious but others, such as food and alcohol, are contested. In such cases, the burden of proof is on the potential partners to show that their activities are health enhancing. Second, do potential partners put their policies into practice in the settings where they can do so, their own workplaces? Third, are the corporate social responsibility activities of potential partners independently audited? Fourth, do potential partners make contributions to the commons rather than to narrow programmes of their choosing? Fifth, is the role of the partner confined to policy implementation rather than policy development, which is ultimately the responsibility of government alone?

  15. The vulnerability of being ill informed: the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement and Global Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Henry; Shiau, Stephanie

    2014-09-01

    The Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) is a regional trade agreement currently being negotiated by 11 Pacific Rim countries, excluding China. While the negotiations are being conducted under a veil of secrecy, substantive leaks over the past 4 years have revealed a broad view of the proposed contents. As it stands the TPPA poses serious risks to global public health, particularly chronic, non-communicable diseases. At greatest risk are national tobacco regulations, regulations governing the emergence of generic drugs and controls over food imports by transnational corporations. Aside from a small group of public health professionals from Australia, the academic public health community has missed these threats to the global community, although many other health-related entities, international lawyers and health-conscious politicians have voiced serious concerns. As of mid-2014 there has been no comment in the leading public health journals. This large lacuna in interest or recognition reflects the larger problem that the public health education community has all but ignored global non-communicable diseases. Without such a focus, the risks are unseen and the threats not perceived. This cautionary tale of the TPPA reflects the vulnerability of being ill informed of contemporary realities.

  16. Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helby Petersen, Ole

    This PhD dissertation studies national similarities and differences in policy and regulation of public-private partnerships (PPPs), with an empirical focus on Denmark and Ireland. The starting point and motivation for the study is the observation that whereas PPPs are often depicted in the academic...

  17. Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Gudrid

    There is a great deal of confusion about the meaning of the concept public-private partnership (PPP). Much is written on the subject but only rarely do authors give an adequate account of what they mean when they talk about PPP, nor do they acknowledge that there exist qualitatively different PPP...

  18. Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin; Jeppesen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Public-private partnerships in the environmental field have emerged as one option in the pursuit of sustainable development. So-called ‘Green Networks’, ‘Cleaner Production Centres’, ‘Waste Minimisation Clubs’ are among others highlighted as alternatives to governmental regulation. While being...

  19. Using public health and community partnerships to reduce density of alcohol outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, David H; Sparks, Michael; Yang, Evelyn; Schwartz, Randy

    2013-04-11

    Excessive alcohol use causes approximately 80,000 deaths in the United States each year. The Guide to Community Preventive Services recommends reducing the density of alcohol outlets - the number of physical locations in which alcoholic beverages are available for purchase either per area or per population - through the use of regulatory authority as an effective strategy for reducing excessive alcohol consumption and related harms. We briefly review the research on density of alcohol outlets and public health and describe the powers localities have to influence alcohol outlet density. We summarize Regulating Alcohol Outlet Density: An Action Guide, which describes steps that local communities can take to reduce outlet density and the key competencies and resources of state and local health departments. These include expertise in public health surveillance and evaluation methods, identification and tracking of outcome measures, geographic information systems (GIS) mapping, community planning and development of multisector efforts, and education of community leaders and policy makers. We illustrate the potential for partnerships between public health agencies and local communities by presenting a contemporary case study from Omaha, Nebraska. Public health agencies have a vital and necessary role to play in efforts to reduce alcohol outlet density. They are often unaware of the potential of this strategy and have strong potential partners in the thousands of community coalitions nationwide that are focused on reducing alcohol-related problems.

  20. Institutional public private partnerships for core health services: evidence from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellaro, Giulia; Longo, Francesco

    2011-04-19

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are potential instruments to enable private collaboration in the health sector. Despite theoretical debate, empirical analyses have thus far tended to focus on the contractual or project dimension, overlooking institutional PPPs, i.e., formal legal entities run by proper corporate-governance mechanisms and jointly owned by public and private parties for the provision of public-health goods. This work aims to fill this gap by carrying out a comparative analysis of the reasons for the adoption of institutional PPPs and the governance and managerial features necessary to establish them as appropriate arrangements for public-health services provisions. A qualitative analysis is carried out on experiences of institutional PPPs within the Italian National Health Service (Sistema Sanitario Nazionale, SSN). The research question is addressed through a contextual and comparative embedded case study design, assuming the entire population of PPPs (4) currently in force in one Italian region as the unit of analysis: (i) a rehabilitation hospital, (ii), an orthopaedic-centre, (iii) a primary care and ambulatory services facility, and (iv) a health- and social-care facility. Internal validity is guaranteed by the triangulation of sources in the data collection phase, which included archival and interview data. Four governance and managerial issues were found to be critical in determining the positive performance of the case examined: (i) a strategic market orientation to a specialised service area with sufficient potential demand, (ii) the allocation of public capital assets and the consistent financial involvement of the private partner, (iii) the adoption of private administrative procedures in a regulated setting while guaranteeing the respect of public administration principles, and (iv) clear regulation of the workforce to align the contracts with the organisational culture. Findings suggests that institutional PPPs enable national health

  1. Institutional public private partnerships for core health services: evidence from Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longo Francesco

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public-private partnerships (PPPs are potential instruments to enable private collaboration in the health sector. Despite theoretical debate, empirical analyses have thus far tended to focus on the contractual or project dimension, overlooking institutional PPPs, i.e., formal legal entities run by proper corporate-governance mechanisms and jointly owned by public and private parties for the provision of public-health goods. This work aims to fill this gap by carrying out a comparative analysis of the reasons for the adoption of institutional PPPs and the governance and managerial features necessary to establish them as appropriate arrangements for public-health services provisions. Methods A qualitative analysis is carried out on experiences of institutional PPPs within the Italian National Health Service (Sistema Sanitario Nazionale, SSN. The research question is addressed through a contextual and comparative embedded case study design, assuming the entire population of PPPs (4 currently in force in one Italian region as the unit of analysis: (i a rehabilitation hospital, (ii, an orthopaedic-centre, (iii a primary care and ambulatory services facility, and (iv a health- and social-care facility. Internal validity is guaranteed by the triangulation of sources in the data collection phase, which included archival and interview data. Results Four governance and managerial issues were found to be critical in determining the positive performance of the case examined: (i a strategic market orientation to a specialised service area with sufficient potential demand, (ii the allocation of public capital assets and the consistent financial involvement of the private partner, (iii the adoption of private administrative procedures in a regulated setting while guaranteeing the respect of public administration principles, and (iv clear regulation of the workforce to align the contracts with the organisational culture. Conclusions Findings

  2. Principles for building public-private partnerships to benefit food safety, nutrition, and health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Kretser, Alison; Steele, Robert; Kretsch, Molly; Applebaum, Rhona; Clydesdale, Fergus; Cummins, Deborah; Hentges, Eric; Navia, Juan; Jarvis, Ashley; Falci, Ken

    2013-10-01

    The present article articulates principles for effective public-private partnerships (PPPs) in scientific research. Recognizing that PPPs represent one approach for creating research collaborations and that there are other methods outside the scope of this article, PPPs can be useful in leveraging diverse expertise among government, academic, and industry researchers to address public health needs and questions concerned with nutrition, health, food science, and food and ingredient safety. A three-step process was used to identify the principles proposed herein: step 1) review of existing PPP guidelines, both in the peer-reviewed literature and at 16 disparate non-industry organizations; step 2) analysis of relevant successful or promising PPPs; and step 3) formal background interviews of 27 experienced, senior-level individuals from academia, government, industry, foundations, and non-governmental organizations. This process resulted in the articulation of 12 potential principles for establishing and managing successful research PPPs. The review of existing guidelines showed that guidelines for research partnerships currently reside largely within institutions rather than in the peer-reviewed literature. This article aims to introduce these principles into the literature to serve as a framework for dialogue and for future PPPs.

  3. Partnerships between the faith-based and medical sectors: Implications for preventive medicine and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jeff

    2016-12-01

    Interconnections between the faith-based and medical sectors are multifaceted and have existed for centuries, including partnerships that have evolved over the past several decades in the U.S. This paper outlines ten points of intersection that have engaged medical and healthcare professionals and institutions across specialties, focusing especially on primary care, global health, and community-based outreach to underserved populations. In a time of healthcare resource scarcity, such partnerships-involving religious congregations, denominations, and communal and philanthropic agencies-are useful complements to the work of private-sector medical care providers and of federal, state, and local public health institutions in their efforts to protect and maintain the health of the population. At the same time, challenges and obstacles remain, mostly related to negotiating the complex and contentious relations between these two sectors. This paper identifies pressing legal/constitutional, political/policy, professional/jurisdictional, ethical, and research and evaluation issues that need to be better addressed before this work can realize its full potential.

  4. Seniors connect: a partnership for training between health care and public libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Diane G; Mosher, Elaine; Wilson, Suzanne; Lipkus, Charlene; Collins, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    Kaleida Health Libraries, in partnership with the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library, presented "Seniors Connect: A Health Information Project." The program was funded by the Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo and the Kaleida Health Foundation. The purpose of the project was to teach African-American and Hispanic senior citizens or their caregivers residing in the city of Buffalo how to search the Internet to find quality, accurate, understandable health information. Attendees were taught to distinguish quality information from inaccurate, misleading, and fraudulent material. A total of fourteen training sessions were offered. The Seniors Connect program was initiated with health fair at each branch library, conducted by Kaleida Health staff, to provide an opportunity for participants to learn about health care services available in their community; observe demonstrations of health information searches on the Internet; learn about new treatment modalities for diseases such as diabetes, high cholesterol, thyroid abnormalities, and hypertension; and interact with area health care providers and library staff. The sessions were highly rated by attendees and many participants expressed their gratitude for a program geared specifically toward seniors.

  5. From consultation to participation in public health research: reflections on a community-based research partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Lauren J; O'Connor, Moira

    2014-12-19

    Road traffic crashes and their outcomes are substantial global public health issues and public health initiatives are increasingly involving relevant community members in order to create sustainable change. This paper describes an applied research project utilizing participatory methods to establish a road trauma support service in Western Australia and reflects on the extent of participation in the community-based research partnership. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) provided the basis for the research project conducted in partnership with 34 government and non-government agency representatives and people affected personally by road trauma and which resulted in 22 recommendations for establishing the service. Attempts to position the group as co-researchers highlighted the dynamic interplay of factors that hinder and enable participation in participatory research. Barriers to participation within the research process included the limited time and funds, reluctance to share authorship, and a lack of clarity regarding roles and processes. Factors that enabled participation were the recognition of each member's expertise, providing different forms and methods of communication, and the reimbursement of costs according to role. In May 2012, the Government of Western Australia announced it would fund the recommendations and Road Trauma Support Western Australia was launched in November 2013. Notwithstanding this successful outcome, there were varied experiences of participation in the research process, and this was despite the use of a research methodology that is by definition participatory, with explicit and embedded participatory structures and processes. The research project shows that elements of CBPR can be incorporated into public health research, even in projects with externally-imposed time and budget constraints.

  6. A study on the public-private partnership to global health issues in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Sook

    2013-12-01

    To find the fit that is most apt for the current situation in Korea and to find new ways of identifying potential partners for the purpose of public-private partnership (PPP). The research was conducted using domestic and international literature where the concept and definition of PPP was stated, and cases of PPP reported by the World Health Organization and cases in developed countries were investigated. Data were collected from 237 PPP potential partner organization, government agencies, and the government under a special law, local governments, businesses, hospitals, and private organizations through their internet webpage. The Delphi questionnaire was given to relevant institutions and questionnaire was surveyed general hospitals. Groups that were likely to realize most of the partnership were nonprofit or nongovernmental organizations, the central government, the private sector, public healthcare services, and products. In order to secure the position of exceptional comparative advantage of international expertise in the field of healthcare, we must implement PPP strategy that is in ordinance of domestic situation.

  7. Leveraging human capital to reduce maternal mortality in India: enhanced public health system or public-private partnership?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhivanan Purnima

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Developing countries are currently struggling to achieve the Millennium Development Goal Five of reducing maternal mortality by three quarters between 1990 and 2015. Many health systems are facing acute shortages of health workers needed to provide improved prenatal care, skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric services – interventions crucial to reducing maternal death. The World Health Organization estimates a current deficit of almost 2.4 million doctors, nurses and midwives. Complicating matters further, health workforces are typically concentrated in large cities, while maternal mortality is generally higher in rural areas. Additionally, health care systems are faced with shortages of specialists such as anaesthesiologists, surgeons and obstetricians; a maldistribution of health care infrastructure; and imbalances between the public and private health care sectors. Increasingly, policy-makers have been turning to human resource strategies to cope with staff shortages. These include enhancement of existing work roles; substitution of one type of worker for another; delegation of functions up or down the traditional role ladder; innovation in designing new jobs;transfer or relocation of particular roles or services from one health care sector to another. Innovations have been funded through state investment, public-private partnerships and collaborations with nongovernmental organizations and quasi-governmental organizations such as the World Bank. This paper focuses on how two large health systems in India – Gujarat and Tamil Nadu – have successfully applied human resources strategies in uniquely different contexts to the challenges of achieving Millennium Development Goal Five.

  8. Building strong research partnerships between public health and researchers: a VA case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midboe, Amanda M; Elwy, A Rani; Durfee, Janet M; Gifford, Allen L; Yakovchenko, Vera; Martinello, Richard A; Ross, David; Czarnogorski, Maggie; Goetz, Matthew B; Asch, Steven M

    2014-12-01

    We are in a new era of partner-based implementation research, and we need clear strategies for how to navigate this new era. Drawing on principles from community-based participatory research, the Clinical Public Health group of the Department of Veterans Affairs and the HIV/Hepatitis Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (HHQUERI) forged a longstanding partnership that has improved the care of Veterans with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus. An exemplar HIV testing project epitomizes this partnership and is discussed in terms of the lessons learned as a result of our high level of collaboration around design, analysis, implementation, and dissemination across projects over the past several years. Lessons learned through this partnered testing program involve respecting different time horizons among the partners, identifying relevant research questions for both parties, designing flexible studies, engaging all partners throughout the research, and placing an emphasis on relationship building at all times. These lessons and strategies can benefit others conducting partner-based research both within the Veterans Health Administration (VA) and in other integrated healthcare systems.

  9. Zoos and public health: A partnership on the One Health frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Robinette

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, accredited zoos are not just places for entertainment, they are actively involved in research for conservation and health. During recent decades in which the challenges for biodiversity conservation and public health have escalated, zoos have made significant changes to address these difficulties. Zoos increasingly have four key areas of focus: education, recreation, conservation, and research. These key areas are important in addressing an interrelated global conservation (i.e. habitat and wildlife loss and public health crisis. Zoo and public health professionals working together within a One Health framework represent a powerful alliance to address current and future conservation and public health problems around the world. For researchers, practitioners, and students, the collaboration between zoos and public health institutions offers the opportunity to both teach and operationalize this transdisciplinary approach. Using examples from our programs, we give a template for moving forward with collaborative initiatives and sustainable solutions involving partners in both zoos and public health institutions. We provide examples of cooperative programs and suggest a model for consideration in the development of further activities in this area.

  10. Zoos and public health: A partnership on the One Health frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinette, C; Saffran, L; Ruple, A; Deem, S L

    2017-06-01

    Today, accredited zoos are not just places for entertainment, they are actively involved in research for conservation and health. During recent decades in which the challenges for biodiversity conservation and public health have escalated, zoos have made significant changes to address these difficulties. Zoos increasingly have four key areas of focus: education, recreation, conservation, and research. These key areas are important in addressing an interrelated global conservation (i.e. habitat and wildlife loss) and public health crisis. Zoo and public health professionals working together within a One Health framework represent a powerful alliance to address current and future conservation and public health problems around the world. For researchers, practitioners, and students, the collaboration between zoos and public health institutions offers the opportunity to both teach and operationalize this transdisciplinary approach. Using examples from our programs, we give a template for moving forward with collaborative initiatives and sustainable solutions involving partners in both zoos and public health institutions. We provide examples of cooperative programs and suggest a model for consideration in the development of further activities in this area.

  11. Public-private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodge, Graeme A.; Greve, Carsten; Boardman, Anthony E.

    2017-01-01

    Infrastructure PPPs are now main-stream. Both partnership language and its contractual forms have evolved over the past few decades, though. Compared to early optimistic promises, we now have a more nuanced and balanced view of what PPPs are and what they can achieve. Indeed, modern PPPs are tied...... experience in this context, particularly through the global financial crisis. It concludes that PPP can become an integrated part of infrastructure development around the world, assuming learning occurs from past experience. It presents several lessons on deepening partnerships; on the multiplicity...... of the PPP ‘model’ and its ingredients; on policy learning and on governing infrastructure in the medium term. And it also concludes that not only does the PPP brand today still offer manifold possibilities, even more public policy experimentation is currently warranted....

  12. Good governance of animal health systems and public-private partnerships: an Australian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, P F

    2012-08-01

    The animal health system in Australia has evolved over more than 100 years and includes innovative public-private partnership arrangements. The establishment in 1996 of Animal Health Australia (AHA), a not-for-profit company, was a crucial development which formalised arrangements for shared decision-making and funding across both government and industry stakeholders. However, Federal and State governments retain legislative authority for animal health control. Accordingly, all programmes must recognise that the public sector remains an executive arm of government, accountable for its actions. Hence, much effort has been invested in ensuring that the governance arrangements within AHA are lawful and transparent. The Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (EADRA) is a very good example of governance arrangements that are sustainably financed, widely available, provided efficiently, without waste or duplication, and in a manner that is transparent and free of fraud or corruption. The benefits of EADRA include certainty and greater transparency of funding; greater efficiency through increased probability of a rapid response to an occurrence of any of 65 diseases; and industry participation in the management and financing of such a response.

  13. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Science Applications Program: Exploring Partnerships to Enhance Decision Making in Public Health Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Timi S.; Venezia, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Earth Science Enterprise is engaged in applications of NASA Earth science and remote sensing technologies for public health. Efforts are focused on establishing partnerships with those agencies and organizations that have responsibility for protecting the Nation's Health. The program's goal is the integration of NASA's advanced data and technology for enhanced decision support in the areas of disease surveillance and environmental health. A focused applications program, based on understanding partner issues and requirements, has the potential to significantly contribute to more informed decision making in public health practice. This paper intends to provide background information on NASA's investment in public health and is a call for partnership with the larger practice community.

  14. [Public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the health sector: global processes and national dynamics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Celia

    2017-10-02

    This essay addresses several dimensions that promote and consolidate the growing participation by private stakeholders in the decision-making process in health, emphasizing international and domestic factors that have facilitated and sustained the persistence of the neoliberal political and ideological perspective over the course of nearly thirty years (since the 1990s). The article emphasizes the role of intergovernmental organizations in this process, highlighting public-private interactions at the global and domestic levels, with a specific focus on so-called public-private partnerships (PPPs). The working premise is that such linkages alter the power relations in policy formulation and implementation, with a predominance of private stakeholders. The article presents an overview of the development of PPPs in Europe, Latin America, and Brazil, identifying their specific origins and the simultaneity of triggering events. The text reiterates the importance of not overlooking the power of these actors in dislodging them from this political position, whether in multilateral organizations or national health systems. The aim is to emphasize the importance of more in-depth reflection on the subject, backing debates within the sector. This entire dynamic requires rethinking strategies of resistance to preserve the rights won through centuries of struggle.

  15. Health problems among migrant construction workers: A unique public-private partnership project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balkrishna B Adsul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Construction sector is a booming industry and involves many hazardous activities. Migrant labor in the industry is susceptible to various health and occupational hazards. In a unique public-private partnership project, a medical team from a public sector teaching hospital in Mumbai provided comprehensive on-site health care services to the construction workers of a private construction company. Objective: To study socio-demographic profile and morbidity pattern of construction workers. Setting and Design: A cross-sectional study at construction site Vidyavihar (West, Mumbai, was carried out over the period of May to November 2010. Materials and Methods: A medical team provided comprehensive on-site health care services, and a Health Card was devised to maintain the record of socio-demographic, occupational details, and complete physical examination findings of the workers who participated in the study. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 15.0. Results: Of the 1337 workers (all males examined, 1289 (96.4% belonged to 15-45 years age group. The mean age of the workers was 26.25 ± 8.49 years. A third of the migrants belonged to West Bengal. The average number of health problems in the workers was 1.41. Regular consumers of tobacco and alcohol were 50.48 and 14.65%, respectively. Nearly one-fifth of the workers had febrile illness, of which 20.71% had suspected malaria; 12.6% had respiratory infections, while 3.4% were found to have hypertension. There was a statistically significant association (P < 0.05 between type of occupation and morbidity status.

  16. HRM in public private partnerships: working in a health production system

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Simon

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the changing nature of employment and employment management within multi-organisational public services ‘partnerships’. In line with international trends, a major feature of the 1997-2010 New Labour government’s public policy was encouraging partnerships between organisations of all sectors to run public services. Within healthcare, central government has increasingly been seen as taking on a role of market regulator, with organisations from all sectors allowed to plan as ...

  17. Partnerships between the faith-based and medical sectors: Implications for preventive medicine and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Levin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Interconnections between the faith-based and medical sectors are multifaceted and have existed for centuries, including partnerships that have evolved over the past several decades in the U.S. This paper outlines ten points of intersection that have engaged medical and healthcare professionals and institutions across specialties, focusing especially on primary care, global health, and community-based outreach to underserved populations. In a time of healthcare resource scarcity, such partnerships—involving religious congregations, denominations, and communal and philanthropic agencies—are useful complements to the work of private-sector medical care providers and of federal, state, and local public health institutions in their efforts to protect and maintain the health of the population. At the same time, challenges and obstacles remain, mostly related to negotiating the complex and contentious relations between these two sectors. This paper identifies pressing legal/constitutional, political/policy, professional/jurisdictional, ethical, and research and evaluation issues that need to be better addressed before this work can realize its full potential.

  18. Pharmaceutical Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagley, Constance; Tvarnø, Christina D.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a game theory and law-and-management analysis of for- profit pharmaceutical public-private partnerships, a complex type of legal arrangement in the highly regulated pharmaceutical industry. A pharmaceutical public-private partnership (PPPP) agreement is a legally binding con...

  19. Public – private 'partnerships' in health – a global call to action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishtar Sania

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The need for public-private partnerships arose against the backdrop of inadequacies on the part of the public sector to provide public good on their own, in an efficient and effective manner, owing to lack of resources and management issues. These considerations led to the evolution of a range of interface arrangements that brought together organizations with the mandate to offer public good on one hand, and those that could facilitate this goal though the provision of resources, technical expertise or outreach, on the other. The former category includes of governments and intergovernmental agencies and the latter, the non-profit and for-profit private sector. Though such partnerships create a powerful mechanism for addressing difficult problems by leveraging on the strengths of different partners, they also package complex ethical and process-related challenges. The complex transnational nature of some of these partnership arrangements necessitates that they be guided by a set of global principles and norms. Participation of international agencies warrants that they be set within a comprehensive policy and operational framework within the organizational mandate and involvement of countries requires legislative authorization, within the framework of which, procedural and process related guidelines need to be developed. This paper outlines key ethical and procedural issues inherent to different types of public-private arrangements and issues a Global Call to Action.

  20. To what extent does a tobacco carve-out protect public health in the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirono, Katherine; Gleeson, Deborah; Freeman, Becky

    2016-04-15

    In November 2015, negotiations of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement came to a close with the release of the final text. It included an optional carve-out (exclusion) for tobacco control measures from the TPP's investor-state dispute settlement mechanism. Despite the apparent 'win' for the field of tobacco control, the limited scope of the carve-out provides only partial protection for public health regulatory measures.

  1. Public-Private Partnerships for Health Promotion: The Experiences of the S[superscript 5] Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, J.; Hellard, M. E.; Lim, M. S.; Dixon, H.; Wakefield, M.; Aitken, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis on involving the private sector in public health to harness the considerable resources and skills of the business world to address significant health issues. While such collaboration should be encouraged, the involvement of business in public health campaigns can raise unexpected challenges when the approaches and…

  2. Nottingham Trent University and Makerere University School of Public Health partnership: experiences of co-learning and supporting the healthcare system in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musoke, David; Gibson, Linda; Mukama, Trasias; Khalil, Yesmean; Ssempebwa, John C

    2016-03-28

    Partnerships between developed and developing country institutions are increasingly becoming important in addressing contemporary global health challenges faced by health systems. Inter-university health collaboration such as the Nottingham Trent University (UK) and Makerere University School of Public Health (Uganda) partnership provide opportunities for working together in training, research and service delivery while strengthening health systems. This paper shares the experiences, achievements and opportunities of this partnership in co-learning and supporting the health system in Uganda. This includes a project being implemented to strengthen the training, supervision and motivation of community health workers in rural Uganda. Training and research are a key focus of the partnership and have involved both staff and students of both institutions including guest lectures, seminars and conference presentations. The partnership's collaboration with stakeholders such as the Ministry of Health (Uganda) and local health authorities has ensured participation necessary in supporting implementation of sustainable interventions. The partnership uses several channels such as email, telephone, Skype, Dropbox and WhatsApp which have been useful in maintaining constant and effective communication. The challenges faced by the partnership include lack of funding to support student mobility, and varying academic schedules of the two institutions. The experiences and prospects of this growing partnership can inform other collaborations in similar settings.

  3. Mobile Health for All: Public-Private Partnerships Can Create a New Mental Health Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zeev, Dror

    2016-06-06

    Research has already demonstrated that different mHealth approaches are feasible, acceptable, and clinically promising for people with mental health problems. With a robust evidence base just over the horizon, now is the time for policy makers, researchers, and the private sector to partner in preparation for the near future. The Lifeline Assistance Program is a useful model to draw from. Created in 1985 by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Lifeline is a nationwide program designed to help eligible low-income individuals obtain home phone and landline services so they can pursue employment, reach help in case of emergency, and access social services and healthcare. In 2005, recognizing the broad shift towards mobile technology and mobile-cellular infrastructure, the FCC expanded the program to include mobile phones and data plans. The FCC provides a base level of federal support, but individual states are responsible for regional implementation, including engagement of commercial mobile phone carriers. Given the high rates of disability and poverty among people with severe mental illness, many are eligible to benefit from Lifeline and research has shown that a large proportion does in fact use this program to obtain a mobile phone and data plan. In the singular area of mobile phone use, the gap between people with severe mental illness and the general population in the U.S. is vanishing. Strategic multi-partner programs will be able to grant access to mHealth for mental health programs to those who will not be able to afford them-arguably, the people who need them the most. Mobile technology manufacturing costs are dropping. Soon all mobile phones in the marketplace, including the more inexpensive devices that are made available through subsidy programs, will have "smart" capabilities (ie, internet connectivity and the capacity to host apps). Programs like Lifeline could be expanded to include mHealth resources that capitalize on "smart" functions

  4. A public health academic-practice partnership to develop capacity for exercise evaluation and improvement planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kate S; Thomas, Michael W; Durham, Dennis P; Jackson, Lillie M; Porth, Leslie L; Buxton, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In December 2006, Congress passed the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act to improve the nation's public health preparedness and response capabilities. It includes the role of Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHPs) to establish a competency-based core curriculum and perform evaluation of impact on newly developed materials. The Heartland Center for Public Health Preparedness (HCPHP) at the Saint Louis University School of Public Health is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention national CPHP network and is engaged with state and regional partners in workforce development, preparedness planning, evaluation, and multi-year exercise and training cycles. This includes development, implementation, and evaluation of the HCPHP Exercise Evaluation Training Program to improve the competence and capacity for exercise evaluation and improvement planning. This program is designed to enhance quality improvement and performance measurement capabilities to identify increase of workforce competence over time (maturity).

  5. Portugal's experience with public-private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.; Akintoye, A.; Beck, M.; Kumaraswamy, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents the Portuguese experience in Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs). Since 1993, Portugal has been using PPPs intensively, mainly for highway construction and in the health sector. This has enabled the country to close the infrastructure gap and avoid the budget constraints at the

  6. Municipalities collaborating in public health: The Danish Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard; El Ansari, Walid; Rasmussen, Hanna Barbara

    2010-01-01

    ; and the fourth factor is the bearing of personal/individual factors on the partnership e.g., personal engagement in the project. Early attention to these four factors could contribute to more effective partnership working. Keywords: partnership; coalition; smoking cessation; Denmark; multi-site evaluation......This study explored the Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership (SPCP) which builds upon a collaboration between two Danish municipalities targeted at the prevention of tobacco smoking. The aim of the study was to describe the processes of SPCP, to examine the difficulties this collaboration...... faced, and to assess how these experiences could be used to improve future partnership collaboration. We employed qualitative methodology comprising 12 semi-structured one-to-one interviews with SPCP‘s stakeholders and an analysis of the partnership documents and reports. The findings suggested...

  7. The laboratory efficiencies initiative: partnership for building a sustainable national public health laboratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderhof, John C; Moulton, Anthony D; Ned, Renée M; Nicholson, Janet K A; Chu, May C; Becker, Scott J; Blank, Eric C; Breckenridge, Karen J; Waddell, Victor; Brokopp, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Beginning in early 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Public Health Laboratories launched the Laboratory Efficiencies Initiative (LEI) to help public health laboratories (PHLs) and the nation's entire PHL system achieve and maintain sustainability to continue to conduct vital services in the face of unprecedented financial and other pressures. The LEI focuses on stimulating substantial gains in laboratories' operating efficiency and cost efficiency through the adoption of proven and promising management practices. In its first year, the LEI generated a strategic plan and a number of resources that PHL directors can use toward achieving LEI goals. Additionally, the first year saw the formation of a dynamic community of practitioners committed to implementing the LEI strategic plan in coordination with state and local public health executives, program officials, foundations, and other key partners.

  8. The Potential Impact of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) on public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vogli, Roberto; Renzetti, Noemi

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to examine the potential health effects of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment partnership (TTIP). Our review indicates that, although proponents of the TTIP claim that the treaty will produce benefits to health-enhancing determinants such as economic growth and employment, evidence shows that previous trade liberalization policies are associated with increasing economic inequities. By reducing Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) and by promoting increased cooperation between US and EU governmental agencies in the pharmaceutical sector, the TTIP could result in improved research cooperation and reduced duplication of processes. However, the TTIP chapter on Intellectual Property (IP) and Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) that expand and extend patent monopolies, and delay the availability of generic drugs, are likely to cause underutilization of needed medications among vulnerable populations. The TTIP's Investor to State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) arbitration system, a mechanism that allows transnational companies (TNCs) to sue governments when a policy or law reduces the value of their investment, is likely to generate a negative impact on regulations aimed at increasing access to healthcare, and reducing tobacco, alcohol consumption, and diet-related diseases. The Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards (SPS) of the TTIP is expected to weaken regulations in the food and agricultural sectors especially in the EU, with potentially negative effects on food safety and foodborne diseases. Finally, the ISDS is likely to infringe the ability of governments to tackle environmental problems such as climate change deemed to be the most important global health threat of the century. Our review concludes by discussing policy implications and the effect of the TTIP on democracy, national sovereignty and the balance of power between large TNCs and governments. It also discusses the adoption of an evidence-based precautionary principle

  9. Municipalities Collaborating in Public Health: The Danish Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Tanggaard Andersen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership (SPCP which builds upon a collaboration between two Danish municipalities targeted at the prevention of tobacco smoking. The aim of the study was to describe the processes of SPCP, to examine the difficulties this collaboration faced, and to assess how these experiences could be used to improve future partnership collaboration. We employed qualitative methodology comprising 12 semi-structured one-to-one interviews with SPCP’s stakeholders and an analysis of the partnership documents and reports. The findings suggested that the main potentials of the partnership were the personal relations between the members and stakeholders with the possibilities of the creation of new connections with other actors. Barriers to successful partnership building were the implementation of the new Local Government Reform as a competing task, and that the two municipalities were heterogenic in respect to organizational issues and working methods. Other impediments included the lack of continuity in leadership, the lack of clarity regarding the form of collaboration and roles, as well as different expectations of the stakeholders. We conclude that four factors remain critical for partnerships. The first is the clarity of the collaborative effort. Second, partnerships need to take into account the structural circumstances and culture/value systems of all stakeholders. Third is the impact of contextual factors on the development of the partnership; and the fourth factor is the bearing of personal/individual factors on the partnership e.g., personal engagement in the project. Early attention to these four factors could contribute to more effective partnership working.

  10. Advancing Public Health on the Changing Global Trade and Investment Agenda Comment on "The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Is It Everything We Feared for Health?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Anne Marie; Gleeson, Deborah

    2016-09-28

    Concerns regarding the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) have raised awareness about the negative public health impacts of trade and investment agreements. In the past decade, we have learned much about the implications of trade agreements for public health: reduced equity in access to health services; increased flows of unhealthy commodities; limits on access to medicines; and constrained policy space for health. Getting health on the trade agenda continues to prove challenging, despite some progress in moving towards policy coherence. Recent changes in trade and investment agendas highlight an opportunity for public health researchers and practitioners to engage in highly politicized debates about how future economic policy can protect and support equitable public health outcomes. To fulfil this opportunity, public health attention now needs to turn to strengthening policy coherence between trade and health, and identifying how solutions can be implemented. Key strategies include research agendas that address politics and power, and capacity building for both trade and health officials. © 2017 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  11. Integrating service-learning into an MPH curriculum for future public health practitioners: strengthening community-campus partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lisa S; Royster, Michael O; Bailey, Nannette; Reed, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Through a 3-year grant from the Community-Campus Partnerships for Health, the Virginia Commonwealth University MPH program adopted an incremental approach to implement service-learning focused on health disparities into its curriculum. We first incorporated service-learning into an elective course and then a required internship. We then worked with the Virginia Department of Health to develop a plan for first-year students to engage in additional experiential learning through a practicum. Students also were encouraged to organize community service events, such as health fairs. Service-learning was fully incorporated into the internship. The first-year student practicum, followed by the internship, has strengthened collaborations among faculty, students, and the Virginia Department of Health and expanded student service in the community. The number of student-supported community service events more than doubled. An incremental approach to incorporating service-learning led to successful implementation of the pedagogy. Service-learning benefits community partners, enriches student learning, and is well-suited for studies in public health.

  12. Municipalities collaborating in public health: The Danish Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard; El Ansari, Walid; Rasmussen, Hanna Barbara

    2010-01-01

    that the main potentials of the partnership were the personal relations between the members and stakeholders with the possibilities of the creation of new connections with other actors. Barriers to successful partnership building were the implementation of the new Local Government Reform as a competing task......, and that the two municipalities were heterogenic in respect to organizational issues and working methods. Other impediments included the lack of continuity in leadership, the lack of clarity regarding the form of collaboration and roles, as well as different expectations of the stakeholders. We conclude that four...

  13. 77 FR 30351 - Sec. 221 Public Private Partnerships Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... such a program be based on public- private partnership (PPP) principles and maximize the use of private... effective public-private partnership equipage incentive program. This notice is for the initial meeting. A...

  14. Public-private partnerships improve health outcomes in individuals with early stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, James E; Tolea, Magdalena I; George, Nika; Wingbermuehle, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    In a collaborative effort between the Missouri Department of Health, Area Agencies on Aging (AAA), Alzheimer Association, and academic researchers, we tested whether early dementia detection and comprehensive care consultations would improve health outcomes in care receivers (CRs) and their family caregivers (FCGs), therefore addressing an important public health concern. A total of 244 community-dwelling older adults screened for early-stage dementia by the AAA field staff were referred to the Alzheimer Association and participated in Project Learn MORE (Missouri Outreach and Referral Expanded) (PLM) - a 2-year, nonrandomized multisite intervention consisting of comprehensive care consultations to improve coping skills. PLM participants were compared against 96 controls receiving the Alzheimer Association's "usual services" between January 2011 and December 2012. We examined CR and FCG outcomes, including burden, care confidence, and mood, as effects of PLM, on delaying transitions in level of care. CRs showed improved knowledge (P=0.002) and reduced depression (P=0.007), while FCGs demonstrated improved knowledge (P=0.003) and ability to identify sources of support for the CR (P=0.032) and for themselves (P=0.043). However, FCGs were more burdened after PLM (P=0.02), due to increased awareness of Alzheimer's disease. PLM delayed transitions in care (odds ratio [OR] 3.32, 95% confidence level [CI]: 1.25-8.83) with the number needed to treat =6.82. PLM was successful in improving detection of incident cases of dementia in the community and in connecting patients and their families with needed services. Our findings support the use of state agencies and community service partners to detect dementia. Early implementation of psychosocial interventions could have significant impact in improving patient- and family-centered outcomes, potentially providing a cost-efficient alternative to pharmacotherapy.

  15. Public Private Partnerships Applicability to Defence Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Public Private Partnerships Applicability to Defence Procurement Jonathan Barnes KPMG Corporate Finance Report Documentation Page Report Date...25SEP2001 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) 25SEP2001 - 27SEP2001 Title and Subtitle Public Private Partnerships Applicability to Defence...unclassified Classification of Abstract unclassified Limitation of Abstract UU Number of Pages 6 kpmg Aim Provide an appreciation of: n Public Private Partnerships

  16. Mutual research capacity strengthening: a qualitative study of two-way partnerships in public health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redman-MacLaren Michelle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Capacity building has been employed in international health and development sectors to describe the process of ‘experts’ from more resourced countries training people in less resourced countries. Hence the concept has an implicit power imbalance based on ‘expert’ knowledge. In 2011, a health research strengthening workshop was undertaken at Atoifi Adventist Hospital, Solomon Islands to further strengthen research skills of the Hospital and College of Nursing staff and East Kwaio community leaders through partnering in practical research projects. The workshop was based on participatory research frameworks underpinned by decolonising methodologies, which sought to challenge historical power imbalances and inequities. Our research question was, “Is research capacity strengthening a two-way process?” Methods In this qualitative study, five Solomon Islanders and five Australians each responded to four open-ended questions about their experience of the research capacity strengthening workshop and activities: five chose face to face interview, five chose to provide written responses. Written responses and interview transcripts were inductively analysed in NVivo 9. Results Six major themes emerged. These were: Respectful relationships; Increased knowledge and experience with research process; Participation at all stages in the research process; Contribution to public health action; Support and sustain research opportunities; and Managing challenges of capacity strengthening. All researchers identified benefits for themselves, their institution and/or community, regardless of their role or country of origin, indicating that the capacity strengthening had been a two-way process. Conclusions The flexible and responsive process we used to strengthen research capacity was identified as mutually beneficial. Using community-based participatory frameworks underpinned by decolonising methodologies is assisting to redress

  17. Public-private partnerships in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.; Bruun, Peter

    2004-01-01

    element of this project, this report presents an inventory of public-private partnerships in Denmark. More specifically, it provides an inventory of past, present and proposed research projects related to food quality and food safety involving both public and private partners. Furthermore it points...... to a number of opportunities for developing public-private partnerships....

  18. University and public health system partnership: A real-life intervention to improve asthma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Janaina; Moreno, Adriana; Ferriani, Virginia; Araujo, Ana Carla; Vianna, Elcio; Borges, Marcos; Roxo, Pérsio; Gonçalves, Marcos; Mello, Luane; Parreira, Rosa; Silva, Jorgete; Stefanelli, Patricia; Panazolo, Larissa; Cetlin, Andrea; Queiroz, Luana; Araujo, Rosângela; Dias, Marina; Aragon, Davi; Domingos, Nélio; Arruda, L Karla

    2017-05-01

    Asthma is under-diagnosed in many parts of the world. We aimed to assess the outcome of a capacitating program on asthma for non-specialist physicians and other healthcare professionals working in the public system in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. A group of 16 asthma specialists developed a one-year capacitating program in 11 healthcare clinics in the Northern District of the city, which included lectures on asthma, training on inhalation device use and spirometry, and development of an asthma management protocol. Researchers visited one health unit 2-4 times monthly, working with doctors on patients' care, discussing cases, and delivering lectures. Asthma education was also directed to the general population, focusing on recognition of signs and symptoms and long-term treatment, including production of educational videos available on YouTube. Outcome measures were the records of doctors' prescriptions of individual asthma medications pre- and post-intervention. Prior to the program, 3205 units of inhaled albuterol and 2876 units of inhaled beclomethasone were delivered by the Northern District pharmacy. After the one-year program, there was increase to 4850 units (51.3%) for inhaled albuterol and 3526 units (22.6%) for inhaled beclomethasone. The albuterol increase followed the recommendation given to the non-specialist doctors by the asthma experts, that every patient with asthma should have inhaled albuterol as a rescue medication, by protocol. No increase was observed in other districts where no capacitating program was conducted. A systematic capacitating program was successful in changing asthma prescription profiles among non-specialist doctors, with increased delivery of inhaled albuterol and beclomethasone.

  19. Partnerships among community development, public health, and health care could improve the well-being of low-income people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, David; Andrews, Nancy

    2011-11-01

    Safe, vibrant neighborhoods are vital to health. The community development "industry"-a network of nonprofit service providers, real estate developers, financial institutions, foundations, and government-draws on public subsidies and other financing to transform impoverished neighborhoods into better-functioning communities. Although such activity positively affects the "upstream" causes of poor health, the community development industry rarely collaborates with the health sector or even considers health effects in its work. Examples of initiatives-such as the creation of affordable housing that avoids nursing home placement-suggest a strong potential for cross-sector collaborations to reduce health disparities and slow the growth of health care spending, while at the same time improving economic and social well-being in America's most disadvantaged communities. We propose a four-point plan to help ensure that these collaborations achieve positive outcomes and sustainable progress for residents and investors alike.

  20. Community health needs assessment in Wake County, North Carolina: partnership of public health, hospitals, academia, and other stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano-Sobsey, Edie; Ledford, Sue Lynn; Decosimo, Kasey; Horney, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Hospitals and other health care agencies are required to conduct a community health needs assessment (CHNA) every 3 years to obtain information about the health needs and concerns of the population. In 2013, to avoid duplication of efforts and to achieve a more comprehensive CHNA, Wake County Human Services, WakeMed Health and Hospitals, Duke Raleigh Hospital, Rex Healthcare, Wake Health Services, United Way of the Greater Triangle, and the North Carolina Institute for Public Health partnered to conduct a joint assessment for Wake County. Information was collected from the community through opinion surveys and focus groups. To understand the social, economic, and health status of Wake County residents, statistics were also collected from state, county, and local sources. Analysis of all data sources allowed 9 areas of community concern to be identified. Five community forums were held simultaneously at locations in east, south, west, north, and central Wake County to inform residents about the main findings of the assessment and to prioritize the 9 areas of concern. The top 3 priority areas identified were poverty and unemployment, health care access and utilization, and mental health and substance use. Results may not be generalizable to counties in North Carolina that are more rural or to counties outside North Carolina. The success of this unique collaborative process provides further opportunity for the project partners and other organizations to coordinate action plans, pool resources, and jointly address the priorities of this assessment over the next 3 years.

  1. Faith-based partnerships in graduate medical education: the experience of the Morehouse School of Medicine Public Health/Preventive Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Beverly D; Buckner, Ayanna V; Walker, Carla Durham; Blumenthal, Daniel S

    2011-10-01

    Faith-based organizations can be strategic partners in addressing the needs of low-income and underserved individuals and communities. The Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) Public Health/Preventive Medicine Residency Program (PH/PMR) collaborates with faith-based organizations for the purpose of resident education, community engagement, and service. These partners provide guidance for the program's community initiatives and health promotion activities designed to address health inequities. Residents complete a longitudinal community practicum experience with a faith-based organization over the 2-year training period. Residents conduct a community health needs assessment at the organization and design a health intervention that addresses the identified needs. The faith-based community practicum also serves as a vehicle for achieving skills in all eight domains of the Public Health Competencies developed by the Council on Linkages and all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Core Competencies. The MSM PH/PMR Program has engaged in faith-based partnerships for 7 years. This article discusses the structure of these partnerships, how partners are identified, funding sources for supporting resident projects, and examples of resident health needs assessment and intervention activities. The MSM PH/PMR Program may serve as a model to other residency and fellowship programs that may have an interest in developing partnerships with faith-based organizations.

  2. The Challenge of Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodge, Graeme; Greve, Carsten

    . "The Challenge of Public - Private Partnerships" advances recent thought on PPPs in the areas of risk transfer, financial implications, contractual matters, politics, management and accountability. International case studies are presented from the United Kingdom, Europe, the US and Australasia......Public - Private Partnerships (PPPs) - co-operative institutional arrangements between public and private sector actors - are now an increasingly relevant and globally popular public policy option. The authors argue that even though PPPs are still evolving, there is now sufficient research to bring...

  3. Value of partnership for workplace health promotion : guideline for partnership building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hämäläinen, R.M.; Dijkman, A.; Guobjörg Asgeirsdóttir, A.; Broek, K. van den; Haratau, T.; Kuhn, K.; Masanotti, G.; Pyzalski, J.; Scheppingen, A. van; Solé, M.D.; Ylikoski, M.

    2007-01-01

    This publication is an outcome of the project Workplace Health Promotion (WHP): National Health Policies and Strategies in an Enlarging Europe, carried out during 2005-2007. The guideline aims to offer ideas and ways to build partnerships by providing background for partnership building, a brief des

  4. Evolution of an academic-public library partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeszer, Robert J; Olmstadt, William; Daley, Jan; Norfolk, Monique; Krekeler, Kara; Rogers, Monica; Colditz, Graham; Anwuri, Victoria V; Morris, Scott; Voorhees, Mychal; McDonald, Brenda; Bernstein, Jackie; Schoening, Paul; Williams, Lee

    2016-01-01

    A partnership to improve access to health information via an urban public library system was established in St. Louis, Missouri, in 2011. A multiyear project was outlined that included an information needs assessment, a training class for public library staff, information kiosks at library branches for delivering printed consumer health materials, and a series of health-related programming. The partnership evolved to include social service and community organizations to carry out project goals and establish a sustainable program that met the health and wellness interests of the community.

  5. Public-private partnership in theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaž Vrhnjak

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In political and other debates much of attention is paid to public – private partnerships (PPPs. These partnerships are perceived as a tool of meeting public demand by private supply. In theory there are at least four different forms of contract partnerships according to the amount of risks transferred to the private sector.Conclusions: Public – private partnerships are neither the only neither the preferred way of providing public service. On one hand they tend to lower financial burden of the public sector but on the other hand PPPs require complex ways of management and monitoring. It is highly important to consider specific circumstances of individual projects in question.

  6. Partnerships - Nutrition / Health

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Judy Bland: School Nutrition Program Employees Impact the Lives of Children. Roxie Rodgers Dinstel: Extension/Food Bank Partnership Unites to Fill Funding Gap in Alaska. Karen Ensle: Should I Eat the Fish I Catch - An Outreach Project to Pregnant Women. Susan Hansen: Child Care Providers – An Untapped Audience. Vicki Hayman: State and County Based Educators Team Up to Participate in Adolescent Calcium Research Project. Susan Holladay: Healthy Eating, Healthy Living. Luanne J. Hughes: Designin...

  7. Implementation of an evidence-based hand hygiene program in elementary schools in Ghana, as part of a City-to-City partnership between Ottawa public health and KEEA health directorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Marie-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Ottawa Public Health in partnership with health staff from the municipality of KEEA (Komenda, Edina, Eguafo, Abrem) in Ghana engaged in a city-to-city partnership to adapt, implement, and evaluate an evidence-based hand hygiene public health initiative in elementary schools in Ghana. All 4 participating schools gained the necessary resources to carry out proper hand hygiene practice, and hand hygiene practice improved. Furthermore, pupils were more likely to wash hands after using the toilets and teachers were better equipped to be good role models. Providing resources to schools was key to the success of the implementation. This partnership gave health and education workers in Ghana the tools, knowledge, and confidence to implement a simple, evidence-based, hand hygiene program. One other remarkable outcome is that school children were the initiators of a behavior change in their community.

  8. Assessing public policies and assets that affect obesity risk while building new public health partnerships, New Hampshire, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ludmila; Foster, Scot; Flynn, Regina; Fitterman, Mindy

    2013-08-08

    The New Hampshire Obesity Prevention Program and the 9 New Hampshire regional planning commissions assessed the state's obesity-related policies and assets by using community measures recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A self-administered questionnaire that focused on policies and assets that promote healthful eating, physical activity, and breast-feeding was sent to 234 municipalities; 59% responded (representing 73% of the state's population). Of the municipalities that responded, 52% had sidewalks, 22% had bicycle lanes, none had nutrition standards, and 4% had a policy supporting breastfeeding. Through collaboration, we gathered baseline information that can be used to set priorities and assess progress over time.

  9. Evaluation of international case studies within 'Live.Learn.Laugh.': a unique global public-private partnership to promote oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdill, Lindsey; Pine, Cynthia M

    2011-08-01

    The partnership between the Féderation Dentaire International (FDI), and Unilever Oral Care, aims to raise awareness of oral health globally; to enable FDI member associations to promote oral health; and to increase the visibility of the FDI and authority of Unilever oral care brands worldwide. Country Projects between National Dental Associations (NDAs), the member associations of FDI, and Unilever Oral Care local companies have been established as a key strand of the partnership. This paper reports on the evaluation of an in-depth sample of Country Projects (n=5) to determine their potential to impact on oral health. Five country sites were selected as being indicative of different programme delivery types. Each site received a two-day visit during Spring-Summer 2009, which enabled the evaluators to audit what was delivered in practice compared with the original written project briefs and to undertake interviews of study site staff. 39 projects in 36 countries have been initiated. In those examined by site visits, clear evidence was found of capacity building to deliver oral health. In some countries, widespread population reach had been prioritised. Effectiveness of partnership working varied depending on the strength of the relationship between the NDA and local Unilever Oral Care representatives and alignment with national marketing strategy. The quality of internal evaluation varied considerably. Over a million people had been reached directly by Country Projects and this public-private partnership has made a successful start. To move towards improving oral health rather than only awareness raising; future Country Projects would benefit from being limited to certain evidence-based intervention designs, and using an agreed core indicator set in order to allow cross-country comparison of intervention outcomes. © 2011 FDI World Dental Federation.

  10. Renegotiating Public-Private Partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.; Renneboog, Luc

    2017-01-01

    The renegotiations of public–private partnership (PPP) contracts are commonly considered to be one of the pitfalls of PPPs, as they tend to undermine their (ex ante) efficiency. A renegotiation occurs when specific events change the conditions of a concession, frequently leading to a financial claim

  11. Renegotiating Public-Private Partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.; Renneboog, Luc

    2017-01-01

    The renegotiations of public–private partnership (PPP) contracts are commonly considered to be one of the pitfalls of PPPs, as they tend to undermine their (ex ante) efficiency. A renegotiation occurs when specific events change the conditions of a concession, frequently leading to a financial claim

  12. Developing public private partnerships in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buser, Martine; Koch, Christian

    2005-01-01

    these various sectors in producing present public services. The paper analyse the emergent network and the metagovernance frame. Examples of Danish PPP are given highlighting the role of the construction firms. The experiences illustrate the importance of recognizing public private partnerships as emergent...

  13. The Challenge of Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodge, Graeme; Greve, Carsten

    Public - Private Partnerships (PPPs) - co-operative institutional arrangements between public and private sector actors - are now an increasingly relevant and globally popular public policy option. The authors argue that even though PPPs are still evolving, there is now sufficient research to bring....... "The Challenge of Public - Private Partnerships" advances recent thought on PPPs in the areas of risk transfer, financial implications, contractual matters, politics, management and accountability. International case studies are presented from the United Kingdom, Europe, the US and Australasia...... international challenges for future PPPs. Re-examining the myriad meanings and definitions given to PPPs, and presenting a range of theories and frameworks to improve understanding of PPP events and outcomes, this book will be of great interest to those involved in public administration and public policy-making....

  14. Developing public private partnerships in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buser, Martine; Koch, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The establishment of private public partnerships in Denmark in relation to construction has been a long and reluctant process. In the spring of 2004 however the government launched an action plan and PPP arrangements are now emerging. A first wave of PPP arrangements started flourishing however...... these various sectors in producing present public services. The paper analyse the emergent network and the metagovernance frame. Examples of Danish PPP are given highlighting the role of the construction firms. The experiences illustrate the importance of recognizing public private partnerships as emergent...... of networking, learning and establishing of institutions. Drawing on new public management perspectives it is argued that the future model of public services is the network of a mixed set of players (private, voluntary and public). Such networks might be strong in combining forces and strength from...

  15. The Portuguese Experience with Public-Private Partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This paper documents the Portuguese experience in Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs). Since 1993, Portugal has been using PPPs intensively, mainly for highway construction and in the health sector. This has enabled the country to close the infrastructure gap and avoid the budget constraint

  16. The Portuguese Experience with Public-Private Partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This paper documents the Portuguese experience in Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs). Since 1993, Portugal has been using PPPs intensively, mainly for highway construction and in the health sector. This has enabled the country to close the infrastructure gap and avoid the budget

  17. Portugal’s experience with public-private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, Luc; Miranda Sarmento, J.J.; Akintoye, Akintola; Beck, Matthias; Kumaraswamy, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents the Portuguese experience in Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs). Since 1993, Portugal has been using PPPs intensively, mainly for highway construction and in the health sector. This has enabled the country to close the infrastructure gap and avoid the budget constraints at the m

  18. The Portuguese Experience with Public-Private Partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This paper documents the Portuguese experience in Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs). Since 1993, Portugal has been using PPPs intensively, mainly for highway construction and in the health sector. This has enabled the country to close the infrastructure gap and avoid the budget constraint

  19. Respondents report survey Public Private Partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans); J.F.M. Koppenjan (Joop); N. de Boer (Noortje)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Public private partnerships (PPP) have become a popular policy instrument in many Western European countries. Governments assume that the involvement of private actors in the provision of services, or in the realization of policy goals will increase quality and provide

  20. Public-private partnerships for the unemployed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol, E.

    2010-01-01

    Under new dimensions of individualisation, decentralisation and particularly marketisation, new forms of public-private partnerships between the actors involved in the employment services for the unemployed have emerged. This is because for-profit providers have now entered the arena of welfare to w

  1. Public/Private Partnerships for New Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew C.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how colleges can finance new construction projects during lean financial times by employing public/private partnerships in an off-balance sheet financing format. Construction planning of a new school parking deck is used to illustrate the process. Benefits of savings in operating costs, management fees, and other line-item expenses are…

  2. PROJECT BONDS IN FINANCING PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ovsiannykova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical principles concerning the financing of public private partnership' projects are deepened and practical recommendations for improving the procedure of raising funds for projects of public-private partnerships through the use project bonds are substantiated.

  3. PROJECT BONDS IN FINANCING PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN UKRAINE

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical principles concerning the financing of public private partnership' projects are deepened and practical recommendations for improving the procedure of raising funds for projects of public-private partnerships through the use project bonds are substantiated.

  4. Health and media: a partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, J C

    1985-12-01

    There has been growing awareness among professionals engaged in marketing and advertising that modern advertising methods can be applied in support of social goals, including health. This has been accompanied by a recognition among health professionals that health is a social phenomenon dependent upon an adequately informed public. However, the health and media sectors have grown apart in past decades. The former tends to be technical and scientific, while the latter is geared to the broadest common denominator of the public. Health professionals often view the mass media with suspicion, and promotion is mistakenly associated with advertising. This paper draws attention to the need for these 2 sectors to work more closely together. Without the involvement of the media, the health sector will not be able to inform the general public on health issues or help stimulate a process of community involvement. Without the technical input of the health sector, the media cannot fulfill their obligation of serving the interests of the public. The role of the media to raise consciousness, stimulate public discussion, articulate public aspirations, disseminate information, and reflect social norms has become established. However, for health practices to be adopted, media input must be complemented by face-to-face communication and should be part of a multifacted program of health services and action. Cooperation between the media and the health sector should be broadened in the years ahead a process that could significantly enhance health and social development.

  5. Modern aspects of public private partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladjana Benkovic

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of infrastructure is essential presumption for growth and development of relevant economic entities. The empirical evidence of private initiative importance and potentials in the establishment of cooperation with the public sector in infrastructure projects financing and operation refocused professional and academic attention on the studies of this phenomenon. The realm of the public private partnership (PPP became scientifically treated as an interdisciplinary skill based mostly on project financing, whilst practically it became almost mandatory method for economic prosperity. Practical problems in implementation appeared due to lack of knowledge and nonsystematic approach in researches of private public partnership. This paper presents theoretical and practical directions for actors in this cooperation, scoping for mobilization of assets and energy for development and facilitation, and advancing of project investments efficiency.

  6. The Public-Private Partnership in ECEC Provision in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Peder

    2014-01-01

    This article seeks to answer three central questions pertaining to public-private partnership in early childhood education and care (ECEC provision) in Norway: How has public-private partnership developed during the last four decades? How is public-private partnership understood in Norwegian ECEC policy? What seem to be the future challenges in…

  7. Public-Private Partnership in the EU Public Procurement Regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    My PhD research focuses on the relationship between the formation and operation of a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) and public procurement law as a legal framework for the award of the PPP contract. The complex nature of PPP projects including long term high value contracts, long award process...... to apply when awarding a Public-Private Partnership contract, as well as to analyse if a deregulation of PPP’s award framework could potentially resolve these potential legal challenges. The latter consideration of deregulation of PPP award framework is based on comparison of highly regulated European...

  8. INVESTING OPPORTUNITIES THROUGH PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN MOLDAVIAN ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela POPA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied the impact of a public-private partnership objectives and scope that are more beneficial for the community's private profit and social welfare for the public, in order to determine the next task: defining, identifyingfeatures and principles of public-private partnerships, identifying criteria for their classification, identification of objectives and benefits they can get a public private partnership, public private partnership development analysis inthe Republic of Moldova the importance of implementing this and proposed projects, identify gaps in regulation andproposing public private partnership for achieving performance in this direction.

  9. The Basic Public Finance of Public-Private Partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Eduardo M. R. A.; Fischer, Ronald D.; Galetovic, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) have been justified because they release public funds or save on distortionary taxes. However, the resources saved by a government that does not finance the upfront investment are offset by giving up future revenue flows to the concessionaire. If a PPP can be justified on efficiency grounds, the PPP contract that optimally balances demand risk, userfee distortions and the opportunity cost of public funds has a minimum revenue guarantee and a revenue cap. The...

  10. The Basic Public Finance of Public-Private Partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo M.R.A. Engel; Ronald D. Fischer; Galetovic, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) have been justified because they release public funds or save on distortionary taxes. However, the resources saved by a government that does not finance the upfront investment are offset by giving up future revenue flows to the concessionaire. If a PPP can be justified on efficiency grounds, the PPP contract that optimally balances demand risk, userfee distortions and the opportunity cost of public funds has a minimum revenue guarantee and a revenue cap. The...

  11. Good legal governance in authoritative public-private partnerships. Conceptualising legitimate partnerships with public authority

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heldeweg, M.A.; Sanders, M.P.T.

    2013-01-01

    The discourse on Public Private Partnerships (PPP) is focused most on Procurement or on what we name ‘Market-PPP’. Placing PPP in the shift from government to governance calls for attention especially to those PPP, which are geared to exercise public legal powers. These ‘Authoritative PPP’ are most

  12. Good legal governance in authoritative public-private partnerships. Conceptualising legitimate partnerships with public authority

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heldeweg, Michiel A.; Sanders, Maurits

    2013-01-01

    The discourse on Public Private Partnerships (PPP) is focused most on Procurement or on what we name ‘Market-PPP’. Placing PPP in the shift from government to governance calls for attention especially to those PPP, which are geared to exercise public legal powers. These ‘Authoritative PPP’ are most

  13. Public Private Partnerships: deciphering meaning message and phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ There is no doubt that Public private partnerships have been a dominant issue in governmental rhetoric’s but also in governmental practice. In many countries governments have turned to the idea of public private partnerships, or partnerships in general, as a vehicle

  14. Public Private Partnerships: deciphering meaning message and phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ There is no doubt that Public private partnerships have been a dominant issue in governmental rhetoric’s but also in governmental practice. In many countries governments have turned to the idea of public private partnerships, or partnerships in general, as a vehicle to

  15. Public-Private Partnership in the EU Public Procurement Regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    My PhD research focuses on the relationship between the formation and operation of a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) and public procurement law as a legal framework for the award of the PPP contract. The complex nature of PPP projects including long term high value contracts, long award process......, poses legal challenges for the procurement of PPP contracts. The overall research objective of my doctoral thesis is to analyse, clarify and discuss potential legal challenges resulting from European Union public procurement law - provided in Directive 2004/18/EC – which a public authority is obliged...... to apply when awarding a Public-Private Partnership contract, as well as to analyse if a deregulation of PPP’s award framework could potentially resolve these potential legal challenges. The latter consideration of deregulation of PPP award framework is based on comparison of highly regulated European...

  16. Public private partnerships for emergency obstetric care: Lessons from Maharashtra

    OpenAIRE

    Sarika Chaturvedi; Bharat Randive

    2011-01-01

    Background: The National Rural Health Mission of India advocates public private partnerships (PPPs) to meet its "service guarantee" of Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) provision. The Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) has a provision of Rs. 1500 for contracting in obstetric specialists. Objectives: The study aimed to understand the issues in the design and implementation of the PPPs for EmOC under the JSY in Maharashtra and how they affect the availability of EmOC services to women. Materials and Me...

  17. Public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Agnes van den Berg wrote an essay about human health and nature, establishing that subject as an important policy argument in developing (urban) nature in the Netherlands. She studied the public balance of fear and fascination for nature, summarising benefits on human health. In this chapter, she ad

  18. Public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Agnes van den Berg wrote an essay about human health and nature, establishing that subject as an important policy argument in developing (urban) nature in the Netherlands. She studied the public balance of fear and fascination for nature, summarising benefits on human health. In this chapter, she

  19. Public-private partnership models in France and in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demotes-Mainard, Jacques; Canet, Emmanuel; Segard, Lionel

    2006-01-01

    The workshop entitled "Public-Private partnerships models in Europe-- comparison between France and European countries" brought together representatives of academia and industry, of national or European health research programs, of regional or national public-private partnership (PPP) initiatives, and of biotechnology with the following objectives: sharing a common vision on the needs, expectations and challenges of public-private partnership, based on the analysis of actual and original cases, and of new initiatives on public-private partnership, drawing conclusions and identifying key success factors, identifying trails for progress and drawing recommendations. The major event in this field is a European public-private partnership initiative between pharmaceutical industry (European Federation of Pharmaceultical Industry and Associations, EFPIA) and the European Commission (DG Research--health priority) resulting in the European Technology Platform project "Innovative Medicines Initiative" (IMI). Its architecture is based on the identification of the main bottlenecks to the development of innovative treatments (predictive pharmacology and toxicology, identification and validation of biomarkers, patients' recruitment, risk evaluation, and cooperation with the regulatory authorities). Simultaneously, initiatives both at the national and regional levels also foster PPP in the therapeutic field. Regional competitivity clusters acting in the biomedical sector, and national PPP calls such as the ANR (National Research Agency) RIB (Research and Innovation in Biotechnology) call are incentives for PPP projects. These regional and national PPP levels help public and private partners to further build consortia able to compete for EU-level calls, thus acting as incubators for EU PPP projects. In spite of incentives and of the regional and national structuring of PPP, weaknesses in the French system are linked to its fragmentation--multiple transfer agencies, multiple

  20. Just Say No to the TPP: A Democratic Setback for American and Asian Public Health; Comment on “The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Is It Everything We Feared for Health?”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Muntaner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article by Labonté, Schram, and Ruckert is a significant and timely analysis of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP policy and the severe threats to public health that it implies for 12 Pacific Rim populations from the Americas and Asia (Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, United States, and Vietnam. With careful and analytic precision the authors convincingly unearth many aspects of this piece of legislation that undermine the public health achievements of most countries involved in the TTP. Our comments complement their policy analysis with the aim of providing a positive heuristic tool to assist in the understanding of the TPP, and other upcoming treaties like the even more encompassing Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP, and in so doing motivate the public health community to oppose the implementation of the relevant provisions of the agreements. The aims of this commentary on the study of Labonté et al are to show that an understanding of the health effects of the TPP is incomplete without a political analysis of policy formation, and that realist methods can be useful to uncover the mechanisms underlying TPP’s political and policy processes.

  1. Public-Private Partnerships in Chronic Disease Prevention-Part 1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-06

    This podcast is the first of a seven part series discussing public health partnerships with the private sector. In this segment, CDC's Elizabeth Majestic and University of North Carolina's Gene Matthews talk about the history of public health partnerships with the for profit sector.  Created: 4/6/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2009.

  2. Towards developing new partnerships in public services: users as consumers, citizens and/or co-producers in health and social care in England and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotaki, Marianna

    2011-01-01

    The causes and effects of marketization of public services have been analysed extensively in the literature, but there is relatively little research on how those policies impact on the development of new forms of governance, and the role of users in these new arrangements. This study reviews examples of competition, freedom of choice and personalized care in health and social services in England and Sweden, in order to examine the type of relationships emerging between the user/consumer vis-à-vis market driven providers and various agencies of the state under the marketized welfare. The article focuses on the possible roles users might assume in new hybrid arrangements between markets, collaborations and steering. A user typology: namely, that of a consumer, citizen, co-producer and responsibilized agent in various governance arrangements, is then suggested. The article concludes by arguing that pro-market policies instead of meeting the alleged needs of post-modern users for individualized public services are likely to promote a new type of highly volatile and fragile partnerships, and create a new subordinated user who has no choice but to ‘choose’ services they have little control over.

  3. Public – private partnership : A critical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johans Tveit Sandvin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Public-private partnerships have long been highly valued in Western welfare states, and the valuation of such cooperation has become even stronger in light of last year’s economic turbulence, particularly with voluntary non-profit organizations (VNPOs. At the same time, the voluntary sector is changing. The broad popular movements have generally declined in favour of more individual interests as the basis for forming VNPOs, and those organisations still involved in the provision of social services are becoming more and more similar to public service, due to requirements placed on them by the public sector. This is believed to have consequences for the value of such cooperation. If voluntary organisations in public services – or other private organisations for the matter – are becoming copies of public services, there is not much value to be gained from such cooperation, except for some financial gain.In this article, we argue that this conclusion is based on a rather narrow perception of public-voluntary cooperation. Research and debate on such cooperation are mainly preoccupied by what we call supplementary relations, in which voluntary organizations are assessed according to whether they can deliver cheaper or better services than the public sector. Based on an example of public-voluntary cooperation in preventive social work among young adults in Norway, the article show that public-voluntary collaboration can be truly valuable when it is based on a complimentary relation, in which parties collaborate because they command different resources equally important to the task at hand.

  4. 78 FR 1918 - Public-Private Partnerships Public Meeting and Request for Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... on what should be included or excluded from such model public-private partnership (P3) contracts. The... Federal Highway Administration Public-Private Partnerships Public Meeting and Request for Comment AGENCY...: The USDOT/FHWA is tasked by MAP-21 to develop ``standard public-private partnership transaction...

  5. Public-Private Partnerships in Chronic Disease Prevention-Part 6

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-06

    This podcast is the sixth of a seven part series discussing public health partnerships with the private sector. In this segment, CDC's Elizabeth Majestic and Georgia State University's Michael Eriksen discuss whether the tobacco industry has forfeited its opportunity to participate in traditional public-private partnerships.  Created: 4/6/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2009.

  6. The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement: Trading away our health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckert, Arne; Schram, Ashley; Labonté, Ronald

    2015-04-29

    There is long-standing interest by the public health community in the potential implications of trade and investment agreements for public health. Our commentary highlights the main pathways by which the Trans-Pacific Partnerships (TPP), a comprehensive trade and investment agreement currently under negotiation, might undermine population health (based on analysis of and commentary about leaked chapters of the TPP), and calls for a more transparent and health-sensitive TPP negotiation process. We argue that use of comprehensive health impact assessments could be helpful in identifying how the potentially serious health consequences of the TPP and similar future international trade and investment agreements can be avoided, minimized or mitigated.

  7. Leveraging public private partnerships to innovate under challenging budget times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilla, Lili M; Rohrbaugh, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH), academic medical centers and industry have a long and productive history in collaborating together. Decreasing R&D budgets in both the private and public sector have made the need for such collaborations paramount to reduce the risk of further declines in the number of innovative drugs reaching the market to address pressing public health needs. Doing more with less has forced both industry and public sector research institutions (PSRIs) to leverage resources and expertise in order to de-risk projects. In addition, it provides an opportunity to envision and implement new approaches to accomplish these goals. We discuss several of these innovative collaborations and partnerships at the NIH that demonstrate how the NIH and industry are working together to strengthen the drug development pipeline.

  8. STRATEGY OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS DEVELOPMENT IN CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya BYKOVA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of strategy of public-private partnerships development through information is examined. The informational nature measures, the implementation of which help to promote Ukrainian innovative products on foreign markets, are identified. The urgency of implementing the strategy of public-private partnerships to intensify foreign trade with innovative products in crisis period is substantiated.

  9. Public health leadership education in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Uno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hideo Uno, Kenneth ZakariasenDepartment of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CanadaAbstract: Public health leadership is one of the priority disciplines public health professionals need to learn well if they are to deal with demanding public health issues effectively and efficiently. This article looks at the trends in public health leadership education by reviewing the literature and using the Internet to explore the public health leadership programs offered in various parts of the world, and suggests several principles to be taken into account for the development of public health leadership education in the future. A variety of educational programs in public health leadership are classified into several types in terms of their formats: degree programs offered by schools of public health or other programs of public health, those offered in partnership with public health agencies, and so on. All of these programs have important implications for the overall effectiveness of public health leadership education. For public health leadership education to be effective, the partnership between academia and public health agencies is vitally important. Programs should provide opportunities to learn on the basis of practical public health experience, a commitment to life-long learning, flexibility in design, and recognition of the diverse needs of individuals and communities. The application of distance learning methods is one of the options to make this possible.Keywords: public health leadership, public health professionals, school of public health

  10. Insights in Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Donald K; Calhoun, Candice R; Joseph, Lin; Farnsworth, JoAnn Y; Arakaki, Kimberly B

    2016-01-01

    The Hawai‘i Maternal and Infant Health Collaborative, founded in 2013, is a public-private partnership committed to improving birth outcomes and reducing infant mortality. The Collaborative was developed in partnership with the Executive Office on Early Learning Action Strategy with help from the Department of Health and National Governor's Association. The Action Strategy provides Hawai‘i with a roadmap for an integrated and comprehensive early childhood system, spanning preconception to third grade. The Collaborative helps advance goals within the Action Strategy by focusing on ensuring that children have the best start in life by being healthy and welcomed. The Collaborative has completed a strategic plan and accompanying Logic Model, The First 1,000 Days, aimed at achieving the outcomes of 8% reduction in preterm births and 4% reduction in infant mortality. To date over 120 people across Hawai‘i have been involved in the Collaborative. These members include physicians and clinicians, public health planners and providers, insurance providers and health care administrators. The work is divided into three primary areas and coordinated by a cross sector leadership team. Work is specific, outcome driven, informed by data and primarily accomplished in small work groups. PMID:27738566

  11. Public/Private School Partnerships: What Can Be Learned from Corporate School Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinners, Kathleen D.

    This paper reports on a larger study that described public/private school partnerships throughout the U.S. The study described collaborations in terms of their goals, organizational structure, support, commonalities and differences, and evaluations. The present essay discusses how these partnerships provide a model for understanding what…

  12. Public-Private Partnerships in Chronic Disease Prevention-Part 4

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-06

    This podcast is the fourth of a seven part series discussing public health partnerships with the private sector. In this segment, CDC's Elizabeth Majestic and University of North Carolina's Gene Matthews talk about strategies that should serve as the cornerstone for partnership development.  Created: 4/6/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2009.

  13. Ethics in Public Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Valerie A.; Garbrah-Aidoo, Nana; Scott, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Skill in marketing is a scarce resource in public health, especially in developing countries. The Global Public–Private Partnership for Handwashing with Soap set out to tap the consumer marketing skills of industry for national handwashing programs. Lessons learned from commercial marketers included how to (1) understand consumer motivation, (2) employ 1 single unifying idea, (3) plan for effective reach, and (4) ensure effectiveness before national launch. After the first marketing program, 71% of Ghanaian mothers knew the television ad and the reported rates of handwashing with soap increased. Conditions for the expansion of such partnerships include a wider appreciation of what consumer marketing is, what it can do for public health, and the potential benefits to industry. Although there are practical and philosophical difficulties, there are many opportunities for such partnerships. PMID:17329646

  14. Economic Public Private Partnerships for Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thomas C.; Kistler, Walter P.; Citron, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Space transportation has evolved to entrepreneurs offering affordable transportation services to LEO. Society expects space tourism to produce low costs quickly, but entrepreneurs need the larger commercial transportation markets to raise the private money to build the orbital vehicles. Early heavy cargo is the logistics model of remote bases on Earth and is likely to be similar for off planet remote bases. Public Private Partnerships (PPP), (Norment, 2006) and other alliances with governments offer new transportation markets and combines private funding with government markets to accelerate the movement of mankind into space, (Kistler, 2004a). Entrepreneurs bring change like a multitude of innovation, changes to the traditional aerospace industry status quo, commercial market forces and the lowering of the cost of transportation to orbit. Within PPPs, government stretches space budgets, increases vehicle innovation without cost and gains cost advantages of larger markets. Examples of PPPs show some opportunity for change in space commerce is possible, (Stainback, 2000 and Spekman, 2000). Some of the items entrepreneurs bring include innovation in hardware, a maturing of the normal market forces such as the pressures from buyers and sellers rather than those from government planners or from regulation. Launch costs are high, society wants orbital hotels and current/future markets are not emerging because of high transportation costs. The paper proposes a new approach with examples, because mankind has taken a long time to transition from expendable launch vehicles to newer more affordable launch innovation and may require the introduction of new innovative approaches.

  15. Public Private Partnership Benefits in Delivering Public Facilities in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapri M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of infrastructure in developing country such as Malaysia was increasingly founded by the Public–Private Partnership (PPP scheme. Collaboration with private sector has become popular as a means to improve the delivery of public facilities. Yet, empirical evidence on how PPP initiative has benefits the delivery of public facilities within Malaysia context is lagging. The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the perception of stakeholders on the benefits of adopting PPP in delivering public facilities in Malaysia. Literature review was carried out to identify PPP benefits, which were then incorporated into the questionnaire. The mean score and mean score ranking was conducted to assess the agreement level of stakeholders towards the PPP benefits. The overall findings show that the implementation of PPP has benefitted the delivery of public facilities in both financial and non-financial aspects. From the analysis, improvement in service quality is perceived as the top advantage followed by innovation in design and transfer of risk. The findings provide more informed basis on the rationale of PPP implementation and its potential in improving the delivery of public facilities within Malaysia context.

  16. Eliminating canine rabies: the role of public-private partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Louise

    2013-05-01

    Canine rabies has been eliminated from industrialized countries, but infected dogs remain the principal source of human infections in the developing world. Despite the availability of effective tools for prevention and post-exposure prophylaxis, canine rabies inflicts a heavy burden on the poorest people of Africa, Asia and Latin America, resulting in more than 60,000 deaths each year. Public-private partnerships offer a new approach to the challenge of eliminating canine rabies in the developing world, by bringing together stakeholders to share responsibilities and reduce costs. The leading partnership for rabies control, the Partners for Rabies Prevention, is an informal international group that includes representatives of major health organizations (WHO, PAHO, FAO, OIE), the European Commission, universities, nongovernmental organizations, the human and animal health industries, and private global health institutions. This article describes how the Partners for Rabies Prevention is working toward the global elimination of canine rabies. It forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on the elimination of canine rabies.

  17. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP AS EFFECTIVE MECHANISM OF SPORTS INFRASTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Moskvin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the current state of sports infrastructure in Russia and also explores the experience of using public-private partnership at Olympic facilities construction in Sochi.

  18. Public-Private Partnership for Regional Development of Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea ZAMFIR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the public-private partnership as a possible solution for regional development of renewable energy. Firstly, the study reveals the strong connection between renewable energy and sustainable regional development, and secondly, the study discloses some reasons for developing renewable energy through public-private partnerships in Romania’s regions. The findings of this study reveal that there is a strong need for a renewable energy partnership between public authorities, business community and civil society in order to achieve the regional development of renewable energy. The results of this study may be used for upcoming research in the area of implementing renewable energy projects through public-private partnerships in order to achieve sustainable regional development.

  19. Implementation of a public-private partnership in local government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementation of a public-private partnership in local government in Ghana: A study of Ga West ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... selected from the two study areas and primary data collected using one-on-one indepth interviews.

  20. Availability and provision of emergency obstetric care under a public-private partnership in three districts of Gujarat, India: lessons for Universal Health Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, V; Sidney, K; Mehta, R; Mavalankar, D

    2016-01-01

    The state of Gujarat in India (population 60 million) has implemented a public-private partnership (PPP) with private obstetricians called the Chiranjeevi Yojana (CY) since 2006. This study investigated the adequacy of basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric care (BEmOC and CEmOC) services through the public and private sectors with reference to the United Nations (UN) guidelines. A cross-sectional facility survey was conducted in three districts. A total of 300 facilities, 151 public and 149 private, had provided obstetric services to a total of 53 896 births in the past 6 months. Nearly half, 135 facilities (104 public and 31 private), individually reported EmOC facilities. All the three districts exceeded the UN recommendation for EmOC availability by 3.3 to 11.3 times. Free provision, through both public and PPP facilities, ranged from 1.42 to 3.43. The actual performance was nearly double the recommendation for CEmOC but inadequate for BEmOC. Public sector EmOC availability and provision is negligible. Private sector availability is well beyond the recommended UN norms. The CY programme has resulted in increased availability and provision of EmOC services. However, the overall provision of EmOC is compromised due to the poor performance of BEmOC functions and clustering of private facilities in towns.

  1. Going tobacco-free on 24 New York City university campuses: A public health agency's partnership with a large urban public university system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnahan, Marie P; Sacks, Rachel; Farley, Shannon M; Mandel-Ricci, Jenna; Patterson, Ty; Lamberson, Patti

    2016-01-01

    The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene partnered with the nation's largest university system, the City University of New York (CUNY), to provide technical assistance and resources to support the development and implementation of a system-wide tobacco-free policy. This effort formed one component of Healthy CUNY-a larger initiative to support health promotion and disease prevention across the university system and resulted in the successful introduction of a system-wide tobacco-free policy on all CUNY campuses. Glassman et al (J Am Coll Health. 2011;59:764-768) published a blueprint for action related to tobacco policies that informed our work. This paper describes the policy development and implementation process and presents lessons learned from the perspective of the Health Department, as a practical case study to inform and support other health departments who may be supporting colleges and universities to become tobacco-free.

  2. Institutionalising of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkee, R

    2014-01-01

    Though public health situation in Nepal is under-developed, the public health education and workforce has not been prioritised. Nepal should institutionalise public health education by means of accrediting public health courses, registration of public health graduates in a data bank and increasing job opportunities for public health graduates in various institutions at government sector.

  3. Going Tobacco-Free on 24 New York City University Campuses: A Public Health Agency's Partnership with a Large Urban Public University System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnahan, Marie P.; Sacks, Rachel; Farley, Shannon M.; Mandel-Ricci, Jenna; Patterson, Ty; Lamberson, Patti

    2016-01-01

    The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene partnered with the nation's largest university system, the City University of New York (CUNY), to provide technical assistance and resources to support the development and implementation of a system-wide tobacco-free policy. This effort formed one component of "Healthy CUNY"--a…

  4. Public-private partnerships in translational medicine: concepts and practical examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijten, Peter R; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Moonen, Chrit T; Storm, Gert; Crommelin, Daan J A

    2012-07-20

    The way forward in multidisciplinary research according to former NIH's director Elias Zerhouni is to engage in predictive, personalized, preemptive and participatory medicine. For the creation of the optimal innovation climate that would allow for such a strategy, public-private partnerships have been widely proposed as an important instrument. Public-private partnerships have become an important instrument to expedite translational research in medicine. The Netherlands have initiated three large public-private partnerships in the life sciences and health area to facilitate the translation of valuable basic scientific concepts to new products and services in medicine. The focus of these partnerships has been on drug development, improved diagnosis and regenerative medicine. The Dutch model of public-private partnership forms the blueprint of a much larger European initiative called EATRIS. This paper will provide practical examples of public-private partnerships initiated to expedite the translation of new technology for drug development towards the clinic. Three specific technologies are in focus: companion diagnostics using nuclear medicine, the use of ultra high field MRI to generate sensitive surrogate endpoints based on endogenous contrast, and MRI guidance for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound mediated drug delivery.

  5. Product Development Partnerships: Case studies of a new mechanism for health technology innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Richard T

    2011-08-26

    There is a continuing need for new health technologies to address the disease burdens of developing countries. In the last decade Product Development Partnerships (PDP) have emerged that are making important contributions to the development of these technologies. PDPs are a form of public private partnerships that focus on health technology development. PDPs reflect the current phase in the history of health technology development: the Era of Partnerships, in which the public and private sectors have found productive ways to collaborate. Successful innovation depends on addressing six determinants of innovation. We examine four case studies of PDPs and show how they have addressed the six determinants to achieve success.

  6. A community-based participatory research partnership to reduce vehicle idling near public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbalnia, Cynthia; Sharkey, Ken; Garland-Porter, Denisha; Alam, Mohammad; Crumpton, Marilyn; Jones, Camille; Ryan, Patrick H

    2013-05-01

    The authors implemented and assessed the effectiveness of a public health initiative aimed at reducing traffic-related air pollution exposure of the school community at four Cincinnati public schools. A partnership was fostered with academic environmental health researchers and community members. Anti-idling campaign materials were developed and education and training were provided to school bus drivers, students, parents, and school staff. Pledge drives and pre- and posteducation assessments were documented to measure the effectiveness of the program. After completing the educational component of the public health initiative, bus drivers (n = 397), community members (n = 53), and staff (n = 214) demonstrated significantly increased knowledge about the health effects of idling (p community-driven public health initiative can be effective in both 1) enhancing community awareness about the benefits of reducing idling vehicles and 2) increasing active participation in idling reduction. The partnership initially developed has continued to develop toward a sustainable and growing process.

  7. [The humanistic partnership model in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Dan; Lefebvre, Hélène; Néron, André; Van Cutsem, Chantal; Bustillo, Aurélia; Laloux, Martine

    2017-06-01

    The humanistic partnership model in health care has been jointly developed by nursing professionals and partner patients. In line with the evolution of our society and nursing thinking, it provides a new implementation of the discipline's core concepts and invites professionals and partner patients to "move together towards" a co-constructed future which is recorded in the patient's life project. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Public-private partnerships needed in horticultural research and development

    OpenAIRE

    Rausser, Gordon; Ameden, Holly

    2004-01-01

    University-industry partnerships are proliferating in the United States, as public funding for high-level research continues to decline yet knowledge plays an increasingly important role in industrial processes. The horticulture industry benefits from such arrangements by influencing research directions and gaining access to innovations and complementary research in agricultural biotechnology. Given the nature of this industry, the obstacles to developing effective partnerships are substantia...

  9. An Excursion Into The Public-Private Partnership Jungle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelling, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    While the Private Finance Initiative (PFI) is doubtless the most visible Public-Private Partnership (PPP) in the public debate it is by no means the only one. A number of scholars have outlined the ambiguity of the PPP concept beyond PFIs and pointed to the multiplicity of differing types...

  10. Anatomy of public-private partnerships : Creation, financing, and renegotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.; Renneboog, Luc

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the main reasons why public-private partnerships (PPPs) are adopted as well as the possible disadvantages for the public and private sectors. By means of two case studies on bridge construction and railway infrastructure (Fertagus and Lusoponte), we elucidate how a PPP is structu

  11. Anatomy of public-private partnerships : Creation, financing, and renegotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.; Renneboog, Luc

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the main reasons why public-private partnerships (PPPs) are adopted as well as the possible disadvantages for the public and private sectors. By means of two case studies on bridge construction and railway infrastructure (Fertagus and Lusoponte), we elucidate how a PPP is

  12. Anatomy of public-private partnerships : Creation, financing, and renegotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.; Renneboog, Luc

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the main reasons why public-private partnerships (PPPs) are adopted as well as the possible disadvantages for the public and private sectors. By means of two case studies on bridge construction and railway infrastructure (Fertagus and Lusoponte), we elucidate how a PPP is structu

  13. Public-Private Partnerships in Chronic Disease Prevention-Part 5

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-06

    This podcast is the fifth of a seven part series discussing public health partnerships with the private sector. In this segment, CDC's Elizabeth Majestic and University of North Carolina's Gene Matthews talk about how the economic downturn will increase the demands on public heath.  Created: 4/6/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2009.

  14. Public private partnerships for emergency obstetric care: Lessons from Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Chaturvedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The National Rural Health Mission of India advocates public private partnerships (PPPs to meet its "service guarantee" of Emergency obstetric care (EmOC provision. The Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY has a provision of Rs. 1500 for contracting in obstetric specialists. Objectives: The study aimed to understand the issues in the design and implementation of the PPPs for EmOC under the JSY in Maharashtra and how they affect the availability of EmOC services to women. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study using the rapid assessment approach was conducted in Ahmednagar district of Maharashtra spanning 1-year duration ending in June 2009. Primary data were obtained through interviews with women, providers, and administrators at various levels. Data were analyzed thematically. Results: The PPP scheme for EmOC is restricted to deliveries by Caesarean section. The administrators prefer subsidization of costs for services in private facilities to contracting in. There are no PPPs executed in the study district. This study identifies barriers to women in accessing the benefit and the difficulties faced by administrators in implementing the scheme. Conclusion: The PPPs for EmOC under the JSY have minimally influenced the out-of-pocket payments for EmOC. Infrastructural inadequacies and passive support of the implementers are major barriers to the implementation of contracting-in model of PPPs. Capacities in the public health system are inadequate to design and manage PPPs.

  15. Public private partnerships for emergency obstetric care: lessons from maharashtra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sarika; Randive, Bharat

    2011-01-01

    The National Rural Health Mission of India advocates public private partnerships (PPPs) to meet its "service guarantee" of Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) provision. The Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) has a provision of Rs. 1500 for contracting in obstetric specialists. The study aimed to understand the issues in the design and implementation of the PPPs for EmOC under the JSY in Maharashtra and how they affect the availability of EmOC services to women. A cross-sectional study using the rapid assessment approach was conducted in Ahmednagar district of Maharashtra spanning 1-year duration ending in June 2009. Primary data were obtained through interviews with women, providers, and administrators at various levels. Data were analyzed thematically. The PPP scheme for EmOC is restricted to deliveries by Caesarean section.The administrators prefer subsidization of costs for services in private facilities to contracting in. There are no PPPs executed in the study district. This study identifies barriers to women in accessing the benefit and the difficulties faced by administrators in implementing the scheme. The PPPs for EmOC under the JSY have minimally influenced the out-of-pocket payments for EmOC. Infrastructural inadequacies and passive support of the implementers are major barriers to the implementation of contracting-in model of PPPs. Capacities in the public health system are inadequate to design and manage PPPs.

  16. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  17. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  18. Public-Private Partnerships for Transport Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Maria Josefina; Greve, Carsten

    The provision of transport infrastructure and services creates fundamental value to society. With traditional sources of transport public funding running short, governments around the world are increasingly turning to public-private finance (PPPs) as a promising tool of public infrastructure...... of the public but of the private actor as well, to act perhaps motivated by corporate social responsibility, committing to bringing innovation and transparency in their efforts for advancing sustainability....

  19. The SAFE project: community-driven partnerships in health, mental health, and education to prevent early school failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, D L

    1997-11-01

    This article presents a case study of an innovative school-based health and mental health project that prevents early school failure in one county in Oklahoma. Success is attributed to social work development of broad-based partnerships involving families, schools, communities, and public policy officials. Citizen-driven, these partnerships have meshed previously fixed institutional boundaries in health, mental health, and education to prevent early school failure. The article describes school-family partnerships that form the core of the project's service intervention model. Statistics on service activities and outcomes are presented, along with a discussion of lessons learned for implementation of the project.

  20. Public-Private Partnerships in Chronic Disease Prevention-Part 2

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-06

    This podcast is the second of a seven part series discussing public health partnerships with the private sector. In this segment, CDC's Elizabeth Majestic and University of North Carolina's Gene Matthews talk about sharing resources and forming relationships that address chronic diseases, as well as urgent health threats, such as terrorism.  Created: 4/6/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2009.

  1. Twitter and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Catherine; Wurtz, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Twitter can serve as a powerful communication modality to both "push" and "pull" public health data; each user is a potential public health sensor and actor. However, in 2012, only 8% of local health departments had Twitter accounts. We outline how Twitter works, describe how to access public tweets for public health surveillance purposes, review the literature on Twitter's current and potential role supporting public health's essential services, summarize Twitter's limitations, and make recommendations for health department use.

  2. Education in the Direction of Public-Private Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Suely Siqueira Eiras

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of the neoliberalism reveals, at its more intense moment, the submission of all the levels of the life human being the mercantile transactions, the capitalist inclination to the world-wide trading. In this manner, the neoliberal proposals objectify, over all, the creation of an only feeling to guarantee the success of its ideals of globalization, free-economy and State minimum, not inhibit the social politics, but partnership of the market. Amongst the artifices used for the neoliberal proposers, placed the Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs with which this article concerns. From the conceptualization and characterization of the instrument Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs, national and European projects, developed through the PPPs, had been analyzed. The subjects of these projects involve Technology of Computer science and Communication and eLearning (education + technology + in the distance. Reflections had evidenced that the partnerships between governments and multinationals companies can lead to a loss of control on the part of the State on the educational formation of the citizens and the loss of identity of its resumes. The explanation for this phenomenon happens of the trend to the globalization. On the other hand, these partnerships bring profits politicians to the governments and economic to the companies.

  3. Public-private partnerships in urban regeneration areas in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael Tophøj; Aunsborg, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The paper focuses formal as well as informal public-private partnerships (PPP) in Danish urban regeneration areas. The concept ‘urban regeneration areas’ was introduced in the 2003 Planning Act as old, remaining industrial areas within the city boundaries by now were recognized as an ressource...

  4. Optimal Provision of Infrastructure Using Public-Private Partnership Contracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, G.; Ruys, P.H.M.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the optimal provision of infrastructure by means of public-private partnership contracts.In the economic literature infrastructure is characterized as a large, indivisible and non-rival capital good that produces services for its users.Users can be both consumers and producers.

  5. Public-Private Partnerships : Risk Allocation and Value for Money

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the allocation and valuation of public-private partnerships (PPPs). First, the paper discusses why governments pursue PPPs and how value for money (VfM) is achieved. Second, the paper reviews the principles of risk allocation and valuation from an academic and pu

  6. Public-private partnerships as facilitators of environmental improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Søren; Lehmann, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Public-private partnerships in the environmental field have emerged as one option in the pursuit of sustainable development in different contexts. So-called ?Green Networks?, ?Cleaner Production Centres?, ?Waste Minimisation Clubs? are among others highlighted as alternatives to (governmental...

  7. How do governments support the development of Public Private Partnerships?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhoest, Koen; Petersen, Ole Helby; Scherrer, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Taking an institutional perspective, in this article we develop an index of the governmental support for public private partnership (PPP) — a ‘PPP Governmental Support Index’ (GSI) — which aims to measure the extent to which national governments provide an institutional framework that is either...

  8. Public-Private Partnerships : Risk Allocation and Value for Money

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    This paper reviews the literature on the allocation and valuation of public-private partnerships (PPPs). First, the paper discusses why governments pursue PPPs and how value for money (VfM) is achieved. Second, the paper reviews the principles of risk allocation and valuation from an academic and

  9. Public-Private Partnerships : Risk Allocation and Value for Money

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the allocation and valuation of public-private partnerships (PPPs). First, the paper discusses why governments pursue PPPs and how value for money (VfM) is achieved. Second, the paper reviews the principles of risk allocation and valuation from an academic and

  10. Optimal Provision of Infrastructure Using Public-Private Partnership Contracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, G.; Ruys, P.H.M.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the optimal provision of infrastructure by means of public-private partnership contracts.In the economic literature infrastructure is characterized as a large, indivisible and non-rival capital good that produces services for its users.Users can be both consumers and producers.

  11. Public-Private Partnerships for Clean Energy Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-09-01

    As part of its mission, CEMI builds partnerships around strategic priorities to increase U.S. clean energy manufacturing competitiveness. This requires an “all-hands-on-deck” approach that involves the nation’s private and public sectors, universities, think tanks, and labor leaders working together.

  12. 26 CFR 1.1446-4 - Publicly traded partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-Free Covenant Bonds § 1.1446-4 Publicly traded partnerships. (a) In general. This section sets forth... whether such amounts are subject to withholding because of a treaty or statutory exemption; (ii) Amounts effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business, but not subject to withholding under section 1446...

  13. Waste water treatment through public-private partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpintero, Samuel; Petersen, Ole Helby

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the experience of the regional government of Aragon (Spain) that has extensively used public-private partnerships for the construction and operation of waste water treatment plants. The paper argues that although overall the implementation of this PPP program might be considered...

  14. Ecological responsibility of business as public-private partnership element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Potravniy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article the questions of social and ecological responsibility of business are considered within the public-private partnership mechanism framework. Methods of the ecological significant project economic regulation are shown in wildlife management and environment protection sphere.

  15. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN IMPLEMENTATION OF GERBANGMASTRA PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Ode Mustafa Muchtar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This research attempts to describe and analyze the effect of public-private partnerships and community participation on successful of the implementation of Gerbangmastra program in Kolaka regency of South East Sulawesi Province. This study is conducted using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. This paper finds that public-private partnerships affect the community participation and successful of the implementation of Gerbangmastra program. It also uncovers that community participation affects the successful of the implementation of Gerbangmastra program. Furthermore, it reveals that the implementation of public-private partnership that are supported by community participation have an impact on the successful of the implementation of Gerbangmastra program.Keywords: Public-private partnerships, community participation, Gerbangmastra programJEL classifications: H80, O21.AbstrakPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan dan menganalisis pengaruh kemitraan pemerintah-swasta dan partisipasi dari masyarakat terhadap keberhasilan pelaksanaan program Gerbangmastra di Kabupaten Kolaka Propinsi Sulawesi Tenggara. Penelitian ini dilakukan dengan menggunakan kombinasi metode kuantitatif yaitu metode regresi analisis jalur dan kualitatif berupa metode deskriptif analitik. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kemitraan antara pemerintah-swasta memiliki pengaruh terhadap partisipasi masyarakat dan keberhasilan pelaksanaan program Gerbangmastra. Sementara itu partisipasi dari masyarakat berpengaruh terhadap keberhasilan pelaksanaan program Gerbangmastra. Pelaksanaan kemitraan pemerintah-swasta yang didukung oleh partisipasi masyarakat berpengaruh terhadap keberhasilan pelaksanaan program Gerbangmastra di daerah tersebut.Kata kunci: Kemitraan pemerintah-swasta, partisipasi masyarakat, program GerbangmastraJEL classifications: H80, O21.

  16. Public-Private Partnership and Infrastructural Development in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduwaiye, R. O.; Sofoluwe, A. O.; Bello, T. O.; Durosaro, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the degree to which Public-Private Partnership (PPP) services are related to infrastructural development in Nigerian Universities. The research design used was descriptive survey method. The population for the study encompassed all the 20 universities in South-west Nigeria. Stratified random sampling was used to select 12…

  17. Lost in diffusion? Democratic accountability in public-private partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Willems, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: In academic literature and in the popular press complex forms of governance such as public-private partnerships (PPPs) are very often associated with democratic deficits due to a shortfall in accountability. Although this negative outlook on democratic accountability in PPPs is almost a self-evident truth, it remains insufficiently supported by empirical research.

  18. Public-Private Partnerships : Risk Allocation and Value for Money

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the allocation and valuation of public-private partnerships (PPPs). First, the paper discusses why governments pursue PPPs and how value for money (VfM) is achieved. Second, the paper reviews the principles of risk allocation and valuation from an academic and pu

  19. Addressing conflicts of interest in Public Private Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Many articles have been written on conflicts of interests (COIs) in fields such as medicine, business, politics, public service and education. With the growing abundance of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs), often involving complex relationships among the partners, it is important to understand how COIs can be mitigated and managed in PPPs. Discussion We wanted to study PPPs, particularly in the areas of global health and agriculture, but discovered no single source of information available to identify and compare various approaches for avoiding and managing COIs in PPPs. This is a significant gap, especially for those wishing to study, compare and strengthen existing COI policies related to PPPs. In order to bridge this gap, we reviewed how PPPs currently address COIs and highlight what might be considered good practice in developing COI policies. We reviewed the online COI policies of 10 PPPs in global health and agriculture, and interviewed two global health PPP chief executives. Summary Based on our review of policies and interviews, we conclude that there exists a range of good practices including attention to accountability and governance, acknowledgement and disclosure, abstention and withdrawal, reporting and transparency, and independent monitoring. There appears to be a need for PPPs to interact closely and learn from each other on these parameters and to also place more emphasis on independent external monitoring of COIs as a means of strengthening their major social objectives on which their activities are largely predicated. We also recommend the establishment of a web based database, which would serve as a forum to discuss COI issues and how they can be resolved. PMID:20615242

  20. Addressing conflicts of interest in Public Private Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omobowale, Emmanuel B; Kuziw, Michael; Naylor, Melinda Treurnicht; Daar, Abdallah S; Singer, Peter A

    2010-07-08

    Many articles have been written on conflicts of interests (COIs) in fields such as medicine, business, politics, public service and education. With the growing abundance of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs), often involving complex relationships among the partners, it is important to understand how COIs can be mitigated and managed in PPPs. We wanted to study PPPs, particularly in the areas of global health and agriculture, but discovered no single source of information available to identify and compare various approaches for avoiding and managing COIs in PPPs. This is a significant gap, especially for those wishing to study, compare and strengthen existing COI policies related to PPPs. In order to bridge this gap, we reviewed how PPPs currently address COIs and highlight what might be considered good practice in developing COI policies. We reviewed the online COI policies of 10 PPPs in global health and agriculture, and interviewed two global health PPP chief executives. Based on our review of policies and interviews, we conclude that there exists a range of good practices including attention to accountability and governance, acknowledgement and disclosure, abstention and withdrawal, reporting and transparency, and independent monitoring. There appears to be a need for PPPs to interact closely and learn from each other on these parameters and to also place more emphasis on independent external monitoring of COIs as a means of strengthening their major social objectives on which their activities are largely predicated. We also recommend the establishment of a web based database, which would serve as a forum to discuss COI issues and how they can be resolved.

  1. Addressing conflicts of interest in Public Private Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daar Abdallah S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many articles have been written on conflicts of interests (COIs in fields such as medicine, business, politics, public service and education. With the growing abundance of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs, often involving complex relationships among the partners, it is important to understand how COIs can be mitigated and managed in PPPs. Discussion We wanted to study PPPs, particularly in the areas of global health and agriculture, but discovered no single source of information available to identify and compare various approaches for avoiding and managing COIs in PPPs. This is a significant gap, especially for those wishing to study, compare and strengthen existing COI policies related to PPPs. In order to bridge this gap, we reviewed how PPPs currently address COIs and highlight what might be considered good practice in developing COI policies. We reviewed the online COI policies of 10 PPPs in global health and agriculture, and interviewed two global health PPP chief executives. Summary Based on our review of policies and interviews, we conclude that there exists a range of good practices including attention to accountability and governance, acknowledgement and disclosure, abstention and withdrawal, reporting and transparency, and independent monitoring. There appears to be a need for PPPs to interact closely and learn from each other on these parameters and to also place more emphasis on independent external monitoring of COIs as a means of strengthening their major social objectives on which their activities are largely predicated. We also recommend the establishment of a web based database, which would serve as a forum to discuss COI issues and how they can be resolved.

  2. Determinants of Successful Public-Private Partnerships in the Context of Overweight Prevention in Dutch Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlijn Leenaars, MSc

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A public-private partnership (PPP is an essential component of the Dutch community-based approach toward overweight prevention, Youth on Healthy Weight (JOGG. Beginning in 2010, 25 Dutch municipalities have implemented JOGG, but little is known about determinants of successful partnerships. This study aims to identify these determinants to guide other municipalities or communities in creating successful partnerships. Methods Semistructured interviews were held in Veghel, a town in the southeast of the Netherlands, with private (n = 7 and public (n = 5 partners from the PPP involved in JOGG. We developed a themes and topics list that fit the purpose of our study. The interviews focused on the formation, functioning, and output of the partnership. Results Recruitment of partners was facilitated by using preexisting networks. Corporate social responsibility, belief in the JOGG approach, importance of the health issue, and strengthened contacts with other partners were important motivations for partners to participate. In addition to partnership functioning and output, enthusiastic and decisive management, shared commitment, joint responsibility, and effective internal communication were important to the partners, as were clear goals and concrete actions to achieve these goals. Conclusion To create successful partnerships, the program and its goals should appeal to the motivations of the partners. Involving partners in defining local program objectives can help to create shared commitment and joint responsibility. Further evaluation of partnerships’ impact on achieving program goals is a subsequent step to be taken to identify long-term determinants of successful PPPs.

  3. USAID Public-Private Partnerships Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — This dataset brings together information collected since 2001 on PPPs that have been supported by USAID. For the purposes of this dataset a Public-Private...

  4. Global health: A lasting partnership in paediatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokila Lakhoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To emphasise the value of on-going commitment in Global Health Partnerships. Materials and Methods: A hospital link, by invitation, was set up between United Kingdom and Tanzania since 2002. The project involved annual visits with activities ranging from exchange of skill to training health professionals. Furthermore, the programme attracted teaching and research activities. For continuity, there was electronic communication between visits. Results: Six paediatric surgeons are now fully trained with three further in training in Africa. Paediatric surgery services are now separate from adult services. Seven trainee exchanges have taken place with four awarded fellowships/scholarships. Twenty-three clinical projects have been presented internationally resulting in eight international publications. The programme has attracted other health professionals, especially nursing and engineering. The Tropical Health and Education Trust prize was recently achieved for nursing and radiography. National Health Service has benefited from volunteering staff bringing new cost-effective ideas. A fully funded medical student elective programme has been achieved since 2008. Conclusion: Global Health Partnerships are an excellent initiative in establishing specialist services in countries with limited resources. In the future, this will translate into improved patient care as long as it is sustained and valued by long term commitment.

  5. Corruption and ethical issues regarding public-private partnership

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The paper raises general questions about  ethical problems that taint public-private  partnership. Everybody talks about the  economical benefits of encouraging firms  to invest in the community using different  incentives offered by the public institutions.  In the same time, every day, newspapers  bring to our attention cases of misuse of  public resources for private gain or cases  of private investors who give bribes in order  to get a contract with a public institution.  The purpose of t...

  6. Public-private partnership: between legal requirements and the real needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu CORNEA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The overview image of the public-private partnership is represented by cooperation between the public and private actors to carry out the activities of public interest, cooperation based on the capacities of each partner to allocate properly the resources, risks and benefits. The main elements of the institutional framework are established by the national legislation. The traditional domains for the development of the partnerships are necessary at the national level and for infrastructure. The increasing tendency toward decentralization of the provision of services introduces a lot of public-private opportunities like health, education and other social services in the non-traditional areas, as well. The study analysis presents the idea of partnership as a means of solving the problem of more and more limited resources which are at the disposal of public administration. The quality of legal framework and government policies for the development of partnerships gives to this way of cooperation, either the quality of strategy in the public policies, which purpose is to obtain greater benefits by combining the resources of those two sectors, or the limited solution to the re-launch of the economy and to meet the general interest.

  7. Evaluation of Public Sector Contributions to Public-Private Partnership Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Mackie, Peter; Nellthorp, John; Laird, James

    2005-01-01

    The Bank requires that any public sector contribution to a collaborative effort between the public sector and private enterprises in the transport sector be analyzed and justified in economic terms. This Note will set out the basis for making such an analysis. The general principles underlying this analysis are that: 1) public contributions to public-private partnership (PPP) projects sho...

  8. The Development of Public-private Partnerships in the Region in Terms of Global Economic Slowdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakulin Serhij

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to develop scientifically grounded methodological tools of public-private partnerships in the region in terms of slowing economic globalization. According to this goal, organizes interaction of the government and businesses in the implementation of public-private partnerships; the mechanism for implementation of public-private partnerships in the Kharkiv region; the model of economic management in the region using a public-private partnership.

  9. The paradoxes of small Public Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    that the largest portion of small PPPs are of a size below 5,4 million roughly reflecting the lower limit of obligatory tendering according to EU-law. Among these there are indeed a good portion of “real” PPPs. It appears that local public units endeavour in PPPs because they are attracted by the innovation...

  10. Research contributions on childhood obesity from a public-private partnership

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity remains a significant global problem with immediate and long-term individual health and societal consequences. Targets for change should include the most potent and predictive factors for obesity at all levels of the personal, social and physical environments. The Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living (‘the Center’) is a public-private partnership that was developed to address child health issues through research, service, and education. This overview pap...

  11. Public-Private Partnerships in Chronic Disease Prevention-Part 7

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-06

    This podcast is the last installment of a seven part series discussing public health partnerships with the private sector. In this segment, CDC's Elizabeth Majestic and Georgia State University's Michael Eriksen discuss how some lessons learned in the tobacco control experience might be relevant for the obesity epidemic.  Created: 4/6/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2009.

  12. Public-Private Partnerships in Chronic Disease Prevention-Part 3

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-06

    This podcast is the third of a seven part series discussing public health partnerships with the private sector. In this segment, CDC's Elizabeth Majestic and University of North Carolina's Gene Matthews talk about how building credibility on preparedness issues can help develop support for initiatives around chronic disease prevention.  Created: 4/6/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2009.

  13. Evolutionary Game Analysis of the Supervision Behavior for Public-Private Partnership Projects with Public Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Congdong Li; Xiaoli Li; Yu Wang

    2016-01-01

    The public can directly or indirectly participate in the PPP (public-private partnership) projects and then has an impact on the project profit and public or private behavior. To explore the influence of the public participation of the PPP projects supervision behavior, this paper analyzes the mutual evolutionary regularity of the private sector and government supervision department and the influence of public participation level on public and private behavior based on evolutionary game theor...

  14. Public-private partnerships in urban regeneration areas in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael Tophøj; Aunsborg, Christian

    2006-01-01

    into housing while neighbouring noisy industries go on. Beyond this, from a municipal point of view there are several public interests to manage when old, remaining industrial areas face re-development. The motive of the municipal council can either be regulative (safeguarding certain financial or other public......The paper focuses formal as well as informal public-private partnerships (PPP) in Danish urban regeneration areas. The concept ‘urban regeneration areas’ was introduced in the 2003 Planning Act as old, remaining industrial areas within the city boundaries by now were recognized as an ressource...

  15. Public-Private Partnership as Incentive Institution of Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Averkieva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interaction system of national public and private sectors institutions is becoming increasingly important in the conditions that characterize the current stage of economic development (such as globalization and post-industrialization trends, geopolitical threats, transformation of production and financial processes. Instability and the dependence of national economies from external environment factors, exposure to systemic crises increase the vulnerability of national business and require the state institutions’ activation in order to support and promote national business initiatives. In these circumstances, one of the most adequate to modern realities forms of entrepreneurial activity stimulation is the public-private partnership model, which proved to be highly effective, both in foreign countries and in Russia. The author reveals potential of public-private partnership as an institution to stimulate entrepreneurial activity by analyzing features of its organizational and management mechanism in the Russian Federation. The practical aspects of the introduction of the public-private partnership model are studied on the example of the Rostov region. The author shows that the implemented programs to encourage entrepreneurship through PPP projects have a positive effect, but at the same time remain a number of problems in the development of the business sector in Russia. The improving ways of the interaction mechanism between government and business at the regional level are identified based on the assessing results of the PPP level in Russia as a whole and in separate regions, implemented by the Association "Center for PPP development".

  16. Theoretical and applied aspects of public-state partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Bodelan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the main approaches to the formation and the development of public-state partnership in foreign countries and in Ukraine. The category «Public-state Partnership» has no clear definition in science, and in public administration it is used in many senses. The lack of theoretical justification, no systematic approach to the separation of theoretical and methodological foundations of the public-state partnerships, the forms of its practical implementation does not allow our country to be competitive internationally. In particular, this applies to such an aspects such as social maturity of business and entrepreneurship. Such companies create NGOs that in many countries provide 3 to 9% of GDP, attract domestic and foreign investments, benefit society and are a form of targeting state impact on the condition and development of social processes and relationships. Ukraine has not yet established the culture of social entrepreneurship, both government authorities and NGOs are not aware how promising such activity authorized by the legislation of Ukraine is. The reserve and the capacity of NGOs when considering formation of a special investment climate, development of production, replenishment of the budgets at all levels, creating conditions for entrepreneurship etc. are not applied. Main role is assigned for the NGOs that make a significant contribution to socio-economic development of the country and become its reliable investment partner.

  17. Building a Health Care Legal Partnership Learning Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Eileen; Polkey, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Many Americans need both health care and legal interventions to maximize their opportunities for health. Medical-legal partnerships (MLPs), also known as health care legal partnerships (HLPs), bring the power of law to health care to reduce barriers and negative social determinants of health. The two terms--HLP and MLP--are used interchangeably in this article. Growing research shows that these partnerships can improve care, improve health, enhance interprofessional collaboration, and improve the financial status of patients and providers. HLPs take many forms, depending on their settings and resources. A health care legal partnership learning collaborative that brings leaders of diverse HLPs together to share experiences and best practices can help expand this effective model and enhance its potential for collective impact in improving population health.

  18. Renegotiation of transportation public-private partnerships: The US experience

    OpenAIRE

    Gifford, Jonathan; Bolaños, Lisardo; Daito, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (P3s) typically rely on long-term contracts between participants. When conditions arise that fall outside the expectations embodied in the contract, one party may seek to renegotiate the contract terms. Globally, the frequency of P3 contract renegotiations has been sufficient to raise questions regarding why these events occur and what their consequences are for the projects and society. The literature highlights four relevant causes behind renegotiation occurrence...

  19. A Public-Private Partnership Improves Clinical Performance In A Hospital Network In Lesotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Nathalie; Grabowski, Aria; Jack, Brian; Nkabane-Nkholongo, Elizabeth Limakatso; Vian, Taryn

    2015-06-01

    Health care public-private partnerships (PPPs) between a government and the private sector are based on a business model that aims to leverage private-sector expertise to improve clinical performance in hospitals and other health facilities. Although the financial implications of such partnerships have been analyzed, few studies have examined the partnerships' impact on clinical performance outcomes. Using quantitative measures that reflected capacity, utilization, clinical quality, and patient outcomes, we compared a government-managed hospital network in Lesotho, Africa, and the new PPP-managed hospital network that replaced it. In addition, we used key informant interviews to help explain differences in performance. We found that the PPP-managed network delivered more and higher-quality services and achieved significant gains in clinical outcomes, compared to the government-managed network. We conclude that health care public-private partnerships may improve hospital performance in developing countries and that changes in management and leadership practices might account for differences in clinical outcomes.

  20. Training Public Health Advisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pamela A; Brusuelas, Kristin M; Baden, Daniel J; Duncan, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Federal public health advisors provide guidance and assistance to health departments to improve public health program work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prepares them with specialized training in administering public health programs. This article describes the evolving training and is based on internal CDC documents and interviews. The first federal public health advisors worked in health departments to assist with controlling syphilis after World War II. Over time, more CDC prevention programs hired them. To meet emerging needs, 3 major changes occurred: the Public Health Prevention Service, a fellowship program, in 1999; the Public Health Associate Program in 2007; and integration of those programs. Key components of the updated training are competency-based training, field experience, supervision, recruitment and retention, and stakeholder support. The enduring strength of the training has been the experience in a public health agency developing practical skills for program implementation and management.

  1. Public-Private Partnerships as Hybrid Organizational Drivers of Innovation in the Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Sofie

    framework, which can be used to investigate the potential for innovation in different PPP types across sectors. The last decades have seen sequential waves of public sector reforms, which have resulted in an increased hybridity in the public sector, where ideas, goals and tools from hierarchy, market...... in the organizational form of PPPs provide different mixes of coordination mechanisms for public-private innovation. The paper investigates three PPP types, Long-term Infrastructure Partnerships (LTICs), Public-Private Service Partnerships (PPSPs) and Public-Private Innovation Partnerships (PPIPs), and shows how...... collaboration, and LTICs are mostly coordinated through competition, though each PPP type displays a specific mix of both competition and collaboration. The article provides a conceptually based explanation for the various degree of innovation in different PPP types displayed in current empirical investigations...

  2. Everyone Swims: A Community Partnership and Policy Approach to Address Health Disparities in Drowning and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempski, Sarah; Liu, Lenna; Grow, H. Mollie; Pomietto, Maureen; Chung, Celeste; Shumann, Amy; Bennett, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Well-known disparities exist in rates of obesity and drowning, two public health priorities. Addressing these disparities by increasing access to safe swimming and water recreation may yield benefits for both obesity and injury prevention. "Everyone Swims," a community partnership, brought community health clinics and water recreation…

  3. Corruption and ethical issues regarding public-private partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca COBÂRZAN

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper raises general questions about ethical problems that taint public-private partnership. Everybody talks about the economical benefits of encouraging firms to invest in the community using different incentives offered by the public institutions. In the same time, every day, newspapers bring to our attention cases of misuse of public resources for private gain or cases of private investors who give bribes in order to get a contract with a public institution. The purpose of this paper is to synthesize our understanding of the entrepreneurial movement and analyze its implications for potential problems of corruption that can arise in the relation between the public and the private sector.a

  4. Corruption and Ethical Issues Regarding Public-Private Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca COBÂRZAN

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper raises general questions about  ethical problems that taint public-private  partnership. Everybody talks about the  economical benefits of encouraging firms  to invest in the community using different  incentives offered by the public institutions.  In the same time, every day, newspapers  bring to our attention cases of misuse of  public resources for private gain or cases  of private investors who give bribes in order  to get a contract with a public institution.  The purpose of this paper is to synthesize  our understanding of the entrepreneurial  movement and analyze its implications for  potential problems of corruption that can  arise in the relation between the public and the private sector.

  5. Public private partnership as a last resort for traditional public procurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojović Viktorija

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent changes in the way public services are delivered A marked increase in the cooperation between the public and private sector in the realization of complex projects, mostly concerning development of infrastructure, is the main characteristic of present-day developing economies. The creation of new, innovative agreements is driven by the limitation of public funds and an ever-growing demand for an increase in the quality of public services. Looking upon the western economies experience alternatives to the traditional public sector procurement are identified in the public/private partnership. The public/private partnership can be seen as one component in the rearrangement of the public sector with a management culture that focuses on the citizen or customer. Also included in this are accountability for results, investigation of a wide variety of alternative service delivery mechanisms, and competition between public and private bodies for contracts to deliver services consistent with cost recovery and the achievement of value for money. The partnership can be realized through an array of models and in this paper priority is given to the DBFO (design-build-finance-operate model, due to its importance in implementation. The DBFO model is considered to be a synonym for the public/private partnership, as it is the most suitable for complex projects and gains the most benefits.

  6. RISK ASSESSMENT MODELS OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE ROAD SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Gasilov; D. V. Shitikov

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the main potential models of public-private partnership; it gives evaluation of risks for these models, considering their distribution between members of partnership. It offers the mechanism of making an optimal choice of a public-private partnership model for projects of transport system development.

  7. RISK ASSESSMENT MODELS OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE ROAD SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Gasilov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the main potential models of public-private partnership; it gives evaluation of risks for these models, considering their distribution between members of partnership. It offers the mechanism of making an optimal choice of a public-private partnership model for projects of transport system development.

  8. Public-Private Partnerships and Sustainable Regional Innovation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin; Christensen, Per; Johnson, Bjørn

    in this connection, and their roles (if any) are still somewhat unclear. So, the question is: What is or could be the role of universities in P3s? A third mission of universities, often referred to as ‘outreach’, is increasingly coming into focus. One aspect of the third mission is the role universities is or may...... be playing in public-private partnerships for sustainable development, and the links and benefits this may provide towards universities fulfilling their first (science) and second (education) missions. In this paper, the first part is dedicated to the discussion and clarification of the concept of public...

  9. An Excursion Into The Public-Private Partnership Jungle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelling, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    While the Private Finance Initiative (PFI) is doubtless the most visible Public-Private Partnership (PPP) in the public debate it is by no means the only one. A number of scholars have outlined the ambiguity of the PPP concept beyond PFIs and pointed to the multiplicity of differing types...... and classifications. Following, the article first of all identifies the emergence of two dimensions that are differently emphasized by the proposed PPP definitions (1) the co-responsibility dimension and (2) the relational governance dimension. Second, the arti-cle finds two differing approaches within each dimension...

  10. Limited partnership: the lack of sustainable development in relation to participation in Hungarian public-private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeczi, David

    2005-01-01

    Public-private partnerships represent a new form of network governance, potentially offering flexibility, economic efficiencies and non-governmental participation in policy development. Such partnerships can be viewed in terms of sustainable development, achieving two of its three tenets - economic

  11. Limited partnership: The lack of sustainable development in relation to participation in Hungarian public-private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeczi, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Public-private partnerships represent a new form of network governance, potentially offering flexibility, economic efficiencies and non-governmental participation in policy development. Such partnerships can be viewed in terms of sustainable development, achieving two of its three tenets - economic

  12. Enhancing Transparency and Public Participation through Local Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmans, Anne [Univ. of Antwerp, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Social and Political Sciences

    2001-07-01

    Collective decision making in a democratic environment essentially is a process of negotiation. This assumption, as well as the failure of the formerly used topdown approach, led to a drastic change in the decision making process for siting a low level nuclear waste repository in Belgium. In two prospective communities, a local partnership was established between NIRAS-ONDRAF, the government organisation responsible for the Belgian nuclear waste, and representatives of the local communities. These partnerships are intended to bring the decision making process closer to the public concerned and to lower the threshold for active participation. The final outcome of this decision making exercise is therefore a mutual project, carried by both experts and local stakeholders, instead of an expert project imposed on an unwilling community.

  13. Successful public-private partnerships: The NYPD shield model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadeo, Vincent; Iannone, Stephen

    2017-12-01

    This article will identify the challenges that post 9/11 law enforcement faces regarding privatepublic partnerships and describe in detail the NYPD Shield programme, created to combat those challenges. Recommendations made by the 911 Commission included the incorporation of the private sector into future homeland security strategies. One such strategy is NYPD Shield. This programme is a nationally recognized award-winning public-private partnership dedicated to providing counterterrorism training and information sharing with government agencies, non-government organizations, private businesses, and the community. Information is shared through several platforms that include a dedicated website, instruction of counterterrorism training curricula, e-mail alerts, intelligence assessments and the hosting of quarterly conferences. This article also details how the NYPD Shield is providing its successful template to other law enforcement agencies enabling them to initiate similar programmes in their respective jurisdictions, and in doing so joining a National Shield Network.

  14. Discover: What Is Public Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series Undergraduate Network Membership Contact Discover What is Public Health? Public health protects and improves the health of individuals, families, communities, and populations, locally and globally. Public health is personal. Public health professionals focus on preventing ...

  15. MARKETING FUNCTION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubiša Ćosić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Marketing function of an economicentity involves the usage of various marketing subfunctionssuch as marketing research, marketingapproach in product development, marketingplanning, marketing management, etc. Themarketing orientation of the economic entity isdirected by using those functions, eitherindividually or jointly. In terms of our public sectorand institutions, introduction and application ofmarketing as a kind of business philosophy are notyet enough widespread and used. This paper posesas imperative introduction of a marketing conceptand corresponding marketing sub-functions inpublic institutions, mainly in the field of public -private partnership. The direct relation andcooperation between public and private sector inthe projects of general and social interest that areimplemented by private partner in cooperation withpublic institution in the framework of private-publicpartnership reflects the significance of marketingfunction of public sector in this field.

  16. Patterns in PARTNERing across Public Health Collaboratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A. Bevc

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inter-organizational networks represent one of the most promising practice-based approaches in public health as a way to attain resources, share knowledge, and, in turn, improve population health outcomes. However, the interdependencies and effectiveness related to the structure, management, and costs of these networks represents a critical item to be addressed. The objective of this research is to identify and determine the extent to which potential partnering patterns influence the structure of collaborative networks. This study examines data collected by PARTNER, specifically public health networks (n = 162, to better understand the structured relationships and interactions among public health organizations and their partners, in relation to collaborative activities. Combined with descriptive analysis, we focus on the composition of public health collaboratives in a series of Exponential Random Graph (ERG models to examine the partnerships between different organization types to identify the attribute-based effects promoting the formation of network ties within and across collaboratives. We found high variation within and between these collaboratives including composition, diversity, and interactions. The findings of this research suggest common and frequent types of partnerships, as well as opportunities to develop new collaborations. The result of this analysis offer additional evidence to inform and strengthen public health practice partnerships.

  17. An Investigation of the Dayton Regional STEM School Public-Private Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kimberly S.

    This dissertation study documents in-depth the exploration of the Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) between the Dayton Regional STEM School (DRSS) and their industry partners as well as the establishment of a framework for evaluating and assessing PPPs. The public-private partnership agreements were studied in order to answer the over-arching research question: How is an effective public-private partnership established, assessed, and evaluated in education? A descriptive case study methodology was used to study DRSS' public-private partnership agreements to determine if goals and objectives were established and whether or not the partnerships met those goals and objectives. This case study also included the development and testing of a proposed evaluation framework that will allow for consistent, systematic inquiry that can produce defensible assertions regarding the assessment and evaluation of public-private partnerships in education. Results of the case study support the findings that utilization of an evaluation framework can serve to make public-private partnerships more successful. Results also indicated that establishment of goals and objectives enable effective evaluation for informal partnerships but could not be definitively stated for formal partnerships due to the lack of data points. The data from this case study revealed many emergent themes that should be considered in the development of future public-private partnerships. Overall this study contributes to the growing body of knowledge for public-private partnerships in education.

  18. Public-private partnerships for long-term success. Implementation of public construction projects in public-private partnerships; Mit PPP zu nachhaltigem Erfolg. Partnerschaftliche Realisierung oeffentlicher Bauaufgaben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simsch, Gerd; Glock, Christian; Herzog, Kati [Bilfinger Berger Hochbau GmbH, Frankfurt (Germany); Prein, Sascha [bauperformance GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Public private partnerships necessitate a comprehensive life cycle assessment, which makes them increasingly important as models of sustainability for public building owners. This is proved by the advantages in terms of efficiency and by the fact that two PPP projects received an award (''Guetesiegel nachhaltiges Bauen''). (orig.)

  19. Integrating Advanced Molecular Technologies into Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinn, Marta; MacCannell, Duncan R; Khabbaz, Rima F

    2017-03-01

    Advances in laboratory and information technologies are transforming public health microbiology. High-throughput genome sequencing and bioinformatics are enhancing our ability to investigate and control outbreaks, detect emerging infectious diseases, develop vaccines, and combat antimicrobial resistance, all with increased accuracy, timeliness, and efficiency. The Advanced Molecular Detection (AMD) initiative has allowed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to provide leadership and coordination in integrating new technologies into routine practice throughout the U.S. public health laboratory system. Collaboration and partnerships are the key to navigating this transition and to leveraging the next generation of methods and tools most effectively for public health.

  20. Partnership tools for health promotion: are they worth the effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joss, Nerida; Keleher, Helen

    2011-09-01

    In health promotion and community sector programs, working through partnerships has become a key strategy for capacity building and infrastructure development that is intended to achieve better health outcomes. Government and funding agencies are providing significant support for partnership work in the apparent belief that partnerships are more likely to improve sustainability of programs and their outcomes than single agencies working alone. Online partnership analysis tools are designed for organisations to measure the effectiveness of their collaborative endeavours, and to demonstrate to funding bodies that the partnership was worthwhile. The tools are predominantly self-assessment evaluation tools but there is a lack of clarity about what these tools actually set out to measure. Self-assessment tools assist partners to recognise strengths and weaknesses in their practice, but analysis of their intentions indicates that there are significant problems with the 'snapshot' data that is generated in terms of analysing effectiveness. Partnership work is complex, dynamic and context specific with varying synergistic rewards which cannot always be represented in survey tools. This article reports analysis of online self-assessment partnership tools which have data-generating capacity, to determine just what they measure and to understand how effective they can be in evaluating collaborative practice. Criteria for analysis were developed from a review of the existing literature. The review and analysis has highlighted that practitioners must consider what they are measuring and for what purpose they seek to evaluate before utilising and implementing a partnership analysis tool.

  1. Growing partners: building a community-academic partnership to address health disparities in rural North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Molly; Kearney, William; Smith, Tosha; Jones, Carson; Kearney-Powell, Arconstar; Ammerman, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) holds tremendous promise for addressing public health disparities. As such, there is a need for academic institutions to build lasting partnerships with community organizations. Herein we have described the process of establishing a relationship between a research university and a Black church in rural North Carolina. We then discuss Harvest of Hope, the church-based pilot garden project that emerged from that partnership. The partnership began with a third-party effort to connect research universities with Black churches to address health disparities. Building this academic-community partnership included collaborating to determine research questions and programming priorities. Other aspects of the partnership included applying for funding together and building consensus on study budget and aims. The academic partners were responsible for administrative details and the community partners led programming and were largely responsible for participant recruitment. The community and academic partners collaborated to design and implement Harvest of Hope, a church-based pilot garden project involving 44 youth and adults. Community and academic partners shared responsibility for study design, recruitment, programming, and reporting of results. The successful operation of the Harvest of Hope project gave rise to a larger National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded study, Faith, Farming and the Future (F3) involving 4 churches and 60 youth. Both projects were CBPR efforts to improve healthy food access and reducing chronic disease. This partnership continues to expand as we develop additional CBPR projects targeting physical activity, healthy eating, and environmental justice, among others. Benefits of the partnership include increased community ownership and cultural appropriateness of interventions. Challenges include managing expectations of diverse parties and adequate communication. Lessons learned and strategies for building

  2. Balancing the benefits and risks of public-private partnerships to address the global double burden of malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraak, Vivica I; Harrigan, Paige B; Lawrence, Mark; Harrison, Paul J; Jackson, Michaela A; Swinburn, Boyd

    2012-03-01

    Transnational food, beverage and restaurant companies, and their corporate foundations, may be potential collaborators to help address complex public health nutrition challenges. While UN system guidelines are available for private-sector engagement, non-governmental organizations (NGO) have limited guidelines to navigate diverse opportunities and challenges presented by partnering with these companies through public-private partnerships (PPP) to address the global double burden of malnutrition. We conducted a search of electronic databases, UN system websites and grey literature to identify resources about partnerships used to address the global double burden of malnutrition. A narrative summary provides a synthesis of the interdisciplinary literature identified. We describe partnership opportunities, benefits and challenges; and tools and approaches to help NGO engage with the private sector to address global public health nutrition challenges. PPP benefits include: raising the visibility of nutrition and health on policy agendas; mobilizing funds and advocating for research; strengthening food-system processes and delivery systems; facilitating technology transfer; and expanding access to medications, vaccines, healthy food and beverage products, and nutrition assistance during humanitarian crises. PPP challenges include: balancing private commercial interests with public health interests; managing conflicts of interest; ensuring that co-branded activities support healthy products and healthy eating environments; complying with ethical codes of conduct; assessing partnership compatibility; and evaluating partnership outcomes. NGO should adopt a systematic and transparent approach using available tools and processes to maximize benefits and minimize risks of partnering with transnational food, beverage and restaurant companies to effectively target the global double burden of malnutrition.

  3. American Public Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Published Books Fact Sheets Reports and Issue Briefs Advertising Public Health Buyers Guide Publications Contacts Professional Development ... Steps Challenge doubles its goal Apr 11 2017 Facebook Is your organization an APHA member? As an ...

  4. Lighting and public health.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ierland, J. van & Schreuder, D.A.

    1969-01-01

    The following topics; are discussed with respect to public health: - the effect of visible and ultraviolet radiation upon man. - vision with respect to lighting. interior lighting. - artificial lighting of work environments. - day light and windows. - recommendations for lighting. public lighting. -

  5. Improving Sustainability Performance for Public-Private-Partnership (PPP Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyin Shen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Improving sustainability performance in developing infrastructure projects is an important strategy for pursuing the mission of sustainable development. In recent years, the business model of public-private-partnership (PPP is promoted as an effective approach in developing infrastructure projects. It is considered that the distribution of the contribution on project investment between private and public sectors is one of the key variables affecting sustainability performance of PPP-type projects. This paper examines the impacts of the contribution distribution between public and private sectors on project sustainability performance. A model named the sustainability performance-based evaluation model (SPbEM is developed for assisting the assessment of the level of sustainability performance of PPP projects. The study examines the possibility of achieving better sustainability through proper arrangement of the investment distribution between the two primary sectors in developing PPP-type infrastructure projects.

  6. Waste water treatment through public-private partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpintero, Samuel; Petersen, Ole Helby

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the experience of the regional government of Aragon (Spain) that has extensively used public-private partnerships for the construction and operation of waste water treatment plants. The paper argues that although overall the implementation of this PPP program might be considered...... allocation of some tasks. The paper also illustrates two features of this PPP program that arguably have strongly influenced its successful implementation: The mitigation of demand risk and the rigorous estimations of demand carried out by the regional government...

  7. Empirical Approaches of the Public-Private Partnership in the Services of Public Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucica Matei

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper approaches from a theoretical and empirical perspective the public-private partnership in Romania with special reference to the services of public utility. The premises for the approach are as follows: 1. The economic-social development and the reform of the public sector in the world, with the corresponding budgetary constraints and cutting off the number of jobs in the public sector represent dimensions of the development of the change management, known on world level since the ’80s period. These issues have created the conditions and opportunities for new economic, managerial, social, political concepts and theories of law and have “invented” new models of public services to which specific models of management correspond. The theory is enriched with new dimensions switching from an immediate conception of the public sector reform and public services reform – that can be temporarily delimited in a political mandate – to a conception based on stages, with rules that are well thought, accepted and understood by all the involved actors (politicians, users-citizens, suppliers. 2. The development of the adequate institutional context for the promotion of the public-private partnership simultaneously with the stable, coherent legal context inscribes in extremely diverse backgrounds, differing from country to country and awarding a different place to the intervention of the public power, within the framework of the capacity building process. Therefore, the models promoted by the developed countries can be considered experiences, varying from a public service to another, from a city to another or from country to country, requiring contextual, cultural, economic, social adjustments. 3. The public authority through the public-private partnership seeks an improvement of the public service quality and the private operator seeks a profit proportional with the capital invested, with his competencies and risks. The diversity of the

  8. The economics of infrastructure finance: Public-private partnerships versus public provision

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Eduardo M. R. A.; Fischer, Ronald D.; Galetovic, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We examine the economics of infrastructure finance, focusing on public provision and Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs). We show that project finance is appropriate for PPP projects, because there are few economies of scope and because assets are project specific. Furthermore, we suggest that the higher cost of finance of PPPs is not an argument in favour of public provision, since it appears to reflect the combination of deficient contract design and the cost-cutting incentives embedded in P...

  9. The economics of infrastructure finance: Public-private partnerships versus public provision

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo M.R.A. Engel; Ronald D. Fischer; Galetovic, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We examine the economics of infrastructure finance, focusing on public provision and Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs). We show that project finance is appropriate for PPP projects, because there are few economies of scope and because assets are project specific. Furthermore, we suggest that the higher cost of finance of PPPs is not an argument in favour of public provision, since it appears to reflect the combination of deficient contract design and the cost-cutting incentives embedded in P...

  10. The role of Public Private Partnership: the Brazilian experience of modernizing hospitals in the São Paulo Prefecture Health Secretariat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Roser; Castillejo, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Within the health sector, the aim of the PPP model is to improve management efficiency and innovation in health care services while it also helps to accelerate the modernization of national health systems. Gesaworld's experience in Brazil, including the modernization of the hospital network of the São Paulo Prefecture, has contributed to improvements in the health of the population by offering better health care facilities. The scope of the project, which is based on the legal model of an administrative concession contract, includes sustainability criteria as part of the project.

  11. Social economy partnerships and the public/private cleavages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joxerramon Bengoetxea

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Public/Private Partnerships can be seen as one particular topos where the divide between the public domain, all levels of the Public Administration and the private initiative and private property is turned into a joint venture rather than a confrontation or a cleavage. Some of the possible combinations of public and private and where public/private partnerships might fit are displayed analytically. The importance of political theory or ideology in conceiving the relationships between ‘public’ and ‘private’, and the conceptions of a market economy as opposed to a social market economy cannot be exaggerated enough, but equally important are the legal or regulatory framework and the underlying dominant legal culture and legal principles, and of course the economic and financial situation. Public/private partnerships thrive in some conditions, but seem to wane in others, and the current predicament is not favourable, taking into account that only the regulatory framework is supportive of these ventures. Los partenariados público-privados se pueden entender como un espacio particular, en el que el sector público, todos los niveles de la administración pública, y la iniciativa privada y la propiedad privada, abordan una empresa conjunta, en lugar mantener posturas contrapuestas. Se muestran algunas de las posibles combinaciones del sector público y privado, en las que tendrían cabida los partenariados público/privados. Es patente la importancia de la teoría o la ideología política para entender las relaciones entre lo público y lo privado, y las concepciones de una economía de mercado frente a una economía social, pero tampoco se puede negar la importancia del marco legal o reglamentario y la cultura jurídica dominante subyacente, y los principios jurídicos, sin olvidar la situación económica y financiera. Los partenariados público-privados prosperan en algunas condiciones, pero no lo hacen siempre, y la situación econ

  12. 77 FR 42801 - Public Private Partnerships Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ...The FAA is conducting a public meeting on August 7 regarding program design and implementation of an equipage incentives program for commercial aircraft and general aviation to equip their aircraft with Next Generation Air Transportation (NextGen) capabilities, pursuant to the FAA's authority in the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (sec. 221). The purpose of this meeting is to serve as an information sharing session.

  13. 26 CFR 1.1445-8 - Special rules regarding publicly traded partnerships, publicly traded trusts and real estate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... partnerships, publicly traded trusts and real estate investment trusts (REITs). 1.1445-8 Section 1.1445-8... estates upon the disposition of U.S. real property interests. Except as otherwise provided in this... Bonds § 1.1445-8 Special rules regarding publicly traded partnerships, publicly traded trusts and real...

  14. Public Private Partnership a využití v oblasti dopravy

    OpenAIRE

    Trunkát, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The theme of my thesis is mutual cooperation between public and private sector called Public Private Partnership. The theoretical part explains the concept of Public Private Partnership, its history, pros and cons which this partnership bears, and branches in which PPP is used. In the second part two case studies of pilot projects in transport infrastructure in Czech Republic are analyzed. The goal is to analyze the application of PPP in these projects and in one unsuccessful project...

  15. Analytical Review on Transportation Public Private Partnerships Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin Ali Soomro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Governments around the globe are embracing Public Private Partnerships (PPPs to overcome financial and technical deficit and to provide public infrastructure on faster pace. However, PPPs are complex institutional arrangements involving many players from diversified fields and thus bringing more risk to the project. Numerous researches had been conducted to investigate potential risks and success factors for establishing PPPs. But, as appetite for transportation PPPs is increasing around the globe, more problems and partnership failures are being witnessed. Existence of such failures and faults, despite of the availability of scientific protocols, motivate the authors to investigate transportation PPPs failures in past two decades. The investigation led to the identification of forty eight potential failure reasons, responsible for transportation PPPs. The identification of “potential failure reasons” was made possible through thirty five transportation PPPs case studies. The investigation through case studies reveals that the adoption of PPPs in different regions was motivated by specific reasons besides fundamental financial and technical concerns. These specific reasons had played important roles in the project success and failure. This paper discusses the global trend of transportation PPPs in different economies with evidence of potential failure reasons and their causal relationships

  16. Museums Connect: Teaching Public History through Transnational Museum Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. W. Harker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums Connect is a program funded by the US Department of State and administered by the American Alliance of Museums that sponsors transnational museum partnerships. This program provides one model for teaching public history in a transnational context, and this article analyzes the experiences of two university-museums—the Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE in the United States and the Ben M’sik Community Museum (BMCM in Morocco—during two grants between 2009 and 2012. In exploring the impact of the program on the staff, faculty, and students involved and by analyzing the experiences and reflections of participants, I argue that this program can generate positive pedagogical experiences. However, in addition to the successes of the MHHE and BMCM during their two grants, the participants encountered significant power differentials that manifested themselves in both the processes and products of the grants. It is the conclusion of this article that both partners in a public history project need to address and confront potential power issues at the outset in order to achieve a more balanced, collaborative partnership.

  17. Public health workforce taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Matthew L; Beck, Angela J; Coronado, Fátima; Merrill, Jacqueline A; Friedman, Charles P; Stamas, George D; Tyus, Nadra; Sellers, Katie; Moore, Jean; Tilson, Hugh H; Leep, Carolyn J

    2014-11-01

    Thoroughly characterizing and continuously monitoring the public health workforce is necessary for ensuring capacity to deliver public health services. A prerequisite for this is to develop a standardized methodology for classifying public health workers, permitting valid comparisons across agencies and over time, which does not exist for the public health workforce. An expert working group, all of whom are authors on this paper, was convened during 2012-2014 to develop a public health workforce taxonomy. The purpose of the taxonomy is to facilitate the systematic characterization of all public health workers while delineating a set of minimum data elements to be used in workforce surveys. The taxonomy will improve the comparability across surveys, assist with estimating duplicate counting of workers, provide a framework for describing the size and composition of the workforce, and address other challenges to workforce enumeration. The taxonomy consists of 12 axes, with each axis describing a key characteristic of public health workers. Within each axis are multiple categories, and sometimes subcategories, that further define that worker characteristic. The workforce taxonomy axes are occupation, workplace setting, employer, education, licensure, certification, job tasks, program area, public health specialization area, funding source, condition of employment, and demographics. The taxonomy is not intended to serve as a replacement for occupational classifications but rather is a tool for systematically categorizing worker characteristics. The taxonomy will continue to evolve as organizations implement it and recommend ways to improve this tool for more accurate workforce data collection.

  18. Health promotion and partnerships: collaboration of a community health management center, county health bureau, and university nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Ling

    2002-06-01

    Effective partnerships were established between a community health management center, a county health bureau and a university nursing program. A health fair was undertaken to heighten public health awareness through the collaboration of these various agencies. In this research, formative, process, and summative evaluations were conducted to determine the benefits of partnerships. Elements evaluated included the planning process, health fair relevancy, integration of community resources, participants satisfaction and knowledge acquisition, and partnership satisfaction. The samples of this study included (1) 529 adult participants who completed the on-site evaluation questionnaires; (2) 1,090 child participants who returned gift-reward cards; (3) 114 partners who gave written feedback on their satisfaction; and (4) 57 third-year and 16 fourth-year undergraduate nursing student participants. Data was collected from the evidence report of the Department of Health, the project proposal, activity protocols, meeting records, the project final report, students term papers, and questionnaires. The chief administrator of the County Health Bureau was very impressed with the creative exhibits in the fair and, therefore, invited a coalition to continue further workshops. Seventeen educational exhibits, two dance programs and two drama programs related to health issues were demonstrated in the fair. Resources from community organizations were successfully integrated and allocated. Community participants expressed satisfaction with the fair and anticipated similar activities in the future. Participants revealed more than 80% accuracy in health knowledge quizzes. The senior nursing students highlighted their interaction with the community, community health nurses, and health volunteers. Community-based health promotion and nursing education can be successfully connected when various disciplines and sectors form effective partnerships.

  19. Partners in Public Health: Public Health Collaborations With Schools of Pharmacy, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro Mager, Natalie A; Ochs, Leslie; Ranelli, Paul L; Kahaleh, Abby A; Lahoz, Monina R; Patel, Radha V; Garza, Oscar W; Isaacs, Diana; Clark, Suzanne

    To collect data on public health collaborations with schools of pharmacy, we sent a short electronic survey to accredited and preaccredited pharmacy programs in 2015. We categorized public health collaborations as working or partnering with local and/or state public health departments, local and/or state public health organizations, academic schools or programs of public health, and other public health collaborations. Of 134 schools, 65 responded (49% response rate). Forty-six (71%) responding institutions indicated collaborations with local and/or state public health departments, 34 (52%) with schools or programs of public health, and 24 (37%) with local and/or state public health organizations. Common themes of collaborations included educational programs, community outreach, research, and teaching in areas such as tobacco control, emergency preparedness, chronic disease, drug abuse, immunizations, and medication therapy management. Interdisciplinary public health collaborations with schools of pharmacy provide additional resources for ensuring the health of communities and expose student pharmacists to opportunities to use their training and abilities to affect public health. Examples of these partnerships may stimulate additional ideas for possible collaborations between public health organizations and schools of pharmacy.

  20. Public-Private Investment Partnerships: Efficiency Estimation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Valeryevich Trynov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on assessing the effectiveness of investment projects implemented on the principles of public-private partnership (PPP. This article puts forward the hypothesis that the inclusion of multiplicative economic effects will increase the attractiveness of public-private partnership projects, which in turn will contribute to the more efficient use of budgetary resources. The author proposed a methodological approach and methods of evaluating the economic efficiency of PPP projects. The author’s technique is based upon the synthesis of approaches to evaluation of the project implemented in the private and public sector and in contrast to the existing methods allows taking into account the indirect (multiplicative effect arising during the implementation of project. In the article, to estimate the multiplier effect, the model of regional economy — social accounting matrix (SAM was developed. The matrix is based on the data of the Sverdlovsk region for 2013. In the article, the genesis of the balance models of economic systems is presented. The evolution of balance models in the Russian (Soviet and foreign sources from their emergence up to now are observed. It is shown that SAM is widely used in the world for a wide range of applications, primarily to assess the impact on the regional economy of various exogenous factors. In order to clarify the estimates of multiplicative effects, the disaggregation of the account of the “industry” of the matrix of social accounts was carried out in accordance with the All-Russian Classifier of Types of Economic Activities (OKVED. This step allows to consider the particular characteristics of the industry of the estimated investment project. The method was tested on the example of evaluating the effectiveness of the construction of a toll road in the Sverdlovsk region. It is proved that due to the multiplier effect, the more capital-intensive version of the project may be more beneficial in

  1. PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP AS A MECHANISM TO REDUCE SOCIAL RISKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Oleynik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of public-private partnership in the overall development of the country and its regions is determined in the article. The opinions of foreign and domestic scientists on the interpretation of the concept of PPP are analyzed, the main causes and social factors in favor of the introduction of PPP in Ukraine are determined. Singled out the main components of the PPP in the social sphere, including: public-regulation, public policy, transparency and accountability of PPP, financing and benefits of the project, the division of responsibilities between the public and private partners, taking into account the interests of consumers. Author determined the main provisions of the law of Ukraine “On Public Private Partnership”. The essence of social risk factors that cause them, their main features are determined. Differentiated concept of social risk and social insurance risk, the role of insurance in PPP agreements and key factors for cooperation between the state and the insurance segment are determined. Risk sharing agreement between the parties to the PPP when the state is a partner insurance company or other private partner is demonstrated.

  2. Building Collaborative Health Promotion Partnerships: The Jackson Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifton C. Addison

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Building Collaborative Health Promotion Partnerships: The Jackson Heart Study. Background: Building a collaborative health promotion partnership that effectively employs principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR involves many dimensions. To ensure that changes would be long-lasting, it is imperative that partnerships be configured to include groups of diverse community representatives who can develop a vision for long-term change. This project sought to enumerate processes used by the Jackson Heart Study (JHS Community Outreach Center (CORC to create strong, viable partnerships that produce lasting change. Methods: JHS CORC joined with community representatives to initiate programs that evolved into comprehensive strategies for addressing health disparities and the high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD. This collaboration was made possible by first promoting an understanding of the need for combined effort, the desire to interact with other community partners, and the vision to establish an effective governance structure. Results: The partnership between JHS CORC and the community has empowered and inspired community members to provide leadership to other health promotion projects. Conclusion: Academic institutions must reach out to local community groups and together address local health issues that affect the community. When a community understands the need for change to respond to negative health conditions, formalizing this type of collaboration is a step in the right direction.

  3. Pigs in Public Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mette N.

    2017-01-01

    Animals are rare topics in public health science texts and speech despite the fact that animal bodies and lives are woven into the health of human populations, and vice versa. Years of ethnographic and documentary research – following pigs and their humans in and out of biomedical research – made...... me mindful and watchful of the porous passages between animal and human bodies and environments that do not confine themselves to ‘national health programs’ directed towards a specific (human) population. These unrecognized species encounters and relationships, which exceed the conventional framework...... of public health, made me re-evaluate both what ‘public’ and what ‘health’ means in public health. In this commentary I provide a short personal account of that intellectual journey. I argue that entanglements between species make it urgent that public health scholars investigate the moral, socio...

  4. Initial lessons from public-private partnerships in drug and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, C; Berkley, S

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, venture capital approaches have delivered impressive results in identifying and funding promising health discoveries and bringing them to market. This success has inspired public sector experiments with "social venture capital" approaches to address the dearth of affordable treatment and prevention for diseases of the developing world. Employing the same focus on well-defined and measurable objectives, and the same type of connections to pool and deploy resources as their for-profit counterparts, social venture capitalists seek to use the tools and incentives of capitalism to solve one of its biggest failures: the lack of drugs and vaccines for diseases endemic to low-income populations. As part of a larger trend of partnerships emerging in health product donation and distribution, public-private partnerships for pharmaceutical development have led research and development (R&D) efforts to generate more accessible and efficacious products for diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, and AIDS. In this article, three R&D-focused partnerships are explored: the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative; the Medicines for Malaria Venture; and the newly formed Global Alliance for TB Drug Development. The article highlights key elements essential to the success of these ventures.

  5. Evaluating Global Health Partnerships: A Case Study of a Gavi HPV Vaccine Application Process in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Kamya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Global health partnerships have grown rapidly in number and scope, yet there has been less emphasis on their evaluation. Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, is one such public-private partnership; in Gavi-eligible countries partnerships are dynamic networks of immunization actors who work together to support all stages and aspects of Gavi support. This paper describes a conceptual framework – the partnership framework – and analytic approach for evaluating the perceptions of partnerships’ added value as well as the results from an application to one case in Uganda. Methods We used a mixed-methods case study design embedded in the Gavi Full Country Evaluations (FCE to test the partnership framework on Uganda’s human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine application partnership. Data from document review, interviews, and social network surveys enabled the testing of the relationships between partnership framework domains (context, structure, practices, performance, and outcomes. Topic guides were based on the framework domains and network surveys identified working together relationships, professional trust, and perceptions of the effectiveness, efficiency, and legitimacy of the partnership’s role in this process. Results Data from seven in-depth interviews, 11 network surveys and document review were analyzed according to the partnership framework, confirming relationships between the framework domains. Trust was an important contributor to the perceived effectiveness of the process. The network was structured around the EPI program, who was considered the leader of this process. While the structure and composition of the network was largely viewed as supporting an effective and legitimate process, the absence of the Ministry of Education (MoE may have had downstream consequences if this study’s results had not been shared with the Ministry of Health (MoH and acted upon. The partnership was not perceived to have increased the efficiency of

  6. Managing across Public­Private Partnerships: A Review of Implementation in China and Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loo-See Beh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Public-private partnership is about governance in the contemporary public service and public interest in public administration with the participation of private sector in the market economy in establishing strategic partnerships in responsible economic management of public services. This article provides an overview of the implementation of public-private partnerships and how these evidences have been managed across China (including Hong Kong SAR and Australia. It also depicts the key challenges of managing them in both countries given their different stages of maturity in implementation framework of regulation and evaluation.

  7. Public-Private Partnerships and Sustainable Agricultural Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Castle

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture in Africa is not sustainable because average yields have been stagnating for decades due to underinvestment, especially in the development of agricultural markets, crop improvement and the sustainable management of agricultural systems. Low public sector funding for agricultural research and lack of incentives for the private sector to operate in areas where there is no market largely explain the yield gap in many food-importing developing countries. Yet, there are effective ways in which the public and the private sector could work together and jointly improve agricultural sustainability in poor countries. The public sector provides a favorable institutional environment for the development of agricultural markets and investment in rural infrastructure, facilitates local business development and funds research with local relevance. The private sector, in return, brings its considerable expertise in product development and deployment. This article illustrates how new forms of public-private partnerships (PPPs for agricultural development can work in challenging environments. It discusses three promising examples of PPPs in which the Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture (SFSA is actively involved, and shows that an experimental approach can sometimes be more effective than social planning in efforts to achieve sustainable agriculture.

  8. A systematic framework for infrastructure development through public private partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqing Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Public–private partnerships (PPPs play an important role in bringing private sector competition to public monopolies in infrastructure development and service provision and in merging the resources of both public and private sectors to better serve the public needs. However, in worldwide practices, there are mixed results, substantial controversy, criticism and conflict over PPPs. This paper proposes a systematic framework for the delivery of public works and services through PPPs in general. Justified by public procurement principles, aimed at a public–private win–win solution, and based on worldwide best industrial practices and lessons from unsuccessful projects, this framework integrates the four broadly divided stages that repeat over time: (1 design of a workable concession, (2 competitive concessionaire selection, (3 financial regulation, and (4 periodic reconcession and rebidding. The four-stage framework takes into account the requirements of public services, realignment of responsibility and reward among multiple participants in PPPs, the monopolistic rights of the concessionaire, and the wide range of risks and uncertainties in the long concession period. Varying competition elements are incorporated in each of the four stages for continuous performance improvement in the delivery of public works and services. The design of the right concession forms the base on which other stages are implemented in addition to planning the project and allocating risks for enhanced efficiency. The financial regulation allows the government to address changing conditions and to regulate the concession for efficient operation with due discretion, whereas the competitive concessionaire selection and periodic reconcession and rebidding play critical roles in achieving innovation, efficiency and cost effectiveness through direct competition rather than government discretionary intervention.

  9. Using an academic-community partnership model and blended learning to advance community health nursing pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeonwu, Mabel; Berkowitz, Bobbie; Vlasses, Frances R

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a model of teaching community health nursing that evolved from a long-term partnership with a community with limited existing health programs. The partnership supported RN-BSN students' integration in the community and resulted in reciprocal gains for faculty, students and community members. Community clients accessed public health services as a result of the partnership. A blended learning approach that combines face-to-face interactions, service learning and online activities was utilized to enhance students' learning. Following classroom sessions, students actively participated in community-based educational process through comprehensive health needs assessments, planning and implementation of disease prevention and health promotion activities for community clients. Such active involvement in an underserved community deepened students' awareness of the fundamentals of community health practice. Students were challenged to view public health from a broader perspective while analyzing the impacts of social determinants of health on underserved populations. Through asynchronous online interactions, students synthesized classroom and community activities through critical thinking. This paper describes a model for teaching community health nursing that informs students' learning through blended learning, and meets the demands for community health nursing services delivery.

  10. Equitable Financial Evaluation Method for Public-Private Partnership Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Yongjian; LIU Xinping; WANG Shouqing

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility study of a public-private partnership (PPP) project is regarded as one of the critical factors for successful implementation,but unfortunately the common financial evaluation methods currently used only represent the benefits of the private sector.There is,therefore,an urgent need to develop an equitable financial evaluation method for PPP projects.This paper presents a comprehensive literature review that examines international practices.An equitable financial evaluation method was then developed taking into account the inherent characteristics of PPP projects using six separate indicators and Monte Carlo simulations.The result for a bridge project in Romania shows that the method combines the viewpoints of all the relevant stakeholders to achieve an equitable financial evaluation of PPP projects.

  11. Governance of partnership between health and social services: the experience in Somerset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Edward; Gulliver, Pauline; Towell, David

    2002-09-01

    As one part of a larger study of the integration of mental health and social care, the present paper explores the role of the Joint Commissioning Board in the governance arrangements for health and social partnership in Somerset, UK. A short review of the literature on joint planning and joint commissioning revealed that such partnership has proved problematic, and that the role of non-executive directors and councillors is usually overlooked. Furthermore, the research on corporate boards suggests that their performance does not match the prescriptions made for them. Following a description of the methodology of the study, the present paper reports the findings of the activity of the Joint Commissioning Board from three data sources: (1) observation of meetings; (2) analysis of documentation; and (3) participant interviews. All three sources support the view, put forward in the Discussion section, that the Board does not play a proactive role in the setting and monitoring of policy and priorities. Nonetheless, it is argued, the Board plays a central and constructive role in the governance of partnership: as the symbol of interagency partnership; as the vehicle for sustaining commitment to mental health; and as the method of bringing additional elements of public accountability to the commissioning and providing of health and social care. Locating this ritual function of the Board within the broader sociological literature, the Discussion section goes on to suggest the implications both for the future of governance of partnership and for further research in this area.

  12. Reflections on the Future of Pharmaceutical Public-Private Partnerships: From Input to Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrueh, Remco L A; Crommelin, Daan J A

    2017-06-06

    Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are multiple stakeholder partnerships designed to improve research efficacy. We focus on PPPs in the biomedical/pharmaceutical field, which emerged as a logical result of the open innovation model. Originally, a typical PPP was based on an academic and an industrial pillar, with governmental or other third party funding as an incentive. Over time, other players joined in, often health foundations, patient organizations, and regulatory scientists. This review discusses reasons for initiating a PPP, focusing on precompetitive research. It looks at typical expectations and challenges when starting such an endeavor, the characteristics of PPPs, and approaches to assessing the success of the concept. Finally, four case studies are presented, of PPPs differing in size, geographical spread, and research focus.

  13. Partnerships in health care: creating a strong value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhart, C M; Alsup, R G

    2001-01-01

    The health care climate is one of stormy relations between various entities. Employers, managed care organizations, hospitals, and physicians battle over premiums, inpatient rates, fee schedules, and percent of premium dollars. Patients are angry at health plans over problems with access, choice, and quality of care. Employers dicker with managed care organizations over prices, benefits, and access. Hospitals struggle to maintain operations, as occupancy rates decline and the shift to ambulatory care continues. Physicians strive to assure their patients get quality care while they try to maintain stable incomes. Businesses, faced with similar challenges in the competitive marketplace, have formed partnerships for mutual benefit. Successful partnerships are based upon trust and the concept of "win-win." Communication, ongoing evaluation, long-term relations, and shared values are also essential. In Japan, the keiretsu contains the elements of a bonafide partnership. Examples in U.S. businesses abound. In health care, partnerships will improve quality and access. When health care purchasers and providers link together, these partnerships create a new value chain that has patients as the focal point.

  14. Military Installation Public-to-Public Partnerships: Lessons from Past and Current Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    many voices of the Sandhills expressed through archaeological investigation, histori- cal research, oral traditions, music , food, arts and crafts...treatment, traumatic brain injury, and depression . Other health-related installation partnerships have to do with healthy living, nutrition, and...providing substance abuse treatment and treating posttraumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and depression . Interns also work at WBAMC, which

  15. Private security, public/private sector partnership, crime prevention, police, public safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ricardo Gómez Hecht

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current security environment in El Salvador is characterized by high levels of insecurity and criminality. Public authorities confronting this problem need to resort to new alternatives for solving or at least managing the situation. One of these alternatives is the public/private sector partnership in crime prevention which is a promising option. Research has analyzed the current state of the public/private sector partnership between the National Civil Police and Private Security Services in El Salvador, revealing among other things that this relationship is at an incipient stage, but has promising results.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5377/rpsp.v4i2.1759

  16. ALGORITHM FOR PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS AS A FORM OF BUSINESS IN THE ENVIRONMENT NATIONAL PARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb A. Sobolev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the current state ofthe public-private partnership in Russia;the algorithm of partnership betweenthe government and the private sectorto develop the business environment ofnational parks. Identified as particularactivities of protected areas, taking into account national and international practices;Consider their relationship and cooperation with public or private entities.

  17. Balancing between feasibility and relationship. Interventions to prevent dysfunctionality of conflict in public private partnership projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousberg, L.H.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research shows that there are many bottle-necks in Public Private Partnership (PPP) Projects in Dutch spatial development. Due to the specific properties of Public Private Partnerships, these bottle-necks can lead to dysfunctional conflicts which are damaging the project. Hence the question is: how

  18. Balancing between feasibility and relationship : interventions to prevent dysfunctionality of conflict in public private partnership projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousberg, L.H.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Research shows that there are many bottle-necks in Public Private Partnership (PPP) Projects in Dutch spatial development. Due to the specific properties of Public Private Partnerships, these bottle-necks can lead to dysfunctional conflicts which are damaging the project. Hence the question is: how

  19. Public-Private Partnerships in College Student Housing: Lessons from Three Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Kevin R.; Ryder, Andrew J.; DeVita, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of public-private partnerships, empirical research about the origins, models, and long-term outcomes of this approach to financing, constructing, and managing college student housing is scant. In this study, we sought to investigate the origins, models, and outcomes of public-private partnerships in college…

  20. Children's Health Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each title has a brief description and link for downloading the full text. Includes the publications catalog, the Child Health Champion resource guide, student curriculum materials, reports, fact sheets, and booklets/brochures of advice and tools.

  1. GLOBAL PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP: AN ANALOGICAL REASONING MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk KIM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to introduce a new strategic direction for the multinational pharmaceutical companies in terms of the access to essential, life-saving medicines. The multinational pharmaceutical companies have been severely criticized by their various stakeholders because of their business models, particularly because of the stringent patent protection on the pharmaceutical products. The multinational pharmaceutical companies should find a new strategic direction to balance their R&D-intensive, expensive business with the access to essential, lifesaving medicines since favorable public relations are critical for the multinational pharmaceutical companies to maintain their profitable business. This paper adopts an Analogical Reasoning Model (ARM to propose a new strategic direction for the multinational pharmaceutical companies in an effort to balance their expensive business with the enhanced social responsibility. In essence, the ARM helps the multinational pharmaceutical companies formulate viable strategies that can realize a win-win situation not only for their stakeholders but also for the pharmaceutical companies themselves. The ARM is constructed, analyzing the food and beverage industry as a source environment, and suggests a comprehensive, industry-wide, multi-stakeholder public-private partnership, led not by the public sector but by the multinational pharmaceutical companies.

  2. The Effect of Partnership Care Model on Mental Health of Patients with Thalassemia Major

    OpenAIRE

    Afzal Shamsi; Fardin Amiri; Abbas Ebadi; Musab Ghaderi

    2017-01-01

    Background. Thalassemia major has become a public health problem worldwide, particularly in developing and poor countries, while the role of educating the family and community has not been considered enough in patients’ care. Objectives. This study examines the impact of partnership care model on mental health of patients with beta-thalassemia major. Materials and Methods. This experimental study, with pretest and posttest design, was performed on patients with beta-thalassemia major in Jirof...

  3. GIS and Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bertazzon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue on GIS and public health is the result of a highly selective process, which saw the participation of some 20 expert peer-reviewers and led to the acceptance of one half of the high-quality submissions received over the past year. Many threads link these papers to each other and, indeed, to our original call for papers, but the element that most clearly emerges from these works is the inextricable connection between public health and the environment. Indeed, GIS analysis of public health simply cannot disregard the geospatial dimension of environmental resources and risks. What consistently emerges from these analyses is that current geospatial research can only scratch the surface of the complex interactions of spatial resources, risks, and public health. In today’s world, or at least in the developed world, researchers and practitioners can count on virtually endless data, on inexpensive computational power, and on seamless connectivity. In this research environment, these papers point to the need for improved analytical tools, covering concepts, representation, modeling and reliability. These works are important contributions that help us to identify what advances in geospatial analysis can better address the complex interactions of public health with our physical and cultural environment, and bridge research and practice, so that geospatial analyses can inform public health policy making. [...

  4. Managing the relational character of public-private partnership contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Predrag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A public-private partnership contract has the character of a relational contract. Relational contracts are incomplete agreements governing transactions where the contracting parties have mutually agreed that it is impossible or economically inefficient to contractually define ex ante possible difficulties and contingencies in the contract implementation, nor the difficulties and contingencies underlying the ex post control of contract performance by a third entity (court or arbitration. Considering the methodology of managing relational contracts, it is essential that the theory of relational contracts does not advocate for the establishment of relational contracts as a separate category of contracts, with specifically designated contractual instruments. This theory defines the relational contract as a category which legitimizes 'the relational mode' of a particular contract. The methodology of relational contracts is important for contracts on public-private partnership as it ensures that the contractual relationship is aligned with the changes in the immediate environment where the PPP contract operates. The aforementioned alignment has two aspects. The first one is the ex ante aspect of the alignment which is primarily aimed at preventing the detrimental effect of such alignment to the public partner's interests. Therefore, the intent to prevent such an effect shall be taken into account when defining the criteria for the selection of the most favorable private partner and the best offer. At the same time, it is essential to establish verifiable standards for measuring the private partner performance in the phase of contract implementation. For this goal to be achieved, it is crucial to specify the subject matter of the private partner's obligations, to establish the priority rank of PPP project objectives, to elaborate on the specific requirements governing the eligibility of private partners to participate in the bidding process, to specify

  5. Effectiveness of Contemporary Public-Private Partnerships for Large Scale Infrastructure in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Bosso, Doran Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, states are relying on creative financing and asset management to maintain and improve the nationâ s transportation infrastructure since budgetary challenges constrain potential options. One method of tapping into alternative sources of capital is the public-private partnership (PPP or P3). A public-private partnership is a long-term contractual agreement in which the public sector authority assigns a traditionally public responsibility (such as operations and/or financing) to t...

  6. A public health hazard mitigation planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Jennifer M; Kay Carpender, S; Crouch, Jill Artzberger; Quiram, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    The Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Rural Public Health, a member of the Training and Education Collaborative System Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (TECS-PERLC), has long-standing partnerships with 2 Health Service Regions (Regions) in Texas. TECS-PERLC was contracted by these Regions to address 2 challenges identified in meeting requirements outlined by the Risk-Based Funding Project. First, within Metropolitan Statistical Areas, there is not a formal authoritative structure. Second, preexisting tools and processes did not adequately satisfy requirements to assess public health, medical, and mental health needs and link mitigation strategies to the Public Health Preparedness Capabilities, which provide guidance to prepare for, respond to, and recover from public health incidents. TECS-PERLC, with its partners, developed a framework to interpret and apply results from the Texas Public Health Risk Assessment Tool (TxPHRAT). The 3-phase community engagement-based TxPHRAT Mitigation Planning Process (Mitigation Planning Process) and associated tools facilitated the development of mitigation plans. Tools included (1) profiles interpreting TxPHRAT results and identifying, ranking, and prioritizing hazards and capability gaps; (2) a catalog of intervention strategies and activities linked to hazards and capabilities; and (3) a template to plan, evaluate, and report mitigation planning efforts. The Mitigation Planning Process provided a framework for Regions to successfully address all funding requirements. TECS-PERLC developed more than 60 profiles, cataloged and linked 195 intervention strategies, and developed a template resulting in 20 submitted mitigation plans. A public health-focused, community engagement-based mitigation planning process was developed by TECS-PERLC and successfully implemented by the Regions. The outcomes met all requirements and reinforce the effectiveness of academic practice partnerships and importance of

  7. Ex ante and ex post control of the public interest in public-private partnership agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirić Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the provisions of public-private partnership agreement (hereinafter: the 'PPP' in the context of control of the public interest in the process of preparing and implementing PPP projects. PPP agreements are a mechanism for defining rights and obligations of public and private partners in the process of realization of a particular PPP project. In spite of being defined as partnership, public and private interests largely remain competitive. However, in case it is not possible to achieve both interests at the same time, the public interest is deemed to have priority. The proper implementation of the supremacy of public interests over the private ones calls for an appropriate contractual definition of conditions and manner for such implementation. The methodology for exercising control of the public interest in PPP projects through agreements on public-private partnership has two aspects. The first aspect is to provide verifiable parameters of legal, economic and technological conditions, as well as the procedure for selecting the best bid for the realization of public-private partnership (ex ante methodological aspect; these conditions are the basis for future PPP agreement. Ex ante methodology has to provide instruments for control of the public interest through pre-established mechanisms aimed at verifying whether the private partner has fulfilled the agreement. If such verification is not possible or if it is considered unreasonable (either financially or otherwise, it may raise an issue whether the public-private partnership is an adequate modality for implementation of the project aimed at promoting the public interest; it further implies that the public partner should resort to other options (employing 'internal' resources or taking a loan for financing the projects of public interests. The second aspect is that the PPP agreements are to provide for the proper implementation of the elements that ensure some flexibility in

  8. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE CONTEXT OF EVOLUTION OF PUBLIC CONSCIOUSNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey E. Berezin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to study the evolution of social consciousness in the Russian Federation, determining the relationship of the change of paradigm of economic development and the evolution of society, with the development of the Institute for public-private partnership (PPP. The result of this research is to identify the prospects of building in Russia a socially oriented economy, the definition of performance indicators of state economic policy, which promotes the use of PPPs

  9. Development of Public and Private Sector Partnership: Managerial Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zivile Tuncikiene

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A partnership between different sectors fundamentally becomes an essential strategic tool in pursuit of the growth in the quality of social life and thus a sustainable development of a state. The value created by collaborate activities of companies and institutions, while increasing the capacity to fulfil social needs, depends on managerial abilities of institutions. Subsequent to analysis of both theoretical and practical aspects of public–private partnership and its management, the research aims to present milestones pertaining to the development of the latter. The tasks for achieving goals are as follow: the analysis of the concept of public–private partnership, the examination of the partnership principles and forms, the analysis of management models, the study of legal and administrative partnership aspects, the evaluation of key partnership problems and the search of their solutions.

  10. How to create a public-private partnership: a replicable project associated with business continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    In an age of political turmoil and mistrust of governments, having an outlet for creative problem solving that involves all aspects of communities during disasters is critical. Additionally, there is a need for outlets that save taxpayer money for particular projects, such as road construction or infrastructure protection. Public-private partnerships are one way to accomplish these goals. Utilised correctly, a public-private partnership is a win-win situation for all participants. This paper will make the case for the continued support from all sectors for public-private partnerships. A description of public-private partnerships will be given to show the broad spectrum of opportunities for such a partnership. In addition, a case study of a public-private partnership called SAFER Santa Rosa is explored as the programme is oriented towards disasters, but keeps the community engaged all year round. Finally, an example is presented of an initiative that not only exemplifies the spirit of public-private partnerships, but has attracted international recognition because it is simple, replicable, cost-effective and valuable to both the private sector and the public sector. The Business Emergency Response Toolkit bag is a true public-private success story. It is hoped that the reader will be able to replicate the ideas discussed herein in their own community.

  11. Building Successful Partnerships in Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Sue; Dale, Helen; Gabler, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy, the ability to obtain and understand information and services to make good health decisions, has received much attention recently. Literacy is a stronger predictor of health status than age, income, race, ethnicity, employment status, or educational level. Inadequate health literacy costs the United States an estimated $100-$236…

  12. A comparative study of institutional frameworks for local public service partnerships in Finland and Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Paula Sonja; Valkama, Pekka; Asenova, Darinka

    2015-01-01

    This research presents a cross-national comparative review of the institutional arrangements for how local public service partnerships are regulated and governed in Finland and Scotland.Both legal and administrative differences of partnership policies are analysed in order to explain the nature of the incentives and obligations for local governments to collaborate with external partners. Institutional theory and conceptual partnership approaches are utilised in the analysis. The Scottish inst...

  13. Data Publication: A Partnership between Scientists, Data Managers and Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, L.; Chandler, C.; Lowry, R.; Urban, E.; Moncoiffe, G.; Pissierssens, P.; Norton, C.; Miller, H.

    2012-04-01

    Current literature on the topic of data publication suggests that success is best achieved when there is a partnership between scientists, data managers, and librarians. The Marine Biological Laboratory/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (MBLWHOI) Library and the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) have developed tools and processes to automate the ingestion of metadata from BCO-DMO for deposit with datasets into the Institutional Repository (IR) Woods Hole Open Access Server (WHOAS). The system also incorporates functionality for BCO-DMO to request a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) from the Library. This partnership allows the Library to work with a trusted data repository to ensure high quality data while the data repository utilizes library services and is assured of a permanent archive of the copy of the data extracted from the repository database. The assignment of persistent identifiers enables accurate data citation. The Library can assign a DOI to appropriate datasets deposited in WHOAS. A primary activity is working with authors to deposit datasets associated with published articles. The DOI would ideally be assigned before submission and be included in the published paper so readers can link directly to the dataset, but DOIs are also being assigned to datasets related to articles after publication. WHOAS metadata records link the article to the datasets and the datasets to the article. The assignment of DOIs has enabled another important collaboration with Elsevier, publisher of educational and professional science journals. Elsevier can now link from articles in the Science Direct database to the datasets available from WHOAS that are related to that article. The data associated with the article are freely available from WHOAS and accompanied by a Dublin Core metadata record. In addition, the Library has worked with researchers to deposit datasets in WHOAS that are not appropriate for national, international, or domain

  14. Public private partnerships in solid waste management – case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Parmezani Munhoz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes two public notices for PPP (Public-Private Partnerships - Law 11.079/2004 for solid waste management and verifies the suitability of these contracts to the new guidelines of Law 12.305/2010 - National Solid Waste Policy - PNRS. The online versions of 2 public notices and draft PPP Contracts, recently signed in the city of São Carlos and the Metropolitan Area of Belo Horizonte and Colar Metropolitano were analyzed. The mapping of the performance indicators of these documents was carried out according to 4 criteria: (a minimization of waste in landfills, (b recovery and valorization of solid waste (recycling, composting, etc.; (c pickers inclusion; and (d social participation. The results indicate that the analyzed contracts meet only part of the guidelines set by PNRS, mainly the eradication of the dumps and the final disposal of waste in landfills. The main object of these contracts remains linked to the old paradigm of waste management: collection and transportation of waste and operation of landfills. To meet the waste minimization policies, there are financial incentives that reward the reduction in the final disposal in landfills. However, there are no fixed contractual targets for the minimization of waste at landfills. If waste minimization policies, like reverse logistics and responsibility shared are implemented by the government, the contracts have clauses allowing periodic reviews for gradual adjustments, ensuring the economic and financial balance of the contract. It is yet to determine the efficiency of these mechanisms to meet the guidelines of PNRS, in the curse of the concession.

  15. Stabilization Operations Beyond Government: Joint Venture Public-Private Partnerships in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Defense Intelligence Agency. This article won the inaugural young Professionals in Foreign Policy Essay competition. Joint Venture Public-Private...Beyond Government: Joint Venture Public-Private Partnerships in Iraq and Afghanistan 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER... joint venture public-private partnerships hold the best possibility to achieve the goals of A Unique Private Sector Methodology Eurasia Group brings

  16. ADVANTAGES AND RISKS OF USING THE PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabau-Popa Liviu Mihai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the advantages and risks of the public-private partnership in realizing the public investments in Romania. Public-private partnerships refer to the forms of cooperation between public authorities and private entities and target the regulation of the design, financing, construction, operation, rehabilitation, development, rental and transfer of any public work, asset or public service. It is a formula agreed by the public authorities by which the solving of public problems of general interest is “commissioned” by attracting entrepreneurs from the private sector. One of the main arguments for supporting the public-private partnerships in case of public investment projects is the transfer of the managerial competencies and of the know-how from the private partner to the public one. One of the main risks of the public-private partnerships is related to the temptation of using the private-public partnerships as a means of eluding the budgetary pressure, which may lead to their inadequate use.

  17. Achieving Resilience in Disaster Management: The Role of Public-Private Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan E. Busch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the current status of public-private partnerships in disaster management, as well as the emerging opportunities and challenges that need to be addressed for these partnerships to achieve their full potential. The article begins with a systematic overview of the strategic, operational, and tactical effects of public-private partnerships in disaster management today and describes how these effects can increase societal resilience. Next, the article discusses several of the emerging opportunities and challenges that these partnerships will have to work through in the coming years. The article concludes with a set of policy recommendations to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of public-private partnerships in disaster management.

  18. What same sex civil partnerships may mean for health

    OpenAIRE

    King, M.; Bartlett, A

    2006-01-01

    A growing number of countries have introduced a form of marriage or civil partnership registration for same sex couples. Marriage confers health benefits on heterosexual men and women and similar benefits could arise from same sex civil unions. The authors argue that legal and social recognition of same sex relationships may reduce discrimination, increase the stability of same sex relationships, and lead to better physical and mental health for gay and lesbian people.

  19. Music and Public Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole; Juel, Knud; Ekholm, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Background: ‘Music and public health’ is a new field of study. Few scientific studies with small samples have documented health implications of musical participation. Research questions in this epidemiological study were: 1) Is there an association between self-rated health and active use of music...... in daily life? 2) What associations can be observed between musical background, uses and understanding of music as a health factor, and self-reported health? Method: Data came from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2013, based on a simple random sample of 25.000 adult Danes (16+ years). Response rate......: 57%. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate associations between musical background/activities and health-related indicators. Discussion: The study documents that a majority of informants use music to regulate physical and psychological states...

  20. Statements on the future of public health in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, D.

    2005-01-01

    The following statements summarise the discussions of five consecutive workshops organised by EUPHA from November 2002 to November 2003: (i) Future public health can only be achieved if the whole society invests in it: building partnerships is essential here. (ii) The long-term benefits of public he

  1. Evolutionary Game Analysis of the Supervision Behavior for Public-Private Partnership Projects with Public Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congdong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The public can directly or indirectly participate in the PPP (public-private partnership projects and then has an impact on the project profit and public or private behavior. To explore the influence of the public participation of the PPP projects supervision behavior, this paper analyzes the mutual evolutionary regularity of the private sector and government supervision department and the influence of public participation level on public and private behavior based on evolutionary game theory. The results show that the supervision strategy is not chosen when the supervision cost of government supervision department is greater than the supervision benefit; it can make private sector consciously provide the high-quality public products/services with the improvement of public participation level. Therefore, the government should reduce the cost of public participation and improve the public participation level and influence through the application of the Internet, big data, and other advanced technologies, in order to restrain the behavior of the private sector and improve the supervision efficiency.

  2. Public-Privat e Partnership in the System of Regional Healthcare Financing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Yur’evna Molchanova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare financing reform in the Russian Federation, besides its positive consequences, has led to the emergence of several major organizational and economic problems that hinder the expansion of financing sources for this sphere, which also involves public-private partnership (PPP. The paper highlights the regional specifics of such healthcare projects compared to similar projects of other spheres of the national economy. The author describes the problems of PPP projects implementation in healthcare; they include the insufficiency of substantiation of public-private partnership application in healthcare, and the absence of typical models for establishment of relations between PPP participants. The paper presents the healthcare priorities put forward by the author; these priorities are based on the theory of the life cycle of a service. The author presents her own model for organizing a regional concession, which is the most common form of public-private partnership in healthcare so far. The cluster brings together on a voluntary basis the legally independent organizations that are interested in improving the quality and increasing the accessibility of health services. These can include medical institutions of various forms of ownership located in the region, clinics, facilities, institutions that train healthcare workers, authorities, etc. The author shows that a favorable environment for the formation and implementation of PPP projects can be created under the cluster approach to the organization of healthcare. When establishing the medical cluster, the main task is to organize interaction between all its subjects in the interest of the overall development of healthcare in the region and the implementation of one’s own interests

  3. Gis and public health

    CERN Document Server

    Cromley, Ellen K

    2011-01-01

    Authoritative and comprehensive, this is the leading text and professional resource on using geographic information systems (GIS) to analyze and address public health problems. Basic GIS concepts and tools are explained, including ways to access and manage spatial databases. The book presents state-of-the-art methods for mapping and analyzing data on population, health events, risk factors, and health services, and for incorporating geographical knowledge into planning and policy. Numerous maps, diagrams, and real-world applications are featured. The companion Web page provides lab exercises w

  4. Globalisation and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettcher, D; Lee, K

    2002-01-01

    At the dawn of the 21st century, globalisation is a word that has become a part of everyday communication in all corners of the world. It is a concept that for some holds the promise of a new and brighter future, while for others it represents a threat that needs to be confronted and counteracted. In the area of public health, a wide range of claims have been made about the various impacts, both positive and negative, that can be attributed to globalisation. In the ever expanding literature on globalisation and health, it has become apparent that considerable confusion is emerging in both the ways that terminology is applied and concepts are defined. The determinants of health are increasingly multisectoral, and in tackling these challenges it is necessary to take a multidisciplinary approach that includes policy analyses in such areas as trade, environment, defence/security, foreign policy, and international law. In assembling the terms for this glossary, we have attempted to demonstrate the richness of the globalisation and public health debate, and in so doing have selected some of the core terms that require definition. We hope that this glossary will help to clarify this interesting and challenging area, and will also serve as a useful entry point to this new debate in public health.

  5. Nurses and Teachers: Partnerships for Green Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendall, Marguerite C.; Lidstone, John; Fleming, MaryLou; Domocol, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Background: The term "green health promotion" is given to health promotion underpinned by the principles of ecological health and sustainability. Green health promotion is supported philosophically by global health promotion documents such as the 1986 Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the ecological public health movement. Green…

  6. Tackling poor parenting: a public health issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Judith

    2003-01-01

    The adverse consequences associated with poor parenting persist down the generations and are a problem for society as well as individuals. The author cites evidence suggesting that in many cases poor parenting is associated with socioeconomic deprivation, including health inequalities. She argues that most parents (especially mothers, as the main child carers) are motivated to do their best for their children but that many families struggle against poverty. Poor parenting skills may be a product of poverty and social exclusion rather than the fault of individual parents. A public health approach, based on partnership with parents to meet their expressed needs in appropriate ways, could offer a constructive way forward.

  7. Public health ethics: informing better public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stacy M; Kerridge, Ian; Sainsbury, Peter; Letts, Julie K

    2012-01-01

    Public health ethics has emerged and grown as an independent discipline over the last decade. It involves using ethical theory and empirical analyses to determine and justify the right thing to do in public health. In this paper, we distinguish public health ethics from clinical ethics, research ethics, public health law and politics. We then discuss issues in public health ethics including: how to weigh up the benefits, harms and costs of intervening; how to ensure that public health interventions produce fair outcomes; the potential for public health to undermine or promote the rights of citizens; and the significance of being transparent and inclusive in public health interventions. We conclude that the explicit and systematic consideration of ethical issues will, and should, become central to every public health worker's daily practice.

  8. Forging partnerships between rural women with chronic conditions and their health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudney, Shirley; Weinert, Clarann; Kinion, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    Successful adaptation to chronic illness is enhanced by active client-health care provider partnerships. The purposes of this article are to (a) examine the health care partnership needs of western rural women with chronic illness who participated in a computer-based support and education project, (b) describe how the role of the women in the partnership can be maximized by the use of a personal health record and improving health literacy, and (c) discuss ways health care providers can enhance their role in the partnership by careful listening and creating environments conducive to forging productive client-provider partnerships.

  9. Using a private-public partnership to supplement healthcare information technology in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewka, Patricia A; Harkins, John; Hoelper, Stephen; Schrieber, John; Daniel, Ralph Eddy; Kaur, Jasdip

    2012-01-01

    Various reports by the World Bank and U.S. business technology executives, academics, economists, researchers, and government policymakers have recommended crafting a new educational model for educating America's future workforce including nurses in their professional research pursuits. According to the National League for Nursing, nursing research is an integral part of the scientific enterprise of improving the nation's health. A major aim of this new educational focus is the partnering of private business enterprises and public educational institutions to achieve this outcome, i.e., public-private partnerships. Merck & Co., Inc. will partner/collaborate on a student learning pilot project with New York City College of Technology of the City University of New York Department of Nursing Bachelor of Nursing Program students - all practicing New York State Registered Professional Nurses - who are taking either Nursing Informatics or Leadership in the Management of Client Care courses.

  10. Vested interests in addiction research and policy poisonous partnerships: health sector buy-in to arrangements with government and addictive consumption industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Peter J; Buetow, Stephen; Rossen, Fiona

    2010-04-01

    This paper critically appraises relationship arrangements among three broadly conceived sectors: the government sector, the health sector (including researchers) and addictive consumption industries (particularly tobacco, alcohol and gambling). Three models for involvement are examined. In the 'tripartite partnership model' health sector agencies engage as co-equals with the government and industry sectors in order to implement public health initiatives such as host responsibility and public education. In the 'non- association model' the health sector engages with government agencies but not with the industry sector. In the 'managed association model' the health sector engages for specific purposes with the industry sector but contact is monitored and managed by government agencies. Government and industry sectors commonly favour tripartite partnership arrangements. Health sector agencies that opt to engage in these partnership arrangements can encounter conflicts of interest and find their voice subsumed by dominant influences. Furthermore, their partnership compliance generates divisions within the health sector, with partnership dissenters often silenced and excluded from policy processes and funding. The non-association model is the least hazardous to the health sector because it protects against compromise and dominance. The managed association model is an option only when the government sector as a whole is committed strongly and clearly to the public health objectives. In contexts where key parts of the government sector are conflicted over their public health responsibilities, health sector engagement in partnership arrangements entails too many risks.

  11. Municipal household solid waste collection strategies in an African megacity: analysis of public private partnership performance in Lagos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, Ibrahim Rotimi; Adeyemi, Oluwagbemiga Ezekiel; Adebayo, Adeolu

    2014-09-01

    Managing municipal solid waste is a pervasive urban problem globally. While several strategies have been applied for efficient municipal solid waste management in developing economies, their performance level has not been critically investigated. Among these strategies, the public private partnership has widest appeal. This study examines the performance of public private partnership in household solid waste collection in Lagos, Nigeria. We collected primary data using a municipal solid waste survey in three residential density areas of Lagos megacity. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data. Two indexes of service performance, namely the service reliability index and operational quality index, were created to produce evidence on public private partnership performance in municipal solid waste collection in Lagos. Results show that the average amount of household solid waste generation per week ranges between 22.75 kg in the medium residential density area and 30.39 kg in the high residential density region of the city. The estimated per capita waste generated in Lagos Megacity is 0.95 kg day(-1). Regression models indicate that the public private partnership performance is significantly influenced by economic status, affordability, flexibility, consistency, cleanliness, coverage and accessibility, as well as number of waste collection vehicles, vehicle maintenance, capacity, trip rate, frequency, number of personnel and quality of personnel. Findings from this study reveal that Lagos residents have strong positive perception of public private partnership as a waste collection policy framework. The study has important policy and practical implications for urban waste management, public health and sustainability in developing economies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Public-private Partnership in the Context of Realisation of the State Financial Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostapenko Victoriia M.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the result of the study the article analyses modern tendencies of development of economy of Ukraine. It marks out problems connected with realisation of the state financial policy. It considers the essence of the state financial policy, its directions (such as budget-tax and monetary-credit, structural components and tasks. It emphasises the place of the public-private partnership as an instrument of realisation of the financial policy. It justifies tasks in the process of realisation of goals of the modern financial policy, which could be carried out with the help of the public-private partnership. The prospect of further studies in this direction is formation of practical recommendations on the use of the public-private partnership in the process of realisation of the state financial policy. Further improvement of the public-private partnership is connected with development of efficient mechanisms of its introduction and optimisation of its financial structure.

  13. Transparency in public-private partnerships : Not so bad after all?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynaers, Anne Marie; Grimmelikhuijsen, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Scholars' criticism of transparency in public-private partnerships (PPPs) often focuses on 'external' transparency, that is, the extent to which internal information is visible to the outside world. However, to achieve external transparency, internal transparency - the availability and inferability

  14. Public-private partnerships in urban regeneration projects: Organizational form or managerial capacity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Kort (Michiel); E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Urban regeneration companies (URCs) are public-private entities appearing across Europe. They are created specifically to manage and implement more effectively urban regeneration projects. Core ideas behind the establishment of these newly emerging partnerships aim to

  15. Public-Private Leadership Forum; 21st Century Power Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-14

    The PPLF convenes stakeholders from across the power sector, spanning electricity supply, delivery, and end-use, and plays a key role in guiding the strategic direction of the Power Partnership. In addition, PPLF members support the implementation of activities set out in the Power Partnership Program of Work. Taken together, the activities of the PPLF span the dynamic landscape of power challenges and opportunities, with a focus on business models, ?nancial tools, and regulatory frameworks.

  16. Public private partnership - a way of overcoming the budget process investment restrictions in european transport infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Cernaianu, Nicolae; Achim, Marian Lucian

    2010-01-01

    One of the ways to overcome, to some extent, the budgetary restrictions on the state's financial resources for investment in transport infrastructure is a public-private partnership. Thus, we considered it useful to express our own opinions as well as reiterating the presentation of world and European experiences by experts in the field of benefits and risks of public-private partnership, and the study which useful lessons can be drawn. We are not just for copying or taking of these experienc...

  17. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP AS FUNDING MECHANISMS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE RAILWAYS

    OpenAIRE

    Pashchenko, Y.; Korin, M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper found that the implementation of the priority areas of railway infrastructure, defined transport strategy Ukraine requires significant funding required amounts which are absent in Railways and the state budget of Ukraine. It was determined that one of the effective tools of financial security of railroad infrastructure is a mechanism of public-private partnerships. Based on this the essence of public-private partnership, its main characteristics and forms of implementation. Deals wi...

  18. Third Way, Third Sector and the partnership IAS/public education system in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Maria Vidal Peroni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to debate on the public-private partnerships in education and to bring elements from the third way and third sector as an important part of this topic. And to present some consequences of the partnerships for democratic management, that is, how the logic of market as a parameter of efficiency is incorporated by public administration, and the consequences of this fact on the educational policies.

  19. Private–Public Partnership as a Tool to Promote Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Development: WWP Torrearte Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio De Los Ríos-Carmenado; Mauricio Ortuño; María Rivera

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the ability of both private–public partnerships and entrepreneurship to promote sustainable rural development. This research outlines the historical chronology and the importance of the PPP (Private Public Partnership) for rural entrepreneurship; the complexity of PPP management dimensions is also analyzed. In addition, this research is based on an empiric study of a PPP for entrepreneurship in sustainable development in the North Highland of Madrid’s community, w...

  20. FEATURES OF E-MEDICINE INTRODUCTION IN THE PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O. Sinyenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It was discussed the possibilities and the reality of the e-medicine challenges through technology of public-private partnership (PPP. It is shown that the use of e-medicine is one of the most important levers of improving the quality of medical care in Ukraine. Taking into account that the computerization of health care is extremely expensive project its rapid implementation is possible for the widest possible PPP. It is believed that mobile medicine is the best example of modern PPP. It is postulated that for the effective control of the quality of medical care it should be created specialized expertise and advisory mechanisms in a specialized system of state control of the new system of electronic health systems with strictly defined principles such as objectivity, complimentarily, law and so on.

  1. Public health law research: exploring law in public health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Jennifer K; Burris, Scott; Hays, Scott

    2012-11-01

    The importance of law in the organization and operation of public health systems has long been a matter of interest to public health lawyers and practitioners, but empirical research on law as a factor in health system performance has been limited in quantity and sophistication. The emergence of Public Health Law Research and Public Health Systems and Services Research within a coordinated effort to strengthen public health research and practice has dramatically changed matters. This article introduces Public Health Law Research as an integral part of Public Health Systems and Services Research, discusses the challenges of integrating the 2 fields, and highlights 2 examples of current research that demonstrate the benefits of an integrated approach to improve the use of law in public health practice.

  2. Public-Private Partnerships and the Role of Universities in "Sustainable Development"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin; Christensen, Per; Hansen, Jens Aage

    2006-01-01

    The notion of Public-Private Partnerships has on several occasions been heralded as one of the pivotal mechanisms for a move towards more sustainable societies. Through such partnerships it is suggested that major stakeholders (governments, NGOs, international organisations, and the private sector......) can address common societal aims while utilising each others' specific strengths and compensating own weaknesses. In this context, what is or could be the role of universities? This paper addresses the concept of public-private partnerships and discusses the role of universities if and when actively...

  3. Public-Private Partnerships and the Role of Universities in "Sustainable Development"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin; Christensen, Per; Hansen, Jens Aage

    2006-01-01

    The notion of Public-Private Partnerships has on several occasions been heralded as one of the pivotal mechanisms for a move towards more sustainable societies. Through such partnerships it is suggested that major stakeholders (governments, NGOs, international organisations, and the private sector......) can address common societal aims while utilising each others' specific strengths and compensating own weaknesses. In this context, what is or could be the role of universities? This paper addresses the concept of public-private partnerships and discusses the role of universities if and when actively...

  4. The ELENA Programme in the Province of Chieti - A Public Private Partnership Best Practice Improving Energy Efficiency of Buildings and Public Lighting Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fecondo, Pierluigi; Moca, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Public Private Partnership initiatives and models are proven, scalable and internationally-recognized procurement methods for reducing the operating costs and improve environmental quality of public bodies...

  5. SERVIR and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Madrinan, Max J.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Khan, Maudood N.; Crosson, William L.; Irwin, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    Servir is a NASA-USAID partnership to improve environmental management and resilience to climate change by strengthening the capacity of governments and other key stakeholders to integrate Earth observations into development decision-making

  6. The Effect of Partnership Care Model on Mental Health of Patients with Thalassemia Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzal Shamsi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thalassemia major has become a public health problem worldwide, particularly in developing and poor countries, while the role of educating the family and community has not been considered enough in patients’ care. Objectives. This study examines the impact of partnership care model on mental health of patients with beta-thalassemia major. Materials and Methods. This experimental study, with pretest and posttest design, was performed on patients with beta-thalassemia major in Jiroft city. 82 patients with beta-thalassemia major were allocated randomly into two groups of intervention (41 patients and control (n=41 groups. Mental health of the participants was measured using the standard questionnaire GHQ-28 before and after intervention in both groups. The intervention was applied to the intervention group for 6 months, based on the partnership care model. Results. There were significant differences between the scores of mental health and its subscales between two groups after the intervention (P<0.05. Conclusions. The findings of the study revealed the efficacy and usefulness of partnership care model on mental health of patients with beta-thalassemia major; thus, implementation of this model is suggested for the improvement of mental health of patients with beta-thalassemia major.

  7. Small Public Private Partnerships: The answer to local public and private needs, yet an ugly duckling?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2009-01-01

    Public Private Partnerships (PPP) are frequently mobilized as a purchasing form suitable for large infrastructure projects. And it is commonly assumed that transaction costs linked to the establishment of PPP make them prohibitive in small sizes. In a Danish context this has been safeguarded...... by the authorities, which recommend sizes over 13,5 million € (100 million DKr). PPP is here understood as Design, Build, Finance and Operate projects. The paper shows, when looking at Germany, Italy and United Kingdom, that small PPP (below 13,5 million €) are widespread in two investigated countries; United...

  8. Small Public Private Partnerships: The answer to local public and private needs, yet an ugly duckling?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2009-01-01

    Public Private Partnerships (PPP) are frequently mobilized as a purchasing form suitable for large infrastructure projects. And it is commonly assumed that transaction costs linked to the establishment of PPP make them prohibitive in small sizes. In a Danish context this has been safeguarded...... businesses and represent operable units for the clients and citizens. Cases are focused within education and healthcare. The analysis suggests that another type of economy apparently is in play. It is thus characteristic within education projects in UK that the largest portion of small PPPs are of a size...

  9. Faith-Based Partnerships Promoting Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael L.; Chappel-Aiken, Lolita

    2012-01-01

    Churches or, as they are now more commonly referred to in some circles, faith-based organizations (FBOs), have a rich tradition of providing not only religious but educational and social service opportunities for their congregations and local community. Social service agencies, health care agencies, and educational institutions have long realized…

  10. Faith-Based Partnerships Promoting Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael L.; Chappel-Aiken, Lolita

    2012-01-01

    Churches or, as they are now more commonly referred to in some circles, faith-based organizations (FBOs), have a rich tradition of providing not only religious but educational and social service opportunities for their congregations and local community. Social service agencies, health care agencies, and educational institutions have long realized…

  11. Building Social Infrastructure through Public-Private Partnerships: The Case of Student Housing in Public Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Bruce Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Evaluations of Public-Private Partnership arrangements as alternatives to traditional government procurement methods for the delivery of public infrastructure projects have been anecdotal at best. This paper proposes a framework to evaluate a public university's infrastructure asset management performance and a specific measure based on a new…

  12. Doping and Public Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest

    rad av världens främsta idrottsvetare och dopningsexperter hade mött upp för att presentera papers till en intresserad och engagerad publik. Temat för konferensen var "Doping and Public Health", och den aspekten behandlades också; dock tolkade flera presentatörer temat på sina egna vis, och hela...

  13. Insights in Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelen, A Christian; Kitagawa, Kent; Maddock, Jay; Hayes, Donald; St John, Tonya Lowery; Rajan, Ranjani

    2013-01-01

    Chronically understaffed public health laboratories depend on a decreasing number of employees who must assume broader responsibilities in order to sustain essential functions for the many clients the laboratories support. Prospective scientists considering a career in public health are often not aware of the requirements associated with working in a laboratory regulated by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA). The purpose of this pilot internship was two-fold; introduce students to operations in a regulated laboratory early enough in their academics so that they could make good career decisions, and evaluate internship methodology as one possible solution to workforce shortages. Four interns were recruited from three different local universities, and were paired with an experienced State Laboratories Division (SLD) staff mentor. Students performed tasks that demonstrated the importance of CLIA regulations for 10–15 hours per week over a 14 week period. Students also attended several directed group sessions on regulatory lab practice and quality systems. Both interns and mentors were surveyed periodically during the semester. Surveys of mentors and interns indicated overall positive experiences. One-on-one pairing of experienced public health professionals and students seems to be a mutually beneficial arrangement. Interns reported that they would participate if the internship was lower paid, unpaid, or for credit only. The internship appeared to be an effective tool to expose students to employment in CLIA-regulated laboratories, and potentially help address public health laboratory staffing shortfalls. Longer term follow up with multiple classes of interns may provide a more informed assessment. PMID:23386992

  14. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN SOCIOECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE MUSEUMS: UNUSED MODERNIZATION RESOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Polyanskova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Public-private partnership practically in all developed and developing countries of the world is recognized as the effective mechanism of social and economic tasks realization of society and state. The most popular use of the economic cooperation tools between business and government in areas such as the creation and modernization of infrastructure, transport infrastructure, road construction, municipal services (housing and communal services, the military-industrial complex, less social infrastructure. A large number of scientific, educational, recommendatory, reference and other books of domestic and foreign authors is developed for each of the called directions, various models of projects implementation of public-private partnership are developed and perfected. Unfortunately, to the sphere of culture it isn't paid due attention. State-private and municipal and private partnership in practice are quite successfully used for increase of efficiency of activity of establishments and objects of culture, but this positive experience isn't systematized and not fixed anywhere, the conceptual model of public-private partnership projects in culture is also not developed. Thus, a research objective is to design initiatives development and offers on modernization of the culture sphere on the basis of instruments of public-private partnership. The subject of the study is a set of administrative, economic and legal relations arising in the implementation of projects in the sphere of the Samara region culture on the basis of public-private partnerships. This article presents the results of a public-private partnerships study as uninvolved resource of the culture sphere modernization and the public-private partnership model developed by authors for projects in this sphere.

  15. Drug discovery and beyond: the role of public-private partnerships in improving access to new malaria medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaka, Solomon

    2005-10-01

    Traditional pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) strategy has failed to address the desperate need for new antimalarial drugs. The populations affected are too poor to attract commercially-driven R&D. Over the last few years, a new model, the public-private partnership for product development, has radically changed the antimalarial R&D landscape. The partnerships bring together academic and industry expertise with funding from governmental, philanthropic and charitable sources. The Medicines for Malaria Venture, a not-for-profit foundation based in Geneva, aims to develop new antimalarials for developing countries through public-private partnership. It is currently managing a portfolio of around 20 projects at various stages of development. However, as in all drug R&D, some of these projects will fail. The portfolio approach helps to maximize the chances of success, but there are obvious challenges, including financial and managerial ones. Proactive management of the two vital interfaces in the drug supply chain is important for success. Upstream, basic research must be aligned with translational research in order to ensure a continuous supply of leads into the development pipeline. Meanwhile, downstream, drug discovery and development must be aligned with access to ensure optimal health impact. All stages require partnership, sustainable financing and the engagement of disease-endemic countries. The recent G8 report on Africa has lent support to mechanisms aimed at improving health and achieving the Millenium Development Goals.

  16. An Evaluation of a Competency-Based Public Health Training Program for Public Health Professionals in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyrah K; Maryman, JʼVonnah; Collins, Tracie

    Less than one-third of the US public health workforce has formal training in public health. Academic-public health agency partnerships aimed at addressing the nation's workforce challenges have shown great promise. To evaluate the effectiveness of a piloted competency-based public health training program formed out of an academic-public health agency partnership. Mixed-methods design using pre- and postworkshop surveys and quizzes, open-ended questions, and document review. Large, urban local health department located in south central Kansas. Participant satisfaction with training, knowledge change, self-report application of new knowledge, and organizational change. Participants reported high satisfaction with the training program and valued the hands-on, practical approach used. Participation increased knowledge and confidence in public health competency areas covered in the program. At 3-month follow-up, 90% of participants reported applying new knowledge and skills in their primary job duties. At the organizational level, 3 major policy changes aimed at sustaining the program were implemented following its launch. Incorporating tailored, theory-driven approaches to trainings and collaborating with health department leadership to identify policy opportunities that help sustain the training program within the agency is recommended. Findings from this evaluation demonstrate the success of an academic-agency partnership's effort to develop and implement at a large, urban local health department.

  17. Community Health Asset Mapping Partnership Engages Hispanic/Latino Health Seekers and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, Teresa; Langdon, Sarah; Meza, Francis Rivers; Hochwalt, Bridget; Pichardo-Geisinger, Rita; Sowell, Brandon; Chapman, Jessica; Dorton, Linda Batiz; Kennett, Beth; Jones, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic/Latino population in Forsyth County, North Carolina, is growing quickly and experiencing significant disparities in access to care and health outcomes. Assessing community perceptions and utilization of health care resources in order to improve health equity among Hispanics/Latinos at both the county and state levels is critical. Our community engagement process was guided by the Community Health Assets Mapping Partnerships (CHAMP) approach, which helps identify gaps in health care availability and areas for immediate action to improve access to and quality of health care. Specifically, we invited and encouraged the Hispanic/Latino population to participate in 4 different workshops conducted in Spanish or English. Participants were identified as either health care providers, defined as anyone who provides health care or a related service, or health care seekers, defined as anyone who utilizes such services. The most commonly cited challenges to access to care were cost of health care, documentation status, lack of public transportation, racism, lack of care, lack of respect, and education/language. These data were utilized to drive continued engagement with the Hispanic community, and action steps were outlined. While participation in the workshops was acceptable, greater representation of health care seekers and community providers is needed. This process is fundamental to multilevel initiatives under way to develop trust and improve relationships between the Hispanic/Latino community and local health care entities in Forsyth County. Follow-through on recommended action steps will continue to further identify disparities, close gaps in care, and potentially impact local and state policies with regard to improving the health status of the Hispanic/Latino community. ©2016 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  18. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS - SOLUTION OR VICTIM OF THE CURRENT ECONOMIC CRISIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MINA Laura

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available It is already a well known fact that public-private partnerships (PPPs are considered to be a solution for world wide governments facing insufficient public budgets. In the context of the current economic crisis, many voices promote public-private part

  19. Introducing Partnering in Denmark – Lessons Learned Applying Public Private Partnerships as an Innovation Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Sten; Olsen, Ib Steen

    The purpose of this paper is to review practical experiences using public private partnership as an innovation platform in the construction sector. There is a growing attention to the importance of construction innovation as a means to securing the quality of the built environment as well....... Furthermore it was decided to anchor the development work in a public private partnership, in which the state as client should collaborate with private architects, engineers, contractors and suppliers. The guidelines for this partnership interaction were prepared in accordance with the long Danish tradition...... work and 4)dissemination and implementation. Lessons learned through the experimental cases are discussed, and the applicability of PPP as an approach to innovation in construction is evaluated. Keywords: public private partnership, partnering, experimental projects, innovation process...

  20. Integrational Models and Forms of Inter-State Public-Private Partnership: Aspects of Financial Convergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA KULAI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article we examined the main models and forms of public-private partnership, their role in the socio-economic development and deepening of financial convergence of countries-participants of the partnership. The attention was paid to decentralization of inter-state forms of public-private partnership as the basis of cross-border and transnational partnership. The scientific research, described in this publication, have found their practical application in the realization of the project within Euro-region “Bug”. This project has founded a joined Ukrainian – Polish institution of labor migration administration and also of granting necessary permissions for realization activities within Ukraine.

  1. Public Health Nutrition Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torheim, Liv Elin; Birgisdottir, Bryndis Eva; Robertson, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Public Health Nutrition Education Liv Elin Torheim* 1, Bryndis Eva Birgisdottir2, 3, Inga Thorsdottir2, 3, Aileen Robertson4, Runa Midtvåge4, Chalida Mae Svastisalee4, Hanne Gillett4, Agneta Yngve5, Arja Erkkilä6 1Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Oslo and Akershus University College......) and healthy aging. Unhealthy dietary patterns, high blood pressure and obesity are major risk factors for NCDs such as cancers, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. There exists enormous potential to promote health and prevent diseases through targeting unhealthy life style, and it is crucial......, educational, social, economic, structural, political and/or legislative. The knowledge, skills, competencies and cultural heritage of the broader community should form a basis for all analyses and actions. The competencies required to be an effective PHN practitioner has been described by several scholars...

  2. Role of public-private partnership in micronutrient food fortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannar, M G Venkatesh; van Ameringen, Marc

    2003-12-01

    Iron, iodine, and vitamin A deficiencies prevent 30% of the world's population from reaching full physical and mental potential. Fortification of commonly eaten foods with micronutrients offers a cost-effective solution that can reach large populations. Effective and sustainable fortification will be possible only if the public sector (which has the mandate and responsibility to improve the health of the population), the private sector (which has experience and expertise in food production and marketing), and the social sector (which has grass-roots contact with the consumer) collaborate to develop, produce, and promote micronutrient-fortified foods. Food fortification efforts must be integrated within the context of a country's public health and nutrition situation as part of an overall micronutrient strategy that utilizes other interventions as well. Identifying a set of priority actions and initiating a continuous dialogue between the various sectors to catalyze the implementation of schemes that will permanently eliminate micronutrient malnutrition are urgently needed. The partners of such a national alliance must collaborate closely on specific issues relating to the production, promotion, distribution, and consumption of fortified foods. Such collaboration could benefit all sectors: National governments could reap national health, economic, and political benefits; food companies could gain a competitive advantage in an expanding consumer marketplace; the scientific, development, and donor communities could make an impact by achieving global goals for eliminating micronutrient malnutrition; and by demanding fortified foods, consumers empower themselves to achieve their full social and economic potential.

  3. Public-Private Partnerships: NASA as Your Business Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Partnerships is an important part of doing business at NASA. NASA partners with external organizations to access capabilities under collaborative agreements; enters into agreements for partner access to NASA capabilities; expand overall landscape of space activity; and spurring innovation. The U.S. national policy on commercial space is to develop a robust and competitive U.S. commercial space sector and to energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets. Commercial space must be competitive, while the government has other priorities such as safety, jobs, etc. NASA partnerships consist of Reimbursable and Non-Reimbursable Space Act Agreements. Partnerships at Ames aligns with Ames' core competencies, and Partners often office in the NASA Research Park, which is an established regional innovation cluster that facilitates commercialization and services as a technology accelerator via onsite collaborations between NASA and its partners.

  4. Ten things to consider when entering into public-private digitization partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Bell

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three years the British Library has brokered mass digitization partnerships with Google, Brightsolid, Find my Past, Cengage Learning and others. This article explores some of the major challenges underlying digitization partnerships, particularly public-private, covering many of the important aspects to be considered such as ownership, access, control and standards. It also covers topics like term (length of time, the importance of flexibility, maximizing use/re-use of digitized material and market penetration. Legal and other aspects of such partnerships are also detailed, with sections on the type of partnership that needs to be entered into (non-exclusive and the role of the commercial partner. Finally, there is sound advice about risk assessment and cover. These lessons learned from experience are itemized in a handy ten-point checklist for anyone considering entering into a digitization partnership, and recommendations are made based on a wealth of acquired knowledge.

  5. The evolving role of health educators in advancing patient safety: forging partnerships and leading change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Annette

    2007-04-01

    At least 1.5 million preventable injuries because of adverse drug events occur in the United States each year, according to an Institute of Medicine report. IOM and other organizations at the forefront of health care improvement emphasize that stronger partnerships between patients, their families, and health care providers are necessary to make health care safer. Health educators possess a skill set and an ethical framework that effectively equip them to advance patient and family-centered care and contribute in other significant ways to a safer health care system. Health educators in clinical settings are playing varied and significant roles in advancing patient safety. They are removing barriers to clear communication and forging partnerships between patients, their families, and staff. Health educators are leading patient safety culture change within their institutions and contributing to the shift from provider-centric to patient-centric systems. To expand their impact in improving patient safety, health educators in clinical settings are participating in public awareness campaigns. In seeking to enhance patient safety, health educators face a number of challenges. To successfully manage those, health educators must expand their knowledge, broaden connections, and engage patients and families in meaningful ways.

  6. Public health, public trust and lobbying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynia, Matthew K

    2007-06-01

    Each year, infection with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) leads to millions of abnormal Pap smears and thousands of cases of cervical cancer in the US. Throughout the developing world, where Pap smears are less common, HPV is a leading cause of cancer death among women. So when the international pharmaceutical giant Merck developed a vaccine that could prevent infection with several key strains of HPV, the public health community was anxious to celebrate a major advance. But then marketing and lobbying got in the way. Merck chose to pursue an aggressive lobbying campaign, trying to make its new vaccine mandatory for young girls. The campaign stoked public mistrust about how vaccines come to be mandated, and now it's not just Merck's public image that has taken a hit. The public health community has also been affected. What is the lesson to be learned from this story? Public health communication relies on public trust.

  7. Public-private partnerships (PPPs) in local services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpintero, Samuel; Petersen, Ole Helby

    2016-01-01

    Local governments are increasingly utilising the public–private partnership (PPP) model as a means of organising service delivery in the public–private domain. This article examines the experiences with construction and operation of 131 PPP wastewater treatment plants in the region of Aragon, Spain...

  8. Bundling and unbundling in public-private partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpintero, Samuel; Petersen, Ole Helby

    2015-01-01

    Public–private partnership (PPP) projects may be organized in a variety of ways, depending on the level of integration of the so-called Special Purpose Vehicle. Based on the analyses of four major PPP light rail projects in Spain, this article outlines two fundamentally different models...

  9. National varieties of public-private partnerships (PPPs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Hurk, Martijn; Brogaard, Lena; Lember, Veiko

    2016-01-01

    Most countries that have adopted the public–private partnership (PPP) model as a means of implementing infrastructure projects have launched dedicated supporting units to guide policy development and stimulate project implementation. This paper draws on the theoretical notion of PPP-enabling fields...

  10. Features of Interaction of Business and Government in the Form of Public-private partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana N. Taranenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Today modernization of relations between the government and the business sector is an important issue particularly relevant in the context of financial globalization in the transition to a market economy. The paper discusses the theoretical concept of public-private partnership, as a form of business organization, combining the functional features of an independent firm or companies and the government, which implementation is caused by the need to ensure the production of the most important benefits in various areas, as well as the features of the interaction of business and government. It is proposed to highlight the definition of public-private partnerships in the form of a special system of relations of economic agents, as well to determine the required features that separate this form of interaction as a partnership from other forms of interaction. Also the authors consider a system of public-private partnership in terms of coordination of joint relations between the government and business, try to identify the basic principles of interaction between the participants, identify their main advantages that each of the participants in the partnership seeks to contribute to the joint project, and identifiess areas to support sustainable development the country's economy. The paper describes the problems associated with the implementation of projects in the public-private partnership system and suggests ways to improve them, discusses the main advantages and disadvantages of such members, as the government and business.

  11. The concept of marketing in the public-private partnership in the medical system in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcărea, V L; Coculescu, B I; Coculescu, E C

    2014-01-01

    During the transition period, the Romanian medical system, subject (like other areas) to a process of reform, had to go through a difficult path, not without obstacles (malpractice, underfunding, embezzlement scandals in the media etc.). Consequently, Romania has faced (and unfortunately still is still facing) the massive exodus of health professionals to countries where they can benefit from better working conditions and payment, and those who suffer from health care crisis are the patients. Reform means "the people in the system for the people", which requires a change of mindset within the medical staff, especially in the continuous professional development. However, to talk about the quality of the medical act requires that all those involved in the medical system should create appropriate conditions - i.e. advanced technical equipment and appropriate salaries. In addition, as underfunding is the main cause of failure in the health system, that management remains the only tool that can lead to the appropriate use of the existing resources and the quality of health services. Therefore, the idea of public-private partnership - which occurred as a challenge, especially after the EU accession - can be considered a solution designed to improve the quality and cost of health services. In other words, the cooperation of the private sector with the public authority means increasing the rigor of the medical equipment performance, fostering professional competition, and an increased attention to the patient, in a word: performance. Currently, more and more frequently, the management has studied to identify opportunities for innovation in health care services in an attempt to bring together patients and practitioners in the field by resorting to the identification of the ways they can receive health care services promptly, fairly and efficiently. Therefore, a clear and responsible design in the spirit of ethics and medical ethic will help the marketing manager solve many

  12. [Phonoaudiology in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, R M

    1992-06-01

    An undestanding of the activities and functions of a speech therapist within the specific context of the Basic Health Units (Unidades Básicas de Saúde) is sought. Difficulties relating to the introduction of a new service on the basis of one of the health professions that has not hitherto belonged to the group of categories which are traditionally incorporated in these same Basic Units. When the statistical data on the demand for speech therapy services by the population who attend health centres were considered, it was discovered that 32% were of schooling age and had been referred by schools, allegedly due to "learning problems". Closer contact with these children, through speech therapy, has brought a different aspect to light i.e. that one cannot consider as disturbance/deviation/problem/pathology written signs which constitute indications of the shock between the process of literacy and that of learning how to read and write. To understand the problem from the point of view of public health, a programme of teacher counselling is proposed, with the purpose of helping the school to clarify its role as co-constructor of the child's literacy process and of returning to the teacher the responsibility for the success and/or failure of teaching how to read and write. A similar programme is proposed for creches where coincidently, a greater proportion (44%) of the younger children (2 to 5 years of age) are seen to have difficulties in oral language development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. A GERMAN EXAMPLE FOR A PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN TRANSPORT RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Boltze, Manfred

    2003-01-01

    In 1998, a new partnership for transport research was founded in Germany's central region Frankfurt RheinMain by major transport authorities and operators, involving partners from industry and consultancy, and supported by the Hessen State Government. This ZIV is an institute at Darmstadt University of Technology, and improves the exchange between research and practice. The article provides organisational details of this public private partnership. The ZIV working areas cover Transport Infras...

  14. Public Outreach for the International Year of Astronomy Through Faculty and Science Center Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentner, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 provides an opportunity to jump-start public education and outreach programs and to engage the community in a fascinating field. In my talk I will discuss a diverse program of education and outreach designed and implemented as a collaborative effort between the Astronomy faculty at the University of Pittsburgh and the Carnegie Science Center. I will highlight some of the unique benefits of such a partnership and some of the unique events such a partnership enables.

  15. Feminism and public health ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, W A

    2006-06-01

    This paper sketches an account of public health ethics drawing upon established scholarship in feminist ethics. Health inequities are one of the central problems in public health ethics; a feminist approach leads us to examine not only the connections between gender, disadvantage, and health, but also the distribution of power in the processes of public health, from policy making through to programme delivery. The complexity of public health demands investigation using multiple perspectives and an attention to detail that is capable of identifying the health issues that are important to women, and investigating ways to address these issues. Finally, a feminist account of public health ethics embraces rather than avoids the inescapable political dimensions of public health.

  16. The Impact of Public Private Partnerships on Education: A Case Study of Sewell Group Plc and Victoria Dock Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Helen; Davies, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the implications of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) for education delivery, attainment, attitude, behaviour and attendance. Partnership success factors are identified, and transferable lessons extracted. Barriers to the success of the partnership are explored and suggestions for improvement are…

  17. Anatomy of Public-Private Partnerships : Their Creation, Financing, and Renegotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This paper presents the main reasons why public-private partnerships (PPPs) are adopted as well as the possible disadvantages for the public and private sectors. By means of two case studies on bridge construction and railway infrastructure (Fertagus and Lusoponte), we elucidate how a PPP

  18. The fantasy world of private finance for transport via public private partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Shaoul, Jean; Stafford, Anne; Stapleton, Pam

    2012-01-01

    In 1993, the British government turned to the private sector to finance much needed investment in public infrastructure and manage services under its Public Private Partnerships (PPP) policy (Edwards et al., 2004), with transport forming by far the largest component by value of the PPP programme. (...)

  19. A Winning Framework for Public-Private Partnerships : Lessons from 60-plus IFC Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Florizone, Richard; Carter, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Despite global financial uncertainty and increased public mistrust of business, partnerships between the public and private sectors have continued to grow- driven by governments' need to access external financing and expertise, by the private sector's search for new opportunities, and by governments' desire to grow the private sector. This report addresses the critical question: how can th...

  20. The fantasy world of private finance for transport via public private partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Shaoul, Jean; Stafford, Anne; Stapleton, Pam

    2012-01-01

    In 1993, the British government turned to the private sector to finance much needed investment in public infrastructure and manage services under its Public Private Partnerships (PPP) policy (Edwards et al., 2004), with transport forming by far the largest component by value of the PPP programme. (...)

  1. A Winning Framework for Public-Private Partnerships : Lessons from 60-plus IFC Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Florizone, Richard; Carter, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Despite global financial uncertainty and increased public mistrust of business, partnerships between the public and private sectors have continued to grow- driven by governments' need to access external financing and expertise, by the private sector's search for new opportunities, and by governments' desire to grow the private sector. This report addresses the critical question: how can th...

  2. Emerging Metagovernance as an Institutional Framework for Public Private Partnership Network in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buser, Martine; Koch, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Implementing private public partnerships in Denmark has been a long and reluctant process. PPP developed among municipalities from the late nineties, but was halted because of a scandal in 2002. In 2004 the government launched an action plan, and PPP are emerging again. Drawing on new public...... employment relations are surfacing. PPPs are thus emergent political arenas....

  3. Museum-University Partnerships as a New Platform for Public Engagement with Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jamie; Chesebrough, David; Cryan, Jason; Koster, Emlyn

    2016-01-01

    A growing trend in natural history museums, science museums, and science centers is the establishment of innovative new partnerships with universities to bring scientific research to the public in compelling and transformative ways. The strengths of both kinds of institutions are leveraged in effective and publicly visible programs, activities,…

  4. Anatomy of Public-Private Partnerships : Their Creation, Financing, and Renegotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This paper presents the main reasons why public-private partnerships (PPPs) are adopted as well as the possible disadvantages for the public and private sectors. By means of two case studies on bridge construction and railway infrastructure (Fertagus and Lusoponte), we elucidate how a PPP

  5. 10+2 Agenda for Public Health in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Gautam

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Public health has come a long way in Nepal, but there is still a long way to go. Over the past years some remarkable achievements have been made in millennium development goals, such as reduction of child mortality, maternal mortality and fertility. However, there still exist wide gaps in healthcoverage among different ethnic groups, geographic regions and gender. In this context, a 10+2 agenda is recommended for scaling-up essentialhealth care in Nepal. These focus on equity, tackling malnutrition, prioritizing non-communicable diseases, preventing accidents, injuries and disabilities, promoting environmental health, harnessing the power of education and communication for behavior change, strengthening healthsystems, fostering public-private partnership, capitalizing on international health partnerships, as well as institutionalizing a culture of non-violence, and consolidating genuine democracy. KEYWORDS: 10+2 agenda, Nepal, public health

  6. TB SCENARIO & PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir K. R.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a major public health problem world o ver and it is India’s worst scourge. In the words of Charles Dickens “it is the disease medicine never cured, wealth warded off, or poverty could boast exemption from.... Which sometimes moves in giant strides & sometimes at tardy sluggish pace, but slow or quick... is never sur e and certain”. India bears 28.4% of the entire world’s burden of Tuberculosis. Every year 2 2 lakh persons contract Tuberculosis, but only half of them seek medical care. One Indian die s of Tuberculosis every 3 minutes! Tuberculosis is not only a medical malady but an ec onomic disaster too it perpetuates poverty and poverty begets Tuberculosis. In view of the enor mity of the problem let us leaf through the pages of history

  7. The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Should We "Fear the Fear"? Comment on "The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Is It Everything We Feared for Health?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Helen L; Hanefeld, Johanna; Smith, Richard D

    2016-10-19

    RLabonté et al entitle their paper in this issue of the International Journal of Health Policy and Management "The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Is It Everything We Feared for Health?" Tantalisingly, they do not directly answer the question they pose, and in this commentary, we suggest that it is the wrong question; we should not 'fear' the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) at all, rather we should ask how we are to respond. The public health community is right to be concerned with the potential implications of trade and investment agreements (TIAs) for health, particularly with shifts from multilateral to regional/bilateral agreements including provisions with greater risk to public health. But it is critical to understand also the potential health benefits, and especially the mitigating policy and governance mechanisms to respond to adverse TIA implications. Given entrenched and divergent sectoral worldviews and perspectives between trade and health communities on these issues, achieving the requisite understanding will also likely require characterisation of these perspectives and identification of areas of common understanding and agreed solutions. © 2017 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  8. Public relations effectiveness in public health institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springston, Jeffrey K; Weaver Lariscy, Ruth Ann

    2005-01-01

    This article explores public relations effectiveness in public health institutions. First, the two major elements that comprise public relations effectiveness are discussed: reputation management and stakeholder relations. The factors that define effective reputation management are examined, as are the roles of issues and crisis management in building and maintaining reputation. The article also examines the major facets of stakeholder relations, including an inventory of stakeholder linkages and key audiences, such as the media. Finally, methods of evaluating public relations effectiveness at both the program level and the institutional level are explored.

  9. Public health and media advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lori; Krasnow, Ingrid Daffner

    2014-01-01

    Media advocacy blends communications, science, politics, and advocacy to advance public health goals. In this article, we explain how media advocacy supports the social justice grounding of public health while addressing public health's "wicked problems" in the context of American politics. We outline media advocacy's theoretical foundations in agenda setting and framing and describe its practical application, from the layers of strategy to storytelling, which can illuminate public health solutions for journalists, policy makers, and the general public. Finally, we describe the challenges in evaluating media advocacy campaigns.

  10. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS (PPPs AND CONCESSIONS OF PUBLIC SERVICES IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. G. Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the current regulation of public-private partnerships (PPPs and concessions of public services inBrazil. Under the Brazilian Constitution, certain public utility services and infrastructure works must be provided or built either directly by the government or through a government franchise. Such franchise takes the form of either concessions or PPPs. The difference between the two is based on the form of government contribution. PPPs are concessions in which part or all of the concessionaire’s compensation is paid by the government and does not come directly from the revenue gained through the service or work at issue. These contractual arrangements are available and actually employed throughout all government levels inBrazil. Most of the government activity in these areas in the past 20 years has adopted a concession or PPP format. By analyzing the main features of the Brazilian concession and PPP system, this paper aims to offer the international reader an introductory view of the legal framework behind most large-scale investments in Brazilian infrastructure. 

  11. The role of tourism public-private partnerships in regional development: a conceptual model proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Franco

    Full Text Available Tourism is characterized as being a sector that stands out as one of the business activities with the greatest potential for worldwide expansion, and as an engine for economic growth. If at the national level, the appeal of tourism is significant, on the local level this sector presents itself as an essential tool in regional development, as a means to avoid regional desertification and stagnation, stimulating the potential of more undeveloped regions. In such a competitive sector as tourism, companies should develop synergies and achieve competitive advantage. In this context, public-private partnerships play an important role in regional development. The aim of this paper is to present a theoretical context that combines different concepts and elements to explain and understand the public-private partnership phenomenon in tourism. A conceptual model of the role of public-private partnerships will be proposed in order to contribute to successful regional development.

  12. ROLE OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS IN THE PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion POTLOG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Public-Private Partnership represents institutional and organizational alliance of the state and business, consisting of financial actors interaction, legal, social and policy oriented joint public and private resources from different sources into a single complex to solve strategic socio-economic problems of country. The aim of the research is to demonstrate the importance of financial institutions in publicprivate partnership projects implementation. Research methodology – in order to achieve the expected results, author applied recognized methods and techniques applied as economic investigations: comparative method, statistical method, logical analysis method. The research results, expressed by knowledge through mentioned field can be applied to improve the process of attracting local and international financial institutions to ensure success in public-private partnerships projects in Republic of Moldova.

  13. [The interface between public health and cyberculture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorato, Eduardo Jorge Sant Ana

    2014-02-01

    This is an opinion piece that proposes a reflection on the current status of the interface between cyberculture and public health and its use as a means for research, not as a mere tool. Cyberculture thus represents a new form of interface between people. And it is precisely "through" and "by means of" social relations that individuals acquire skills and communication techniques. The forms and the means of the relationship alters, but the ends remain unchanged, namely to be in contact with other humans. In recent decades, with the advent of computers, the Internet and all the technological apparatus, human relationships are dependent on them, which is the modern so-called cyberculture. This now affects all areas of activity, and public health cannot be left behind, taking advantage of it and its benefits for its development. It is necessary to keep abreast of these changes and raise them from the theoretical to the practical plane, not only implementing public health policies but also taking the socio-virtual aspects into consideration. It is also necessary for the professionals involved to be updated on new forms of communication, interaction, research methodology, preparation of instruments, sampling approaches and all other phenomena arising from cyberculture that will work in partnership with public health.

  14. Academic-Hospital Partnership: Conducting a Community Health Needs Assessment as a Service Learning Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumwiede, Kelly A; Van Gelderen, Stacey A; Krumwiede, Norma K

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this service learning project were to trial nursing student application of the Community-Based Collaborative Action Research (CBCAR) framework while conducting a community health needs assessment and to assess the effectiveness of the CBCAR framework in providing real-world learning opportunities for enhancing baccalaureate nursing students' public health knowledge. In this case study analysis, the CBCAR framework linked service learning and community health needs assessment with public health nursing core competencies. Fifteen nursing students partnered with collaborative members. Student observational field notes and narrative reflections were analyzed qualitatively for fidelity to the CBCAR framework and to evaluate student public health knowledge. Students successfully employed the CBCAR framework in collaboration with the critical access hospital and community stakeholders to design and conduct the community health needs assessment. Service learning themes were real-world solutions, professional development, community collaboration, and making a difference. Students developed skills in six of the eight domains of the Quad Council's core competencies for public health nurses. Community-Based Collaborative Action Research facilitates collaborative partnerships and relationships throughout the research process. Students benefited by applying what they have learned from their education to a real community who lacks resources. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. DESIGNING PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP FOR BONTANG INDUSTRIAL ESTATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adjie Pamungkas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bontang Local Government has planned Bontang Industrial Estate (BIE to accommodate oil, gas, condensate and other industries.  The estate will need investment for about IDR. 2.27 Trillion while the total annual local government budget is near to IDR 2 Trillion. Moreover, the estate has to be operated in a business manner while the local government officers have a culture in non-profit organisation as part of bureaucracy. However, the BIE feasibility study 2013 has determined that the estate will generate economic multipliers boosting the city development.  Therefore, a partnership among government and private parties should be determined and accommodated in a proper cooperation arrangement. To design the partnership, we review literature, interview related private parties and confirm opinions of the private parties to the governments. A content analysis was used to assess information from the interviews. Considering the final outputs, BIE should be organised by a pure private enterprise or Ltd. to ensure the economic viable of the estate. The Ltd. is a partnership among the government and private parties via shareholders. The government can still hold a majority share with special arrangement in investment scheme. For the initial investments, the government can use its assets valued as 51% of total share while private parties can inject cash money equal to 49% of the total.  With this capital arrangement, the estate can be operated with initial investment for about IDR. 267.11 Billion on 244.97 Ha land. This initial investment can be profitable with IDR. 650 Billion NPV, 19.93% IRR and 13.95 year PP.Bontang Local Government has planned Bontang Industrial Estate (BIE to accommodate oil, gas, condensate and other industries.

  16. Partnerships

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Go Sport Free prize draw    Win Go Sport vouchers by participating in a prize draw of the Staff Association! Thanks to our partnership, 30 vouchers of 50 euros each have been offered to us. To reward you for your loyalty, the Staff Association, organizes a free prize draw for its members. The 30 people who will specify a number that comes closest to the total number of participants to this draw will win a voucher. Deadline for participation: Monday 14th July 2014 – 2 p.m. To participate: https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/content/concours-de-lassociation-du-personnel-2014-competition-staff-association Upon presentation of the Staff Association membership card Go Sport Val Thoiry offers a 15 % discount on all purchases in the shop (excluding promotions, sale items and bargain corner, and excluding purchases using Go Sport and Kadéos gift cards. Only one discount can be applied to each purchase). The manager of Go Sport Val Thoiry hands the discount vouchers to the presid...

  17. Prioritizing Public- Private Partnership Models for Public Hospitals of Iran Based on Performance Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asghari Jaafarabadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was conducted to scrutinize Public- Private Partnership (PPP models in public hospitals of different countries based on performance indicators in order to se-lect appropriated models for Iran hospitals.Methods: In this mixed (quantitative-qualitative study, systematic review and expert panel hasbeen done to identify varied models of PPP as well as performance indicators. In the second stepwe prioritized performance indicator and PPP models based on selected performance indicatorsby Analytical Hierarchy process (AHP technique. The data were analyzed by Excel 2007 andExpert Choice11 software’s.Results: In quality – effectiveness area, indicators like the rate of hospital infections(100%, hospital accidents prevalence rate (73%, pure rate of hospital mortality (63%, patientsatisfaction percentage (53%, in accessibility equity area indicators such as average inpatientwaiting time (100% and average outpatient waiting time (74%, and in financial – efficiency area,indicators including average length of stay (100%, bed occupation ratio (99%, specific incometo total cost ratio (97% have been chosen to be the most key performance indicators. In the prioritizationof the PPP models clinical outsourcing, management, privatization, BOO (build, own,operate and non-clinical outsourcing models, achieved high priority for various performance indicatorareas.Conclusion: This study had been provided the most common PPP options in the field of public hospitals and had gathered suitable evidences from experts for choosing appropriate PPP option for public hospitals. Effect of private sector presence in public hospital performance, based on which PPP options undertaken, will be different.

  18. Leprosy: International Public Health Policies and Public Health Eras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyi Awofeso

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Public health policies continue to play important roles in national and international health reforms. However, the influence and legacies of the public health eras during which such policies are formulated remain largely underappreciated. The limited appreciation of this relationship may hinder consistent adoption of public health policies by nation-states, and encumber disinvestment from ineffective or anachronistic policies. This article reviews seven public health eras and highlights how each era has influenced international policy formulation for leprosy control—“the fertile soil for policy learning”. The author reiterates the role of health leadership and health activism in facilitating consistency in international health policy formulation and implementation for leprosy control.

  19. Health for all: a public health vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeath, W H

    1991-12-01

    The approach of a millennial passage invites public health to a review of past performance and a preview of future prospects toward assuring a healthy public. Since the 1974 Canadian Lalonde report, the best national plans for health progress have emphasized disease prevention and health promotion. WHO's multinational Health for All by the Year 2000 promotes basic health services essential to leading a socially and economically productive life. Healthy People 2000, the latest US guide, establishes three goals: increase healthy life span, reduce health disparities, and achieve universal access to preventive services. Its objectives can be used to excite public understanding, equip program development, evaluate progress, and encourage public accountability for health initiatives. Needed is federal leadership in defining requisite action and securing necessary resources. Elsewhere a "new public health" emphasizes community life-style and multisectoral "healthy public policy." In the United States, a national health program is needed to achieve equity in access to personal health care. Even more essential is equitable sharing in basic health determinants in society--nutritious food, basic education, safe water, decent housing, secure employment, adequate income, and peace. Vital to such a future is able and active leadership now from governments and public health professionals.

  20. Where Do We Stand on Transport Infrastructure Deregulation and Public-Private Partnership?

    OpenAIRE

    Estache, Antonio; Serebrisky, Tomás

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of transport public-private partnerships (PPPs) in developing and developed countries since the early 1990s seems to be following a similar path: private initiatives work for a while but after a shock to the sector takes place the public sector returns as regulator, owner or financier; after a while the public sector runs into problems and eventually finds a hybrid solution t...

  1. The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement and health: few gains, some losses, many risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonté, Ronald; Schram, Ashley; Ruckert, Arne

    2016-06-06

    In early October 2015, 12 nations signed the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA), promoted as a model '21(st) century' trade and investment agreement that other countries would eventually join. There are growing concerns amongst the public health community about the potential health implications of such WTO+ trade and investment agreements, but little existing knowledge on their potential health impacts. We conducted a health impact review which allows for a summary estimation of the most significant health impacts of a set of policies, in our case the TPPA. Our analysis shows that there are a number of potentially serious health risks, with the following key pathways linking trade to health: access to medicines, reduced regulatory space, investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), and environmental protection and labor rights. We also note that economic gains that could translate into health benefits will likely be inequitably distributed. Our analysis demonstrates the need for the public health community to be knowledgeable about trade issues and more engaged in trade negotiations. In the context of the COP21 climate change Agreement, and the UN Sustainable Development Goals, this may be an opportune time for TPPA countries to reject it as drafted, and rethink what should be the purpose of such agreements in light of (still) escalating global wealth inequalities and fragile environmental resources-the two most foundational elements to global health equity.

  2. Support of public–private partnerships in health promotion and conflicts of interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Aguado, Ildefonso; Zaragoza, G A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Public–private partnerships (PPPs) are considered key elements in the development of effective health promotion. However, there is little research to back the enthusiasm for these partnerships. Our objective was to describe the diversity of visions on PPPs and to assess the links between the authors and corporations engaged in such ventures. Methods We reviewed the scientific literature through PubMed in order to select all articles that expressed a position or recommendation on governments and industries engaging in PPPs for health promotion. We included any opinion paper that considered agreements between governments and corporations to develop health promotion. Papers that dealt with healthcare provision or clinical preventive services and those related to tobacco industries were excluded. We classified the articles according to the authors' position regarding PPPs: strongly agree, agree, neutral, disagree and strongly disagree. We related the type of recommendation to authors' features such as institution and conflicts of interest. We also recorded whether the recommendations were based on previous assessments. Results Of 46 papers analysed, 21 articles (45.6%) stated that PPPs are helpful in promoting health, 1 was neutral and 24 (52.1%) were against such collaborations. 26 papers (57%) set out conditions to assure positive outcomes of the partnerships. Evidence for or against PPPs was mentioned in 11 papers that were critical or neutral (44%) but not in any of those that advocated collaboration. Where conflicts were declared (26 papers), absence of conflicts was more frequent in critics than in supporters (86% vs 17%). Conclusions Although there is a lack of evidence to support PPPs for health promotion, many authors endorse this approach. The prevalence of ideas encouraging PPPs can affect the intellectual environment and influence policy decisions. Public health researchers and professionals must make a contribution in properly framing the PPP

  3. Exploration Into the Business Priorities Related to Corporate Engagement in Community Health Improvement Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P; Baase, Catherine; May, Jeanette; Terry, Paul; Moseley, Karen

    2017-07-24

    To explore factors that matter to business in making decisions regarding engagement in community health improvement efforts. Using qualitative methods, domains of interest were identified through literature reviews and expert interviews. Relevance of the domains in terms of potential priorities for action was tested through employer and community stakeholder interviews. Factors that employers considered important to sustained community collaboration as a business priority included (1) credibility of the convener, (2) broad representation of the community, (3) strong mission and goals, (4) individual commitment to health, (5) organizational commitment to health, and (6) demonstrated commitment from leadership. Priorities have been identified for engaging business in community health efforts. Implications for research, practice, and policy include the need for measurement, transparency in reporting, and agreement on principles for public-private partnership in this area.

  4. Solid Waste Management System: Public-Private Partnership, the Best System for Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nabukeera Madinah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Solid waste management (SWM is a major public health and environmental concern in urban areas of many developing countries. Nairobi’s solid waste situation, which could be taken to generally represent the status which is largely characterized by low coverage of solid waste collection, pollution from uncontrolled dumping of waste, inefficient public services, unregulated and uncoordinated private sector and lack of key solid waste management infrastructure. This paper recapitulates on the public-private partnership as the best system for developing countries; challenges, approaches, practices or systems of SWM, and outcomes or advantages to the approach; the literature review focuses on surveying information pertaining to existing waste management methodologies, policies, and research relevant to the SWM. Information was sourced from peer-reviewed academic literature, grey literature, publicly available waste management plans, and through consultation with waste management professionals. Literature pertaining to SWM and municipal solid waste minimization, auditing and management were searched for through online journal databases, particularly Web of Science, and Science Direct. Legislation pertaining to waste management was also researched using the different databases. Additional information was obtained from grey literature and textbooks pertaining to waste management topics. After conducting preliminary research, prevalent references of select sources were identified and scanned for additional relevant articles. Research was also expanded to include literature pertaining to recycling, composting, education, and case studies; the manuscript summarizes with future recommendationsin terms collaborations of public/ private patternships, sensitization of people, privatization is important in improving processes and modernizing urban waste management, contract private sector, integrated waste management should be encouraged, provisional government

  5. Primary health care and public health: foundations of universal health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to advocate for more integrated and universally accessible health systems, built on a foundation of primary health care and public health. The perspective outlined identified health systems as the frame of reference, clarified terminology and examined complementary perspectives on health. It explored the prospects for universal and integrated health systems from a global perspective, the role of healthy public policy in achieving population health and the value of the social-ecological model in guiding how best to align the components of an integrated health service. The importance of an ethical private sector in partnership with the public sector is recognized. Most health systems around the world, still heavily focused on illness, are doing relatively little to optimize health and minimize illness burdens, especially for vulnerable groups. This failure to improve the underlying conditions for health is compounded by insufficient allocation of resources to address priority needs with equity (universality, accessibility and affordability). Finally, public health and primary health care are the cornerstones of sustainable health systems, and this should be reflected in the health policies and professional education systems of all nations wishing to achieve a health system that is effective, equitable, efficient and affordable.

  6. Childhood Obesity: Harnessing the Power of Public and Private Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malepati, Sarath; Pirani, Hafiza; Surie, Diya; Dietz, David; Lee, Jason; Ramos, Lauren Raskin; Petersen, Brittney

    2007-01-01

    In this report the National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation (NIHCM) and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) focus on selective, exemplary collaborations between state health agencies and health plans to reduce overweight and obesity in children. The idea of collaboration is simple. Partner A agrees to…

  7. Partnership Versus Public Ownership of Accounting Firms: Exploring RelativePerformance, Performance Measurement and Measurement Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E Pickering

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite theoretical arguments that partnerships are the most efficient ownership form for professional service firms (PSFs, PSFs are increasingly moving to other ownership structures, such as publicly listed companies (PLCs. Research on the comparative performance of PSF, PLCs and partnerships is sparse with conflicting results suggesting that some segments of PSFs are moving to a less efficient form. This study explores the performance of two Australian accounting PLCs compared to a sample of similar sized mid tier accounting firms. The accounting PLCs achieved substantially higher revenue growth rates but lower productivity than the partnership sample. Measurement issues were identified in the use of closing resource numbers and different treatment of reporting merger and acquisition revenues which may partially explain the underperformance of publicly owned PSFs in prior studies. The need for research at a more detailed level exploring the market and service focus, organisational structures, resources utilised and resource costs across different PSF ownership forms is suggested.

  8. Graduate health professions education: an interdisciplinary university - community partnership model 1996 - 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Deborah; Behringer, Bruce; Smith, Patricia; Townsend, Tom; Wachs, Joy; Stanifer, Larry; Goodrow, Bruce

    2003-07-01

    In 1996, East Tennessee State University (ETSU) reinforced its historical commitment to multidisciplinary community engagement by developing a graduate level community partnerships program in the Division of Health Sciences. While the university's earlier health partnership efforts relied primarily on curricular innovation, the approach to graduate health professions education was to seed a series of curricular enhancements and interdisciplinary, community-based learning experiences and service into traditional curricula. This paper presents the experience of one school in crafting a regional network that became the basis of a division-wide graduate level teaching and learning initiative. Carefully selected planning and implementation techniques enabled multidisciplinary practitioners and community members from across a 20-county region to participate with university faculty in training ETSU learners in community-based medical care. By year four of the project, curricular "enhancements" were institutionalized in over five departments across the Division and engaged 1160 medical residents and graduate learners in a give - get model of health education. Programme evaluation methodology was collaboratively defined and documentation of programme effort and outcomes regularly reported and strategically reviewed. Programme evaluation demonstrates mutual benefit to community and university. Faculty involvement in programme activity increased fourfold and community involvement in training of health professions graduate learners increased threefold by year four. Educational innovations were adopted into traditional curricula, thousands of hours of clinical services were provided to underserved communities and the university-community team forged by network links continues to promote multidisciplinary interests through joint public policy endeavors.

  9. Zoning should promote public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, Joel S

    2004-01-01

    Legally, governments use their police powers to protect public health, safety, and welfare through zoning. This paper presents a case for revisiting zoning on the basis of increasing evidence that certain types of community design promote public health, as opposed to the dominant pattern of sprawl development, which does not. Zoning, and the land use planning linked to it, that prohibits or disfavors health-promoting community designs contradicts the inherent public policy goal on which it is based. If there is a paradigm shift underway, from traditional sprawl to health-promoting community designs, then health professionals and others should understand why zoning must be reassessed.

  10. Service-learning: an integral part of undergraduate public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Suzanne B; Seifer, Sarena D

    2008-09-01

    In 2003, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) described public health as "an essential part of the training of citizens," a body of knowledge needed to achieve a public health literate citizenry. To achieve that end, the IOM recommended that "all undergraduates should have access to education in public health." Service-learning, a type of experiential learning, is an effective and appropriate vehicle for teaching public health and developing public health literacy. While relatively new to public health, service-learning has its historical roots in undergraduate education and has been shown to enhance students' understanding of course relevance, change student and faculty attitudes, encourage support for community initiatives, and increase student and faculty volunteerism. Grounded in collaborative relationships, service-learning grows from authentic partnerships between communities and educational institutions. Through emphasizing reciprocal learning and reflective practice, service-learning helps students develop skills needed to be effective in working with communities and ultimately achieve social change. With public health's enduring focus on social justice, introducing undergraduate students to public health through the vehicle of service-learning as part of introductory public health core courses or public health electives will help ensure that our young people are able to contribute to developing healthy communities, thus achieving the IOM's vision.

  11. [Terrorism, public health and health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Pérez-Berrocal Alonso, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Today the terrorism is a problem of global distribution and increasing interest for the international public health. The terrorism related violence affects the public health and the health care services in an important way and in different scopes, among them, increase mortality, morbidity and disability, generates a context of fear and anxiety that makes the psychopathological diseases very frequent, seriously alters the operation of the health care services and produces important social, political and economic damages. These effects are, in addition, especially intense when the phenomenon takes place on a chronic way in a community. The objective of this paper is to examine the relation between terrorism and public health, focusing on its effects on public health and the health care services, as well as to examine the possible frames to face the terrorism as a public health concern, with special reference to the situation in Spain. To face this problem, both the public health systems and the health care services, would have to especially adapt their approaches and operational methods in six high-priority areas related to: (1) the coordination between the different health and non health emergency response agencies; (2) the reinforcement of the epidemiological surveillance systems; (3) the improvement of the capacities of the public health laboratories and response emergency care systems to specific types of terrorism as the chemical or biological terrorism; (3) the mental health services; (4) the planning and coordination of the emergency response of the health services; (5) the relations with the population and mass media and, finally; (6) a greater transparency in the diffusion of the information and a greater degree of analysis of the carried out health actions in the scope of the emergency response.

  12. Liberalism and Public Health Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajczi, Alex

    2016-02-01

    Many public health dilemmas involve a tension between the promotion of health and the rights of individuals. This article suggests that we should resolve the tension using our familiar liberal principles of government. The article considers the common objections that (i) liberalism is incompatible with standard public health interventions such as anti-smoking measures or intervention in food markets; (2) there are special reasons for hard paternalism in public health; and (3) liberalism is incompatible with proper protection of the community good. The article argues that we should examine these critiques in a larger methodological framework by first acknowledging that the right theory of public health ethics is the one we arrive at in reflective equilibrium. Once we examine the arguments for and against liberalism in that light, we can see the weaknesses in the objections and the strength of the case for liberalism in public health.

  13. Diabetes Literacy: Health and Adult Literacy Practitioners in Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes pedagogy in a series of "diabetes literacy" programs involving culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. The programs were jointly delivered in local community sites, including neighbourhood centres and public housing halls, by qualified nutritionists from a public health service and adult literacy…

  14. Between Public - Private Partnerships and public finance in the public infrastructure sector: The water and sanitation sector in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fjona Zeneli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It’s known in the literature that public-private partnerships (PPPs are one the main instruments that permit private collaboration in projects that are public otherwise. It’s also clear that their implementation is different depending on the rules of the countries, their market level of acceptance etc. The first objective of this paper is to revise PPPs projects in the water sector in Albania, seen in the context of alternative financing ways for joint-stock companies of Albanian water sector, due to the nature of the market (a developing emerging market, in the context of bad financial times after 2008 (the start of the international financial crisis. The second objective is to describe the development of the Albanian legislation for management contracts introduced for the first time in the waters and sanitation sector in 2004 and privatization practices in public sector. The main conclusion is that in the developing markets creating possibilities for private sector participation in the infrastructure public services (especially in the drinking water and sanitation sector will be seen with skepticism because of failed previous privatization practices or the sensitivity degree of the water sector related to the penetration level of private factor in the sector. Public finance will be explored as a convenient alternative.

  15. Migrant Health: a value for Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Laurenti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The health matters associated with migration are crucial public health challenges faced by both governments and societies. According to United Nations estimates, 120 million of the approximately 175 million migrants worldwide are migrant workers with their families (1. Legal and illegal workers have a different status and, therefore, varying levels of access to social and health services. The collective health needs and implications of this sizeable population are considerable, and different health determinants and levels of vulnerability could impact on their health (2. The main public health goal is to avoid disparities in health status and access to health services between migrants and the host population (3. The second, closely associated principle, is to ensure migrants’ health rights, as stated during the 4th Conference on Migrant and Ethnic Minority Health in Europe which took place from 21st to 23rd June 2012 in Milan, where Migrants and ethnic minorities were confirmed as a benefit to the society (4.

  16. Constitutional and administrative law comments on public-private partnerships in urban development: Experiences from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobma, F.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Public-private partnership agreements can be seen as government making use of private law to achieve planning objectives. Public-private partnerships (PPP’s) have extensively been used in urban development projects during the past few decades in the Netherlands (and elsewhere around the globe). A lo

  17. Constitutional and administrative law comments on public-private partnerships in urban development: Experiences from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobma, F.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Public-private partnership agreements can be seen as government making use of private law to achieve planning objectives. Public-private partnerships (PPP’s) have extensively been used in urban development projects during the past few decades in the Netherlands (and elsewhere around the globe). A

  18. Constitutional and administrative law comments on public-private partnerships in urban development: Experiences from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobma, F.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Public-private partnership agreements can be seen as government making use of private law to achieve planning objectives. Public-private partnerships (PPP’s) have extensively been used in urban development projects during the past few decades in the Netherlands (and elsewhere around the globe). A lo

  19. Accelerating the development of improved analgesic treatments: the ACTION public-private partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C

    2011-07-01

    There has been considerable progress identifying pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but analgesic medications with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability still represent an unmet public health need. Numerous treatments examined in recent randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have failed to show efficacy for neuropathic pain, including treatments that had previously demonstrated efficacy. This suggests that at least some negative results reflect limited assay sensitivity of RCTs to distinguish efficacious treatments from placebo. Patient characteristics, clinical trial research designs and methods, outcome measures, approaches to data analysis, and statistical power may all play a role in accounting for difficulties in demonstrating the benefits of efficacious analgesic treatments vs placebo. The identification of specific clinical trial characteristics associated with assay sensitivity in existing data has the potential to provide an evidence-based approach to the design of analgesic clinical trials. The US Food and Drug Administration recently launched the Analgesic Clinical Trial Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) public-private partnership, which is designed to facilitate the discovery and development of analgesics with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability for acute and chronic pain conditions. ACTION will establish a collaborative effort to prioritize research objectives, develop a standardized analgesic database platform, and conduct methodologically focused studies to increase the assay sensitivity and efficiency of analgesic clinical trials. The results of these activities have the potential to inform and accelerate the development of improved pain management interventions of all types, not just pharmacologic treatments.

  20. To procure for better buildings - FM and Public Private Partnerships in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian

    Purpose: The paper is based on a research project investigating whether PPP´s are good for the procurement of FM, i.e. are PPP´s advantageous for the integration of FM considerations into the planning, design and construction of buildings? Background: In Public-Private Partnerships FM services...

  1. Public-private partnerships in The Netherlands: Policy, projects and lessons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines the re-emergence of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the Netherlands since the 1980s, summarising the policy discussions that have taken place, and analysing the projects that have been implemented or planned. Several policy conclusions are drawn from the Dutch

  2. Realizing multiple spatial policy objectives through public-private partnerships: Propositions for institutional design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Stefan; Lenferink, Sander; Leendertse, Wim; Busscher, Tim; Arts, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary Dutch planning practice is increasingly characterized by more ‘area-oriented’ approaches, in which planners seek to integrate the (re)development of transport infrastructure with that of the surrounding space. This paper looks into the role of Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) in integ

  3. Concerning Descriptive Standards: A Partnership between Public Archives and Private Collections in Geneva, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth-Lochner, Barbara; Grange, Didier

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a partnership begun in 2002 in the field of archival description between the Geneva City Archives (AVG) and the Manuscripts Department of the Public and University Library of Geneva (BPU). This cooperation has allowed the creation of two computer applications, which share technical and conceptual foundations.…

  4. A mountainscape which isn't there - public private partnerships in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

      Private public partnerships are hesitant innovations, with a complex cross sectorial origin and domain. This is also the case in Denmark: In a first round, a PPP variant, sale and lease back, developed among municipalities from the late nineties, but was halted because of a scandal in 2002. In ...

  5. Public-private partnerships in The Netherlands: Policy, projects and lessons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines the re-emergence of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the Netherlands since the 1980s, summarising the policy discussions that have taken place, and analysing the projects that have been implemented or planned. Several policy conclusions are drawn from the Dutch

  6. The One Laptop School: Equipping Rural Elementary Schools in South India through Public Private Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byker, Erik Jon

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a Public Private Partnership (PPP) program in South India that provided information and communication technology (ICT) to rural elementary schools. The article examined the current status of rural, government-run elementary schools in India by reviewing reports like the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) in India.…

  7. Institutional and Strategic Barriers to Public-Private Partnership: An Analysis of Dutch Cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans); G.R. Teisman (Geert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPublic Private Partnerships (PPP) have been much discussed throughout Europe, but does the practice match the idea of cooperating actors who achieve added value together and share risks? An analysis of three cases of PPP in The Netherlands suggests that practice tends to be less ideal th

  8. Institutional and Strategic Barriers to Public-Private Partnership: An Analysis of Dutch Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans); G.R. Teisman (Geert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPublic-Private Partnerships (PPPs) are becoming popular in Europe, but does the reality match the idea of co-operating actors who achieve added value together and share risks? An analysis of three PPPs in the Netherlands suggests that, in practice, PPPs are less ideal than the idea. Part

  9. 24 CFR 1006.335 - Use of nonprofit organizations and public-private partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of nonprofit organizations and... Requirements § 1006.335 Use of nonprofit organizations and public-private partnerships. (a) Nonprofit organizations. The DHHL must, to the extent practicable, provide for private nonprofit organizations...

  10. The study and practice of public-private partnerships in the Low Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hueskes, Marlies; Koppenjan, Joop; Verweij, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) have attracted considerable attention in the Netherlands and Flanders (Belgium), as witnessed by the recent wave of doctoral theses on this topic. This paper presents a review of fourteen Dutch and Flemish doctoral theses, published in the period 2012-2015. The mai

  11. ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROJECTS OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN INVESTMENT AND CONSTRUCTION SPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natal'ya V Gorodnova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the economic instability the problem of development of mechanisms of integration of state and private business became even more important. The paper presents the evaluation of the effectiveness of public-private partnerships (PPPs. It is concluded that adoption of the new Federal law on PPP will increase the efciency of interaction between participants in PPP projects

  12. Improving the effectiveness of sickness benefit case management through a public-private partnership?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malene Rode; Aust, Birgit; Høgelund, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether a multidimensional public-private partnership intervention, focussing on improving the quality and efficiency of sickness benefit case management, reduced the sickness benefit duration and the duration until self-support. Methods We used...

  13. The essence and historical genesis of public-private partnership in the tourism sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajkova Anastasija Ivanovna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In article historical stages of emergence and state-private partnership (SPP development as tool of the public relations are investigated, the main lines of process of its formation are revealed, potential subjects of business - "participants of SPP" in economic system "tourism" are considered.

  14. The Development and Implementation of Successful School-Community Partnerships in Public Elementary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Vincent N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to define common characteristics of successful school-community partnerships supporting the improvement of academic achievement in public elementary schools. Based on the perceptions of elementary school administrators, this study identified important factors of, barriers to, and benefits of successful school-community…

  15. Innovative Public Engagement Practices and Partnerships: Lifting Stakeholder Voices in Education Accountability Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Monica; Brewer, Curtis; Knoeppel, Robert; Witte, James; Pargas, Roy; Lindle, Jane Clark

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, due to increasing stakeholder dissatisfaction with assessment results and school report cards, South Carolina revised its 1998 Educational Accountability Act and required public engagement with stakeholders including parents/guardians, educators, business and community leaders, and taxpayers. The legislation created partnerships between…

  16. Culture Shock in Public-Private Partnerships: Examining P3 from Cultural Persective in Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeczi, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Ask for a definition of the word public-private partnership in a room filled with people from different cultures, and their answers may differ remarkably. The American of the group might refer to privatization and contracting out of traditional government services. A Dutch person might think of a

  17. Designs for Simultaneous Renewal in University-Public School Partnerships: Hitting the "Sweet Spot"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Marisa L.; Horn, Ilana; Campbell, Sara Sunshine; Kazemi, Elham; Hintz, Allison; Kelley-Petersen, Megan; Stevens, Reed; Saxena, Amit; Peck, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The promise of university-public school partnerships as contexts for mutually beneficial learning, or "simultaneous renewal," has been well established (Goodlad, 1994, 1999). However, difficulties in creating and sustaining these kinds of collaborative contexts for teacher education are also well known, including practical challenges such as time…

  18. El Sistema Fundamentals in Practice: An Examination of One Public Elementary School Partnership in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson Steele, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    El Sistema is a Venezuelan program of social change that has inspired a worldwide movement in music education. El Sistema inspires social transformation and musical excellence to occur simultaneously and symbiotically. This study examines: What does El Sistema look like within the context of a public school partnership in the United States? How do…

  19. Culture Shock in Public-Private Partnerships: Examining P3 from a Cultural Perspective in Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeczi, David

    2004-01-01

    Ask for a definition of the word public-private partnership in a room filled with people from different cultures, and their answers may differ remarkably. The American of the group might refer to privatization and contracting out of traditional government services. A Dutch person might think of a ne

  20. Institutional and Strategic Barriers to Public-Private Partnership: An Analysis of Dutch Cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans); G.R. Teisman (Geert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPublic Private Partnerships (PPP) have been much discussed throughout Europe, but does the practice match the idea of cooperating actors who achieve added value together and share risks? An analysis of three cases of PPP in The Netherlands suggests that practice tends to be less ideal th

  1. The study and practice of public-private partnerships in the Low Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hueskes, Marlies; Koppenjan, Joop; Verweij, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) have attracted considerable attention in the Netherlands and Flanders (Belgium), as witnessed by the recent wave of doctoral theses on this topic. This paper presents a review of fourteen Dutch and Flemish doctoral theses, published in the period 2012-2015. The

  2. Public-private partnerships in urban regeneration projects: Organizational form or managerial capacity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Kort (Michiel); E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Urban regeneration companies (URCs) are public-private entities appearing across Europe. They are created specifically to manage and implement more effectively urban regeneration projects. Core ideas behind the establishment of these newly emerging partnerships aim to t

  3. Public-private partnership: a new engine for translational research in neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Declan G M; Goldman, Michel; Loth, Eva; Spooren, Will

    2014-11-05

    We have made little recent progress developing effective new treatments for neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. Novel molecular mechanisms have been identified, but have not translated into the clinic. We suggest an alternative: combinations of treatments targeting different aspects of final common pathways in biologically defined clinical subgroups. This will require integrated translational neuroscience and international public-private partnerships.

  4. Public-Private Partnerships in Cloud-Computing Services in the Context of Genomic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados Moreno, Palmira; Joly, Yann; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2017-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) have been increasingly used to spur and facilitate innovation in a number of fields. In healthcare, the purpose of using a PPP is commonly to develop and/or provide vaccines and drugs against communicable diseases, mainly in developing or underdeveloped countries. With the advancement of technology and of the area of genomics, these partnerships also focus on large-scale genomic research projects that aim to advance the understanding of diseases that have a genetic component and to develop personalized treatments. This new focus has created new forms of PPPs that involve information technology companies, which provide computing infrastructure and services to store, analyze, and share the massive amounts of data genomic-related projects produce. In this article, we explore models of PPPs proposed to handle, protect, and share the genomic data collected and to further develop genomic-based medical products. We also identify the reasons that make these models suitable and the challenges they have yet to overcome. To achieve this, we describe the details and complexities of MSSNG, International Cancer Genome Consortium, and 100,000 Genomes Project, the three PPPs that focus on large-scale genomic research to better understand the genetic components of autism, cancer, rare diseases, and infectious diseases with the intention to find appropriate treatments. Organized as PPP and employing cloud-computing services, the three projects have advanced quickly and are likely to be important sources of research and development for future personalized medicine. However, there still are unresolved matters relating to conflicts of interest, commercialization, and data control. Learning from the challenges encountered by past PPPs allowed us to establish that developing guidelines to adequately manage personal health information stored in clouds and ensuring the protection of data integrity and privacy would be critical steps in the development of

  5. Social media in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass-Hout, Taha A; Alhinnawi, Hend

    2013-01-01

    While social media interactions are currently not fully understood, as individual health behaviors and outcomes are shared online, social media offers an increasingly clear picture of the dynamics of these processes. Social media is becoming an increasingly common platform among clinicians and public health officials to share information with the public, track or predict diseases. Social media can be used for engaging the public and communicating key public health interventions, while providing an important tool for public health surveillance. Social media has advantages over traditional public health surveillance, as well as limitations, such as poor specificity, that warrant additional study. Social media can provide timely, relevant and transparent information of public health importance; such as tracking or predicting the spread or severity of influenza, west nile virus or meningitis as they propagate in the community, and, in identifying disease outbreaks or clusters of chronic illnesses. Further work is needed on social media as a valid data source for detecting or predicting diseases or conditions. Also, whether or not it is an effective tool for communicating key public health messages and engaging both, the general public and policy-makers.

  6. The Role and Significance of Public-Private Partnerships in the Republic of Croatia: Selected Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Barković

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A public-private partnership is a long-term contractual partner relationship between the public and private sector which may involve financing, design, construction, operation and/or maintenance of infrastructure and/or provision of services by the private sector which is traditionally procured and provided by the public sector. This model is gaining popularity in our modern age when governments are facing the challenge of protecting the public interest on one hand and meeting different (individualized needs of the citizens on the other. Citizens´ expectations are rising together with the demand for better quality and more affordable public services. Moreover, the confidence citizens have in their government and leaders depends to a large extent on the quality of the services they provide. Therefore, the role and significance of public-private partnership is becoming increasingly important, as can be seen from contemporary academic works dealing with law and economics that discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this public policy model. The purpose of this paper is to offer a short theoretical insight into the role and significance of the publicprivate partnership, especially in Croatia. In this paper several examples of the applied models of public-private partnership in the Republic of Croatia will be presented. There are also suggestions based on theoretical and practical analysis, especially from a legal and institutional point of view, of how to improve the application of this model in order to ensure a more efficient and effective way of providing public products and services.

  7. Moving toward implementation: the potential for accountable care organizations and private-public partnerships to advance active neighborhood design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusman, Edie E; Carr, Sara Jensen; Robinson, Judy; Kasirye, Olivia; Zell, Bonnie; Miller, William Jahmal; Duarte, Teri; Engel, Adrian B; Hernandez, Monica; Horton, Mark B; Williams, Frank

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 Affordable Care Act's (ACA) aims of lowering costs and improving quality of care will renew focus on preventive health strategies. This coincides with a trend in medicine to reconsider population health approaches as part of the standard curriculum. This intersection of new policy and educational climates presents a unique opportunity to reconsider traditional healthcare structures. This paper introduces and advances an alignment that few have considered. We propose that accountable care organizations (ACOs), which are expected to proliferate under the ACA, present the best opportunity to establish partnerships between healthcare, public health, and community-based organizations to achieve the legislation's goals. One example is encouraging daily physical activity via built environment interventions and programs, which is recommended by numerous groups. We highlight how nonprofit organizations in Sacramento, California have been able to leverage influence, capital, and policy to encourage design for active living, and how their work is coordinating with public health and healthcare initiatives. In conclusion, we critically examine potential barriers to the success of partnerships between ACOs and community organizations and encourage further exploration and evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Citizen Science for public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, Den Lea; Devilee, Jeroen; Oers, Van Hans; Schuit, A.J.; Wagemakers, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    Community engagement in public health policy is easier said than done. One reason is that public health policy is produced in a complex process resulting in policies that may appear not to link up to citizen perspectives. We therefore address the central question as to whether citizen engagement in

  9. Periodontal health and global public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul E; Baehni, Pierre C

    2012-10-01

    Chronic diseases are a growing burden to people, to health-care systems and to societies across the world. The rapid increase in the burden of chronic diseases is particularly prevalent in the developing countries. Periodontal disease is one of the two most important oral diseases contributing to the global burden of chronic disease. In addition to social determinants, periodontal health status is related to several proximal factors. Modifiable risk factors, such as tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, poor diet and nutrition, obesity, psychological stress and insufficient personal/oral hygiene, are important and these principal risk factors for periodontal disease are shared by other chronic diseases. The present monograph is devoted to the existing evidence on the practice of public health related to periodontal health. Public health is defined as the process of mobilizing and engaging local, national and international resources to assure that people can be healthy. Social determinants of health, environmental hazards and unhealthy lifestyles are prioritized in modern public health-care. Disease prevention and health promotion are cornerstones in actions for public health. This volume of Periodontology 2000 is entitled ‘Periodontal health and global public health’; the 12 articles of this volume discuss different aspects of this statement. It covers a range of subjects from public health issues to patient care. This monograph intends to stimulate community action research in the field of periodontology in order to help the development of appropriate public health intervention and relevant surveillance programs. It also expects to stimulate health authorities and professional organizations to initiate and support actions to promote periodontal health in their respective countries.

  10. Partnerships as knowledge encounters: a psychosocial theory of partnerships for health and community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveling, Emma-Louise; Jovchelovitch, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a psychosocial theory of partnership, illustrated with case studies from Cambodia and Brazil. Partnerships are conceptualised as encounters with the knowledge of self and others, entailing processes of representation and communication between all stakeholders involved, and shaped by institutional and sociocultural contexts. We argue that partnership is an evolving practice that requires critical reflection and the creation of enabling institutional contexts. As such, it must be understood not as a tool for intervention, but as part of the intervention and definition of success.

  11. Working together for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Pompeo

    2009-06-01

    Italy's recent economic growth and strategic position in the Mediterranean Sea have made it a prime destination for immigrants and asylum seekers in Europe. Despite its well-developed health care system, statistics on foreign citizens' health are worrisome. In 1998 public health services were extended to illegal immigrants, giving them the right to necessary urgent and non-urgent medical assistance, even for a prolonged period. This paper examines a two-year joint intervention project between Centre for the Study and Research of Public Health (Mental Health), Local Health Agency ROMA E (LHA RME) and the non-governmental organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Rome.

  12. Adapting pediatric obesity treatment delivery for low-income families: a public-private partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluss, Patricia A; Ewing, Linda J; Long, Kristin A; Krieger, William G; Lovelace, John

    2010-02-01

    The objective was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering a pediatric weight management intervention adapted for low-income families. Academic researchers, a Medicaid health plan, a State Medicaid agency, and community pediatric providers partnered in the project. Participants were 48 families with 52 overweight/obese children aged 4 to 12 recruited from Medicaid health plan and providers' offices. Elements of efficacious pediatric obesity interventions were modified for low literacy and implemented in person and telephonically with parents. Families report ents in food shopping and preparation, and child eating and activity habits. The retention rate was 88%. Children grew significantly taller (F = 7.1; P = .012) but did not gain significant weight (F = 0.91; P = .35), with a trend toward decreased BMI ( F = 3.2; P = .08). The authors demonstrate the feasibility of delivering an adapted pediatric obesity intervention with low-income families. They also discuss implications for public-private partnerships among key stakeholders to address pediatric obesity in this high-risk population.

  13. A South African public-private partnership HIV treatment model: viability and success factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Igumbor

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The increasing number of people requiring HIV treatment in South Africa calls for efficient use of its human resources for health in order to ensure optimum treatment coverage and outcomes. This paper describes an innovative public-private partnership model which uses private sector doctors to treat public sector patients and ascertains the model's ability to maintain treatment outcomes over time. METHODS: The study used a retrospective design based on the electronic records of patients who were down-referred from government hospitals to selected private general medical practitioners (GPs between November 2005 and October 2012. In total, 2535 unique patient records from 40 GPs were reviewed. The survival functions for mortality and attrition were calculated. Cumulative incidence of mortality for different time cohorts (defined by year of treatment initiation was also established. RESULTS: The median number of patients per GP was 143 (IQR: 66-246. At the time of down-referral to private GPs, 13.8% of the patients had CD4 count <200 cell/mm(3, this proportion reduced to 6.6% at 12 months and 4.1% at 48 months. Similarly, 88.4% of the patients had suppressed viral load (defined as HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/ml at 48 months. The patients' probability of survival at 12 and 48 months was 99.0% (95% CI: 98.4%-99.3% and 89.0% (95% CI: 87.1%-90.0% respectively. Patient retention at 48 months remained high at 94.3% (95% CI: 93.0%-95.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings demonstrate the ability of the GPs to effectively maintain patient treatment outcomes and potentially contribute to HIV treatment scale-up with the relevant support mechanism. The model demonstrates how an assisted private sector based programme can be effectively and efficiently used to either target specific health concerns, key populations or serve as a stop-gap measure to meet urgent health needs.

  14. 77 FR 24992 - OSHA Strategic Partnership Program for Worker Safety and Health (OSPP); Extension of the Office...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA Strategic Partnership Program for Worker Safety and Health (OSPP); Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of Information Collection... approval of the information collection requirements specified in the OSHAs Strategic Partnership...

  15. Public safety and social participation: new practices, partnership and actions manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Marcos Leandro Dalaeste de; Regis, Jonathan Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    It has been noted that over the past decades a considerable change has occurred in how it comes to preventing crime and other offenses in the world. Through these new positions, great advances and changes are seen as fruit of a partnership that has been working since today the control of crime and violence is not seen or treated as unique and exclusive task of public institutions. Great actions are seen as true manufacturing tasks, widely participatory between various public institutions, non...

  16. Risk Allocation in Public Private Partnership (PPP) Project: A Review on Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Alkaf Abd Karim

    2011-01-01

    It is important for the public and private sectors to establish effective risk allocation strategies for Public-Private Partnership (PPP) projects. According to Malaysia’s PPP Guideline, one of the key feature or characteristics is to optimal sharing of risk whereby risk is allocated to the party who is the best able to manage. This mean that in PPP itself, it emphasis risk allocation in construction project. This paper presents on reviewing the risk factors of PPP construction project by map...

  17. Public-Private Partnerships and Sustainable Regional Innovation Systems:special Roles for Universities?

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Martin; Christensen, Per,; Johnson, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    The notion of Public-Private Partnerships (P3) is ambiguous. This has not stopped the UN and several other organisations from proclaiming these partnerships as a pivotal mechanism for a move towards more sustainable societies. To date, however, little emphasis has been on universities in this connection, and their roles (if any) are still somewhat unclear. So, the question is: What is or could be the role of universities in P3s?A third mission of universities, often referred to as ‘outreach’,...

  18. Public Health Events and International Health Regulations

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-06-21

    Dr. Katrin Kohl, a medical officer at the CDC, discusses the World Health Organization’s International Health Regulations for assessing and reporting on public health events across the world.  Created: 6/21/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/21/2012.

  19. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN FUNCTION OF RAPID ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubiša Vladušić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains a review of themost important characteristics of public-privatepartnerships, explaining mutual adjustment ofpublic and private sectors goals during theimplementation of a particular public project. Inaddition, this paper outlines the benefits of publicprivatepartnership through redefining governmentrole in economy ensuring the necessary efficiencyand productivity in the management of publicgoods. The author specially noted that forsuccessful development of public-privatepartnership it is necessary for all stakeholders to beadequately involved in the process and to clearlyrecognize the possibility of better and higherquality in realization of their own interests bydefining the contractual assumptions of riskdiversification. The author also points out that inexplaining the concept of public-privatepartnership it is necessary to distinguish betweenthis kind of contractual relationship and thetraditional ways of providing public services,privatization and concessions. The circumstancessuggest that the experience in strategic merger ofpublic and private sectors in developed countries ispositive and that these processes in countries intransition are delayed both in view of legal aspectand application in practice. The author believesthat not only the legal solutions but also newprocedures and regulations as well as mechanismsfor effective implementation of models of publicprivatepartnership will be of great importance forfurther economic development of the countries intransition.

  20. How to Achieve Transparency in Public-Private Partnerships Engaged in Hunger and Malnutrition Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Bird, Julia K

    2016-01-01

    Multi-stakeholder partnerships are important facilitators of improving nutrition in developing countries to achieve the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals. Often, the role of industry is challenged and questions are raised as to the ethics of involving for-profit companies in humanitarian projects. The Second International Conference on Nutrition placed great emphasis on the role of the private sector, including industry, in multi-stakeholder partnerships to reduce hunger and malnutrition. Governments have to establish regulatory frameworks and institutions to guarantee fair competition and invest in infrastructure that makes investments for private companies attractive, eventually leading to economic growth. Civil society organizations can contribute by delivering nutrition interventions and behavioral change-related communication to consumers, providing capacity, and holding governments and private sector organizations accountable. Industry provides technical support, innovation, and access to markets and the supply chain. The greatest progress and impact can be achieved if all stakeholders cooperate in multi-stakeholder partnerships aimed at improving nutrition, thereby strengthening local economies and reducing poverty and inequality. Successful examples of public-private partnerships exist, as well as examples in which these partnerships did not achieve mutually agreed objectives. The key requirements for productive alliances between industry and civil society organizations are the establishment of rules of engagement, transparency and mutual accountability. The Global Social Observatory performed a consultation on conflicts of interest related to the Scaling Up Nutrition movement and provided recommendations to prevent, identify, manage and monitor potential conflicts of interest. Multi-stakeholder partnerships can be successful models in improving nutrition if they meet societal demand with transparent decision-making and execution. Solutions to

  1. Towards a public health profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldspang, Anders

    2015-01-01

    and disease prevention, health economics and leadership, health sociology, ethics, etc.—unified under the comprehensive public health umbrella. This approach will contribute to the prevention of silo thinking and isolated, particularistic action. Conversely, just thinking in and engaging specialists...

  2. Transforming Water Supply Regimes in India: Do Public-Private Partnerships Have a Role to Play?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Gopakumar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Public-private partnerships (PPP are an important governance strategy that has recently emerged as a solution to enhance the access of marginalised residents to urban infrastructures. With the inception of neo-liberal economic reforms in India, in Indian cities too PPP has emerged as an innovative approach to expand coverage of water supply and sanitation infrastructures. However, there has been little study of the dynamics of partnership efforts in different urban contexts: What role do they play in transforming existing infrastructure regimes? Do reform strategies such as partnerships result in increased privatisation or do they make the governance of infrastructures more participative? Reviewing some of the recent literature on urban political analysis, this article develops the concept of water supply regime to describe the context of water provision in three metropolitan cities in India. To further our understanding of the role of PPP within regimes, this article sketches five cases of water supply and sanitation partnerships located within these three metropolitan cities. From these empirical studies, the article arrives at the conclusion that while PPP are always products of the regime-context they are inserted within, quite often strategic actors in the partnership use the PPP to further their interests by initiating a shift in the regime pathway. This leads us to conclude that PPPs do play a role in making water supply regimes more participative but that depends on the nature of the regime as well as the actions of partners.

  3. Tension, Risk and Conflict: Action-Learning Journeys with Four Public-Sector Partnership Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the learning gained from facilitating four action-learning sets whose members were drawn from management teams of local authority, health, education and police, working in partnership. Facilitation posed a series of difficult choices which impacted on personal and organizational dynamics within and between the partnership…

  4. A Guide to Successful Public Private Partnerships for Youth Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relave, Nanette; Deich, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    This publication is part of a series of tools and resources on financing and sustaining youth programming. These tools and resources are intended to help policymakers, program developers, and community leaders develop innovative strategies for implementing, financing, and sustaining effective programs and policies. This guide provides practical…

  5. ECO-Report - Research-management-public partnership continues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane Kapler Smith; Greg Jones; Nan Christianson; Lucia Solorzano; Gloria Weisgerber; Steve Arno; Sallie J. Hejl; F. Jeremy Wheeler; Timothy S. Redman; Joshua J. Tewksbury; Tom DeLuca; K. Zouhar

    1998-01-01

    ECO-Report is an annual Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) publication which contains a set of articles showcasing the Bitterroot Ecosystem Management Research Project (BEMRP) research projects and activities. The articles are concise, user-friendly, and designed to inform a broad range of audiences interested in ecosystem management. Articles featured in...

  6. The right to public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James

    2016-06-01

    Much work in public health ethics is shaped by an 'autonomy first' view, which takes it to be axiomatic that it is difficult to justify state interference in the lives of competent adults unless the behaviours interfered with are compromised in terms of their autonomy, or would wrongfully infringe on the autonomy of others. However, such an approach is difficult to square with much of traditional public heath practice. Recent years have seen running battles between those who assume that an 'autonomy first' approach is basically sound (and so much the worse for public health practice) and those who assume that public health practice is basically sound (and so much the worse for the 'autonomy first' approach). This paper aims to reconcile in a normatively satisfying way what is best about the 'autonomy first' approach with what is best about a standard public health approach. It develops a positive case for state action to promote and protect health as a duty that is owed to each individual. According to this view, the state violates individuals' rights if it fails to take cost-effective and proportionate measures to remove health threats from the environment. It is thus a mistake to approach public health in the way that 'autonomy first' accounts do, as primarily a matter of individual entitlements versus the common good. Too little state intervention in the cause of improving population health can violate individuals' rights, just as too much can.

  7. Association between Organizational Capacity and Involvement in Chronic Disease Prevention Programming among Canadian Public Health Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusaik, Nancy; Sabiston, Catherine M.; Kishchuk, Natalie; Maximova, Katerina; O'Loughlin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the emerging field of public health services and systems research, this study (i) tested a model of the relationships between public health organizational capacity (OC) for chronic disease prevention, its determinants (organizational supports for evaluation, partnership effectiveness) and one possible outcome of OC (involvement…

  8. Financing and cost-effectiveness analysis of public-private partnerships: provision of tuberculosis treatment in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaranayake Lilani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public-private partnerships (PPP could be effective in scaling up services. We estimated cost and cost-effectiveness of different PPP arrangements in the provision of tuberculosis (TB treatment, and the financing required for the different models from the perspective of the provincial TB programme, provider, and the patient. Methods Two different models of TB provider partnerships are evaluated, relative to sole public provision: public-private workplace (PWP and public-private non-government (PNP. Cost and effectiveness data were collected at six sites providing directly observed treatment (DOT. Effectiveness for a 12-month cohort of new sputum positive patients was measured using cure and treatment success rates. Provider and patient costs were estimated, and analysed according to sources of financing. Cost-effectiveness is estimated from the perspective of the provider, patient and society in terms of the cost per TB case cured and cost per case successfully treated. Results Cost per case cured was significantly lower in PNP (US $354–446, and comparable between PWP (US $788–979 and public sites (US $700–1000. PPP models could significantly reduce costs to the patient by 64–100%. Relative to pure public sector provision and financing, expansion of PPPs could reduce government financing required per TB patient treated from $609–690 to $130–139 in PNP and $36–46 in PWP. Conclusion There is a strong economic case for expanding PPP in TB treatment and potentially for other types of health services. Where PPPs are tailored to target groups and supported by the public sector, scaling up of effective services could occur at much lower cost than solely relying on public sector models.

  9. An analysis of ophthalmology services in Finland - has the time come for a Public-Private Partnership?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehto Juhani

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied the prerequisites for Public-Private Partnership (PPP in the context of the Finnish health care system and more specifically in the field of ophthalmology. PPP can be defined as a more or less permanent cooperation between public and private actors, through which the joint products or services are developed and in which the risks, costs and profits are shared. The Finnish eye care services system is heterogeneous with several different providers and can be regarded as sub-optimal in terms of overall resource use. What is more, the public sector is suffering from a shortage of ophthalmologists, which further decreases its possibilities to meet the present needs. As ophthalmology has traditionally been a medical specialty with a substantial private sector involvement in service provision, PPP could be a feasible policy to be used in the field. We thus ask the following research question: Is there, and to what extent, an open window of opportunity for PPP? Methods In addition to the previously published literature, the research data consisted of 17 thematic interviews with public and private experts in the field of ophthalmology. The analysis was conducted in two stages. First, a literature-based content analysis was used to explore the prerequisites for PPP. Second, Kingdon's (1995 multiple streams theory was used to study the opening of the window of opportunity for PPP. Results Public and private parties reported similar problems in the current situation but defined them differently. Also, there is no consensus on policy alternatives. Public opinion seems to be somewhat uncertain as to the attitudes towards private service providers. The analysis thus showed that although there are prerequisites for PPP, the time has not yet come for a Public-Private Partnership. Conclusion Should the window open fully, the emergence of policy entrepreneurs and an opportunity for a win-win situation between public and private

  10. Sustainable Health Development Becoming Agenda for Public Health Academia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein TAKIAN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs aim to transform our world, and each goal has specific targets to be achieved by 2030. For the goals to be achieved, everyone needs to do their part: governments, academia, the private sector and all people. This paper summarizes the main evidence-based recommendations made by excellent academics and scholars who discussed their experiences and views during the conference to respond to the challenges of sustainable health development.Methods: To contribute to exploring to the academia's role in reaching SDGs, the 1st International Conference on Sustainable Health Development was held at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, on 24-25 April 2016, in Tehran, Iran. Results: In line with Goal 3 of SDGs: "ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages", the conference discussed various aspects of Universal Health Coverage (UHC, as well as Global Action Plans for prevention and control of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs, and explained the special role of academic public health institutes in education, research and service provision in the two above-mentioned areas. Conclusion: To fulfill the requirements of SDGs, modern approaches to funding, education, teaching, research priority setting and advocacy, which in turn need novel strategies in collaboration and constructive partnerships among academic public health institutes from low, middle and high-income countries, are essential. Keywords: Sustainable development goals (SDGs, Academia, UHC, NCD

  11. Sustainable Health Development Becoming Agenda for Public Health Academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takian, Amirhossein; Akbari-Sari, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to transform our world, and each goal has specific targets to be achieved by 2030. For the goals to be achieved, everyone needs to do their part: governments, academia, the private sector and all people. This paper summarizes the main evidence-based recommendations made by excellent academics and scholars who discussed their experiences and views during the conference to respond to the challenges of sustainable health development. To contribute to exploring to the academia's role in reaching SDGs, the 1(st) International Conference on Sustainable Health Development was held at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, on 24-25 April 2016, in Tehran, Iran. In line with Goal 3 of SDGs: "ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages", the conference discussed various aspects of Universal Health Coverage (UHC), as well as Global Action Plans for prevention and control of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs), and explained the special role of academic public health institutes in education, research and service provision in the two above-mentioned areas. To fulfill the requirements of SDGs, modern approaches to funding, education, teaching, research priority setting and advocacy, which in turn need novel strategies in collaboration and constructive partnerships among academic public health institutes from low, middle and high-income countries, are essential.

  12. Sustainable Health Development Becoming Agenda for Public Health Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAKIAN, Amirhossein; AKBARI-SARI, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to transform our world, and each goal has specific targets to be achieved by 2030. For the goals to be achieved, everyone needs to do their part: governments, academia, the private sector and all people. This paper summarizes the main evidence-based recommendations made by excellent academics and scholars who discussed their experiences and views during the conference to respond to the challenges of sustainable health development. Methods: To contribute to exploring to the academia’s role in reaching SDGs, the 1st International Conference on Sustainable Health Development was held at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, on 24–25 April 2016, in Tehran, Iran. Results: In line with Goal 3 of SDGs: “ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages”, the conference discussed various aspects of Universal Health Coverage (UHC), as well as Global Action Plans for prevention and control of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs), and explained the special role of academic public health institutes in education, research and service provision in the two above-mentioned areas. Conclusion: To fulfill the requirements of SDGs, modern approaches to funding, education, teaching, research priority setting and advocacy, which in turn need novel strategies in collaboration and constructive partnerships among academic public health institutes from low, middle and high-income countries, are essential. PMID:28028502

  13. [Anomie and public mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parales-Quenza, Carlos J

    2008-01-01

    This article uses the concept of anomie for understanding public mental-health issues and constructing strategies aimed at promoting health and preventing disease. Studying anomie involves many definitions and approaches; this article conceptualises anomie as dérréglement or derangement and as a total social fact as its effects and consequences are pervasive across all areas of human experience. The article suggests the pertinence of the concept to public health based on several authors' observations depicting Latin-America as being a set of anomic societies and Colombia as the extreme case. Current definitions of mental health in positive terms (not just as being the absence of mental illness) validate the need for considering anomie as an indicator of public mental health. The article proposes that if anomie expresses itself through rules as basic social structure components, then such rules should also be considered as the point of intervention in promoting mental health.

  14. Building drought resilience in agriculture: Partnerships and public outreach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Brusberg

    2015-12-01

    By highlighting some of the successes achieved during the recent drought in California, this article will examine some of the current activities underway specifically designed to help the agricultural community. Gaps will be identified as well, as a plan to more efficiently provide information to decision makers and the public is presented. In particular, specific programs and agencies will be identified as potential leads to address where future resources should be focused, including implementation of a National Soil Moisture Monitoring Network.

  15. Fostering SMART partnerships to develop an effective continuum of behavioral health services and supports in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Eric J; Duong, Mylien T; Lyon, Aaron R; Pullmann, Michael D; Cook, Clayton R; Cheney, Douglas; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    The education sector offers compelling opportunities to address the shortcomings of traditional mental health delivery systems and to prevent and treat youth mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) problems. Recognizing that social and emotional wellness is intrinsically related to academic success, schools are moving to adopt multi-tier frameworks based on the public health model that provide a continuum of services to all children, including services to address both academic and MEB problems. In this article, we review the potential value of multi-tier frameworks in facilitating access to, and increasing the effectiveness of, mental health services in schools, and review the empirical support for school-based mental health interventions by tier. We go on to describe a community-academic partnership between the Seattle Public Schools and the University of Washington School Mental Health Assessment, Research, and Training (SMART) Center that exemplifies how multi-tier educational frameworks, research and evidence, and purposeful collaboration can combine to improve development and implementation of a range of school-based strategies focused on MEB needs of students. Finally, we present a set of 10 recommendations that may help guide other research and practice improvement efforts to address MEB problems in youth through effective school mental health programming. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Adapting online learning for Canada's Northern public health workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnie Bell

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Canada's North is a diverse, sparsely populated land, where inequalities and public health issues are evident, particularly for Aboriginal people. The Northern public health workforce is a unique mix of professional and paraprofessional workers. Few have formal public health education. From 2009 to 2012, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC collaborated with a Northern Advisory Group to develop and implement a strategy to strengthen public health capacity in Canada's 3 northern territories. Access to relevant, effective continuing education was identified as a key issue. Challenges include diverse educational and cultural backgrounds of public health workers, geographical isolation and variable technological infrastructure across the north. Methods . PHAC's Skills Online program offers Internet-based continuing education modules for public health professionals. In partnership with the Northern Advisory Group, PHAC conducted 3 pilots between 2008 and 2012 to assess the appropriateness of the Skills Online program for Northern/Aboriginal public health workers. Module content and delivery modalities were adapted for the pilots. Adaptations included adding Inuit and Northern public health examples and using video and teleconference discussions to augment the online self-study component. Results . Findings from the pilots were informative and similar to those from previous Skills Online pilots with learners in developing countries. Online learning is effective in bridging the geographical barriers in remote locations. Incorporating content on Northern and Aboriginal health issues facilitates engagement in learning. Employer support facilitates the recruitment and retention of learners in an online program. Facilitator assets included experience as a public health professional from the north, and flexibility to use modified approaches to support and measure knowledge acquisition and application, especially for First Nations, Inuit and

  17. Public-private collaborations and partnerships in stratified medicine: making sense of new interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chataway, Joanna; Fry, Caroline; Marjanovic, Sonja; Yaqub, Ohid

    2012-09-15

    The field of personalised or stratified medicine is evolving alongside the formation of a plethora of public/private partnerships and collaborations. These new institutional forms, or 'social technologies', are varied and emerge in response to several drivers, including the need to draw on a broader base of data inputs relating to genomics, patient behaviour and healthcare system differentiation. This paper discusses some of these drivers of partnerships and collaborations. Although the number of such partnerships is growing, their rationale and basis for collaboration remains unclear. Public-private collaborations are at the core of the set of new life sciences policies in the UK but there is little indication in the policy documents of clear boundaries for these partnerships. In part, this is due to the lack of empirical evidence at the system level for conceptualising what is still a relatively new approach. The collection of evidence in the form of broad evaluations, rather than tightly focused theoretical studies, is more likely to be related back to systems and be of more use for formulating policy rationales.

  18. Closing the (service) gap: exploring partnerships between Aboriginal and mainstream health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kate P; Thompson, Sandra C

    2011-08-01

    Although effective partnerships between Aboriginal and mainstream health services are critical to improve Aboriginal health outcomes, many factors can cause these partnerships to be tenuous and unproductive. Understanding the elements of best practice for successful partnerships is essential. A literature review was conducted in 2009 using keyword searches of electronic databases. Sourced literature was assessed for relevance regarding the benefits, challenges, lessons learnt and factors contributing to successful Aboriginal and mainstream partnerships. Key themes were collated. Although there is much literature regarding general partnerships generally, few specifically examine Aboriginal and mainstream health service partnerships. Twenty-four sources were reviewed in detail. Benefits include broadening service capacity and improving the cultural security of healthcare. Challenges include the legacy of Australia's colonial history, different approaches to servicing clients and resource limitations. Recommendations for success include workshopping tensions early, building trust and leadership. Although successful partnerships are crucial to optimise Aboriginal health outcomes, failed collaborations risk inflaming sensitive Aboriginal-non-Aboriginal relationships. Factors supporting successful partnerships remind us to develop genuine, trusting relationships that are tangibly linked to the Aboriginal community. Failure to invest in this relational process and push forward with 'business as usual' can ultimately have negative ramifications on client outcomes.

  19. Constraints, Challenges and Prospects of Public-Private Partnership ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    millennium development goals (MDGs) if it continues ... In theory this ... administered to 466 respondents (251 health workers and 215 community members), selected ... PPP refers to the establishment of on-going relationship ... to that the new PATHS-2 program has sensitized the Enugu State ..... More jobs in the private.

  20. Integrating information literacy into the education of public health professionals: roles for librarians and the library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobus, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The paper reviews the core competencies for public health professionals presented in the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) report, Who Will Keep the Public Healthy: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century; describes improving information literacy (IL) as a mechanism for integrating the core competencies in public health education; and showcases IL as an opportunity for solidifying partnerships between academic librarians and public health educators. Methods: The IOM competencies, along with explicit examples of library support from a literature review of current IL trends in the health sciences, are analyzed. Results: Librarians can play a fundamental role in implementing the IOM's core competencies in shaping public health education for the twenty-first century. A partnership between public health educators and librarians through a transdisciplinary approach is recommended. Conclusions: IL skills and competencies integrated into public health curricula through a collaborative partnership between public health educators and librarians can help integrate the IOM's core competencies and improve public health education. PMID:18219378

  1. Personalism for public health ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Petrini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In public health ethics, as in bioethics, utilitarian approaches usually prevail, followed by Kantian and communitarian foundations. If one considers the nature and core functions of public health, which are focused on a population perspective, utilitarianism seems still more applicable to public health ethics. Nevertheless, faulting additional protections towards the human person, utilitarianism doesn't offer appropriate solutions when conflicts among values do arise. Further criteria must be applied to protect the fundamental principles of respect for human life. Personalism offers similar advantages to utilitarianism but warrants more protection to the human person. We suggest a possible adaptation of personalism in the specific field of public health by means of four principles: absolute respect for life or principle of inviolability; subsidiarity and the "minimum" mandatory principle; solidarity; justice and non discrimination.

  2. Genomics, medicine and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Trbovich

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Public health genomics unifies the scientific disciplines of genetics and public health. Public health genomics aims to facilitate the transfer of newly acquired knowledge in genetic and molecular biology into classical medicine, to evaluate the currently available genetic tests, and to educate both the medical community and the general population about advancements in molecular and cell biology of medical interest. Due to various factors, the application of new genetic discoveries in classical medicine and the evaluation of the current genetic clinical tests occur at relatively slow paste. The challenge of public health genomics is to create the most effective modus for coexistence of new molecular and cell biology discoveries and classical medical techniques in applied medicine. The ultimate goal is to accomplish a truly individualized medical therapy.

  3. Public Health Genetics : Challenging "Public Health at the Crossroads"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brand

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Dear public health professionals, Honestly, isn’t it time to ask whether or not we are doing “the right things”in public health? Are our present public health strategies evidence-based? The public health agenda demands a vision that reaches beyond research to the application of public health and the determination of it’s impact. In this scenario what is the role of genomics? In the past twenty years, advances in genome research have revolutionised what is known about the role of inheritance in health and disease.[1]

    Nowadays,we know that our DNA determines not only the cause of single-gene disorders, but also determines our predisposition to common diseases.Whereas medicine is currently undergoing extraordinary developments from its morphological and phenotype orientation to a molecular and genotype orientation, promoting the importance of prognosis and prediction, public health practice has to date concerned itself with environmental determinants of health and disease and has paid scant attention to genetic variations within the population.

     The advances brought about by genomics is changing these perceptions.[2,3] Many predict, that this knowledge will enable health promotion messages and disease prevention programmes to be specifically directed at susceptible individuals or at subgroups of the population, based on their genetic profile.[4,5]

    The new technologies will allow researchers to examine genetic mutations at the functional genomic unit level, and to better understand the significance of environmental factors such as noxious agents, nutrition and personal behaviour in relation to the causation of diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, psychiatric disorders and infectious diseases.

  4. No Policy for Public Private Partnership? PPP, Collaboration and Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup Christensen, Lene; Greve, Carsten

    infrastructure projects and public service provision contracts in the transport sector within roads and busses, bridges and tunnels, rail, airports and aviation and harbors. The projects will be categorized in relation to organizational and financial models and it leads to a. discussion of types of policy...... choices across the sector and the reasons behind whether or not PPP was chosen. The final part of the paper presents an institutional historical account of the Danish case, and focuses on the more general question of how PPP policy planning evolves. There is no direct step from privatization...

  5. Building a Culture of Authentic Partnership: One Academic Health Center Model for Nursing Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Janie; Swartz, Colleen

    2017-09-01

    Senior nursing leaders from the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Nursing and UK HealthCare have explored the meaning of an authentic partnership. This article quantifies the tangible benefits and outcomes from this maturing academic nursing and clinical practice partnership. Benefits include inaugural academic nursing participation in health system governance, expanded integration of nursing research programs both in the college and in the health science center, and the development of collaborative strategies to address nursing workforce needs.

  6. Emerging metagovernance as an institutional framework for public private partnership networks in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Buser, Martine

    2006-01-01

    management perspectives, public services are viewed as a network of mixed players with a regulatory framework, a metagovernance. Examples of Danish PPP initiatives are given. The present metagovernance consists of a comparator, guidelines, feasibility studies and a central competence unit. New issues like......Implementing private public partnerships in Denmark has been a long and reluctant process. PPP developed among municipalities from the late nineties, but was halted because of a scandal in 2002. In 2004 the government launched an action plan, and PPP are emerging again. Drawing on new public...

  7. Emerging Metagovernance as an Institutional Framework for Public Private Partnership Network in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buser, Martine; Koch, Christian

    2006-01-01

    management perspectives, public services are viewed as a network of mixed players with a regulatory framework, a metagovernance. Examples of Danish PPP initiatives are given. The present metagovernance consists of a comparator, guidelines, feasibility studies and a central competence unit. New issues like......Implementing private public partnerships in Denmark has been a long and reluctant process. PPP developed among municipalities from the late nineties, but was halted because of a scandal in 2002. In 2004 the government launched an action plan, and PPP are emerging again. Drawing on new public...

  8. PROBLEMS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir B. Zotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Public-private partnership (PPP is a complex mechanism, which includes a variety of industry legislation, which together form a system of legislative regulation of relations at the interaction of private and public parties in the realization of long-term capital-intensive investment projects for the development of public infrastructure. The article describes the current state of PPP in the Russian Federation, the analysis of the main problems and needs integrated action (regulatory, institutional and investment to improve and develop this project.

  9. Exploring options to strengthen Canada’s Capacity for public-private partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Calvin Su Chi

    2007-01-01

    Canada’s public infrastructure is ageing and the cost of replacing this infrastructure run in the order of hundreds of billions of dollars. Public-private partnerships (P3s) are long-term partnering arrangements between the public and private sector for infrastructure delivery and provide one viable method for Canadian governments to address this challenge. This study explores options to strengthen Canada’s organizational capacity for P3s, so that it may optimize the use of this procurement m...

  10. Consideration of an applied model of public health program infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavinghouze, René; Snyder, Kimberly; Rieker, Patricia; Ottoson, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Systemic infrastructure is key to public health achievements. Individual public health program infrastructure feeds into this larger system. Although program infrastructure is rarely defined, it needs to be operationalized for effective implementation and evaluation. The Ecological Model of Infrastructure (EMI) is one approach to defining program infrastructure. The EMI consists of 5 core (Leadership, Partnerships, State Plans, Engaged Data, and Managed Resources) and 2 supporting (Strategic Understanding and Tactical Action) elements that are enveloped in a program's context. We conducted a literature search across public health programs to determine support for the EMI. Four of the core elements were consistently addressed, and the other EMI elements were intermittently addressed. The EMI provides an initial and partial model for understanding program infrastructure, but additional work is needed to identify evidence-based indicators of infrastructure elements that can be used to measure success and link infrastructure to public health outcomes, capacity, and sustainability.

  11. Insights in Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Michelle; Sentell, Tetine

    2017-01-01

    Chinese Americans constitute the largest percentage of Asian Americans. In Hawai‘i, Chinese Americans make up approximately 4.7% of the total state population. Accurately assessing health disparities across specific Asian American subgroups is critically important to health research and policy, as there is often substantial variability in risk and outcomes. However, even for Chinese Americans, the largest of the Asian American subgroups, such analyses can present challenges in population-based surveys. This article considers these challenges generally and then specifically in terms of the issue of health literacy and heart disease in Chinese Americans using existing population-based survey data sets in the United States, California, and Hawai‘i.

  12. The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Is It Everything We Feared for Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonté, Ronald; Schram, Ashley; Ruckert, Arne

    2016-04-17

    Negotiations surrounding the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade and investment agreement have recently concluded. Although trade and investment agreements, part of a broader shift to global economic integration, have been argued to be vital to improved economic growth, health, and general welfare, these agreements have increasingly come under scrutiny for their direct and indirect health impacts. We conducted a prospective health impact analysis to identify and assess a selected array of potential health risks of the TPP. We adapted the standard protocol for Health impact assessments (HIAs) (screening, scoping, and appraisal) to our aim of assessing potential health risks of trade and investment policy, and selected a health impact review methodology. This methodology is used to create a summary estimation of the most significant impacts on health of a broad policy or cluster of policies, such as a comprehensive trade and investment agreement. Our analysis shows that there are a number of potentially serious health risks associated with the TPP, and details a range of policy implications for the health sector. Of particular focus are the potential implications of changes to intellectual property rights (IPRs), sanitary and phytosanitary measures (SPS), technical barriers to trade (TBT), investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), and regulatory coherence provisions on a range of issues, including access to medicines and health services, tobacco and alcohol control, diet-related health, and domestic health policy-making. We provide a list of policy recommendations to mitigate potential health risks associated with the TPP, and suggest that broad public consultations, including on the health risks of trade and investment agreements, should be part of all trade negotiations.

  13. The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Is It Everything We Feared for Health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Labonté

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Negotiations surrounding the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP trade and investment agreement have recently concluded. Although trade and investment agreements, part of a broader shift to global economic integration, have been argued to be vital to improved economic growth, health, and general welfare, these agreements have increasingly come under scrutiny for their direct and indirect health impacts. Methods: We conducted a prospective health impact analysis to identify and assess a selected array of potential health risks of the TPP. We adapted the standard protocol for Health impact assessments (HIAs (screening, scoping, and appraisal to our aim of assessing potential health risks of trade and investment policy, and selected a health impact review methodology. This methodology is used to create a summary estimation of the most significant impacts on health of a broad policy or cluster of policies, such as a comprehensive trade and investment agreement. Results: Our analysis shows that there are a number of potentially serious health risks associated with the TPP, and details a range of policy implications for the health sector. Of particular focus are the potential implications of changes to intellectual property rights (IPRs, sanitary and phytosanitary measures (SPS, technical barriers to trade (TBT, investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS, and regulatory coherence provisions on a range of issues, including access to medicines and health services, tobacco and alcohol control, diet-related health, and domestic health policymaking. Conclusion: We provide a list of policy recommendations to mitigate potential health risks associated with the TPP, and suggest that broad public consultations, including on the health risks of trade and investment agreements, should be part of all trade negotiations.

  14. Ethical analysis in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Marc J; Reich, Michael R

    2002-03-23

    Public-health regularly encounters serious ethical dilemmas, such as rationing scarce resources, influencing individuals to change their behaviour, and limiting freedom to diminish disease transmission. Yet unlike medical ethics, there is no agreed-upon framework for analysing these difficulties. We offer such a framework. It distinguishes three philosophical views, often invoked in public-health discourse: positions based on outcomes (utilitarianism), positions focused on rights and opportunities (liberalism), and views that emphasise character and virtue (communitarianism). We explore critical variations within each approach, and identify practical problems that arise in addressing the ethical dimensions of health policy. We conclude by examining challenges posed by the feminist argument of ethics-of-care and by postmodern views about the nature of ethics. Health professionals need enhanced skills in applied philosophy to improve the coherence, transparency, and quality of public deliberations over ethical issues inherent in health policy.

  15. 75 FR 6033 - Public Meeting of the President's Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Public Meeting of the President's Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: A notice was published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010... Partnerships that was scheduled to be held on Tuesday, Feb. 9th, 2010. This meeting has been cancelled in...

  16. American Public Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infectious Diseases has a new Spanish language website! https://t.co… RT @CDCgov: Know when you need ... Together we can fight antibiotic resistance. Be #AntibioticSmart. https://t.… RT @AMJPublicHealth: Whiteness of the #opioidepidemic is ...

  17. Poison Center Data for Public Health Surveillance: Poison Center and Public Health Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Royal K.; Schier, Josh; Schauben, Jay; Wheeler, Katherine; Mulay, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the use of poison center data for public health surveillance from the poison center, local, state, and federal public health perspectives and to generate meaningful discussion on how to address the challenges to collaboration. Introduction Since 2008, poisoning has become the leading cause of injury-related death in the United States (US); since 1980, the poisoning-related fatality rate in the US has almost tripled.1 Many poison-related injuries and deaths are reported to regional poison centers (PCs) which receive about 2.4 million reports of human chemical and poison exposures annually.2 Federal, state, and local public health (PH) agencies often collaborate with poison centers and use PC data for public health surveillance of poisoning-related health issues. Many state and local PH agencies have partnerships with regional PCs for direct access to local PC data which help them perform this function. At the national level, CDC conducts public health surveillance for exposures and illnesses of public health significance using the National Poison Data System (NPDS), the national PC reporting database. Though most PC and PH officials agree that PC data play an important role in PH practice and surveillance, collaboration between PH agencies and PCs has been hindered by numerous challenges. To address these challenges and bolster collaboration, the Poison Center and Public Health Collaborations Community of Practice (CoP) was created in 2010 by CDC as a means to share experiences, identify best practices, and facilitate relationships among federal, state and local public health agencies and PCs. To date, the Poison Center and Public Health Collaborations CoP includes over 200 members from state and local public health, regional PCs, CDC, the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A leadership team was created with representatives of the many stakeholders of the community to drive its

  18. A GERMAN EXAMPLE FOR A PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN TRANSPORT RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred BOLTZE

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1998, a new partnership for transport research was founded in Germany's central region Frankfurt RheinMain by major transport authorities and operators, involving partners from industry and consultancy, and supported by the Hessen State Government. This ZIV is an institute at Darmstadt University of Technology, and improves the exchange between research and practice. The article provides organisational details of this public private partnership. The ZIV working areas cover Transport Infrastructure and Traffic Management, Traffic Engineering and Traffic Control, Public Transport, Organisational Concepts for Traffic Management and Mobility Services, Railway Systems and Railway Engineering, and Navigation and Positioning Systems. For each of these areas, basic intentions in research and some project examples are presented. This may also allow some view on the current status of transport research in Germany.

  19. Private–Public Partnership as a Tool to Promote Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Development: WWP Torrearte Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio De Los Ríos-Carmenado

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the ability of both private–public partnerships and entrepreneurship to promote sustainable rural development. This research outlines the historical chronology and the importance of the PPP (Private Public Partnership for rural entrepreneurship; the complexity of PPP management dimensions is also analyzed. In addition, this research is based on an empiric study of a PPP for entrepreneurship in sustainable development in the North Highland of Madrid’s community, with more than 20 years of experience. This PPP is managed according to the Working With People (WWP model, which is for the management of complex projects in the sustainable rural development field, and aims to promote the development of competences amongst the parties involved. The results show the positive effects in terms of entrepreneurship’s competences for sustainable rural development and the parties involved who create the PPP management model for entrepreneurship and the Torrearte Project.

  20. Beginning a Partnership with PhotoVoice to Explore Environmental Health and Health Inequities in Minority Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Butsch Kovacic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Research informs action, but the challenge is its translation into practice. The 2012–2017 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Strategic Plan emphasizes partnership with community stakeholders to capture critical missing information about the effects of environment on health and to improve translation of study results, a daunting task for many traditionally-trained researchers. To better understand economic and neighborhood context consistent with these goals as well as existing inequities, we needed access to a highly affected community to inform and participate in our research. Our team therefore undertook a PhotoVoice project as a first step in establishing a participatory partnership and to appreciate the lived experiences of and build trust with youth visiting an urban community center in a high-risk, low-income, African American neighborhood located along a busy, polluted interstate. Ten 8–13 years-olds represented their community’s perspectives through photographs over 14-weeks using structured questioning. Five themes emerged: poor eating habits/inadequate nutrition; safety/violence; family/friends/community support; future hopes/dreams; and garbage/environment. Public viewings of the photos/captions facilitated engagement of other community agencies and multidisciplinary academic faculties to work together to build a sustainable “community collaboratory” that will promote health at the center by providing families knowledge/skills to prevent/minimize environmental exposures via diet/lifestyle changes using community-engaged, citizen scientist and systems thinking approaches.

  1. Beginning a partnership with PhotoVoice to explore environmental health and health inequities in minority communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Stigler, Sara; Smith, Angela; Kidd, Alexis; Vaughn, Lisa M

    2014-10-27

    Research informs action, but the challenge is its translation into practice. The 2012-2017 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Strategic Plan emphasizes partnership with community stakeholders to capture critical missing information about the effects of environment on health and to improve translation of study results, a daunting task for many traditionally-trained researchers. To better understand economic and neighborhood context consistent with these goals as well as existing inequities, we needed access to a highly affected community to inform and participate in our research. Our team therefore undertook a PhotoVoice project as a first step in establishing a participatory partnership and to appreciate the lived experiences of and build trust with youth visiting an urban community center in a high-risk, low-income, African American neighborhood located along a busy, polluted interstate. Ten 8-13 years-olds represented their community's perspectives through photographs over 14-weeks using structured questioning. Five themes emerged: poor eating habits/inadequate nutrition; safety/violence; family/friends/community support; future hopes/dreams; and garbage/environment. Public viewings of the photos/captions facilitated engagement of other community agencies and multidisciplinary academic faculties to work together to build a sustainable "community collaboratory" that will promote health at the center by providing families knowledge/skills to prevent/minimize environmental exposures via diet/lifestyle changes using community-engaged, citizen scientist and systems thinking approaches.

  2. An evaluation of the benefits to a UK Health Care Trust working in a partnership with a hospital in Northern Uganda: International partnership working in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, Ben; Sills, Jenny; Thompson, Andrew R

    2015-12-22

    Despite the worthy intentions of international health partnerships between high-income countries and countries with developing economies, the tangible benefits are rarely evaluated, limiting the assessment of the achievements of such collaborations. The present study used longitudinal qualitative methods to examine the individual and organisational benefits of a partnership between a National Health Service (NHS) mental health Trust in the United Kingdom and a mental health referral hospital in Northern Uganda. Benefits to UK staff and organisational development were benchmarked against an existing framework of healthcare competencies. Partnership involvement was beneficial to UK staff, by increasing awareness of diversity, and in enhancing ability to work flexibly and as a team. There were clear benefits expressed with regards to the partnership having the potential to enhance organisational reputation and staff morale. The findings from this study demonstrate that international partnerships are experienced as being of tangible value for healthcare staff from high-income countries, providing opportunities for the development of recognised healthcare competencies. In this study there was also some evidence that staff involvement might also provide wider organisational benefits.

  3. Application of Public-Private Partnership in Land Degradation Control and A Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The paper reviewed the background of public-private partnership (PPP) development, described PPP concept, characteristics and basic models, and analyzed the necessity and feasibility to develop land degradation control PPP. Then the experiences that Elion Resources Group in Inner Mongolia has accumulated in Kubuqi Desert control and development as well as the revelations were summarized with the hope to provide reference for establishing land degradation control PPP in arid area of western region.

  4. Public-private Partnerships in Micro-finance: Should NGO Involvement be Restricted?

    OpenAIRE

    Roy Chowdhury, Prabal; Roy, Jaideep

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines public-private partnerships in micro-finance, whereby NGOs can help in channelizing credit to the poor, both in borrower selection, as well as in project implementation. We argue that a distortion may arise out of the fact that the private partner, i.e. the NGO, is a motivated agent. We find that whenever the project is neither too productive, nor too unproductive, reducing such distortion requires unbundling borrower selection and project implementati...

  5. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN SOCIOECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE MUSEUMS: UNUSED MODERNIZATION RESOURCE

    OpenAIRE

    N. V. Polyanskova; E. A. Ukhtverova

    2015-01-01

    Summary. Public-private partnership practically in all developed and developing countries of the world is recognized as the effective mechanism of social and economic tasks realization of society and state. The most popular use of the economic cooperation tools between business and government in areas such as the creation and modernization of infrastructure, transport infrastructure, road construction, municipal services (housing and communal services), the military-industrial complex, less s...

  6. THE SYNERGISTIC AND MULTIPLICATIVE EFFECTS OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN THE LIVELIHOODS OF CITIZENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Yakovlev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the formation of the forms and methods of public-private partnerships in the major subsystems of life and livelihood of citizens of the Russian Federation on the basis of the organization of production and social infrastructure - housing, social security and pension. Analyzes the uses of multipliers in the formation of synergistic and multiplicative eff ects in the development of production and the economy.

  7. Public-private Partnerships in Micro-finance: Should NGO Involvement be Restricted?

    OpenAIRE

    Roy Chowdhury, Prabal; Roy, Jaideep

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines public-private partnerships in micro-finance, whereby NGOs can help in channelizing credit to the poor, both in borrower selection, as well as in project implementation. We argue that a distortion may arise out of the fact that the private partner, i.e. the NGO, is a motivated agent. We find that whenever the project is neither too productive, nor too unproductive, reducing such distortion requires unbundling borrower selection and project implementati...

  8. Further process of public-private partnership implementation: EU, Serbia and neighboring countries

    OpenAIRE

    Knežević, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the progress some European countries, particularly Serbia and its neighbors, have made in overcoming obstacles for foreign investments and wider application of public-private partnership, such as: inadequate legal framework, underdeveloped market relations reflected in insufficient competitiveness of domestic suppliers, the lack of financial resources and funds, and limited institutional capacities for reforms, strategic planning, and marketing accompanied by a negative im...

  9. Knowledge sharing in public-private partnerships in life science: An open science perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Jiménez, Óscar David; Aibar Puentes, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Resultados preliminares sobre la adopción de prácticas de ciencia abierta en partenariados público-privados en Ciencias de la Vida. Resultats preliminars sobre l'adopció de pràctiques de ciència oberta a partenariats publico-privats en Ciències de la Vida. Preliminary results on the adoption of open science practices in public-private partnerships in Life Sciences.

  10. Public Private Partnership in Hydro-Power Development of India: Prospects and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Amir

    2015-01-01

    India has experienced a sharp increase in energy demand as a result of economic growth and rising per capita energy consumption. The Government of India is focusing on Hydro-power as one of the sources of renewable energy due to con-cern for climate change and fast depleting coal/oilfields. But, its development has not been commensurate due to shortage of financial resources, lack of power infrastructure, and modern technologies. The successful completion of Public Private Partnership (PPP) p...

  11. Stakeholders' perception of key performance indicators (KPIs) of public-private partnership (PPP) projects

    OpenAIRE

    Olabode Emmanuel Ogunsanmi

    2013-01-01

    The study investigates key performance indicators (KPIs) that could improve performance of public-private partnership (PPP) projects in Nigeria. The study objectives include a comparison of stakeholders’ perception on KPIs and to investigate if significant difference exists between stakeholders’ perceptions on most KPIs. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information from various respondents who were recently involved in PPP projects. Random sampling technique was used to select f...

  12. Do health partnerships with organisations in lower income countries benefit the UK partner? A review of the literature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Felicity Ae; Knights, Daniel Ph; Sinclair, Vita Fe; Baraitser, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Health partnerships between institutions in the UK and Low or Lower- middle Income Countries are an increasingly important model of development, yet analysis of partnerships has focused on benefits...

  13. Evolutionary Aspects for Technology Policy: the Case of Galileo Public-Private Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervos, Vasilis

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of strategic interactions on Private-Public Partnerships (PPPs) in space. Though there is substantial business and economics literature on PPPs, it is traditionally focused on the relationships within the partnerships (low level) and the respective factors affecting its success. The contribution of this paper is that it examines the political economy of PPPs, analysing how `high-level' strategic interactions across public-private sectors in Europe and the US determine their behaviour and success. Within this context, the European case of Galileo and other national space projects, such as the US plans for a space-based anti- missile defence, are each based on different types of PPPs, confined within the geographical borders of the two areas. The security and commercial benefits of such programmes for the respective space industries and economies have a direct impact on the other area's industry and sense of security. The paper shows that trans- Atlantic cooperation at public policy level is essential to allow the respective industries to explore the benefits of cross-border strategic research partnerships (SRPs). This will reduce the costs of the respective programmes, addressing security concerns.

  14. Health education and public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Service, A

    1986-01-01

    The UK's Minister for Health has again raised the debate about the role of health educators, and in particular that of the Health Education Council, in what is termed public policy work. 1 possible definition of public policy work as regards health education is that aspect that seeks to establish certain health promoting principles as part of the conscious factors always to be considered by individuals, by opinion leaders, by manufacturers, by employers and trade unions, by service providers, by local authorities, and by central government in their plans and decisions. The Health Education Council (HEC) has no power to make or impose public policy; the Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) has that task. The world of health education providers includes the Health Education Officers working for the Health Authorities and with the Education Authorities, an increasing number of important academic workers in the field, the HEC, the Scottish Health Education Group (SHEG), the DHSS, and some of the members of various professions who provide health education to the public as part of their daily work. Most of the HEC's work consists of providing these people with health educational tools. If the HEC begins to do more in the public policy field, it will not be at the cost of providing health educational tools. At the HEC a staff of 4 liaison workers is responsible for keeping field workers informed about future and imminent HEC work programs. They also assess needs and ideas by holding periodic meetings with Health Education Officers and others in various parts of the country. HEC's efforts have contributed substantially to increasing attention to preventive health measures on the part of the DHSS, parliamentary committees, the Royal Colleges, other professional bodies, and the media. In regard to the future, several paths deserve exploration as part of the HEC's education of decision-makers and opinion-formers. These include: local authorities, relevant

  15. Periodontal health and global public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul E; Baehni, Pierre C

    2012-01-01

    Chronic diseases are a growing burden to people, to health-care systems and to societies across the world. The rapid increase in the burden of chronic diseases is particularly prevalent in the developing countries. Periodontal disease is one of the two most important oral diseases contributing...... to the global burden of chronic disease. In addition to social determinants, periodontal health status is related to several proximal factors. Modifiable risk factors, such as tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, poor diet and nutrition, obesity, psychological stress and insufficient personal....../oral hygiene, are important and these principal risk factors for periodontal disease are shared by other chronic diseases. The present monograph is devoted to the existing evidence on the practice of public health related to periodontal health. Public health is defined as the process of mobilizing and engaging...

  16. PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP OFFERS NO MAGIC SOLUTIONS, BUT A METHOD FOR RESOLVING COMMUNITY NEEDS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pana Elena Cristina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Public-private partnership (PPP is considered an important tool in financing public sector investments, its purpose being to provide more capital to invest in the most efficient manner. PPPs development has become more important as the economic and financial crisis has challenged the ability of the public bugets to raise adequate financial means and to allocate resources to specific projects. Local governments agree with the participation in realization of PPPs, which leads to increased efficiency, a shorter implementation and a value of the provision of services as large as possible. The advantages of implementing concern: appropriate sharing of risks and responsibilities; mainly public sector retains sovereign powers and the private sector has tasks requiring the implementation; private investment lifecycle as decisive elements of the forms of stimulation of PPP is long; it provides a long-term contractual relationship and offers innovation, in particular by specification of results, level of service and payment mechanisms . In the Member States of the European Union, the adoption of public-private partnership was made differently from one sector to another and from one country to another. At this point one can distinguish three types, namely: " Advanced PPP adopters" with very important projects in the transport sector (road, rail and in the construction of public buildings and equipment (schools, hospitals, prisons but also in the environment sector( water / waste treatment, waste management ; "Medium PPP adopters ", with projects completed or under execution and excellent results in the transport sector; " PPP adopters at a low level ", where PPP is lacking in all sectors and is in a preliminary stage of adoption. Great Britain, Spain and Romania are three countries and at the same time three levels of adopting, corresponding to the three types of PPP adopters. Although the partnership is thought as one which must bring benefits to both

  17. How PEPFAR's public-private partnerships achieved ambitious goals, from improving labs to strengthening supply chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, Jeffrey L; Cohen, Gary M

    2012-07-01

    The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), established in 2003, is widely recognized as one of the most ambitious and successful bilateral programs ever implemented to address a single disease. Part of the program's success is attributable to the participation of the private sector, working in partnership with the US and local governments and implementing organizations to maximize the reach and effectiveness of every dollar spent. We examined key public-private partnerships that grew out of PEPFAR to identify features that have made them effective. For example, PEPFAR's Supply Chain Management System took advantage of private industry's best practices in logistics, and a partnership with the medical technology company BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) improved laboratory systems throughout sub-Saharan Africa. We found that setting ambitious goals, enlisting both global and local partners, cultivating a culture of collaboration, careful planning, continuous monitoring and evaluation, and measuring outcomes systematically led to the most effective programs. The Office of the US Global AIDS Coordinator and PEPFAR should continue to strengthen their capacity for private-sector partnerships, learning from a decade of experience and identifying new ways to make smart investments that will make the most efficient use of taxpayer resources, expand proven interventions more rapidly, and help ensure the sustainability of key programs.

  18. Citizen Science for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Broeder, Lea; Devilee, Jeroen; Van Oers, Hans; Schuit, A Jantine; Wagemakers, Annemarie

    2016-12-23

    Community engagement in public health policy is easier said than done. One reason is that public health policy is produced in a complex process resulting in policies that may appear not to link up to citizen perspectives. We therefore address the central question as to whether citizen engagement in knowledge production could enable inclusive health policy making. Building on non-health work fields, we describe different types of citizen engagement in scientific research, or 'Citizen Science'. We describe the challenges that Citizen Science poses for public health, and how these could be addressed. Despite these challenges, we expect that Citizen Science or similar approaches such as participatory action research and 'popular epidemiology' may yield better knowledge, empowered communities, and improved community health. We provide a draft framework to enable evaluation of Citizen Science in practice, consisting of a descriptive typology of different kinds of Citizen Science and a causal framework that shows how Citizen Science in public health might benefit both the knowledge produced as well as the 'Citizen Scientists' as active participants.

  19. Population targeting amid complex mental health programming: Are California's Full Service Partnerships reaching underserved children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Katharan D; Snowden, Lonnie R

    2017-01-01

    California's Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) created Full Service Partnership programs (FSPs) targeting socially and economically vulnerable children with mental illness who are underserved by counties' public mental health treatment system. To determine whether FSPs reach a distinctive group of children, this study compares indicators of FSP-targeted underservice for FSP entrants (n = 15,598) versus everyone treated in the counties' public mental health systems (n = 282,178) and for FSP entrants versus entrants in the most intensive Medicaid delivered program in California, Therapeutic Behavioral Services (TBS, n = 11,993). Results identify that, despite first encountering mental health services systems at earlier ages, FSP clients had fewer months of treatment and were less likely to have been treated in the prior 6 months, except for crisis care, as compared to all other children served, after considering clinical severity and indicators of service need. FSP entrants also had more substance abuse and trauma-related problems. Although less seriously ill than TBS served children, FSP served children were significantly underserved. The results indicate that, amid overlapping policies and programs, carving out and reaching a distinctly underserved population can be achieved in practice, and that specialized programs, such as the FSP program, which target underserved children, have the potential to augment a system's ability to reach the underserved. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Community-based senior health promotion program using a collaborative practice model: the Escalante Health Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Diane E; Armbruster, Charlotte; Phillips, Wayne T; Gale, Betty J

    2003-01-01

    Recent research demonstrates that, although the risk of disease and disability clearly increases with age, poor health need not be an inevitable consequence of aging. A healthy lifestyle is more influential than genetic factors in assisting older adults avoid the decline and deterioration traditionally associated with aging. Many effective strategies for reducing disease and disability are widely underused. The Escalante Health Partnerships is a community-based, nurse-managed health promotion and chronic disease care management program for community-residing older adults. The program base supports a multidisciplinary, collaborative practice model, which has responded to the health needs of members of a community at high risk of having or developing chronic conditions. Preliminary comparisons of the health status of program participants with national norms demonstrate that these seniors report better general health, performance of roles, and social functioning, with the strongest correlations occurring between general health and vitality and between general health and role-physical. In addition, these participants have 4.2 doctor visits per year, in comparison with 7.1 office visits for a national comparison group and 1.6 hospital days per year, in comparison with 2.1 hospital days in the same referenced population. This collaborative partnership is a model that can be replicated cost-effectively in other communities.

  1. Open NASA Earth Exchange (OpenNEX): A Public-Private Partnership for Climate Change Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemani, R. R.; Lee, T. J.; Michaelis, A.; Ganguly, S.; Votava, P.

    2014-12-01

    NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a data, computing and knowledge collaborative that houses satellite, climate and ancillary data where a community of researchers can come together to share modeling and analysis codes, scientific results, knowledge and expertise on a centralized platform with access to large supercomputing resources. As a part of broadening the community beyond NASA-funded researchers, NASA through an agreement with Amazon Inc. made available to the public a large collection of Climate and Earth Sciences satellite data. The data, available through the Open NASA Earth Exchange (OpenNEX) platform hosted by Amazon Web Services (AWS) public cloud, consists of large amounts of global land surface imaging, vegetation conditions, climate observations and climate projections. In addition to the data, users of OpenNEX platform can also watch lectures from leading experts, learn basic access and use of the available data sets. In order to advance White House initiatives such as Open Data, Big Data and Climate Data and the Climate Action Plan, NASA over the past six months conducted the OpenNEX Challenge. The two-part challenge was designed to engage the public in creating innovative ways to use NASA data and address climate change impacts on economic growth, health and livelihood. Our intention was that the challenges allow citizen scientists to realize the value of NASA data assets and offers NASA new ideas on how to share and use that data. The first "ideation" challenge, closed on July 31st attracted over 450 participants consisting of climate scientists, hobbyists, citizen scientists, IT experts and App developers. Winning ideas from the first challenge will be incorporated into the second "builder" challenge currently targeted to launch mid-August and close by mid-November. The winner(s) will be formally announced at AGU in December of 2014. We will share our experiences and lessons learned over the past year from OpenNEX, a public-private partnership for

  2. Building partnerships towards strengthening Makerere University College of Health Sciences: a stakeholder and sustainability analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pariyo George W

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partnerships and networking are important for an institution of higher learning like Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS to be competitive and sustainable. Methods A stakeholder and sustainability analysis of 25 key informant interviews was conducted among past, current and potential stakeholders of MakCHS to obtain their perspectives and contributions to sustainability of the College in its role to improve health outcomes. Results The College has multiple internal and external stakeholders. Stakeholders from Uganda wanted the College to use its enormous academic capacity to fulfil its vision, take initiative, and be innovative in conducting more research and training relevant to the country’s health needs. Many stakeholders felt that the initiative for collaboration currently came more from the stakeholders than the College. External stakeholders felt that MakCHS was insufficiently marketing itself and not directly engaging the private sector or Parliament. Stakeholders also identified the opportunity for MakCHS to embrace information technology in research, learning and training, and many also wanted MakCHS to start leadership and management training programmes in health systems. The need for MakCHS to be more vigorous in training to enhance professionalism and ethical conduct was also identified. Discussion As a constituent of a public university, MakCHS has relied on public funding, which has been inadequate to fulfill its mission. Broader networking, marketing to mobilize resources, and providing strong leadership and management support to inspire confidence among its current and potential stakeholders will be essential to MakCHS’ further growth. MakCHS’ relevance is hinged on generating research knowledge for solving the country’s contemporary health problems and starting relevant programs and embracing technologies. It should share new knowledge widely through publications and other forms of

  3. Chiropractic care and public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Claire; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Côté, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    through the lifespan, and effective participation in community health issues. The questions that are addressed include: Is spinal manipulative therapy for neck and low-back pain a public health problem? What is the role of chiropractic care in prevention or reduction of musculoskeletal injuries...... in children? What ways can doctors of chiropractic stay updated on evidence-based information about vaccines and immunization throughout the lifespan? Can smoking cessation be a prevention strategy for back pain? Does chiropractic have relevance within the VA Health Care System for chronic pain and comorbid...... of prevention and public health? What role do citizen-doctors of chiropractic have in organizing community action on health-related matters? How can our future chiropractic graduates become socially responsible agents of change?...

  4. Service learning education and practice partnerships in maternal-infant health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebeke, Roberta; McCullough, Julie; Cagle, Lesa; St Clair, Julie

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article examines the concept of service learning in nursing practice and education. The benefits of education and practice partnerships for the community partners and organizations, students, nursing staff, the health care system, and academic institutions are described. Examples of innovative service learning projects with undergraduate nursing students that impact maternal-infant health are presented. A successful interdisciplinary campus and community partnership service learning project with students in a community nutrition course is highlighted.

  5. Health Reforms and Public Health in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raminashvili, D.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Starting from 90‘th, the Government of Georgia (GoG made several attempts to transform Georgian health care system into one with improved efficiency, accessibility, and quality services. Mandatory social health insurance which was introduced in the 1990s was abolished and private health insurance has been promoted as its replacement. The main principle of health care reform since 2006 was the transition towards complete marketization of the health care sector: private provision, private purchasing, liberal regulation, and minimum supervision.This paper aims to analyze an impact of ongoing reforms on public health and population health status.MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was conducted through national and international organization reports; key informant interviews were conducted with major stakeholders. RESULTS: The country has attained critical achievements in relation to improved maternal and child health, national responses to HIV, TB and Malaria. Life expectancy has increased from 70.3 years in 1995 to 75.1 years in 2010. Under-5 mortality indicator has improved from 45.3 to 16.4 per 1000 live birth in 2005-2010 meaning a 64% decrease. However, Georgia is still facing a number of critical challenges securing better health for the population. Cardiovascular diseases are by far the largest cause of mortality, respiratory diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and have doubled during last decade. Georgia has one of the highest rates of male smoking in the world (over 50%.CONCLUSION: Governmental efforts in health promotion and disease prevention can have significant impact on health status by preventing chronic diseases and detecting health problems at a treatable stage. Government should consider increasing funding for public health and prevention programmes with the focus on prevention of the main risk factors affecting the population’s health: tobacco and drug use and unsafe

  6. Insights in Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Lehua B; Smith, Heidi Hansen; Espiritu, Justine; Higa, Earl; Lee, Thomas; Maddock, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In 2011, a small pilot bike share program was established in the town core of Kailua, Hawai‘i, with funding from the Hawai‘i State Department of Health. The Kailua system consisted of two stations with 12 bicycles, and the goal was to secure additional funding to expand the station network in the future. Community feedback consistently indicated support for the bike share program. However, system metrics showed low levels of usage, averaging 41.5 rides per month (2011–2014). From observational data, users were primarily tourists. With minimal local staff, the bike share program had limited resources for promotion and education, which may have hindered potential use by local residents. Management of station operations and bike maintenance were additional, ongoing barriers to success. Despite the challenges, the pilot bike share program was valuable in several ways. It introduced the bike share concept to Hawai‘i, thereby helping to build awareness and connect an initial network of stakeholders. Furthermore, the pilot bike share program informed the development of a larger bike share program for urban Honolulu. As limited information exists in the literature about the experiences of smaller bike share programs and their unique considerations, this article shares lessons learned for other communities interested in starting similar bike share programs. PMID:26535166

  7. Causal inference in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Thomas A; Goodman, Steven N; Hernán, Miguel A; Samet, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Causal inference has a central role in public health; the determination that an association is causal indicates the possibility for intervention. We review and comment on the long-used guidelines for interpreting evidence as supporting a causal association and contrast them with the potential outcomes framework that encourages thinking in terms of causes that are interventions. We argue that in public health this framework is more suitable, providing an estimate of an action's consequences rather than the less precise notion of a risk factor's causal effect. A variety of modern statistical methods adopt this approach. When an intervention cannot be specified, causal relations can still exist, but how to intervene to change the outcome will be unclear. In application, the often-complex structure of causal processes needs to be acknowledged and appropriate data collected to study them. These newer approaches need to be brought to bear on the increasingly complex public health challenges of our globalized world.

  8. Informatics enables public health surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. N McNabb

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the world has radically changed. New advances in information and communication technologies (ICT connect the world in ways never imagined. Public health informatics (PHI leveraged for public health surveillance (PHS, can enable, enhance, and empower essential PHS functions (i.e., detection, reporting, confirmation, analyses, feedback, response. However, the tail doesn't wag the dog; as such, ICT cannot (should not drive public health surveillance strengthening. Rather, ICT can serve PHS to more effectively empower core functions. In this review, we explore promising ICT trends for prevention, detection, and response, laboratory reporting, push notification, analytics, predictive surveillance, and using new data sources, while recognizing that it is the people, politics, and policies that most challenge progress for implementation of solutions.

  9. Collaboration, Competencies and the Classroom: A Public Health Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E. Wallar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The University of Guelph Master of Public Health program is a professional degree program that seeks to prepare graduates to meet complex public health needs by developing their proficiency in the 36 public health core competencies. Provision of experiential learning opportunities, such as a semester-long practicum, is part of student development. In the Fall 2013 semester, a new opportunity was introduced in which small groups of students were paired with local public health professionals to complete a capstone business plan assignment that addressed a current public health issue. However, the impact of this external collaboration on the student learning experience was unknown. To address this, quantitative and qualitative information about students’ perceived proficiency in the core competencies and their learning experiences was collected using a pre/post survey and focus groups, respectively. A post-assignment survey was also administered to participating local public health professionals in which they assessed their group’s proficiency in the core competencies, and provided additional feedback. The results of this study showed that students had unique learning experiences with enhanced proficiency in different areas including policy and program planning, implementation and evaluation, assessment and analysis, and partnerships, collaboration and advocacy. Managing and communicating expectations was important throughout the learning experience. By using realistic community-based assignments, graduate public health programs can enrich students’ learning experiences by creating an environment for students to apply their classroom knowledge and gain practical knowledge and skills.

  10. Organizational attributes that assure optimal utilization of public health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher-Stewart, Donna; Underwood, Jane; MacDonald, Mary; Schoenfeld, Bonnie; Blythe, Jennifer; Knibbs, Kristin; Munroe, Val; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ehrlich, Anne; Ganann, Rebecca; Crea, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Optimal utilization of public health nurses (PHNs) is important for strengthening public health capacity and sustaining interest in public health nursing in the face of a global nursing shortage. To gain an insight into the organizational attributes that support PHNs to work effectively, 23 focus groups were held with PHNs, managers, and policymakers in diverse regions and urban and rural/remote settings across Canada. Participants identified attributes at all levels of the public health system: government and system-level action, local organizational culture of their employers, and supportive management practices. Effective leadership emerged as a strong message throughout all levels. Other organizational attributes included valuing and promoting public health nursing; having a shared vision, goals, and planning; building partnerships and collaboration; demonstrating flexibility and creativity; and supporting ongoing learning and knowledge sharing. The results of this study highlight opportunities for fostering organizational development and leadership in public health, influencing policies and programs to optimize public health nursing services and resources, and supporting PHNs to realize the full scope of their competencies.

  11. US - India Partnership in Science and Technology, Environment and Health: Opportunities and Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Satish V [Georgetown University

    2010-10-06

    Today, the US – India strategic partnership is rooted in shared values and is broad in nature and scope, with our two countries working together on global and energy security, climate change and clean environment, life sciences and public health, economic prosperity and trade, and education. A key outcome of this partnership has been the signing of the historic Indo-US Civil Nuclear Deal. Science and technology (S&T) have always been important elements of this partnership, and US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Indian S&T Minister Kapil Sibal signed an agreement on S&T Cooperation between the two countries in October 2005. In March 2006, recognizing the expanding role of S&T, President George Bush and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh formed a Bi-National S&T Commission and established a Joint S&T Endowment Fund focused on innovation, entrepreneurship and commercialization. In July 2009, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Indian Foreign Minister Krishna signed the Endowment Agreement with a total equivalent funding of $30M (equal contribution from US and India). While these steps take our engagement to new heights, US-India collaboration in S&T is not new and has been ongoing for several decades, principally through agencies like NSF, NIH, EPA, DOE, NASA, NOAA, the PL480 US-India Fund, and the Indian Diaspora. However, acting as a damper, especially during the cold war days, this engagement has been plagued by sanctions and the resulting tensions and mistrust which continue to linger on even today. In this context, several ongoing activities in energy, space, climate change and education will be highlighted. Also, with the S&T and the Civil Nuclear Agreements and climate change as examples, the interplay of science, policy and politics will be discussed.

  12. Examining the Interrelationship among Critical Success Factors of Public Private Partnership Infrastructure Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiying Shi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Examining the interrelationships among critical success factors (CSFs for public private partnership (PPP projects is of importance for improving PPP project performance and maintaining the sustainability of PPP project implementation. Previous studies mostly focused on the identification of the CSFs for PPP projects; limited studies investigated the interrelationships among CSFs. Hence, the research objectives are (a to determine the interrelationships among CSFs of PPP projects taking into account the public and (b to identify influence paths contributing to take advantage of CSFs in the process of PPP implementation. A literature review and expert interviews were adopted to construct the CSFs framework; nine hypotheses were constructed and tested by the structural equation modelling (SEM based on the data collected from a questionnaire survey. This research reveals that the relationship between public and private partners is the leader-follower relationship, not the partnership relationship, in PPP projects, indicating that the responsibilities, power or resources existing among partners are very unequal. It also highlights that public involvement has a negative effect on the process of service provisions, and costs and risks exist in the process of public involvement in PPP projects. The determined interrelationships among CSFs will contribute to the sustainability and success of a PPP project.

  13. [Public health education in Austria. An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diem, Günter; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2014-04-01

    The future challenges for the Austrian health care system require an increasing number of public health experts of different professions in all fields of public health. In this article the offer of public health education in Austrian universities and universities for applied sciences was searched based on the predominantly online available information on web platforms of the schools. Currently (2013), there are three postgraduate public health university courses and two public health doctoral programs in Austria. Additionally, 34 degree programmes could be identified, in which parts of public health are covered. But also in medical curricula at Austrian medical schools, public health contents have found their place. In Austria, there is already a multifaceted offer for public health education. However, to build an appropriate public health work force, capable to manage the public health challenges in all its dimensions in terms of health in all policies, this offer should still be intensified.

  14. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. THE CASE OF ROMANIA. CONCEPT AND MANAGEMENT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisetchi Mihai

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The public administration has a major role in partnerships establishing and operating with different community actors aiming at solving specific community problems. In the process of identifying and solving the community problems the actions of the non-governmental organisations are considered as "alternatives" to the solutions of the public administration. The advantages of an on-going collaboration between non-governmental organisations, as relevant agents in the social economy, and the public authorities aiming at solving the community problems were identified and aknowledged by both sides representatives. The access to complementary resources, and implicitly, an increase in the range of actions of the partners beyond mathematical calculus, an increase in the credibility and public image of the partners, as well as the social benefit corollary to positive models established within the community, are only a few of the arguments. The question raised is why this type of a more consistent approach is not used in the current practices of solving the community issues in Romania. The following causes should be considered in response to this question: the lack of an associative culture at the level of all potential partners, the access to resources is by far too limited on behalf of any of the two parts involved, a neutral, thus, unrestrictive legislative environment, but at the same time, unstimulating towards an associative action, i.e. limited management capacities on both sides. From this perspectives, this paper aims at clarifying the partnership concept (definition, typology, the public-private partnership role in solving community problems and the management issues related: partners identification, negociation of the cooperation protocol, decision making process and resource management, assesment, etc.

  15. Multistakeholder partnerships with the Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea to improve childhood immunisation: A perspective from global health equity and political determinants of health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hani; Marks, Florian; Novakovic, Uros; Hotez, Peter J; Black, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    To examine the current partnerships to improve the childhood immunisation programme in the Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea (DPRK) in the context of the political determinants of health equity. A literature search was conducted to identify public health collaborations with the DPRK government. Based on the amount of publicly accessible data and a shared approach in health system strengthening among the partners in immunisation programmes, the search focused on these partnerships. The efforts by WHO, UNICEF, GAVI and IVI with the DPRK government improved the delivery of childhood vaccines (e.g. pentavalent vaccines, inactivated polio vaccine, two-dose measles vaccine and Japanese encephalitis vaccine) and strengthened the DPRK health system by equipping health centres, and training all levels of public health personnel for VPD surveillance and immunisation service delivery. The VPD-focused programmatic activities in the DPRK have improved the delivery of childhood immunisation and have created dialogue and contact with the people of the DPRK. These efforts are likely to ameliorate the political isolation of the people of the DPRK and potentially improve global health equity. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Eliminating malaria in Malaysia: the role of partnerships between the public and commercial sectors in Sabah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    general public. Best practices included consistent communication, developing government-staffed subsector offices for malaria control on-site, engaging commercial plantations to provide financial and human resources for malaria control activities, and the development of new worker screening programmes. The successes and challenges associated with partnerships between the public and commercial sector can serve as an example for other malaria-eliminating countries with large plantation sectors, and may also be applied to other sectors that employ migrant workers or have commercial enterprises in hard to reach areas. PMID:24443824

  17. Eliminating malaria in Malaysia: the role of partnerships between the public and commercial sectors in Sabah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kelly C; Rundi, Christina; Jelip, Jenarun; Rashman, Yusof; Smith Gueye, Cara; Gosling, Roly D

    2014-01-21

    Countries in the Asia Pacific region have made great progress in the fight against malaria; several are rapidly approaching elimination. However, malaria control programmes operating in elimination settings face substantial challenges, particularly around mobile migrant populations, access to remote areas and the diversity of vectors with varying biting and breeding behaviours. These challenges can be addressed through subnational collaborations with commercial partners, such as mining or plantation companies, that can conduct or support malaria control activities to cover employees. Such partnerships can be a useful tool for accessing high-risk populations and supporting malaria elimination goals. This observational qualitative case study employed semi-structured key informant interviews to describe partnerships between the Malaysian Malaria Control Programme (MCP), and private palm oil, rubber and acacia plantations in the state of Sabah. Semi-structured interview guides were used to examine resource commitments, incentives, challenges, and successes of the collaborations. Interviews with workers from private plantations and the state of Sabah MCP indicated that partnerships with the commercial sector had contributed to decreases in incidence at plantation sites since 1991. Several plantations contribute financial and human resources toward malaria control efforts and all plantations frequently communicate with the MCP to help monitor the malaria situation on-site. Management of partnerships between private corporations and government entities can be challenging, as prioritization of malaria control may change with annual profits or arrival of new management. Partnering with the commercial sector has been an essential operational strategy to support malaria elimination in Sabah. The successes of these partnerships rely on a common understanding that elimination will be a mutually beneficial outcome for employers and the general public. Best practices included

  18. Do International Health Partnerships contribute to reverse innovation? a mixed methods study of THET-supported partnerships in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasabanathan, Kavian; Issa, Hamdi; Bhatti, Yasser; Prime, Matthew; Del Castillo, Jacqueline; Darzi, Ara; Harris, Matthew

    2017-04-18

    International health partnerships (IHPs) are changing, with an increased emphasis on mutual accountability and joint agenda setting for both the high- and the low- or middle-income country (LMIC) partners. There is now an important focus on the bi-directionality of learning however for the UK partners, this typically focuses on learning at the individual level, through personal and professional development. We sought to evaluate whether this learning also takes the shape of 'Reverse Innovation' -when an idea conceived in a low-income country is subsequently adopted in a higher-income country. This mixed methods study used an initial scoping survey of all the UK-leads of the Tropical Health Education Trust (THET)-supported International Health Partnerships (n = 114) to ascertain the extent to which the IHPs are or have been vehicles for Reverse Innovation. The survey formed the sampling frame for further deep-dive interviews to focus on volunteers' experiences and attitudes to learning from LMICs. Interviews of IHP leads (n = 12) were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Survey data was analysed descriptively. Interview transcripts were coded thematically, using an inductive approach. Survey response rate was 27% (n = 34). The majority (70%) strongly agreed that supporting LMIC partners best described the mission of the partnership but only 13% of respondents strongly agreed that learning about new innovations and models was a primary mission of their partnership. Although more than half of respondents reported having observed innovative practice in the LMIC, only one IHP respondent indicated that this has led to Reverse Innovation. Interviews with a sample of survey respondents revealed themes primarily around how learning is conceptualised, but also a central power imbalance between the UK and LMIC partners. Paternalistic notions of knowledge could be traced to partnership power dynamics and latent attitudes to LMICs. Given the global flow of

  19. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT: A PANACEA TO ALL LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT ILLS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela van der Berg

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is anticipated that the occurrence and intensity of disasters will increase globally and in South Africa where typical disasters include droughts, floods, extreme hailstorms, gales, fires and earthquakes, as well as sinkholes arising from mining activity in dolomitic areas. Disasters such as these result in human suffering and damage to the resources and infrastructure on which South Africans rely for their survival and the maintenance of their quality of life. Section 24 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 affords to everyone the right to an environment that is not harmful to his or her health and well-being. It may be argued that a person's sense of environmental security in relation to the potential risks and dangers of disaster falls within the scope of the protection provided by section 24. The responsibility to intervene for the protection of the interests inherent in the constitutional environmental right lies with the government of South Africa. Disaster management specifically is a functional area of competence of national and provincial government, but practice has shown that the actual implementation of and planning for disaster management happens in the local government sphere. Against the backdrop of these introductory discussions and, given the fact that several municipalities in South Africa are under-resourced, this article very specifically aims to critically discuss and describe from a legal perspective the potential and function of public-private partnerships (PPPs between local government (municipalities and the private sector (such as industries in fulfilling the legally entrenched disaster management mandate of municipalities. Through a critical evaluation of some existing PPPs, this article illustrates that the private sector has a key role to play in assisting municipalities to fulfil their legally entrenched disaster management mandate.

  20. Creating a charter of collaboration for international university partnerships: the Elmina Declaration for Human Resources for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Frank; Donkor, Peter; de Vries, Raymond; Appiah-Denkyira, Ebenezer; Dakpallah, George Fidelis; Rominski, Sarah; Hassinger, Jane; Lou, Airong; Kwansah, Janet; Moyer, Cheryl; Rana, Gurpreet K; Lawson, Aaron; Ayettey, Seth

    2014-08-01

    The potential of international academic partnerships to build global capacity is critical in efforts to improve health in poorer countries. Academic collaborations, however, are challenged by distance, communication issues, cultural differences, and historical context. The Collaborative Health Alliance for Reshaping Training, Education, and Research project (funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and implemented through academic medicine and public health and governmental institutions in Michigan and Ghana) took a prospective approach to address these issues. The project had four objectives: to create a "charter for collaboration" (CFC), to improve data-driven policy making, to enhance health care provider education, and to increase research capacity. The goal of the CFC was to establish principles to guide the course of the technical work. All participants participated at an initial conference in Elmina, Ghana. Nine months later, the CFC had been revised and adopted. A qualitative investigation of the CFC's effects identified three themes: the CFC's unique value, the influence of the process of creating the CFC on patterns of communication, and the creation of a context for research and collaboration. Creating the CFC established a context in which implementing technical interventions became an opportunity for dialogue and developing a mutually beneficial partnership. To increase the likelihood that research results would be translated into policy reforms, the CFC made explicit the opportunities, potential problems, and institutional barriers to be overcome. The process of creating a CFC and the resulting document define a new standard in academic and governmental partnerships.